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Sample records for floating drug delivery

  1. FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM - CHRONOTHERAPEUTIC APPROACH

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    Vishal Kalal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of writing this review on the floating drug delivery systems (FDDS was to compile the recent literature with special focus on the principal mechanism of floatation to achieve gastric retention. FDDS is one of the approaches in chronotherapeutic drug delivery. In the past reviews of FDDS the physiological and formulation variables affecting gastric retention, approaches to design single-unit and multiple-unit floating systems, their classification and formulation aspects have been covered. This review summarizes the special focus on chronotherapeutics, diseases affected by biological rhythm, its importance, advantages, various approaches in Chronotherapeutic drug delivery and applications of FDDS. These systems are useful for several problems encountered during the development of a pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  2. A REVIEW ON FLOATING TYPE GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

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    Pallavi Pal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral controlled release delivery systems are programmed to deliver the drug in predictable time frame that will increase the efficacy and minimize the adverse effects and increase the bioavailability of drugs. Oral route is considered mostnatural, uncomplicated, convenient and safe due to its ease of administration, patient acceptance, and cost-effective manufacturing process.Floating Drug delivery system are designed to prolong the gastric residence time after oral administration, at particular site and controlling the release of drug especially useful for achieving controlled plasma level a swell as improving bioavailability Several approaches are currently being used to prolong the GRT, including floating drug delivery systems (FDDS, also known as hydrodynamically balanced systems (HBS, swelling and expanding systems, high-density systems, and other delayed gastric emptying devices.

  3. Design and optimization of floating drug delivery system of acyclovir

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    Kharia A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to design and optimize floating drug delivery systems of acyclovir using psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. A 32 full factorial design was used for optimization of drug release profile. The amount of psyllium husk (X1 and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M (X2 were selected as independent variables. The times required for 50% (t 50% and 70% (t 70% drug dissolution were selected as dependent variables. All the designed nine batches of formulations were evaluated for hardness, friability, weight variation, drug content uniformity, swelling index, in vitro buoyancy, and in vitro drug release profile. All formulations had floating lag time below 3 min and constantly floated on dissolution medium for more than 24 h. Validity of the developed polynomial equation was verified by designing two check point formulations (C1 and C2. The closeness of predicted and observed values for t 50% and t 70% indicates validity of derived equations for the dependent variables. These studies indicated that the proper balance between psyllium husk and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M can produce a drug dissolution profile similar to the predicted dissolution profile. The optimized formulations followed Higuchi′s kinetics while the drug release mechanism was found to be anomalous type, controlled by diffusion through the swollen matrix.

  4. REVIEW ON FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: AN APPROACH TO ORAL CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY VIA GASTRIC RETENTION

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    Kadam Shashikant M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release (CR dosage forms have been extensively used to improve therapy with many important drugs. Several approaches are currently utilized in prolongation of gastric residence time, including floating drug delivery system, swelling and expanding system, polymeric bioadhesive system, modified shape system, high density system and other delayed gastric emptying devices. However, the development processes are faced with several physiological difficulties such as the inability to restrain and localize the system within the desired region of the gastrointestinal tract and the highly variable nature of the gastric emptying process. On the other hand, incorporation of the drug in a controlled release gastroretentive dosage forms (CR-GRDF which can remain in the gastric region for several hours would significantly prolong the gastric residence time of drugs and improve bioavailability, reduce drug waste, and enhance the solubility of drugs that are less soluble in high pH environment. Gastroretention would also facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach and proximal small intestine. Thus, gastroretention could help to provide greater availability of new products and consequently improved therapeutic activity and substantial benefits to patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and current technology used in the development of gastroretentive dosage forms.

  5. A novel liquid effervescent floating delivery system for sustained drug delivery.

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    Ibrahim, H K

    2009-08-01

    An effervescent floating liquid formulation with in situ gelling properties has been assessed for its potential for sustaining drug delivery and targeting. The formulation consisted of sodium alginate and glyceryl monooleate (GMO). The developed formulation met all pre-requisites to become an in situ gelling floating system and it gelled and floated instantaneously in the pH conditions of the stomach. Moreover, the gels formed in situ remained intact for more than 48 h to facilitate sustained release of drugs. Increasing the mannuronic acid ratio of sodium alginate and the GMO concentration significantly retarded the release rate and extent. The in vitro release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs from the prepared formulations followed root-time kinetics during the sustained release period. Replacing the free drug with drug encapsulated microspheres enabled tailoring of the release profile and achieved zero-order release kinetics. The system retained its appearance and rheological properties for 12 months at ambient conditions. The values of the similarity factor Sd proved the absence of any significant difference in the release profile upon storage.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF FAMOTIDINE FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM USING NATURAL POLYMERS

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    Mohammed Muqtader et al.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study,FDDS of Famotidine, a copmpetative inhibitor of histamine H2 receptors were prepared by using natural gums viz. xanthan gum and guar gum at different drug to gum ratio using sodium bicarbonate and citric acid as gas generating agents and lactose as diluent.FDDS tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique using PVP K30 as granulating agent. The prepared FDDS tablets were evaluated for its pre compression characteristics like bulk density, angle of repose, true density and compresibility index and post compression parameters such as hardness, friability, uniformity of drug content, in vitro floating studies, in vitro dissolution studies. The physical evaluation of all the formulations showed values within the prescribed limits for tests like hardness, friability and weight variation which indicate that the prepared tablets are of standard quality. The floating lag time of all the formulations was less than 10 minutes,All the formulations showed good matrix integrity and retarded the release of drug for 10 hours. Formulation X3 containg drug: xantahne gum ratio of 1:3 showed zero order kinetics, the IR spectroscopic studies indicated that the drug was compatible with the polymer and co-excipients and therefore can be a promising alternative to the existing dosage form.

  7. FLOATING GASTRO-RETENTIVE DOSAGE FORMS - A NOVEL APPROACH FOR TARGETED AND CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

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    Aleksandar Aleksovski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Controlled (modified release dosage forms are one of the key concepts in drug delivery, leading to enhanced drug bioavailability and increased patient’s compliance. However conventional modified release dosage forms encounter one big disadvantage- lack of site-specific drug delivery. Scientists developed different kinds of targeted oral controlled release forms. One of these are gastro-retentive systems- systems which can remain in the stomach region for prolonged period of time and thereby release the active compound in controlled fashion. Floating dosage forms are the most promising approach of all gastro-retentive systems. They are capable to float over the gastric content in longer time intervals. This article makes a review on floating dosage forms in general, different approaches for achieving flotation, advantages and disadvantages of this drug delivery concept. For better understanding the topic,an emphasis is made also on the anatomical and physiological features of the stomach and on the factors affecting gastric retention.

  8. Novel Strategy to Fabricate Floating Drug Delivery System Based on Sublimation Technique.

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    Huanbutta, Kampanart; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to develop floating drug delivery system by sublimation of ammonium carbonate (AMC). The core tablets contain a model drug, hydrochlorothiazide, and various levels (i.e., 0-50% w/w) of AMC. The tablets were then coated with different amounts of the polyacrylate polymers (i.e., Eudragit® RL100, Eudragit® RS100, and the mixture of Eudragit® RL100 and Eudragit® RS100 at 1:1 ratio). The coated tablets were kept at ambient temperature (25°C) or cured at 70°C for 12 h before further investigation. The floating and drug release behaviors of the tablets were performed in simulated gastric fluid USP without pepsin at 37°C. The results showed that high amount of AMC induced the floating of the tablets. The coated tablets containing 40 and 50% AMC floated longer than 8 h with a time-to-float of about 3 min. The sublimation of AMC from the core tablets decreased the density of system, causing floating of the tablets. The tablets coated with Eudragit® RL100 floated at a faster rate than those of Eudragit® RS100. Even the coating level of polymer did not influence the time-to-float and floating time of coated tablets containing the same amount of AMC, the drug release from the tablets coated with higher coating level of polymer showed slower drug release. The results suggested that the sublimation technique using AMC is promising for the development of floating drug delivery system.

  9. Chitosan superporous hydrogel composite-based floating drug delivery system: A newer formulation approach

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    Hitesh Chavda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study efforts have been made to design a drug delivery system based on a superporous hydrogel composite, for floating and sustained delivery of Ranitidine hydrochloride. Materials and Methods: The characterization studies were performed by the measurement of apparent density, porosity, swelling studies, mechanical strength studies, and scanning electron microscopy studies. The prepared formulation was evaluated for buoyant behavior, in vitro drug release, kinetics of drug release, and stability. The release profile of Ranitidine hydrochloride was investigated by changing the release retardant polymer in the formulation. To ascertain the kinetics of drug release, the drug release profiles were fitted to mathematical models that included zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, Hixson-Crowell, Korsmeyer-Peppas, Weibull, and Hopfenberg models. Results: Scanning electron microscopy images clearly indicated the formation of interconnected pores and capillary channels, and cross-linked Chitosan molecules were observed around the peripheries of the pores. The prepared drug delivery system floated and delivered the Ranitidine hydrochloride for about 17 hours. The in vitro drug release from the proposed system was best explained by the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. The values of the diffusion exponent in the Korsmeyer-Peppas model ranged between 0.47 ± 0.02 and 0.66 ± 0.02, which appeared to indicate a coupling of the diffusion and erosion mechanisms, anomalous non-Fickian transport. Conclusion: It was concluded that the proposed floating drug delivery system, based on the superporous hydrogel composite containing Chitosan as a composite material, is promising for stomach-specific delivery of Ranitidine hydrochloride.

  10. Formulation of gastroretentive floating drug delivery system using hydrophilic polymers and its in vitro characterization

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    Venkata Srikanth Meka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to formulate and evaluate the gastroretentive floating drug delivery system of antihypertensive drug, propranolol HCl. Gastroretentive floating tablets (GRFT were prepared by using a synthetic hydrophilic polymer polyethylene oxide of different grades such as PEO WSR N-12 K and PEO 18 NF as release retarding polymers and calcium carbonate as gas generating agent. The GRFT were compressed by direct compression strategy and the tablets were evaluated for physico-chemical properties, in vitro buoyancy, swelling studies, in vitro dissolution studies and release mechanism studies. From the dissolution and buoyancy studies, F 9 was selected as an optimized formulation. The optimized formulation followed zero order rate kinetics with non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. The optimized formulation was characterised with FTIR studies and observed no interaction between the drug and the polymers.

  11. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF AMOXYCILLIN TRIHYDRATE

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    Marella Radhakrishna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to formulate and evaluate balanced Floating Drug Delivery Systems as controlled release modules, which prolongs the release rate of the drugs. Amoxycillin is an anti- bacterial acts by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. It inhibits cross-linkage between the linear peptidoglycan polymer chains that make up a major component of the cell walls of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Helicobacter pylori exists in the gastric mucous layer or epithelial cell surfaces. Thus, the concentration and resident time of Amoxycillin trihydrate in stomach would be effective for complete eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Formulation of Amoxycillin trihydrate as gastro retentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS is especially advantageous over other prolonged type drug delivery systems and conventional tablets because the drug is having absorption window in upper part of gastro intestinal tract and having relatively short half life. Amoxycillin trihydrate was taken as the model drug to optimized formulations was prepared. The single unit floating matrix tablets of Amoxycillin trihydrate with different natural and synthetic polymers such has HPMC K4M, HPMC K15M, HPMC K100M by taking single polymer in the formulation.The evaluation of physicochemical characteristics of all formulations and to carryout in vitro drug release studies using USP XXIV apparatus and data were analyzed at 272nm.The drug release of Amoxycillin trihydrate from formulations containing HPMC K4M,HPMC K15M followed zero order kinetics where has formulation containing combination of xanthan gum(natural polymer and HPMC K100M(synthetic polymer followed Higuchi and First-order pattern respectively. Of all the formulations in which combination of polymers has retarded the drug successfully upto 12 hours.

  12. A multiple unit floating drug delivery system of piroxicam using eudragit polymer

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    Kale R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A floating drug delivery system of piroxicam in the form of microspheres was prepared using an enteric polymer and emulsification solvent-evaporation method. The microspheres remained buoyant continuously over the surface of acidic media containing surfactant for a period of 8-12 h in vitro . Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies showed that drug incorporated in the outer shell of the polymer was completely amorphous. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that the microsphere is perfect sphere with an internal hollow cavity enclosed by a rigid shell of polymer. The micromeritic properties of microspheres were found to be much improved compared with original drug crystals. The in vitro drug release behavior of the floating microspheres was characterized as an enteric property. Polymer being soluble above pH 7.0, the drug release rates from microspheres changed dramatically above and below pH 7.0. At intestinal pH the drug release was faster and continuous as compared to the amount released at gastric pH.

  13. Formulation and evaluation of gastroretentive microballoons containing baclofen for a floating oral controlled drug delivery system.

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    Dube, T S; Ranpise, N S; Ranade, A N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to fabricate and evaluate a multiparticulate oral gastroretentive dosage form of baclofen characterized by a central large cavity (hollow core) promoting unmitigated floatation with practical applications to alleviate the signs and symptoms of spasticity and muscular rigidity. Solvent diffusion and evaporation procedure were applied to prepare floating microspheres with a central large cavity using various combinations of ethylcellulose (release retardant) and HPMC K4M (release modifier) dissolved in a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (2:1). The obtained microspheres (700-1000 µm) exhibit excellent floating ability (86 ± 2.00%) and release characteristics with entrapment efficiency of 95.2 ± 0.32%. Microspheres fabricated with ethylcellulose to HPMC K4M in the ratio 8.5:1.5 released 98.67% of the entrapped drug in 12 h. Muscle relaxation caused by baclofen microspheres impairs the rotarod performance for more than 12 h. Abdominal X-ray images showed that the gastroretention period of the floating barium sulfate- labeled microspheres was no less than 10 h. The buoyant baclofen microspheres provide a promising gastroretentive drug delivery system to deliver baclofen in spastic patients with a sustained release rate.

  14. Pharmacokinetic study of repaglinide floating drug delivery system in rabbits by RP-HPLC method

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    T. Ramanj ireddy; D. Dhachinamoorthi; K.B. Chandrasekhar

    2012-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the pharmacokinetic parameters of optimized repaglinide floating drug delivery system (FDDS) by 24 factorial designs,followed by comparison with a commercially available formulation.The main effects and interactions of formulation variables were studied by using normal and pareto charts.The optimized formulation shows a fickian diffusion drug release mechanism.Pharmacokinetic parameters of the designed drug delivery system were evaluated in rabbit models.Mean while a simple,specific high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated as per biopharmaceutical specifications,the linearity was observed at the range of 110-550 ng/mL (r2 =0.999).By using methanol-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) (70∶30,v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min the validation shows a better retention time of 5.2 min for repaglinide.And the same validation method was used for pharmacokinetic profile analysis of repaglinide marketed products and FDDS.The comparative pharmacokinetic results such as tmax,half-life,area under the curve,mean residence times were increased significantly for the repaglinide in FDDS than the marketed product of repaglinide except Cmax and elimination rate constant.

  15. Development of sustained release floating drug delivery system for norfloxacin: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

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    Guguloth, Mohan; Bomma, Ramesh; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2011-01-01

    gastroretentive drug delivery systems. Gastroretentive floating tablets of norfloxcin were developed by employing three different polymers, which prolonged the drug release from the dosage forms. Tablet floatation was achieved by an effervescent mechanism. Citric acid at different concentrations was used in formulations to provide an acidic microenvironment. The prepared tablets were characterized for hardness, weight variation, thickness, friability, floating lag time, and dissolution. Around 12 tablet formulations were prepared as a continuation of the previous work. The best formulation (F4c) was selected based on in vitro characteristics and used in vivo radiographic studies by incorporating barium sulphate as a radio-opaque agent. The tablets remained in the stomach for about 205 ± 8.4 min. Bioavailability studies were conducted in healthy male human volunteers, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of the best formulation were compared with that of the marketed conventional (Norbid) tablet. The increased bioavailability of the developed formulation was found to be 16.27%.

  16. Influence of barium sulfate X-ray imaging contrast material on properties of floating drug delivery tablets.

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    Diós, Péter; Szigeti, Krisztián; Budán, Ferenc; Pócsik, Márta; Veres, Dániel S; Máthé, Domokos; Pál, Szilárd; Dévay, Attila; Nagy, Sándor

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the study was to reveal the influence of necessarily added barium sulfate (BaSO4) X-ray contrast material on floating drug delivery tablets. Based on literature survey, a chosen floating tablet composition was determined containing HPMC and carbopol 943P as matrix polymers. One-factor factorial design with five levels was created for evaluation of BaSO4 (X1) effects on experimental parameters of tablets including: floating lag time, total floating time, swelling-, erosion-, dissolution-, release kinetics parameters and X-ray detected volume changes of tablets. Applied concentrations of BaSO4 were between 0 and 20.0% resulting in remarkable alteration of experimental parameters related especially to flotation. Drastic deterioration of floating lag time and total floating time could be observed above 15.0% BaSO4. Furthermore, BaSO4 showed to increase the integrity of tablet matrix by reducing eroding properties. A novel evaluation of dissolutions from floating drug delivery systems was introduced, which could assess the quantity of drug dissolved from dosage form in floating state. In the cases of tablets containing 20.0% BaSO4, only the 40% of total API amount could be dissolved in floating state. In vitro fine resolution X-ray CT imagings were performed to study the volume change and the voxel distributions as a function of HU attenuations by histogram analysis of the images. X-ray detected relative volume change results did not show significant difference between samples. After 24h, all tablets containing BaSO4 could be segmented, which highlighted the fact that enough BaSO4 remained in the tablets for their identification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Design and gamma-scintigraphic evaluation of a floating and pulsatile drug delivery system based on an impermeable cylinder.

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    Zou, Hao; Jiang, Xuetao; Kong, Lingshan; Gao, Shen

    2007-04-01

    A blend of floating and pulsatile principles of drug delivery system seems to present the advantage that a drug can be released in the upper GI tract after a definite time period of no drug release. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a floating and pulsatile drug delivery system based on an impermeable cylinder. Pulsatile capsule was prepared by sealing the drug tablet and the buoyant material filler inside the impermeable capsule body with erodible plug. The drug delivery system showed typical floating and pulsatile release profile with a lag time followed by a rapid release phase. The lag time prior to the pulsatile drug release correlated well with the erosion properties of plugs and the composition of the plug could be controlled by the weight of the plug. The buoyancy of the whole system depended on the bulk density of the dosage form. Gamma-scintigraphic evaluation in humans was used to establish methodology capable of showing the subsequent in vivo performance of the floating and pulsatile release capsule. Developed formulations showed instantaneous floating with no drug release during the lag time followed by a pulse drug release. From the gamma-scintigraphic results, the pulsatile release capsule we prepared could achieve a rapid release after lag time in vivo, which was longer than that in vitro. The scintigraphic evaluation could confirm qualitatively that the system with in vitro lag time of 4.0 h provided, with relatively high reproducibility, a pulsatile release occurred around 5.0 h after administration.

  18. Design and statistical optimization of an effervescent floating drug delivery system of theophylline using response surface methodology

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    Srikanth Meka Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to formulate effervescent floating drug delivery systems of theophylline using different release retarding polymers such as ethyl cellulose, Eudragit® L100, xanthan gum and polyethylene oxide (PEO N12K. Sodium bicarbonate was used as a gas generating agent. Direct compression was used to formulate floating tablets and the tablets were evaluated for their physicochemical and dissolution characteristics. PEO based formulations produced better drug release properties than other formulations. Hence, it was further optimized by central composite design. Further subjects of research were the effect of formulation variables on floating lag time and the percentage of drug released at the seventh hour (D7h. The optimum quantities of PEO and sodium bicarbonate, which had the highest desirability close to 1.0, were chosen as the statistically optimized formulation. No interaction was found between theophylline and PEO by Fourier Transformation Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC studies.

  19. Stomach-specific drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil using floating alginate beads

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    Shishu,; Gupta, Neeta; Aggarwal, Nidhi

    2007-01-01

    A multiple-unit-type oral floating dosage form (FDF) of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was developed to prolong gastric residence time, target stomach cancer, and increase drug bioavailability. The floating bead formulations were prepared by dispersing 5-FU together with calcium carbonate into a mixture of sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution and then dripping the dispersion into an acidified solution of calcium chloride. Calcium alginate beads were formed, as alginate undergoes ...

  20. Preformulation studies and optimization of sodium alginate based floating drug delivery system for eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

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    Diós, Péter; Nagy, Sándor; Pál, Szilárd; Pernecker, Tivadar; Kocsis, Béla; Budán, Ferenc; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Bölcskei, Kata; Máthé, Domokos; Dévay, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design a local, floating, mucoadhesive drug delivery system containing metronidazole for Helicobacter pylori eradication. Face-centered central composite design (with three factors, in three levels) was used for evaluation and optimization of in vitro floating and dissolution studies. Sodium alginate (X1), low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (L-HPC B1, X2) and sodium bicarbonate (X3) concentrations were the independent variables in the development of effervescent floating tablets. All tablets showed acceptable physicochemical properties. Statistical analysis revealed that tablets with 5.00% sodium alginate, 38.63% L-HPC B1 and 8.45% sodium bicarbonate content showed promising in vitro floating and dissolution properties for further examinations. Optimized floating tablets expressed remarkable floating force. Their in vitro dissolution studies were compared with two commercially available non-floating metronidazole products and then microbiologically detected dissolution, ex vivo detachment force, rheological mucoadhesion studies and compatibility studies were carried out. Remarkable similarity (f1, f2) between in vitro spectrophotometrically and microbiologically detected dissolutions was found. Studies revealed significant ex vivo mucoadhesion of optimized tablets, which was considerably increased by L-HPC. In vivo X-ray CT studies of optimized tablets showed 8h gastroretention in rats represented by an animation prepared by special CT technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Floating drug delivery of a locally acting H2-antagonist: an approach using an in situ gelling liquid formulation.

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    Rohith, Ganapati; Sridhar, Bhimagoni Keshavamurthy; Srinatha, Anegundha

    2009-09-01

    In the present work, a gastroretentive in situ gelling liquid formulation for controlled delivery of ranitidine was formulated using sodium alginate (low, medium and high viscosity grades), calcium carbonate (source of cations) and ranitidine. Prepared formulations were evaluated for viscosity, buoyancy lag time and buoyancy duration, drug content and in vitro drug release. Formulation variables such as concentration of sodium alginate, calcium carbonate and drug significantly affected the formulation viscosity, floating behavior and in vitro drug release. Analysis of the release pattern showed that the drug release from in situ gel followed a diffusion mechanism.

  2. THE STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF FORMULATION VARIABLES ON IN VITRO FLOATING TIME AND THE RELEASE PROPERTIES OF A FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM BY A STATISTICAL OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

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    C. NARENDRA

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation concerns the evaluation of the effect of formulation variables on in vitro floating time and the release properties in developing a floating drug delivery system (FDDS containing a highly water soluble drug metoprolol tartrate (MT in the presence of a gas generating agent. A 32 full factorial design was employed in formulating the FDDS containing hydroxyl propylmethylcellulose (HPMC K4M and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC as swellable polymers. Drug-to-polymer ratio and polymer-to-polymer ratio were included as independent variables. The main effect and the interaction terms were quantitatively evaluated by a quadratic model to predict formulations with the floating time desired, and the release properties. It was found that only drug-to-polymer ratio and its quadratic term were found to be significantly affective for all the response variables. Non-Fickian transport was confirmed as a release mechanism from the optimized formulations. The desirability function was used to optimize the response variables, each having a different target, and the observed responses were highly agreed with experimental values. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the model in the development of FDDS containing a highly water-soluble drug MT.

  3. FORMULATION AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF GLIPIZIDE AS FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM WITH NATURAL POLYMER (GUAR-GUM

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    Singh Amit Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to prepare a gastro retentive drug delivery system of Glipizide. Floating tablets of Glipizide were prepared employing different polymers like HPMC K15M, Guar-Gum, Carbopol 934p and Magnesium Stearate by effervescent technique. Sodium bicarbonate and citric acid were incorporated as a gas generating agent. The Floating tablets were evaluated for uniformity of weight, hardness, friability, drug content, in- vitro buoyancy, swelling study, dissolution studies and stability studies. The drug release profile and floating properties was investigated. The prepared tablets exhibited satisfactory physico-chemical characteristics. All the prepared batches showed good in vitro buoyancy. It was aimed to prepare for prolonged residence in the stomach over conventional Gastroretentive approaches. The tablets are produced by direct compression method. The release of the drug is concern from the nine formulations. F5 is a best formulation to determine the mode of release the data was subjected to Zero Order model. F5 optimized formulation released approximately 98.15% drug in 12 hours in vitro.

  4. Characteristic of Starch-Poly(N-Vinyl-Pyrrolidone) for an encapsulation material in floating drug delivery system

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    Rositaningsih, N.; Budianto, E.

    2017-04-01

    Modified starch has been widely used in many studies in the field of drug delivery for gastrointestinal drug release. In this study, the starch was modified with poly(N-vinyl-pyrrolidone) by interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) method. Characterizations were done to observe its characteristics in floating drug delivery applications. Three modified starch-based hydrogels were synthesized, i.e. crosslinked starch, semi-IPN, and full-IPN hydrogels. Non-modified starch hydrogel was also synthesized for benchmark purpose. All materials were characterized and analysed by Swelling Test, Buoyancy Test, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Swelling test showed that the crosslinked-starch hydrogel has the lowest swelling percentage compared to other hydrogels, whereas non-modified hydrogels tend to have similar swelling percentage to Semi-IPN. Morphology and visual analysis results showed that non-modified hydrogels were physically the most fragile, followed by a crosslinked-starch, semi-IPN-starch, and full-IPN-starch hydrogel. Therefore, full-IPN-starch hydrogel had the highest elasticity. From IR spectrum result, it can be seen that a wavenumbers shift was observed for the modified starch compared with the IR spectrum of pure starch powder. TGA and DSC characterizations showed the degradation temperature for non-modified hydrogel was at 250°C. The degradation temperature for both crosslinked and semi-IPN starch were at 275°C. For full-IPN, however, the degradation temperature was at 225°C. On the other hand, the degradation level could be observed from DSC and TGA results as well. Full-IPN appeared to be the slowest, while non-modified hydrogel seem to be the fastest to degrade. CaCO3 was used as the pore forming agent (PFA) in this research for buoyancy characterization. Buoyancy test showed that the full-IPN had the fastest floating lag and longest floating time followed by

  5. Sodium Alginate with PEG/PEO Blends as a Floating Drug Delivery Carrier – In vitro Evaluation

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    Christe Sonia Mary

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Floating drug delivery system reduces the quantity of drug intake and the risk of overloading the organs with excess drug. Methods: In the present study, we prepared the blends of sodium alginate with polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyethylene oxide (PEO as a matrix, sodium hydrogen carbonate as a pore forming agent, methyl cellulose as a binder and barium chloride containing 10% acetic acid as a hardening agent. Different ratios of pore forming agent to the polymer blend was used to prepare the floating beads with different porosity and morphology. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride was used as a model drug for the release kinetics studies. Results: The beads were characterized by optical and FESEM microscopy to study the morphology and pore dimensions. The results obtained shows decrease in beads size with increase in the concentration of the pore forming agent. The swelling properties of the beads were found to be in the range of 80% to 125%. The release kinetics of the ciprofloxacin from the beads was measured by UV-Visible spectroscopy at λmax of 278nm and the results shows for highly porous beads. Conclusion: By varying the amount of alginate and pore forming agent the release kinetics is found to get altered. As a result, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride release is found to be sustained from the blended beads.

  6. Preparation and in vitro characterization of non-effervescent floating drug delivery system of poorly soluble drug, carvedilol phosphate

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    Srikanth Meka Venkata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to enhance the solubility of carvedilol phosphate and to formulate it into non-effervescent floating tablets using swellable polymers. Solid dispersions (SD of carvedilol were prepared with hydrophilic carriers such as polyvinylpyrrolidone and poloxamer to enhance solubility. Non-effervescent floating tablets were prepared with a combination of optimized solid dispersions and release retarding polymers/swellable polymers such as xanthan gum and polyethylene oxide. Tablets were evaluated for physicochemical properties such as hardness, thickness and buoyancy. SD prepared with the drug to poloxamer ratio of 1:4 by melt granulation showed a higher dissolution rate than all other dispersions. Formulations containing 40 mg of polyethylene oxide (C-P40 and 50 mg xanthan gum (C-X50 were found to be best, with the drug retardation up to 12 hours. Optimized formulations were characterized using FTIR and DSC and no drug and excipient interactions were detected.

  7. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING IN SITU GEL BASED GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY OF CIMETIDINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav D. Jayswal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the formulation and evaluation of sodium alginate and pectin basedIn situ gel of Cimetidine. Sodium alginate and pectin were used as a polymer and CaCO3 was used as across-linking agent. In-situ forming polymeric formulations drug delivery systems is in sol form beforeadministration in the body, but once administered, undergoes gelation in-situ to form a gel. Theformulation of gel depends upon factors like temperature modulation, pH changes, presence of ions andultra-violet irradiation, from which drug gets released in sustained and controlled manner. The objectiveof this study was to develop a novel in- situ gel system for sustained drug delivery using naturalbiodegradable polymers. The system utilizes polymers that exhibit sol-to-gel phase transition due tochange in specific physico-chemical parameters. In-situ gel was formed at a biological pH. In vitrorelease studies were conducted in simulated gastric fluid and cumulative amount of drug release wasanalyzed by spectrophotometry. From designed set of experiments, it was evident that formulationcontaining 1.2% of sodium alginate and 1.5% of pectin control the release of drug for longer duration.The in-situ gel exhibited the expected, viscosity, drug content, pH, in vitro gelling capacity, in vitrofloating ability, water uptake ability and sustained drug release.The drug release from the in situ gelsfollows the fickian diffusion type of release.

  8. Effects of pore forming agents on chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogel properties for use as a matrix for floating drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budianto, E.; Al-Shidqi, M. F.; Cahyana, A. H.

    2017-07-01

    Eradicating H. pylori-based infection by using conventional oral dosage form of amoxicillin trihydrate finds difficulties to overcome rapid gastric retention time. Encapsulating amoxicillin trihydrate in floating drug delivery system may solve the problem. In this research, the floating drug delivery system of amoxicillin trihydrate encapsulated in floating chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) hydrogels containing CaCO3 and NaHCO3 as pore forming agents has been successfully prepared. Pore forming agents used was varied with the ratio of 10 to 25% pore forming agents to total mass of the used materials. The hydrogel were characterizedusing FTIR spectrophotometer and stereo microscope. As pore forming agents compositions increased, the porosity (%) and floating properties increased but followed by decrease in drug entrapment efficiency. Most of the floating hydrogels possessed floating ability longer than 180 min and the highest porosity was found in hydrogel containing 25% NaHCO3. Hydrogel containing CaCO3 showed sustained drug release profile than hydrogel containing NaHCO3. However, the optimum formulation was achieved at composition of 10% NaHCO3 with 57% of drug entrapped within the hydrogel and 43% drug released. The results of these studies show that NaHCO3 is an effective pore forming agents for chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) hydrogel preparation as compare to CaCO3.

  9. Development of novel gastroretentive floating particulate drug delivery system of gliclazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Rajendra; Kulkarni, Giriraj T

    2012-09-01

    The objective of present project was to improve the dissolution profile of gliclazide by developing floating alginate beads using various biodegradable polymers like gelatin, pectin and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC). The floating beads were prepared by a simple ionotropic gelatin method using calcium carbonate as gas generating agent. The developed beads were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared beads showed good in vitro floatation, which was dependent on the concentration of gas-forming agent. SEM photomicrographs confirmed that the developed beads were spherical in shape and had particle size in the range of 730 to 890 μm. The incorporation efficiency was found to be in the range of 59.96 to 85.1%. The cumulative percent drug release from the beads after 10 h dissolution study at pH 1.2 and pH 5.8 was in the range of 33 to 46% and 82 to 95% respectively. The concentration of the gas generating agent was found to influence the release rate. The mechanism of drug release was Fickian diffusion with swelling. The in vivo sub-acute hypoglycemic study in high fat diet induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) hypoglycemic effect over a period of 12 h and 24 h, respectively, with HPMC and pectin beads. A significant (p & 0.05) reduction in fasting and non-fasting blood glucose levels, reduction in fasting plasma insulin level and a significant improvement in glucose tolerance were observed in animals treated with formulations. The developed beads were suitable carriers for improving the systemic absorption of gliclazide and maintaining reduced blood glucose levels.

  10. Characterizations of plasticized polymeric film coatings for preparing multiple-unit floating drug delivery systems (muFDDSs with controlled-release characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Feng Hung

    Full Text Available Effervescent multiple-unit floating drug delivery systems (muFDDSs consisting of drug (lorsartan- and effervescent (sodium bicarbonate-containing pellets were characterized in this study. The mechanical properties (stress and strain at rupture, Young's modulus, and toughness of these plasticized polymeric films of acrylic (Eudragit RS, RL, and NE and cellulosic materials (ethyl cellulose (EC, and Surelease were examined by a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Results demonstrated that polymeric films prepared from Surelease and EC were brittle with less elongation compared to acrylic films. Eudragit NE films were very flexible in both the dry and wet states. Because plasticizer leached from polymeric films during exposure to the aqueous medium, plasticization of wet Eudragit RS and RL films with 15% triethyl citrate (TEC or diethyl phthalate (DEP resulted in less elongation. DEP might be the plasticizer of choice among the plasticizers examined in this study for Eudragit RL to provide muFDDSs with a short time for all pellets to float (TPF and a longer period of floating. Eudragit RL and RS at a 1∶1 ratio plasticized with 15% DEP were optimally selected as the coating membrane for the floating system. Although the release of losartan from the pellets was still too fast as a result of losartan being freely soluble in water, muFDDSs coated with Eudragit RL and RS at a 1∶1 ratio might have potential use for the sustained release of water-insoluble or the un-ionized form of drugs from gastroretentive drug delivery systems.

  11. Gastroretentive floating drug delivery systems with potential herbal drugs for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a review%胃内滞留漂浮给药系统中使用草药根除幽门螺旋杆菌的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shreeraj H. SHAH; Jayvadan K. PATEL; Nirav V. PATEL

    2009-01-01

    @@ Helicobacter pylori are very common patho-genic bacteria colonizing about half of all populations and associated with the development of serious gastroduodenal diseases like gastric lym-phoma, peptic ulcers and acute chronic gastritis. Current drug regimes are not wholly effective. Other problems related with the current drug regimes are lack of patient compliance, side effects and bacterial resistance. Thus, drug delivery to the site of residence in the gastric mucosa may help in solving the problems associated with the current drug therapy. Gastric retentive delivery systems potentially allow increased penetration and thus increased drug concentration at the site of action. Floating drug delivery systems, expandable or swellable drug delivery systems and bioadhesive systems are the major areas of interest to formulate gastroretentive drug delivery system against H. pylori.

  12. Transdermal drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability ...

  13. Controlled release calcium silicate based floating granular delivery system of ranitidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish K; Jain, Sunil K; Yadav, Awesh; Agrawal, Govind P

    2006-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to prepare and evaluate floating granular delivery system consisting of (i) calcium silicate (CS) as porous carrier; (ii) ranitidine hydrochloride (RH), an anti-ulcer agent; and (iii) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K4M (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) as matrix forming polymers. The effect of various formulation and process variables on the particle morphology, particle size, micromeritic properties, percent drug content, in vitro floating behavior, and in vitro drug release from the floating granules was studied. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of granules revealed that that more pores of CS in secondary coated granules (SCG) were covered by the polymer film than those in primary coated granules (PCG). The formulation demonstrated favorable in vitro floating and drug release characteristics. The in vivo evaluation for the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters was performed in albino rats. Higher plasma concentration was maintained throughout the study period from the floating granules of RH. The enhanced bioavailability and elimination half-life observed in the present study may be due to the floating nature of the dosage form. The results suggested that CS is a useful carrier for the development of floating and sustained release preparations.

  14. Buccal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John D

    2005-05-01

    Buccal formulations have been developed to allow prolonged localised therapy and enhanced systemic delivery. The buccal mucosa, however, while avoiding first-pass effects, is a formidable barrier to drug absorption, especially for biopharmaceutical products (proteins and oligonucleotides) arising from the recent advances in genomics and proteomics. The buccal route is typically used for extended drug delivery, so formulations that can be attached to the buccal mucosa are favoured. The bioadhesive polymers used in buccal drug delivery to retain a formulation are typically hydrophilic macro-molecules containing numerous hydrogen bonding groups. Newer second-generation bioadhesives have been developed and these include modified or new polymers that allow enhanced adhesion and/or drug delivery, in addition to site-specific ligands such as lectins. Over the last 20 years a wide range of formulations has been developed for buccal drug delivery (tablet, patch, liquids and semisolids) but comparatively few have found their way onto the market. Currently, this route is restricted to the delivery of a limited number of small lipophilic molecules that readily cross the buccal mucosa. However, this route could become a significant means for the delivery of a range of active agents in the coming years, if the barriers to buccal drug delivery are overcome. In particular, patient acceptability and the successful systemic delivery of large molecules (proteins, oligonucleotides and polysaccharides) via this route remains both a significant opportunity and challenge, and new/improved technologies may be required to address these.

  15. Visualized intravesical floating hydrogel encapsulating vaporized perfluoropentane for controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanchen; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Kaikai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Lian, Huibo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haoran; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-10-01

    Intravesical drug delivery is the main strategy for the treatment of bladder disorders. To reduce the relief arising from frequent intravesical instillation, mucoadhesive hydrogel was used for the controlled release of the drug. However, the viscosity of mucoadhesive gel might cause severe urinary obstruction and bladder irritation. To solve all these problems, a floating hydrogel delivery system was developed using perfluoropentane (PFP) as the floating agent. After intravesical instillation of the floating hydrogel, the increased temperature in bladder vaporized PFP, resulting in the generation of microbubbles in the hydrogel. Then, it can float in urine to avoid the urinary obstruction and bladder irritation. In this study, systematic experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of PFP vaporization on the morphology and floating ability of hydrogels. The floating process is much milder and safer than other floating methods published before. In addition, PFP had been used as contrast agent, which affiliated the monitoring of gels during the operation. Therefore, this new drug delivery system addresses the problems of conventional intravesical instillation and is promising for clinic use.

  16. AN OVERVIEW ON VARIOUS APPROACHES TO ORAL CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM VIA GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla.Neetika

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years scientific and technological advancements have been made in the research and development of oral drug delivery system. Oral sustained drug delivery system is complicated by limited gastric residence times (GRTs. In order to understand various physiological difficulties to achieve gastric retention, we have summarized important factors controlling gastric retention. To overcome these limitations, various approaches have been proposed to increase gastric residence of drug delivery systems in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract includes floating drug dosage systems (FDDS, swelling or expanding systems , mucoadhesive systems , magnetic systems, modified-shape systems, high density system and other delayed gastric emptying devices.

  17. MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Madan Jyotsana; Banode Sagar; Dangi Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    The process of mucoadhesion involving a polymeric drug delivery system is a complex one that includes processes such as wetting, adsorption and interpenetration of polymer chains. The success and degree of mucoadhesion bonding is influenced by various polymer-based properties such as the degree of cross-linking, chain length and the presence of various functional groupings. The attractiveness of mucosal-targeted controlled drug delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients, has led formulatio...

  18. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamatullah Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal.

  19. Nanotopography applications in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Laura A; Allen, Jessica L; Desai, Tejal A

    2016-01-01

    Refinement of micro- and nanofabrication in the semiconductor field has led to innovations in biomedical technologies. Nanotopography, in particular, shows great potential in facilitating drug delivery. The flexibility of fabrication techniques has created a diverse array of topographies that have been developed for drug delivery applications. Nanowires and nanostraws deliver drug cytosolically for in vitro and ex vivo applications. In vivo drug delivery is limited by the barrier function of the epithelium. Nanowires on microspheres increase adhesion and residence time for oral drug delivery, while also increasing permeability of the epithelium. Low aspect ratio nanocolumns increase paracellular permeability, and in conjunction with microneedles increase transdermal drug delivery of biologics in vivo. In summary, nanotopography is a versatile tool for drug delivery. It can deliver directly to cells or be used for in vivo delivery across epithelial barriers. This editorial highlights the application of nanotopography in the field of drug delivery. PMID:26512871

  20. Metrology for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed.

  1. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  2. Statistical optimization of ranitidine HCl floating pulsatile delivery system for chronotherapy of nocturnal acid breakthrough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Pallab; Shahiwala, Aliasgar

    2009-06-28

    Present work conceptualizes a specific technology, based on combining floating and pulsatile principles to develop drug delivery system, intended for chronotherapy in nocturnal acid breakthrough. This approach will be achieved by using a programmed delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride from a floating tablet with time-lagged coating. In this study, investigation of the functionality of the outer polymer coating to predict lag time and drug release was statistically analyzed using the response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was employed for designing of the experiment, generation of mathematical models and optimization study. The chosen independent variables, i.e. percentage weight ratios of ethyl cellulose to hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose in the coating formulation and coating level (% weight gain) were optimized with a 3(2) full factorial design. Lag time prior to drug release and cumulative percentage drug release in 7h were selected as responses. Results revealed that both, the coating composition and coating level, are significant factors affecting drug release profile. A second-order polynomial equation fitted to the data was used to predict the responses in the optimal region. The optimized formulation prepared according to computer-determined levels provided a release profile, which was close to the predicted values. The proposed mathematical model is found to be robust and accurate for optimization of time-lagged coating formulations for programmable pulsatile release of ranitidine hydrochloride, consistent with the demands of nocturnal acid breakthrough.

  3. Drug delivery goes supercritical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Ginty

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In the field of drug delivery, the ability to control the size, morphology, and release of drug particles is fundamental to good targeting, but is often hampered by harsh processing conditions or inadequate methods; likewise for the processing of polymeric controlled-release systems. However, the use of supercritical fluids such as supercritical CO2 (scCO2 has provided a ‘clean’ and effective alternative to traditional methods of drug and polymer processing. In particular, scCO2 has a number of unique properties that make it possible to process both bioactive molecules and amorphous polymers without using toxic organic solvents or elevated temperatures. Here, we review the positive impact that supercritical fluids have had on the micronization, encapsulation, and impregnation of molecules of interest to both the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  4. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed.

  5. CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY THROUGH MICROENCAPSULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKHIL K. SACHAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriately designed controlled release drug delivery system can be a major advance towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue and controlling the rate of drug delivery to the target site. The development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and localize the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. The objective of this paper is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to appreciate the application possibilities of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed.

  6. Rhythmomimetic drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Calderer, M Carme; Siegel, Ronald A; Yao, Lingxing

    2015-01-01

    We present modeling, analysis and numerical simulation of a prototype glucose driven drug delivery device based on chemomechanical interactions and volume phase transitions in polyelectrolyte gels. The device consists of two fluid compartments, an external cell (I) mimicking the physiological environment, and a closed chamber (II), separated by a hydrogel membrane. Cell I, which is held at constant pH and ionic strength, provides a constant supply of glucose to cell II, and also serves as clearance station for reaction products. Cell II contains the drug to be delivered to the body, an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of glucose into hydrogen ions, and a piece of marble to remove excess hydrogen ions that would otherwise overwhelm the system. When the membrane is swollen, glucose flux into Cell II is high, leading to rapid production of hydrogen ions. However, the hydrogen ions are not immediately released to Cell I but react, instead, with the negatively charged carboxyl groups of the membrane, which collaps...

  7. APPROACHES, TECHNIQUES AND EVALUATION OF GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar D; Saini S; Seth N; Khullar R; Sharma R

    2011-01-01

    This review explains the recent advances in gastroretentive drug delivery systems with special focus on floating drug delivery systems. Oral route is the most convenient and painless technique of drug delivery. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems have been developed which overcome physiological conditions in gastrointestinal tract such as short gastric resident time (GRT) and unpredictable gastric emptying times (GET). Various approaches used for prolonging GRT are mucoadhesive systems (Bio...

  8. Optimizing drugs for local delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, S; Lock, R; Searcey, M

    2009-12-01

    An international panel of speakers together with approximately 70 delegates were brought together by The Society for Medicines Research's symposium on Optimising Drugs for Local Delivery, held on June 11, 2009 at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham, UK. The focus of the conference was on the delivery of drugs direct to the site of action and the consequences of this delivery route on delivery technologies, formulation science and molecular design.

  9. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-06

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  10. Cyclodextrins for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laza-Knoerr, A L; Gref, R; Couvreur, P

    2010-11-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are macrocyclic oligosaccharides composed of α(1,4)-linked glucopyranose subunits. These molecules possess a cage-like supramolecular structure, comparable with the structures of crown ethers, cryptands, spherands, cyclophanes, or calixarenes. However, it took 50 years to establish the molecular structure of CDs. Owing to their capability to form inclusion complexes with a variety of guest molecules, CDs are considered as the most important supramolecular host family among all supramolecular structures mentioned above. They can form complexes with various types of molecules including inorganic, organic, or organometallic that can be radical, cationic, anionic, or neutral molecules. This phenomenon bears the name "molecular recognition," while the selectivity in the formation of complexes with enantiomeric species as guests is called "chiral recognition." In addition, the properties of the molecules forming the complexes with CDs can be modified significantly. As such, a large number of scientists have attempted to elaborate and evaluate various CD derivatives that are able to complex a variety of drugs, enhancing by this way their in vivo solubility and activity. Moreover, a large number of publications describe CD uses in other fields such as foods, textile, cosmetics, or agriculture. This review reports on the recent developments of CDs in drug delivery using various routes of administration.

  11. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  12. Modulating drug release from gastric-floating microcapsules through spray-coating layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li Lee

    Full Text Available Floating dosage forms with prolonged gastric residence time have garnered much interest in the field of oral delivery. However, studies had shown that slow and incomplete release of hydrophobic drugs during gastric residence period would reduce drug absorption and cause drug wastage. Herein, a spray-coated floating microcapsule system was developed to encapsulate fenofibrate and piroxicam, as model hydrophobic drugs, into the coating layers with the aim of enhancing and tuning drug release rates. Incorporating fenofibrate into rubbery poly(caprolactone (PCL coating layer resulted in a complete and sustained release for up to 8 h, with outermost non-drug-holding PCL coating layer serving as a rate-controlling membrane. To realize a multidrug-loaded system, both hydrophilic metformin HCl and hydrophobic fenofibrate were simultaneously incorporated into these spray-coated microcapsules, with metformin HCl and fenofibrate localized within the hollow cavity of the capsule and coating layer, respectively. Both drugs were observed to be completely released from these coated microcapsules in a sustained manner. Through specific tailoring of coating polymers and their configurations, piroxicam loaded in both the outer polyethylene glycol and inner PCL coating layers was released in a double-profile manner (i.e. an immediate burst release as the loading dose, followed by a sustained release as the maintenance dose. The fabricated microcapsules exhibited excellent buoyancy in simulated gastric fluid, and provided controlled and sustained release, thus revealing its potential as a rate-controlled oral drug delivery system.

  13. Modulating drug release from gastric-floating microcapsules through spray-coating layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Li; Tan, Jun Wei Melvin; Tan, Chaoyang Nicholas; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Floating dosage forms with prolonged gastric residence time have garnered much interest in the field of oral delivery. However, studies had shown that slow and incomplete release of hydrophobic drugs during gastric residence period would reduce drug absorption and cause drug wastage. Herein, a spray-coated floating microcapsule system was developed to encapsulate fenofibrate and piroxicam, as model hydrophobic drugs, into the coating layers with the aim of enhancing and tuning drug release rates. Incorporating fenofibrate into rubbery poly(caprolactone) (PCL) coating layer resulted in a complete and sustained release for up to 8 h, with outermost non-drug-holding PCL coating layer serving as a rate-controlling membrane. To realize a multidrug-loaded system, both hydrophilic metformin HCl and hydrophobic fenofibrate were simultaneously incorporated into these spray-coated microcapsules, with metformin HCl and fenofibrate localized within the hollow cavity of the capsule and coating layer, respectively. Both drugs were observed to be completely released from these coated microcapsules in a sustained manner. Through specific tailoring of coating polymers and their configurations, piroxicam loaded in both the outer polyethylene glycol and inner PCL coating layers was released in a double-profile manner (i.e. an immediate burst release as the loading dose, followed by a sustained release as the maintenance dose). The fabricated microcapsules exhibited excellent buoyancy in simulated gastric fluid, and provided controlled and sustained release, thus revealing its potential as a rate-controlled oral drug delivery system.

  14. Nanosuspension Technology for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn CHINGUNPITUK

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The poor water solubility of drugs is major problem for drug formulation. To date, nanoscale systems for drug delivery have gained much interest as a way to improve the solubility problems. The reduction of drug particles into the sub-micron range leads to a significant increase in the dissolution rate and therefore enhances bioavailability. Nanosuspensions are promising candidates that can be used for enhancing the dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs. Nanosuspensions contain submicron colloidal dispersion of pharmaceutical active ingredient particles in a liquid phase stabilized by surfactants. Production of drugs as nanosuspensions has been developed for drug delivery systems as an oral formulation and non-oral administration. This review describes the methods of pharmaceutical nanosuspension production, formulations and pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery as well as the marketed products.

  15. Organoclays for drug delivery Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Canovas Creus, Alba

    2008-01-01

    Modified clays can be used as carriers of drugs due to their suitable properties and structure in order to achieve improvements in drug delivery. The study of this thesis starts with an introduction to mineral clays and its classification, properties and characterization, then deepens into modified clays (properties, comparison with mineral clays, applications and procedure of modification). Another chapter is focused in drug delivery: definition, its difficulties nowadays and the different w...

  16. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye George JC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1 controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2 targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli.

  17. Approaches for drug delivery with intracortical probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Sven; Schumacher, Axel; Trenkle, Fabian; Brett, Olivia; Seidl, Karsten; Herwik, Stanislav; Kisban, Sebastian; Ruther, Patrick; Paul, Oliver; Aarts, Arno A A; Neves, Hercules P; Rich, P Dylan; Theobald, David E; Holtzman, Tahl; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Janssen, Peter; Zengerle, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Intracortical microprobes allow the precise monitoring of electrical and chemical signaling and are widely used in neuroscience. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies have greatly enhanced the integration of multifunctional probes by facilitating the combination of multiple recording electrodes and drug delivery channels in a single probe. Depending on the neuroscientific application, various assembly strategies are required in addition to the microprobe fabrication itself. This paper summarizes recent advances in the fabrication and assembly of micromachined silicon probes for drug delivery achieved within the EU-funded research project NeuroProbes. The described fabrication process combines a two-wafer silicon bonding process with deep reactive ion etching, wafer grinding, and thin film patterning and offers a maximum in design flexibility. By applying this process, three general comb-like microprobe designs featuring up to four 8-mm-long shafts, cross sections from 150×200 to 250×250 µm², and different electrode and fluidic channel configurations are realized. Furthermore, we discuss the development and application of different probe assemblies for acute, semichronic, and chronic applications, including comb and array assemblies, floating microprobe arrays, as well as the complete drug delivery system NeuroMedicator for small animal research.

  18. Floating and bioadhesive delivery system of metoprolol succinate: Formulation, development and in vitro evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to develop gastroretentive sustained release floating and bioadhesive drug delivery system (FBDDS to prolong the gastric retention time of Metoprolol succinate. Tablets were prepared employing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K100M as hydrophilic gel material, sodium bicarbonate as gas-generating agent and Sodium CMC (SCMC as bioadhesive polymer. A 3 2 full factorial design and response surface methodology were used for designing of experiment, mapping change in responses and deriving optimum formulation. Selected independent variables were amounts HPMC K100M and SCMC polymer while floating lag time (FLT, bioadhesive strength, t 50 (time taken to release 50% of drug and t90 (time taken to release 90% of drug were selected as dependent variables. Investigation of functionality of individual polymer to predict effect on dependent variable were statistically analyzed using the RSM. Tablets were also evaluated for physical properties, swelling and matrix erosion. Increase in concentration of HPMC and decrease in concentration of SCMC resulted in retardation of drug release. Furthermore, combination of HPMC K100M and sodium bicarbonate along with SCMC was found to affect buoyancy, bioadhesion strength and drug release. Optimized formulation showed values of dependent variables close to predicted values. Optimized formulation follows Higuchi kinetics with short buoyancy lag time, total buoyancy time of more than 24 hours and could maintain drug release for 24 hours. Content uniformity, hardness, friability, weight variation were all lying within limits. Hence, FBDDS was found to be very promising and alternative approach to increase gastric retention of dosage form and may improve bioavailability.

  19. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  20. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  1. Balloon Pump with Floating Valves for Portable Liquid Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Morimoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a balloon pump with floating valves to control the discharge flow rates of sample solutions. Because the floating valves were made from a photoreactive resin, the shapes of the floating valves could be controlled by employing different exposure patterns without any change in the pump configurations. Owing to the simple preparation process of the pump, we succeeded in changing the discharge flow rates in accordance with the number and length of the floating valves. Because our methods could be used to easily prepare balloon pumps with arbitrary discharge properties, we achieved several microfluidic operations by the integration of the balloon pumps with microfluidic devices. Therefore, we believe that the balloon pump with floating valves will be a useful driving component for portable microfluidic systems.

  2. Design and evaluation of effervescent floating tablets based on hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium alginate using pentoxifylline as a model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Safwan Abdel; Carter, Paul A; Elkordy, Amal Ali

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to design and evaluate effervescent floating gastro-retentive drug delivery matrix tablets with sustained-release behavior using a binary mixture of hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium alginate. Pentoxifylline was used as a highly water-soluble, short half-life model drug with a high density. The floating capacity, swelling, and drug release behaviors of drug-loaded matrix tablets were evaluated in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) at 37°C±0.5°C. Release data were analyzed by fitting the power law model of Korsmeyer-Peppas. The effect of different formulation variables was investigated, such as wet granulation, sodium bicarbonate gas-forming agent level, and tablet hardness properties. Statistical analysis was applied by paired sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance depending on the type of data to determine significant effect of different parameters. All prepared tablets through wet granulation showed acceptable physicochemical properties and their drug release profiles followed non-Fickian diffusion. They could float on the surface of dissolution medium and sustain drug release over 24 hours. Tablets prepared with 20% w/w sodium bicarbonate at 50-54 N hardness were promising with respect to their floating lag time, floating duration, swelling ability, and sustained drug release profile.

  3. Patient's Guide to Aerosol Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ................................................................ 1. Aerosol Drug Delivery: The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2. Aerosol Drugs: The Major Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 3. Aerosol Drug Delivery Devices: Small-Volume Nebulizers . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 4. Aerosol Drug ...

  4. Floating matrix tablets based on low density foam powder: effects of formulation and processing parameters on drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, A; Siepmann, J; Bodmeier, R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and physicochemically characterize single unit, floating controlled drug delivery systems consisting of (i). polypropylene foam powder, (ii). matrix-forming polymer(s), (iii). drug, and (iv). filler (optional). The highly porous foam powder provided low density and, thus, excellent in vitro floating behavior of the tablets. All foam powder-containing tablets remained floating for at least 8 h in 0.1 N HCl at 37 degrees C. Different types of matrix-forming polymers were studied: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), polyacrylates, sodium alginate, corn starch, carrageenan, gum guar and gum arabic. The tablets eroded upon contact with the release medium, and the relative importance of drug diffusion, polymer swelling and tablet erosion for the resulting release patterns varied significantly with the type of matrix former. The release rate could effectively be modified by varying the "matrix-forming polymer/foam powder" ratio, the initial drug loading, the tablet geometry (radius and height), the type of matrix-forming polymer, the use of polymer blends and the addition of water-soluble or water-insoluble fillers (such as lactose or microcrystalline cellulose). The floating behavior of the low density drug delivery systems could successfully be combined with accurate control of the drug release patterns.

  5. Single compartment drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modi...

  6. Microwave Assisted Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microwave radiation is adopted for remote activation of pharmaceutical drug capsules inside the human body in order to release drugs at a pre-determined time and location. An array of controllable transmitting sources is used to produce a constructive interference at a certain...... focus point inside the body, where the drugs are then released from the specially designed capsules. An experimental setup for microwave activation has been developed and tested on a body phantom that emulates the human torso. A design of sensitive receiving structures for integration with a drug...

  7. Microwave Assisted Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microwave radiation is adopted for remote activation of pharmaceutical drug capsules inside the human body in order to release drugs at a pre-determined time and location. An array of controllable transmitting sources is used to produce a constructive interference at a certain...... focus point inside the body, where the drugs are then released from the specially designed capsules. An experimental setup for microwave activation has been developed and tested on a body phantom that emulates the human torso. A design of sensitive receiving structures for integration with a drug...

  8. Albumin-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maja Thim; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Hvam, Michael Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of a drug is dependent on accumulation at the site of action at therapeutic levels, however, challenges such as rapid renal clearance, degradation or non-specific accumulation requires drug delivery enabling technologies. Albumin is a natural transport protein with multiple ligand...... binding sites, cellular receptor engagement, and a long circulatory half-life due to interaction with the recycling neonatal Fc receptor. Exploitation of these properties promotes albumin as an attractive candidate for half-life extension and targeted intracellular delivery of drugs attached by covalent...... conjugation, genetic fusions, association or ligand-mediated association. This review will give an overview of albumin-based products with focus on the natural biological properties and molecular interactions that can be harnessed for the design of a next-generation drug delivery platform....

  9. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  10. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS are topically administered medicaments in the form of patches that deliver drugs for systemic effects at a predetermined and controlled rate. It works very simply in which drug is applied inside the patch and it is worn on skin for long period of time. By this constant concentration of drug remain in blood for long time. Polymer matrix, drug, permeation enhancers are the main components of TDDS; polymers includes Zein, Shellac (as a natural to synthetic ones (Polybutadiene, Polysiloxane, Polyvinyl chloride, Polyvinyl alcohol etc.. TDDS are of many types varying from single layer drug in adhesive to multi layer drug in adhesive and others are reservoir and the matrix systems. The market value of TDDS products are increasing with rapid rate, more than 35 products have now been approved for sale in US, and approximately 16 active ingredients are approved globally for use as a TDDS. Transdermal drug delivery is a recent technology which promises a great future it has a potential to limit the use of needles for administering wide variety of drugs but cost factor is a important thing to consider since developing nations like INDIA have second highest population, but due to higher cost TDDS are the hidden part of therapy used in general population.

  11. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  12. Factorial study on influence of gas generating agent and diluent on drug release kinetics of clopidogrel bisulfate floating tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Koteswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present work was to formulate and characterize a floating drug delivery system for Clopidogrel bisulphate to improve bioavailability and to minimize the side-effects of the drug such as gastric bleeding and drug resistance development. Clopidogrel floating tablets were prepared by direct compression technique by the use of xanthan gum at different concentrations (20%, 25% and 30% w/w. Sodium bicarbonate (15% w/w and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC (30% w/w were used as gas generating agent and diluent respectively. The effects of sodium bicarbonate and MCC on the drug release kinetics and floating properties were investigated. A 2 2 factorial design was applied systematically to optimized formulation. The percentage amount of sodium bicarbonate (X 1 and percentage amount of MCC (X 2 were selected as independent variables. The drug release rate constant (K and time required for 85% drug dissolution (T85 was selected as dependent variables. Factorial design revealed that the percentage amount of sodium bicarbonate and MCC had insignificant effect on drug release kinetics (K, T85 within the chosen levels and a high level of sodium bicarbonate (X 1 and the low level of MCC (X 2 favor the preparation of clopidogrel floating tablets. All the Clopidogrel floating formulations followed first order kinetics, Higuchi drug release kinetics with diffusion as the dominant mechanism of drug release. As per Korsmeyer-Peppas equation, the release exponent "n" ranged 0.455-0.654 indicating that drug release from all the formulations was by non-fickian diffusion mechanism.

  13. Drug delivery by lipid cochleates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Leila

    2005-01-01

    Drug delivery technology has brought additional benefits to pharmaceuticals such as reduction in dosing frequency and side effects, as well as the extension of patient life. To address this need, cochleates, a precipitate obtained as a result of the interaction between phosphatidylserine and calcium, have been developed and proved to have potential in encapsulating and delivering small molecule drugs. This chapter discusses the molecules that can be encapsulated in a cochleate system and describes in detail the methodology that can be used to encapsulate and characterize hydrophobic drugs such as amphotericin B, a potent antifungal agent. Some efficacy data in animal models infected with candidiasis or aspergillosis are described as well.

  14. Pulsatile drug delivery systems: An approach for controlled drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Shweta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile systems are gaining a lot of interest as they deliver the drug at the right site of action at the right time and in the right amount, thus providing spatial and temporal delivery and increasing patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body. The principle rationale for the use of pulsatile release is for the drugs where a constant drug release, i.e., a zero-order release is not desired. The release of the drug as a pulse after a lag time has to be designed in such a way that a complete and rapid drug release follows the lag time. Various systems like capsular systems, osmotic systems, single- and multiple-unit systems based on the use of soluble or erodible polymer coating and use of rupturable membranes have been dealt with in the article. It summarizes the latest technological developments, formulation parameters, and release profiles of these systems. Products available as once-a-daily formulation based on Pulsatile release like Pulsincap ®, Ritalin ®, and Pulsys ® are also covered in the review. These systems are beneficial for the drugs having chronopharmacological behaviour where night time dosing is required and for the drugs having high first-pass effect and having specific site of absorption in GIT. Drugs used in asthmatic patients and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis are also discussed along with many other examples.

  15. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  16. A REVIEW ON OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnish Patel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional oral drug delivery systems supply an instantaneous release of drug, which cannot control the release of the drug and effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the process of osmosis. Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. They are the most reliable controlled drug delivery systems and could be employed as oral drug delivery systems. Various patents available for osmotic drug delivery system like Rose-Nelson pump, Higuchi leeper pump, Higuchi Theeuwes pump, Elementary Osmotic pump etc. ODDS are useful for poorly soluble drug, for pulsatile drug release, zero order release. Various techniques available for preparation of ODDS include push pull osmotic Pump, osmotic Brusting osmotic pump, liquid oral osmotic system, sandwiched osmotic tablets , delayed delivery osmotic device, monolithic osmotic System and controlled porosity osmotic Pump. Osmotically controlled oral drug delivery systems utilize osmotic pressure for controlled delivery of active agents. These systems can be utilized for systemic as well as targeted delivery of drugs. The release of drugs from osmotic systems is governed by various formulation factors such as solubility and osmotic pressure of the core components, size of the delivery orifice, and nature of the rate-controlling membrane. In this Paper mainly focused on the Osmotic System with example, the basic component of osmotic system and evaluation parameter of the osmotic drug delivery system.

  17. Porous carriers for controlled/modulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, G; Pathak, K

    2009-11-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed in recent years towards the development of porous carriers as controlled drug delivery matrices because of possessing several features such as stable uniform porous structure, high surface area, tunable pore size and well-defined surface properties. Owing to wide range of useful properties porous carriers have been used in pharmaceuticals for many purposes including development of floating drug delivery systems, sustained drug delivery systems. Various types of pores like open, closed, transport and blind pores in the porous solid allow them to adsorb drugs and release them in a more reproducible and predictable manner. Pharmaceutically exploited porous adsorbents includes, silica (mesoporous), ethylene vinyl acetate (macroporous), polypropylene foam powder (microporous), titanium dioxide (nanoporous). When porous polymeric drug delivery system is placed in contact with appropriate dissolution medium, release of drug to medium must be preceded by the drug dissolution in the water filled pores or from surface and by diffusion through the water filled channels. The porous carriers are used to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs, to increase the dissolution of relatively insoluble powders and conversion of crystalline state to amorphous state.

  18. Porous carriers for controlled/modulated drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuja G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research efforts have been directed in recent years towards the development of porous carriers as controlled drug delivery matrices because of possessing several features such as stable uniform porous structure, high surface area, tunable pore size and well-defined surface properties. Owing to wide range of useful properties porous carriers have been used in pharmaceuticals for many purposes including development of floating drug delivery systems, sustained drug delivery systems. Various types of pores like open, closed, transport and blind pores in the porous solid allow them to adsorb drugs and release them in a more reproducible and predictable manner. Pharmaceutically exploited porous adsorbents includes, silica (mesoporous, ethylene vinyl acetate (macroporous, polypropylene foam powder (microporous, titanium dioxide (nanoporous. When porous polymeric drug delivery system is placed in contact with appropriate dissolution medium, release of drug to medium must be preceded by the drug dissolution in the water filled pores or from surface and by diffusion through the water filled channels. The porous carriers are used to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs, to increase the dissolution of relatively insoluble powders and conversion of crystalline state to amorphous state.

  19. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  20. Polyester Dendrimers: Smart Carriers for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean–d’Amour K. Twibanire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyester dendrimers have been shown to be outstanding candidates for biomedical applications. Compared to traditional polymeric drug vehicles, these biodegradable dendrimers show excellent advantages especially as drug delivery systems because they are non-toxic. Here, advances on polyester dendrimers as smart carriers for drug delivery applications have been surveyed. Both covalent and non-covalent incorporation of drugs are discussed.

  1. Osmotically regulated floating asymmetric membrane capsule for controlled site-specific delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride: optimization by central composite design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Manvendra S; Kumar, Anil; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-12-01

    A nondisintegrating, floating asymmetric membrane capsule (FAMC) was developed to achieve site-specific osmotic flow of a highly water-soluble drug, ranitidine hydrochloride (RHCl), in a controlled manner. Solubility suppression of RHCl was achieved by the common ion effect, using optimized coated sodium chloride as a formulation component. The capsular wall of FAMC was prepared by the phase inversion process wherein the polymeric membrane was precipitated on glass pins by dipping them in a solution of cellulose acetate followed by quenching. Central composite design was utilized to investigate the influence of independent variables, namely, level(s) of membrane former, pore former, and osmogen, on percent cumulative drug release (response). The release mechanism of RHCl through FAMC was confirmed as osmotic pumping. The asymmetry of the membrane was characterized by scanning electron microscopy that revealed a dense nonporous outer region of membrane supported by an inner porous region. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated no incompatibility between the drug and excipients. In vitro drug release in three biorelevant media, pH 2.5 (low fed), pH 4.5 (intermediate fed), and pH 6.5 (high fed), demonstrated pH-independent release of RHCl (P > 0.05). Floating ability for 12 h of the optimized FAMC9 was visually examined during the in vitro release studies that showed maximal drug release with zero-order kinetics (r (2) = 0.9991). Thus, a novel osmotically regulated floating capsular system was developed for site-specific delivery of RHCl.

  2. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye.

  3. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral insulin delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the combination of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and enteric-coated capsules as a potential delivery strategy for oral delivery of insulin. The SNEDDS preconcentrates, loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex at different levels (0, 2.5 and 10% w...

  4. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  5. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  6. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate.

  7. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  8. ORAL MULTIPARTICULATE PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaji Jessy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile drug delivery aims to release drugs in a planned pattern i.e. at appropriate time and/or at a suitable site of action. Pharmaceutical invention and research are increasingly focusing on delivery systems which enhance desirable therapeutic objectives while minimising side effects. However, in recent pharmaceutical applications involving pulsatile delivery, multiparticulate dosage forms are gaining much favour over single-unit dosage forms because of their potential benefits like predictable gastric emptying, no risk of dose dumping, flexible release patterns and increased bioavailability with less inter- and intra-subject variability. Based on these, the present review aims to study multiparticulate pulsatile delivery systems, for which the Reservoir systems with rupturable polymeric coatings and Reservoir systems with erodible polymer coatings are primarily involved in the control of release. Multiparticulate drug delivery systems provide tremendous opportunities for designing new controlled and delayed release oral formulations, thus extending the frontier of future pharmaceutical development. The development of low density floating multiparticulate pulsed-release dosage forms possessing gastric retention capabilities has also been addressed with increasing focus on the upcoming multiparticulate-pulsatile technologies being exploited on an industrial scale.

  9. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  10. DESIGN OF GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE

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    L. K. Omray

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastro retentive drug delivery system of diltiazem hydrochloride was designed and evaluated for its effectiveness for the management of mild to moderate hypertension. Gastro retentive drug delivery system were prepared using polyvinyl alcohol and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose as the polymers and sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent for the reduction of floating lag time. Gastro retentive drug delivery system tablets were prepared by wet granulation method by compression in tablet compression machine. Formulations DL1, DL2, DL3, DL4 and DL5 were developed which differed in the ratio of polyvinyl alcohol and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose polymers. All the formulations were evaluated for hardness, weight variation, friability, drug content, swelling index, buoyancy studies and in vitro drug release study. In vitro drug release study was performed using United State Pharmacopoeia 23 type 2 dissolution test apparatus employing paddle stirrer at 50 r/pm. Dissolution medium was 900 ml of 0.1N hydrochloric acid at 37ºC ± 3ºC. Formulations DL3 was found to be better as compared to other formulation.

  11. Lipid Based Vesicular Drug Delivery Systems

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    Shikha Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular drug delivery system can be defined as highly ordered assemblies consisting of one or more concentric bilayers formed as a result of self-assembling of amphiphilic building blocks in presence of water. Vesicular drug delivery systems are particularly important for targeted delivery of drugs because of their ability to localize the activity of drug at the site or organ of action thereby lowering its concentration at the other sites in body. Vesicular drug delivery system sustains drug action at a predetermined rate, relatively constant (zero order kinetics, efficient drug level in the body, and simultaneously minimizes the undesirable side effects. It can also localize drug action in the diseased tissue or organ by targeted drug delivery using carriers or chemical derivatization. Different types of pharmaceutical carriers such as polymeric micelles, particulate systems, and macro- and micromolecules are presented in the form of novel drug delivery system for targeted delivery of drugs. Particulate type carrier also known as colloidal carrier system, includes lipid particles, micro- and nanoparticles, micro- and nanospheres, polymeric micelles and vesicular systems like liposomes, sphingosomes, niosomes, transfersomes, aquasomes, ufasomes, and so forth.

  12. Microemulsion Drug Delivery Systems for Radiopharmacy Studies

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    Emre Ozgenc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsions have been used increasingly for last year’s because of ideal properties like favorable drug delivery, ease of preparation and physical stability. They have been improved the solubility and efficacy of the drug and reduce the side effects. Use of radiolabeled microemulsions plays an alternative role in drug delivery systems by investigating the formation, stability and application of microemulsions in radiopharmacy. Gama scintigraphic method is well recognized for developing and detecting the biodistribution of newly developed drugs or formulation. This review will focus on how radionuclides are able to play role with characterization studies of microemulsion drug delivery systems.

  13. Pharmacosomes: A Potential Vesicular Drug Delivery System

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    D. Nagasamy Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid based drug delivery systems have been examined in various studies and exhibited their potential in controlled and targeted drug delivery. Pharmacosomes, a novel vesicular drug delivery system, offering a unique advantage over liposomes and niosomes, and serve as potential alternative to these conventional vesicles. They constitute an amphiphilic phospholipid complex with drug bearing an active hydrogen atom covalently that bind to phospholipids. They provide an efficient delivery of drug required at the site of action, which ultimately reduces the drug toxicity with reduced adverse effects and also reduces the cost of therapy by imparting better biopharmaceutical properties to the drug, resulting in increases bioavailability, especially in case of poorly soluble drugs. As the system is formed by binding the drug (pharmakon to carrier (soma, they are termed as pharmacosomes. Depending upon the chemical structure of the drug lipid complex they may exist as ultrafine vesicular, micellar and hexagonal aggregate. Drug having active hydrogen group such as carboxyl, hydroxyl group can be esterified to lipids, resulting in amphiphilic compound. Pharmacosomes are widely used as carriers for various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins, cardiovascular and antineoplastic drugs. The release of drug from pharmacosomes is generally governed by the process of enzymatic reaction and acid hydrolysis. Here, in the present review paper we have discussed the potential of pharmacosomes as a controlled and targeted drug delivery system and highlighted the method of preparation and characterization.

  14. Microneedles: an emerging transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariya, Shital H; Gohel, Mukesh C; Mehta, Tejal A; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2012-01-01

    One of the thrust areas in drug delivery research is transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) due to their characteristic advantages over oral and parenteral drug delivery systems. Researchers have focused their attention on the use of microneedles to overcome the barrier of the stratum corneum. Microneedles deliver the drug into the epidermis without disruption of nerve endings. Recent advances in the development of microneedles are discussed in this review for the benefit of young scientists and to promote research in the area. Microneedles are fabricated using a microelectromechanical system employing silicon, metals, polymers or polysaccharides. Solid coated microneedles can be used to pierce the superficial skin layer followed by delivery of the drug. Advances in microneedle research led to development of dissolvable/degradable and hollow microneedles to deliver drugs at a higher dose and to engineer drug release. Iontophoresis, sonophoresis and electrophoresis can be used to modify drug delivery when used in concern with hollow microneedles. Microneedles can be used to deliver macromolecules such as insulin, growth hormones, immunobiologicals, proteins and peptides. Microneedles containing 'cosmeceuticals' are currently available to treat acne, pigmentation, scars and wrinkles, as well as for skin tone improvement. Literature survey and patents filled revealed that microneedle-based drug delivery system can be explored as a potential tool for the delivery of a variety of macromolecules that are not effectively delivered by conventional transdermal techniques. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Inorganic nanocarriers for platinum drug delivery

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    Ping’an Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays platinum drugs take up almost 50% of all the clinically used anticancer drugs. Besides cisplatin, novel platinum agents including sterically hindered platinum (II drugs, chemically reductive platinum (IV drugs, photosensitive platinum (IV drugs, and multinuclear platinum drugs have been developed recently, with a few entering clinic trials. Rapid development of nanobiotechnology makes targeted delivery of anticancer platinum agents to the tumor site possible, while simultaneously minimizing toxicity and maximizing the drug efficacy. Being versatile drug carriers to deliver platinum drugs, inorganic nanovehicles such as gold nanoparticles, iron oxide nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous nanosilica, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, have been extensively studied over the past decades. In contrast to conventional polymeric and lipid nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles based drug carriers are peculiar as they have shown excellent theranostic effects, revealing themselves an indispensable part of future nanomedicine. Here, we will elaborate recent research advances on fabrication of inorganic nanoparticles for platinum drug delivery.

  16. Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R

    2001-08-14

    Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

  17. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  18. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  19. Smart polymers in nasal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Chonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones.

  20. Emulsomes: An emerging vesicular drug delivery system

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    Bhawandeep Gill

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is the easiest, cost effective, and most vital method for drug administration. Therefore, improvement of dosage forms mainly for the prolonged release purpose has been a challenge for scientists. Vesicular drug delivery systems are developed with a purpose to overcome problems coupled with the drugs such a poor bioavailability, protection from harsh gastric environment, and from gastric enzymes, which degrade the drug. Vesicular drug delivery systems such as liposomes, emulsions, niosomes, proniosomes, solid lipid-nano particles, ethosomes, nanoparticles, and pharmacosomes, etc have gained much attention, but emulsomes have rouse as system, which bypasses many disadvantages associated with other systems, developed as novel lipoidal vesicular system with internal solid fat core surrounded by phospholipid bilayer. This technology is designed to act as vehicle for poorly soluble drugs. The drug is enclosed in the emulsomes and provide prolong existence of drug in systemic circulation. Furthermore, emulsomal-based formulations of genetic drugs such as antisense oligonucleotides and plasmids for gene therapy that have clear potential for systemic utility are increasingly available. This review addresses the concept of emulsomal drug delivery system, summarizes the success of emulsomes for the delivery of small molecules, and special attention has been paid to its formulation design, advantages, biopharmaceutical aspects, stability aspects, and various aspects related to drug delivery including future aspects.

  1. RECENT TRENDS IN DENTAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

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    Sharma Nishu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release local drug delivery systems offer advantages compared to systemic dosage forms for many dental diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis. The objective of this literature survey was to gain knowledge about various dental drug delivery systems for targeted delivery of the drug. The polymer ethyl cellulose was used in the formulation of dental films. The dental film was then evaluated for various parameters like thickness, folding endurance and weight variation and content uniformity, in vitro and in vivo study. There has been a great attention in using iontophoretic technique for the transdermal drug delivery of medications, both ionic and non ionic. This technique of facilitated movement of ions across a membrane under the influence of an externally applied electric potential difference is one of the most promising physical skin penetrations enhancing method. Another novel approach is the use of lasers in dentistry. Lasers can be used in both hard and soft tissue applications including laser bleaching, frenectomy, gingivectomy, caries removal etc. Drugs delivery via the buccal routs using bio adhesive dosage forms offers such a novel route of drugs administration. This route has been used successfully for the systematic delivery of number of drugs candidates. Problems such as high first pass metabolisms and drugs degradation in the gastrointestinal tract can be circumvented by administrating the drug buccal routes.

  2. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems

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    Singh Baljit

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. In this review we discussed recent developments in nanotechnology for drug delivery. To overcome the problems of gene and drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different compositions and biological properties have been extensively investigated for drug and gene delivery applications. To achieve efficient drug delivery it is important to understand the interactions of nanomaterials with the biological environment, targeting cell-surface receptors, drug release, multiple drug administration, stability of therapeutic agents and molecular mechanisms of cell signalling involved in pathobiology of the disease under consideration. Several anti-cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and dexamethasone have been successfully formulated using nanomaterials. Quantom dots, chitosan, Polylactic/glycolic acid (PLGA and PLGA-based nanoparticles have also been used for in vitro RNAi delivery. Brain cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to detect and treat mainly because of the difficulty in getting imaging and therapeutic agents past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Anti-cancer drugs such as loperamide and doxorubicin bound to nanomaterials have been shown to cross the intact blood-brain barrier and released at therapeutic concentrations in the brain. The use of nanomaterials including peptide-based nanotubes to target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor and cell adhesion molecules like integrins, cadherins and selectins, is a new approach to control disease progression.

  3. Thiolated polymers as mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sarah; Cummins, Wayne; O' Donovan, Orla; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor

    2017-03-30

    Mucoadhesion is the process of binding a material to the mucosal layer of the body. Utilising both natural and synthetic polymers, mucoadhesive drug delivery is a method of controlled drug release which allows for intimate contact between the polymer and a target tissue. It has the potential to increase bioavailability, decrease potential side effects and offer protection to more sensitive drugs such as proteins and peptide based drugs. The thiolation of polymers has, in the last number of years, come to the fore of mucoadhesive drug delivery, markedly improving mucoadhesion due to the introduction of free thiol groups onto the polymer backbone while also offering a more cohesive polymeric matrix for the slower and more controlled release of drug. This review explores the concept of mucoadhesion and the recent advances in both the polymers and the methods of thiolation used in the synthesis of mucoadhesive drug delivery devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ROLE OF XANTHAN GUM (XANTHOMONAS COMPESTRIS IN GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: AN OVERVIEW

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    Uday Prakash

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Floating drug delivery system is the form of gastro-retentive drug delivery system. That controls kinetic release rate of drug to a specific site for its pharmacological action. These are achieved by use of various polymeric substances including natural polymer such as xanthan gum. This delivery system prolongs the retention time of the drug in the stomach as compared to conventional dosage form. The present article highlights the use of xanthan gum for the formulation of the gastro-retentive drug delivery system especially with natural polymer (xanthan gum. The main goal of any drug delivery system is to achieve desired concentration of the drug in blood or tissue, which is therapeutically effective and non toxic for a prolonged period. Oral delivery of drugs is by far the most preferable route of drug delivery due to the ease of administration, patient compliance and flexibility in formulation etc. From immediate release to cite specific delivery, oral dosage forms have really progressed.

  5. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  6. Recent development in novel drug delivery systems of herbal drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mayank Chaturvedi; Manish Kumar; Amit Sinhal; Alimuddin Saifi

    2011-01-01

    Novel technologies have been developed recently for drug delivery systems. The use of herbal formulations for novel drug delivery systems is more advantageous and has more benefits compared to others. The use of liposome, ethosome, phytosomes, emulsion, microsphere, solid lipid nanoparticles of herbal formulation has enhanced the therapeutic effects of plant extracts. With the use of all these, targeted delivery of the formulation is achieved, due to which the formulation demonstrates effect ...

  7. Polysaccharides for the Delivery of Antitumor Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Posocco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the several delivery materials available so far, polysaccharides represent very attractive molecules as they can undergo a wide range of chemical modifications, are biocompatible, biodegradable, and have low immunogenic properties. Thus, polysaccharides can contribute to significantly overcome the limitation in the use of many types of drugs, including anti-cancer drugs. The use of conventional anti-cancer drugs is hampered by their high toxicity, mostly depending on the indiscriminate targeting of both cancer and normal cells. Additionally, for nucleic acid based drugs (NABDs, an emerging class of drugs with potential anti-cancer value, the practical use is problematic. This mostly depends on their fast degradation in biological fluids and the difficulties to cross cell membranes. Thus, for both classes of drugs, the development of optimal delivery materials is crucial. Here we discuss the possibility of using different kinds of polysaccharides, such as chitosan, hyaluronic acid, dextran, and pullulan, as smart drug delivery materials. We first describe the main features of polysaccharides, then a general overview about the aspects ruling drug release mechanisms and the pharmacokinetic are reported. Finally, notable examples of polysaccharide-based delivery of conventional anti-cancer drugs and NABDs are reported. Whereas additional research is required, the promising results obtained so far, fully justify further efforts, both in terms of economic support and investigations in the field of polysaccharides as drug delivery materials.

  8. Tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating beads for intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nikhil; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study was to develop tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating beads for the intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate (MT). The beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation method using calcium chloride as crosslinker and gas forming calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as floating inducer. The alginate gel beads having 51-58% entrapped MT showed 90% release within 45 min in gastric medium (pH 1.2). Tapioca starch blending markedly improved the entrapment efficiency (88%) and sustained the release for 3-4 h. A 12% w/w HPMC coating on these beads extended the release upto 9-11 h. In vitro wash off and buoyancy test in gastric media revealed that the beads containing CaCO3 has gastric residence of more than 12 h. In vitro optimized multi-unit formulation consisting of immediate and sustained release mucoadhesive-floating beads (40:60) showed good initial release of 42% MT within 1h followed by a sustained release of over 90% for 11 h. Pharmacokinetic study performed in rabbit model showed that the relative oral bioavailability of MT after administration of oral solution, sustain release and optimized formulation was 51%, 67% and 87%, respectively. Optimized formulation showed a higher percent inhibition of isoprenaline induced heart rate in rabbits for almost 12 h.

  9. Lipid nanoparticles for dermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakadia, Pratibha G; Conway, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Lipid based drug delivery systems have been widely studied and reported over the past decade and offer a useful alternative to other colloidal drug delivery systems. Skin is a popular route of drug delivery for locally and systemically acting drugs and nanoparticles are reported as a potential formulation strategy for dermal delivery. Although the skin acts as a natural physical barrier against penetration of foreign materials, including particulates, opportunities exist for the delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles, especially in diseased and damaged skin and via appendageal routes such as the openings of hair follicles. The extent and ability of nanoparticles to penetrate into the underlying viable tissue is still the subject of debate although recent studies have identified the follicular route as the most likely route of entry; this influences the potential applications of these dosage forms as a drug delivery strategy. This paper reviews present state of art of lipid-based nanocarriers focussing on solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and nanoemulsions, their production methods, potential advantages and applications in dermal drug delivery.

  10. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

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    Dave Jao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based polymers compared to synthetic polymers have the advantages of good biocompatibility, biodegradability, environmental sustainability, cost effectiveness and availability. This review addresses the sources of protein-based polymers, compares the similarity and differences, and highlights characteristic properties and functionality of these protein materials for sustained and controlled drug release. Targeted drug delivery using highly functional multicomponent protein composites to guide active drugs to the site of interest will also be discussed. A systematical elucidation of drug-delivery efficiency in the case of molecular weight, particle size, shape, morphology, and porosity of materials will then be demonstrated to achieve increased drug absorption. Finally, several important biomedical applications of protein-based materials with drug-delivery function—including bone healing, antibiotic release, wound healing, and corneal regeneration, as well as diabetes, neuroinflammation and cancer treatments—are summarized at the end of this review.

  11. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

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    Shi P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pu Shi, Joshua A Gustafson, J Andrew MacKayDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins.Keywords: polymeric drug carrier, non-polymeric drug carrier, gene delivery, GE drug carriers

  12. Image Guided Biodistribution of Drugs and Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Image guided technique is playing an increasingly important role in the investigation of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of drugs or drug delivery systems. The application of these new materials and techniques with combined properties of diagnosis and therapy can benefit the development of targeted drug delivery system and modern personalized medicine This special issue provides an up-to-date collection of original research articles and review on the development of novel targeted dru...

  13. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    and diffusion hole follow sterilization . The manufactured PLGA devices were sterilized using 70% ethanol (n=42), ethylene oxide (ETO) (n=46), and a...hydrogels. The shortcomings of current devices in terms of burst effect , nonuniform dosage, and uneven drug delivery, necessitates a new approach to...Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit-drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a 15mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic

  14. Nasal Delivery of High Molecular Weight Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Erdal Cevher; Yıldız Ozsoy; Sevgi Gungor

    2009-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery may be used for either local or systemic effects. Low molecular weight drugs with are rapidly absorbed through nasal mucosa. The main reasons for this are the high permeability, fairly wide absorption area, porous and thin endothelial basement membrane of the nasal epithelium. Despite the many advantages of the nasal route, limitations such as the high molecular weight (HMW) of drugs may impede drug absorption through the nasal mucosa. Recent studies have focused particula...

  15. Molecular imprinted polymers as drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Shabi Abbas

    2016-09-01

    This review is aimed to discuss the molecular imprinted polymer (MIP)-based drug delivery systems (DDS). Molecular imprinted polymers have proved to possess the potential and also as a suitable material in several areas over a long period of time. However, only recently it has been employed for pharmaceuticals and biomedical applications, particularly as drug delivery vehicles due to properties including selective recognition generated from imprinting the desired analyte, favorable in harsh experimental conditions, and feedback-controlled recognitive drug release. Hence, this review will discuss their synthesis, the reason they are selected as drug delivery vehicles and for their applications in several drug administration routes (i.e. transdermal, ocular and gastrointestinal or stimuli-reactive routes).

  16. Microemulsion: As Excellent Drug Delivery System

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    Pathan Maksud

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Today though the oral drug delivery system is dominant still it is found to be need of ideal transdermal drug delivery system. “A micro emulsion is a system of water, oil and an amphiphile which is a single optically isotropic and thermodynamically stable liquid solution”. Microemulsions offer several advantages as drug delivery systems as these are thermodynamically stable and stability allows for self emulsification of the system with microemulsion acting as supersolvent of the drugs which are poorly or insoluble in water. They are preferred more as compared to conventional emulsions due stability. The dispersed phase mainly acts as the solvent for the water insoluble drug. Microemulsions have been proved to increase the cutaneous absorption of both lipophilic and hydrophilic API’s when compared to conventional vehicles.

  17. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  18. Designing hydrogels for controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyu; Mooney, David J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogel delivery systems can leverage therapeutically beneficial outcomes of drug delivery and have found clinical use. Hydrogels can provide spatial and temporal control over the release of various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule drugs, macromolecular drugs and cells. Owing to their tunable physical properties, controllable degradability and capability to protect labile drugs from degradation, hydrogels serve as a platform on which various physiochemical interactions with the encapsulated drugs occur to control drug release. In this Review, we cover multiscale mechanisms underlying the design of hydrogel drug delivery systems, focusing on physical and chemical properties of the hydrogel network and the hydrogel-drug interactions across the network, mesh and molecular (or atomistic) scales. We discuss how different mechanisms interact and can be integrated to exert fine control in time and space over drug presentation. We also collect experimental release data from the literature, review clinical translation to date of these systems and present quantitative comparisons between different systems to provide guidelines for the rational design of hydrogel delivery systems.

  19. Polymethacrylate microparticles gel for topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar Ibrahim; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2010-10-01

    Evaluating the potentials of particulate delivery systems in topical drug delivery. Polymethacrylate microparticles (MPs) incorporating verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) as a model hydrophilic drug with potential topical clinical uses, using Eudragit RS100 and Eudragit L100 were prepared for the formulation of a composite topical gel. The effect of initial drug loading, polymer composition, particularly the proportion of Eudragit L100 as an interacting polymer component and the HLB of the dispersing agent on MPs characteristics was investigated. A test MPs formulation was incorporated in gel and evaluated for drug release and human skin permeation. MPs showed high % incorporation efficiency and % yield. Composition of the hybrid polymer matrix was a main determinant of MPs characteristics, particularly drug release. Factors known to influence drug release such as MPs size and high drug solubility were outweighed by strong VRP-Eudragit L100 interaction. The developed MPs gel showed controlled VRP release and reduced skin retention compared to a free drug gel. Topical drug delivery and skin retention could be modulated using particulate delivery systems. From a practical standpoint, the VRP gel developed may offer advantage in a range of dermatological conditions, in response to the growing off-label topical use of VRP.

  20. Gastroretentive drug delivery system of Ranitidine hydrochloride based on osmotic technology: development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Singh, S; Mishra, B

    2008-10-01

    Gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) of Ranitidine hydrochloride (RHC) has been designed based on the osmotic technology, with the floating and swelling features in order to prolong the gastric retention time. The developed system consisted of osmotic core (containing drug, osmotic agent and hydrophilic polymers), coated with semipermeable membrane (SPM) which is then further coated with compression coating of gelling agent (HPMC K4M) containing gas generating agent (citric acid). All the developed formulations were evaluated for floating lag time, duration of floating, drug content and in-vitro drug release profile. Formulation variables like levels of hydrophilic polymer (0-18.26%w/w), type of plasticizer (PEG-400, Dibutyl phthalate), coat thickness of SPM (60-100 microm), were found to affect the drug release from the developed formulations. Drug release was directly proportional to hydrophilic nature of plasticizer but inversely proportional to the levels of hydrophilic polymer and coat thickness of SPM. Drug release from developed formulations was independent of level of gas generating agent in compression coat, pH and agitation intensities of release media but dependent on osmotic pressure of the release media. All the developed formulation showed floating lag time of less than 2 min (desired) and were floated for more than 12 hr. Floating lag time was inversely related to level of citric acid in compression coat and directly related to the density of the developed formulations. The manufacturing procedure was found to be reproducible and formulations were stable after 3 months accelerated stability study. Prediction of steady state levels showed the plasma concentrations of RHC to be within desired range.

  1. RECENT ADVANCES IN NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivannan Rangasamy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivered can have significant effect on its efficacy. Some drugs have an optimum concentration range with in which maximum benefit is derived and concentrations above (or below the range can be toxic or produce no therapeutic effect. Various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. The main goal for developing such delivery systems is to minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase bioavailability. Targeting is the ability to direct the drug loaded system to the site of interest. Among drug carrier one can name soluble polymers, microparticles made of insoluble (or biodegradable natural and synthetic polymers, microcapsules, cells, cell ghosts, lipoproteins, liposomes and micelles. Two major mechanisms can be distinguished for addressing the desired sites for drug release, (a Passive and (b Active targeting. Controlled drug carrier systems such as micellar solutions, vescicles and liquid crystal dispersions, as well as nanoparticle dispersions consisting of small particles of 10 – 400 nm show great promise as drug delivery systems. Hydrogels are three dimensional, hydrophilic, polymer networks capable of imbibing large amounts of water or biological fluids. Buckyballs, a novel delivery system with 60 carbon atoms formed in the shape of hollow ball. They are other type’s namely bucky babies, fuzzy balls, gadofullereness, and giant fullerenes. Nanoparticles can be classified as nano tubes, nano wires, nano cantilever, nanoshells, quantum dots, nano pores. Researchers at north western university using gold particles to develop ultra sensitive detection systems for DNA and protein markers associated with many forms of cancer, including breast and prostrate cancer. Drug loaded erythrocytes is one of the growing and potential systems for delivery of drugs and enzymes.

  2. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  3. Needle-free insulin drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Preeti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For most patients with type 1 diabetes, the worst part of the disease is to tolerate needle after needle, both for glucose measurement and to deliver insulin. In the last two decades, concept of insulin therapy by multiple-dose injection has undergone a miraculous change. Needle-free insulin delivery appeared to be a wonderful approach, and its allure rested in being comfortable and safe. In today′s era, insulin delivery by alternative route is a topic of current interest in the design of drug delivery system. Major global pharmaceutical companies are showing encouraging progress in their attempts to develop alternative insulin delivery technologies. Many such drug delivery systems have been developed for oral, buccal and nasal route. This review article discusses, in brief, the novel and emerging technologies that are in pipeline, including insulin inhalers, insulin spray, insulin pill, insulin analogues, insulin complement, islet cell transplant, implantable insulin pumps and guardian continuous glucose monitoring system.

  4. Influence of microemulsions on cutaneous drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2002-01-01

    In attempt to increase cutaneous drug delivery, microemulsion vehicles have been more and more frequently employed over recent years. Microemulsion formulations have been shown to be superior for both transdermal and dermal delivery of particularly lipophilic compounds, but also hydrophilic...... compounds appear to benefit from application in microemulsions compared to conventional vehicles, like hydrogels, emulsions and liposomes. The favourable drug delivery properties of microemulsions appear to mainly be attributed to the excellent solubility properties. However, the vehicles may also act...... as penetration enhancers depending on the oil/surfactant constituents, which involves a risk of inducing local irritancy. The correlation between microemulsion structure/composition and drug delivery potential is not yet fully elucidated. However, a few studies have indicated that the internal structure...

  5. Novel biodegradable nanocarriers for enhanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina

    2016-12-01

    With the refinement of functional properties, the interest around biodegradable materials, in biorelated applications and, in particular, in their use as controlled drug-delivery systems, increased in the last decades. Biodegradable materials are an ideal platform to obtain nanoparticles for spatiotemporal controlled drug delivery for the in vivo administration, thanks to their biocompatibility, functionalizability, the control exerted on delivery rates and the complete degradation. Their application in systems for cancer treatment, brain and cardiovascular diseases is already a consolidated practice in research, while the bench-to-bedside translation is still late. This review aims at summarizing reported applications of biodegradable materials to obtain drug-delivery nanoparticles in the last few years, giving a complete overview of pros and cons related to degradable nanomedicaments.

  6. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines

    OpenAIRE

    V Kusum Devi; Nimisha Jain; Valli, Kusum S.

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in...

  7. PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: RECENT TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Sayeed*, Md. M. Hamed , Mohd. Rafiq and Nahid Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Pulsatile Drug Delivery Systems are gaining a lot of interest as they deliver the drug at the right place at the right time and in the right amount, thus providing spatial and temporal delivery and increasing patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body. The principle rationale for the use of pulsatile release of the drugs is where a constant drug release is not desired. A pulse has to be designed in such a way that a complete and rapid drug release is achieved after the lag time. Various systems like capsular systems, osmotic systems, single- and multiple-unit systems based on the use of soluble or erodible polymer coating and use of rupturable membranes have been dealt with in the article. It summarizes the latest technological developments, formulation parameters, and release profiles of these systems. These systems are beneficial for the drugs having chronopharmacological behavior where night time dosing is required, such as anti-arhythmic and anti-asthmatic. Current review article discussed the reasons for development of pulsatile drug delivery system, types of the disease in which pulsatile release is required, classification, advantages, limitation, and future aspects of pulsatile drug delivery system.

  8. Electroresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Devleena; Hosseini-Nassab, Niloufar; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of electroresponsive conducting polymer nanoparticles to be used as general drug delivery systems that allow electrically pulsed, linearly scalable, and on demand release of incorporated drugs is demonstrated. As examples, facile release from polypyrrole nanoparticles is shown for fluorescein, a highly water-soluble model compound, piroxicam, a lipophilic small molecule drug, and insulin, a large hydrophilic peptide hormone. The drug loading is about 13 wt% and release is accomplished in a few seconds by applying a weak constant current or voltage. To identify the parameters that should be finely tuned to tailor the carrier system for the release of the therapeutic molecule of interest, a systematic study of the factors that affect drug delivery is performed, using fluorescein as a model compound. The parameters studied include current, time, voltage, pH, temperature, particle concentration, and ionic strength. Results indicate that there are several degrees of freedom that can be optimized for efficient drug delivery. The ability to modulate linearly drug release from conducting polymers with the applied stimulus can be utilized to design programmable and minimally invasive drug delivery devices.

  9. A cyclically actuated electrolytic drug delivery device

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This work, focusing on an implantable drug delivery system, presents the first prototype electrolytic pump that combines a catalytic reformer and a cyclically actuated mode. These features improve the release performance and extend the lifetime of the device. Using our platinum (Pt)-coated carbon fiber mesh that acts as a catalytic reforming element, the cyclical mode is improved because the faster recombination rate allows for a shorter cycling time for drug delivery. Another feature of our device is that it uses a solid-drug-in-reservoir (SDR) approach, which allows small amounts of a solid drug to be dissolved in human fluid, forming a reproducible drug solution for long-term therapies. We have conducted proof-of-principle drug delivery studies using such an electrolytic pump and solvent blue 38 as the drug substitute. These tests demonstrate power-controlled and pulsatile release profiles of the chemical substance, as well as the feasibility of this device. A drug delivery rate of 11.44 ± 0.56 μg min-1 was achieved by using an input power of 4 mW for multiple pulses, which indicates the stability of our system. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  10. A pulsed mode electrolytic drug delivery device

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-09-14

    This paper reports the design of a proof-of-concept drug delivery device that is actuated using the bubbles formed during electrolysis. The device uses a platinum (Pt) coated nickel (Ni) metal foam and a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach to improve the device\\'s performance. This electrochemically-driven pump has many features that are unlike conventional drug delivery devices: it is capable of pumping periodically and being refilled automatically; it features drug release control; and it enables targeted delivery. Pt-coated metal foam is used as a catalytic reforming element, which reduces the period of each delivery cycle. Two methods were used for fabricating the Pt-coated metal: sputtering and electroplating. Of these two methods, the sputtered Pt-coated metal foam has a higher pumping rate; it also has a comparable recombination rate when compared to the electroplated Pt-coated metal foam. The only drawback of this catalytic reformer is that it consumes nickel scaffold. Considering long-term applications, the electroplated Pt metal foam was selected for drug delivery, where a controlled drug release rate of 2.2 μg ± 0.3 μg per actuation pulse was achieved using 4 mW of power.

  11. Nanotech approaches to drug delivery and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sanjeeb K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2003-12-15

    Nanotechnology, a multidisciplinary scientific undertaking, involves creation and utilization of materials, devices or systems on the nanometer scale. The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to create innovations and play a critical role in various biomedical applications, not only in drug delivery, but also in molecular imaging, biomarkers and biosensors. Target-specific drug therapy and methods for early diagnosis of pathologies are the priority research areas where nanotechnology would play a vital role. This review considers different nanotechnology-based drug delivery and imaging approaches, and their economic impact on pharmaceutical and biomedical industries.

  12. A REVIEW: TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY OF NICOTINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Ravi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking has been the leading cause of premature death and illness in many industrialized country in the world, while the U.S. alone registers more than 4,00,000 deaths each year. The nicotine patch serves to deliver a constant dose of nicotine across the skin that helps to relieve the symptoms which are associated with tobacco withdrawal. Further, the use of carbon nanotube membranes and micro needle based transdermal drug delivery has lead to the great advancements. Some of the main advantages of transdermal drug delivery are bypassing of hepatic first pass metabolism, maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug and enhancement of therapeutic efficiency.

  13. Computational Amphiphilic Materials for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh eThota

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic materials can assemble into a wide variety of morphologies and have emerged as a novel class of candidates for drug delivery. Along with a large number of experiments reported, computational studies have been also conducted in this field. At an atomistic/molecular level, computations can facilitate quantitative understanding of experimental observations and secure fundamental interpretation of underlying phenomena. This review summarizes the recent computational efforts on amphiphilic copolymers and peptides for drug delivery. Atom-resolution and time-resolved insights are provided from bottom-up to microscopically elucidate the mechanisms of drug loading/release, which are indispensable in the rational screening and design of new amphiphiles for high-efficacy drug delivery.

  14. Emulsion forming drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, there is a growing interest in the lipid-based formulations for delivery of lipophilic drugs. Due to their potential as therapeutic agents, preferably these lipid soluble drugs are incorporated into inert lipid carriers such as oils, surfactant dispersions, emulsions, liposomes etc. Among them, emulsion forming drug delivery systems appear to be a unique and industrially feasible approach to overcome the problem of low oral bioavailability associated with the BCS class II drugs. Self-emulsifying formulations are ideally isotropic mixtures of oils, surfactants and co-solvents that emulsify to form fine oil in water emulsions when introduced in aqueous media. Fine oil droplets would pass rapidly from stomach and promote wide distribution of drug throughout the GI tract, thereby overcome the slow dissolution step typically observed with solid dosage forms. Recent advances in drug carrier technologies have promulgated the development of novel drug carriers such as control release self-emulsifying pellets, microspheres, tablets, capsules etc. that have boosted the use of "self-emulsification" in drug delivery. This article reviews the different types of formulations and excipients used in emulsion forming drug delivery system to enhance the bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

  15. Drug Delivery Research: The Invention Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kinam

    2016-07-05

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been successful in introducing improved formulations for better use of existing drugs and novel delivery of biologicals. The initial success of producing many oral products and some injectable depot formulations, however, reached a plateau, and the progress over the past three decades has been slow. This is likely due to the difficulties of formulating hydrophilic, high molecular weight drugs, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for targeting specific cells, month-long sustained delivery, and pulsatile release. Since the approaches that have served well for delivery of small molecules are not applicable to large molecules, it is time to develop new methods for biologicals. The process of developing future drug delivery systems, termed as the invention cycle, is proposed, and it starts with clearly defining the problems for developing certain formulations. Once the problems are well-defined, creative imagination examines all potential options and selects the best answer and alternatives. Then, innovation takes over to generate unique solutions for developing new formulations that resolve the previously identified problems. Ultimately, the new delivery systems will have to go through a translational process to produce the final formulations for clinical use. The invention cycle also emphasizes examining the reasons for success of certain formulations, not just the reasons for failure of many systems. Implementation of the new invention cycle requires new mechanisms of funding the younger generation of scientists and a new way of identifying their achievements, thereby releasing them from the burden of short-termism.

  16. Ultrasonic Drug Delivery – A General Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, William G.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Staples, Bryant J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents including genetic material, proteins, and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies such as microbubbles are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilize cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Delivery of genetic material is greatly enhanced by ultrasound in the presence of microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles or to gas-containing liposomes enhances gene uptake even further. US-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumor and even fetal tissue. US-enhanced delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal delivery of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; it also makes the cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has upon cells and drug-carrying vesicles. PMID:16296719

  17. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF GASTRO RETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF STAVUDINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voleti. Vijaya Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to formulate and evaluate hydro dynamically balanced Floating Drug Delivery Systems as controlled release modules, which prolongs the release rate of the drugs. Stavudine is an anti- retroviral, reverse transcriptase inhibitor (Nucleoside. Stavudine triphosphate inhibits the HIV reverse transcriptase by competing with natural substrate, thymidine triphosphate. It also causes termination of DNA synthesis by incorporating into it. Formulation of Stavudine as gastro retentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS is especially advantageous over other prolonged type drug delivery systems and conventional tablets because the drug is having absorption window in the duodenum and jejunum level and having relatively short half life. Stavudine was taken as the model drug to optimized formulations was prepared. The floating ability of lipoidal fatty polymers Gelucire 13/01, Gelucire 43/ 01 is compared over various polymers like HPMC, HPMC K4M, Ethocel, Sodium carboxy methyl cellulose. The drug: polymer ratios used to prepare the different formulations were 1:0.5 and 1:1. Blend of all the formulations are prepared by melt granulation technique. All the tablets were subjected for dissolution study using USP dissolution apparatus (USP XXIII paddle method and data were analyzed at 265nm. The drug release of Stavudine from all the formulations followed zero order kinetics. According to the dissolution profiles of formulations drug retardation was enhanced in 1:1 Drug: Polymer proportion than 1:0.5 proportions. Of all the formulations in which Gelucire 13/01 is used as a floating polymer, has retarded the drug successfully upto 12 hours.

  18. NOVEL PARADIGMS IN MUCOADHESIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharma et al

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesion is a field of current interest in the design of drug delivery systems. Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system may be designed to enable prolonged residence time of the dosage form at the site of application or absorption and facilitate an intimate contact of the dosage form with the underline absorption surface. Extending the residence time of a dosage form at a particular site and controlling the release of drug from the dosage form are useful especially for achieving controlled plasma level of the drug as well as improving bioavailability. Application of these dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The present review describes mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive polymers and use of these polymers in designing different types of mucoadhesive gastrointestinal, nasal, ocular, vaginal and rectal drug delivery systems. The research on mucoadhesives, however, is still in its early stage, and further advances need to be made for the successful translation of the concept into practical application in controlled drug delivery.

  19. Advanced Analgesic Drug Delivery and Nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Fiorda-Diaz, Juan; Joseph, Nicholas; Shabsigh, Muhammad; Arias-Morales, Carlos; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Mavarez-Martinez, Ana; Marjoribanks, Stephen; Bergese, Sergio D

    2017-07-01

    Transdermal administration of analgesic medications offers several benefits over alternative routes of administration, including a decreased systemic drug load with fewer side effects, and avoidance of drug degradation by the gastrointestinal tract. Transdermal administration also offers a convenient mode of drug administration over an extended period of time, particularly desirable in pain medicine. A transdermal administration route may also offer increased safety for drugs with a narrow therapeutic window. The primary barrier to transdermal drug absorption is the skin itself. Transdermal nanotechnology offers a novel method of achieving enhanced dermal penetration with an extended delivery profile for analgesic drugs, due to their small size and relatively large surface area. Several materials have been used to enhance drug duration and transdermal penetration. The application of nanotechnology in transdermal delivery of analgesics has raised new questions regarding safety and ethical issues. The small molecular size of nanoparticles enables drug delivery to previously inaccessible body sites. To ensure safety, the interaction of nanoparticles with the human body requires further investigation on an individual drug basis, since different formulations have unique properties and side effects.

  20. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry F. Vandamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order to improve their administration (oral, pulmonary and dermal, the nanocarriers can be spread into microparticles. These supramolecular associations can also modulate the kinetic releases of drugs entrapped in the nanoparticles. Different strategies to produce these hybrid particles and to optimize the release kinetics of encapsulated drugs are discussed in this review.

  1. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Vandamme, Thierry F.; Nicolas Anton; Anshuman Jakhmola

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco) which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order t...

  2. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe...... biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral...... delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract...

  3. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  4. Assessment of cutaneous drug delivery using microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade microdialysis has been successfully applied to assess cutaneous drug delivery of numerous substances, indicating the large potential for bioequivalence/bioavailability evaluation of topical formulations. The technique has been shown to be minimally invasive and supply...... pharmacokinetic information directly in the target organ for cutaneous drug delivery with high temporal resolution without further intervention with the tissue after implantation. However, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed before microdialysis can be regarded as a generally applicable routine...... technique for cutaneous drug delivery assessments. Firstly, the technique is currently not suitable for sampling of highly lipophilic compounds and, secondly, more studies are desirable for elucidation of the variables associated with the technique to increase reproducibility. The present literature...

  5. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Marcel R. [Philips Research Europe, Biomolecular Engineering, HTC11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Muenster, Albert Schweitzerstrasse 33, 48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: marcel.bohmer@philips.com; Klibanov, Alexander L. [Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Cobb Hall, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Hospital Drive, Cobb Hall RM 1026, Charlottesville, VA 22908-158 (United States); Tiemann, Klaus [Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Muenster, Albert Schweitzerstrasse 33, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Hall, Christopher S. [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy, 345 Scarborough Road, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510 (United States); Gruell, Holger; Steinbach, Oliver C. [Philips Research Europe, Biomolecular Engineering, HTC11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaging has been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Important advances in this field are based on a combination of progress in guiding and monitoring ultrasound energy, novel drug classes becoming available, the development of smart delivery vehicles, and more in depth understanding of the mechanisms of the cellular and molecular basis of diseases. Recent research demonstrates that both pressure sensitive and temperature sensitive delivery systems hold promise for local treatment. The use of ultrasound for the delivery of drugs has been demonstrated in particular the field of cardiology and oncology for a variety of therapeutics ranging from small drug molecules to biologics and nucleic acids.

  6. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M; Brugge, William R; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Ultrasonic drug delivery--a general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, William G; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Staples, Bryant J

    2004-11-01

    Ultrasound has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents, including genetic material, protein and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies, such as microbubbles, are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilise cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus, the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances ultrasonic delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Numerous reports show that the most efficient delivery of genetic material occurs in the presence of cavitating microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles, or to gas-containing liposomes, enhances gene uptake even further. Ultrasonic-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues, including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumour and even fetal tissue. Ultrasonic-assisted delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal transport of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; and makes cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has on cells and drug-carrying vesicles.

  8. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  9. Transungual drug delivery: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkeeb, Rania; AliKhan, Ali; Elkeeb, Laila; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-01-15

    Topical therapy is highly desirable in treating nail disorders due to its localized effects, which results in minimal adverse systemic events and possibly improved adherence. However, the effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed. A new method of nail sampling is examined. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed.

  10. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  11. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use......Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe...... biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral...

  12. Investigation and Optimization of the Effect of Polymers on Drug Release of Norfloxacin from Floating Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadade, Dipak D; Sarda, Kalpana; Shahi, Sadhana R

    2016-01-01

    Norfloxacin is fluoroquinolone anti-infective used in the treatment of urinary tract infections, prostatitis, gonorrhea and genital tract infections. It has plasma half life of 3 to 4 h requiring multiple dosing in the treatment. Releaseretarding polymers can be used to modulate the drug release of norfloxacin. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of release-retarding polymers on the drug release of norfloxacin from floating tablets. Norfloxacin was procured as a gift sample from Concept Pharma Ltd. Aurangabad (India) and HPMC K100M was procured as a gift sample from Colorcon Asia Pvt. Ltd., Goa (India). The tablets were prepared by direct compression method and various pharmaceutical parameters were evaluated. It was observed that all tablet formulations F1-F9 retained the drug release up to 12 h with good floating property but only Batch-F4 complies with the USP dissolution limits with a minimum floating lag time. The drug release kinetics were evaluated by the model-dependent (curve fitting) method using PCP Disso v3 software shows Batch-F4 shows to best fit with Peppas model for which R2 value was 0.9921 and the release exponent value was 0.6892. The drug release kinetics study indicates that the floating tablets release the drug by diffusion followed by erosion mechanism. Obtained in-vitro drug release data was analyzed by design expert software for drug release at first hour and at 12th h values and found that release the selected independent variables like HPMC K100M and sodium alginate concentration has a significant effect on drug release.

  13. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  14. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  15. ELASTIC LIPOSOME: DRUG DELIVERY ACROSS HUMAN SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhan Harsh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery is hardly an old technology, since 1800’s and the technology is no longer just adhesive patches. Due to recent advances in technology and the ability to apply the drug to the site of action without rupturing the skin membrane, transdermal route is becoming a widely accepted route of drug administration. Recently, various strategies have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. Mainly, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis, chemical permeation enhancers, micro needles, and vesicular system. Among these strategies elastic liposomes appear promising. Elastic liposomes possess an infrastructure consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties together and as a result can accommodate drug molecules with wide range of solubility. It is an ultra deformable vesicle, elastic in nature which can squeeze itself through a pore which is many times smaller than its size owing to its elasticity. They can deform and pass through narrow constriction (from 5 to 10 times less than their own diameter without measurable loss. This high deformability gives better penetration of intact vesicles. This system is much more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. The article speaks specifically on various phenomenon associated with the properties of these vesicles and their transport mechanisms. It also throws light on the effectiveness of conventional and deformable vesicles as drug delivery systems as well as their possible mode of action as transdermal drug carriers.

  16. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  17. Dry powder platform for pulmonary drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derek Ivan Daniher; Jesse Zhu

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of particle interaction involved in pulmonary drug delivery belongs to a wide variety of disciplines of particle technology, in particular, fluidization. This paper reviews the basic concepts of pulmonary drug delivery with references to fluidization research, in particular, studies on Geldart group C powders. Dry powder inhaler device-formulation combination has been shown to be an effective method for delivering drugs to the lung for treatment of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Even with advanced designs, however, delivery efficiency is still poor mainly due to powder dispersion problems which cause poor lung deposition and high dose variability. Drug particles used in current inhalers must be 1-5 μm in diameter for effective deposition in small-diameter airways and alveoli. These powders are very cohesive, have poor flowability, and are difficult to disperse into aerosol due to cohesion arising from van tier Waals attraction. These problems are well known in fluidization research, much of which is highly relevant to pulmonary drug delivery.

  18. Liposomal drug delivery systems--clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Parveen; Goyal, Kumud; Vijaya Kumar, Sengodan Gurusamy; Singh, Ajit; Katare, Om Prakash; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2005-03-01

    Liposomes have been widely investigated since 1970 as drug carriers for improving the delivery of therapeutic agents to specific sites in the body. As a result, numerous improvements have been made, thus making this technology potentially useful for the treatment of certain diseases in the clinics. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. The current pharmaceutical preparations of liposome-based therapeutic systems mainly result from our understanding of lipid-drug interactions and liposome disposition mechanisms. The insight gained from clinical use of liposome drug delivery systems can now be integrated to design liposomes that can be targeted on tissues, cells or intracellular compartments with or without expression of target recognition molecules on liposome membranes. This review is mainly focused on the diseases that have attracted most attention with respect to liposomal drug delivery and have therefore yielded most progress, namely cancer, antibacterial and antifungal disorders. In addition, increased gene transfer efficiencies could be obtained by appropriate selection of the gene transfer vector and mode of delivery.

  19. Dendrimer a versatile polymer in drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Shakti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are a unique class of synthetic macromolecules having highly branched, three-dimensional, nanoscale architecture with very low polydispersity and high functionality. Structural advantages allow dendrimers to play an important role in the fields of nanotechnology, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry. This review discusses several aspects of dendrimers, including preparation, dendrimer-drug coupling chemistry, structural models of dendrimer-based drug delivery systems, and physicochemical and toxicological properties. Dendrimers have emerged as one of the most interesting themes for researchers as a result of their unique architecture and macromolecular characteristics. Several groups are involved in exploring their potential as versatile carriers in drug delivery. The use of dendrimers in drug delivery has been reviewed extensively. The increasing relevance of the potential of dendrimers in drug delivery emphasizes the need to explore the routes by which they can be administered. The high level of control possible over the architectural design of dendrimers; their size, shape, branching length/density, and their surface functionality clearly distinguish these structures as unique and optimum carriers in those applications. The bioactive agents may be encapsulated into the interior of the dendrimers or chemically attached/physically adsorbed onto the dendrimer surface, with the option of tailoring the carrier to the specific needs of the active material and its therapeutic applications. This review clearly demonstrates the potential of this new fourth major class of polymer architecture and indeed substantiates the high hopes for the future of dendrimers.

  20. Ingestion of drugs by "parachuting": a unique drug delivery technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenerson, Katherine L; Lear-Kaul, Kelly C

    2012-06-01

    "Parachuting" is a technique of drug delivery where medications or illicit drugs are ingested by wrapping the drug of choice in a covering, which then will dissolve or unravel in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby releasing the drug for absorption. Parachuting of drugs can entail crushing of a pill prior to packaging to theoretically increase the surface area for absorption or may involve the packaging of a higher than usual dose of a drug in attempts to attain a sustained-release effect as the "parachute" dissolves or unravels. A case is presented in which a prescription drug abuser known to parachute his medications dies from obstruction of his airway by the inhaled packet. Risks of parachuting any drug would include overdose and fatal toxic effect from the drug itself and adverse effects from the packaging including bowel obstruction or perforation, or airway obstruction.

  1. STRATEGIES AND PROSPECTS OF NASAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Gannu Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The recent advancement of nasal drug delivery systems has increased enormously and is gaining significant importance. Intranasal therapy has been an accepted form of treatment in the Ayurvedic system of Indian Medicine. The non-invasive delivery of nasal drug delivery systems made to exploit for the development of successful treatment. The advantages, disadvantages, mechanism of action and application of nasal drug delivery system in local delivery, systematic delivery, nasal vaccines and CNS...

  2. Drug delivery applications with ethosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainbinder, D; Paolino, D; Fresta, M; Touitou, E

    2010-10-01

    Ethosomes are specially tailored vesicular carriers able to efficiently deliver various molecules with different physicochemical properties into deep skin layers and across the skin. This paper reviews the unique characteristics of the ethosomal carriers, focusing on work carried out with drug containing ethosomal systems in animal models and in clinical studies. The paper concludes with a discussion on the safety of the ethosomal system applications.

  3. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  4. Recent Advances in Ocular Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu Fujii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport of drugs applied by traditional dosage forms is restricted to the eye, and therapeutic drug concentrations in the target tissues are not maintained for a long duration since the eyes are protected by a unique anatomy and physiology. For the treatment of the anterior segment of the eye, various droppable products to prolong the retention time on the ocular surface have been introduced in the market. On the other hand, direct intravitreal implants, using biodegradable or non-biodegradable polymer technology, have been widely investigated for the treatment of chronic vitreoretinal diseases. There is urgent need to develop ocular drug delivery systems which provide controlled release for the treatment of chronic diseases, and increase patient’s and doctor’s convenience to reduce the dosing frequency and invasive treatment. In this article, progress of ocular drug delivery systems under clinical trials and in late experimental stage is reviewed.

  5. Biodegradable Hybrid Stomatocyte Nanomotors for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yingfeng; Peng, Fei; André, Alain A M; Men, Yongjun; Srinivas, Mangala; Wilson, Daniela A

    2017-02-28

    We report the self-assembly of a biodegradable platinum nanoparticle-loaded stomatocyte nanomotor containing both PEG-b-PCL and PEG-b-PS as a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery. Well-defined stomatocyte structures could be formed even after incorporation of 50% PEG-b-PCL polymer. Demixing of the two polymers was expected at high percentage of semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), resulting in PCL domain formation onto the membrane due to different properties of two polymers. The biodegradable motor system was further shown to move directionally with speeds up to 39 μm/s by converting chemical fuel, hydrogen peroxide, into mechanical motion as well as rapidly delivering the drug to the targeted cancer cell. Uptake by cancer cells and fast doxorubicin drug release was demonstrated during the degradation of the motor system. Such biodegradable nanomotors provide a convenient and efficient platform for the delivery and controlled release of therapeutic drugs.

  6. Transdermal drug delivery system: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS is one of the systems lying under the category of controlled drug delivery, in which the aim is to deliver the drug through the skin in a predetermined and controlled rate. It has various advantages, like prolonged therapeutic effect, reduced side-effects, improved bioavailability, better patient compliance and easy termination of drug therapy. The stratum corneum is considered as the rate limiting barrier in transdermal permeation of most molecules. There are three main routes of drug penetration, which include the appendageal, transcellular and intercellular routes. Skin age, condition, physicochemical factors and environmental factors are some factors that are to be considered while delivering drug through this route. Basic components of TDDS include polymer matrix, membrane, drug, penetration enhancers, pressure-sensitive adhesives, backing laminates, release liner, etc. Transdermal patches can be divided into various systems like reservoir system, matrix system and micro-reservoir system, which are used to incorporate the active ingredients into the circulatory system via the skin. After preparation of transdermal patches, consistent methodology are adopted to test the adhesion properties, physicochemical properties, in vitro drug release studies, in vitro skin permeation studies, skin irritation studies and stability studies. According to the duration of therapy, various drugs are commercially available in the form of transdermal patches.

  7. TRANSCUTANEOUS DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Premjeet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drug delivery systems are often not suitable for new protein based and other Therapeutic compounds produced by modern technology. Therefore an alternative Approach to deliver these drugs can be achieved through the skin in the form of transcutaneous drug delivery system. Modern medicine has responded with the development of methods to deliver drug transcutanously (through the skin for therapeutic use as an alternative to traditional route including oral, intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous, and sublingual. Transcutaneous drug delivery has many theoretic and practical advantage and disadvantages, and such issues are often a concern for both clinicians and patients. Transcutaneous patches are flexible pharmaceutical preparations of varying sizes, containing one or more active ingredient, intended to be applied to the unbroken skin in order to deliver the active ingredient to the systemic circulation after passing through the skin barriers. A Transcutaneous patch or skin patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication through the skin and into the bloodstream. Often, this promotes healing to an injured area of the body. In this method, the drug enters the bloodstream directly through skin and it avoid first pass effect. Characterization of Transcutaneous patch are necessary because check it’s quality, size, time of onset & duration, adhesive property, thickness, weight of patch, moisture of content, uniformity & cutaneous toxicological studies. Their requirements for evaluation are HPLC, U.V. spectrophotometer, screw gauge, digital balance, desiccators, thin layer chromatography & K.C. Cell used.

  8. Inhalation delivery of asthma drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, H

    1990-01-01

    In the immediate future, metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) with spacers remain the aerosol application of choice for topical steroids, mainly to reduce side effects. For beta 2-agonist, anticholinergics and prophylactic drugs, MDI (with or without demand valve), dry powder inhalers (multidose inhalers), ultrasonic or jet aerosol generators (with or without mechanical breathing assistance [IPPB]) are chosen according to the preference or the ability of the patients to perform the necessary breathing maneuvers as well as the availability of different products in different countries.

  9. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  10. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING TABLETS OF NORFLOXACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Jyoti Rathore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is considered as the most promising route of drug delivery. Several approaches have been attempted in the preparation of gastro-retentive drug delivery systems. These include floating systems, swell able and expandable systems, high density systems, bioadhesive systems, altered shape systems, gel forming solution or suspension systems and sachet systems. Various approaches have been followed to encourage gastric retention of an oral dosage form. Floating systems have low bul density so that they can float on the gastric juice in the stomach. The problem arises when the stomach is completely emptied of gastric fluid. In such a situation, there is nothing to float on.

  11. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  12. CURRENT TRENDS IN PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Tajane et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose for this review on pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS is to compile the recent literatures with special focus on the different types and approaches involved in the development of the formulation. Pulsatile drug delivery system is the most interesting time and site-specific system. This system is designed for chronopharmacotherapy. Thus, to mimic the function of living systems and in view of emerging chronotherapeutic approaches, pulsatile delivery, which is meant to release a drug following programmed lag phase, has increasing interest in the recent years. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcer, cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, and attention deficit syndrome in children, cancer, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery system divided into 2 types’ preplanned systems and stimulus induced system, preplanned systems based on osmosis, rupturable layers, and erodible barrier coatings. Stimuli induced system based on electrical, temperature and chemically induced systems. This review also summarizes some current PDDS already available in the market. These systems are useful to several problems encountered during the development of a pharmaceutical dosage form.

  13. Microbubbles for Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Skachkov (Ilya)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn my thesis, microbubbles (MBs) for ultrasound (US) imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging, and drug delivery were studied. Microbubbles are gas-encapsulated lipid or polymer shell coated micro-particles, widely used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). MBs oscillate in response to t

  14. Drug delivery strategies for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Alfred; Liu, Xiangli

    2007-07-01

    The drug candidates coming from combinatorial chemistry research and/or the drugs selected from biologically based high-throughput screening are quite often very lipophilic, as these drug candidates exert their pharmacological action at or in biological membranes or membrane-associated proteins. This challenges drug delivery institutions in industry or academia to develop carrier systems for the optimal oral and parenteral administration of these drugs. To mention only a few of the challenges for this class of drugs: their oral bioavailability is poor and highly variable, and carrier development for parenteral administration is faced with problems, including the massive use of surface-active excipients for solubilisation. Formulation specialists are confronted with an even higher level of difficulties when these drugs have to be delivered site specifically. This article addresses the emerging formulation designs for delivering of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  15. Micro- and nano-fabricated implantable drug-delivery systems

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems provide new means for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations over entire treatment durations in order to optimize drug action. This article focuses on new drug administration modalities achieved using implantable drug-delivery systems that are enabled by micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, and microfluidics. Recent advances in drug administration technologies are discussed and remaining challenges are highlighted.

  16. Current strategies for drug delivery to the inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhuo Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For many years, drug delivery to the inner ear has been a challenge to physicians in the treatment of inner ear disorders. In the past decade, the field of inner ear drug delivery has emerged with the development of new biomaterials and drug delivery technologies to improve the effectiveness of inner ear drug therapy. This paper reviews a number of inner ear drug delivery strategies including systemic, intratympanic, and intracochlear delivery. A focus of this review is the recent advances in intratympanic delivery of medications; approaches utilizing novel biomaterials as well as other recent developments are also discussed. Biotechnology-based approaches, such as gene and stem cell therapy methods are also reviewed. Among the various strategies, local drug delivery approaches including intratympanic and intracochlear drug delivery methods that limit systemic exposure are particularly promising. These inner ear drug delivery systems provide a new opportunity to improve the treatment of inner ear disorders.

  17. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu M Boddupalli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems interact with the mucus layer covering the mucosal epithelial surface, and mucin molecules and increase the residence time of the dosage form at the site of absorption. The drugs which have local action or those which have maximum absorption in gastrointestinal tract (GIT require increased duration of stay in GIT. Thus, mucoadhesive dosage forms are advantageous in increasing the drug plasma concentrations and also therapeutic activity. In this regard, this review covers the areas of mechanisms and theories of mucoadhesion, factors influencing the mucoadhesive devices and also various mucoadhesive dosage forms.

  18. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release.

  19. Advanced materials and nanotechnology for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-08-20

    Many biological barriers are of great importance. For example, stratum corneum, the outmost layer of skin, effectively protects people from being invaded by external microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses. Cell membranes help organisms maintain homeostasis by controlling substances to enter and leave cells. However, on the other hand, these biological barriers seriously restrict drug delivery. For instance, stratum corneum has a very dense structure and only allows very small molecules with a molecular weight of below 500 Da to permeate whereas most drug molecules are much larger than that. A wide variety of drugs including genes needs to enter cells for proper functioning but cell membranes are not permeable to them. To overcome these biological barriers, many drug-delivery routes are being actively researched and developed. In this research news, we will focus on two advanced materials and nanotechnology approaches for delivering vaccines through the skin for painless and efficient immunization and transporting drug molecules to cross cell membranes for high-throughput intracellular delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Cellulose nanofiber aerogel as a promising biomaterial for customized oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jyoti Bhandari,1 Harshita Mishra,1 Pawan Kumar Mishra,2 Rupert Wimmer,2,3 Farhan J Ahmad,1 Sushama Talegaonkar1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Wood Science, Mendel University in Brno, Brno, Czech Republic; 3Institute for Natural Materials Technology, Department of Agrobiotechnology, IFA-Tulln, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Cellulose nanofiber (CNF aerogels with favorable floatability and mucoadhesive properties prepared by the freeze-drying method have been introduced as new possible carriers for oral controlled drug delivery system. Bendamustine hydrochloride is considered as the model drug. Drug loading was carried out by the physical adsorption method, and optimization of drug-loaded formulation was done using central composite design. A very lightweight-aerogel-with-matrix system was produced with drug loading of 18.98%±1.57%. The produced aerogel was characterized for morphology, tensile strength, swelling tendency in media with different pH values, floating behavior, mucoadhesive detachment force and drug release profiles under different pH conditions. The results showed that the type of matrix was porous and woven with excellent mechanical properties. The drug release was assessed by dialysis, which was fitted with suitable mathematical models. Approximately 69.205%±2.5% of the drug was released in 24 hours in medium of pH 1.2, whereas ~78%±2.28% of drug was released in medium of pH 7.4, with floating behavior for ~7.5 hours. The results of in vivo study showed a 3.25-fold increase in bioavailability. Thus, we concluded that CNF aerogels offer a great possibility for a gastroretentive drug delivery system with improved bioavailability. Keywords: cellulose nanofiber, aerogel, controlled release, gastroretentive, floating behavior, swelling behavior, mucoadhesion, bioavailability

  1. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  2. Carbon materials for drug delivery & cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes and graphene are both low-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterials exhibiting many unique physical and chemical properties that are interesting in a wide range of areas including nanomedicine. Since 2004, carbon nanotubes have been extensively explored as drug delivery carriers for the intracellular transport of chemotherapy drugs, proteins, and genes. In vivo cancer treatment with carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated in animal experiments by several different groups. Recently, graphene, another allotrope of carbon, has also shown promise in various biomedical applications. In this article, we will highlight recent research on these two categories of closely related carbon nanomaterials for applications in drug delivery and cancer therapy, and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this rapidly growing field.

  3. Mucoadhesive polymeric platforms for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin P; Laverty, Thomas P; Jones, David S

    2009-03-01

    The process of mucoadhesion involving a polymeric drug delivery platform is a complex one that includes wetting, adsorption and interpenetration of polymer chains amongst various other processes. The success and degree of mucoadhesion bonding is influenced by various polymer-based properties such as the degree of cross-linking, chain length and the presence of various functional groupings. The attractiveness of mucosal-targeted controlled drug delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), has led formulation scientists to engineer numerous polymeric systems for such tasks. Formulation scientists have at their disposal a range of in vitro and in vivo mucoadhesion testing setups in order to select candidate adhesive drug delivery platforms. As such, mucoadhesive systems have found wide use throughout many mucosal covered organelles for API delivery for local or systemic effect. Evolution of such mucoadhesive formulations has transgressed from first-generation charged hydrophilic polymer networks to more specific second-generation systems based on lectin, thiol and various other adhesive functional groups.

  4. A Review: Transdermal Drug Delivery System: A Tool For Novel Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKHIL SHARMA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The human skin is a readily accessible surface for drug delivery. Skin of an average adult body covers a surface of approximately 2 m2 and receives about one-third of the blood circulating through the body. Over the past decades, developing controlled drug delivery has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. The human skin surface is known to contain, on an average, 10- 70 hair follicles and 200-250 sweat ducts on every square centimeters of the skin area. It is one of the most readily accessible organs of the human body. There is considerable interest in the skin as a site of drug application both for local and systemic effect. However, the skin, in particular the stratum corneum, poses a formidable barrier to drug penetration thereby limiting topical and transdermal bioavailability. Skin penetration enhancement techniques have been developed to improve bioavailability and increase the range of drugs for which topical and transdermal delivery is a viable option. During the past decade, the number of drugs formulated in the patches has hardly increased, and there has been little change in the composition of the patch systems. Modifications have been mostly limited to refinements of the materials used. The present review article explores the overall study on transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS which leads to novel drug delivery system (NDDS.

  5. A new brain drug delivery strategy: focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (i.n. administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+i.n. for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After i.n. administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (i.v. drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after i.v. injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+i.n. enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by i.n. only. Despite the fact that the i.n. route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+i.n. was not significantly different from that of FUS+i.v.. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+i.n. technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases.

  6. A new brain drug delivery strategy: focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Cherry C; Acosta, Camilo; Wu, Shih-Ying; Sun, Tao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (i.n.) administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+i.n.) for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After i.n. administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (i.v.) drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after i.v. injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+i.n. enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by i.n. only. Despite the fact that the i.n. route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+i.n. was not significantly different from that of FUS+i.v.. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+i.n. technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases.

  7. Pharmaceutical technology, biopharmaceutics and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2011-03-01

    The 40th annual international conference of the Korean Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology on Pharmaceutical Technology, Biopharmaceutics and Drug Delivery was held on 2-3 December 2010 in Jeju Special Self-Governing Providence, Korea, to celebrate its 40th anniversary. A comprehensive review of a wide spectrum of recent topics on pharmaceutical technology, biopharmaceutics and drug delivery was presented. Invited lectures and poster presentations over 2 days were divided into six parallel sessions covering areas such as biotechnology, biopharmaceutics, drug delivery, formulation/manufacture, regulatory science and frontier science. Among these, there were two sessions related to regulatory science and biopharmaceutics that were co-sponsored by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. In fact, this conference provided an opportunity for many investigators to discuss their research, collect new information and to promote the advancement of knowledge in each pharmaceutical area. This conference report summarizes the keynote podium presentations provided by many distinguished speakers, including Gordon L Amidon of the University of Michigan.

  8. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  9. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative co

  10. Design and Evaluation of Gastro retentive Drug Delivery System of Anti Ulcer Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Floating matrix tablets of Lansoprezol were developed to prolong gastric residence time, leading to sustained action of the drug. Tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique, using hydroxypropylmethyl-cellulose as a polymer in two different grades, HPMC K4M and HPMC K15M. Tablets were evaluated for their physical characteristics, viz., hardness, thickness, friability, mass variation, drug content and floating properties. Further, tablets were studied for in vitro drug release character...

  11. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  12. Transdermal drug delivery: from micro to nano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Carla; MacNeil, Sheila; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Delivery across skin offers many advantages compared to oral or intravenous routes of drug administration. Skin however is highly impermeable to most molecules on the basis of size, hydrophilicity, lipophilicity and charge. For this reason it is often necessary to temporarily alter the barrier properties of skin for effective administration. This can be done by applying chemical enhancers, which alter the lipid structure of the top layer of skin (the stratum corneum, SC), by applying external forces such as electric currents and ultrasounds, by bypassing the stratum corneum via minimally invasive microneedles or by using nano-delivery vehicles that can cross and deliver their payload to the deeper layers of skin. Here we present a critical summary of the latest technologies used to increase transdermal delivery.

  13. Advanced drug delivery systems: Nanotechnology of health design A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Safari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has finally and firmly entered the realm of drug delivery. Performances of intelligent drug delivery systems are continuously improved with the purpose to maximize therapeutic activity and to minimize undesirable side-effects. This review describes the advanced drug delivery systems based on micelles, polymeric nanoparticles, and dendrimers. Polymeric carbon nanotubes and many others demonstrate a broad variety of useful properties. This review emphasizes the main requirements for developing new nanotech-nology-based drug delivery systems.

  14. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clini

  15. Image-guided drug delivery : Preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, G; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clini

  16. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; Martucci, Nicola M.; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Tatè, Rosarita; Rendina, Ivo; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Rea, Ilaria

    2014-07-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  17. Viruses as nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockney, Dustin; Franzen, Stefan; Lommel, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Virus delivery vectors are one among the many nanomaterials that are being developed as drug delivery materials. This chapter focuses on methods utilizing plant virus nanoparticles (PVNs) synthesized from the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). A successful vector must be able to effectively carry and subsequently deliver a drug cargo to a specific target. In the case of the PVNs, we describe two types of ways cargo can be loaded within these structures: encapsidation and infusion. Several targeting approaches have been used for PVNs based on bioconjugate chemistry. Herein, examples of such approaches will be given that have been used for RCNMV as well as for other PVNs in the literature. Further, we describe characterization of PVNs, in vitro cell studies that can be used to test the efficacy of a targeting vector, and potential routes for animal administration.

  18. Nanotechnology approaches for ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness is a major health concern worldwide that has a powerful impact on afflicted individuals and their families, and is associated with enormous socio-economical consequences. The Middle East is heavily impacted by blindness, and the problem there is augmented by an increasing incidence of diabetes in the population. An appropriate drug/gene delivery system that can sustain and deliver therapeutics to the target tissues and cells is a key need for ocular therapies. The application of nanotechnology in medicine is undergoing rapid progress, and the recent developments in nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches may bring significant benefits to address the leading causes of blindness associated with cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal degeneration. In this brief review, we highlight some promising nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches for drug and gene delivery to the anterior and posterior segments.

  19. Polysaccharide-Based Micelles for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of hydrophobic molecules and proteins has been an issue due to poor bioavailability following administration. Thus, micelle carrier systems are being investigated to improve drug solubility and stability. Due to problems with toxicity and immunogenicity, natural polysaccharides are being explored as substitutes for synthetic polymers in the development of new micelle systems. By grafting hydrophobic moieties to the polysaccharide backbone, self-assembled micelles can be readily formed in aqueous solution. Many polysaccharides also possess inherent bioactivity that can facilitate mucoadhesion, enhanced targeting of specific tissues, and a reduction in the inflammatory response. Furthermore, the hydrophilic nature of some polysaccharides can be exploited to enhance circulatory stability. This review will highlight the advantages of polysaccharide use in the development of drug delivery systems and will provide an overview of the polysaccharide-based micelles that have been developed to date.

  20. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis.

  1. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Hussain, Amjad; Walsh, Susannah; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-11-05

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described) have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  2. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  3. Loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo

    , they are usually degraded before they are absorbed. These combined factors considerably reduce the bioavailability of many active ingredients. Several strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges. One of them are microfabricated drug delivery devices. Microreservoir based-systems are characterized...... of drugs and with the perspective of mass production. In a first instance, the suitability of inkjet printing as filling method was elucidated. Solutions containing furosemide and lipid based formulations of insulin were dispensed into microcontainers. Secondly, this technique was successfully utilized...... to dispense controlled amounts of polymer into microcontainers. Subsequently, polymer filled-containers were loaded with drug. To achieve this, supercritical impregnation technology was successfully employed. Furthermore, in vitro drug dissolution studies showed that the loading yields and the release...

  4. An Insight into Ophthalmic Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathore K. S.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Promising management of eye ailments take off effective concentration of drug at the eye for sufficient period of time. Dosage forms are administered directly to eye for localized ophthalmic therapy. Most of the treatments call for the topical administration of ophthalmic active drugs to the tissues around the ocular cavity. Conventional ophthalmic drug delivery systems including eye drops, ophthalmic ointments, are no longer sufficient to encounter eye diseases. This article reviews the constraints with conventional ocular therapy and explores various novel approaches like in-situ gel, ocular films or ocuserts, nanosuspension, collagen shields, latex systems, nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, iontophorosis, eye implants, etc to improve the ophthalmic bioavailability of drugs to the anterior chamber of the eye.

  5. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Haj-Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  6. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    .6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using...... clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines......Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of “stealth” design principals...

  7. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  8. [Drug delivery systems for intraocular applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, J-L; Touchard, E; Kowalczuk, L; Berdugo, M; Thomas-Doyle, A; Bochot, A; Gomez, A; Azan, F; Gurny, R; Behar-Cohen, F

    2007-12-01

    Numerous drug delivery systems (DDSs) can be used as intraocular tools to provide a sustained and calibrated release for a specific drug. Great progress has been made on the design, biocompatibility, bioavailability, and efficacy of DDSs. Although several of them are undergoing clinical trials, a few are already on the market and could be of a routine use in clinical practice. Moreover, miniaturization of the implants makes them less and less traumatic for the eye tissues and some DDSs are now able to target certain cells or tissues specifically. An overview of ocular implants with therapeutic application potentials is provided.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, J

    2008-01-01

    Stuart C McBain, Humphrey HP Yiu, Jon DobsonInstitute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7QB, U.K.Abstract: Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design...

  10. Sublingual Drug Delivery: An Extensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Kumar Vats; H. G. Shivakumar; Chaudhari C. A.

    2016-01-01

    The demand of fast disintegrating tablets has been growing during the last decade, due to the characteristics of fast disintegrating sublingual tablets for the potential emergency treatment. In terms of permeability, the sublingual area of the oral cavity (i.e, the floor of the mouth) is more permeable than the buccal (cheek) area, which in turn is more permeable than the palatal (roof) of the mouth. Drug delivery through the oral mucous membrane is considered to be a promising a...

  11. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew J; Seib, F Philipp

    2015-11-09

    Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of "stealth" design principals is especially necessary to support their evolution. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the potential of PEGylated silk nanoparticles as an anticancer drug delivery system. We first generated B. mori derived silk nanoparticles by driving β-sheet assembly (size 104 ± 1.7 nm, zeta potential -56 ± 5.6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines to human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, these results, taken together with prior silk nanoparticle data, support a viable future for silk-based nanomedicines.

  12. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs...

  13. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (pAnimals were treated by either systemic cisplatin injection (sCis), or with SCPC-Cis hybrid placed adjacent (ADJ) to, or within (IT), the tumor. Five days after implantation 50-55% of the total cisplatin loaded was released from the SCPC-Cis hybrids resulting in an approximately 50% decrease in tumor volume compared to sCis treatment. Severe side effects were observed in animals treated with sCis including rapid weight loss and decreased liver and kidney function, effects not observed in SCPC-Cis treated animals. Analysis of cisplatin

  14. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  15. Iontophoretic drug delivery across the nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Charro, Maria Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Topical drug delivery to treat nail diseases such as onychomycosis and psoriasis is receiving increasing attention. Topical nail delivery is challenged by the complicated structure of the nail and the low permeability of most drugs across the nail plate. Considerable effort has been directed at developing methods to promote drug permeation across the nail plate. Iontophoresis efficiently enhances molecular transport across the skin and the eye and is now being tested for its potential in ungual delivery. This review covers the basic mechanisms of transport (electro-osmosis and -migration) and their relative contribution to nail iontophoresis as well as the key factors governing nail permselectivity and ionic transport numbers. Methodological issues concerning research in this area are summarized. The data available in vivo on nail iontophoresis of terbinafine specifically are reviewed in separate sections. Our understanding of nail iontophoresis has improved considerably since 2007; most decisively, the feasibility of nail iontophoresis in vivo has been clearly demonstrated. Future work is required to establish the adequate implementation of the technique so that its clinical efficacy to treat onychomycosis and nail psoriasis can be unequivocally determined.

  16. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  17. Transdermal microneedles for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Ai Ling [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Shearwood, Christopher [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ng, Kian Chye [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Lu Jia [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Moochhala, Shabbir [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117510 (Singapore)]. E-mail: mshabbir@dso.org.sg

    2006-07-25

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has many advantages, the main one being the ability to maintain the prolonged release of drugs to attain optimal blood concentrations. Unfortunately, nature has provided a very effective protective barrier, the stratum corneum (sc), which limits TDD to certain types of drugs with specific properties. In order to enhance TDD, the idea of using microneedles to painlessly penetrate the sc barrier has previously been proposed. In this paper, we will review the different microneedles that are currently being developed as well as our own efforts in this area. Based on our experiences, we will offer our view on the key parameters for effective transdermal microneedle design as well as future directions in this area.

  18. Mucus as a Barrier to Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative charge...... and hydrophobic domains, the overall hydrophilic mucus also presents an interactive barrier limiting the free diffusion of components within and through the mucus. Furthermore, mucus is a dynamic barrier due to its continuous secretion and shedding from the mucosal surfaces. Mucus is thus a highly complex gel......, studies of peptide and protein drug diffusion in and through mucus and studies of mucus-penetrating nanoparticles are included to illustrate the mucus as a potentially important barrier to obtain sufficient bioavailability of orally administered drugs, and thus an important parameter to address...

  19. Bioadhesive floating microsponges of cinnarizine as novel gastroretentive delivery: Capmul GMO bioadhesive coating versus acconon MC 8-2 EP/NF with intrinsic bioadhesive property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Smita; Pathak, Kamla

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at the development of low-density gastroretentive bioadhesive microsponges of cinnarizine by two-pronged approach (i) coating with bioadhesive material and (ii) exploration of acconon MC 8-2 EP/NF as bioadhesive raw material for fabrication. Microsponges were prepared by quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method using 3(2) factorial design. Capmul GMO was employed for bioadhesive coating. In parallel, potential of acconon for the fabrication of bioadhesive floating microsponges (A8) was assessed. Formulation with entrapment efficiency = 82.4 ± 3.4%, buoyancy = 82.3 ± 2.5%, and correlation of drug release (CDR8h) = 88.7% ± 2.9% was selected as optimized formulation (F8) and subjected to bioadhesive coating (BF8). The %CDR8h for A8 was similar to BF8 (87.2% ± 3.5%). Dynamic in vitro bioadhesion test revealed comparable bioadhesivity with BF8. The ex vivo permeation across gastric mucin displayed 63.16% for BF8 against 56.74% from A8; affirmed the bioadhesivity of both approaches. The study concluded with the development of novel bioadhesive floating microsponges of cinnarizine employing capmul GMO as bioadhesive coating material and confirmed the viability of acconon MC 8-2EP/NF as bioadhesive raw material for sustained targeted delivery of drug.

  20. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ibrahim, Rahul Verma, Lucila Garcia-ContrerasDepartment of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided.Keywords: pulmonary delivery, asthma, nebulizers, metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler

  1. Recent advances in chitosan-based nanoparticulate pulmonary drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Ferro, Vito

    2016-07-01

    The advent of biodegradable polymer-encapsulated drug nanoparticles has made the pulmonary route of administration an exciting area of drug delivery research. Chitosan, a natural biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharide has received enormous attention as a carrier for drug delivery. Recently, nanoparticles of chitosan (CS) and its synthetic derivatives have been investigated for the encapsulation and delivery of many drugs with improved targeting and controlled release. Herein, recent advances in the preparation and use of micro-/nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives for pulmonary delivery of various therapeutic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines) are reviewed. Although chitosan has wide applications in terms of formulations and routes of drug delivery, this review is focused on pulmonary delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives. In addition, the controversial toxicological effects of chitosan nanoparticles for lung delivery will also be discussed.

  2. The use of bisphosphonates for bone-specific drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farbod, K.

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological efficacy of conventional drug formulations can be improved through the use of drug delivery systems. Controlled drug delivery systems are intended to deliver drugs locally at predetermined rates for predefined periods of time. By delivering pharmacologically high concentrations o

  3. Ultrasound triggered, image guided, local drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T W

    2010-11-20

    Ultrasound allows the deposition of thermal and mechanical energies deep inside the human body in a non-invasive way. Ultrasound can be focused within a region with a diameter of about 1mm. The bio-effects of ultrasound can lead to local tissue heating, cavitation, and radiation force, which can be used for 1) local drug release from nanocarriers circulating in the blood, 2) increased extravasation of drugs and/or carriers, and 3) enhanced diffusivity of drugs. When using nanocarriers sensitive to mechanical forces (the oscillating ultrasound pressure waves) and/or sensitive to temperature, the content of the nanocarriers can be released locally. Thermo-sensitive liposomes have been suggested for local drug release in combination with local hyperthermia more than 25 years ago. Microbubbles may be designed specifically to enhance cavitation effects. Real-time imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance, optical and ultrasound imaging have led to novel insights and methods for ultrasound triggered drug delivery. Image guidance of ultrasound can be used for: 1) target identification and characterization; 2) spatio-temporal guidance of actions to release or activate the drugs and/or permeabilize membranes; 3) evaluation of bio-distribution, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and 4) physiological read-outs to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Bawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments.

  5. Novel swellable polymer of orchidaceae family for gastroretentive drug delivery of famotidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mahboubeh Razavi,1 Shaik Nyamathulla,1,2 Hamed Karimian,1 Mohamed Ibrahim Noordin1,2 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, 2Center for Natural Products and Drug Discovery, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: This study aimed to develop hydrophilic, gastroretentive matrix tablets of famotidine with good floating and swelling properties. A novel gastroretentive drug delivery formulation was designed using salep, also known as salepi, a flour obtained from grinding dried palmate tubers of Orchis morio var mascula (Orchidaceae family. The main polysaccharide content of salep is glucomannan, highly soluble in cold and hot water, which forms a viscous solution. Salep was characterized for physicochemical properties, thermal stability, chemical interaction, and surface morphology using X-ray diffraction analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Ten different formulations (S1–S10 were prepared using famotidine to salep ratios from 1:0.5 to 1:5. Results demonstrated that all formulations were able to sustain the drug release for more than 24 hours. The S5 formulation, with a famotidine to salep ratio of 1:2.5, had the shortest floating lag time of 35 seconds and 100% drug release within 24 hours. The dissolution data were fitted into popular mathematical models to assess the mechanism of drug release. S5 showed Zero order release (R=0.9746 with Higuchi diffusion (R=0.9428. We conclude that salep, a novel polymer, can be used in controlled release formulations to sustain release for 24 hours, due to inherent swelling and gelling properties. Keywords: famotidine, floating matrix tablets, gastroretentive drug delivery, orchis, salep

  6. Drug accumulation by means of noninvasive magnetic drug delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuzawa, M., E-mail: chuzawa@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, A1 Bldg, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S. [Osaka University, A1 Bldg, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The medication is one of the most general treatment methods, but drugs diffuse in the normal tissues other than the target part by the blood circulation. Therefore, side effect in the medication, particularly for a drug with strong effect such as anti-cancer drug, are a serious issue. Drug Delivery System (DDS) which accumulates the drug locally in the human body is one of the techniques to solve the side-effects. Magnetic Drug Delivery System (MDDS) is one of the active DDSs, which uses the magnetic force. The objective of this study is to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs noninvasively in the deep part of the body by using MDDS. It is necessary to generate high magnetic field and magnetic gradient at the target part to reduce the side-effects to the tissues with no diseases. The biomimetic model was composed, which consists of multiple model organs connected with diverged blood vessel model. The arrangement of magnetic field was examined to accumulate ferromagnetic drug particles in the target model organ by using a superconducting bulk magnet which can generate high magnetic fields. The arrangement of magnet was designed to generate high and stable magnetic field at the target model organ. The accumulation experiment of ferromagnetic particles has been conducted. In this study, rotating HTS bulk magnet around the axis of blood vessels by centering on the target part was suggested, and the model experiment for magnet rotation was conducted. As a result, the accumulation of the ferromagnetic particles to the target model organ in the deep part was confirmed.

  7. Transdermal Patches: A Complete Review on Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel DS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Today about 70% of drugs are taken orally and are found not to be as effective as desired. To improvesuch characters transdermal drug delivery system was emerged. Transdermal drug delivery system(TDDS provides a means to sustain drug release as well as reduce the intensity of action and thusreduce the side effects associated with its oral therapy and differs from traditional topical drug delivery.Transdermal Drug Delivery System is the system in which the delivery of the active ingredients of thedrug occurs by means of skin. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are limitationof hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steadyplasma level of the drug. Various types of transdermal patches are used to incorporate the activeingredients into the circulatory system via skin. This review article covers a brief outline of theprinciples of transdermal permeation, various components of transdermal patch, approaches oftransdermal patch, evaluation of transdermal system, its application with its limitation.

  8. Emulgel Formulation: Novel Approach for Topical Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Habeeba Basheer; Krishnakumar, K.; Dineshkumar B.

    2016-01-01

    Topical drug delivery has been used for centuries for the treatment of local skin disorders. Drugs applied to the skin for their local action include antiseptics, antifungal agents, skin emollients, and protectants. On the other hand, topical delivery system increases the contact time and mean resident time of drug. Many advantages of gels a major limitation is in the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. So to overcome this limitation an emulsion based approach is being used. When gels and emulsion...

  9. Laser assisted Drug Delivery: Grundlagen und Praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stephan Alexander; Schrumpf, Holger; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne

    2016-05-01

    Die topische Applikation von Wirkstoffen ist eine zentrale Therapieoption der Dermatologie. Allerdings mindert die effektive Barrierefunktion der Haut die Bioverfügbarkeit der meisten Externa. Fraktionierte ablative Laser stellen ein innovatives Verfahren dar, um die epidermale Barriere standardisiert, kontaktfrei zu überwinden. Die Bioverfügbarkeit im Anschluss applizierter Externa wird im Sinne einer laser assisted drug delivery (LADD) signifikant gesteigert. Das Prinzip der LADD wird bereits in einigen Bereichen der Dermatologie erfolgreich eingesetzt. Die vorliegende Übersichtsarbeit soll einen Überblick über die aktuellen aber auch perspektivischen Einsatzmöglichkeiten der LADD bieten.

  10. Pulmonary drug delivery by powder aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Michael Yifei; Chan, John Gar Yan; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-11-10

    The efficacy of pharmaceutical aerosols relates to its deposition in the clinically relevant regions of the lungs, which can be assessed by in vivo lung deposition studies. Dry powder formulations are popular as devices are portable and aerosolisation does not require a propellant. Over the years, key advancements in dry powder formulation, device design and our understanding on the mechanics of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosol have opened up new opportunities in treatment of diseases through pulmonary drug delivery. This review covers these advancements and future directions for inhaled dry powder aerosols.

  11. Dendrimer based nanotherapeutics for ocular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Siva Pramodh

    PAMAM dendrimers are a class of well-defined, hyperbranched polymeric nanocarriers that are being investigated for ocular drug and gene delivery. Their favorable properties such as small size, multivalency and water solubility can provide significant opportunities for many biologically unstable drugs and allows potentially favorable ocular biodistribution. This work exploits hydroxyl terminated dendrimers (G4-OH) as drug/gene delivery vehicles that can target retinal microglia and pigment epithelium via systemic delivery with improved efficacy at much lower concentrations without any side effects. Two different drugs Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) conjugated to G4-OH dendrimers showed tailorable sustained release in physiological relevant solutions and were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Dendrimer-TA conjugates enhanced the solubility of TA and were 100 fold more effective at lower concentrations than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity in activated microglia and in suppressing VEGF production in hypoxic RPE cells. Dendrimers targeted activated microglia/macrophages and RPE and retained for a period of 21 days in I/R mice model. The relative retention of intravitreal and intravenous dendrimers was comparable, if a 30-fold intravenous dose is used; suggesting intravenous route targeting retinal diseases are possible with dendrimers. D-NAC when injected intravenously attenuated retinal and choroidal inflammation, significantly reduced (˜73%) CNV growth at early stage of AMD in rat model of CNV. A combination therapy of D-NAC + D-TA significantly suppressed microglial activation and promoted CNV regression in late stages of AMD without causing side-effects. G4-OH was modified with linker having minimal amine groups and incorporation of TA as a nuclear localization enhancer resulted in compact gene vectors with favorable safety profile and achieved high levels of transgene expression in hard to transfect human retinal pigment

  12. Lysolipid containing liposomes for transendothelial drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koklic Tilen

    2012-04-01

    transendothelial permeability in presence and absence of albumin. Implications of the hypothesis We propose that lysolipid containing liposomal formulations might be used as nonspecific transendothelial transport vector, since leakage of liposome encapsulated active drug occurs simultaneously with the release of the lysolipids. The concentration of the active drug is therefore expected to be the highest at the site of compromised endothelial barrier. By appropriate choice of the lysolipids an endothelial barrier would stay open only for a short time. Use of such liposomes would potentially maximize the delivery of the drug while limiting the passage of toxic substances and pathogens across the endothelial barrier. Combining lysolipid containing liposomes with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles or a targeting ligand might be required to efficiently localize drug delivery to a disease affected tissue and to avoid endothelial disruption over the entire body.

  13. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  14. MICROENCAPSULATION: AN INDISPENSABLE TECHNOLOGY FOR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakar Jadupati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the various new and well established technologies relevant to the controlled and targeted drug delivery systems have been precisely discussed. A perfectly designed controlled drug delivery system can be of huge advantage towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue and controlling the rate of drug delivery at the target site. Novel drug delivery systems have various advantages over other conventional drug therapy. In which microencapsulation is one approach for achieving the novel drug delivery dosage forms such as sustained release and controlled release, though the development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and focus the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. Our objective is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to elucidate the application of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed.

  15. Light activated liposomes: Functionality and prospects in ocular drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, Tatu; Nurmi, Riikka; Kontturi, Leena; Viitala, Lauri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2016-12-28

    Ocular drug delivery, especially to the retina and choroid, is a major challenge in drug development. Liposome technology may be useful in ophthalmology in enabling new routes of delivery, prolongation of drug action and intracellular drug delivery, but drug release from the liposomes should be controlled. For that purpose, light activation may be an approach to release drug at specified time and site in the eye. Technical advances have been made in the field of light activated drug release, particularly indocyanine green loaded liposomes are a promising approach with safe materials and effective light triggered release of small and large molecules. This review discusses the liposomal drug delivery with light activated systems in the context of ophthalmic drug delivery challenges.

  16. The Research Progress of Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiayin; Ting, Xizi Liang; Zhu, Junjie

    2017-06-01

    Targeted drug delivery system (DDS) means to selectively transport drugs to targeted tissues, organs, and cells through a variety of drugs carrier. It is usually designed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and to overcome problems such as limited solubility, drug aggregation, poor bio distribution and lack of selectivity, controlling drug release carrier and to reduce normal tissue damage. With the characteristics of nontoxic and biodegradable, it can increase the retention of drug in lesion site and the permeability, improve the concentration of the drug in lesion site. at present, there are some kinds of DDS using at test phase, such as slow controlled release drug delivery system, targeted drug delivery systems, transdermal drug delivery system, adhesion dosing system and so on. This paper makes a review for DDS.

  17. NASAL IN SITU GEL: A NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhrupesh panchal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, advances in the in situ gel technologies have spurred development in manymedical and biomedical applications including controlled drug delivery. Many novel in situ gel baseddelivery matrices have been designed and fabricated to fulfill the ever increasing needs of thepharmaceutical and medical fields. In situ gelling systems are liquid at room temperature but undergogelation when in contact with body fluids or change in pH. In situ gel forming drug delivery is a type ofmucoadhesive drug delivery system. The formation of gel depends on factors like temperaturemodulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultraviolet irradiation from which the drug gets released ina sustained and controlled manner. Nasal delivery is a promising drug delivery option where commondrug administrations such as intravenous, intramuscular or oral are inapplicable. Recently, it has beenshown that many drugs have better bioavailability by nasal route than the oral route. This has beenattributed to rich vasculature and a highly permeable structure of the nasal mucosa coupled withavoidance of hepatic first-pass elimination, gut wall metabolism and/or destruction in thegastrointestinal tract. The physiology of the nose presents obstacles but offers a promising route for noninvasivesystemic delivery of numerous therapies and debatably drug delivery route to the brain. Thusthis review focuses on nasal drug delivery, various aspects of nasal anatomy and physiology, nasal drugabsorption mechanisms, various nasal drug delivery systems and their applications in drug delivery.

  18. AQUASOMES: A NOVEL CARRIER FOR DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Sutariya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanobiopharmaceutics involves delivery of biopharmaceutical product through different biomaterials like multifunctional nanoparticles, quantum dots, aquasomes, superparamagnetic iron oxide crystals, and liposomes dendrimers. Nanotechnology has emerged fields of biomedical research in the last few decades the presents context is an attempt to present the brief information about nanobiotechnological applications. Aquasomes are nanoparticulate carrier system but instead of being simple nanoparticles these arse three layered self assembled structures, comprised of a solid phase nanocrystalline core coated with oligomeric film to which biochemically active molecules are adsorbed with or without modification. Aquasomes are spherical 60–300 nm particles used for drug and antigen delivery. Aquasomes discovery comprises a principle from microbiology, food chemistry, biophysics and many discoveries including solid phase synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, molecular shape change and self assembly. Three types of core materials are mainly used for producing aquasomes: tin oxide, nanocrystalline carbon ceramics (diamonds and brushite (calcium phosphate dihydrate. Calcium phosphate is the core of interest, owing to its natural presence in the body. The brushite is unstable and converts to hydroxyapatite upon prolong storage. Hydroxyapatite seems, therefore, a better core for the preparation of aquasomes. It is widely used for the preparation of implants for drug delivery. The solid core provides the structural stability, while the carbohydrate coating protects against dehydration and stabilizes the biochemically active molecules. This property of maintaining the conformational integrity of bioactive molecules has led to the proposal that aquasomes have potential as a carrier system for delivery of peptide, protein, hormones, antigens and genes to specific sites. Aquasome deliver their content through specific targeting, molecular sheiling and slow

  19. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, V Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples.

  20. A microneedle roller for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Seong-O; Seo, Soonmin; Choy, Young Bin; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-10-01

    Microneedle rollers have been used to treat large areas of skin for cosmetic purposes and to increase skin permeability for drug delivery. In this study, we introduce a polymer microneedle roller fabricated by inclined rotational UV lithography, replicated by micromolding hydrophobic polylactic acid and hydrophilic carboxy-methyl-cellulose. These microneedles created micron-scale holes in human and porcine cadaver skin that permitted entry of acetylsalicylic acid, Trypan blue and nanoparticles measuring 50nm and 200nm in diameter. The amount of acetylsalicylic acid delivered increased with the number of holes made in the skin and was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in untreated skin. Lateral diffusion in the skin between holes made by microneedles followed expected diffusional kinetics, with effective diffusivity values that were 23-160 times smaller than in water. Compared to inserting microneedles on a flat patch, the sequential insertion of microneedles row by row on a roller required less insertion force in full-thickness porcine skin. Overall, polymer microneedle rollers, prepared from replicated polymer films, offer a simple way to increase skin permeability for drug delivery.

  1. Polymeric micelles for acyclovir drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawdon, Alicia J; Peng, Ching-An

    2014-10-01

    Polymeric prodrug micelles for delivery of acyclovir (ACV) were synthesized. First, ACV was used directly to initiate ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone to form ACV-polycaprolactone (ACV-PCL). Through conjugation of hydrophobic ACV-PCL with hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) or chitosan, polymeric micelles for drug delivery were formed. (1)H NMR, FTIR, and gel permeation chromatography were employed to show successful conjugation of MPEG or chitosan to hydrophobic ACV-PCL. Through dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and critical micelle concentration (CMC), the synthesized ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were characterized. It was found that the average size of the polymeric micelles was under 200nm and the CMCs of ACV-PCL-MPEG and ACV-PCL-chitosan were 2.0mgL(-1) and 6.6mgL(-1), respectively. The drug release kinetics of ACV was investigated and cytotoxicity assay demonstrates that ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were non-toxic.

  2. Challenges in modelling nanoparticles for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been significant advances in the fields of theoretical condensed matter and computational physics, when confronted with the complexity and diversity of nanoparticles available in conventional laboratories a number of modeling challenges remain. These challenges are generally shared among application domains, but the impacts of the limitations and approximations we make to overcome them (or circumvent them) can be more significant one area than another. In the case of nanoparticles for drug delivery applications some immediate challenges include the incompatibility of length-scales, our ability to model weak interactions and solvation, the complexity of the thermochemical environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and the role of polydispersivity in determining properties and performance. Some of these challenges can be met with existing technologies, others with emerging technologies including the data-driven sciences; some others require new methods to be developed. In this article we will briefly review some simple methods and techniques that can be applied to these (and other) challenges, and demonstrate some results using nanodiamond-based drug delivery platforms as an exemplar.

  3. Vascular permeability and drug delivery in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy eAzzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents.

  4. Nanodiamond and its application to drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Osawa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-spherical diamond crystals having an average diameter of 3.7±0.6 nm are attracting much attention as an ideal material in carbon nanotechnology. In contrast to the other popular nanocarbons including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphenes, our single-nanodiamond can be produced in uniform shape/size on industrial scale. Thus, the most serious problem in nanocarbon industry that persisted in the past 25 years, namely the technical failure to produce highly crystalline nanocarbons in narrow shape/size range does not exist in our diamond from the beginning. Among potential applications of the single-nanodiamond under development, this review concentrates on its highly promising role as a drug carrier, especially for therapeutic-resistant cancer. An interesting possibility of intercalation is proposed as the mechanism of drug transport through blood, which takes into accounts of the spontaneous formation of nanographene layer on the [111] facets, which is then extensively oxidized during oxidative soot removal process to give nanographene oxide partial surface, capable of intercalating drug molecules to prevent them from leaking and causing undesirable side effects during transportation to target malignant cells. A perspective of quantifying the drug delivery process by anticipating orders of magnitude in the number of administered detonation nanodiamond (DND particles is suggested.

  5. STRATEGIES AND PROSPECTS OF NASAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gannu Praveen Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent advancement of nasal drug delivery systems has increased enormously and is gaining significant importance. Intranasal therapy has been an accepted form of treatment in the Ayurvedic system of Indian Medicine. The non-invasive delivery of nasal drug delivery systems made to exploit for the development of successful treatment. The advantages, disadvantages, mechanism of action and application of nasal drug delivery system in local delivery, systematic delivery, nasal vaccines and CNS delivery are explained lucidly. The relevant aspects of biological, physicochemical and pharmaceutical factors of nasal cavity that must be considered during the process of discovery and development of new drugs for nasal delivery as well as in their incorporation into appropriate nasal pharmaceutical formulations are also discussed. Nasal route is more suitable for those drugs which cannot be administered orally due to gastric degradation or hepatic first pass metabolism of the drug. Intranasal drug delivery is found much promising route for administration of peptides and protein drugs. Much has been investigated and much more are to be investigated for the recent advancement of nasal drug delivery systems.

  6. Nanoscale coordination polymers for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rachel Huxford

    This dissertation reports the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) for anticancer drug delivery. Nanoparticles have been explored in order to address the limitations of small molecule chemotherapeutics. NCPs have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles as they can exhibit the same beneficial properties as the bulk metal-organic frameworks as well as interesting characteristics that are unique to nanomaterials. Gd-MTX (MTX = methotrexate) NCPs with a MTX loading of 71.6 wt% were synthesized and stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid bilayer containing anisamide (AA), a small molecule that targets sigma receptors which are overexpressed in many cancer tissues. Functionalization with AA allows for targeted delivery and controlled release to cancer cells, as shown by enhanced efficacy against leukemia cells. The NCPs were doped with Ru(bpy)32+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), and this formulation was utilized as an optical imaging agent by confocal microscopy. NCPs containing the chemotherapeutic pemetrexed (PMX) were synthesized using different binding metals. Zr-based materials could not be stabilized by encapsulation with a lipid bilayer, and Gd-based materials showed that PMX had degraded during synthesis. However, Hf-based NCPs containing 19.7 wt% PMX were stabilized by a lipid coating and showed in vitro efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Enhanced efficacy was observed for formulations containing AA. Additionally, NCP formulations containing the cisplatin prodrug disuccinatocisplatin were prepared; one of these formulations could be stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid layer. Coating with a lipid layer doped with AA rendered this formulation an active targeting agent. The resulting formulation proved more potent than free cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines. Improved NCP uptake was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and competitive binding assays. Finally, a Pt(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug was

  7. Fractional CO(2) laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A

    2010-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates vertical channels that might assist the delivery of topically applied drugs into skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate drug delivery by CO(2) laser AFR using methyl 5-aminolevulinate (MAL), a porphyrin precursor, as a test drug....

  8. Fractional CO(2) laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A

    2010-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates vertical channels that might assist the delivery of topically applied drugs into skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate drug delivery by CO(2) laser AFR using methyl 5-aminolevulinate (MAL), a porphyrin precursor, as a test drug....

  9. A Fully Integrated Microneedle-based Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Roxhed, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    Patch-based transdermal drug delivery offers a convenient way to administer drugs without the drawbacks of standard hypodermic injections relating to issues such as patient acceptability and injection safety. However, conventional transdermal drug delivery is limited to therapeutics where the drug can diffuse across the skin barrier. By using miniaturized needles, a pathway into the human body can be established which allow transport of macromolecular drugs such as insulins or vaccines. These...

  10. Advanced drug delivery systems: Nanotechnology of health design A review

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Safari; Zohre Zarnegar

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has finally and firmly entered the realm of drug delivery. Performances of intelligent drug delivery systems are continuously improved with the purpose to maximize therapeutic activity and to minimize undesirable side-effects. This review describes the advanced drug delivery systems based on micelles, polymeric nanoparticles, and dendrimers. Polymeric carbon nanotubes and many others demonstrate a broad variety of useful properties. This review emphasizes the main requirements ...

  11. The Development of Magnetic Drug Delivery and Disposition

    OpenAIRE

    Marszall, Michal Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/the-delivery-of-nanoparticles/the-development-of-magnetic-drug-deliveryand-disposition The process of drug delivery and disposition in the modern scientific aspect is very complex. Advances in many fields are converging to make the commercialisation of advanced drug delivery concepts possible. It integrates many disciplines, including biotechnology, medicine and pharmacology. Innovative devices should protect labile active ingredient...

  12. Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Viitala, Tapani; Ihalainen, Petri

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There has been increased activity in the field recently regarding the development and research on various printing techniques in fabrication of dosage forms and drug delivery systems. These technologies may offer benefits and flexibility in manufacturing, potentially paving the way...... recent literature where printing techniques are used in fabrication of drug delivery systems. The future perspectives and possible impacts on formulation strategies, flexible dosing and personalized medication of using printing techniques for fabrication of drug delivery systems are discussed.......\

  13. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  14. A REVIEW ON PARENTERAL CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Agrawal et al

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The parenteral administration route is the most effective and common form of delivery for active drug substances with poor bioavailability and the drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Drug delivery technology that can reduce the total number of injection throughout the drug therapy period will be truly advantageous not only in terms of compliance, but also to improve the quality of the therapy and also may reduce the dosage frequency. Such reduction in frequency of drug dosing is achieved by the use of specific formulation technologies that guarantee the release of the active drug substance in a slow and predictable manner. The development of new injectable drug delivery system has received considerable attention over the past few years. A number of technological advances have been made in the area of parenteral drug delivery leading to the development of sophisticated systems that allow drug targeting and the sustained or controlled release of parenteral medicines.

  15. Lipoidal Soft Hybrid Biocarriers of Supramolecular Construction for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Gurmeet; Singh, Mankaran; Rathore, Mahendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-based innovations have achieved new heights during the last few years as an essential component of drug development. The current challenge of drug delivery is liberation of drug agents at the right time in a safe and reproducible manner to a specific target site. A number of novel drug delivery systems has emerged encompassing various routes of administration, to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery. Microparticulate lipoidal vesicular system represents a unique technology platform suitable for the oral and systemic administration of a wide variety of molecules with important therapeutic biological activities, including drugs, genes, and vaccine antigens. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. Also, novel lipid carrier-mediated vesicular systems are originated. This paper has focused on the lipid-based supramolecular vesicular carriers that are used in various drug delivery and drug targeting systems. PMID:22888455

  16. Protein nanoparticle: A unique system as drug delivery vehicles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    . ... contributions in the field of protein nanoparticles used as drug delivery systems. .... tic guidance. ..... response of cytoskeletal organization and adhesion ..... Helicobacter Pylori Effect of Mucoadhesive Nanoparticles Bearing.

  17. Controlled drug delivery systems: past forward and future back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kinam

    2014-09-28

    Controlled drug delivery technology has progressed over the last six decades. This progression began in 1952 with the introduction of the first sustained release formulation. The 1st generation of drug delivery (1950-1980) focused on developing oral and transdermal sustained release systems and establishing controlled drug release mechanisms. The 2nd generation (1980-2010) was dedicated to the development of zero-order release systems, self-regulated drug delivery systems, long-term depot formulations, and nanotechnology-based delivery systems. The latter part of the 2nd generation was largely focused on studying nanoparticle formulations. The Journal of Controlled Release (JCR) has played a pivotal role in the 2nd generation of drug delivery technologies, and it will continue playing a leading role in the next generation. The best path towards a productive 3rd generation of drug delivery technology requires an honest, open dialog without any preconceived ideas of the past. The drug delivery field needs to take a bold approach to designing future drug delivery formulations primarily based on today's necessities, to produce the necessary innovations. The JCR provides a forum for sharing the new ideas that will shape the 3rd generation of drug delivery technology.

  18. Microneedle-iontophoresis combinations for enhanced transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Garland, Martin J; Alkilani, Ahlam Zaid

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the combination of skin barrier impairment using microneedles (MNs) coupled with iontophoresis (ITP) may broaden the range of drugs suitable for transdermal delivery as well as enabling the rate of delivery to be achieved with precise electronic control. However, few reports exist on the combination of ITP with in situ drug-loaded polymeric MN delivery systems. Our in vitro permeation studies revealed that MN enhances transdermal drug delivery. The combination of dissolving MN and ITP did not further enhance the extent of delivery of the low molecular weight drug ibuprofen sodium after short application periods. However, the extent of peptide/protein delivery was significantly enhanced when ITP was used in combination with hydrogel-forming MN arrays. As such, hydrogel-forming MN arrays show promise for the electrically controlled transdermal delivery of biomacromolecules in a simple, one-step approach, though further technical developments will be necessary before patient benefit is realized.

  19. Lipid formulation as a drug carrier for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomii, Yoshifumi

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a Drug Delivery System (DDS), a preparative approach attracts the attention in the development of new drugs. DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs by an applicable use of drug preparation technologies. A conventional intravenous dosage form of Amphotericin B (AmB), Fungizone, is the most effective clinically available for treating fungal infections. However, the clinical efficacy of AmB is limited by its adverse effects. Several lipid formulations, such as Liposomal AmB (L-AmB), AmB lipid complex (ABLC), and AmB colloidal dispersion (ABCD), with reduced side effects have been developed. These formulations are reported to have excellent safety and efficacy. However, comparable efficacy can be achieved only when they are administered at high doses than AmB. One of the problems of using these formulations is that they are easily taken up by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). An artificial lipoprotein-like particles, a novel drug carrier Lipid Nano-Sphere (LNS), which is 25 - 50 nm in size and is composed of phospholipids and simple lipid. LNS show a higher plasma concentration of drugs and lower uptake by RES-tissue different forms other lipid base drug carriers. In vitro and in vivo, LNS incorporating AmB, NS-718, shows reduced toxicity, while maintaining activity against fungi. LNS have a unique characteristic as an effective carrier of AmB for treatment of fungal infection.

  20. Drug delivery by organ-specific immunoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Mori, Atsuhide; Hunag, Leaf (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry); Kennel, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies highly specific to the mouse pulmonary endothelial cells were conjugated to liposomes. The resulting immunoliposomes showed high levels of lung accumulation when injected intravenously into mice. Optimal target binding and retention were achieved if the lipid composition included ganglioside GM{sub 1} to reduce the uptake of immunoliposomes by the reticuloendothelial system. Details of the construction and optimization of these organ-specific immunoliposomes are reviewed. The drug delivery potential of this novel liposome system was demonstrated in an experimental pulmonary metastasis model. Immunoliposomes containing a lipophilic prodrug of deoxyfluorouridine effectively prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. This and other therapeutic applications of the immunoliposomes are discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Andrés M; Doukas, Apostolos G; Farinelli, William A

    2016-01-01

    , potentially due to insufficient drug uptake in deeper skin layers. This study sought to investigate a standardized method to actively fill laser-generated channels by altering pressure, vacuum, and pressure (PVP), enquiring its effect on (i) relative filling of individual laser channels; (ii) cutaneous...... deposition and delivery kinetics; (iii) biodistribution and diffusion pattern, estimated by mathematical simulation. METHODS: Franz diffusion chambers (FCs) were used to evaluate the PVP-technique, comparing passive (AFXL) and active (AFXL + PVP) channel filling. A fractional CO2-laser generated superficial...... (225 µm;17.5 mJ/channel) and deep (1200 µm; 130.5 mJ/channel) channels, and PVP was delivered as a 3-minutes cycle of 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm), 1 minute vacuum (-1.0 atm), and 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm). Filling of laser channels was visualized with a colored biomarker liquid (n = 12 FCs, n = 588...

  2. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip; Polsky, Ronen; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2017-08-22

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a^ device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  3. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip

    2017-08-29

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  4. Sublingual Drug Delivery: An Extensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar Vats

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand of fast disintegrating tablets has been growing during the last decade, due to the characteristics of fast disintegrating sublingual tablets for the potential emergency treatment. In terms of permeability, the sublingual area of the oral cavity (i.e, the floor of the mouth is more permeable than the buccal (cheek area, which in turn is more permeable than the palatal (roof of the mouth. Drug delivery through the oral mucous membrane is considered to be a promising alternative to the oral route. Fast disintegrating sublingual tablets may lead to significant improvements over current treatment options for specific patient group, for instance pediatric and geriatric patients. This review highlights the mechanism of sublingual absorption, factors affecting sublingual absorption, formulation techniques, types of sublingual tablets, advantages, evaluation parameters and commercially available sublingual dosage forms.

  5. Supramolecular hydrogels as drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Roya Mahdavi

    2015-04-01

    Drug delivery from a hydrogel carrier implanted under the kidney capsule is an innovative way to induce kidney tissue regeneration and/or prevent kidney inflammation or fibrosis. We report here on the development of supramolecular hydrogels for this application. Chain-extended hydrogelators containing hydrogen bonding units in the main chain, and bifunctional hydrogelators end-functionalized with hydrogen bonding moieties, were made. The influence of these hydrogels on the renal cortex when implanted under the kidney capsule was studied. The overall tissue response to these hydrogels was found to be mild, and minimal damage to the cortex was observed, using the infiltration of macrophages, formation of myofibroblasts, and the deposition of collagen III as relevant read-out parameters. Differences in tissue response to these hydrogels could be related to the different physico-chemical properties of the three hydrogels.

  6. Development of Wax-Incorporated Emulsion Gel Beads for the Encapsulation and Intragastric Floating Delivery of the Active Antioxidant from Tamarindus indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitthiphong Soradech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L. seed extracts with potential antioxidant activity and toxicity to cancer cells were developed as functional foods and nutraceutical ingredients in the form of emulsion gel beads. Three extracts were obtained from ethanol and water: TSCH50, TSCH95 and TSCH. All extracts exhibited high potential for superoxide anion scavenging activity over the IC50 range < 5–11 µg/mL and had no toxic effects on normal cells, however, the water extract (TSCH was the most effective due to its free radical scavenging activity and toxicity in mitochondrial membranes of cancer cells. Next a study was designed to develop a new formulation for encapsulation and intragastric floating delivery of tamarind seed extract (TSCH using wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads, which were prepared using a modified ionotropic gelation technique. Tamarind seed extract at 1% (w/w was used as the active ingredient in all formulations. The effect of the types and amounts of wax on the encapsulation efficiency and percentage of the active release of alginate gel beads was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the incorporation of both waxes into the gel beads had an effect on the percentage of encapsulation efficiency (% and the percentage of the active ingredient release. Furthermore, the addition of water insoluble waxes (carnauba and bee wax significantly retarded the release of the active ingredient. The addition of both waxes had a slight effect on drug release behavior. Nevertheless, the increase in incorporated waxes in all formulations could sustain the percentage of active ingredient release. In conclusion, wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads using a modified ionotropic gelation technique could be applied for the intragastric floating delivery and controlled release of functional food and nutraceutical products for their antioxidant and anticancer capacity.

  7. Development of Wax-Incorporated Emulsion Gel Beads for the Encapsulation and Intragastric Floating Delivery of the Active Antioxidant from Tamarindus indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soradech, Sitthiphong; Petchtubtim, Intira; Thongdon-A, Jeerayu; Muangman, Thanchanok

    2016-03-22

    In this study, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed extracts with potential antioxidant activity and toxicity to cancer cells were developed as functional foods and nutraceutical ingredients in the form of emulsion gel beads. Three extracts were obtained from ethanol and water: TSCH50, TSCH95 and TSCH. All extracts exhibited high potential for superoxide anion scavenging activity over the IC50 range extract (TSCH) was the most effective due to its free radical scavenging activity and toxicity in mitochondrial membranes of cancer cells. Next a study was designed to develop a new formulation for encapsulation and intragastric floating delivery of tamarind seed extract (TSCH) using wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads, which were prepared using a modified ionotropic gelation technique. Tamarind seed extract at 1% (w/w) was used as the active ingredient in all formulations. The effect of the types and amounts of wax on the encapsulation efficiency and percentage of the active release of alginate gel beads was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the incorporation of both waxes into the gel beads had an effect on the percentage of encapsulation efficiency (%) and the percentage of the active ingredient release. Furthermore, the addition of water insoluble waxes (carnauba and bee wax) significantly retarded the release of the active ingredient. The addition of both waxes had a slight effect on drug release behavior. Nevertheless, the increase in incorporated waxes in all formulations could sustain the percentage of active ingredient release. In conclusion, wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads using a modified ionotropic gelation technique could be applied for the intragastric floating delivery and controlled release of functional food and nutraceutical products for their antioxidant and anticancer capacity.

  8. Controlled drug delivery systems towards new frontiers in patient care

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Filippo; Masi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview of controlled drug delivery systems, covering the most important innovative applications. The principles of controlled drug release and the mechanisms involved in controlled release are clearly explained. The various existing polymeric drug delivery systems are reviewed, and new frontiers in material design are examined in detail, covering a wide range of polymer modification techniques. The concluding chapter is a case study focusing on use of a drug-eluting stent. The book is designed to provide the reader with a complete understanding of the mechanisms and design of controlled drug delivery systems, and to this end includes numerous step-by-step tutorials. It illustrates how chemical engineers can advance medical care by designing polymeric delivery systems that achieve either temporal or spatial control of drug delivery and thus ensure more effective therapy that eliminates the potential for both under-and overdosing.

  9. Biodegradable Polymeric Nanoparticles as the Delivery Carrier for Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Li, Dan; Shi, Ci; Ma, Xueling; Rong, Guangu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xiaohua; Sun, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Drug research and development has entered into the new epoch of innovation formulation, and the drug delivery system has been in the forefront of pharmaceutical innovation. Nanotechnology is widely used in fiber and textiles, electronics, space, agriculture, forensic science and medical therapeutics. It increasingly plays a significant role in drug delivery system. Compared with traditional delivery system, the nanoparticle drug delivery system has lots of merits, such as the high drug loading ability, the excellent biocompatibility, low toxicity, controlled and targeted drug release. We undertook a structured research of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles used as delivery carrier for drug using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. We have searched the bibliographic databases for peerreviewed research literature. The outstanding characteristics of the screened papers were described respectively, and a systematic content analysis methodology was used to analysis the findings. Seventy-three papers were included in the review, the majority defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the polymeric nanoparticles as the delivery carrier for drug in therapeutic applications and developments. Seven papers outlined the superiority characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles that applied in the field of vaccine. Forty-seven papers overviewed the application prospects of polymeric nanoparticles used as drug delivery carrier for cancer. These included current advances in research and clinical applications of polymeric nanoparticles. The review identified the drug delivery carrier of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles, and we described the synthesis methods, applications and challenges of polymeric nanoparticles. The findings of this review identified that the biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles were used as delivery carrier for drug currently. It also indicates that the biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles play an

  10. RECENT ADVANCEMENT OF LIPID DRUG CONJUGATE AS NANOPARTICULATE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Jyoti Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology by manipulation of characteristics of materials such as polymers and fabrication of nanostructures is able to provide superior drug delivery systems for better management and treatment of diseases. The nanostructures employed as drug delivery systems have multiple advantages which make them superior to conventional delivery systems. Nanotechnology is one approach to overcome challenges of conventional drug delivery systems based on the development and fabrication of nanostructures. Some challenges associated with the technology as it relates to drug effectiveness, toxicity, stability and pharmacokinetics and drug regulatory control. Nanotechnology is a welcome development that is set to transform drug delivery and drug supply chain management, if optimally developed. Lipid Drug Conjugates (LDCs are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Due to their unique size dependent properties, lipid nanoparticles offer possibility to develop new therapeutics. The ability to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers offers a new prototype in drug delivery that could use for drug targeting. Hence lipid drug conjugates hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. Solid lipid nanoparticle technology represents a promising new approach to lipophile drug delivery.

  11. Design and evaluation of a gastroretentive drug delivery system for metformin HCl using synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Gorajana, Adinaravyana; Dharmanlingam, Senthil Rajan; Kolapalli, Venkata Ramana Murthy

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present research was to prepare and evaluate a gastroretentive drug delivery system for metformin HCl, using synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers. The floating approach was applied for preparing gastroretentive tablets (GRT) and these tablets were manufactured by the direct compression method. The drug delivery system comprises of synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers such as polyethylene oxide and Carboxymethyl ethyl cellulose (CMEC) as release-retarding polymers. GRT were evaluated for physico-chemical properties like weight variation, hardness, assay friability, in vitro floating behaviour, swelling studies, in vitro dissolution studies and rate order kinetics. Based upon the drug release and floating properties, two formulations (MP04 & MC03) were selected as optimized formulations. The optimized formulations MP04 and MC03 followed zero order rate kinetics, with non-Fickian diffusion and first order rate kinetics with erosion mechanism, respectively. The optimized formulation was characterised with FTIR studies and it was observed that there was no interaction between the drug and polymers.

  12. Nasal and buccal drug delivery: management forum conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John D

    2012-07-01

    The scope of the conference (Nasal and Buccal Drug Delivery Conference, Management Forum; Chairs Franz Merkus and Julie Suman) was to consider innovations in drug delivery via the nose and oral cavity, notably for the delivery of vaccines, antimalarials and rapidly acting sedatives. Presentations from experts from academia, government agencies and commercial organisations were made over the 2 days. The advantages of both routes were ease of application, patient acceptability and no requirement to produce sterile products. These routes worked best for drugs that are water soluble--but with some lipophilicity--only require low doses, are acceptable to the patient and have low irritancy (particulary for the nasal route). Challenges relate to the effectiveness of deposition from the delivery systems and the efficient clearance mechanisms. It was concluded that for many drugs, buccal and nasal delivery could become the route of choice for their application; vaccines, in particular, appear to show promise for nasal delivery.

  13. Acoustic behavior of microbubbles and implications for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooiman, K.; Vos, H.J.; Versluis, M.; Jong, de N.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are valuable in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, and they increasingly show potential for drug delivery. This review focuses on the acoustic behavior of flexible-coated microbubbles and rigid-coated microcapsules and their contribution to enhanced drug delivery. Phenomena re

  14. REVIEW ON ADVANCES IN COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunena Sethi, SL Harikumar* and Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The colon is the terminal part of the GIT which has gained in recent years as a potential site for delivery of various novel therapeutic drugs, i.e. peptides. However, colon is rich in microflora which can be used to target the drug release in the colon. Colon is a site where both local and systemic drug delivery can take place. Local delivery allows the topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. If drug can be targeted directly into the colon, treatment can become more effective and side effects can be minimized. These systemic side effects can be minimized by primary approaches for CDDS (Colon specific drug delivery namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems and microbially triggered system which gained limited success and have limitations as compared with recently new CDDS namely pressure controlled colon delivery capsules (PCDCS, CODESTM (Novel colon targeted delivery system osmotic controlled drug delivery system, Pulsincap system, time clock system, chronotropic system. This review is to understand the pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems for better therapeutic action without compromising on drug degradation (or its low bioavailability.

  15. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Ordikhani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  16. Clinical applications of biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, Pablo; Miranda, Oscar R; Clayton, Kevin; Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of devices to micrometer and nanometer scales, combined with the use of biocompatible and functional materials, has created new opportunities for the implementation of drug delivery systems. Advances in biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery platforms promise a new generation of capabilities for the treatment of acute conditions and chronic illnesses, which require high adherence to treatment, in which temporal control over the pharmacokinetic profiles is critical. In addition, clinical conditions that require a combination of drugs with specific pharmacodynamic profiles and local delivery will benefit from drug delivery microdevices. This review provides a summary of various clinical applications for state-of-the-art controlled drug delivery microdevices, including cancer, endocrine and ocular disorders, and acute conditions such as hemorrhagic shock. Regulatory considerations for clinical translation of drug delivery microdevices are also discussed. Drug delivery microdevices promise a remarkable gain in clinical outcomes and a substantial social impact. A review of articles covering the field of microdevices for drug delivery was performed between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine.

  17. Biological studies of matrix metalloproteinase sensitive drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann

    due to severe side effects as a result of drug distribution to healthy tissues. To enhance ecacy of treatment and improve life quality of patients, tumor specific drug delivery strategies, such as liposome encapsulated drugs, which accumulate in tumor tissue, has gained increased attention. Several...... for delivery of drugs to specific tissues or cells utilizing biological knowledge of cancer tissue is getting increased attention. In this thesis a novel matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) sensitive poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) coated liposomal drug delivery system for treatment of cancer was developed...... the use of MMP- 2 as a trigger for liposomal activation in tumor tissue. Thus, this new strategy provides a promising system for specific delivery of encapsulated drugs and controlled release in tumor tissues, resulting in enhanced drug bioavailability and decreased systemic side effects. In addition, we...

  18. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  19. An Overview on Osmotic Controlled Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thummar A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews constructed drug delivery systems applying osmotic principles for controlled drugrelease from the formulation. Osmotic devices which are tablets coated with walls of controlled porosityare the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. In contrast to commontablets, these pumps provide constant (zero order drug release rate. When these systems are exposed towater, low levels of water soluble additive is leached from polymeric material i.e. semipermeablemembrane and drug releases in a controlled manner over an extended period of time. The main clinicalbenefits of oral osmotic drug delivery system are their ability to improve treatment tolerability andpatient compliance. These advantages are mainly driven by the capacity to deliver drugs in a sustainedmanner, independent of the drug chemical properties, of the patient’s physiological factors or followingfood intake. This review brings out the theoretical concept of drug delivery, history, advantages anddisadvantages of the delivery systems, types of oral osmotic drug delivery systems, factors affecting thedrug delivery system and marketed products.

  20. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  1. Nanobiotechnology and its applications in drug delivery system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Khan, Momin; Umar, Muhammad Naveed; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    Nanobiotechnology holds great potential in various regimes of life sciences. In this review, the potential applications of nanobiotechnology in various sectors of nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine and nanobiopharmaceuticals, are highlighted. To overcome the problems associated with drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained increasing interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different biological properties and compositions have been extensively investigated for drug delivery applications. Nanoparticles fabricated through various techniques have elevated therapeutic efficacy, provided stability to the drugs and proved capable of targeting the cells and controlled release inside the cell. Polymeric nanoparticles have shown increased development and usage in drug delivery as well as in diagnostics in recent decades.

  2. Novel chemical permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery has been accepted as a potential non-invasive route of drug administration, with advantages of prolonged therapeutic action, decreased side effect, easy use and better patient compliance. However, development of transdermal products is primarily hindered by the low permeability of the skin. To overcome this barrier effect, numerous new chemicals have been synthesized as potential permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery. In this review, we presented an overview of the investigations in this field, and further implications on selection or design of suitable permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery were also discussed.

  3. Gastro-retentive drug delivery systems and their in vivo success: A recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar Mandal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-retentive drug delivery system (GRDDS has gained immense popularity in the field of oral drug delivery recently. It is a widely employed approach to retain the dosage form in the stomach for an extended period of time and release the drug slowly that can address many challenges associated with conventional oral delivery, including poor bioavailability. Different innovative approaches like magnetic field assisted gastro-retention, plug type swelling system, muco-adhesion technique, floating system with or without effervescence are being applied to fabricate GRDDS. Apart from in vitro characterization, successful GRDDS development demands well designed in vivo study to establish enhanced gastro-retention and prolonged drug release. Gama scintigraphy and MRI are popular techniques to evaluate in vivo gastric residence time. However, checking of their overall in-vivo efficacy still remains a major challenge for this kind of dosage form, especially in small animals like mice or rat. Reported in vivo studies with beagle dogs, rabbits, and human subjects are only a handful in spite of a large number of encouraging in vitro results. In spite of the many advantages, high subject variations in gastrointestinal physiological condition, effect of food, and variable rate of gastric emptying time are the challenges that limit the number of available GRDDS in the market. This review article highlights the in vivo works of GRDDS carried out in the recent past, including their limitations and challenges that need to be overcome in the near future.

  4. Fabrication and loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh

    is achieved. Characterization of spin coating of drug-polymer films is thoroughly performed using microscopy, profilometry, differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and microdissolution release tests. These films are applied for loading of microcontainers. Furosemide which......Oral drug delivery is considered as the most patient compliant delivery route. However, it faces many obstacles, especially due to the ever-increasing number of drugs that are poorly soluble and barely absorbed in the gastro-intestinal tract. Moreover, drugs can degrade in the harsh acidic...... environment of stomach before they reach the intestine. These issues lead to reduced bioavailability of active ingredients. To combat that novel oral drug delivery systems have been developed. Some of these systems that have gained significant interest in this field are reservoir based drug delivery...

  5. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias J. Cardoso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine.

  6. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Diego-Taboada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine, made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine, composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell.

  7. Advances and Challenges of Liposome Assisted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eSercombe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of liposomes to assist drug delivery has already had a major impact on many biomedical areas. They have been shown to be beneficial for stabilizing therapeutic compounds, overcoming obstacles to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of compounds to target sites in vivo. This enables effective delivery of encapsulated compounds to target sites while minimizing systemic toxicity. Liposomes present as an attractive delivery system due to their flexible physicochemical and biophysical properties, which allow easy manipulation to address different delivery considerations. Despite considerable research in the last 50 years and the plethora of positive results in preclinical studies, the clinical translation of liposome assisted drug delivery platforms has progressed incrementally. In this review, we will discuss the advances in liposome assisted drug delivery, biological challenges that still remain, and current clinical and experimental use of liposomes for biomedical applications. The translational obstacles of liposomal technology will also be presented.

  8. Cubosomes and hexosomes as versatile platforms for drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mat Azmi, Intan Diana Binti; Moghimi, Seyed M; Yaghmur, Anan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases are attractive platforms for drug solubilization and targeted delivery. The attractiveness of this formulation principle is linked to the nanostructural versatility, compatiblity, digestiblity and bioadhesive properties of their lipid constituents......, and the capability of solubilizing and sustaining the release of amphiphilic, hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases offer two distinct promising strategies in the development of drug delivery systems. These comprise formation of ISAsomes (internally self-assembled 'somes...

  9. Orodispersible tablets: A new trend in drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Paramita; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2010-01-01

    The most common and preferred route of drug administration is through the oral route. Orodispersible tablets are gaining importance among novel oral drug-delivery system as they have improved patient compliance and have some additional advantages compared to other oral formulation. They are also solid unit dosage forms, which disintegrate in the mouth within a minute in the presence of saliva due to super disintegrants in the formulation. Thus this type of drug delivery helps a proper peroral...

  10. SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES: AN ADVANCED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Raghu Nandan Reddy* and Arshia Shariff

    2013-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery, research and clinical medicine, as well as in other varied sciences. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) dispersions have been proposed as a new type of colloidal drug carrier system suitable for intravenous administration. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) technology represents a promising new approach to lipophilic drug delivery. Solid lipid nanopa...

  11. Biomaterial-Derived Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Enteric Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Diane Render; Temesgen Samuel; Howard King; Madan Vig; Shaik Jeelani; Ramapuram Jayachandra Babu; Vijaya Rangari

    2016-01-01

    Oral drug delivery systems provide the most convenient, noninvasive, readily acceptable alternatives to parenteral systems. In the current work, eggshell-derived calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles were used to develop enteric drug delivery system in the form of tablets. CaCO3 nanoparticles were manufactured using top-down ball-milling method and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and loaded with 5-fluorouracil as a model drug. Tablets w...

  12. GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: STOMACH SPECIFIC MUCOADHESIVE TABLET

    OpenAIRE

    Siddhapara Mihir; Tikare Vijay; Ramana MV; Sutariya Bhavesh; Vaghasiya Bhavesh

    2011-01-01

    The current article focuses on the principles of mucoadhesive drug delivery systems based on adhesion to biological surfaces that are covered by mucus. Bioadhesion can be defined as the process by which a natural or a synthetic polymer can adhere to a biological substrate. When the biological substrate is a mucosal layer then the phenomena is known as mucoadhesion. Drug actions can be improved by developing new drug delivery systems, such as the mucoadhesive system. These systems remain in cl...

  13. Cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian T; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-12-28

    Nanoparticles can preferentially accumulate at sites of action and hold great promise to improve the therapeutic index of many drugs. While conventional methods of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery have focused on primarily synthetic approaches, engineering strategies that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials have recently gained much attention. In particular, cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles are a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine the unique functionalities of cellular membranes and engineering versatility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective delivery of therapeutic agents. Herein, we report on the recent progress on cell membrane-coated nanoparticles for drug delivery. In particular, we highlight three areas: (i) prolonging systemic circulation via cell membrane coating, (ii) cell-specific targeting via cell membrane coating, and (iii) applications of cell membrane coating for drug delivery. The cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticle platform has emerged as a novel delivery strategy with the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of a variety of diseases.

  14. Asymmetrical Polymer Vesicles for Drug delivery and Other Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientists have been attracted by polymersomes as versatile drug delivery systems since the last two decades. Polymersomes have the potential to be versatile drug delivery systems because of their tunable membrane formulations, stabilities in vivo, various physicochemical properties, controlled release mechanisms, targeting abilities, and capacities to encapsulate a wide range of drugs and other molecules. Asymmetrical polymersomes are nano- to micro-sized polymeric capsules with asymmetrical membranes, which means, they have different outer and inner coronas so that they can exhibit better endocytosis rate and endosomal escape ability than other polymeric systems with symmetrical membranes. Hence, asymmetrical polymersomes are highly promising as self-assembled nano-delivery systems in the future for in vivo therapeutics delivery and diagnostic imaging applications. In this review, we prepared a summary about recent research progresses of asymmetrical polymersomes in the following aspects: synthesis, preparation, applications in drug delivery and others.

  15. Elastin-like recombinamers as smart drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Arias, F; Santos, Mercedes; Ibáñez-Fonseca, Arturo; Piña, Maria Jesús; Serrano, Sofía

    2016-01-31

    Drug delivery systems that are able to control site and rate release of bioactive molecules are of particular interest for tissue therapy. Systems comprising biocompatible materials that can respond to environmental stimuli include elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), a class of proteinaceous polymers bioinspired by natural elastin, which are especially useful as advanced drug delivery systems in the biomedical field. This review brings together information concerning different versions of ELR-based delivery systems that allow targeted delivery. ELR-drug systems in their monomeric form as well as drug encapsulation by nanoparticle-forming ELRs will be reviewed, focusing later on these drug carriers in which smart release is triggered by pH or temperature with a particular interest on cancer treatments. Systems for controlled drug release based on depots and hydrogels that act both as a support and reservoir in which drugs can be stored will be described, and their applications in drug delivery discussed. Finally, smart drug-delivery systems not based on ELRs, including those comprising proteins, synthetic polymers and non-polymeric systems, will also be briefly discussed.

  16. Preparation and In vitro evaluation of a stomach specific drug delivery system based on superporous hydrogel composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H V Chavda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses efforts made to design drug-delivery system based on superporous hydrogel composite for sustained delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride. The characterization studies involve measurement of apparent density, porosity, swelling studies, mechanical strength studies, and scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic images clearly showed the formation of interconnected pores, capillary channels, and the cross-linked sodium carboxymethylcellulose molecules around the peripheries of pores. The prepared system floated and delivered the ranitidine hydrochloride for about 17 h. The release profile of ranitidine hydrochloride was studies by changing the retardant polymer in the system. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the dissolution profiles were fitted to different mathematical models that include zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, Hixson-Crowell, Korsmeyer-Peppas, Weibull, and Hopfenberg models. The in vitro dissolution from system was explained by Korsmeyer-Peppas model. The diffusion exponent values in Korsmeyer-Peppas model range between 0.48±0.01 and 0.70±0.01, which appears to indicate an anomalous non-Fickian transport. It is concluded that the proposed mechanically stable floating drug-delivery system based on superporous hydrogel composite containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose as a composite material is promising for stomach specific delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride.

  17. Microneedle technologies for (trans)dermal drug and vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maaden, Koen; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke

    2012-07-20

    Microneedles have been used for the dermal and transdermal delivery of a broad range of drugs, such as small molecular weight drugs, oligonucleotides, DNA, peptides, proteins and inactivated viruses. However, until now there are no microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery systems on the market. In the past decade various types of microneedles have been developed by a number of production processes. Numerous geometries of microneedles have been designed from various materials. These microneedles have been used for different approaches of microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery. Following a brief introduction about dermal and transdermal drug delivery, this review describes different production methods for solid and hollow microneedles as well as conditions that influence skin penetration. Besides, the four microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery approaches are discussed: "poke and flow", "poke and patch", "poke and release", and "coat and poke". A separate section of this review is devoted to the use of microneedles for the delivery of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. Finally, we give our view on research and development that is needed to render microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery technologies clinically useful in the near future.

  18. Pectin-based colon-specific drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon-specific drug delivery have a great importance in the delivery of drugs for the treatment of local colonic, as well as systemic diseases like Crohn′s disease, ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, amoebiasis, asthma, arthritis and inflammation which can be achieved by targeted delivery of drug to colon. Specific systemic absorption in the colon gave interesting possibilities for the delivery of protein and peptides. It contains relatively less proteolytic enzyme activities in the colon compared to the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Recommended treatments included the administration of anti-inflammatory drugs, chemotherapeutic agents and antibiotics which must be released in the colon. Pectin is a naturally occurring polysaccharide has in recent years gained increasingly in importance in advance drug delivery. It was employed in pharmaceutical industry, health promotion and treatment. Owing to its gelling properties it has been used potentially as a carrier for drug delivery to the GIT, such as matrix tablets, gel beads, film-coated dose form. This review will discuss the important chemistry and general properties of pectin, its gel formation mechanism properties and its uses in novel drug delivery to the colon.

  19. Bioavailability of phytochemicals and its enhancement by drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Vadhanam, Manicka V

    2013-06-28

    Issues of poor oral bioavailability of cancer chemopreventives have hindered progress in cancer prevention. Novel delivery systems that modulate the pharmacokinetics of existing drugs, such as nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, niosomes, liposomes and implants, could be used to enhance the delivery of chemopreventive agents to target sites. The development of new approaches in prevention and treatment of cancer could encompass new delivery systems for approved and newly investigated compounds. In this review, we discuss some of the delivery approaches that have already made an impact by either delivering a drug to target tissue or increasing its bioavailability by many fold.

  20. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huile Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood–brain tumor barrier (BBTB, and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed.

  1. A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rompicharla Bhargavi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile drug delivery systems are gaining popularity in the field of pharmaceutical formulation, research and development. The prime advantage in this drug delivery is that the drug is released as per the pathophysiological need of the disease. As a result the change of development of drug resistance which is seen in conventional and sustained released formulations can be reduced. This therapy is mainly applicable where sustained action is not required and the drugs are toxic. Basic point of development of this formulation is to find out the circadian rhythms that is a suitable indicator that will trigger the release of drug from the device. Clock genes are the genes that control the circadian rhythms in human physiology. Pulsatile drug delivery systems are promising incase of asthma, cardiovascular diseases, peptic ulcers, arthritis, and hypercholesterolemic conditions.

  2. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  3. Colloidal drug delivery systems: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview an extensive range of colloidal drug delivery systems with special focus on vesicular and particulates systems that are being used in research or might be potentially useful as carriers systems for drug or active biomolecules or as cell carriers with application in the therapeutic field. We present some important examples of commercially available drug delivery systems with applications in research or in clinical fields. This class of systems is widely used due to excellent drug targeting, sustained and controlled release behavior, higher entrapment efficiency of drug molecules, prevention of drug hydrolysis or enzymatic degradation, and improvement of therapeutic efficacy. These characteristics help in the selection of suitable carrier systems for drug, cell, and gene delivery in different fields.

  4. Micro fabrication of biodegradable polymer drug delivery devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagstrup, Johan

    The pharmaceutical industry is presently facing several obstacles in developing oral drug delivery systems. This is primarily due to the nature of the discovered drug candidates. The discovered drugs often have poor solubility and low permeability across the gastro intestinal epithelium. Furtherm...... the developed devices. Additionally, it has been shown that it is possible to control the release of drug by adding polymeric coatings........ Furthermore, they are often degraded before they can be absorbed. The result is low bioavailability of the drugs. To overcome these challenges, better drug delivery systems need to be developed. Recently, micro systems have emerged as promising candidates to solve the challenges of poor solubility, low...... permeability and degradation. These systems are for the majority based on traditional materials used in micro technology, such as SU-8, silicon, poly(methyl methacrylate). The next step in developing these new drug delivery systems is to replace classical micro fabrication materials with biodegradable polymers...

  5. Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xue; Zhang, Hui; Dou, Liguang

    2014-01-01

    Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS). In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i) DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii) DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii) DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed. PMID:24940733

  6. Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS. In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed.

  7. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development......The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...

  8. Recent advances of cocktail chemotherapy by combination drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Gu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Combination chemotherapy is widely exploited for enhanced cancer treatment in the clinic. However, the traditional cocktail administration of combination regimens often suffers from varying pharmacokinetics among different drugs. The emergence of nanotechnology offers an unparalleled opportunity for developing advanced combination drug delivery strategies with the ability to encapsulate various drugs simultaneously and unify the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This review surveys the most recent advances in combination delivery of multiple small molecule chemotherapeutics using nanocarriers. The mechanisms underlying combination chemotherapy, including the synergistic, additive and potentiation effects, are also discussed with typical examples. We further highlight the sequential and site-specific co-delivery strategies, which provide new guidelines for development of programmable combination drug delivery systems. Clinical outlook and challenges are also discussed in the end.

  9. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  10. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  11. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes.

  12. Cyclodextrin nanoassemblies: a promising tool for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Véronique; Gervaise, Cédric; Djedaïni-Pilard, Florence; Furlan, Aurélien; Sarazin, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Among the biodegradable and nontoxic compounds that can form nanoparticles for drug delivery, amphiphilic cyclodextrins are very promising. Apart from ionic cyclodextrins, which have been extensively studied and reviewed because of their application in gene delivery, our purpose is to provide a clear description of the supramolecular assemblies of nonionic amphiphilic cyclodextrins, which can form nanoassemblies for controlled drug release. Moreover, we focus on the relationship between their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which is crucial for self assembly and drug delivery. We also highlight the importance of the nanoparticle technology preparation for the stability and application of this nanodevice.

  13. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  14. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  15. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  16. Assessing the viability of microsponges as gastro retentive drug delivery system of curcumin: optimization and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Priyanka; Pathak, Kamla

    2014-01-01

    The work was aimed to validate the gastroretentive potential of microsponges via optimization of targeted floating curcumin microsponges for improved site specific absorption for gastric cancer Modified quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method was used to formulate microsponges using 3(2) full factorial design. The effect of different levels of ethyl cellulose and polyvinyl alcohol concentration, selected as independent variables was determined on the % entrapment efficiency, % buoyancy and % cumulative drug release. Modified rosette rise apparatus was used for in vitro release and the release data best fitted Higuchi's model and mechanism of drug release was diffusion (n). The optimized formulation (MS5) demonstrated favourable % entrapment efficiency (90.7 ± 1.7), % buoyancy (82.0 ± 2.0) and % cumulative drug release (85.2 ± 1.07) with maximum desirability factor of 0.816. SEM revealed spherical and porous microsponges. DSC confirmed molecular dispersion of the drug in the microsponges polymeric matrix. DRIFT revealed no chemical interaction between the drug and polymer used. The in vitro permeation of curcumin through gastric mucin gel layer affirmed the capability of microsponges to deliver drug across mucin r and reach the target site to treat gastric cancer. Anticancer oral dose of microsponges was calculated as 50mg by cytotoxicity assay in human cancer cell line KB. The pharmacokinetic evaluation of MS5 in rabbits revealed 10-fold increase in bioavailability as compared to native curcumin, demonstrated the superiority of microsponges over native curcumin as gastro retentive drug delivery system. This study presents a new approach based on floating ability of microsponges for treatment of gastric cancer.

  17. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  18. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, E H; Lerche, C M; Erlendsson, A M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) facilitates delivery of topical methotrexate (MTX). This study investigates impact of laser-channel depth on topical MTX-delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MTX (1% [w/v]) diffused for 21 hours through AFXL-exposed porcine skin in in vitro......-thickness skin, biodistribution profiles at specific skin levels, and transdermal permeation. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize UVC-activated MTX-fluorescence (254 nm) and semi-quantify MTX distribution in skin. RESULTS: AFXL increased topical MTX-delivery (P ... of coagulation zones (6-47 μm, P ≥ 0.438). CONCLUSION: AFXL greatly increases topical MTX-delivery. Deeper MAZs deliver higher MTX-concentrations than superficial MAZs, which indicates that laser channel depth may be important for topical delivery of hydrophilic molecules. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:519-529, 2016...

  19. Kinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pararas, Erin E Leary; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Mescher, Mark J; Kim, Ernest S; McKenna, Michael J; Kujawa, Sharon G; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Sewell, William F

    2011-06-10

    Reciprocating drug delivery is a means of delivering soluble drugs directly to closed fluid spaces in the body via a single cannula without an accompanying fluid volume change. It is ideally suited for drug delivery into small, sensitive and unique fluid spaces such as the cochlea. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the scala tympani within the cochlea by measuring the effects of changes in flow parameters on the distribution of drug throughout the length of the cochlea. Distribution was assessed by monitoring the effects of DNQX, a reversible glutamate receptor blocker, delivered directly to the inner ear of guinea pigs using reciprocating flow profiles. We then modeled the effects of those parameters on distribution using both an iterative curve-fitting approach and a computational fluid dynamic model. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that reciprocating delivery distributes the drug into a volume in the base of the cochlea, and suggest that the primary determinant of distribution throughout more distal regions of the cochlea is diffusion. Increases in flow rate distributed the drug into a larger volume that extended more apically. Over short time courses (less than 2h), the apical extension, though small, significantly enhanced apically directed delivery of drug. Over longer time courses (>5h) or greater distances (>3mm), maintenance of drug concentration in the basal scala tympani may prove more advantageous for extending apical delivery than increases in flow rate. These observations demonstrate that this reciprocating technology is capable of providing controlled delivery kinetics to the closed fluid space in the cochlea, and may be suitable for other applications such as localized brain and retinal delivery.

  20. INTRANASAL LIPOSOMES : AN APPROACH FOR DRUG DELIVERY TO BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Jatin B. Trivedi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Targeting drug molecules to brain is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceuticalsciences. Drugs that are effective against diseases in the CNS and reach the brain via the bloodcompartment must pass the BBB. The blood-brain barrier (BBB represents an insurmountable obstaclefor a large number of drugs, including antibiotics, anti-neoplastic agents, and a variety of central nervoussystem (CNS-active drugs. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery ofdifferent drugs to this tissue which includes liposomes, colloidal drug carriers, micelles, chimericpeptide technology, intranasal and olfactory route of administration and nano technology. The discoveryof liposome or lipid vesicle emerged from self forming enclosed lipid bi-layer upon hydration; liposomedrug delivery systems have played a significant role in formulation of potent drug to improvetherapeutics Liposomes have been investigated as carriers of various pharmacologically active agentssuch as antineoplastic, antimicrobial drugs, chelating agents, steroids, vaccines, and genetic materials.Liposomes provide an efficient drug delivery system because they can alter the pharmacokinetics andpharmacodynamics of the entrapped drugs. Liposomes have been widely used for brain delivery in vivo.Nowadays, the nasal route for systemic drug delivery has gained great interest. It provides severaladvantages over other routes of drug administrations, which includes rapid absorption, avoids intestinaland hepatic presystemic disposition and high potential for drug transfer to the CSF. Moreover, the nasalroute is a potential alternative route for systemic availability of drugs restricted to intravenousadministration, viz. peptide and protein drugs and vaccines. As well, intranasal route has also beensuccessfully exploited for bypassing the blood brain barrier [BBB] and subsequently delivering drugmolecules to central nervous system [CNS].

  1. Magnetic microspheres as magical novel drug delivery system: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satinder Kakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic microspheres hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery. Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional radiation methods which uses highly penetrating radiations that is absorbed throughout the body. Its use is limited by toxicity and side effects. Now days, several targeted treatment systems including magnetic field, electric field, ultrasound, temperature, UV light and mechanical force are being used in many disease treatments (e.g. cancer, nerve damage, heart and artery, anti-diabetic, eye and other medical treatments. Among them, the magnetic targeted drug delivery system is one of the most attractive and promising strategy for delivering the drug to the specified site. Magnetically controlled drug targeting is one of the various possible ways of drug targeting. This technology is based on binding establish anticancer drug with ferrofluid that concentrate the drug in the area of interest (tumor site by means of magnetic fields. There has been keen interest in the development of a magnetically target drug delivery system. These drug delivery systems aim to deliver the drug at a rate directed by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the activity entity to the site of action. Magnetic microspheres were developed to overcome two major problems encountered in drug targeting namely: RES clearance and target site specificity.

  2. Recent advancement of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nityananda; Sahoo, Ranjan Ku; Biswas, Nikhil; Guha, Arijit; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2015-11-01

    Novel drug delivery system using nanoscale materials with a broad spectrum of applications provides a new therapeutic foundation for technological integration and innovation. Nanoparticles are suitable drug carrier for various routes of administration as well as rapid recognition by the immune system. Gelatin, the biological macromolecule is a versatile drug/vaccine delivery carrier in pharmaceutical field due to its biodegradable, biocompatible, non-antigenicity and low cost with easy availability. The surface of gelatin nanoparticles can be modified with site-specific ligands, cationized with amine derivatives or, coated with polyethyl glycols to achieve targeted and sustained release drug delivery. Compared to other colloidal carriers, gelatin nanoparticles are better stable in biological fluids to provide the desired controlled and sustained release of entrapped drug molecules. The current review highlights the different formulation aspects of gelatin nanoparticles which affect the particle characteristics like zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficacy and drug release properties. It has also given emphasis on the major applications of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery, gene delivery to target tissues and nutraceutical delivery for improving the poor bioavailabity of bioactive phytonutrients.

  3. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug’s water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye’s unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed.

  4. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems: microfabrication, drug delivery, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Woolfson, A David

    2010-05-01

    Many promising therapeutic agents are limited by their inability to reach the systemic circulation, due to the excellent barrier properties of biological membranes, such as the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin or the sclera/cornea of the eye and others. The outermost layer of the skin, the SC, is the principal barrier to topically-applied medications. The intact SC thus provides the main barrier to exogenous substances, including drugs. Only drugs with very specific physicochemical properties (molecular weight transdermally. Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecular agents of interest, including peptides, DNA, and small interfering RNA is problematic. Therefore, facilitation of drug penetration through the SC may involve by-pass or reversible disruption of SC molecular architecture. Microneedles (MNs), when used to puncture skin, will by-pass the SC and create transient aqueous transport pathways of micron dimensions and enhance the transdermal permeability. These micropores are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions, and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules. Various strategies have been employed by many research groups and pharmaceutical companies worldwide, for the fabrication of MNs. This review details various types of MNs, fabrication methods and, importantly, investigations of clinical safety of MN.

  5. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  6. A Microfluidic Ion Pump for In Vivo Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Uguz, Ilke

    2017-05-15

    Implantable devices offer an alternative to systemic delivery of drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders. A microfluidic ion pump (µFIP), capable of delivering a drug without the solvent through electrophoresis, is developed. The device is characterized in vitro by delivering γ-amino butyric acid to a target solution, and demonstrates low-voltage operation, high drug-delivery capacity, and high ON/OFF ratio. It is also demonstrated that the device is suitable for cortical delivery in vivo by manipulating the local ion concentration in an animal model and altering neural behavior. These results show that µFIPs represent a significant step forward toward the development of implantable drug-delivery systems.

  7. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  8. Review Article Ion-paired Drug Delivery: An Avenue for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-09

    Aug 9, 2011 ... application of ion paired system to delivery of drugs through various routes of ... octanol/water partition coefficient of the ion pairs ... Physical stability of these preparations .... complex was lyophilized and directly encapsulated.

  9. Carbon nanotubes for delivery of small molecule drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Bin Sheng; Yoong, Sia Lee; Jagusiak, Anna; Panczyk, Tomasz; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-12-01

    In the realm of drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have gained tremendous attention as promising nanocarriers, owing to their distinct characteristics, such as high surface area, enhanced cellular uptake and the possibility to be easily conjugated with many therapeutics, including both small molecules and biologics, displaying superior efficacy, enhanced specificity and diminished side effects. While most CNT-based drug delivery system (DDS) had been engineered to combat cancers, there are also emerging reports that employ CNTs as either the main carrier or adjunct material for the delivery of various non-anticancer drugs. In this review, the delivery of small molecule drugs is expounded, with special attention paid to the current progress of in vitro and in vivo research involving CNT-based DDSs, before finally concluding with some consideration on inevitable complications that hamper successful disease intervention with CNTs.

  10. Emerging Technologies of Polymeric Nanoparticles in Cancer Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Brewer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanomaterials have the potential to improve upon present chemotherapy delivery methods. They successfully reduce side effects while increasing dosage, increase residence time in the body, offer a sustained and tunable release, and have the ability to deliver multiple drugs in one carrier. However, traditional nanomaterial formulations have not produced highly therapeutic formulations to date due to their passive delivery methods and lack of rapid drug release at their intended site. In this paper, we have focused on a few “smart” technologies that further enhance the benefits of typical nanomaterials. Temperature and pH-responsive drug delivery devices were reviewed as methods for triggering release of encapsulating drugs, while aptamer and ligand conjugation were discussed as methods for targeted and intracellular delivery, with emphases on in vitro and in vivo works for each method.

  11. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2014-12-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including: i) elastin-like peptides for delivery of anticancer therapeutics; ii) heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery; iii) carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery; iv) Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future.

  12. Bioadhesive drug delivery system of diltiazem hydrochloride for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Emergency Medicine, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 3Department of ... (including oral/buccal, nasal, vaginal or rectal) ... membrane and drug delivery device for extended .... The time required for complete.

  13. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY AND METHODS TO ENHANCE IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the common methods employed in recent years for enhancing transdermal delivery of drug substances when applying transdermal therapeutic delivery systems. The chemical, physical and mechanical methods to enhance the transport of macromolecular compounds through the skin are considered in details. 

  14. Formulation and in-vitro evaluation of floating bilayer tablet of lisinopril maleate and metoprolol tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Hira; Qureshi, Junaid; Danish, Zeeshan; Zaman, Muhammad; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed; Hanif, Muhammad; Waheed, Imran; Mohammad, Imran Shair

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce the technology for the development of rate-controlled oral drug delivery system to overcome various physiological problems. Several approaches are being used for the purpose of increasing the gastric retentive time, including floating drug delivery system. Gastric floating lisinopril maleate and metoprolol tartrate bilayer tablets were formulated by direct compression method using the sodium starch glycolate, crosscarmellose sodium for IR layer. Eudragit L100, pectin, acacia as sustained release polymers in different ratios for SR metoprolol tartrate layer and sodium bicarbonate, citric acid as gas generating agents for the floating extended release layer. The floating bilayer tablets of lisinopril maleate and metoprolol tartrate were designed to overcome the various problems associated with conventional oral dosage form. Floating tablets were evaluated for floating lag time, drug contents and in-vitro dissolution profile and different kinetic release models were applied. It was clear that the different ratios of polymers affected the drug release and floating time. L2 and M4 showed good drug release profile and floating behavior. The linear regression and model fitting showed that all formulation followed Higuchi model of drug release model except M4 that followed zero order kinetic. From the study it is evident that a promising controlled release by floating bilyer tablets of lisinopril maleate and metoprolol tartrate can be developed successfully.

  15. Nanoparticle hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2015-02-14

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems offer fundamental advantages over current therapeutic agents that commonly display a longer circulation time, lower toxicity, specific targeted release, and greater bioavailability. For successful NP-based drug delivery it is essential that the drug-carrying nanocarriers can be internalized by the target cells and transported to specific sites, and the inefficient internalization of nanocarriers is often one of the major sources for drug resistance. In this work, we use the dissipative particle dynamics simulation to investigate the effect of NP hardness on their internalization efficiency. Three simplified models of NP platforms for drug delivery, including polymeric NP, liposome and solid NP, are designed here to represent increasing nanocarrier hardness. Simulation results indicate that NP hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery. Rigid NPs can enter the cell by a pathway of endocytosis, whereas for soft NPs the endocytosis process can be inhibited or frustrated due to wrapping-induced shape deformation and non-uniform ligand distribution. Instead, soft NPs tend to find one of three penetration pathways to enter the cell membrane via rearranging their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Finally, we show that the interaction between nanocarriers and drug molecules is also essential for effective drug delivery.

  16. Micelles and nanoparticles for ultrasonic drug and gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2008-06-30

    Drug delivery research employing micelles and nanoparticles has expanded in recent years. Of particular interest is the use of these nanovehicles that deliver high concentrations of cytotoxic drugs to diseased tissues selectively, thus reducing the agent's side effects on the rest of the body. Ultrasound, traditionally used in diagnostic medicine, is finding a place in drug delivery in connection with these nanoparticles. In addition to their non-invasive nature and the fact that they can be focused on targeted tissues, acoustic waves have been credited with releasing pharmacological agents from nanocarriers, as well as rendering cell membranes more permeable. In this article, we summarize new technologies that combine the use of nanoparticles with acoustic power both in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasonic drug delivery from micelles usually employs polyether block copolymers and has been found effective in vivo for treating tumors. Ultrasound releases drug from micelles, most probably via shear stress and shock waves from the collapse of cavitation bubbles. Liquid emulsions and solid nanoparticles are used with ultrasound to deliver genes in vitro and in vivo. The small packaging allows nanoparticles to extravasate into tumor tissues. Ultrasonic drug and gene delivery from nanocarriers has tremendous potential because of the wide variety of drugs and genes that could be delivered to targeted tissues by fairly non-invasive means.

  17. Formulation and Stability Aspects of Nanosized Solid Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Peter; Zelko, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Nano drug delivery systems are considered as useful means to remedy the problems of drugs of poor solubility, permeability and bioavailability, which became one of the most troublesome questions of the pharmaceutical industry. Different types of nanosized drug delivery systems have been developed and investigated for oral administration, providing auspicious solutions for drug development. In this paper nanosized drug delivery systems intended for oral administration are discussed based on the chemical nature of the carrier of drug molecules. Lipid nanoparticles comprising solid lipid nanoparticles, improved nanostructured lipid carriers and nanostructured silica- lipid hybrid particles have become popular in the formulation of lipophilic drugs of poor oral bioavailability. Polymeric nanoparticles including nanospheres and nanocapsules and polymeric fibrous systems have also emerged as potential drug delivery systems owing to their unique structure. The feasibility of surface functionalization of mesoporous materials and gold nanoparticles enables high level of control over particle characteristics making inorganic nanoparticles an exceptional formulation approach. The authors paid particular attention to the functionality-related stability of the reviewed delivery systems.

  18. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barar, Jaleh; AGHANEJAD, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis...

  19. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.

  20. ETHOSOMES: A POTENTIAL CARRIES FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    RAJ KUMAR TIWARI; NITESH S CHAUHAN,; YOGESH H S,

    2010-01-01

    The literature is abounding with attempts made to enhance the delivery of drugs into the deep layers of the skin and through the skin. Ethosomes are noninvasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. Although ethosomal systems are conceptually sophisticated, they are characterized by simplicity in their preparation, safety, and efficacy a combination that can highly expand their application. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles tai...

  1. Dissolving polymeric microneedle arrays for electrically assisted transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Martin J; Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Migalska, Katarzyna; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2012-04-10

    It has recently been proposed that the combination of skin barrier impairment using microneedles (MNs) coupled with iontophoresis (ITP) may broaden the range of drugs suitable for transdermal delivery, as well as enabling the rate of delivery to be achieved with precise electronic control. However, no reports exist on the combination of ITP with in situ drug loaded polymeric MN delivery systems. Furthermore, although a number of studies have highlighted the importance of MN design for transdermal drug delivery enhancement, to date, there has been no systematic investigation of the influence of MN geometry on the performance of polymeric MN arrays which are designed to remain in contact with the skin during the period of drug delivery. As such, for the first time, this study reports on the effect of MN heigth and MN density upon the transdermal delivery of small hydrophilic compounds (theophylline, methylene blue, and fluorescein sodium) across neonatal porcine skin in vitro, with the optimised MN array design evaluated for its potential in the electrically faciliatated delivery of peptide (bovine insulin) and protein (fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled bovine serum albumin (FTIC-BSA)) macromolecules. The results of the in vitro drug release investigations revealed that the extent of transdermal delivery was dependent upon the design of the MN array employed, whereby an increase in MN height and an increase in MN density led to an increase in the extent of transdermal drug delivery achieved 6h after MN application. Overall, the in vitro permeation studies revealed that the MN design containing 361 MNs/cm(2) of 600 μm height resulted in the greatest extent of transdermal drug delivery. As such, this design was evaluated for its potential in the MN mediated iontophoretic transdermal delivery. Whilst the combination of MN and ITP did not further enhance the extent of small molecular weight solute delivery, the extent of peptide/protein release was significantly

  2. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  3. A REVIEW ON ADVANCES OF SUSTAINED RELEASE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Bose

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustained release matrix tablets facilitate prolonged and continuous drug release and improve the bioavailability of drugs while avoiding unwanted side effects. Ofloxacin is a broad spectrum antibacterial agent used for treating wide range of gram positive and gram negative infections. The goal in designing sustained or controlled delivery systems is to reduce frequency of dosing or to increase the effectiveness of the drug by localization at the site of action, reducing the dose required, providing uniform drug delivery. Sustained release drug administration means not only prolongation of duration of drug delivery, but the term also implies the predictability and reproducibility of drug release kinetics. The controlled release of drug substances and their effective transport to sites of action can be exploited to maximize the beneficial clinical response and to minimize the incidence of unbeneficial adverse reactions and side effects. Oral ingestion has long been the most convenient and commonly employed route of drug delivery. Indeed, for sustained release systems, oral route of administration has received most of the attention with respect to research on physiological and drug constraints as well as design and testing of products.

  4. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  5. Synergistic effect of enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitragotri, S

    2000-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers a non-invasive route of drug administration, although its applications are limited by low skin permeability. Various enhancers including iontophoresis, chemicals, ultrasound, and electroporation have been shown to enhance transdermal drug transport. Although all these methods have been individually shown to enhance transdermal drug transport, their combinations have often been found to enhance transdermal transport more effectively than each of them alone. This paper summarizes literature studies on these combinations with respect to their efficacy and mechanisms.

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymers as the future drug delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the investigations of new drug delivery systems have been directed on the development of some "intelligent" drug delivery devices that are able to directly respond to the patient's individual needs. New drug delivery systems should maximize the efficiency of administrated therapeutic agents and improve the patient's quality of life. Introduction of the new drug delivery devices is an important scientific goal, which could be achieved by combining new technologies and intelligent biomaterials. Molecular imprinting technology has a high potential for the preparation of optimized drug delivery forms. Here, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are promising new materials for such purposes, but their application in this field is nowadays at a developing stage. In this review, the principles of molecular imprinting and the recognition-release mechanisms of polymeric matrices are discussed. The potential application of molecularly imprinted materials as the future drug delivery systems with various administering routes (transdermal, ocular or oral) are presented, and some future prospects for the imprinted polymers are outlined.

  7. Critical Assessment of Implantable Drug Delivery Devices in Glaucoma Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharani Manickavasagam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a group of heterogeneous disorders involving progressive optic neuropathy that can culminate into visual impairment and irreversible blindness. Effective therapeutic interventions must address underlying vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs to degeneration in conjunction with correcting other associated risk factors (such as elevated intraocular pressure. However, realization of therapeutic outcomes is heavily dependent on suitable delivery system that can overcome myriads of anatomical and physiological barriers to intraocular drug delivery. Development of clinically viable sustained release systems in glaucoma is a widely recognized unmet need. In this regard, implantable delivery systems may relieve the burden of chronic drug administration while potentially ensuring high intraocular drug bioavailability. Presently there are no FDA-approved implantable drug delivery devices for glaucoma even though there are several ongoing clinical studies. The paper critically assessed the prospects of polymeric implantable delivery systems in glaucoma while identifying factors that can dictate (a patient tolerability and acceptance, (b drug stability and drug release profiles, (c therapeutic efficacy, and (d toxicity and biocompatibility. The information gathered could be useful in future research and development efforts on implantable delivery systems in glaucoma.

  8. Recent trends in challenges and opportunities of Transdermal drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.Patil

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery system relates to the production of a drug, its delivery medium, and the way of administration. Drug delivery systems are even used for administering nitroglycerin. Transdermal drug delivery system is the system in which the delivery of the active ingredients of the drug occurs by the means of skin. Various types of transdermal patches are used. There are various methods to enhance the transdermal drug delivery system. But using microfabricated microneedles drugs are delivered very effectively to skin patch. There has been great progress in the Transdermal drug delivery system for the delivery of different forms and our aim is to collect the information about what progressed have done in Transdermal drug delivery system and developments in Transdermal drug delivery systems in theoretical form. Also, to collect the information about the advantages and application of the Transdermal drug delivery systems.

  9. NMR characterisation and transdermal drug delivery potential of microemulsion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Pedersen, E J; Jaroszewski, J W

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of structure and composition of microemulsions (Labrasol/Plurol Isostearique/isostearylic isostearate/water) on their transdermal delivery potential of a lipophilic (lidocaine) and a hydrophilic model drug (prilocaine hydrochloride......), and to compare the drug delivery potential of microemulsions to conventional vehicles. Self-diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy and T(1) relaxation times were used to characterise the microemulsions. Transdermal flux of lidocaine and prilocaine hydrochloride through...... and transdermal flux was indicated. The increased transdermal drug delivery from microemulsion formulations was found to be due mainly to the increased solubility of drugs and appeared to be dependent on the drug mobility in the individual vehicle. The microemulsions did not perturb the skin barrier, indicating...

  10. A Review on Composite Liposomal Technologies for Specialized Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maluta S. Mufamadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of liposomes with polymeric scaffolds could revolutionize the current state of drug delivery technology. Although liposomes have been extensively studied as a promising drug delivery model for bioactive compounds, there still remain major drawbacks for widespread pharmaceutical application. Two approaches for overcoming the factors related to the suboptimal efficacy of liposomes in drug delivery have been suggested. The first entails modifying the liposome surface with functional moieties, while the second involves integration of pre-encapsulated drug-loaded liposomes within depot polymeric scaffolds. This attempts to provide ingenious solutions to the limitations of conventional liposomes such as short plasma half-lives, toxicity, stability, and poor control of drug release over prolonged periods. This review delineates the key advances in composite technologies that merge the concepts of depot polymeric scaffolds with liposome technology to overcome the limitations of conventional liposomes for pharmaceutical applications.

  11. TRANSDERMAL PATCHES: A SYNERGISTIC APPROACH OF DRUG DELIVERY FOR NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya* and V. Rastogi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery system has been accepted as potential non-invasive route of drug administration, with advantages of prolonged therapeutic effect, reduced side effects, improved bioavailability, better patient compliance and easy termination of drug therapy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs represents the most commonly used medications for the treatment of pain and inflammation, but numerous well-described side effects can limit their use. Therefore transdermal delivery of NSAIDs has advantages of avoiding hepatic first pass effect, gastric irritation and delivering the drug for extended period of time at a sustained level. The present article gives the brief view on the work been done on various NSAIDs by formulated and delivered as transdermal patches to decrease the side effects associated with the oral delivery. The various NSAIDs included in this article include Ketoprofen, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Fluribrofen, Diclofenac, Aceclofenac, Ketorolac, Indomethacin, Meloxicam, Nimesulide, Celecoxib, Etoricoxib.

  12. A DETAILED REVIEW ON ORAL MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bhati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal drug delivery system is widely applicable as novel site for administration of drug for immediate and controlled release action by preventing first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation due to GI microbial flora. Oral mucosal drug delivery system provides local and systemic action. In this review, attention is focused to give regarding physiology of oral mucosal including tissue permeability, barriers to permeation and route of permeation, biopharmaceutics of buccal and sublingual absorption, factors affecting drug absorption, detailed information of penetration enhancers, design of oral mucosal drug delivery system and role of mucoadhesion and various theories of bioadhesion. Evaluation techniques and selection of animal model for in-vivo studies are also discussed.

  13. Advanced Drug Delivery Systems - a Synthetic and Biological Applied Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lise Nørkjær

    Specific delivery of drugs to diseased sites in the body is a major topic in the development of drug delivery system today. Especially, the field of cancer treatment needs improved drug delivery systems as the strong dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy today often present a barrier...... unloading of the encapsulated drug have been tried optimized in a variety of ways. Many propose the use of small molecules, such as vitamins and peptides, for active targeting of the liposomes to overexpressed receptors on the cancerous tissue. Once located close to the diseased site a trigger mechanism...... for releasing the drug from the liposome interior is often needed. Several approaches have been suggested to work as release mechanisms such a pH changes, the presence of enzymes or external applied stimulus as heat or light. Chapter two deals with the synthesis of the functionalized phospholipids, which...

  14. Using exosomes, naturally-equipped nanocarriers, for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakova, Elena V; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-12-10

    Exosomes offer distinct advantages that uniquely position them as highly effective drug carriers. Comprised of cellular membranes with multiple adhesive proteins on their surface, exosomes are known to specialize in cell-cell communications and provide an exclusive approach for the delivery of various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, exosomes can be amended through their parental cells to express a targeting moiety on their surface, or supplemented with desired biological activity. Development and validation of exosome-based drug delivery systems are the focus of this review. Different techniques of exosome isolation, characterization, drug loading, and applications in experimental disease models and clinic are discussed. Exosome-based drug formulations may be applied to a wide variety of disorders such as cancer, various infectious, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, exosomes combine benefits of both synthetic nanocarriers and cell-mediated drug delivery systems while avoiding their limitations.

  15. New perspectives on lipid and surfactant based drug delivery systems for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllertz, Anette; Ogbonna, Anayo; Ren, Shan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to highlight relevant considerations when implementing a rational strategy for the development of lipid and surfactant based drug delivery system and to discuss shortcomings and challenges to the current classification of these delivery systems. We also aim to offer...

  16. Interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Chiat; Ong, Charlene Li Ching; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah; Wong, Tin Wui

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system is compared with that of a solid dispersion. The influences of drug load, particle size, and crystallinity of these test systems are investigated. The interactive mixtures and solid dispersions were prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydrophobic nifedipine drug by means of physical mixing and melting methods, respectively. The formed products were subjected to drug particle size and crystallinity analyses, and dissolution tests. In comparison with the interactive mixtures, the solid dispersions with low drug load were more effective as a rapid drug delivery system, as the size of a given batch of drug particles was markedly reduced by the molten PEG 3350. The rate and extent of drug dissolution were mainly promoted by decreasing effective drug particle size. However, these were lower in the solid dispersions than in the interactive mixtures when a high load of fine drug particles was used as the starting material. This was attributed to drug coarsening during the preparation of the solid dispersion. Unlike solid dispersions, the interactive mixtures could accommodate a high load of fine drug particles without compromising its capacity to enhance the rate and extent of drug dissolution. The interactive mixture is appropriate for use to deliver a fine hydrophobic drug in a formulation requiring a high drug load.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: a potential concept for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dhanawat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Brahma N; Pandit, Jayant K; Sinha, Vivek R

    2014-04-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a highly interesting and demandable nanocarrier in the field of nanoscience. CNTs facilitate efficient delivery of therapeutics like drugs, proteins, genes, nucleic acids, vitamins and lot more. Even though highly beneficial, the biocompatibility of CNTs is a major issue in their questioning their potential application in targeting drug delivery. Studies confirmed subdued toxicity of CNTs following slight modifications like functionalization, controlled dimensions, purification etc. A well-established mechanism for cellular internalization is an insistent need to attain a more efficient and targeted delivery. Recent patents have been thoroughly discussed in the text below.

  18. NIOSOMES: A ROLE IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles inclosing an aqueous phase and a wide range of molecules could be encapsulated within aqueous spaces of lipid membrane vesicles. They are microscopic lamellar structures formed on the admixture of a non-ionic surfactant, cholesterol and phosphate with subsequent hydration in aqueous media. Niosomes belongs to novel drug delivery system which offers a large number of advantages over other conventional and vesicular delivery systems. Namely they are the targeted drug delivery system which showing reduction of dose, stability and compatibility of non-ionic surfactants, easy modification, delayed clearance, suitability for a wide range of Active Pharmaceutical Agents.

  19. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchè MM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Martino Maria Zacchè, Sushma Srikrishna, Linda Cardozo Department of Urogynaecology, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD. Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin, nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. Keywords: drug targeting, drug-delivery system, bladder disorders

  20. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods.

  1. Design of an Implantable Device for Ocular Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hwan Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular diseases, such as, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa require drug management in order to prevent blindness and affecting million of adults in USA and worldwide. There is an increasing need to develop devices for drug delivery to address ocular diseases. This study focuses on the design, simulation, and development of an implantable ocular drug delivery device consisting of micro-/nanochannels embedded between top and bottom covers with a drug reservoir made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS which is silicon-based organic and biodegradable polymer. Several simulations were carried out with six different micro-channel configurations in order to see the feasibility for ocular drug delivery applications. Based on the results obtained, channel design of osmotic I and osmotic II satisfied the diffusion rates required for ocular drug delivery. Finally, a prototype illustrating the three components of the drug delivery design is presented. In the future, the device will be tested for its functionality and diffusion characteristics.

  2. Solid lipid excipients - matrix agents for sustained drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiaux, Yvonne; Jannin, Vincent; Hughes, Sophie; Marchaud, Delphine

    2014-08-28

    Lipid excipients are attracting interest from drug developers due to their performance, ease of use, versatility and their potential to generate intellectual property through innovation in drug delivery particularly in the case of modifying drug release systems. Many articles have described the use of lipid excipients to develop matrix modified release dosage forms in a range of processing techniques, therefore a comprehensive review is timely to collect together and analyze key information. This review article focuses on the utility of lipid excipients in solid sustained drug delivery systems with emphasis on the efficiency and robustness of these systems with respect to: (i) the choice of the manufacturing process and impact on drug release, (ii) the fundamental drug release mechanisms, (iii) resistance of the drug formulation under physiological conditions and (iv) long-term stability. Understanding the functionality of these versatile excipients in formulation is elementary for the development of highly robust lipid-based sustained release medicines.

  3. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  4. Mucoadhesive and thermogelling systems for vaginal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramella, Carla M; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Sandri, Giuseppina

    2015-09-15

    This review focuses on two formulation approaches, mucoadhesion and thermogelling, intended for prolonging residence time on vaginal mucosa of medical devices or drug delivery systems, thus improving their efficacy. The review, after a brief description of the vaginal environment and, in particular, of the vaginal secretions that strongly affect in vivo performance of vaginal formulations, deals with the above delivery systems. As for mucoadhesive systems, conventional formulations (gels, tablets, suppositories and emulsions) and novel drug delivery systems (micro-, nano-particles) intended for vaginal administration to achieve either local or systemic effect are reviewed. As for thermogelling systems, poly(ethylene oxide-propylene oxide-ethylene oxide) copolymer-based and chitosan-based formulations are discussed as thermogelling systems. The methods employed for functional characterization of both mucoadhesive and thermogelling drug delivery systems are also briefly described.

  5. Drug delivery system based on chronobiology--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Asim Sattwa; Biswas, Nikhil; Karim, Kazi Masud; Guha, Arijit; Chatterjee, Sugata; Behera, Mamata; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2010-11-01

    With the advancement in the field of chronobiology, modern drug delivery approaches have been elevated to a new concept of chronopharmacology i.e. the ability to deliver the therapeutic agent to a patient in a staggered profile. However the major drawback in the development of such delivery system that matches the circadian rhythm requires the availability of precise technology (pulsatile drug delivery). The increasing research interest surrounding this delivery system has widened the areas of pharmaceutics in particular with many more sub-disciplines expected to coexist in the near future. This review on chronopharmaceutics gives a comprehensive emphasis on potential disease targets, revisits the existing technologies in hand and also addresses the theoretical approaches to emerging discipline such as genetic engineering and target based specific molecules. With the biological prospective approaches in delivering drugs it is well understood that safer and more realistic approaches in the therapy of diseases will be achieved in the days to come.

  6. Polymeric Micro- and Nanofabricatced Devices for Oral Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cade Brylee

    While oral drug administration is by far the most preferred route, it is accompanied by many barriers that limit drug uptake such as the low pH of the stomach, metabolic and proteolytic enzymes, and limited permeability of the intestinal epithelium. As a result, many drugs ranging from small molecules to biological therapeutics have limited oral bioavailability, precluding them from oral administration. To address this issue, microfabrication has been applied to create planar, asymmetric devices capable of binding to the lining of the gastrointestinal tract and releasing drug at high concentrations, thereby increasing oral drug uptake. While the efficacy of these devices has been validated in vitro and in vivo, modifying their surfaces with nanoscale features has potential to refine their properties for enhanced drug delivery. This dissertation first presents an approach to fabricate polymeric microdevices coated with nanowires in a rapid, high throughput manner. The nanowires demonstrate rapid drug localization onto the surface of these devices via capillary action and increased adhesion to epithelial tissue, suggesting that this fabrication technique can be used to create devices with enhanced properties for oral drug delivery. Also presented are microdevices sealed with nanostraw membranes. The nanostraw membranes provide sustained drug release by limiting drug efflux from the devices, prevent drug degradation by limiting influx of outside biomolecules, and enhance device bioadhesion by penetrating into the mucus layer of the intestinal lining. Finally, an approach that dramatically increases the capacity and efficiency of drug loading into microdevices over previous methods is presented. A picoliter-volume printer is used to print drug directly into device reservoirs in an automated fashion. The technologies presented here expand the capabilities of microdevices for oral drug delivery by incorporating nanoscale structures that enhance device bioadhesion

  7. Floating microspheres: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagtap Yogesh Mukund

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric emptying is a complex process, one that is highly variable and that makes in vivo performance of drug delivery systems uncertain. A controlled drug delivery system with prolonged residence time in the stomach can be of great practical importance for drugs with an absorption window in the upper small intestine. The main limitations are attributed to the inter- and intra-subject variability of gastro-intestinal (GI transit time and to the non-uniformity of drug absorption throughout the alimentary canal. Floating or hydrodynamically controlled drug delivery systems are useful in such applications. Various gastroretentive dosage forms are available, including tablets, capsules, pills, laminated films, floating microspheres, granules and powders. Floating microspheres have been gaining attention due to the uniform distribution of these multiple-unit dosage forms in the stomach, which results in more reproducible drug absorption and reduced risk of local irritation. Such systems have more advantages over the single-unit dosage forms. The present review briefly addresses the physiology of the gastric emptying process with respect to floating drug delivery systems. The purpose of this review is to bring together the recent literature with respect to the method of preparation, and various parameters affecting the performance and characterization of floating microspheres.O esvaziamento gástrico é um processo complexo, com elevada variabilidade e responsável pela incerteza do desempenho dos medicamentos in vivo. Dessa forma, os sistemas de liberação modificada de fármacos, com tempo de residência prolongado no estômago, em especial, considerando aqueles fármacos com janela de absorção na porção superior do intestino delgado, apresentam fundamental importância. As principais limitações relativas à absorção do fármaco são, no geral, atribuídas à variabilidade inter e intra-paciente do tempo de trânsito gastro-intestinal (GI e

  8. Aptamer-Gated Nanoparticles for Smart Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Avni Oktem

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are functional nucleic acid sequences which can bind specific targets. An artificial combinatorial methodology can identify aptamer sequences for any target molecule, from ions to whole cells. Drug delivery systems seek to increase efficacy and reduce side-effects by concentrating the therapeutic agents at specific disease sites in the body. This is generally achieved by specific targeting of inactivated drug molecules. Aptamers which can bind to various cancer cell types selectively and with high affinity have been exploited in a variety of drug delivery systems for therapeutic purposes. Recent progress in selection of cell-specific aptamers has provided new opportunities in targeted drug delivery. Especially functionalization of nanoparticles with such aptamers has drawn major attention in the biosensor and biomedical areas. Moreover, nucleic acids are recognized as an attractive building materials in nanomachines because of their unique molecular recognition properties and structural features. A active controlled delivery of drugs once targeted to a disease site is a major research challenge. Stimuli-responsive gating is one way of achieving controlled release of nanoparticle cargoes. Recent reports incorporate the structural properties of aptamers in controlled release systems of drug delivering nanoparticles. In this review, the strategies for using functional nucleic acids in creating smart drug delivery devices will be explained. The main focus will be on aptamer-incorporated nanoparticle systems for drug delivery purposes in order to assess the future potential of aptamers in the therapeutic area. Special emphasis will be given to the very recent progress in controlled drug release based on molecular gating achieved with aptamers.

  9. Electrically responsive smart hydrogels in drug delivery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, R V; Biswanath, Sa

    2007-01-01

    Recently, much of the research activity has been focused on the development of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. Such hydrogels can show a response to the external or internal stimuli in the form of rapid changes in the physical nature of the polymeric network. This hydrogel property can be utilized for drug delivery applications. A literature search suggests that current research related to stimuli responsive drug delivery systems deals with temperature sensitive, pH sensitive, glucose sensitive and bio-molecule sensitive hydrogels. Electrically responsive hydrogels have also been recently developed in the form of gel matrices, implants and membranes for drug delivery. Control over the release of drugs such as quantity and timing, is essential to optimize drug therapy. Reports say that the electrically controlled in vitro and in vivo drug release studies have been carried out on polyelectrolyte hydrogels. A pulsatile pattern of drug release was achieved with the alternative application and removal of the electrical stimulus. This article gives an overview of the latest developments in the formulation of drug delivery systems using electrically responsive hydrogels.

  10. Nasal drug delivery : A direct approach to the cerebrospinal fluid?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Mascha van den

    2005-01-01

    With the growing number of patients suffering from central nervous system (CNS) diseases a suitable approach for drug targeting to the brain becomes more and more important. This is a major problem in drug delivery research, due to the tight blood-brain barrier (BBB) that prevents the influx of xeno

  11. Providing an address for delivery of nanoencapsulated TB drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemmer, Yolandy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available compliance and drug resistance pose a great challenge to TB treatment programs worldwide. To improve the current inadequate therapeutic management of TB, a polymeric anti-TB nanodrug delivery system, for anti-TB drugs, was developed that could enable entry...

  12. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Haj-Ahmad; Hashim Khan; Muhammad Sohail Arshad; Manoochehr Rasekh; Amjad Hussain; Susannah Walsh; Xiang Li; Ming-Wei Chang; Zeeshan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisat...

  13. Soft Interaction in Liposome Nanocarriers for Therapeutic Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lombardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of smart nanocarriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs has experienced considerable expansion in recent decades, with the development of new medicines devoted to cancer treatment. In this respect a wide range of strategies can be developed by employing liposome nanocarriers with desired physico-chemical properties that, by exploiting a combination of a number of suitable soft interactions, can facilitate the transit through the biological barriers from the point of administration up to the site of drug action. As a result, the materials engineer has generated through the bottom up approach a variety of supramolecular nanocarriers for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics which have revealed beneficial developments for stabilizing drug compounds, overcoming impediments to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of therapeutic compounds to target sites. Herein we present recent advances in liposome drug delivery by analyzing the main structural features of liposome nanocarriers which strongly influence their interaction in solution. More specifically, we will focus on the analysis of the relevant soft interactions involved in drug delivery processes which are responsible of main behaviour of soft nanocarriers in complex physiological fluids. Investigation of the interaction between liposomes at the molecular level can be considered an important platform for the modeling of the molecular recognition processes occurring between cells. Some relevant strategies to overcome the biological barriers during the drug delivery of the nanocarriers are presented which outline the main structure-properties relationships as well as their advantages (and drawbacks in therapeutic and biomedical applications.

  14. A Molecular Communication System Model for Particulate Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahibi, Youssef; Pierobon, Massimiliano; Song, Sang Ok; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2013-12-01

    The goal of a drug delivery system (DDS) is to convey a drug where the medication is needed, while, at the same time, preventing the drug from affecting other healthy parts of the body. Drugs composed of micro- or nano-sized particles (particulate DDS) that are able to cross barriers which prevent large particles from escaping the bloodstream are used in the most advanced solutions. Molecular communication (MC) is used as an abstraction of the propagation of drug particles in the body. MC is a new paradigm in communication research where the exchange of information is achieved through the propagation of molecules. Here, the transmitter is the drug injection, the receiver is the drug delivery, and the channel is realized by the transport of drug particles, thus enabling the analysis and design of a particulate DDS using communication tools. This is achieved by modeling the MC channel as two separate contributions, namely, the cardiovascular network model and the drug propagation network. The cardiovascular network model allows to analytically compute the blood velocity profile in every location of the cardiovascular system given the flow input by the heart. The drug propagation network model allows the analytical expression of the drug delivery rate at the targeted site given the drug injection rate. Numerical results are also presented to assess the flexibility and accuracy of the developed model. The study of novel optimization techniques for a more effective and less invasive drug delivery will be aided by this model, while paving the way for novel communication techniques for Intrabody communication networks.

  15. Electrospun Fibers of Enteric Polymer for Controlled Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia F. P. da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of electrospun fibers of enteric polymer for controlled delivery of drugs represents a simple and low cost procedure with promising advantages relative to the longer therapeutic window provided by cylindrical geometry in association with intrinsic properties of pH-dependent drug carriers. In this work, we have explored the incorporation of additives (block copolymers of poly(ethylene-b-poly(ethylene oxide into matrix of Eudragit L-100 and the effective action of hybrid composites on delivery of nifedipine, providing improvement in the overall process of controlled release of loaded drug.

  16. Application of Various Types of Liposomes in Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Alavi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes, due to their various forms, require further exploration. These structures can deliver both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for cancer, antibacterial, antifungal, immunomodulation, diagnostics, ophtalmica, vaccines, enzymes and genetic elements. Preparation of liposomes results in different properties for these systems. In addition, based on preparation methods, liposomes types can be unilamellar, multilamellar and giant unilamellar; however, there are many factors and difficulties that affect the development of liposome drug delivery structure. In the present review, we discuss some problems that impact drug delivery by liposomes. In addition, we discuss a new generation of liposomes, which is utilized for decreasing the limitation of the conventional liposomes.

  17. Application of Various Types of Liposomes in Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mehran; Karimi, Naser; Safaei, Mohsen

    2017-04-01

    Liposomes, due to their various forms, require further exploration. These structures can deliver both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for cancer, antibacterial, antifungal, immunomodulation, diagnostics, ophtalmica, vaccines, enzymes and genetic elements. Preparation of liposomes results in different properties for these systems. In addition, based on preparation methods, liposomes types can be unilamellar, multilamellar and giant unilamellar; however, there are many factors and difficulties that affect the development of liposome drug delivery structure. In the present review, we discuss some problems that impact drug delivery by liposomes. In addition, we discuss a new generation of liposomes, which is utilized for decreasing the limitation of the conventional liposomes.

  18. Enrichment of anti-ulcer activity of monoammonium glycerrhizin and Aloe vera gel powder through a novel drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati N Ranade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Usual treatment for Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer includes a 14-day "triple therapy" of two antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor. However, the current therapy has side-effects like stomach upset, non-compliance, incomplete absorption of drug and antibiotic resistance. To overcome these limitations, there is a need to suggest an alternative therapy. The best possible alternative is to deliver herbal constituents. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the efficacy of herbal constituents by applying the concept of a novel drug delivery system. The present investigation is designed to deliver and retain two herbal constituents in the stomach for better action against gastric ulcers. The objective was to develop a bilayer floating tablet of monoammonium glycerrhizin and Aloe vera gel powder through rational combination of excipients to give the lowest possible lag time with maximum drug release in 7 h. Formulation OF2 containing hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose E5, crospovidone and effervescent agents in the ratio 1:2 gave 98% drug release with desired floating properties. Pharmacodynamic studies in rats showed that the combination of monoammonium glycerrhizin and Aloe vera gave 99% ulcer inhibition in comparison with 51% ulcer inhibition in the group administered with monoammonium glycerrhizin alone. X-ray studies in rabbits proved the gastroretention of the tablet for more than 6 h. This suggests relevance of NDDS in delivery of herbal constituents in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  19. Development of cup shaped microneedle array for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayakumar, Kadayar B; Hegde, Gopal M; Ramachandra, Subbaraya G; Nayak, Mangalore M; Dinesh, Narasimhian S; Rajanna, Konandur

    2015-06-08

    Microneedle technology is one of the attractive methods in transdermal drug delivery. However, the clinical applications of this method are limited owing to: complexity in the preparation of multiple coating solutions, drug leakage while inserting the microneedles into the skin and the outer walls of the solid microneedle can hold limited quantity of drug. Here, the authors present the fabrication of an array of rectangular cup shaped silicon microneedles, which provide for reduced drug leakage resulting in improvement of efficiency of drug delivery and possibility of introducing multiple drugs. The fabricated solid microneedles with rectangular cup shaped tip have a total height of 200 μm. These cup shaped tips have dimensions: 60 × 60 μm (length × breadth) with a depth of 60 μm. The cups are filled with drug using a novel in-house built drop coating system. Successful drug dissolution was observed when the coated microneedle was used on mice. Also, using the above method, it is possible to fill the cups selectively with different drugs, which enables simultaneous multiple drug delivery.

  20. Hydrogel-Forming Microneedle Arrays for Enhanced Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Garland, Martin J; Migalska, Katarzyna; Majithiya, Rita; McCrudden, Cian M; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Mahmood, Tuan Mazlelaa Tuan; McCarthy, Helen O; Woolfson, A David

    2012-12-05

    Unique microneedle arrays prepared from crosslinked polymers, which contain no drug themselves, are described. They rapidly take up skin interstitial fluid upon skin insertion to form continuous, unblockable, hydrogel conduits from attached patch-type drug reservoirs to the dermal microcirculation. Importantly, such microneedles, which can be fabricated in a wide range of patch sizes and microneedle geometries, can be easily sterilized, resist hole closure while in place, and are removed completely intact from the skin. Delivery of macromolecules is no longer limited to what can be loaded into the microneedles themselves and transdermal drug delivery is now controlled by the crosslink density of the hydrogel system rather than the stratum corneum, while electrically modulated delivery is also a unique feature. This technology has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional microneedle designs and greatly increase the range of the type of drug that is deliverable transdermally, with ensuing benefits for industry, healthcare providers and, ultimately, patients.

  1. Biodegradation-tunable mesoporous silica nanorods for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Bum; Joo, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyunryung; Ryu, WonHyoung; Park, Yong-il

    2015-05-01

    Mesoporous silica in the forms of micro- or nanoparticles showed great potentials in the field of controlled drug delivery. However, for precision control of drug release from mesoporous silica-based delivery systems, it is critical to control the rate of biodegradation. Thus, in this study, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to fabricate "biodegradation-tunable" mesoporous silica nanorods based on capillary wetting of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template with an aqueous alkoxide precursor solution. The porosity and nanostructure of silica nanorods were conveniently controlled by adjusting the water/alkoxide molar ratio of precursor solutions, heat-treatment temperature, and Na addition. The porosity and biodegradation kinetics of the fabricated mesoporous nanorods were analyzed using N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm, TGA, DTA, and XRD. Finally, the performance of the mesoporous silica nanorods as drug delivery carrier was demonstrated with initial burst and subsequent "zero-order" release of anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin.

  2. Crystallization Methods for Preparation of Nanocrystals for Drug Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Yongli; Yin, Qiuxiang; Glennon, Brian; Zhong, Jian; Ouyang, Jinbo; Huang, Xin; Hao, Hongxun

    2015-01-01

    Low water solubility of drug products causes delivery problems such as low bioavailability. The reduced particle size and increased surface area of nanocrystals lead to the increasing of the dissolution rate. The formulation of drug nanocrystals is a robust approach and has been widely applied to drug delivery system (DDS) due to the significant development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It can be used to improve drug efficacy, provide targeted delivery and minimize side-effects. Crystallization is the main and efficient unit operation to produce nanocrystals. Both traditional crystallization methods such as reactive crystallization, anti-solvent crystallization and new crystallization methods such as supercritical fluid crystallization, high-gravity controlled precipitation can be used to produce nanocrystals. The current mini-review outlines the main crystallization methods addressed in literature. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were summarized and compared.

  3. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-07-07

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.

  4. Pulsatile Drug Delivery System Based on Electrohydrodynamic Method

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yi; Hu, Junqiang; Gao, Wenle

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) generation, a commonly used method in BioMEMS, plays a significant role in the pulsatile drug delivery system for a decade. In this paper, an EHD based drug delivery system is well designed, which can be used to generate a single drug droplet as small as 2.83 nL in 8.5 ms with a total device of 2\\times2\\times3 mm^3, and an external supplied voltage of 1500 V. Theoretically, we derive the expressions for the size and the formation time of a droplet generated by EHD method, while taking into account the drug supply rate, properties of liquid, gap between two electrodes, nozzle size, and charged droplet neutralization. This work proves a repeatable, stable and controllable droplet generation and delivery system based on EHD method experimentally as well as theoretically.

  5. Use of microwave in processing of drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T W

    2008-04-01

    Microwave has received a widespread application in pharmaceuticals and food processing, microbial sterilization, biomedical therapy, scientific and biomedical analysis, as well as, drug synthesis. This paper reviews the basis of application of microwave to prepare pharmaceutical dosage forms such as agglomerates, gel beads, microspheres, nanomatrix, solid dispersion, tablets and film coat. The microwave could induce drying, polymeric crosslinkages as well as drug-polymer interaction, and modify the structure of drug crystallites via its effects of heating and/or electromagnetic field on the dosage forms. The use of microwave opens a new approach to control the physicochemical properties and drug delivery profiles of pharmaceutical dosage forms without the need for excessive heat, lengthy process or toxic reactants. Alternatively, the microwave can be utilized to process excipients prior to their use in the formulation of drug delivery systems. The intended release characteristics of drugs in dosage forms can be met through modifying the physicochemical properties of excipients using the microwave.

  6. MICRONEEDLE AS A NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Shakeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Patch-based transdermal drug delivery offers a convenient way to administer drugs without the drawbacks of standard hypodermic injections relating to issues such as patient acceptability and injection safety. However, conventional transdermal drug delivery is limited to therapeutics where the drug can diffuse across the skin barrier. By using miniaturized needles, a pathway into the human body can be established which allow transport of macromolecular drugs such as insulin or vaccines. These microneedles only penetrate the outermost skin layers, superficial enough not to reach the nerve receptors of the lower skin. Thus, microneedle insertions are perceived as painless. These microneedle arrays could be easily inserted into skin without breaking and were shown to increase permeability of human skin in vitro to a model drug, calcein, by up to 4 orders of magnitude. Limited tests on human subjects indicated those microneedles were reported as painless.

  7. Nanosuspension technology and its applications in drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Solubility is an essential factor for drug effectiveness, independent of the route of administration. Poorly soluble drugs are often a challenging task for formulators in the industry. Conventional approaches for enhancement of solubility have limited applicability, especially when the drugs are poorly soluble simultaneously in aqueous and in non-aqueous media. Nanosuspension technology can be used to improve the stability as well as the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. Nanosuspensions are biphasic systems consisting of pure drug particles dispersed in an aqueous vehicle, stabilized by surfactants. These are simple to prepare and are more advantageous than other approaches. Techniques such as wet milling, high-pressure homogenization, emulsification-solvent evaporation and super critical fluid have been used in the preparation of nanosuspensions. It has the advantage of delivery by various routes, including oral, parenteral, pulmonary and ocular routes. The present article reviews the current methods used to prepare nanosuspensions and their application in drug delivery.

  8. A REVIEW ARTICLE ON MUCOADHESIVE BUCCAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasvir Singh* and Pawan Deep

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: As an alternative to injection pharmaceutical researcher and scientist are trying to explore transdermal and transmucosal route over the last few years. To overcome the deficiency associated with the other route of administration buccal region of oral cavity is an alternative target for the administration of choice of drug. The disadvantages relative with the oral drug delivery is the extensive presystemic metabolism, instability in acidic medium as a result inadequate absorption of the drugs. However parental route may overcome the drawback related with the oral route but these formulations have high cost, supervision is required and least patient compliance. By the buccal route the drug are directly pass through into systemic circulation, less hepatic metabolism and high bioavailability. The aim of the review article is an overview of buccal drug delivery, anatomy of oral mucosa, mechanism of drug penetration and their in-vitro and in-vivo mucoadhesion testing method.

  9. Numerical simulation of iontophoresis in the drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Zivanovic, Marko; Savic, Andrej; Bijelic, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and composition of stratum corneum act as barriers and limit the diffusion of most drug molecules and ions. Much effort has been made to overcome this barrier and it can be seen that iontophoresis has shown a good effect. Iontophoresis represents the application of low electrical potential to increase the transport of drugs into and across the skin or tissue. Iontophoresis is a noninvasive drug delivery system, and therefore, it is a useful alternative to drug transportation by injection. In this study, we present a numerical model and effects of electrical potential on the drug diffusion in the buccal tissue and the stratum corneum. The initial numerical results are in good comparison with experimental observation. We demonstrate that the application of an applied voltage can greatly improve the efficacy of localized drug delivery as compared to diffusion alone.

  10. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating tablets of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide using ranitidine hydrochloride as a model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharti, Kp; Thapa, P; Budhathoki, U; Bhargava, A

    2012-10-01

    The present study was carried out with an objective of preparation and in vitro evaluation of floating tablets of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) using ranitidine hydrochloride as a model drug. The floating tablets were based on effervescent approach using sodium bicarbonate a gas generating agent. The tablets were prepared by dry granulation method. The effect of polymers concentration and viscosity grades of HPMC on drug release profile was evaluated. The effect of sodium bicarbonate and stearic acid on drug release profile and floating properties were also investigated. The result of in vitro dissolution study showed that the drug release profile could be sustained by increasing the concentration of HPMC K15MCR and Polyox WSR303. The formulation containing HPMC K15MCR and Polyox WSR303 at the concentration of 13.88% showed 91.2% drug release at the end of 24 hours. Changing the viscosity grade of HPMC from K15MCR to K100MCR had no significant effect on drug release profile. Sodium bicarbonate and stearic acid in combination showed no significant effect on drug release profile. The formulations containing sodium bicarbonate 20 mg per tablet showed desired buoyancy (floating lag time of about 2 minutes and total floating time of >24 hours). The present study shows that polymers like HPMC K15MCR and Polyox WSR303 in combination with sodium bicarbonate as a gas generating agent can be used to develop sustained release floating tablets of ranitidine hydrochloride.

  11. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC) nanoparticle

  12. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  13. Biopharmaceutical aspects of oral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, Werenfriedus Adrianus

    2004-01-01

    Most drugs display their therapeutic activity on specific places in the human body and should reach the systemic circulation in order to be transported towards the site of action. Irrespective of the route of administration the same sequence of steps are of relevance for the exposure to a drug: rele

  14. Dry powder inhalers for pulmonary drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijlink, H.W.; De Boer, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The pulmonary route is an interesting route for drug administration, both for effective local therapy (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cystic fibrosis) and for the systemic administration of drugs (e.g., peptides and proteins). Well-designed dry powder inhalers are highly efficient

  15. Carbon nanotubes buckypapers for potential transdermal drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwengber, Alex [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Prado, Héctor J. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cátedra de Tecnología Farmacéutica II, Departamento de Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zilli, Darío A. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonelli, Pablo R. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-12-01

    Drug loaded buckypapers based on different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared and characterized in order to evaluate their potentialities for the design of novel transdermal drug delivery systems. Lab-synthesized CNTs as well as commercial samples were employed. Clonidine hydrochloride was used as model drug, and the influence of composition of the drug loaded buckypapers and processing variables on in vitro release profiles was investigated. To examine the influence of the drug nature the evaluation was further extended to buckypapers prepared with flurbiprofen and one type of CNTs, their selection being based on the results obtained with the former drug. Scanning electronic microscopy images indicated that the model drugs were finely dispersed on the CNTs. Differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction pointed to an amorphous state of both drugs in the buckypapers. A higher degree of CNT–drug superficial interactions resulted in a slower release of the drug. These interactions were in turn affected by the type of CNTs employed (single wall or multiwall CNTs), their functionalization with hydroxyl or carboxyl groups, the chemical structure of the drug, and the CNT:drug mass ratio. Furthermore, the application of a second layer of drug free CNTs on the loaded buckypaper, led to decelerate the drug release and to reduce the burst effect. - Highlights: • Drug loaded buckypapers from carbon nanotubes were prepared and characterized. • Their potentialities for transdermal drug delivery applications were evaluated. • Characteristics of carbon nanotubes and the structure of the drug affected release • A higher carbon nanotube:drug mass ratio decelerated release • Up to one week controlled release profiles were obtained for the drug flurbiprofen.

  16. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  17. Recent trends in protein and peptide drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Himanshu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of insulin in 1922, identification and commercialization of potential protein and peptide drugs have been increased. Since then, research and development to improve the means of delivering protein therapeutics to patients has begun. The research efforts have followed two basic pathways: One path focused on noninvasive means of delivering proteins to the body and the second path has been primarily aimed at increasing the biological half-life of the therapeutic molecules. The search for approaches that provide formulations that are stable, bioavailable, readily manufacturable, and acceptable to the patient, has led to major advances in the development of nasal and controlled release technology, applicable to every protein or peptide. In several limited cases, sustained delivery of peptides and proteins has employed the use of polymeric carriers. More successes have been achieved by chemical modification using amino acid substitutions, protein pegylation or glycosylation to improve the pharmacodynamic properties of certain macromolecules and various delivery systems have been developed like the prolease technology, nano-particulate and microparticulate delivery systems, and the mucoadhesive delivery of peptides. The needle and syringe remain the primary means of protein delivery. Major hurdles remain in order to overcome the combined natural barriers of drug permeability, drug stability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of protein therapeutics. In our present review we have tried to compile some recent advances in protein and peptide drug delivery systems.

  18. Gellified Emulsion of Ofloxacin for Transdermal Drug Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdale, Swati; Pawar, Saylee

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Ofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone with broad-spectrum antibacterial action, used in treatment of systemic and local infections. Ofloxacin is BCS class II drug having low solubility, high permeability with short half-life. The present work was aimed to design, develop and optimize gellified emulsion of Ofloxacin to provide site targeted drug delivery. Transdermal drug delivery will enhance the bioavailability of the drug giving controlled drug release. Methods: Transdermal drug delivery system was designed with gelling agent (Carbopol 940 and HPMC K100M), oil phase (oleic acid) and emulsifying agent (Tween 80: Span 80). Effect of concentration of gelling agent on release of drug from transdermal delivery was studied by 3(2) factorial design. Emulgel was evaluated for physical appearance, pH, drug content, viscosity, spreadability, antimicrobial activity, in- vitro diffusion study and ex-vivo diffusion study. Results: FE-SEM study of the emulsion batch B5 has revealed formation of emulsion globules of approximately size 6-8 µm with -11.2 mV zeta potential showing good stability for the emulsion. Carbopol 940 had shown greater linear effect on drug release and viscosity of the formulations due to its high degree of gelling. In-vitro diffusion study through egg membrane had shown 88.58±1.82 % drug release for optimized batch F4. Ex-vivo diffusion study through goat skin indicated 76.68 ± 2.52% drug release. Conclusion: Controlled release Ofloxacin emulgel exhibiting good in-vitro and ex-vivo drug release proving good antimicrobial property was formulated.

  19. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-01-01

    Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualiz...

  20. Ceramic Nanoparticles: Fabrication Methods and Applications in Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shindu C; Harshita; Mishra, Pawan Kumar; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic nanoparticles are primarily made up of oxides, carbides, phosphates and carbonates of metals and metalloids such as calcium, titanium, silicon, etc. They have a wide range of applications due to a number of favourable properties, such as high heat resistance and chemical inertness. Out of all the areas of ceramic nanoparticles applications, biomedical field is the most explored one. In the biomedical field, ceramic nanoparticles are considered to be excellent carriers for drugs, genes, proteins, imaging agents etc. To be able to act as a good and successful drug delivery agent, various characteristics of nanoparticles need to be controlled, such as size range, surface properties, porosity, surface area to volume ratio, etc. In achieving these properties on the favourable side, the method of preparation and a good control over process variables play a key role. Choosing a suitable method to prepare nanoparticles, along with loading of significant amount of drug(s) leads to development of effective drug delivery systems which are being explored to a great extent. Ceramic nanoparticles have been successfully used as drug delivery systems against a number of diseases, such as bacterial infections, glaucoma, etc., and most widely, against cancer. This review gives a detailed account of commonly used methods for synthesising nanoparticles of various ceramic materials, along with an overview of their recent research status in the field of drug delivery.

  1. Towards soft robotic devices for site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Gursel

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have recently been dedicated to the establishment of various drug delivery systems (DDS) that are mechanical/physical, chemical and biological/molecular DDS. In this paper, we report on the recent advances in site-specific drug delivery (site-specific, controlled, targeted or smart drug delivery are terms used interchangeably in the literature, to mean to transport a drug or a therapeutic agent to a desired location within the body and release it as desired with negligibly small toxicity and side effect compared to classical drug administration means such as peroral, parenteral, transmucosal, topical and inhalation) based on mechanical/physical systems consisting of implantable and robotic drug delivery systems. While we specifically focus on the robotic or autonomous DDS, which can be reprogrammable and provide multiple doses of a drug at a required time and rate, we briefly cover the implanted DDS, which are well-developed relative to the robotic DDS, to highlight the design and performance requirements, and investigate issues associated with the robotic DDS. Critical research issues associated with both DDSs are presented to describe the research challenges ahead of us in order to establish soft robotic devices for clinical and biomedical applications.

  2. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation.

  3. Silk Fibroin-Based Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin (SF is a protein-based biomacromolecule with excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. The development of SF-based nanoparticles for drug delivery have received considerable attention due to high binding capacity for various drugs, controlled drug release properties and mild preparation conditions. By adjusting the particle size, the chemical structure and properties, the modified or recombinant SF-based nanoparticles can be designed to improve the therapeutic efficiency of drugs encapsulated into these nanoparticles. Therefore, they can be used to deliver small molecule drugs (e.g., anti-cancer drugs, protein and growth factor drugs, gene drugs, etc. This paper reviews recent progress on SF-based nanoparticles, including chemical structure, properties, and preparation methods. In addition, the applications of SF-based nanoparticles as carriers for therapeutic drugs are also reviewed.

  4. Novel non-invasive protein and peptide drug delivery approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, L; Kleynhans, E; Toit, T Du; Gouws, C; Steyn, D; Steenekamp, J; Viljoen, J; Hamman, J

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide based therapeutics are typically administered by injection due to their poor uptake when administered via enteral routes of drug administration. Unfortunately, chronic administration of these drugs through multiple injections presents certain patient related problems and it is difficult to mimic the normal physiological release patterns via this mode of drug administration. A need therefore exists to non-invasively deliver these drugs by means of alternative ways such as via the oral, pulmonary, nasal, transdermal and buccal administration routes. Although some attempts of needle free peptide and protein drug delivery have progressed to the clinical stage, relatively limited success has been achieved in terms of commercially available products. Despite the low frequency of clinical breakthroughs with noninvasive protein drug delivery this far, it remains an active research area with renewed interest not only due to its improved therapeutic potential, but also due to the attractive commercial outcomes it offers. It is the aim of this review article to reflect on the main strategies investigated to overcome the barriers against effective systemic protein drug delivery in different routes of drug administration. Approaches based on chemical modifications and pharmaceutical technologies are discussed with reference to examples of drugs and devices that have shown potential, while attempts that have failed are also briefly outlined.

  5. ORGANOGELS: ADVANCED AND NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Tarun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Organogel, is a non crystalline, non-glassy thermoreversible (thermoplastic solid material and viscoelastic system, can be regarded as a semi-solid preparation which has an immobilized external apolar phase. The apolar phase gets immobilized within spaces of the three-dimensional networked structure formed due to the physical interactions amongst the self assembled structures of compounds regarded as gelators. Often, these systems are based on self-assembly of the structurant molecules. In general, organogels are thermodynamically stable in nature and have been explored as matrices for the delivery of bioactive agents. Organogels have potential for use in a number of applications, such as in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, art conservation, and food. An example of formation of an undesired thermoreversible network is the occurrence of wax crystallization in petroleum. In the current manuscript, attempts have been made to understand the properties of organogels, various types of organogelators and some applications of the organogels in controlled delivery.

  6. Enhancing transdermal drug delivery with electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tak-Wah; Ko, Shu-Fen; Hui, Sek-Wen

    2008-01-01

    The application of electroporation to enhance transdermal delivery has opened up a new possibility to introduce larger molecules such as peptide hormones and vaccines as well as minigenes and RNAi etc. through the transdermal route. Many devices have been developed to deliver the pulse electric field needed to permeate the skin. These devices include both non-puncturing surface electrodes as well as puncturing electrodes of different geometrical arrangements. The latter type uses electroporation only to increase uptake of molecules injected through the puncturing electrode or syringe. Different electroporation protocols have been developed to maximize transport, uptake and minimizing pain. Synergistic effect of chemical enhancers and physical (sonic, vibrational and thermal) treatments are used to enhance the transport. This article reviews the patents pertaining to the instrumentation as well as application protocols of transdermal delivery, uptake enhancement and interstitial fluid sampling by electroporation.

  7. Mathematical modelling of the release of drug from porous, nonswelling transdermal drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A J; King, J R; Hibberd, S

    1998-06-01

    A general model is presented for the release of drug from porous nonswelling, transdermal drug-delivery devices and it is shown to reduce to previously proposed models in suitable limits. The processes which govern the release of drug are considered to be diffusion of dissolved drug and dissolution of dispersed drug, both in the body of the device and in the device pores, and transfer of drug between the two domains. In the classical limit of large dissolution rates, the problem reduces to one of the moving-boundary type, and solution of this problem in the case where the initial drug loading is much greater than the drug solubility in the device yields expressions for the flux of drug to a perfect sink (modelling in vitro conditions). It is shown that behaviour greatly differing from the classical first-order drug delivery (alpha t 1/2) may be exhibited, depending upon the parameter regime. In some situations the dissolution rates may not be so large and solutions of the general model are derived in the case where the dispersed drug is considered to be undepleted and the diffusivity in the solvent-filled pores is much larger than in the body of the delivery device. Numerical studies are undertaken, and the coupling of delivery device and skin-diffusion models (in order to model the complete transdermal drug-delivery process) is also considered.

  8. Liposomal drug delivery systems: from concept to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Theresa M; Cullis, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    The first closed bilayer phospholipid systems, called liposomes, were described in 1965 and soon were proposed as drug delivery systems. The pioneering work of countless liposome researchers over almost 5 decades led to the development of important technical advances such as remote drug loading, extrusion for homogeneous size, long-circulating (PEGylated) liposomes, triggered release liposomes, liposomes containing nucleic acid polymers, ligand-targeted liposomes and liposomes containing combinations of drugs. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas as the delivery of anti-cancer, anti-fungal and antibiotic drugs, the delivery of gene medicines, and the delivery of anesthetics and anti-inflammatory drugs. A number of liposomes (lipidic nanoparticles) are on the market, and many more are in the pipeline. Lipidic nanoparticles are the first nanomedicine delivery system to make the transition from concept to clinical application, and they are now an established technology platform with considerable clinical acceptance. We can look forward to many more clinical products in the future.

  9. ETHOSOMES: A POTENTIAL CARRIES FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJ KUMAR TIWARI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature is abounding with attempts made to enhance the delivery of drugs into the deep layers of the skin and through the skin. Ethosomes are noninvasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. Although ethosomal systems are conceptually sophisticated, they are characterized by simplicity in their preparation, safety, and efficacy a combination that can highly expand their application. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles tailored for enhanced delivery of active agents. This article reviews various aspect of ethosomes including their preparation, characterization, potential advantages and their applications in drug delivery. Because of their unique structure, ethosomes are able to encapsulate and deliver through the skin highly lipophilic molecules such as cannabinoids, testosterone, and minoxidil, as well as cationic drugs such as propranolol and trihexyphenidil. Ethosomes are provides a number of important benefits including improving the drug's efficacy, enhancing patient compliance and comfort and reducing the total cost of treatment. Enhanced delivery of bioactive molecules through the skin and cellular membranes by means of an ethosomal carrier opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies.

  10. TRANSFEROSOMES: A NOVEL APPROACH FOR TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery system appears to be most promising delivery system due to their merits over conventional delivery systems. Recently, various strategies have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. Mainly, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis, chemical permeation enhancers, microneedles, and vesicular system (liposomes, niosomes, elastic liposomes such as ethosomes and transfersomes. Among these strategies transferosomes appear promising. Transfersomes possess an infrastructure consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties together and as a result can accommodate drug molecules with wide range of solubility. A novel vesicular drug carrier system called transfersomes, which is composed of phospholipid, surfactant, and water for enhanced transdermal delivery. Transfersomes can deform and pass through narrow constriction (from 5 to 10 times less than their own diameter without measurable loss.. The system can be characterized by in vitro for vesicle shape and size, entrapment efficiency, degree of deformability, number of vesicles per cubic mm. Flexibility of transferosomes membrane is achieved by mixing suitable surface active agents in the proper ratios. Transferosomes have beneficial advantages over other vesicular systems such as their high penetration power across skin, higher stability, systemic drug release possible and higher deformability than other vesicular systems such as niosomes, liposomes etc. They can act as a carrier for low as well as high molecular weight drugs e.g. analgesic, anesthetic, corticosteroids, sex hormone, anticancer, insulin, gap junction protein, and albumin.

  11. Nanoparticles and nanostructured carriers for drug delivery and contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godage, Olga S.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; German, Sergey V.; Zuev, Viktor V.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Gorin, Dmitry A.

    2016-04-01

    Currently, nanotechnologies are widely used in science and industry. It is known that the application of drug delivery nanostructured carriers for biomedicine is one of the promising areas of nanotechnology. Nanostructured carriers can be used in the diagnosis process for detecting a neoplastic tumor cells in peripheral blood, for contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as for targeted drug delivery to tumor tissues. Agents for the targeted delivery (nanoparticles, liposomes, microcapsules, and etc) can affect the healthy tissues and organs, cause side effects and have a toxic effect. Therefore, it necessary to study the morphological changes that occur not only in the "target", such as a tumor, but also the internal organs, taking place under the influence of both the agents for targeted drug delivery and physical impact induced remote controlled drug release. Thus , the aim of our work is selection of the most promising agents for targeted drug delivery to tumor and contrast agents for in vivo visualization of tumor tissue boundaries , as well as their impact on the organs and tissues as results of nanostructured object biodistribution.

  12. Best practices for intrathecal drug delivery for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Joshua; Deer, Timothy; Levy, Robert; Bruel, Brian; Buchser, Eric; Caraway, David; Cousins, Michael; Jacobs, Marilyn; McGlothlen, Gail; Rauck, Richard; Staats, Peter; Stearns, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify best practices and provide guidance to clinicians to ensure safety and optimize intrathecal drug delivery for chronic intractable pain. Twelve experienced pain medicine practitioners-eight anesthesiologists, one neurosurgeon, one physiatrist, one clinical psychologist, and one advanced practice registered nurse-from the United States, Australia, and Europe gathered to identify and publish consensus on best practices in three areas related to safe intrathecal therapy for pain: safety and monitoring, patient and device management, and patient selection and trialing. Intrathecal drug delivery is a valuable alternative drug delivery system for many patients with severe chronic or end-of-life pain. While device-related complications (mostly with catheters) and surgical-site infections can occur, the main therapy-related safety issues associated with intrathecal drug delivery arise primarily with inadequate patient monitoring (e.g., respiratory depression), inflammatory mass (e.g., high doses and concentrations of opioids), wound healing, dosing errors (e.g., medication concentration and pump programming), pump fills or refills (e.g., pocket fills), and interaction with concomitant systemic medications (e.g., opioids and benzodiazepines). Many of the reported adverse events and complications of intrathecal drug delivery can be prevented by adequate clinician training, implementation of best practices, and experience. In adopting the therapy, patients must be apprised of its risks and benefits. Physicians and patients must partner to achieve both safety and effectiveness. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Microneedles for intradermal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan-Mahmood, Tuan-Mazlelaa; McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; Torrisi, Barbara M; McAlister, Emma; Garland, Martin J; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2013-12-18

    The formidable barrier properties of the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, impose significant limitations for successful systemic delivery of broad range of therapeutic molecules particularly macromolecules and genetic material. Microneedle (MN) has been proposed as a strategy to breach the stratum corneum barrier function in order to facilitate effective transport of molecules across the skin. This strategy involves use of micron sized needles fabricated of different materials and geometries to create transient aqueous conduits across the skin. MN, alone or with other enhancing strategies, has been demonstrated to dramatically enhance the skin permeability of numerous therapeutic molecules including biopharmaceuticals either in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo experiments. This suggested the promising use of MN technology for various possible clinical applications such as insulin delivery, transcutaneous immunisations and cutaneous gene delivery. MN has been proved as minimally invasive and painless in human subjects. This review article focuses on recent and future developments for MN technology including the latest type of MN design, challenges and strategies in MNs development as well as potential safety aspects based on comprehensive literature review pertaining to MN studies to date.

  14. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  15. Retinal Drug Delivery System, Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy. Intraocular injection can place the drug directly into the vitreous cavity but is not recommended...drugs for treatment of other ocular diseases such as retinal tumors, diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and cytomegalovirus...with the changes in mobile phase as indicated in each section. Data was collected for 10 min and the peak area was analyzed using the standard

  16. The effect of carbon nanotubes on drug delivery in an electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji S; Bai, Byong Ch; Lee, Young-Seak

    2010-02-01

    An electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system was prepared by the electrospinning method to control drug release. A semi-interpenetrating polymer network was prepared as the matrix with polyethylene oxide and pentaerythritol triacrylate polymers. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used as an additive to increase the electrical sensitivity. The release experiment was carried out under different electric voltage conditions. Carbon nanotubes were observed in the middle of the electrospun fibers by SEM and TEM. The amount of released drug was effectively increased with higher applied electric voltages. These results were attributed to the excellent electrical conductivity of the carbon additive. The suggested mechanism of drug release involves polyethylene oxide of the semi-interpenetrating polymer network being dissolved under the effects of carbon nanotubes, thereby releasing the drug. The effects of the electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system were enhanced by the carbon nanotubes.

  17. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualization, vesicle size and zeta potential, transition temperature, surface tension activity measurement, vesicle stability, drug content, penetration and permeation studies. Ethosomes have been found to be much more efficient at delivering drug to the skin than either liposomes or hydroalcoholic solution. Thus, it can be a logical conclusion that ethosomal formulation possesses promising future in effective dermal/transdermal delivery of bioactive agents.

  18. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Anish; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2017-03-27

    Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  19. MULTIPARTICULATE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: PELLETIZATION THROUGH EXTRUSION AND SPHERONIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Anshuli Sharma; Sandhya Chaurasia

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical invention and research are increasingly focusing on delivery systems which enhance desirable therapeutic objectives while minimising side effects. Recent trends indicate that multiparticulate drug delivery systems are especially suitable for achieving controlled or delayed release oral formulations with low risk of dose dumping, flexibility of blending to attain different release patterns as well as reproducible and short gastric residence time. Pelletization is a technique use...

  20. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  1. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  2. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  3. Macrophages as drug delivery vehicles for photochemical internalization (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Gonzalez, Jonathan; Molina, Stephanie; Kumar Nair, Rohit; Hirschberg, Henry

    2017-02-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumor sites is a major challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Cell-based vectorization of therapeutic agents has great potential for cancer therapy in that it can target and maintain an elevated concentration of therapeutic agents at the tumor site and prevent their spread into healthy tissue. The use of circulating cells such as monocytes/macrophages (Ma) offers several advantages compared to nanoparticles as targeted drug delivery vehicles. Ma can be easily obtained from the patient, loaded in vitro with drugs and reinjected into the blood stream. Ma can selectively cross the partially compromised blood-brain barrier surrounding brain tumors and are known to actively migrate to tumors, drawn by chemotactic factors, including hypoxic regions where conventional chemo and radiation therapy are least effective. The utility of Ma as targeted drug delivery vehicles for photochemical internalization (PCI) of tumors was investigated in this study. In vitro studies were conducted using a mixture of F98 rat glioma cells and rat macrophages loaded with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents including bleomycin and 5-fluorouracil. Preliminary data show that macrophages are resistant to both chemotherapeutics while significant toxicity is observed for F98 cells exposed to both drugs. Co-incubation of F98 cells with loaded Ma results in significant F98 toxicity suggesting that Ma are releasing the drugs and, hence providing the rationale for their use as delivery vectors for cancer therapies such as PCI.

  4. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems: promising approaches against infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranghar, Shweta; Sirohi, Parul [Department of Applied Mechanics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India); Verma, Pritam; Agarwal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu_agarwal02@rediffmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India)

    2014-03-15

    Despite the fact that many new drugs and technologies have been developed to combat the infectious diseases, these have continued to be global health challenges. The use of conventional antimicrobial agents against these infections is always associated with problems such as the development of multiple drug resistance and adverse side effects. In addition, the inefficient traditional drug delivery system results in inadequate therapeutic index, low bioavailability of drugs and many other limitations. In this regard, antimicrobial nanoparticles and nanosized drug delivery carriers have emerged as potent effective agents against the infections. Nanoparticles have unique properties owing to their ultra small and controllable size such as high surface area, enhanced reactivity, and functionalizable structure. This review focused on different classes of antimicrobial nanoparticles, including metal, metal oxide and others along with their mechanism of action and their potential use against the infections. The review also focused on the development of nanoparticle systems for antimicrobial drug delivery and use of these systems for delivery of various antimicrobial agents, giving an overview about modern nanoparticle based therapeutic strategies against the infections. (author)

  5. Nanostructured lipid carriers system: recent advances in drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Md Asif; Md, Shadab; Sahni, Jasjeet Kaur; Baboota, Sanjula; Dang, Shweta; Ali, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) is second generation smarter drug carrier system having solid matrix at room temperature. This carrier system is made up of physiological, biodegradable and biocompatible lipid materials and surfactants and is accepted by regulatory authorities for application in different drug delivery systems. The availability of many products in the market in short span of time reveals the success story of this delivery system. Since the introduction of the first product, around 30 NLC preparations are commercially available. NLC exhibit superior advantages over other colloidal carriers viz., nanoemulsions, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, SLN etc. and thus, have been explored to more extent in pharmaceutical technology. The whole set of unique advantages such as enhanced drug loading capacity, prevention of drug expulsion, leads to more flexibility for modulation of drug release and makes NLC versatile delivery system for various routes of administration. The present review gives insights on the definitions and characterization of NLC as colloidal carriers including the production techniques and suitable formulations. This review paper also highlights the importance of NLC in pharmaceutical applications for the various routes of drug delivery viz., topical, oral, pulmonary, ocular and parenteral administration and its future perspective as a pharmaceutical carrier.

  6. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  7. Designer lipids for drug delivery: from heads to tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Aditya G.; Kierstead, Paul H.; Venditto, Vincent J.; Walsh, Colin L.; Szoka, Francis C.

    2014-01-01

    For four decades, liposomes composed of both naturally occurring and synthetic lipids have been investigated as delivery vehicles for low molecular weight and macromolecular drugs. These studies paved the way for the clinical and commercial success of a number of liposomal drugs, each of which required a tailored formulation; one liposome size does not fit all drugs! Instead, the physicochemical properties of the liposome must be matched to the pharmacology of the drug. An extensive biophysical literature demonstrates that varying lipid composition can influence the size, membrane stability, in vivo interactions, and drug release properties of a liposome. In this review we focus on recently described synthetic lipid headgroups, linkers and hydrophobic domains that can provide control over the intermolecular forces, phase preference, and macroscopic behavior of liposomes. These synthetic lipids further our understanding of lipid biophysics, promote targeted drug delivery, and improve liposome stability. We further highlight the immune reactivity of novel synthetic headgroups as a key design consideration. For instance it was originally thought that synthetic PEGylated lipids were immunologically inert; however, it’s been observed that under certain conditions PEGylated lipids induce humoral immunity. Such immune activation may be a limitation to the use of other engineered lipid headgroups for drug delivery. In addition to the potential immunogenicity of engineered lipids, future investigations on liposome drugs in vivo should pay particular attention to the location and dynamics of payload release. PMID:24816069

  8. NanoClusters Enhance Drug Delivery in Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornputtapitak, Warangkana

    The overall goal of this thesis was to develop a dry powder delivery system for patients on mechanical ventilation. The studies were divided into two parts: the formulation development and the device design. The pulmonary system is an attractive route for drug delivery since the lungs have a large accessible surface area for treatment or drug absorption. For ventilated patients, inhaled drugs have to successfully navigate ventilator tubing and an endotracheal tube. Agglomerates of drug nanoparticles (also known as 'NanoClusters') are fine dry powder aerosols that were hypothesized to enable drug delivery through ventilator circuits. This Thesis systematically investigated formulations of NanoClusters and their aerosol performance in a conventional inhaler and a device designed for use during mechanical ventilation. These engineered powders of budesonide (NC-Bud) were delivered via a MonodoseRTM inhaler or a novel device through commercial endotracheal tubes, and analyzed by cascade impaction. NC-Bud had a higher efficiency of aerosol delivery compared to micronized stock budesonide. The delivery efficiency was independent of ventilator parameters such as inspiration patterns, inspiration volumes, and inspiration flow rates. A novel device designed to fit directly to the ventilator and endotracheal tubing connections and the MonodoseRTM inhaler showed the same efficiency of drug delivery. The new device combined with NanoCluster formulation technology, therefore, allowed convenient and efficient drug delivery through endotracheal tubes. Furthermore, itraconazole (ITZ), a triazole antifungal agent, was formulated as a NanoCluster powder via milling (top-down process) or precipitation (bottom-up process) without using any excipients. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by wet milling showed better aerosol performance compared to micronized stock ITZ and ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation methods also showed an amorphous state

  9. Improving drug delivery to solid tumors: priming the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawar, Iftikhar Ali; Kim, Jung Ho; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-03-10

    Malignant transformation and growth of the tumor mass tend to induce changes in the surrounding microenvironment. Abnormality of the tumor microenvironment provides a driving force leading not only to tumor progression, including invasion and metastasis, but also to acquisition of drug resistance, including pharmacokinetic (drug delivery-related) and pharmacodynamic (sensitivity-related) resistance. Drug delivery systems exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and active targeting moieties were expected to be able to cope with delivery-related drug resistance. However, recent evidence supports a considerable barrier role of tumors via various mechanisms, which results in imperfect or inefficient EPR and/or targeting effect. The components of the tumor microenvironment such as abnormal tumor vascular system, deregulated composition of the extracellular matrix, and interstitial hypertension (elevated interstitial fluid pressure) collectively or cooperatively hinder the drug distribution, which is prerequisite to the efficacy of nanoparticles and small-molecule drugs used in cancer medicine. Hence, the abnormal tumor microenvironment has recently been suggested to be a promising target for the improvement of drug delivery to improve therapeutic efficacy. Strategies to modulate the abnormal tumor microenvironment, referred to here as "solid tumor priming" (vascular normalization and/or solid stress alleviation leading to improvement in blood perfusion and convective molecular movement), have shown promising results in the enhancement of drug delivery and anticancer efficacy. These strategies may provide a novel avenue for the development of new chemotherapeutics and combination chemotherapeutic regimens as well as reassessment of previously ineffective agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Applications of polymers in intraocular drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhalafi, Ali Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    We are entering a new era of ophthalmic pharmacology where new drugs are rapidly being developed for the treatment of anterior and posterior segment of the eye disease. The pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the eye remains a very active area of ophthalmic research. Intraocular drug delivery systems allow the release of the drug, bypassing the blood-ocular barrier. The main advantage of these preparations is that they can release the drug over a long time with one single administration. These pharmaceutical systems are of great important in the treatment of the posterior segment diseases, and they can be prepared from biodegradable or nonbiodegradable polymers. Biodegradable polymers have the advantage of disappearing from the site of action after releasing the drug. The majority of intraocular devices are prepared from nonbiodegradable polymers, and they can release controlled amounts of drugs for months. Nonbiodegradable polymers include silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, and ethylene-vinyl acetate. The polymers usually employed to prepare nanoparticles for the topical ophthalmic route are poly (acrylic acid) derivatives (polyalquilcyanocrylates), albumin, poly-ε-caprolactone, and chitosan. Dendrimers are a recent class of polymeric materials with unique nanostructure which has been studied to discover their role in the delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Hydrogels are polymers that can swell in aqueous solvent system, and they hold the solvents in a swollen cross-linked gel for delivery. This review exhibits the current literature regarding applications of polymers in ophthalmic drug delivery systems including pharmacokinetics, advantages, disadvantages, and indications aimed to obtain successful eye therapy. Method of Literature Search: A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed databases into two steps. The first step was oriented to classification of intraocular polymers implants focusing on their advantages and disadvantages. The second

  11. Applications of polymers in intraocular drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammed Alhalafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering a new era of ophthalmic pharmacology where new drugs are rapidly being developed for the treatment of anterior and posterior segment of the eye disease. The pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the eye remains a very active area of ophthalmic research. Intraocular drug delivery systems allow the release of the drug, bypassing the blood–ocular barrier. The main advantage of these preparations is that they can release the drug over a long time with one single administration. These pharmaceutical systems are of great important in the treatment of the posterior segment diseases, and they can be prepared from biodegradable or nonbiodegradable polymers. Biodegradable polymers have the advantage of disappearing from the site of action after releasing the drug. The majority of intraocular devices are prepared from nonbiodegradable polymers, and they can release controlled amounts of drugs for months. Nonbiodegradable polymers include silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, and ethylene-vinyl acetate. The polymers usually employed to prepare nanoparticles for the topical ophthalmic route are poly (acrylic acid derivatives (polyalquilcyanocrylates, albumin, poly-μ-caprolactone, and chitosan. Dendrimers are a recent class of polymeric materials with unique nanostructure which has been studied to discover their role in the delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Hydrogels are polymers that can swell in aqueous solvent system, and they hold the solvents in a swollen cross-linked gel for delivery. This review exhibits the current literature regarding applications of polymers in ophthalmic drug delivery systems including pharmacokinetics, advantages, disadvantages, and indications aimed to obtain successful eye therapy. Method of Literature Search: A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed databases into two steps. The first step was oriented to classification of intraocular polymers implants focusing on their advantages and

  12. Lipid-coated polymeric nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Sangeetha; Vaiyapuri, Rajendran; Zhang, Liangfang; Chan, Juliana M

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes have been the platform of choice for nanoparticle-based cancer drug delivery applications over the past decade, but extensive research has revealed their limitations as drug delivery carriers. A hybrid class of nanoparticles, aimed at combining the advantages of both polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, has received attention in recent years. These core/shell type nanoparticles, frequently referred to as lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs), possess several characteristics that make them highly suitable for drug delivery. This review introduces the formulation methods used to synthesize LPNs and discusses the strategies used to treat cancer, such as by targeting the tumor microenvironment or vasculature. Finally, it discusses the challenges that must be overcome to realize the full potential of LPNs in the clinic.

  13. MULTIPARTICULATE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: PELLETIZATION THROUGH EXTRUSION AND SPHERONIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuli Sharma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical invention and research are increasingly focusing on delivery systems which enhance desirable therapeutic objectives while minimising side effects. Recent trends indicate that multiparticulate drug delivery systems are especially suitable for achieving controlled or delayed release oral formulations with low risk of dose dumping, flexibility of blending to attain different release patterns as well as reproducible and short gastric residence time. Pelletization is a technique used to prepare fine powders into pellets used as multiparticulate drug delivery systems. There are different pelletization techniques used to prepare pellets. Extrusion and spheronization is one of them used to prepare pellets drug loaded beads/pellets for extended release or sustained release oral formulations such as tablets and capsules.

  14. MICROEMULSIONS AS ANTIDIABETIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omnia Sarhan, Mahmoud M. Ibrahim* and Mahmoud Mahdy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Glibenclamide is practically insoluble in water and its gastrointestinal absorption is limited by its dissolution rate. Therefore, to enhance the drug dissolution and its hypoglycemic effects, the drug was formulated in different microemulsion systems and in vitro/in vivo evaluated. Microemulsion systems were prepared by Water titration method in which surfactants and cosurfactants (S/CoS were mixed at different weight ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. They were subjected to transmission electron microscopical examination, pH determination and viscosity tests. The solubility of Glibenclamide in different microemulsion systems was determined. Forms 8, 9, 10, 11, 14 and 18 were found to have high Glibenclamide solubility using different oils. Form 11 and 9 showed the highest Glibenclamide release rates of 59.72% and 52.35%, respectively after 6 hours. In-vivo studies were tested using diabetic rats by application of form 11 with n-butanol as cosurfactant transdermally and form 8 with propylene glycol cosurfactant orally and transdermally. The results were compared to the drug suspension as a positive control. It was shown that microemulsion systems gave an effective tool of increasing drug dissolution probably due to enhanced wettability and reduced drug particle size, which in turn led to enhance its hypoglycemic effects.

  15. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS.

  16. Novel drug-delivery systems for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albu S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Silviu AlbuDepartment of Otolaryngology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Chronic rhinosinusitis, one of the most common chronic medical complaints in the United States, seems to be increasing in incidence and prevalence, and has a significant impact on quality of life. Topical forms of medical therapy represent an attractive alternative for drug delivery to the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Topical drug delivery has the advantage of directly acting on the site of inflammation, producing a higher concentration at the target site while avoiding systemic side effects. Although considerable research has been undertaken into improving nasal formulations in order to enhance absorption, little attention has so far been directed to upgrading the delivery devices. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge on the novel drug-delivery devices in use in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis patients, and to present the current available knowledge on topical drug penetration into the sinuses using various delivery devices. Additionally, methods used to enhance fluid sinus deposition are presented and the published clinical studies on the results of nebulized antibiotics in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis patients are discussed.Keywords: paranasal sinuses, topical therapy, nebulized antibiotics, clinical trials

  17. Advances in drug delivery via electrospun and electrosprayed nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maedeh Zamani,1 Molamma P Prabhakaran,2 Seeram Ramakrishna1,21Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Electrohydrodynamic (EHD techniques refer to procedures that utilize electrostatic forces to fabricate fibers or particles of different shapes with sizes in the nano-range to a few microns through electrically charged fluid jet. Employing different techniques, such as blending, surface modification, and coaxial process, there is a great possibility of incorporating bioactive such molecules as drugs, DNA, and growth factors into the nanostructures fabricated via EHD techniques. By careful selection of materials and processing conditions, desired encapsulation efficiency as well as preserved bioactivity of the therapeutic agents can be achieved. The drug-loaded nanostructures produced can be applied via different routes, such as implantation, injection, and topical or oral administration for a wide range of disease treatment. Taking advantage of the recent developments in EHD techniques like the coaxial process or multilayered structures, individually controlled delivery of multiple drugs is achievable, which is of great demand in cancer therapy and growth-factor delivery. This review summarizes the most recent techniques and postmodification methods to fabricate electrospun nanofibers and electrosprayed particles for drug-delivery applications.Keywords: electrospinning, electrospraying, gene delivery, growth-factor delivery, cancer therapy, wound dressing

  18. The effects of polymeric nanostructure shape on drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Shrinivas; Hedrick, James L; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Yang, Chuan; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Hammond, Paula T; Yang, Yi Yan

    2011-11-01

    Amphiphilic polymeric nanostructures have long been well-recognized as an excellent candidate for drug delivery applications. With the recent advances in the "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, development of well-defined polymeric nanostructures of different shapes has been possible. Such a possibility of tailoring the shape of the nanostructures has allowed for the fabrication of model systems with chemically equivalent but topologically different carriers. With these model nanostructures, evaluation of the importance of particle shape in the context of biodistribution, cellular uptake and toxicity has become a major thrust area. Since most of the current polymeric delivery systems are based upon spherical nanostructures, understanding the implications of other shapes will allow for the development of next generation drug delivery vehicles. Herein we will review different approaches to fabricate polymeric nanostructures of various shapes, provide a comprehensive summary on the current understandings of the influence of nanostructures with different shapes on important biological processes in drug delivery, and discuss future perspectives for the development of nanostructures with well-defined shapes for drug delivery.

  19. Delivery of aerosolized drugs encapsulated in liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Lyons, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmid, M.H.

    1995-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an infectious disease that resides in the human lung. Due to the difficulty in completely killing off the disease in infected individuals, Mtb has developed drug-resistant forms and is on the rise in the human population. Therefore, ITRI and the University of New Mexico are collaborating to explore the treatment of Mtb by an aerosolized drug delivered directly to the lungs. In conclusion, it is feasible to obtain an appropriate size and concentration of the liposomes before and after aerosolization.

  20. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY ADHESION AS A CRITICAL PARAMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Mahavir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS, also known as “patches”, are the dosage forms designed to deliver a therapeutically effective amount of drug across a patient’s skin. The adhesive of the transdermal drug delivery system is very crucial to the safety, efficacy and quality of the product. Recently, it has been recognized that the skin can also serve as the port of administration for systemically active drugs. The drugs applied topically are first absorbed into the blood stream and then are transported to the target tissues. Now, it is becoming evident that the benefits of intra venous infusion can be closely duplicated by using skin as the port of drug administration to provide continuous transdermal drug infusion into the systemic circulation. One of the objectives of TDDS is the maintenance of blood concentration of drug at therapeutic level by means of controlled permeation throughout the skin during a long period of time and using only one administration. The drug input can be terminated at any point of time by just removing the patch. Rate of drug release from the TDDS is normally much greater than the amount that the skin can possibly absorb. Hence, even if there is a variation in skin permeability, a constant rate of drug input into the circulation is achieved. This article provides an overview of type of transdermal systems, role of adhesion, possible adhesion failures and the measurement of adhesion. In vitro techniques like peel adhesion, tack and shear strength are discussed. Adhesion needs to be a critical parameter for designing a transdermal drug delivery system in order to provide good quality and efficacy to the patient. This review also covers a brief outline of various components of a patch, their advantages, when the patch should be used and when their use should be avoided.

  1. Carbon nanotubes hybrid hydrogels in drug delivery: a perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cirillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior. The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review.

  3. Drug delivery via porous silicon: a focused patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyavtsev, Paulina A; Spencer, Roxanne P

    2017-03-01

    Although silicon is more commonly associated with computer chips than with drug delivery, with the discovery that porous silicon is a viable biocompatible material, mesoporous silicon with pores between 2 and 50 nm has been loaded with small molecule and biomolecule therapeutics and safely implanted for controlled release. As porous silicon is readily oxidized, porous silica must also be considered for drug delivery applications. Since 2010, only a limited number of US patents have been granted, primarily for ophthalmologic and immunotherapy applications, in contrast to the growing body of technical literature in this area.

  4. DNA nanoparticles as ocular drug delivery platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and now offers facile fabrication of a large variety of nanostructures of different shapes and geometries. In this thesis, short nucleic acid sequences are functionalized with hydrophobic units to form the basis of an ocular drug

  5. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and connect the two tubes; (b) A scanning electron microscope image of the transverse cross-sectional view of the PLGA nerve conduit. The filter is...reprints of manuscripts and abstracts, a curriculum vitae, patent applications, study questionnaires, and surveys, etc. Bioresorbable Multi-Drug

  6. Carbon nanotubes buckypapers for potential transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwengber, Alex; Prado, Héctor J; Zilli, Darío A; Bonelli, Pablo R; Cukierman, Ana L

    2015-12-01

    Drug loaded buckypapers based on different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared and characterized in order to evaluate their potentialities for the design of novel transdermal drug delivery systems. Lab-synthesized CNTs as well as commercial samples were employed. Clonidine hydrochloride was used as model drug, and the influence of composition of the drug loaded buckypapers and processing variables on in vitro release profiles was investigated. To examine the influence of the drug nature the evaluation was further extended to buckypapers prepared with flurbiprofen and one type of CNTs, their selection being based on the results obtained with the former drug. Scanning electronic microscopy images indicated that the model drugs were finely dispersed on the CNTs. Differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction pointed to an amorphous state of both drugs in the buckypapers. A higher degree of CNT-drug superficial interactions resulted in a slower release of the drug. These interactions were in turn affected by the type of CNTs employed (single wall or multiwall CNTs), their functionalization with hydroxyl or carboxyl groups, the chemical structure of the drug, and the CNT:drug mass ratio. Furthermore, the application of a second layer of drug free CNTs on the loaded buckypaper, led to decelerate the drug release and to reduce the burst effect.

  7. Hydrogel nanoparticles and nanocomposites for nasal drug/vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatin, Sara; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Adibkia, Khosro; Milani, Mitra Alami; Jelvehgari, Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Over the past few years, nasal drug delivery has attracted more and more attentions, and been recognized as the most promising alternative route for the systemic medication of drugs limited to intravenous administration. Many experiments in animal models have shown that nanoscale carriers have the ability to enhance the nasal delivery of peptide/protein drugs and vaccines compared to the conventional drug solution formulations. However, the rapid mucociliary clearance of the drug-loaded nanoparticles can cause a reduction in bioavailability percentage after intranasal administration. Thus, research efforts have considerably been directed towards the development of hydrogel nanosystems which have mucoadhesive properties in order to maximize the residence time, and hence increase the period of contact with the nasal mucosa and enhance the drug absorption. It is most certain that the high viscosity of hydrogel-based nanosystems can efficiently offer this mucoadhesive property. This update review discusses the possible benefits of using hydrogel polymer-based nanoparticles and hydrogel nanocomposites for drug/vaccine delivery through the intranasal administration.

  8. Alginate-based hybrid aerogel microparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V S S; Gurikov, P; Poejo, J; Matias, A A; Heinrich, S; Duarte, C M M; Smirnova, I

    2016-10-01

    The application of biopolymer aerogels as drug delivery systems (DDS) has gained increased interest during the last decade since these structures have large surface area and accessible pores allowing for high drug loadings. Being biocompatible, biodegradable and presenting low toxicity, polysaccharide-based aerogels are an attractive carrier to be applied in pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, some polysaccharides (e.g. alginate and chitosan) present mucoadhesive properties, an important feature for mucosal drug delivery. This feature allows to extend the contact of DDS with biological membranes, thereby increasing the absorption of drugs through the mucosa. Alginate-based hybrid aerogels in the form of microparticles (alginate and further dried with supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Spherical mesoporous aerogel microparticles were obtained for alginate, hybrid alginate/pectin and alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogels, presenting high specific surface area (370-548m(2)g(-1)) and mucoadhesive properties. The microparticles were loaded with ketoprofen via adsorption from its solution in sc-CO2, and with quercetin via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation. Loading of ketoprofen was in the range between 17 and 22wt% whereas quercetin demonstrated loadings of 3.1-5.4wt%. Both the drugs were present in amorphous state. Loading procedure allowed the preservation of antioxidant activity of quercetin. Release of both drugs from alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogel was slightly faster compared to alginate/pectin. The results indicate that alginate-based aerogel microparticles can be viewed as promising matrices for mucosal drug delivery applications.

  9. Drug delivery with topically applied nanoparticles: science fiction or reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J; Richter, H; Meinke, M C; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B; Antoniou, C; Mak, W C; Renneberg, R; Sterry, W; Patzelt, A

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of topically applied drugs is determined by their action mechanism and their potential capacity of passing the skin barrier. Nanoparticles are assumed to be efficient carrier systems for drug delivery through the skin barrier. For flexible nanoparticles like liposomes, this effect has been well demonstrated. The penetration properties of solid nanoparticles are currently under intensive investigation. The crucial advantage of nanoparticles over non-particulate substances is their capability to penetrate deeply into the hair follicles where they can be stored for several days. There is no evidence, yet, that solid particles ≥40 nm are capable of passing through the healthy skin barrier. Therefore and in spite of the long-standing research efforts in this field, commercially available solid nanoparticle-based products for drug delivery through the healthy skin are still missing. Nevertheless, the prospects for the clinical use of nanoparticles in drug delivery are tremendous. They can be designed as transport systems delivering drugs efficiently into the hair follicles in the vicinity of specific target structures. Once deposited at these structures, specific signals might trigger the release of the drugs and exert their effects on the target cells. In this article, examples of such triggered drug release are presented.

  10. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  11. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted.

  12. 3D lithographically fabricated nanoliter containers for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Christina L; Leong, Timothy G; Bassik, Noy; Gracias, David H

    2007-12-22

    Lithographic patterning offers the possibility for precise structuring of drug delivery devices. The fabrication process can also facilitate the incorporation of advanced functionality for imaging, sensing, telemetry and actuation. However, a major limitation of present day lithographic fabrication is the inherent two-dimensionality of the patterning process. We review a new approach to construct three dimensional (3D) patterned containers by lithographically patterning two dimensional (2D) templates with liquefiable hinges that spontaneously fold upon heating into hollow polyhedral containers. The containers have finite encapsulation volumes, can be made small enough to pass through a hypodermic needle, and the 3D profile of the containers facilitates enhanced diffusion with the surrounding medium as compared to reservoir systems fabricated in planar substrates. We compare the features of the containers to those of present day drug delivery systems. These features include ease of manufacture, versatility in size and shape, monodisperse porosity, ability for spatial manipulation and remote triggering to release drugs on-demand, the incorporation of electronic modules, cell encapsulation, biocompatibility and stability. We also review possible applications in drug delivery and cell encapsulation therapy (CET). The results summarized in this review suggest a new strategy to enable construction of "smart", three dimensional drug delivery systems using lithography.

  13. LIPOSOME AS A POTENTIAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW

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    Dash Tapaswi Rani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are microscopic phospholipid vescicles made of lipid bilayer which are the drug carrier for improving the delivery of therapeutic agents. Research on liposome technology has progressed from conventional vesicles (“first-generation liposomes” to “second-generation liposomes”, in which long-circulating liposomes are obtained by modulating the lipid composition, size, and charge of the vesicle. Liposomes with modified surfaces have also been developed using several molecules, such as glycolipids or sialic acid. A significant step in the development of long-circulating liposomes came with inclusion of the synthetic polymer poly-(ethylene glycol (PEG in liposome composition. Due to advancement in liposomal technology a number of liposomal formulations are available in market for clinical use, with gene delivery and cancer therapy and some formulations are under clinical trial. Reformulation of drugs in liposomes has provided an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic indices of various agents mainly through alteration in their biodistribution. This review discusses the basic principles of liposome structures and preparations, evaluation parameters of liposomal formulation, pharmacokinetics of liposomes and liposome-encapsulated drugs, the potential applications of liposomes in drug delivery with examples of formulations approved for clinical use, and the problems associated with further exploitation of this drug delivery system.

  14. Orally disintegrating films: A modern expansion in drug delivery system

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    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, tendency toward innovative drug delivery systems has majorly increased attempts to ensure efficacy, safety and patient acceptability. As discovery and development of new chemical agents is a complex, expensive and time consuming process, so recent trends are shifting toward designing and developing innovative drug delivery systems for existing drugs. Out of those, drug delivery system being very eminent among pediatrics and geriatrics is orally disintegrating films (ODFs. These fast disintegrating films have superiority over fast disintegrating tablets as the latter are associated with the risks of choking and friability. This drug delivery system has numerous advantages over conventional fast disintegrating tablets as they can be used for dysphasic and schizophrenic patients and are taken without water due to their ability to disintegrate within a few seconds releasing medication in mouth. Various approaches are employed for formulating ODFs and among which solvent casting and spraying methods are frequently used. Generally, hydrophilic polymers along with other excipients are used for preparing ODFs which allow films to disintegrate quickly releasing incorporated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API within seconds. Orally disintegrating films have potential for business and market exploitation because of their myriad of benefits over orally disintegrating tablets. This present review attempts to focus on benefits, composition, approaches for formulation and evaluation of ODFs. Additionally, the market prospect of this innovative dosage form is also targeted.

  15. Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Innovative Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Lohani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have always been valuable excipients in conventional dosage forms, also have shown excellent performance into the parenteral arena, and are now capable of offering advanced and sophisticated functions such as controlled drug release and drug targeting. Advances in polymer science have led to the development of several novel drug delivery systems. Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs have shown superior performances over the conventional individual polymers and, consequently, the ranges of applications have grown rapidly for such class of materials. The advanced properties of IPNs like swelling capacity, stability, biocompatibility, nontoxicity and biodegradability have attracted considerable attention in pharmaceutical field especially in delivering bioactive molecules to the target site. In the past few years various research reports on the IPN based delivery systems showed that these carriers have emerged as a novel carrier in controlled drug delivery. The present review encompasses IPNs, their types, method of synthesis, factors which affects the morphology of IPNs, extensively studied IPN based drug delivery systems, and some natural polymers widely used for IPNs.

  16. Biocompatibility of Chitosan Carriers with Application in Drug Delivery

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    Ana Grenha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is one of the most used polysaccharides in the design of drug delivery strategies for administration of either biomacromolecules or low molecular weight drugs. For these purposes, it is frequently used as matrix forming material in both nano and micron-sized particles. In addition to its interesting physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which include high mucoadhesion and a great capacity to produce drug delivery systems, ensuring the biocompatibility of the drug delivery vehicles is a highly relevant issue. Nevertheless, this subject is not addressed as frequently as desired and even though the application of chitosan carriers has been widely explored, the demonstration of systems biocompatibility is still in its infancy. In this review, addressing the biocompatibility of chitosan carriers with application in drug delivery is discussed and the methods used in vitro and in vivo, exploring the effect of different variables, are described. We further provide a discussion on the pros and cons of used methodologies, as well as on the difficulties arising from the absence of standardization of procedures.

  17. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Lan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo, including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

  18. Drug delivery through soft contact lenses: An introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourishanker Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current ophthalmic drug delivery systems are insufficient, specifically eye drops, which allow approximately 95% of the drug contained in the drops to be lost due to absorption through the conjunctiva or through the tear drainage. The use of soft contact lenses has been proposed as a method to deliver drugs to the eye in an efficient manner. The contact lenses restrict the drug from being lost to tear drainage by releasing the drug into two tear layers on either side of the contact lens, where it ultimately diffuses into the eye. By using loaded soft contact lenses, continuous drug release for extended period is possible. This paper focuses on the different methods of drug loading used throughout a polymer hydrogel.

  19. Lasers as an approach for promoting drug delivery via skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-04-01

    Using lasers can be an effective drug permeation-enhancement approach for facilitating drug delivery into or across the skin. The controlled disruption and ablation of the stratum corneum (SC), the predominant barrier for drug delivery, is achieved by the use of lasers. The possible mechanisms of laser-assisted drug permeation are the direct ablation of the skin barrier, optical breakdown by a photomechanical wave and a photothermal effect. It has been demonstrated that ablative approaches for enhancing drug transport provide some advantages, including increased bioavailability, fast treatment time, quick recovery of SC integrity and the fact that skin surface contact is not needed. In recent years, the concept of using laser techniques to treat the skin has attracted increasing attention. This review describes recent developments in using nonablative and ablative lasers for drug absorption enhancement. This review systematically introduces the concepts and enhancement mechanisms of lasers, highlighting the potential of this technique for greatly increasing drug absorption via the skin. Lasers with different wavelengths and types are employed to increase drug permeation. These include the ruby laser, the erbium:yttrium-gallium-garnet laser, the neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and the CO2 laser. Fractional modality is a novel concept for promoting topical/transdermal drug delivery. The laser is useful in enhancing the permeation of a wide variety of permeants, such as small-molecule drugs, macromolecules and nanoparticles. This potential use of the laser affords a new treatment for topical/transdermal application with significant efficacy. Further studies using a large group of humans or patients are needed to confirm and clarify the findings in animal studies. Although the laser fluence or output energy used for enhancing drug absorption is much lower than for treatment of skin disorders and rejuvenation, the safety of using lasers is still an issue

  20. Drug delivery to the inner ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew K.; Gillespie, Lisa N.

    2012-12-01

    Bionic devices electrically activate neural populations to partially restore lost function. Of fundamental importance is the functional integrity of the targeted neurons. However, in many conditions the ongoing pathology can lead to continued neural degeneration and death that may compromise the effectiveness of the device and limit future strategies to improve performance. The use of drugs that can prevent nerve cell degeneration and promote their regeneration may improve clinical outcomes. In this paper we focus on strategies of delivering neuroprotective drugs to the auditory system in a way that is safe and clinically relevant for use in combination with a cochlear implant. The aim of this approach is to prevent neural degeneration and promote nerve regrowth in order to improve outcomes for cochlear implant recipients using techniques that can be translated to the clinic.

  1. Modified release drug delivery in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, Michael J; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2002-08-01

    To successfully research and develop an animal pharmaceutical dosage form, a diverse array of issues covering basic medicine, pharmacology and technology must be addressed. Societal concerns regarding animal and public health, as well as the rapidly changing farming and economic environments, provide additional challenges that require integration into an already complex web of issues. Here, we examine the drive towards reducing the frequency of administration to animals and the closing of gaps between the human and veterinary drug product development.

  2. HDL as a drug and nucleic acid delivery vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras G Lacko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review is intended to evaluate the research findings and potential clinical applications of drug transport systems, developed based on the concepts of the structure/function and physiological role(s of high density lipoprotein=type nanoparticles. These macromolecules provide targeted transport of cholesteryl esters (a highly lipophilic payload in their natural/physiological environment. The property of accommodating highly water insoluble constituents in their core region enables HDL type nanoparticles to effectively transport hydrophobic drugs upon intravenous administration. Even though the application of reconstituted HDL in the treatment of a number of diseases is reviewed, the primary focus is on the application of HDL type drug delivery agents in cancer chemotherapy. The use of both native and synthetic HDL as drug delivery agents are compared to evaluate their respective potentials for commercial and clinical development. The current status and future perspectives for HDL type nanoparticles are discussed, including current obstacles and future applications in therapeutics.

  3. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS. The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  4. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  5. Trojan-horse nanotube on-command intracellular drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Hsuan; Cao, Cong; Kim, Jin Ho; Hsu, Chih-Hsun; Wanebo, Harold J; Bowen, Wayne D; Xu, Jimmy; Marshall, John

    2012-11-14

    A major challenge to nanomaterial-based medicine is the ability to release drugs on-command. Here, we describe an innovative drug delivery system based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which compounds can be released inside cells from within the nanotube "on-command" by inductive heating with an external alternating current or pulsed magnetic field. Without inductive heating the drug remains safely inside the CNTs, showing no toxicity in cell viability tests. Similar to the "Trojan-Horse" in function, we demonstrate the delivery of a combination of chemotherapeutic agents with low aqueous solubility, paclitaxel (Taxol), and C6-ceramide, to multidrug resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Nanotube encapsulation permitted the drugs to be used at a 100-fold lower concentration compared to exogenous treatment yet achieve a comparable ~70% cancer kill rate.

  6. The use of microbubbles to target drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Richard

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles destruction has been proposed as an innovative method for noninvasive delivering of drugs and genes to different tissues. Microbubbles are used to carry a drug or gene until a specific area of interest is reached, and then ultrasound is used to burst the microbubbles, causing site-specific delivery of the bioactive materials. Furthermore, the ability of albumin-coated microbubbles to adhere to vascular regions with glycocalix damage or endothelial dysfunction is another possible mechanism to deliver drugs even in the absence of ultrasound. This review focuses on the characteristics of microbubbles that give them therapeutic properties and some important aspects of ultrasound parameters that are known to influence microbubble-mediated drug delivery. In addition, current studies involving this novel therapeutical application of microbubbles will be discussed.

  7. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-10

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  8. NANOTECHNOLOGY: A PROMISING CARRIER FOR INTRACELLULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

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    Malakar Jadupati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is on its way to make a big impact in Biotech, Pharmaceutical and Medical diagnostics sciences. Nanotechnology holds a tremendous potential when it applied in the fields of drug delivery. In this review it has been discussed how nanotechnology can implemented to design formulations which can effectively carry drug molecule to the targeted cell organelles. Introduction of certain functional groups or addition of surface active agents may alter the characteristics of the carrier molecule, thus increasing the sensitivity to site selection of the carrier. It has been predicted that in the near future, nanoparticles with the ability of carrying multiple drug molecules, will be designed. They can maintain the delivery of drugs at specific time interval.

  9. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  10. Modeling of transdermal drug delivery with a microneedle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y.-G.; Liu, J.; Gao, Y.-H.; Xu, B.

    2006-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is generally limited by the extraordinary barrier properties of the stratum corneum, the outer 10-15 µm layer of skin. A conventional needle inserted across this barrier and into deeper tissues could effectively deliver drugs. However, it would lead to infection and cause pain, thereby reducing patient compliance. In order to administer a frequent injection of insulin and other therapeutic agents more efficiently, integrated arrays with very short microneedles were recently proposed as very good candidates for painless injection or extraction. A variety of microneedle designs have thus been made available by employing the fabrication tools of the microelectronics industry and using materials such as silicon, metals, polymers and glass with feature sizes ranging from sub-micron to nanometers. At the same time, experiments were also made to test the capability of the microneedles to inject drugs into tissues. However, due to the difficulty encountered in measurement, a detailed understanding of the spatial and transient drug delivery process still remains unclear up to now. To better grasp the mechanisms involved, quantitative theoretical models were developed in this paper to simultaneously characterize the flow and drug transport, and numerical solutions were performed to predict the kinetics of dispersed drugs injected into the skin from a microneedle array. Calculations indicated that increasing the initial injection velocity and accelerating the blood circulation in skin tissue with high porosity are helpful to enhance the transdermal drug delivery. This study provides the first quantitative simulation of fluid injection through a microneedle array and drug species transport inside the skin. The modeling strategy can also possibly be extended to deal with a wider range of clinical issues such as targeted nanoparticle delivery for therapeutics or molecular imaging.

  11. POLYSACCHARIDE MATRIX TABLET FOR COLON SPECIFIC DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Kumar Panigrahi et al

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to prepare a matrix tablet for colon targeting. Natural gaums (guar gum and xanthan gum) were used for the preparation of colon targeted drug delivery system. Different concentrations of guar gum and xanthan gum and their combinations were tried for the purpose. The prepared tablets were evaluated for in-process parameters as well as colon targeting characteristics. The colon targeting properties were evaluated by analysing the formulations for drug rele...

  12. Use of liposomes as injectable-drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, M J; Cullis, P R

    1989-08-01

    The formation of liposomes and their application as delivery systems for injectable drugs are described. Liposomes are microscopic vesicles composed of one or more lipid membranes surrounding discrete aqueous compartments. These vesicles can encapsulate water-soluble drugs in their aqueous spaces and lipid-soluble drugs within the membrane itself. Liposomes release their contents by interacting with cells in one of four ways: adsorption, endocytosis, lipid exchange, or fusion. Liposome-entrapped drugs are distributed within the body much differently than free drugs; when administered intravenously to healthy animals and humans, most of the injected vesicles accumulate in the liver, spleen, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Liposomes also accumulate preferentially at the sites of inflammation and infection and in some solid tumors; however, the reason for this accumulation is not clear. Four major factors influence liposomes' in vivo behavior and biodistribution: (1) liposomes tend to leak if cholesterol is not included in the vesicle membrane, (2) small liposomes are cleared more slowly than large liposomes, (3) the half-life of a liposome increases as the lipid dose increases, and (4) charged liposomal systems are cleared more rapidly than uncharged systems. The most advanced application of liposome-based therapy is in the treatment of systemic fungal infections, especially with amphotericin B. Liposomes are also under investigation for treatment of neoplastic disorders. Liposomes' uses in cancer therapy include encapsulation of known antineoplastic agents such as doxorubicin and methotrexate, delivery of immune modulators such as N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine, and encapsulation of new chemical entities that are synthesized with lipophilic segments tailored for insertion into lipid bilayers. Liposomal formulations of injectable antimicrobial agents and antineoplastic agents already are undergoing clinical testing, and most probably will receive

  13. Natural Terpenes as Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Chen; Qiu-Dong Jiang; Ya-Ping Chai; Hui Zhang; Pei Peng; Xi-Xiong Yang

    2016-01-01

    The greatest hindrance for transdermal drug delivery (TDD) is the barrier property of skin, especially the stratum corneum (SC). Various methodologies have been investigated and developed to enhance the penetration of drugs through the skin. Among them, the most popular approach is the application of penetration enhancers (PEs), including natural terpenes, a very safe and effective class of PEs. In the present paper, we focused on terpenes as skin PEs for TDD. The mechanism of their action, t...

  14. Dual-mechanism gastroretentive drug delivery system loaded with an amorphous solid dispersion prepared by hot-melt extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Anh Q; Feng, Xin; Pimparade, Manjeet; Ye, Xinyou; Kim, Dong Wuk; Martin, Scott T; Repka, Michael A

    2017-02-28

    In the present study, we aimed to prepare a gastroretentive drug delivery system that would be both highly resistant to gastric emptying via multiple mechanisms and would also potentially induce in situ supersaturation. The bioadhesive floating pellets, loaded with an amorphous solid dispersion, were prepared in a single step of hot-melt extrusion technology. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (Klucel™ MF) and hypromellose (Benecel™ K15M) were used as matrix-forming polymers, and felodipine was used as the model drug. The foam pellets were fabricated based on the expansion of CO2, which was generated from sodium bicarbonate during the melt-extrusion process. A 2(n) full factorial experimental design was utilized to investigate the effects of formulation compositions to the pellet properties. The melt-extrusion process transformed the crystalline felodipine into an amorphous state that was dispersed and "frozen" in the polymer matrix. All formulations showed high porosity and were able to float immediately, without lag time, on top of gastric fluid, and maintained their buoyancy over 12h. The pellet-specific floating force, which could be as high as 4800μN/g, increased significantly during the first hour, and was relatively stable until 9h. The sodium bicarbonate percentage was found to be most significantly effect to the floating force. The ex vivo bioadhesion force of the pellets to porcine stomach mucosa was approximately 5mN/pellet, which was more than five times higher than the gravitation force of the pellet saturated with water. Drug release was well controlled up to 12h in the sink condition of 0.5% sodium lauryl sulphate in 0.1N HCl. The dissolution at 1, 3, 5, and 8h were 5-12%, 25-45%, 55-80%, and ≥75% respectively for all 11 formulations. In biorelevant dissolution medium, a supersaturated solution was formed, and the concentration was maintained at around 2μg/mL, approximately 10-folds higher than that of the pure felodipine. All input factors

  15. PHYTOSOMES: A NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY FOR HERBAL EXTRACTS

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    M. Sravanthi* and J. Shiva Krishna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. The effectiveness of any herbal medication is dependent on the delivery of effective level of the therapeutically active compound. Severe limitation exists in their bioavailability when administered orally or topically. Phytosomes are recently introduced herbal formulations that are better absorbed and as a result produce better bioavailability and actions than the conventional phyto-molecules or botanical extracts. In the recent days, most of the prevailing diseases and nutritional disorders are treated with natural medicines. Several plant extracts and phytoconstituents, despite having excellent bioactivity in vitro demonstrate less or no in vivo actions due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size or both, resulting in poor absorption and bioavailability. So, much work has been directed towards the development of new concept in herbal delivery system i.e., “phytosomes” which are better absorbed, utilized and as a result produce better results than conventional herbal extracts owing to the presence of phosphatidylcholine which likely pushes the phytoconstituent through the intestinal epithelial cell outer membrane, subsequently accessing the bloodstream phytosomes have improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacological parameter which in result can advantageously be used in the treatment of the acute and chronic liver disease of toxic metabolic or infective origin or of degenerative nature.

  16. MICRONEEDLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN UNIQUE PAINLESS OPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Raj Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The outermost layer of skin, the stratum corneum, has developed unnerving physical and immunological barrier properties that prevent infiltration of noxious chemicals and pathogens. Consequently, transdermal delivery of medicaments is currently restricted to a limited number of low molecular weight drugs to enter the skin at successful therapeutic rates. As a result, there has been significant recent interest in providing strategies that disrupt or dodge the principal physical barrier, the stratum corneum, for the efficient cutaneous delivery of macromolecular and nucleic acid based therapeutics. Recently, the use of micron-scale needles in increasing skin permeability has been proposed and shown to dramatically increase transdermal delivery, especially for macromolecules. Using the tools of the microelectronics industry, micro-needles have been fabricated with a wide range of sizes, shapes and materials. These strategies include: Micro-needles, Macroflux ®. A micro-needle-based drug delivery system is pain free administration, easy to use, discrete, continuous and controlled release system. This review compile the current advancement and literature regarding the fabricated micro-needles used for enhancing Transdermal Drug Delivery System and other structure based techniques.

  17. Coaxial electrospun fibers: applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Huang, Jiangnan; Yu, Guoqiang; Cardenas, Romel; Wei, Suying; Wujcik, Evan K; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-09-01

    Coelectrospinning and emulsion electrospinning are two main methods for preparing core-sheath electrospun nanofibers in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Here, physical phenomena and the effects of solution and processing parameters on the coaxial fibers are introduced. Coaxial fibers with specific drugs encapsulated in the core can exhibit a sustained and controlled release. Their exhibited high surface area and three-dimensional nanofibrous network allows the electrospun fibers to resemble native extracellular matrices. These features of the nanofibers show that they have great potential in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and many other agents have been successfully encapsulated into coaxial fibers for drug delivery. A main advantage of the core-sheath design is that after the process of electrospinning and release, these drugs remain bioactive due to the protection of the sheath. Applications of coaxial fibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering include bone, cartilage, cardiac tissue, skin, blood vessels and nervous tissue, among others. A synopsis of novel coaxial electrospun fibers, discussing their applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering, is covered pertaining to proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and other drugs and applications in the fields of bone, cartilage, cardiac, skin, blood vessel, and nervous tissue engineering, respectively. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:654-677. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1391 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. Natural polysaccharide functionalized gold nanoparticles as biocompatible drug delivery carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooja, Deep; Panyaram, Sravani; Kulhari, Hitesh; Reddy, Bharathi; Rachamalla, Shyam S; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-09-01

    Biocompatibility is one of the major concerns with inorganic nanoparticles for their applications as drug delivery system. Natural compounds such as sugars, hydrocolloids and plant extracts have shown potential for the green synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles. In this study, we report the synthesis of gum karaya (GK) stabilized gold nanoparticles (GKNP) and the application of prepared nanoparticles in the delivery of anticancer drugs. GKNP were characterized using different analytical techniques. GKNP exhibited high biocompatibility during cell survival study against CHO normal ovary cells and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells and during hemolytic toxicity studies. Gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM), an anticancer drug, was loaded on the surface of nanoparticles with 19.2% drug loading efficiency. GEM loaded nanoparticles (GEM-GNP) showed better inhibition of growth of cancer cells in anti-proliferation and clonogenic assays than native GEM. This effect was correlated with higher reactive oxygen species generation by GEM-GNP in A549 cells than native GEM. In summary, GK has significant potential in the synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles that could be used as prospective drug delivery carrier for anticancer drugs.

  19. Noninvasive measurement of transdermal drug delivery by impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Cesaro, Umberto; Moccaldi, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness in transdermal delivery of skin permeation strategies (e.g., chemical enhancers, vesicular carrier systems, sonophoresis, iontophoresis, and electroporation) is poorly investigated outside of laboratory. In therapeutic application, the lack of recognized techniques for measuring the actually-released drug affects the scientific concept itself of dosage for topically- and transdermally-delivered drugs. Here we prove the suitability of impedance measurement for assessing the amount of drug penetrated into the skin after transdermal delivery. In particular, the measured amount of drug depends linearly on the impedance magnitude variation normalized to the pre-treated value. Three experimental campaigns, based on the electrical analysis of the biological tissue behavior due to the drug delivery, are reported: (i) laboratory emulation on eggplants, (ii) ex-vivo tests on pig ears, and finally (iii) in-vivo tests on human volunteers. Results point out that the amount of delivered drug can be assessed by reasonable metrological performance through a unique measurement of the impedance magnitude at one single frequency. In particular, in-vivo results point out sensitivity of 23 ml−1, repeatability of 0.3%, non-linearity of 3.3%, and accuracy of 5.7%. Finally, the measurement resolution of 0.20 ml is compatible with clinical administration standards. PMID:28338008

  20. Polymeric Plant-derived Excipients in Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josias H. Hamman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug dosage forms contain many components in addition to the active pharmaceutical ingredient(s to assist in the manufacturing process as well as to optimise drug delivery. Due to advances in drug delivery technology, excipients are currently included in novel dosage forms to fulfil specific functions and in some cases they directly or indirectly influence the extent and/or rate of drug release and absorption. Since plant polysaccharides comply with many requirements expected of pharmaceutical excipients such as non-toxicity, stability, availability and renewability they are extensively investigated for use in the development of solid oral dosage forms. Furthermore, polysaccharides with varying physicochemical properties can be extracted from plants at relatively low cost and can be chemically modified to suit specific needs. As an example, many polysaccharide-rich plant materials are successfully used as matrix formers in modified release dosage forms. Some natural polysaccharides have even shown environmental-responsive gelation characteristics with the potential to control drug release according to specific therapeutic needs. This review discusses some of the most important plant-derived polymeric compounds that are used or investigated as excipients in drug delivery systems.

  1. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections.

  2. Acrylated chitosan for mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitrit, Yulia; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2017-01-30

    A new mucoadhesive polymer was synthesized by conjugating chitosan to poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) via the Michael type reaction. The product was characterized using NMR. Higher PEGDA grafting efficacy was observed with low molecular weight PEGDA (0.7kDa), compared to long 10kDa PEGDA. The acrylation percentage was calculated based on the reaction of ninhydrin with chitosan, and supported the qualitative NMR findings. The adhesive properties were studied by tensile test and rotating system involving detachment of polymer tablets from a fresh intestine sample. Chitosan modified with high molecular weight PEGDA presented improvement in mucoadhesive properties compared to both non-modified and thiolated chitosan. On the molecular level, rheology measurements of polymer/mucin mixtures provided additional evidence of strong interaction between modified chitosan and mucin glycoproteins. This new polymer shows promise as a useful polymeric carrier matrix for delivery systems, which could provide prolonged residence time of the vehicle on the mucosa surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanomedicine to improve drug delivery outcomes [Retracted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The early genesis of the concept of nanomedicine sprang from the visionary idea that tiny nanorobots and related machines could be designed, manufactured, and introduced into the human body to perform cellular repairs at the molecular level. Nanomedicine today has branched out in hundreds of different directions, each of them embodying the key insight that the ability to structure materials and devices at the molecular scale can bring enormous immediate benefits in the research and practice of medicine. The integration of nanotechnology with biology and medicine has given birth to a new field of science called "Nanomedicine". Research into the rational delivery and targeting of pharmaceutical, therapeutic, and diagnostic agents is at the forefront of projects in nanomedicine. These involve the identification of precise targets (cells and receptors related to specific clinical conditions and choice of the appropriate nanocarriers to achieve the required responses while minimizing the side effects. Mononuclear phagocytes, dendritic cells, endothelial cells, and cancers (tumor cells as well as tumor neovasculature are key targets. The ultimate goal of nanomedicine is to develop well-engineered nanotools for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of many diseases. Nanomedicine today has branched out in hundreds of different directions, each of them embodying the key insight that the ability to structure materials and devices at the molecular scale can bring enormous immediate benefits in the research and practice of medicine.

  4. Novel strategies for effective transdermal drug delivery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankita; Jain, Priyanka; Kurmi, Jaya; Jain, Darshana; Jain, Roshni; Chandel, Silky; Sahu, Anamika; Mody, Nishi; Upadhaya, Satish; Jain, Aviral

    2014-01-01

    Skin is the largest and easily accessible organ of the body and therefore can be extensively used as a prominent route of delivery for local and systemic effects. Though it presents a multifunctional barrier between body and surrounding particles, there are chances to deliver therapeutic nanocarrier, particularly in diseased skin. Both for dermal and transdermal drug delivery, the horny layer, i.e., the uppermost layer of the skin serve as the most resistant layer to be crossed and for this purpose, different perforation techniques are used that relatively widen the skin opening and allow the passage of drug (≤ 10 mg) and micromolecules, but this amateur disruption of the skin can be avoided in order to preserve this barrier against cutaneous microbiota by using deformable nanocarriers. In this review, we discuss the nanosized aggregates and microneedle technology for the advanced delivery of vaccines, protein, peptides, nucleic acid, and hormone across the skin.

  5. Brian Barry: innovative contributions to transdermal and topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A C

    2013-01-01

    Brian Barry published over 300 research articles across topics ranging from colloid science, vasoconstriction and the importance of thermodynamics in dermal drug delivery to exploring the structure and organisation of the stratum corneum barrier lipids and numerous strategies for improving topical and transdermal drug delivery, including penetration enhancers, supersaturation, coacervation, eutectic formation and the use of varied liposomes. As research in the area blossomed in the early 1980s, Brian wrote the book that became essential reading for both new and established dermal delivery scientists, explaining the background mathematics and principles through to formulation design. Brian also worked with numerous scientists, as collaborators and students, who have themselves taken his rigorous approach to scientific investigation into their own research groups. This paper can only describe a small fraction of the many significant contributions that Brian made to the field during his 40-year academic career.

  6. High-content analysis for drug delivery and nanoparticle applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayden, David J; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Dawson, Kenneth A; O'Brien, Peter J; Simpson, Jeremy C

    2015-08-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) provides quantitative multiparametric cellular fluorescence data. From its origins in discovery toxicology, it is now addressing fundamental questions in drug delivery. Nanoparticles (NPs), polymers, and intestinal permeation enhancers are being harnessed in drug delivery systems to modulate plasma membrane properties and the intracellular environment. Identifying comparative mechanistic cytotoxicity on sublethal events is crucial to expedite the development of such systems. NP uptake and intracellular routing pathways are also being dissected using chemical and genetic perturbations, with the potential to assess the intracellular fate of targeted and untargeted particles in vitro. As we discuss here, HCA is set to make a major impact in preclinical delivery research by elucidating the intracellular pathways of NPs and the in vitro mechanistic-based toxicology of formulation constituents.

  7. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirsagar N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, FungisomeTM drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India

  8. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  9. Modification of microbial polyacids for drug delivery systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lanz Landázuri, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are becoming preferred materials in biomedical applications because of their vast diversity of properties, functionalities and applications. Properties as mechanical strength, stability against degradation, biocompatibility and biodegradability, among others, have been attractive for different medical applications. One of the most interesting applications of these materials is drug delivery systems. Biodegradable polymers and copolymers are the preferred materials for the manufacture...

  10. Nanofabricated biomimetic structures for smart targeting and drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudia, Alma; Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2005-01-01

    We present a new approach to hybrid artificial cells (AC) designed for specific targeting and active drug delivery by combining an impermeable non-biological scaffold with an artificial bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) that supports the functioning bio-molecules required to provide AC functionality. We

  11. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems for transdermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Maria Bernadete Riemma; Rossetti, Fabia Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Transdermal delivery offers an attractive, noninvasive administration route but it is limited by the skin's barrier to penetration. Minimally invasive techniques, such as the use of microneedles (MNs), bypass the stratum corneum (SC) barrier to permit the drug's direct access to the viable epidermis. These novel micro devices have been developed to puncture the skin for the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules, including peptides, DNA and other molecules, that would otherwise have difficulty passing the outermost layer of the skin, the SC. Using the tools of the microelectronics industry, MNs have been fabricated with a range of sizes, shapes and materials. MNs have been shown to be robust enough to penetrate the skin and dramatically increase the skin permeability of several drugs. Moreover, MNs have reduced needle insertion pain and tissue trauma and provided controlled delivery across the skin. This review focuses on the current state of the art in the transdermal delivery of drugs using various types of MNs and developments in the field of microscale devices, as well as examples of their uses and clinical safety.

  12. Self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for phytoconstituents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Neeraj; Mittal, Vineet; Kaushik, Deepak; Khatkar, Anurag; Raina, Mitali

    2015-01-01

    The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) is considered to be the novel technique for the delivery of lipophillic plant actives. The self emulsifying (SE) formulation significantly enhance the solubility and bioavailability of poorly aqueous soluble phytoconstituents. The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) can be developed for such plant actives to enhance the oral bioavailability using different excipients (lipid, surfactant, co solvent etc.) and their concentration is selected on the basis of pre formulation studies like phase equilibrium studies, solvent capacity of oil for drug and mutual miscibility of excipients. The present review focuses mainly on the development of SEDDS and effect of excipients on oral bioavailability and aqueous solubility of poorly water soluble phytoconstituents/ derived products. A recent list of patents issued for self emulsifying herbal formulation has also been included. The research data for various self emulsifying herbal formulation and patents issued were reviewed using different databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Google patents, Scopus and Web of Science. In a nutshell, we can say that SEDDS was established as a novel drug delivery system for herbals and with the advances in this technique, lots of patents on herbal SEDDS can be translated into the commercial products.

  13. Molecularly imprinted nanotubes for enantioselective drug delivery and controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junfa; Cui, Yue; Yang, Gengliang; Wang, Hailin

    2010-11-07

    Molecularly imprinted nanotubes for enantioselective drug delivery and controlled release are fabricated by the combination of template synthesis and ATRP grafting. The release of R-propranolol from the imprinted nanotubes in rats is restricted while the release of pharmacologically active S-enantiomer is greatly promoted.

  14. PAIN RELIEF MEDIATED BY IMPLANTABLE DRUG-DELIVERY DEVICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, A

    1994-01-01

    Various totally implantable drug delivery systems from single access ports to micropumps are now available for administration of repeated boluses, and continuous or programmable infusions. In this respect, emphasis is given to a relatively cheap, totally implantable system for self-administering int

  15. Evaluation of mesotherapy as a transdermal drug delivery tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Kye, J; Lee, M; Park, B

    2016-05-01

    There has been no research about the exact mechanism of transdermal drug delivery during mesotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the commercial mesogun can be an appropriate technique for a transdermal drug delivery. We injected blue ink into the polyurethane foam or pig skin with three types of mesotherapy using a commercial mesogun, or local made intradermal injector, or a manual injection of syringe. To assess the internal pressure of the cylinder and drug delivery time, we designed the evaluation setup using a needle tip pressure transducer. All types of injectors induced adequate penetration of blue ink into the polyurethane foam without backflow. In the pig skin, blue ink leaked out rapidly with the backward movement of the needle in the commercial mesogun in contrast to the local made injector or the manual injection of syringe. When the time for backward movement of the syringe approaches 1000 ms, the cylinder pressure of the syringe is saturated at around 25 mmHg which can be translated into the dermal pressure of the pig skin. There should be sufficient time between the insertion and withdrawal of the needle of injector for the adequate transdermal drug delivery and it must be considered for mesotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  17. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  18. FORMATION OF POROUS MEMBRANES FOR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDEWITTE, P; ESSELBRUGGE, H; PETERS, AMP; DIJKSTRA, PJ; FEIJEN, J; GROENEWEGEN, RJJ; SMID, J; OLIJSLAGER, J; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; EENINK, MJD; SAM, AP

    1993-01-01

    Highly crystalline porous hollow poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) fibres suitable for the delivery of various drugs were obtained using a dry-wet spinning process. The pore structure of the fibres could be regulated by changing the spinning systems and spinning conditions. Using the spinning system PLLA-diox

  19. Economic and societal dimensions of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulve, te H.; Rip, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There is an increasing interest in nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery systems which are expected to have significant impacts for health care. The economic and societal aspects are uncertain, even ambiguous, at this stage of development, and often not addressed, or only as part of the

  20. Optical Molecular Imaging of Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derieppe, M.P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop optical molecular imaging methods to study drug delivery facilitated by ultrasound waves (US) and hyperthermia. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), together with dedicated image analysis, was used in vitro on a cell monolayer, and in vivo at