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Sample records for flexible tactile sensor

  1. High Resolution Flexible Tactile Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a tactile sensor for robotics inspired by the human sense of touch. It consists of two parts: a static tactile array sensor based on piezoresistive rubber and a dynamic sensor based on piezoelectric PVDF film. The combination of these two layers addresses b...

  2. Development of flexible array tactile sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of an array tactile sensor for use in robotic grippers based on a flexible piezoresistive material. We start by comparing different cell structures in terms of output characteristics and we construct an array of cells in a row and columns layout. A real...... time data acquisition system scans all the cells and converts electrical resistance to tactile pressure maps. We validate that this information can be used to improve grasping and perform object recognition. Key words: piezoresistivity, tactile, sensor, pressure, robotics...

  3. Research for improved flexible tactile sensor sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hae Yong; Kim, Ho Chan [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Hwan [Chungbuk National University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    With the development of robotic technologies, in recent years these technologies have been applied to multidisciplinary fields of study. To operate similarly to a human being, many robot technologies require devices that can receive exterior stimulus, temperature, visual data, and the sense of smell, etc. The robot's hand needs sensor devices that can receive exterior stimuli in order to operate similarly to human skin. The flexible tactile sensor for the robot has to be manufactured to have a shape similar to the shape of human skin. The research studied the development of a system and materials that will enable exterior stimuli to be received effectively. This research used carbon nano tube as a material. Carbon nano tube is used because it has a high electrical conductivity and outstanding mechanical characteristics. In addition, the two composite Materials are used to improve the stimulation sensitivity at different rates, the flexible tactile sensor to measure the sensitivity. Using 3D printing technology, the fabrication of a flexible tactile sensor system is introduced.

  4. Wearable tactile sensor based on flexible microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Koh, Zhao Ming; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-08-16

    In this work, we develop a liquid-based thin film microfluidic tactile sensor of high flexibility, robustness and sensitivity. The microfluidic elastomeric structure comprises a pressure sensitive region and parallel arcs that interface with screen-printed electrodes. The microfluidic sensor is functionalized with a highly conductive metallic liquid, eutectic gallium indium (eGaIn). Microdeformation on the pressure sensor results in fluid displacement which corresponds to a change in electrical resistance. By emulating parallel electrical circuitry in our microchannel design, we reduced the overall electrical resistance of the sensor, therefore enhancing its device sensitivity. Correspondingly, we report a device workable within a range of 4 to 100 kPa and sensitivity of up to 0.05 kPa(-1). We further demonstrate its robustness in withstanding >2500 repeated loading and unloading cycles. Finally, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the sensors may be multiplexed to detect forces at multiple regions of the hand. In particular, our sensors registered unique electronic signatures in object grasping, which could provide better assessment of finger dexterity.

  5. Development of flexible tactile sensors for hexapod robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Børlum-Petersen, Mikkel; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    on the upper and lower part of the rubber. To address a wider range of tactile stimuli, namely the dynamic tactile stimuli, a piezoelectric thin film sensor based on polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) is embedded into the leg tip mould. Both piezoresistive array and piezoelectric types of sensors are investigated......This paper describes the development of flexible based tactile array sensors based on piezoresistive rubber for use in the leg tips of hexapod robotics. The sensors are composed of a sandwich similar structure, with a piezoresistive rubber used as the middle layer and flexPCB electrodes...

  6. Flexible PZT Thin Film Tactile Sensor for Biomedical Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jong Wu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of tactile sensors using the sol-gel process to deposit a PZT thin-film from 250 nm to 1 μm on a flexible stainless steel substrate. The PZT thin-film tactile sensor can be used to measure human pulses from several areas, including carotid, brachial, finger, ankle, radial artery, and the apical region. Flexible PZT tactile sensors can overcome the diverse topology of various human regions and sense the corresponding signals from human bodies. The measured arterial pulse waveform can be used to diagnose hypertension and cardiac failure in patients. The proposed sensors have several advantages, such as flexibility, reliability, high strain, low cost, simple fabrication, and low temperature processing. The PZT thin-film deposition process includes a pyrolysis process at 150 °C/500 °C for 10/5 min, followed by an annealing process at 650 °C for 10 min. Finally, the consistent pulse wave velocity (PWV was demonstrated based on human pulse measurements from apical to radial, brachial to radial, and radial to ankle. It is characterized that the sensitivity of our PZT-based tactile sensor was approximately 0.798 mV/g.

  7. Flexible Electronics Sensors for Tactile Multi-Touching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hsing Yeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Flexible electronics sensors for tactile applications in multi-touch sensing and large scale manufacturing were designed and fabricated. The sensors are based on polyimide substrates, with thixotropy materials used to print organic resistances and a bump on the top polyimide layer. The gap between the bottom electrode layer and the resistance layer provides a buffer distance to reduce erroneous contact during large bending. Experimental results show that the top membrane with a bump protrusion and a resistance layer had a large deflection and a quick sensitive response. The bump and resistance layer provided a concentrated von Mises stress force and inertial force on the top membrane center. When the top membrane had no bump, it had a transient response delay time and took longer to reach steady-state. For printing thick structures of flexible electronics sensors, diffusion effects and dimensional shrinkages can be improved by using a paste material with a high viscosity. Linear algorithm matrixes with Gaussian elimination and control system scanning were used for multi-touch detection. Flexible electronics sensors were printed with a resistance thickness of about 32 µm and a bump thickness of about 0.2 mm. Feasibility studies show that printing technology is appropriate for large scale manufacturing, producing sensors at a low cost.

  8. Development of flexible tactile sensors for hexapod robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Børlum-Petersen, Mikkel; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    on the upper and lower part of the rubber. To address a wider range of tactile stimuli, namely the dynamic tactile stimuli, a piezoelectric thin film sensor based on polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) is embedded into the leg tip mould. Both piezoresistive array and piezoelectric types of sensors are investigated...

  9. Piezoresistive Characteristic of Conductive Rubber for Flexible Tactile Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ying; LIU Ping; ZHANG Yugang; QIU Huaili; GE Yunjian

    2011-01-01

    In the research of 2D flexible tactile sensor matrix, pressure-sensitive conductive rubber was developed and tested in which carbon black was used as its conductive phase and silicon rubber as its matrix layer. Experiments were undertaken and the resultant data were used for its piezoresistive characteristics investigation for two kinds of electrode connection configurations, the surface directive connection and embedded connection. It is found that due to the rather strong nonlinearity of the piezoresistive characteristic curves obtained, a higher correlation relationship can be obtained by means of quadratic polynomial fitting.It also showed that the embedded electrode assembling has higher fitting accuracy while the surface directive connection has better mechanical sensitivity.

  10. Design of a Large-scale Three-dimensional Flexible Arrayed Tactile Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Ding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new type of large-scale three-dimensional flexible arrayed tactile sensor based on conductive rubber. It can be used to detect three-dimensional force information on the continuous surface of the sensor, which realizes a true skin type tactile sensor. The widely used method of liquid rubber injection molding (LIMS method is used for "the overall injection molding" sample preparation. The structure details of staggered nodes and a new decoupling algorithm of force analysis are given. Simulation results show that the sensor based on this structure can achieve flexible measurement of large-scale 3-D tactile sensor arrays.

  11. The Design of a Novel Flexible Tactile Sensor Based on Pressure-conductive Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel flexible tactile sensor using conductive rubber with electrical-wires knitted method is presented. The sensor’s design is based on rubber’s pressure-sensitive property. It is flexible and can be mounted on any object to measure tactile information. The mathematic piezoresistivity model of the rubber is described, and we also discuss the sensor’s structure and scanning method. The simulation results show that the sensor can detect pressure accurately.

  12. A flexible tactile sensitive sheet using a hetero-core fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, S.; Yamazaki, H.; Hosoki, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2014-05-01

    In this report, we have designed a tactile sensitive sheet based on a hetero-core fiber-optic sensor, which realize an areal sensing by using single sensor potion in one optical fiber line. Recently, flexible and wide-area tactile sensing technology is expected to applied to acquired biological information in living space and robot achieve long-term care services such as welfare and nursing-care and humanoid technology. A hetero-core fiber-optic sensor has several advantages such as thin and flexible transmission line, immunity to EMI. Additionally this sensor is sensitive to moderate bending actions with optical loss changes and is independent of temperature fluctuation. Thus, the hetero-core fiber-optic sensor can be suitable for areal tactile sensing. We measure pressure characteristic of the proposed sensitive sheet by changing the pressure position and pinching characteristic on the surface. The proposed tactile sensitive sheet shows monotonic responses on the whole sensitive sheet surface although different sensitivity by the position is observed at the sensitive sheet surface. Moreover, the tactile sensitive sheet could sufficiently detect the pinching motion. In addition, in order to realize the discrimination between pressure and pinch, we fabricated a doubled-over sensor using a set of tactile sensitive sheets, which has different kinds of silicon robbers as a sensitive sheet surface. In conclusion, the flexible material could be given to the tactile sensation which is attached under proposed sensitive sheet.

  13. A novel flexible tactile sensor based on Ce-doped BaTiO3 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yongyong; Xu, Zhuo; Fu, Xiaotian; Li, Fei; Li, Jinglei; Liao, Zhipeng; Liu, Weihua

    2017-07-01

    The performance of a robotic hand is severely limited by the tactile feedback information similar to a human hand. Hence, a novel and robust tactile sensor has been developed to cope with the challenge of robotic hand technology. Piezoelectric material is proposed as a suitable candidate for a new efficient tactile sensor due to its excellent piezoelectric properties. In this paper, a novel flexible tactile sensor based on Ce-doped BTO nanofibers was developed. The doping mechanism of cerium ions and the working process of the sensor were analysed. The results showed that sheer stress had no contribution to the sensor, this indicated that the sensor was easy to control according to the individual’s wish. The output voltage of the sensor could reach up to 0.078 V which showed great potential for the future of intelligent robot skin application.

  14. Research of a Novel Three-dimensional Force Flexible Tactile Sensor Based on Conductive Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel three-dimensional force flexible tactile sensor using conductive rubber with "overall injection molding" technique is presented. The sensor is based on conductive rubber’s force-sensitive property. The sensor is flexible and can measure 3-D force. The rubber’s characteristics, the sensor’s structure and its principle are described. The results of simulation will be also presented.

  15. Elastomer-Carbon Nanostructure Composites as Prospective Materials for Flexible Robotic Tactile Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Knite, M; Podiņš, G; Zīke, S; Zavickis, J

    2008-01-01

    Our recent achievements in the design, processing and studies of physical properties of elastomer – nano-structured carbon composites as prospective compressive strain sensor materials for robotic tactile elements are presented. Composites made of polyisoprene matrix and high-structured carbon black or multi-wall carbon nano-tube filler have been designed and manufactured to develop completely flexible conductive polymer nano-composites for tactile sensing elements. Electrical resistance of t...

  16. Highly Flexible Graphene Oxide Nanosuspension Liquid-Based Microfluidic Tactile Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenry; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Shang, Menglin; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-03-23

    A novel graphene oxide (GO) nanosuspension liquid-based microfluidic tactile sensor is developed. It comprises a UV ozone-bonded Ecoflex-polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic assembly filled with GO nanosuspension, which serves as the working fluid of the tactile sensor. This device is highly flexible and able to withstand numerous modes of deformation as well as distinguish various user-applied mechanical forces it is subjected to, including pressing, stretching, and bending. This tactile sensor is also highly deformable and wearable, and capable of recognizing and differentiating distinct hand muscle-induced motions, such as finger flexing and fist clenching. Moreover, subtle differences in the handgrip strength derived from the first clenching gesture can be identified based on the electrical response of our device. This work highlights the potential application of the GO nanosuspension liquid-based flexible microfluidic tactile sensing platform as a wearable diagnostic and prognostic device for real-time health monitoring. Also importantly, this work can further facilitate the exploration and potential realization of a functional liquid-state device technology with superior mechanical flexibility and conformability.

  17. Fully printed flexible fingerprint-like three-axis tactile and slip force and temperature sensors for artificial skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shingo; Kanao, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-12-23

    A three-axis tactile force sensor that determines the touch and slip/friction force may advance artificial skin and robotic applications by fully imitating human skin. The ability to detect slip/friction and tactile forces simultaneously allows unknown objects to be held in robotic applications. However, the functionalities of flexible devices have been limited to a tactile force in one direction due to difficulties fabricating devices on flexible substrates. Here we demonstrate a fully printed fingerprint-like three-axis tactile force and temperature sensor for artificial skin applications. To achieve economic macroscale devices, these sensors are fabricated and integrated using only printing methods. Strain engineering enables the strain distribution to be detected upon applying a slip/friction force. By reading the strain difference at four integrated force sensors for a pixel, both the tactile and slip/friction forces can be analyzed simultaneously. As a proof of concept, the high sensitivity and selectivity for both force and temperature are demonstrated using a 3×3 array artificial skin that senses tactile, slip/friction, and temperature. Multifunctional sensing components for a flexible device are important advances for both practical applications and basic research in flexible electronics.

  18. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Liu, Weiting; Gu, Chunxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2016-06-03

    A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5-400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility.

  19. Magnetic Nanocomposite Cilia Tactile Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-10-21

    A multifunctional biomimetic nanocomposite tactile sensor is developed that can detect shear and vertical forces, feel texture, and measure flow with extremely low power consumption. The sensor\\'s high performance is maintained within a wide operating range that can be easily adjusted. The concept works on rigid and flexible substrates and the sensors can be used in air or water without any modifications.

  20. Design of a flexible tactile sensor for classification of rigid and deformable objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Kootstra, Gert; Bilberg, Arne

    2014-01-01

    of the sensor in an active object-classification system. A robotic gripper with two sensors mounted on its fingers performs a palpation procedure on a set of objects. By squeezing an object, the robot actively explores the material properties, and the system acquires tactile information corresponding...... to the resulting pressure. Based on a k-nearest neighbor classifier and using dynamic time warping to calculate the distance between different time series, the system is able to successfully classify objects. Our sensor demonstrates similar classification performance to the Weiss Robotics tactile sensor, while...

  1. Hybrid fabrication process of additive manufacturing and direct writing for a 4 X 4 mm matrix flexible tactile sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang Gu; Lee, In Hwan [Chungbuk National University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyong Chang [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Various machines require data from their external environments for safety and/or accuracy. In this respect, many sensors that mimic the human sensory system have been investigated. Among these, tactile sensors may be useful for obtaining data on the roughness of, and external forces acting upon, an object. Several tactile sensors have been developed; however, these are typically fabricated via a series of complex processes, and hence are unsuitable for volume manufacturing. In this paper, we report a fabrication process for a 4 X 4 mm matrix flexible sensor element using layered manufacturing and direct-write technology. A composite composed of photocurable resin and Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was used as the sensing material. The MWCNTs were mixed with the photocurable resin using ultrasonic dispersion, and the liquid mixture exhibited excellent piezoresistive properties following curing using ultraviolet light. The used photocurable resin is flexible and elastic after curing. Therefore, the composite material can be bent and deformed. To use this composite material with the flexible sensor, dispensing characteristics were examined using direct-write technology. For the acquisition of sensor data, a commercial pin-header was inserted and photocurable resin was filled up to the height of pin-header and cured . Then, the composite material was dispensed onto the pin-header as a sensing material. Using this process, a flexible sensor with piezoresistive properties was formed.

  2. Insights into the Mechanical Behaviour of a Layered Flexible Tactile Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Castellanos-Ramos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows realizations of a piezoresistive tactile sensor with a low cost screen-printing technology. A few samples were fabricated for different materials used as insulator between the conductive layers and as top layer or cover. Both can be used to tune the sensitivity of the sensor. However, a large influence is also observed of the roughness at the contact interface on the sensitivity and linearity of the output, as well as on mismatching between the outputs from different taxels. The roughness at the contact interface is behind the transduction principle of the sensor, but it also limits its performance if the wavelength of the roughness is comparable or even longer than the size of the contacts. The paper shows experimental results that confirm this relationship and discusses its consequences in sensor response related to the materials chosen for the insulator and the cover. Moreover, simulations with FEA tools and with simple models are used to support the discussions and conclusions obtained from the experimental data. This provides insights into the sensor behaviour that are shared by other sensors based on the same principle.

  3. A Two-Ply Polymer-Based Flexible Tactile Sensor Sheet Using Electric Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional capacitive tactile sensor sheets usually have a three-layered structure, with a dielectric layer sandwiched by two electrode layers. Each electrode layer has a number of parallel ribbon-like electrodes. The electrodes on the two electrode layers are oriented orthogonally and each crossing point of the two perpendicular electrode arrays makes up a capacitive sensor cell on the sheet. It is well known that compatibility between measuring precision and resolution is difficult, since decreasing the width of the electrodes is required to obtain a high resolution, however, this may lead to reduction of the area of the sensor cells, and as a result, lead to a low Signal/Noise (S/N ratio. To overcome this problem, a new multilayered structure and related calculation procedure are proposed. This new structure stacks two or more sensor sheets with shifts in position. Both a high precision and a high resolution can be obtained by combining the signals of the stacked sensor sheets. Trial production was made and the effect was confirmed.

  4. 3D customized and flexible tactile sensor using a piezoelectric nanofiber mat and sandwich-molded elastomer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bit Lee, Han; Kim, Young Won; Yoon, Jonghun; Lee, Nak Kyu; Park, Suk-Hee

    2017-04-01

    We developed a skin-conformal flexible sensor in which three-dimensional (3D) free-form elastomeric sheets were harmoniously integrated with a piezoelectric nanofiber mat. The elastomeric sheets were produced by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molding via using a 3D printed mold assembly, which was adaptively designed from 3D scanned skin surface geometry. The mold assembly, fabricated using a multi-material 3D printer, was composed of a pair of upper/lower mold parts and an interconnecting hinge, with material properties are characterized by different flexibilities. As a result of appropriate deformabilites of the upper mold part and hinge, the skin-conformal PDMS structures were successfully sandwich molded and demolded with good repeatability. An electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) nanofiber mat was prepared as the piezoelectric active layer and integrated with the 3D elastomeric parts. We confirmed that the highly responsive sensing performances of the 3D integrated sensor were identical to those of a flat sensor in terms of sensitivity and the linearity of the input–output relationship. The close 3D conformal skin contact of the flexible sensor enabled discernable perception of various scales of physical stimuli, such as tactile force and even minute skin deformation caused by the tester’s pulse. Collectively from the 3D scanning design to the practical application, our achievements can potentially meet the needs of tailored human interfaces in the field of wearable devices and human-like robots.

  5. 三维柔性触觉/热觉传感器设计与仿真%Design and simulation of 3 D flexible tactile/thermal sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢娜; 秦岚

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at difficult problem that current tactile sensor can not have both flexible,multi-dimensional force measurement and thermal perception and tactile signals mixed,design a flexible multi-fumction tactile/thermal sensor. Introduce basic structure of the sensor,and set up mathematical model three-dimensional force parallel measurement based on polyvinylidene fluoride( PVDF )film properties. Tactile detection based on piezoelectric effect of PVDF and thermal detection based on pyroelectric effect of PVDF. Gy doing proportional subtraction on tactile and thermal sensing signal,completely distinguish tactile and thermal sensing signals.%针对目前触觉传感器研究中不能兼有柔韧性、多维力测量和热觉与触觉信号混杂等难题,设计了一种柔性多功能触觉/热觉传感器。介绍了该传感器的基本结构,并基于聚偏氟乙烯( PVDF)薄膜的特性建立了三维力并行测量的数学模型。触觉检测基于PVDF的压电效应,热觉检测基于PVDF的热释电效应。通过对触觉和热觉信号做比例减法运算,从而彻底区分触觉和热觉信号。

  6. Piezoresistive Tactile Sensor Discriminating Multidirectional Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdo Jung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flexible tactile sensors capable of detecting the magnitude and direction of the applied force together are of great interest for application in human-interactive robots, prosthetics, and bionic arms/feet. Human skin contains excellent tactile sensing elements, mechanoreceptors, which detect their assigned tactile stimuli and transduce them into electrical signals. The transduced signals are transmitted through separated nerve fibers to the central nerve system without complicated signal processing. Inspired by the function and organization of human skin, we present a piezoresistive type tactile sensor capable of discriminating the direction and magnitude of stimulations without further signal processing. Our tactile sensor is based on a flexible core and four sidewall structures of elastomer, where highly sensitive interlocking piezoresistive type sensing elements are embedded. We demonstrate the discriminating normal pressure and shear force simultaneously without interference between the applied forces. The developed sensor can detect down to 128 Pa in normal pressure and 0.08 N in shear force, respectively. The developed sensor can be applied in the prosthetic arms requiring the restoration of tactile sensation to discriminate the feeling of normal and shear force like human skin.

  7. Tactile Response of Building Materials by Tactile Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    岡島, 達雄; 呉, 健丹; 堀越, 哲美; 武田, 雄二; 水谷, 章夫; 川邊, 伸二; ホリコシ, テツミ; ミズタニ, アキオ; カワベ, シンジ; Horikoshi, Tetsumi; Mizutani, Akio; Kawabe, Shinji

    1991-01-01

    The object of this paper is to clarify the tactile response of building materials by tactile sensor. We developed the compact tactile sensor that can measure the physical values of warmth, hardness and roughness of building materials. At a temperature of 2℃, psychological values of warmth, hardness and roughness were obtaind from the physical values of sixty materials by the tactile sensor. The tactile comfort value can be expressed from physical values of warmth, hardness and roughness by th...

  8. A tactile sensor using a conductive graphene-sponge composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Hong, Ahyoung; Choi, Yeonhoi; Ha, Chunho; Park, Wanjun

    2016-04-01

    For sensors that emulate human tactile perception, we suggest a simple method for fabricating a highly sensitive force sensor using a conductive polyurethane sponge where graphene flakes are self-assembled into the porous structure of the sponge. The complete sensor device shows a sensitive and reliable detection response for a broad range of pressure and dynamic pressure that correspond to human tactile perception. Sensitivity of the sensor to detect vibration is also confirmed with vertical actuations due to slipping over micro-scale ridge structures attached on the sensors. Based on the sensor's ability to detect both pressure and vibration, the sensor can be utilized as a flexible tactile sensor.For sensors that emulate human tactile perception, we suggest a simple method for fabricating a highly sensitive force sensor using a conductive polyurethane sponge where graphene flakes are self-assembled into the porous structure of the sponge. The complete sensor device shows a sensitive and reliable detection response for a broad range of pressure and dynamic pressure that correspond to human tactile perception. Sensitivity of the sensor to detect vibration is also confirmed with vertical actuations due to slipping over micro-scale ridge structures attached on the sensors. Based on the sensor's ability to detect both pressure and vibration, the sensor can be utilized as a flexible tactile sensor. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00774k

  9. A Prototype Tactile Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-15

    Active Touch Sensing. Technical Report, MIT Artificial Inteligence Laboratory, 1981. (9] Larcombe, M. Carbon Fibre Tactile Sensors. Technical Report...thesis, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1981. [13] Purbrick, John A. A Force Transducer Employing Conductive Silicone Rubber. Technical Report, MIT Artificial

  10. Robot hand with soft tactile sensors and underactuated control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, H; Murashima, Y; Honma, N; Akazawa, K

    2013-01-01

    We developed a robot hand with three fingers and controlled them using underactuated control to obtain a more flexible grip. With underactuated control, we can flexibly operate an artificial robot hand and reduce the number of actuators. The robot fingers had three joints to imitate human fingers. One finger was driven by one wire and one servo motor for bending and by three torsion springs for extension. We also developed a soft tactile sensor having three pneumatic sensors and mounted it on front of each robot fingers. We obtained the following information from our experimental examinations of the robot hand. It adaptively grasped an object by underactuated control. The soft tactile sensor deftly touched an object, and the data showed the contact position with. By analyzing the data from tactile sensors, we obtained the rough information of the object's shape.

  11. Hi-Speed Tactile Sensing for Array-type Tactile Sensor and Object Manipulation based on Tactile Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Wataru; Kobayashi, Futoshi; Kojima, Fumio; Nakamoto, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Tadashi; Imamura, Nobuaki; Shirasawa, Hidenori

    Recently, a robotic hand with tactile sensors is developed all over the world. We also have developed a universal robot hand with tactile sensors and other sensors. Tactile sensors are very important for manipulating objects dexterously. However, array-type tactile sensor has many I/O, thus require much processing time. In this paper, we propose a hi-speed tactile sensing based on the genetic algorithm in order to measure the tactile information rapidly. The validity of the proposed method shows through some experiments. Moreover, a multi-object manipulation according to the tactile information is proposed.

  12. Sensor chip and apparatus for tactile and/or flow sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sensor chip, comprising a flexible, polymer-based substrate, and at least one microfabricated sensor disposed on the substrate and including a conductive element. The at least one sensor comprises at least one of a tactile sensor and a flow sensor. Other embodiments of the present invention include sensors and/or multi-modal sensor nodes.

  13. Development of a Tactile Sensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae; Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2010-01-01

    . The paper describes the related research work we have developed for sensor design, exploration and control for a robot gripping system, in order to analyze normal forces applied on the tactile pixels for gripping force control and generate tactile images for gripping positioning and object recognition....... Section 1 gives an introduction of principles and technologies in tactile sensing for robot grippers. Section 2 presents the sensor cell (taxel) and array design and characterization. Section 3 introduces object recognition and shape analysis ideas showing a few preliminary examples, where geometrical...

  14. Magnetic Tactile Sensor for Braille Reading

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-04-27

    We report a biomimetic magnetic tactile sensor for Braille characters reading. The sensor consists of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia implemented on magnetic micro sensors. The nanocomposite is produced from the highly elastic polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires that exhibit a permanent magnetic behavior. This design enables remote operation and does not require an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires. The highly elastic nanocomposite is easy to pattern, corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces, which allows recognizing small changes in surface texture, as in the case of Braille dots. The 6 dots of a braille cell are read from top to bottom with a tactile sensor array consisting of 4 elements and 1 mm long nanocomposite cilia.

  15. Flexible Tactile Sensing Based on Piezoresistive Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stassi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The large expansion of the robotic field in the last decades has created a growing interest in the research and development of tactile sensing solutions for robot hand and body integration. Piezoresistive composites are one of the most widely employed materials for this purpose, combining simple and low cost preparation with high flexibility and conformability to surfaces, low power consumption, and the use of simple read-out electronics. This work provides a review on the different type of composite materials, classified according to the conduction mechanism and analyzing the physics behind it. In particular piezoresistors, strain gauges, percolative and quantum tunnelling devices are reviewed here, with a perspective overview on the most used filler types and polymeric matrices. A description of the state-of-the-art of the tactile sensor solutions from the point of view of the architecture, the design and the performance is also reviewed, with a perspective outlook on the main promising applications.

  16. Flexible tactile sensing based on piezoresistive composites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, Stefano; Cauda, Valentina; Canavese, Giancarlo; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio

    2014-03-14

    The large expansion of the robotic field in the last decades has created a growing interest in the research and development of tactile sensing solutions for robot hand and body integration. Piezoresistive composites are one of the most widely employed materials for this purpose, combining simple and low cost preparation with high flexibility and conformability to surfaces, low power consumption, and the use of simple read-out electronics. This work provides a review on the different type of composite materials, classified according to the conduction mechanism and analyzing the physics behind it. In particular piezoresistors, strain gauges, percolative and quantum tunnelling devices are reviewed here, with a perspective overview on the most used filler types and polymeric matrices. A description of the state-of-the-art of the tactile sensor solutions from the point of view of the architecture, the design and the performance is also reviewed, with a perspective outlook on the main promising applications.

  17. Integrated Flexible, Waterproof, Transparent, and Self-Powered Tactile Sensing Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu-Zhou; Sun, Yi-Jing; Fan, Zhiyong; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-23

    Portable and wearable electronic devices are human-centered devices; therefore, many unique attributes are highly desirable, such as flexibility, being self-powered, and waterproof. These properties render devices excellent adaptivity in harsh operation environments. In this work, we report an integrated triboelectric tactile sensor array with flexible, transparent, self-powered, and waterproof features. Each tactile sensor is a surface nano/microtexture enhanced triboelectric nanogenerator. The sensor array can serve as a touch panel for electronic devices. Owing to a unique design of a built-in triboelectric contact pair and an electrical shielding layer, an individual pixel of the fabricated tactile sensor array can generate an open circuit voltage up to 1.613 V and a short circuit current density of 47.308 mA/m(2) under 612.5 kPa. The tactile sensors can produce stable voltage signals regardless of the materials of the touching objects, and work stably both in ambient and aqueous environments. To examine the touch panel function of a sensor array, a matrix of 10 × 10 individually addressable 4 mm × 4 mm triboelectric sensors has been integrated into a thin, transparent, and flexible film, and the 2-D touch mapping has been successfully demonstrated. The unique triboelectric tactile sensor array reported here is robust and highly versatile, and it may find broad applications in display, wearable electronics, artificial skins, Internet of Things (IoT), etc.

  18. A miniaturized and flexible optoelectronic sensing system for tactile skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, L.; Corradi, P.; Beccai, L.; Laschi, C.

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a hybrid sensing module consisting of a general purpose electro-optical converter and three MEMS force sensors integrated into flexible substrates for tactile skin applications. The features of the converter, namely its flexible and thin substrate and small dimensions, programmability, optical coding and transmission of the information allow this versatile device to host different sensors, locally preprocess signals, translate this diverse information into a 'common language', and transmit it in a parallel, efficient and robust way to the processing unit. After discussing the major technical requirements, the design of the sensing, electrical and optical subsystems is illustrated, as well as the whole process for the module fabrication. A first characterization of a working prototype, hosting three MEMS force sensors and nine independent optical channels was performed. The global performance in terms of sensitivity, bandwidth and spatial sensing resolution make the presented module suitable to be used as basic element of a complete tactile system, conceived for robotic grasping and manipulation. Several solutions for mass production, improved optical properties and more efficient optical transmission are discussed.

  19. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alfadhel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  20. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-07

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  1. Micro-vibration-based slip detection in tactile force sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Raul; Payo, Ismael; Vazquez, Andres S; Becedas, Jonathan

    2014-01-03

    Tactile sensing provides critical information, such as force, texture, shape or temperature, in manipulation tasks. In particular, tactile sensors traditionally used in robotics are emphasized in contact force determination for grasping control and object recognition. Nevertheless, slip detection is also crucial to successfully manipulate an object. Several approaches have appeared to detect slipping, the majority being a combination of complex sensors with complex algorithms. In this paper, we deal with simplicity, analyzing how a novel, but simple, algorithm, based on micro-vibration detection, can be used in a simple, but low-cost and durable, force sensor. We also analyze the results of using the same principle to detect slipping in other force sensors based on flexible parts. In particular, we show and compare the slip detection with: (i) a flexible finger, designed by the authors, acting as a force sensor; (ii) the finger torque sensor of a commercial robotic hand; (iii) a commercial six-axis force sensor mounted on the wrist of a robot; and (iv) a fingertip piezoresistive matrix sensor.

  2. Testing of tactile sensors for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lisa; Weadon, Timothy L.; Evans, Thomas; DeVallance, David B.; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to integrate tactile sensing into robotic manipulators performing tasks in space environments, including those used to repair satellites. Integration can be achieved by embedding specialized tactile sensors. Reliable and consistent signal interpretation can be obtained by ensuring that sensors with a suitable sensing mechanism are selected based on operational demands, and that materials used within the sensors do not change structurally under vacuum and expected applied pressures, and between temperatures of -80°C to +120°C. The sensors must be able to withstand space environmental conditions and remain adequately sensitive throughout their operating life. Additionally, it is necessary to integrate the sensors into the target system with minimum disturbance while remaining responsive to applied loads. Previous work has been completed to characterize sensors within the selected temperature and pressure ranges. The current work builds on this investigation by embedding these sensors in different geometries and testing the response measured among varying configurations. Embedding material selection was aided by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) to determine stress/strain behavior for adhesives and compliant layers used to keep the sensors in place and distribute stresses evenly. Electromechanical characterization of the embedded sensor packages was conducted by using the DMA in tandem with an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR) meter. Methods for embedding the sensor packages were developed with the aid of finite element analysis and physical testing to account for specific geometrical constraints. Embedded sensor prototypes were tested within representative models of potential embedding locations to compare final embedded sensor performance.

  3. TACTILE SENSOR AND METHOD FOR DETERMINING A SHEAR FORCE AND SLIP WITH SUCH A TACTILE SENSOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, F; Holweg, E.G.M.; Regtien, P.P.L.; Jongkind, W.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9740339 (A1) The invention relates to a tactile sensor comprising a base plate provided at a first side with a plurality of electrically conducting wires forming a row, and provided at a second side opposite to the first side of the base plate with a plurality of electrically cond

  4. High-Speed Tactile Sensing for Array-Type Tactile Sensor and Object Manipulation Based on Tactile Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Fukui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a universal robot hand with tactile and other sensors. An array-type tactile sensor is crucial for dexterous manipulation of objects using a robotic hand, since this sensor can measure the pressure distribution on finger pads. The sensor has a very high resolution, and the shape of a grasped object can be classified by using this sensor. The more the number of measurement points provided, the higher the accuracy of the classification, but with a corresponding lengthening of the measurement cycle. In this paper, the problem of slow response time is resolved by using software for an array-type tactile sensor with high resolution that emulates the human sensor system. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated through experiments.

  5. A Large Area Tactile Sensor Patch Based on Commercial Force Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso García-Cerezo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design of a tactile sensor patch to cover large areas of robots and machines that interact with human beings. Many devices have been proposed to meet such a demand. These realizations are mostly custom-built or developed in the lab. The sensor of this paper is implemented with commercial force sensors. This has the benefit of a more foreseeable response of the sensor if its behavior is understood as the aggregation of readings from all the individual force sensors in the array. A few reported large area tactile sensors are also based on commercial sensors. However, the one in this paper is the first of this kind based on the use of polymeric commercial force sensing resistors (FSR as unit elements of the array or tactels, which results in a robust sensor. The paper discusses design issues related to some necessary modifications of the force sensor, its assembly in an array, and the signal conditioning. The patch has 16 × 9 force sensors mounted on a flexible printed circuit board with a spatial resolution of 18.5 mm. The force range of a tactel is 6 N and its sensitivity is 0.6 V/N. The array is read at a rate of 78 frames per second. Finally, two simple application examples are also carried out with the sensor mounted on the forearm of a rescue robot that communicates with the sensor through a CAN bus.

  6. Bio-inspired tactile sensor with arrayed structures based on electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Sato, Hiroshi; Taya, Minoru

    2009-03-01

    We reported some work on flexible tactile sensors based on Flemion ionic polymer metal composites previously. In this work, we compared the signals in both voltage and current with the signals obtained from a giant nerve fiber reported previously by other researchers. We found some similarities between the artificial tactile sensor and the nerve fiber, in both of which ionic movement play a very important role. This bio-inspired Flemion based ionic polymer metal composites would be a good candidate for bio-related sensors especially for prosthetic limb socket interface applications.

  7. Flexible magnetoimpedance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-03-01

    Flexible magnetoimpedance (MI) sensors fabricated using a NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layer on Kapton substrate have been studied. A customized flexible microstrip transmission line was employed to investigate the MI sensors\\'s magnetic field and frequency responses and their dependence on the sensors\\'s deflection. For the first time, the impedance characteristic is obtained through reflection coefficient analysis over a wide range of frequencies from 0.1 MHz to 3 GHz and for deflections ranging from zero curvature to a radius of 7.2 cm. The sensor element maintains a high MI ratio of up to 90% and magnetic sensitivity of up to 9.2%/Oe over different bending curvatures. The relationship between the curvature and material composition is discussed based on the magnetostriction effect and stress simulations. The sensor\\'s large frequency range, simple fabrication process and high sensitivity provide a great potential for flexible electronics and wireless applications.

  8. Fabrication of strain gauge based sensors for tactile skins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Joshua R.; Zhang, Ruoshi; Wei, Danming; Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    Fabricating cost effective, reliable and functional sensors for electronic skins has been a challenging undertaking for the last several decades. Application of such skins include haptic interfaces, robotic manipulation, and physical human-robot interaction. Much of our recent work has focused on producing compliant sensors that can be easily formed around objects to sense normal, tension, or shear forces. Our past designs have involved the use of flexible sensors and interconnects fabricated on Kapton substrates, and piezoresistive inks that are 3D printed using Electro Hydro Dynamic (EHD) jetting onto interdigitated electrode (IDE) structures. However, EHD print heads require a specialized nozzle and the application of a high-voltage electric field; for which, tuning process parameters can be difficult based on the choice of inks and substrates. Therefore, in this paper we explore sensor fabrication techniques using a novel wet lift-off photolithographic technique for patterning the base polymer piezoresistive material, specifically Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) or PEDOT:PSS. Fabricated sensors are electrically and thermally characterized, and temperaturecompensated designs are proposed and validated. Packaging techniques for sensors in polymer encapsulants are proposed and demonstrated to produce a tactile interface device for a robot.

  9. Flexible magnetoimpidence sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Kavaldzhiev, Mincho

    2015-05-01

    Recently, flexible electronic devices have attracted increasing interest, due to the opportunities they promise for new applications such as wearable devices, where the components are required to flex during normal use[1]. In this light, different magnetic sensors, like microcoil, spin valve, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), magnetoimpedance (MI), have been studied previously on flexible substrates.

  10. Flexible magnetoimpedance sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bodong; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho N.; Kosel, Jürgen, E-mail: jurgen.kosel@kaust.edu.sa

    2015-03-15

    Flexible magnetoimpedance (MI) sensors fabricated using a NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layer on Kapton substrate have been studied. A customized flexible microstrip transmission line was employed to investigate the MI sensors's magnetic field and frequency responses and their dependence on the sensors's deflection. For the first time, the impedance characteristic is obtained through reflection coefficient analysis over a wide range of frequencies from 0.1 MHz to 3 GHz and for deflections ranging from zero curvature to a radius of 7.2 cm. The sensor element maintains a high MI ratio of up to 90% and magnetic sensitivity of up to 9.2%/Oe over different bending curvatures. The relationship between the curvature and material composition is discussed based on the magnetostriction effect and stress simulations. The sensor's large frequency range, simple fabrication process and high sensitivity provide a great potential for flexible electronics and wireless applications. - Highlights: • A flexible magnetoimpedance (MI) sensor is developed. • Studies are carried out using a flexible microstrip transmission line. • An MI ratio of up to 90% is obtained. • The effect of magnetostriction is studied.

  11. A Distributed Tactile Sensor for Intuitive Human-Robot Interfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cirillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety of human-robot physical interaction is enabled not only by suitable robot control strategies but also by suitable sensing technologies. For example, if distributed tactile sensors were available on the robot, they could be used not only to detect unintentional collisions, but also as human-machine interface by enabling a new mode of social interaction with the machine. Starting from their previous works, the authors developed a conformable distributed tactile sensor that can be easily conformed to the different parts of the robot body. Its ability to estimate contact force components and to provide a tactile map with an accurate spatial resolution enables the robot to handle both unintentional collisions in safe human-robot collaboration tasks and intentional touches where the sensor is used as human-machine interface. In this paper, the authors present the characterization of the proposed tactile sensor and they show how it can be also exploited to recognize haptic tactile gestures, by tailoring recognition algorithms, well known in the image processing field, to the case of tactile images. In particular, a set of haptic gestures has been defined to test three recognition algorithms on a group of 20 users. The paper demonstrates how the same sensor originally designed to manage unintentional collisions can be successfully used also as human-machine interface.

  12. Advances in bio-tactile sensors for minimally invasive surgery using the fibre Bragg grating force sensor technique: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushagur, Abdulfatah A G; Arsad, Norhana; Reaz, Mamun Ibne; Bakar, A Ashrif A

    2014-04-09

    The large interest in utilising fibre Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) applications to replace conventional electrical tactile sensors has grown in the past few years. FBG strain sensors offer the advantages of optical fibre sensors, such as high sensitivity, immunity to electromagnetic noise, electrical passivity and chemical inertness, but are not limited by phase discontinuity or intensity fluctuations. FBG sensors feature a wavelength-encoding sensing signal that enables distributed sensing that utilises fewer connections. In addition, their flexibility and lightness allow easy insertion into needles and catheters, thus enabling localised measurements inside tissues and blood. Two types of FBG tactile sensors have been emphasised in the literature: single-point and array FBG tactile sensors. This paper describes the current design, development and research of the optical fibre tactile techniques that are based on FBGs to enhance the performance of MIS procedures in general. Providing MIS or microsurgery surgeons with accurate and precise measurements and control of the contact forces during tissues manipulation will benefit both surgeons and patients.

  13. A Table-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Detecting Triaxial Force on the Basis of Strain Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Il; Kim, Min-Gyu; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A slim and flexible tactile sensor applicable to the interaction of human and intelligent robots is presented. In particular, a simple sensing principle for decoupling of three-dimensional force is proposed. Sensitivity of the proposed tactile sensor is tested experimentally. To improve the sensitivity of the sensor, a table-shaped sensing element was designed. Table-shaped structure can convert an external acting force into concentrated internal stress. A “triaxial force decoupling algorithm” was developed by combining two-dimensional mapping data calculated by finite element analysis. The sensor was calibrated under normal and tangential forces. The external loads applied to the sensor could be decoupled independently as a function of the strain-gauge responses. PMID:24287546

  14. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  15. Self-Powered High-Resolution and Pressure-Sensitive Triboelectric Sensor Matrix for Real-Time Tactile Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiandi; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Han, Xun; Du, Weiming; Zhai, Junyi; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A triboelectric sensor matrix (TESM) can accurately track and map 2D tactile sensing. A self-powered, high-resolution, pressure-sensitive, flexible and durable TESM with 16 × 16 pixels is fabricated for the fast detection of single-point and multi-point touching. Using cross-locating technology, a cross-type TESM with 32 × 20 pixels is developed for more rapid tactile mapping, which significantly reduces the addressing lines from m × n to m + n.

  16. Biomimic Hairy Skin Tactile Sensor Based on Ferromagnetic Microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Hao, Lifeng; Yang, Fan; Jiao, Weicheng; Liu, Wenbo; Li, Yibin; Wang, Rongguo; He, Xiaodong

    2016-12-14

    We present a multifunctional tactile sensor inspired by human hairy skin structure, in which the sensitive hair sensor and the robust skin sensor are integrated into a single device via a pair of Co-based ferromagnetic microwire arrays in a very simple manner. The sensor possesses a self-tunable effective compliance with respect to the magnitude of the stimulus, allowing a wide range of loading force to be measured. The sensor also exhibits some amazing functions, such as air-flow detection, material property characterization, and excellent damage resistance. The novel sensing mechanism and structure provide a new strategy for designing multifunctional tactile sensors and show great potential applications on intelligent robot and sensing in harsh environments.

  17. Three Realizations and Comparison of Hardware for Piezoresistive Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Navas-González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors are basically arrays of force sensors that are intended to emulate the skin in applications such as assistive robotics. Local electronics are usually implemented to reduce errors and interference caused by long wires. Realizations based on standard microcontrollers, Programmable Systems on Chip (PSoCs and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs have been proposed by the authors for the case of piezoresistive tactile sensors. The solution employing FPGAs is especially relevant since their performance is closer to that of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs than that of the other devices. This paper presents an implementation of such an idea for a specific sensor. For the purpose of comparison, the circuitry based on the other devices is also made for the same sensor. This paper discusses the implementation issues, provides details regarding the design of the hardware based on the three devices and compares them.

  18. From Dual-Mode Triboelectric Nanogenerator to Smart Tactile Sensor: A Multiplexing Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zou, Jingdian; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Meng; Cao, Xia; Wang, Ning; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-25

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can be applied for the next generation of artificial intelligent products, where skin-like tactile sensing advances the ability of robotics to feel and interpret environment. In this paper, a flexible and thin tactile sensor was developed on the basis of dual-mode TENGs. The effective transduction of touch and pressure stimulus into independent and interpretable electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of location and pressure with a plane resolution of 2 mm, a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity up to 28 mV·N(-1), and a linear pressure detection ranging from 40 to 140 N. Interestingly, this self-powered dual-mode sensor can even interpret contact and hardness of objects by analyzing the shape of the current peak, which makes this low-cost TENG-based sensor promising for applications in touch screens, electronic skins, healthcare, and environmental survey.

  19. A Low-cost Soft Tactile Sensing Array using 3D Hall Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.; de Boer, G.; Kow, J; Ghajari, M; Alazmani, A; R. Hewson; Culmer, P

    2016-01-01

    Tactile sensors are essential for robotic systems to safely interact with the external world and to precisely manipulate objects. Existing tactile sensors are typically either expensive or limited by poor performance, and most are not mechanically compliant. This work presents MagTrix, a soft tactile sensor array based on four 3D Hall sensors with corresponding permanent magnets. MagTrix has the capability to precisely measure triaxis force (1 mN resolution) and to determine contact area. In ...

  20. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  1. Optical fiber based slide tactile sensor for underwater robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ding-zhong; WANG Qi-ming; SONG Rui-han; YAO Xin; GU Yi-hua

    2008-01-01

    In the underwater environment,many visual sensors don't work,and many sensors which work well for robots working in space or on land can not be used underwater.Therefore,an optical fiber slide tactile sensor was designed based on the inner modulation mechanism of optical fibers.The principles and structure of the sensor are explained in detail.Its static and dynamic characteristics were analyzed theoretically and then simulated.A dynamic characteristic model was built and the simulation made using the GA based neural network.In order to improve sensor response,the recognition model of the sensor was designed based on the'inverse solution'principle of neural networks,increasing the control precision and the sensitivity of the manipulator.

  2. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas.

  3. Flexible sensors based on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev-Bar, Meital; Haick, Hossam

    2013-10-22

    Flexible sensors can be envisioned as promising components for smart sensing applications, including consumer electronics, robotics, prosthetics, health care, safety equipment, environmental monitoring, homeland security and space flight. The current review presents a concise, although admittedly nonexhaustive, didactic review of some of the main concepts and approaches related to the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in flexible sensors. The review attempts to pull together different views and terminologies used in the NP-based sensors, mainly those established via electrical transduction approaches, including, but, not confined to: (i) strain-gauges, (ii) flexible multiparametric sensors, and (iii) sensors that are unaffected by mechanical deformation. For each category, the review presents and discusses the common fabrication approaches and state-of-the-art results. The advantages, weak points, and possible routes for future research, highlighting the challenges for NP-based flexible sensors, are presented and discussed as well.

  4. Estimation of Displacement and Rotation by Magnetic Tactile Sensor Using Stepwise Regression Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Nakamoto; Taketo Wakabayashi; Futoshi Kobayashi; Fumio Kojima

    2014-01-01

    The human is covered with soft skin and has tactile receptors inside. The skin deforms along a contact surface. The tactile receptors detect the mechanical deformation. The detection of the mechanical deformation is essential for the tactile sensation. We propose a magnetic type tactile sensor which has a soft surface and eight magnetoresistive elements. The soft surface has a permanent magnet inside and the magnetoresistive elements under the soft surface measure the magnetic flux density of...

  5. Tactile object exploration using cursor navigation sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Bierbaum, Alexander; Kjaergaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    of this sensor for active haptic exploration. More specifically, we present experiments and results which demonstrate the extraction of relevant object properties such as local shape, weight and elasticity using this technology. Besides its low price due to mass production and its modularity, an interesting...

  6. Tactile Sensors for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Toby B.; Diftler, Myron; Ambrose, Robert O.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Butzer, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Tactile sensors are providing the foundation for developing autonomous grasping skills for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut, a dexterous humanoid robot. The sensors originally developed for the Utah/MIT hand are now incorporated into a rugged glove for Robonaut. These custom gloves compliment the human like dexterity available in the Robonaut hands. The sensors and gloves are discussed showing a progression in using advanced materials and construction techniques to enhance sensitivity and overall sensor coverage. The force data provided by the gloves can be used to improve dexterous, tool and power grasping primitives. Experiments with the latest gloves focus on the use of tools, specifically a power drill used to approximate an astronaut's torque tool.

  7. Development of a Tactile Sensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae; Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Flexible grasping robots are needed for enabling automated, profitable and competitive production of small batch sizes including complex handling processes of often fragile objects. This development will create new conditions for value-adding activities in the production of the future world. The ...... features of small objects are identified. Slip detection in order to define optimum grasp pressure is addressed in section 4. The paper will conclude by addressing future ideas about how to judge or forecast a good grasp quality from sensory information....

  8. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  9. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method.

  10. Wearable Flexible Sensors: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2017-05-18

    The paper provides a review on some of the significant research work done on wearable flexible sensors (WFS). Sensors fabricated with flexible materials have been attached to a person along with the embedded system to monitor a parameter and transfer the significant data to the monitoring unit for further analyses. The use of wearable sensors has played a quite important role to monitor physiological parameters of a person to minimize any malfunctioning happening in the body. The paper categorizes the work according to the materials used for designing the system, the network protocols and different types of activities that were being monitored. The challenges faced by the current sensing systems and future opportunities for the wearable flexible sensors regarding its market values are also briefly explained in the paper.

  11. Flexible Temperature Sensors on Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sloma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present research dedicated to the elaboration of novel, miniaturized flexible temperature sensors for textronic applications. Examined sensors were manufactured on a single yarn, which ensures their high flexibility and good compatibility with textiles. Stable and linear characteristics were obtained by special technological process and applied temperature profiles. As a thermo-sensitive materials the innovative polymer compositions filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes were used. Elaborated material was adapted to printing and dip-coating techniques to produce NTC composites. Nanotube sensors were free from tensometric effect typical for other carbon-polymer sensor, and demonstrated TCR of 0.13%/K. Obtained temperature sensors, compatible with textile structure, can be applied in rapidly developing smart textiles and be used for health and protections purposes.

  12. Contact Pressure Level Indication Using Stepped Output Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsuk Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report on a novel diaphragm-type tactile pressure sensor that produces stepwise output currents depending on varying low contact pressures. When contact pressures are applied to the stepped output tactile sensor (SOTS, the sensor’s suspended diaphragm makes contact with the substrate, which completes a circuit by connecting resistive current paths. Then the contact area, and therefore the number of current paths, would determine the stepped output current produced. This mechanism allows SOTS to have high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB in the 3–500 Hz frequency range at contact pressures below 15 kPa. Moreover, since the sensor’s operation does not depend on a material’s pressure-dependent electrical properties, the SOTS is able to demonstrate high reproducibility and reliability. By forming a 4 × 4 array of SOTS with a surface bump structure, we demonstrated shear sensing as well as surface (1 × 1 cm2 pressure mapping capabilities.

  13. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  14. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force, good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  15. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design. PMID:27563908

  16. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangping Ji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET substrates with copper (Cu electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0–1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance.

  17. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhangping; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Huicong; Liu, Nan; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2016-11-25

    In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates with copper (Cu) electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves) atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0-1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance.

  18. The Design and Characterization of a Flexible Tactile Sensing Array for Robot Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhangping; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Huicong; Liu, Nan; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a flexible tactile sensing array based on a capacitive mechanism was designed, fabricated, and characterized for sensitive robot skin. A device with 8 × 8 sensing units was composed of top and bottom flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates with copper (Cu) electrodes, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) dielectric layer, and a bump contact layer. Four types of microstructures (i.e., pyramids and V-shape grooves) atop a PDMS dielectric layer were well-designed and fabricated to enhance tactile sensitivity. The optimal sensing unit achieved a high sensitivity of 35.9%/N in a force range of 0–1 N. By incorporating a tactile feedback control system, the flexible sensing array as the sensitive skin of a robotic manipulator demonstrated a potential capability of robotic obstacle avoidance. PMID:27897993

  19. A New Approach in Design and Operating Principle of Silicone Tactile Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakri Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Research and development in tactile sensor are escalating due to the fact that advanced robot needs to interact with surrounding environments which is very complex, dynamic, uncontrolled and difficult to perceive reliably. Recent research has been focusing in development of new tactile sensor that takes advantage of advances in materials, Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS and semiconductor technology. To date, several basic sensing principles are commonly used in tactile sensor such as capacitive sensor, piezoelectric sensor, inductive sensor, opto-electrical and piezo-resistive sensor. However they are still lack of sensitivity and low dynamic range in sensing the changes of forces in 3 axes and not durable enough to perform in various working environments. Approach: Three different designs of optical tactile sensor was proposed and analyzed. The overall design of the test-rig of the system was presented. The working principle was based on the deformation of the silicone tactile sensor. The deformation image will be transferred through high quality medical fiberscope and will be recorded using a CCD camera. The image will be stored in a computer for further analysis to relate the image with the given forces. These data can be used to control a robotic gripper so that it can perform gently and precisely like human tactile sensing capability but with greater strength and durability in various working environments. Results: The sensor had been designed and an experimental test rig was developed. Initial experiment was carried out to check the potential of this technique. Based on results, there is almost a linear relationship between the forces and the deformation of the tactile sensor. The amount of deformation is calculated based on the analyzed image data. Conclusion: The results of the experiment gave a convincing idea and provide a ground for further research to enhance this system to be an alternative tactile sensor in

  20. A Novel Two-Wire Fast Readout Approach for Suppressing Cable Crosstalk in a Tactile Resistive Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Wang, Yu; Li, Jianqing; Song, Aiguo

    2016-05-18

    For suppressing the crosstalk problem due to wire resistances and contacted resistances of the long flexible cables in tactile sensing systems, we present a novel two-wire fast readout approach for the two-dimensional resistive sensor array in shared row-column fashion. In the approach, two wires are used for every driving electrode and every sampling electrode in the resistive sensor array. The approach with a high readout rate, though it requires a large number of wires and many sampling channels, solves the cable crosstalk problem. We also verified the approach's performance with Multisim simulations and actual experiments.

  1. A Novel Two-Wire Fast Readout Approach for Suppressing Cable Crosstalk in a Tactile Resistive Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For suppressing the crosstalk problem due to wire resistances and contacted resistances of the long flexible cables in tactile sensing systems, we present a novel two-wire fast readout approach for the two-dimensional resistive sensor array in shared row-column fashion. In the approach, two wires are used for every driving electrode and every sampling electrode in the resistive sensor array. The approach with a high readout rate, though it requires a large number of wires and many sampling channels, solves the cable crosstalk problem. We also verified the approach’s performance with Multisim simulations and actual experiments.

  2. Capacitive wearable tactile sensor based on smart textile substrate with carbon black /silicone rubber composite dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Huang, Ying; Cai, Xia; Liu, Caixia; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    To achieve the wearable comfort of electronic skin (e-skin), a capacitive sensor printed on a flexible textile substrate with a carbon black (CB)/silicone rubber (SR) composite dielectric was demonstrated in this paper. Organo-silicone conductive silver adhesive serves as a flexible electrodes/shielding layer. The structure design, sensing mechanism and the influence of the conductive filler content and temperature variations on the sensor performance were investigated. The proposed device can effectively enhance the flexibility and comfort of wearing the device asthe sensing element has achieved a sensitivity of 0.02536%/KPa, a hysteresis error of 5.6%, and a dynamic response time of ~89 ms at the range of 0-700 KPa. The drift induced by temperature variations has been calibrated by presenting the temperature compensation model. The research on the time-space distribution of plantar pressure information and the experiment of the manipulator soft-grasping were implemented with the introduced device, and the experimental results indicate that the capacitive flexible textile tactile sensor has good stability and tactile perception capacity. This study provides a good candidate for wearable artificial skin.

  3. Object Recognition and Localization: The Role of Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achint Aggarwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors, because of their intrinsic insensitivity to lighting conditions and water turbidity, provide promising opportunities for augmenting the capabilities of vision sensors in applications involving object recognition and localization. This paper presents two approaches for haptic object recognition and localization for ground and underwater environments. The first approach called Batch Ransac and Iterative Closest Point augmented Particle Filter (BRICPPF is based on an innovative combination of particle filters, Iterative-Closest-Point algorithm, and a feature-based Random Sampling and Consensus (RANSAC algorithm for database matching. It can handle a large database of 3D-objects of complex shapes and performs a complete six-degree-of-freedom localization of static objects. The algorithms are validated by experimentation in ground and underwater environments using real hardware. To our knowledge this is the first instance of haptic object recognition and localization in underwater environments. The second approach is biologically inspired, and provides a close integration between exploration and recognition. An edge following exploration strategy is developed that receives feedback from the current state of recognition. A recognition by parts approach is developed which uses the BRICPPF for object sub-part recognition. Object exploration is either directed to explore a part until it is successfully recognized, or is directed towards new parts to endorse the current recognition belief. This approach is validated by simulation experiments.

  4. Object Recognition and Localization: The Role of Tactile Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Achint; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Tactile sensors, because of their intrinsic insensitivity to lighting conditions and water turbidity, provide promising opportunities for augmenting the capabilities of vision sensors in applications involving object recognition and localization. This paper presents two approaches for haptic object recognition and localization for ground and underwater environments. The first approach called Batch Ransac and Iterative Closest Point augmented Particle Filter (BRICPPF) is based on an innovative combination of particle filters, Iterative-Closest-Point algorithm, and a feature-based Random Sampling and Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm for database matching. It can handle a large database of 3D-objects of complex shapes and performs a complete six-degree-of-freedom localization of static objects. The algorithms are validated by experimentation in ground and underwater environments using real hardware. To our knowledge this is the first instance of haptic object recognition and localization in underwater environments. The second approach is biologically inspired, and provides a close integration between exploration and recognition. An edge following exploration strategy is developed that receives feedback from the current state of recognition. A recognition by parts approach is developed which uses the BRICPPF for object sub-part recognition. Object exploration is either directed to explore a part until it is successfully recognized, or is directed towards new parts to endorse the current recognition belief. This approach is validated by simulation experiments. PMID:24553087

  5. Sensitivity improvements of a resonance-based tactile sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yoshinobu; Lindahl, Olof A

    2017-02-01

    Resonance-based contact-impedance measurement refers to the application of resonance sensors based on the measurement of the changes in the resonance curve of an ultrasonic resonator in contact with a surface. The advantage of the resonance sensor is that it is very sensitive to small changes in the contact impedance. A sensitive micro tactile sensor (MTS) was developed, which measured the elasticity of soft living tissues at the single-cell level. In the present paper, we studied the method of improving the touch and stiffness sensitivity of the MTS. First, the dependence of touch sensitivity in relation to the resonator length was studied by calculating the sensitivity coefficient at each length ranging from 9 to 40 mm. The highest touch sensitivity was obtained with a 30-mm-long glass needle driven at a resonance frequency of 100 kHz. Next, the numerical calculation of contact impedance showed that the highest stiffness sensitivity was achieved when the driving frequency was 100 kHz and the contact-tip diameter of the MTS was 10 μm. The theoretical model was then confirmed experimentally using a phase-locked-loop-based digital feedback oscillation circuit. It was found that the developed MTS, whose resonant frequency was 97.030 kHz, performed with the highest sensitivity of 53.2 × 10(6) Hz/N at the driving frequency of 97.986 kHz, i.e. the highest sensitivity was achieved at 956 Hz above the resonant frequency.

  6. Development of a biomimetic roughness sensor for tactile information with an elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Sung Joon; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2016-04-01

    Human uses various sensational information for identifying an object. When contacting an unidentified object with no vision, tactile sensation provides a variety of information to perceive. Tactile sensation plays an important role to recognize a shape of surfaces from touching. In robotic fields, tactile sensation is especially meaningful. Robots can perform more accurate job using comprehensive tactile information. And in case of using sensors made by soft material like silicone, sensors can be used in various situations. So we are developing a tactile sensor with soft materials. As the conventional robot operates in a controlled environment, it is a good model to make robots more available at any circumstance that sensory systems of living things. For example, there are lots of mechanoreceptors that each of them has different roles detecting simulation in side of human skin tissue. By mimicking the mechanoreceptor, a sensory system can be realized more closely to human being. It is known that human obtains roughness information through scanning the surface with fingertips. During that times, subcutaneous mechanoreceptors detect vibration. In the same way, while a robot is scanning a surface of object, a roughness sensor developed detects vibrations generated between contacting two surfaces. In this research, a roughness sensor made by an elastomer was developed and experiment for perception of objects was conducted. We describe means to compare the roughness of objects with a newly developed sensor.

  7. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Han, Haijun; Liu, Tao; Yi, Jingang; Li, Qingguo; Inoue, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems. PMID:27023545

  8. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  9. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Han, Haijun; Liu, Tao; Yi, Jingang; Li, Qingguo; Inoue, Yoshio

    2016-03-24

    Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  10. Fabrication of a wearable fabric tactile sensor produced by artificial hollow fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Ogura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Sato, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    An artificial-hollow-fiber structure as a new material for MEMS was developed and applied to a novel type of fabric tactile sensor. The artificial hollow fiber was fabricated by uniformly deposited metal and insulation layers on the surface of an elastic tube. A special rotating mechanism for uniformly depositing a metal layer on the tube surface during sputtering was developed. A rectangular-shaped fabric tactile sensor was produced by combining artificial hollow fibers and typical cotton yarns, like a cloth. The sensor can detect a contact force by measuring changes in capacitance at all intersection points of the artificial hollow fibers. Two different types of wearable-tactile-sensor glove, a patched type and a direct knit type, were also fabricated, and it was confirmed that both types can detect a normal load by measuring the capacitance change.

  11. A Bio-Hybrid Tactile Sensor Incorporating Living Artificial Skin and an Impedance Sensing Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheneler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of a bio-hybrid tactile sensor array that incorporates a skin analogue comprised of alginate encapsulated fibroblasts is described. The electrical properties are modulated by mechanical stress induced during contact, and changes are detected by a ten-channel dual-electrode impedance sensing array. By continuously monitoring the impedance of the sensor array at a fixed frequency, whilst normal and tangential loads are applied to the skin surface, transient mechanotransduction has been observed. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the preliminary prototype bio-hybrid tactile sensor.

  12. Estimation of Displacement and Rotation by Magnetic Tactile Sensor Using Stepwise Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human is covered with soft skin and has tactile receptors inside. The skin deforms along a contact surface. The tactile receptors detect the mechanical deformation. The detection of the mechanical deformation is essential for the tactile sensation. We propose a magnetic type tactile sensor which has a soft surface and eight magnetoresistive elements. The soft surface has a permanent magnet inside and the magnetoresistive elements under the soft surface measure the magnetic flux density of the magnet. The tactile sensor estimates the displacement and the rotation on the surface based on the change of the magnetic flux density. Determination of an estimate equation is difficult because the displacement and the rotation are not geometrically decided based on the magnetic flux density. In this paper, a stepwise regression analysis determines the estimate equation. The outputs of the magnetoresistive elements are used as explanatory variables, and the three-axis displacement and the two-axis rotation are response variables in the regression analysis. We confirm the regression analysis is effective for determining the estimate equations through simulation and experiment. The results show the tactile sensor measures both the displacement and the rotation generated on the surface by using the determined equation.

  13. A flexible infrared sensor for tissue oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl; Thyssen, Anders; Engholm, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    We present a flexible infrared sensor for use in tissue oximetry with the aim of treating prematurely born infants. The sensor will detect the oxygen saturation in brain tissue through near infrared spectroscopy. The sensor itself consists of several individual silicon photo detectors fully...... integrated in a flexible array. The flexibility is achieved by combining silicon with Polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide using standard IC manufacturing. This ensures that the electrical interconnects on the sensor can withstand being bent in order for the sensor to confine to the curved surface of the head...

  14. Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) as dexterous manipulators and tactile sensors for minimally invasive robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramzadeh, Y.; Shahinpoor, M.

    2012-04-01

    Robot-assisted surgery provides the surgeons with new tools to perform sophisticated surgical operations in a minimally invasive manner. Small robotic end-effectors at the tip of the surgical forceps are the key advantage of robotic surgery over laparoscopic surgery and any improvement on the design of these small robots can significantly improve the overall functionality of the surgical robots. In this sense, novel bio-compatible electro-active polymeric actuators can improve the design and functionality of these robotic end-effectors particularly by introducing smaller and more flexible robotic tools. Here, we introduce the applications of IPMCs as flexible actuators with embedded tactile and force feedback sensors in minimally-invasive robotic surgery. A new design for the robotic manipulation of the organs is presented in which a two dimensional IPMC actuator is replaced with the rigid robotic distal tip. It is shown that with a customized design, IPMC actuators maintain the required dexterity for two-dimensional bending of robotic distal tip. The overall design of the robot could be considered as a hybrid robot with the combination of rigid robotic links and flexible IPMC actuator with two degrees of freedom. On the other hand with the current robotic distal tips, no tactile force feedback is available during surgery and the surgeons rely solely on vision feedback. With the proposed design of actuator, the IPMC based distal tip could be used to deliver force feedback data by using an embedded IPMC tactile sensor. Design considerations, kinematics and chemo-electro-mechanical model of the proposed actuator is presented.

  15. Development of an LSI for Tactile Sensor Systems on the Whole-Body of Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroyama, Masanori; Makihata, Mitsutoshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Matsuzaki, Sakae; Yamada, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ui; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nonomura, Yutaka; Fujiyoshi, Motohiro; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    We have developed a network type tactile sensor system, which realizes high-density tactile sensors on the whole-body of nursing and communication robots. The system consists of three kinds of nodes: host, relay and sensor nodes. Roles of the sensor node are to sense forces and, to encode the sensing data and to transmit the encoded data on serial channels by interruption handling. Relay nodes and host deal with a number of the encoded sensing data from the sensor nodes. A sensor node consists of a capacitive MEMS force sensor and a signal processing/transmission LSI. In this paper, details of an LSI for the sensor node are described. We designed experimental sensor node LSI chips by a commercial 0.18µm standard CMOS process. The 0.18µm LSIs were supplied in wafer level for MEMS post-process. The LSI chip area is 2.4mm × 2.4mm, which includes logic, CF converter and memory circuits. The maximum clock frequency of the chip with a large capacitive load is 10MHz. Measured power consumption at 10MHz clock is 2.23mW. Experimental results indicate that size, response time, sensor sensitivity and power consumption are all enough for practical tactile sensor systems.

  16. A Flexible Capacitive Sensor with Encapsulated Liquids as Dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Hotta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flexible and high-sensitive capacitive sensors are demanded to detect pressure distribution and/or tactile information on a curved surface, hence, wide varieties of polymer-based flexible MEMS sensors have been developed. High-sensitivity may be achieved by increasing the capacitance of the sensor using solid dielectric material while it deteriorates the flexibility. Using air as the dielectric, to maintain the flexibility, sacrifices the sensor sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate flexible and highly sensitive capacitive sensor arrays that encapsulate highly dielectric liquids as the dielectric. Deionized water and glycerin, which have relative dielectric constants of approximately 80 and 47, respectively, could increase the capacitance of the sensor when used as the dielectric while maintaining flexibility of the sensor with electrodes patterned on flexible polymer substrates. A reservoir of liquids between the electrodes was designed to have a leak path, which allows the sensor to deform despite of the incompressibility of the encapsulated liquids. The proposed sensor was microfabricated and demonstrated successfully to have a five times greater sensitivity than sensors that use air as the dielectric.

  17. Sensitivity enhancement of a micro-scale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhua

    2010-08-01

    A microscale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of force detection. Guided by the principles of the human tactile perception mechanism, specifically the epidermal ridges, artificial epidermal ridges made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were designed and placed on micro-fabricated metal strain gauge arrays. A polyimide layer was fabricated to facilitate attachment between the metal and PDMS, so that patterned copper could be deposited on the polyimide to function as the strain gauges. The aspect ratio of the artificial epidermal ridges was optimized using material stability calculations and finite element method (FEM) simulations, and the optimal structure obtained was 400 µm in width and 110 µm in height. Experiments verified the effectiveness of enhancing the sensitivity of such a tactile sensor with the artificial epidermal ridges, in that the outputs of the strain gauges were 1.8 times more sensitive than those of a tactile sensor without ridges. The proposed artificial epidermal ridges are readily applicable to any developed tactile sensors for performance enhancement.

  18. Flexible thin film magnetoimpedance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Ural Federal University, Laboratory of Magnetic sensoric, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Fernández, E. [BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Vizcaya Science and Technology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Svalov, A. [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Ural Federal University, Laboratory of Magnetic sensoric, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Burgoa Beitia, A. [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); García-Arribas, A. [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Vizcaya Science and Technology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Larrañaga, A. [SGIker, Servicios Generales de Investigación, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    Magnetically soft thin film deposited onto polymer substrates is an attractive option for flexible electronics including magnetoimpedance (MI) applications. MI FeNi/Ti based thin film sensitive elements were designed and prepared using the sputtering technique by deposition onto rigid and flexible substrates at different deposition rates. Their structure, magnetic properties and MI were comparatively analyzed. The main structural features were sufficiently accurately reproduced in the case of deposition onto cyclo olefine polymer substrates compared to glass substrates for the same conditions. Although for the best condition (28 nm/min rate) of the deposition onto polymer a significant reduction of the MI field sensitivity was found satisfactory for sensor applications sensitivity: 45%/Oe was obtained for a frequency of 60 MHz. - Highlights: • [FeNi/Ti]{sub 3}/Cu/[FeNi/Ti]{sub 3} films were prepared by sputtering at different deposition rates. • Polymer substrates insure sufficiently accurate reproducibility of the film structure. • High deposition rate of 28 nm/min insures the highest values of the magnetoimpedance sensitivity. • Deposition onto polymer results in the satisfactory magnetoimpedance sensitivity of 45%/Oe.

  19. Sensorization of Robotic Hand Using Optical Three-Axis Tactile Sensor: Evaluation with Grasping and Twisting Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafiah Yussof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sensitization of robot hand is still remaining as crucial issue since most of robot hand systems nowadays are only capable to grasp a predefined specific object. It is still difficult for robot hand system to realize human-like tactile sensation. Some common problems in robot hand system are low accuracy sensing device, sensors are not robust enough for long time work and heavy duties, inconsistence tactile sensing detection and difficulties in control of sensing fusion with robot trajectory. These problems are apparently drawback the progress to commercializing robot hands as real consumer products. Approach: This study presented the application of optical three-axis tactile sensor to robot hand to improve sensitization quality in robotic hand system. The proposed tactile sensor system was designed with compliance modules to communicate with robot hand control system. The sensing principle used in this tactile sensor comparatively provides better sensing accuracy to detect contact phenomena from acquisition of three axial directions of forces. Methodology of force and slippage detection in the tactile sensor system was presented. Accordingly, the optimization of robot hand control algorithm to comply with the tactile sensor system was presented and verified in experiment of grasping and twisting. Results: The tactile sensor presented in this study is capable of detecting normal and shear force simultaneously. The proposed methodology was verified in experiment with paper cup and water, in which the result shows the robot control system managed to respond to the proposed object stiffness distinction parameters and effectively respond to sudden change of object weight during grasping. An experiment of grasping and twisting motions was conducted using a bottle cap. In order to perform simultaneous grasping and twisting tasks, optimization of the control algorithm was conducted with additional parameters to satisfy the desired

  20. Highly sensitive resistive type single-axis tactile sensor with liquid pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonggi; Kim, Baek-chul; Jung, Jiyeon; Koo, Ja Choon; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Moon, Hyungpil

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the resistive type tactile sensor with a liquid pocket. The tactile sensor with polymer substrate has two components which are the sensing element and the structural part. The sensing part is surrounded by PDMS (Sylgard 184) which is relatively solid. To make the sensor more sensitive, we design the upper part of the sensing element in a shape of half-sphere filled with a liquid (silicone oil). When the force is applied to the sensor, the liquid pressure increases and evenly presses down the sensing element to deform. The size of sensor is 7 x 3 x 1 mm including the wiring part. The good sensitivity (0.012 S/kPa-1) of the fabricated sensor is experimentally verified.

  1. Artificial Roughness Encoding with a Bio-inspired MEMS-based Tactile Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogero Maria Oddo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A compliant 2x2 tactile sensor array was developed and investigated for roughness encoding. State of the art cross shape 3D MEMS sensors were integrated with polymeric packaging providing in total 16 sensitive elements to external mechanical stimuli in an area of about 20 mm2, similarly to the SA1 innervation density in humans. Experimental analysis of the bio-inspired tactile sensor array was performed by using ridged surfaces, with spatial periods from 2.6 mm to 4.1 mm, which were indented with regulated 1N normal force and stroked at constant sliding velocity from 15 mm/s to 48 mm/s. A repeatable and expected frequency shift of the sensor outputs depending on the applied stimulus and on its scanning velocity was observed between 3.66 Hz and 18.46 Hz with an overall maximum error of 1.7%. The tactile sensor could also perform contact imaging during static stimulus indentation. The experiments demonstrated the suitability of this approach for the design of a roughness encoding tactile sensor for an artificial fingerpad.

  2. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM. The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures.

  3. The role of fingerprints in the coding of tactile information probed with a biomimetic sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Scheibert, J; Prevost, A; Debrégeas, G; 10.1126/science.1166467

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the tactile perception of fine textures (spatial scale <200 micrometers) is mediated by skin vibrations generated as the finger scans the surface. To establish the relationship between texture characteristics and subcutaneous vibrations, a biomimetic tactile sensor has been designed whose dimensions match those of the fingertip. When the sensor surface is patterned with parallel ridges mimicking the fingerprints, the spectrum of vibrations elicited by randomly textured substrates is dominated by one frequency set by the ratio of the scanning speed to the interridge distance. For human touch, this frequency falls within the optimal range of sensitivity of Pacinian afferents, which mediate the coding of fine textures. Thus, fingerprints may perform spectral selection and amplification of tactile information that facilitate its processing by specific mechanoreceptors.

  4. Stiffness mapping prostate biopsy samples using a tactile sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiyu; Omata, Sadao; Peehl, Donna M; Constantinou, Chris E

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the stiffness of cancerous cells reflects their pathological stage and progression rates, with increased cancerous cell stiffness associated with increased aggressiveness. Therefore, the elasticity of the cancerous cells has the potential to be used as an indicator of the cancer's aggressiveness. However, the sensitivity and resolution of current palpation and imaging techniques are not sufficient to detect small cancerous tissues. In previous studies, we developed a tactile-based device to map with high resolution the stiffness of a tissue section. The purpose of this study is to evaluate this device using different tissues (BPH, Cancer and PZ) collected from human prostates. The preliminary results show that the tactile device is sensitive enough to tell the differences of the stiffness of different tissues. The results also disclosed the factors (humidity, temperature and tissue degradation) which could dramatically affect the results of stiffness mapping. The tactile technology described in this paper has the potential to help disclose the underlying mechanical mechanisms that lead to increased stiffness in prostate tumors.

  5. An Optoelectromechanical Tactile Sensor for Detection of Breast Lumps

    OpenAIRE

    Başdoğan, Çağatay; Ayyıldız, Mehmet; Yıldız, Mustafa Zahid; Güçlü, Burak

    2013-01-01

    We developed a compact tactile imaging (TI) system to guide the clinician or the self-user for noninvasive detection of breast tumors. Our system measures the force distribution based on the difference in stiffness between a palpated object and an abnormality within. The average force resolution, force range, and the spatial resolution of the device are 0.02 N, 0-4 N, and 2.8 mm, respectively. To evaluate the performance of the proposed TI system, compression experiments were performed to mea...

  6. Flexible Sensor Network Reprogramming for Logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Havinga, P.J.M.; Kuper, J.

    2007-01-01

    Besides the currently realized applications, Wireless Sensor Networks can be put to use in logistics processes. However, doing so requires a level of flexibility and safety not provided by the current WSN software platforms. This paper discusses a logistics scenario, and presents SensorScheme, a run

  7. Slip detection with accelerometer and tactile sensors in a robotic hand model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shanoon, Abdulrahman Abdulkareem S.; Anom Ahmad, Siti; Hassan, Mohd. Khair b.

    2015-11-01

    Grasp planning is an interesting issue in studies that dedicated efforts to investigate tactile sensors. This study investigated the physical force interaction between a tactile pressure sensor and a particular object. It also characterized object slipping during gripping operations and presented secure regripping of an object. Acceleration force was analyzed using an accelerometer sensor to establish a completely autonomous robotic hand model. An automatic feedback control system was applied to regrip the particular object when it commences to slip. Empirical findings were presented in consideration of the detection and subsequent control of the slippage situation. These findings revealed the correlation between the distance of the object slipping and the required force to regrip the object safely. This approach is similar to Hooke's law formula.

  8. Development of a Tactile and Slip Sensor Controlled Prosthetic Hand System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wang, R. C.; Zhang, J. C.; Jin, D. W.

    2008-10-01

    Supported by the latest sensor and microcontroller technologies, prosthetic hands have been widely used to reclaim the human functionaries. Among these, the most advanced prosthetic hand was controlled by the tactile and EMG singles. However, for a slippery object, attention has to be taken for the inexperienced users who need to control the shrinkage of the wrist flexor carefully. In this paper, the authors presented a prosthetic hand control system using PVDF film sensor to provide both tactile and slip force feedback signals to operate the hand. The PVDF film sensor used for this control system was specifically developed to detect both tactile and slip force between the prosthetic finger and object. The method of distinguishing two signals was described. A prototype system was constructed using a microcontroller to process the signal from the sensor and provide control signal to the motors operate the prosthetic hand. The test result of the prototype device shown that comparing with the one without slippery signal feedback, this system was easy to operate for an inexperienced user.

  9. Flexible heartbeat sensor for wearable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Wonhyo; Park, Kwang Bum; Kim, Kunnyun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2017-03-08

    We demonstrate a flexible strain-gauge sensor and its use in a wearable application for heart rate detection. This polymer-based strain-gauge sensor was fabricated using a double-sided fabrication method with polymer and metal, i.e., polyimide and nickel-chrome. The fabrication process for this strain-gauge sensor is compatible with the conventional flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) processes facilitating its commercialization. The fabricated sensor showed a linear relation for an applied normal force of more than 930 kPa, with a minimum detectable force of 6.25Pa. This sensor can also linearly detect a bending radius from 5mm to 100mm. It is a thin, flexible, compact, and inexpensive (for mass production) heart rate detection sensor that is highly sensitive compared to the established optical photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. It can detect not only the timing of heart pulsation, but also the amplitude or shape of the pulse signal. The proposed strain-gauge sensor can be applicable to various applications for smart devices requiring heartbeat detection.

  10. Tactile sensing of prostate cancer : a resonance sensor method evaluated using human prostate tissue in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jalkanen, Ville

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in men in Europe and the USA. The methods presently used to detect and diagnose prostate cancer are inexact, and new techniques are needed. Prostate tumours can be regarded as harder than the surrounding normal healthy glandular tissue, and therefore it is of interest to be able to reliably measure prostate tissue stiffness. In this dissertation the approach was to evaluate tactile resonance sensor technology and its ability to measure mecha...

  11. A screen-printed flexible flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, A.; Syrovy, T.; Syrova, L.; Kaltsas, G.

    2017-04-01

    A thermal flow sensor was printed on a flexible plastic substrate using exclusively screen-printing techniques. The presented device was implemented with custom made screen-printed thermistors, which allows simple, cost-efficient production on a variety of flexible substrates while maintaining the typical advantages of thermal flow sensors. Evaluation was performed for both static (zero flow) and dynamic conditions using a combination of electrical measurements and IR imaging techniques in order to determine important characteristics, such as temperature response, output repeatability, etc. The flow sensor was characterized utilizing the hot-wire and calorimetric principles of operation, while the preliminary results appear to be very promising, since the sensor was successfully evaluated and displayed adequate sensitivity in a relatively wide flow range.

  12. Bio-Inspired PVDF-Based, Mouse Whisker Mimicking, Tactile Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Islam Tiwana

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design and fabrication of a Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF based, mouse (or rodent whisker mimicking, tactile sensor is presented. Unlike previous designs reported in the literature, this sensor mimics the mouse whisker not only mechanically, but it also makes macro movements just like a real mouse whisker in a natural environment. We have developed a mathematical model and performed finite element analysis using COMSOL, in order to optimise the whisker to have the same natural frequency as that of a biological whisker. Similarly, we have developed a control system that enables the whisker mimicking sensor to vibrate at variable frequencies and conducted practical experiments to validate the response of the sensor. The natural frequency of the whisker can be designed anywhere between 35 and 110 Hz, the same as a biological whisker, by choosing different materials and physical dimensions. The control system of this sensor enables the whisker to vibrate between 5 and 236 Hz.

  13. A CMOS-Based Tactile Sensor for Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Kirstein, K -U; Salo, T; Hagleitner, C; Vancura, T; Hierlemann, A

    2011-01-01

    A monolithic integrated tactile sensor array is presented, which is used to perform non-invasive blood pressure monitoring of a patient. The advantage of this device compared to a hand cuff based approach is the capability of recording continuous blood pressure data. The capacitive, membrane-based sensor device is fabricated in an industrial CMOS-technology combined with post-CMOS micromachining. The capacitance change is detected by a S?-modulator. The modulator is operated at a sampling rate of 128kS/s and achieves a resolution of 12bit with an external decimation filter and an OSR of 128.

  14. FLEXIBLE STRUCTURE WITH INTEGRATED SENSOR/ACTUATOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A polymer-based flexible structure with integrated sensing/actuator means is presented. Conventionally, silicon has been used as a piezo-resistive material due to its high gauge factor and thereby high sensitivity to strain changes in a sensor. By using the fact that e.g. an SU-8 based polymer...

  15. Integrated dynamic and static tactile sensor: focus on static force sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettels, Nicholas; Pletner, Baruch

    2012-04-01

    Object grasping by robotic hands in unstructured environments demands a sensor that is durable, compliant, and responsive to static and dynamic force conditions. In order for a tactile sensor to be useful for grasp control in these, it should have the following properties: tri-axial force sensing (two shear plus normal component), dynamic event sensing across slip frequencies, compliant surface for grip, wide dynamic range (depending on application), insensitivity to environmental conditions, ability to withstand abuse and good sensing behavior (e.g. low hysteresis, high repeatability). These features can be combined in a novel multimodal tactile sensor. This sensor combines commercial-off-the-shelf MEMS technology with two proprietary force sensors: a high bandwidth device based on PZT technology and low bandwidth device based on elastomers and optics. In this study, we focus on the latter transduction mechanism and the proposed architecture of the completed device. In this study, an embedded LED was utilized to produce a constant light source throughout a layer of silicon rubber which covered a plastic mandrel containing a set of sensitive phototransistors. Features about the contacted object such as center of pressure and force vectors can be extracted from the information in the changing patterns of light. The voltage versus force relationship obtained with this molded humanlike finger had a wide dynamic range that coincided with forces relevant for most human grip tasks.

  16. Fabrication of a Flexible Graphene Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyojin; Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong Sik; Bae, Gi Yoon; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-11-01

    The electromechanical properties of single-layer graphene have inspired specific application to force sensors, sinceit is capable of sensing within the range of human pressure perception. In this study, we present a pressure sensor for vertical force that is flexible and transparent by introducing a single graphene layer on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate. This substrate is commonly used as a force absorber in sensors. By employing it with a pressure amplifying structure, the performance of the sensor shows a reliable resistance change of 0.15% per 1 kPa of applied vertical pressure. Detection for the motion of the finger joint and touching are demonstrated with the sensor equipped on the human body.

  17. Contact Region Estimation Based on a Vision-Based Tactile Sensor Using a Deformable Touchpad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ito

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to estimate the contact region between a sensor and an object using a deformable tactile sensor. The sensor consists of a charge-coupled device (CCD camera, light-emitting diode (LED lights and a deformable touchpad. The sensor can obtain a variety of tactile information, such as the contact region, multi-axis contact force, slippage, shape, position and orientation of an object in contact with the touchpad. The proposed method is based on the movements of dots printed on the surface of the touchpad and classifies the contact state of dots into three types—A non-contacting dot, a sticking dot and a slipping dot. Considering the movements of the dots with noise and errors, equations are formulated to discriminate between the contacting dots and the non-contacting dots. A set of the contacting dots discriminated by the formulated equations can construct the contact region. Next, a method is developed to detect the dots in images of the surface of the touchpad captured by the CCD camera. A method to assign numbers to dots for calculating the displacements of the dots is also proposed. Finally, the proposed methods are validated by experimental results.

  18. Tactile Robotic Topographical Mapping Without Force or Contact Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kevin; Melko, Joseph; Krajewski, Joel; Cady, Ian

    2008-01-01

    A method of topographical mapping of a local solid surface within the range of motion of a robot arm is based on detection of contact between the surface and the end effector (the fixture or tool at the tip of the robot arm). The method was conceived to enable mapping of local terrain by an exploratory robot on a remote planet, without need to incorporate delicate contact switches, force sensors, a vision system, or other additional, costly hardware. The method could also be used on Earth for determining the size and shape of an unknown surface in the vicinity of a robot, perhaps in an unanticipated situation in which other means of mapping (e.g., stereoscopic imaging or laser scanning with triangulation) are not available. The method uses control software modified to utilize the inherent capability of the robotic control system to measure the joint positions, the rates of change of the joint positions, and the electrical current demanded by the robotic arm joint actuators. The system utilizes these coordinate data and the known robot-arm kinematics to compute the position and velocity of the end effector, move the end effector along a specified trajectory, place the end effector at a specified location, and measure the electrical currents in the joint actuators. Since the joint actuator current is approximately proportional to the actuator forces and torques, a sudden rise in joint current, combined with a slowing of the joint, is a possible indication of actuator stall and surface contact. Hence, even though the robotic arm is not equipped with contact sensors, it is possible to sense contact (albeit with reduced sensitivity) as the end effector becomes stalled against a surface that one seeks to measure.

  19. Tactile sensor integrated dielectric elastomer actuator for simultaneous actuation and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadooka, Kevin; Imamura, Hiroya; Taya, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) are a subgroup of electroactive polymers which may be used as soft transducers. Such soft transducers exhibit high energy density and silent operation, which makes them desirable for life-like robotic systems such as a robotic hand. A robotic hand must be able to sense the object being manipulated, in terms of normal and shear force being applied, and note when contact has been achieved or lost. To this end, a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with integrated tactile sensing has been developed to provide simultaneous actuation and sensing. The tactile sensing dielectric elastomer actuator consists of a unimorph-type structure, where the active portion is a laminate of alternating DE and electrode material which expands under applied voltage, and the sensing portion is a stiffer sensing dielectric elastomer which has no electrical connection to the active portion. Under applied voltage, the deformation of the active portion expands but is constrained on one side by the sensing portion, resulting in bending actuation. The sensing portion is a DE with electrodes patterned to form 2x2 capacitive sensing arrays. Dome-shaped bumps positioned over the sensing arrays redistribute tactile forces onto the sensor segments, so that measurement of the capacitance change across the array allows for reconstruction of magnitude and direction of the incoming force.

  20. The output characteristic of cantilever-like tactile sensor based on the inverse magnetostrictive effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lili; Wang, Bowen; Wang, Qilong; Han, Jianhui; Cao, Shuying

    2017-05-01

    The output characteristic model of a magnetostrictive cantilever-like tactile sensor has been founded based on the inverse-magnetostrictive effect, the flexure mode, and the Jiles-Atherton model. The magnetostrictive sensor has been designed and an output voltage is analyzed under the conditions of bias magnetic field, contact pressure and deflection of cantilever beam. The experiment has been performed to determine the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. It is found that the peak of the induced output voltage increases with an increasing pressure under the bias magnetic field of 4.8kA/m. The experimental result agrees well with the theoretical one and it means that the model can describe the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. The sensor with a Galfenol sheet may hold potentials in sample characterization and deformation predication in artificial intelligence area.

  1. The output characteristic of cantilever-like tactile sensor based on the inverse magnetostrictive effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The output characteristic model of a magnetostrictive cantilever-like tactile sensor has been founded based on the inverse-magnetostrictive effect, the flexure mode, and the Jiles-Atherton model. The magnetostrictive sensor has been designed and an output voltage is analyzed under the conditions of bias magnetic field, contact pressure and deflection of cantilever beam. The experiment has been performed to determine the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. It is found that the peak of the induced output voltage increases with an increasing pressure under the bias magnetic field of 4.8kA/m. The experimental result agrees well with the theoretical one and it means that the model can describe the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. The sensor with a Galfenol sheet may hold potentials in sample characterization and deformation predication in artificial intelligence area.

  2. Flexible optical chemical sensor platform for BTX

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Espinoza, Juan Diego; Sazhnikov, Viacheslav; Sabik, Sami; Ionov, Dmitriy; Smits, Edsger; Kalathimekkad, Sandeep; Van Steenberge, Geert; Alfimov, Michail; Posniak, Malgorzata; Schoo, Herman

    2012-01-01

    An in-plane flexible sensor platform for BTX detection was developed using low-cost patterning techniques and foil-based optical components. The platform was produced by a combination of laser patterning, inkjet printing and capillary filling. Key optical components such as lightguides, opticalcladding layers and metallic interconnections were realized on low cost substrates such as paper and PET. The sensing mechanism is based on the change in fluorescence spectra of a reporter dye, supporte...

  3. Classification of rigid and deformable objects using a novel tactile sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Kootstra, Gert; Bilberg, Arne;

    2011-01-01

    . A real time acquisition system scans the data from the array which is then further processed. We validate the properties of the sensor in an application that classifies a number of household objects while performing a palpation procedure with a robotic gripper. Based on the haptic feedback, we classify...... various rigid and deformable objects. We represent the array of tactile images for each grasped object to a time series of features and use this as the input for a KNN classifier. Dynamic time warping is used for calculating distances between different time series of features. In the end, we compare...

  4. A Tactile Sensor Using Piezoresistive Beams for Detection of the Coefficient of Static Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatani, Taiyu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Noda, Kentaro; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-05-18

    This paper reports on a tactile sensor using piezoresistive beams for detection of the coefficient of static friction merely by pressing the sensor against an object. The sensor chip is composed of three pairs of piezoresistive beams arranged in parallel and embedded in an elastomer; this sensor is able to measure the vertical and lateral strains of the elastomer. The coefficient of static friction is estimated from the ratio of the fractional resistance changes corresponding to the sensing elements of vertical and lateral strains when the sensor is in contact with an object surface. We applied a normal force on the sensor surface through objects with coefficients of static friction ranging from 0.2 to 1.1. The fractional resistance changes corresponding to vertical and lateral strains were proportional to the applied force. Furthermore, the relationship between these responses changed according to the coefficients of static friction. The experimental result indicated the proposed sensor could determine the coefficient of static friction before a global slip occurs.

  5. Integration of Fiber-Optic Sensor Arrays into a Multi-Modal Tactile Sensor Processing System for Robotic End-Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, Peter; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:24743158

  6. Integration of Fiber-Optic Sensor Arrays into a Multi-Modal Tactile Sensor Processing System for Robotic End-Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kampmann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach.

  7. Spatial asymmetry in tactile sensor skin deformation aids perception of edge orientation during haptic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D; Hellman, Randall B; Santos, Veronica J

    2014-01-01

    Upper-limb amputees rely primarily on visual feedback when using their prostheses to interact with others or objects in their environment. A constant reliance upon visual feedback can be mentally exhausting and does not suffice for many activities when line-of-sight is unavailable. Upper-limb amputees could greatly benefit from the ability to perceive edges, one of the most salient features of 3D shape, through touch alone. We present an approach for estimating edge orientation with respect to an artificial fingertip through haptic exploration using a multimodal tactile sensor on a robot hand. Key parameters from the tactile signals for each of four exploratory procedures were used as inputs to a support vector regression model. Edge orientation angles ranging from -90 to 90 degrees were estimated with an 85-input model having an R (2) of 0.99 and RMS error of 5.08 degrees. Electrode impedance signals provided the most useful inputs by encoding spatially asymmetric skin deformation across the entire fingertip. Interestingly, sensor regions that were not in direct contact with the stimulus provided particularly useful information. Methods described here could pave the way for semi-autonomous capabilities in prosthetic or robotic hands during haptic exploration, especially when visual feedback is unavailable.

  8. Development of Compact Flexible Displacement Sensors Using Ultrasonic Sensor for Wearable Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In position control of wearable actuator such as a rubber artificial muscle, a compact flexible displacement sensor is much attractive and required. In this paper, two types of flexible displacement sensor using the ultrasonic sensor were introduced. One is a built-in displacement sensor for rubber artificial muscle. Another is a sensor that can measure the sliding displacement on a flexible tube for flexible robot. Both sensors use ultrasonic displacement sensors. The construction, operating principle and measuring performance of two sensors were also described.

  9. A Study on Design Concept for a Braille Tactile Sensor Segment Using Softness Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongwei; Arabshahi, Sayyed Alireza; Watanabe, Tetsuyou

    The purpose of this report is to introduce and discuss about the design parameters for a segment of a tactile sensor reading one dot of a Braille alphabet. A sensor segment consisting of a piezoelectric (PVDF) film sandwiched between two elastic materials is designed. Experiments and simulations are used to define and examine the design parameters. With regards to the sensor structure, Free and Clamped boundary conditions are presented and the relevant equations containing the design parameters, e.g. “bending softness”, are derived. Applying different materials and thicknesses for layers surrounding the PVDF film, simulations are used to quantize the approximate values for each design parameter. The results show that the output of sensor is mostly dependent on the bending effect near the PVDF layer, and the structure encouraging more bending produces higher output. Finally, it is concluded that the real sensor has a structure which is between Free and Clamped boundary conditions, therefore design parameters are modified to compromise between the two cases and optimum values are presented.

  10. Development of 3D carbon nanotube interdigitated finger electrodes on polymer substrate for flexible capacitive sensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chih-Fan; Wang, Jhih-Yu; Liu, Yu-Chia; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2013-11-08

    This study reports a novel approach to the implementation of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) interdigitated finger electrodes on flexible polymer, and the detection of strain, bending curvature, tactile force and proximity distance are demonstrated. The merits of the presented CNT-based flexible sensor are as follows: (1) the silicon substrate is patterned to enable the formation of 3D vertically aligned CNTs on the substrate surface; (2) polymer molding on the silicon substrate with 3D CNTs is further employed to transfer the 3D CNTs to the flexible polymer substrate; (3) the CNT-polymer composite (~70 μm in height) is employed to form interdigitated finger electrodes to increase the sensing area and initial capacitance; (4) other structures such as electrical routings, resistors and mechanical supporters are also available using the CNT-polymer composite. The preliminary fabrication results demonstrate a flexible capacitive sensor with 50 μm high CNT interdigitated electrodes on a poly-dimethylsiloxane substrate. The tests show that the typical capacitance change is several dozens of fF and the gauge factor is in the range of 3.44-4.88 for strain and bending curvature measurement; the sensitivity of the tactile sensor is 1.11% N(-1); a proximity distance near 2 mm away from the sensor can be detected.

  11. Contact State Estimation by Vision-based Tactile Sensors for Dexterous Manipulation with Robot Hands Based on Shape-Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for estimating the contact state of objects with varying shapes on a vision‐ based fluid‐type tactile sensor, which touch pad is an elastic transparent membrane of silicon rubber with dotted pattern printed on its inner side. The membrane is filled with translucent red colored water. The proposed method leads to better understanding of the object

  12. Universal Robot Hand Equipped with Tactile and Joint Torque Sensors: Development and Experiments on Stiffness Control and Object Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki NAKAMOTO

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Various humanoid robots have been developed and multifunction robot hands which are able to attach those robots like human hand is needed. But a useful robot hand has not been depeveloped, because there are a lot of problems such as control method of many degrees of freedom and processing method of enormous sensor outputs. Realizing such robot hand, we have developed five-finger robot hand. In this paper, the detailed structure of developed robot hand is described. The robot hand we developed has five fingers of multi-joint that is equipped with joint torque sensors and tactile sensors. We report experimental results of a stiffness control with the developed robot hand. Those results show that it is possible to change the stiffness of joints. Moreover we propose an object recognition method with the tactile sensor. The validity of that method is assured by experimental results.

  13. Driving Interface Based on Tactile Sensors for Electric Wheelchairs or Trolleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Trujillo-León

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel device based on a tactile interface to replace the attendant joystick in electric wheelchairs. It can also be used in other vehicles such as shopping trolleys. Its use allows intuitive driving that requires little or no training, so its usability is high. This is achieved by a tactile sensor located on the handlebar of the chair or trolley and the processing of the information provided by it. When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right. The electronics within the device then perform the signal conditioning and processing of the information received, identifying the intention of the user on the basis of this pattern using an algorithm, and translating it into control signals for the control module of the wheelchair. These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick. This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

  14. ThimbleSense: a fingertip-wearable tactile sensor for grasp analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; Altobelli, Alessandro; Grioli, Giorgio; Catalano, Manuel; Serio, Alessandro; Santello, Marco; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-10-08

    Accurate measurement of contact forces between hand and grasped objects is crucial to study sensorimotor control during grasp and manipulation. In this work we introduce ThimbleSense, a prototype of individual-digit wearable force/torque sensor based on the principle of intrinsic tactile sensing. By exploiting the integration of this approach with an active marker-based motion capture system, the proposed device simultaneously measures absolute position and orientation of the fingertip, which in turn yields measurements of contacts and force components expressed in a global reference frame. The main advantage of this approach with respect to more conventional solutions is its versatility. Specifically, ThimbleSense can be used to study grasping and manipulation of a wide variety of objects, while still retaining complete force/torque measurements. Nevertheless, validation of the proposed device is a necessary step before it can be used for experimental purposes. In this work we present the results of a series of experiments designed to validate the accuracy of ThimbleSense measurements and evaluate the effects of distortion of tactile afferent inputs caused by the device's rigid shells on grasp forces.

  15. Haptic exploration of fingertip-sized geometric features using a multimodal tactile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D.; Hellman, Randall B.; Santos, Veronica J.

    2014-06-01

    Haptic perception remains a grand challenge for artificial hands. Dexterous manipulators could be enhanced by "haptic intelligence" that enables identification of objects and their features via touch alone. Haptic perception of local shape would be useful when vision is obstructed or when proprioceptive feedback is inadequate, as observed in this study. In this work, a robot hand outfitted with a deformable, bladder-type, multimodal tactile sensor was used to replay four human-inspired haptic "exploratory procedures" on fingertip-sized geometric features. The geometric features varied by type (bump, pit), curvature (planar, conical, spherical), and footprint dimension (1.25 - 20 mm). Tactile signals generated by active fingertip motions were used to extract key parameters for use as inputs to supervised learning models. A support vector classifier estimated order of curvature while support vector regression models estimated footprint dimension once curvature had been estimated. A distal-proximal stroke (along the long axis of the finger) enabled estimation of order of curvature with an accuracy of 97%. Best-performing, curvature-specific, support vector regression models yielded R2 values of at least 0.95. While a radial-ulnar stroke (along the short axis of the finger) was most helpful for estimating feature type and size for planar features, a rolling motion was most helpful for conical and spherical features. The ability to haptically perceive local shape could be used to advance robot autonomy and provide haptic feedback to human teleoperators of devices ranging from bomb defusal robots to neuroprostheses.

  16. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks.

  17. A new MRI-compatible optical fiber tactile sensor for use in minimally invasive robotic surgery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Dargahi, Javad; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Cecere, Renzo

    2010-09-01

    In conventional open surgery, using finger palpation, surgeons can distinguish between different types of tissues. However, in the current commercially available minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS) systems, direct tactile feedback is negligible. In the present paper, based on a novel concept, a new bend-type optical fiber tactile sensor is proposed, designed, simulated, fabricated, and tested. In both dynamic and static loading conditions, the proposed tactile sensor measures forces interacting between tissues and surgical tools whether they are distributed contact forces or concentrated contact forces, or even if these forces are in combination. As a result, the sensor can identify the size and the position of blood vessels or of abnormal tissues, one of which could be a tumorous lump within normal tissues. In addition, the static force measurement provided by the sensor allows surgeons to maintain contact stability in any static interactions between surgical tools and tissues while at the same time avoiding tissue damage because of excessive contact force. In the meantime, because the sensor is based uniquely on optical fibers, it is insensitive to electromagnetic fields. As a result, it is compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) devices, which are currently in widespread use in surgical operating rooms.

  18. Influence of Errors in Tactile Sensors on Some High Level Parameters Used for Manipulation with Robotic Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Sánchez-Durán

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors suffer from many types of interference and errors like crosstalk, non-linearity, drift or hysteresis, therefore calibration should be carried out to compensate for these deviations. However, this procedure is difficult in sensors mounted on artificial hands for robots or prosthetics for instance, where the sensor usually bends to cover a curved surface. Moreover, the calibration procedure should be repeated often because the correction parameters are easily altered by time and surrounding conditions. Furthermore, this intensive and complex calibration could be less determinant, or at least simpler. This is because manipulation algorithms do not commonly use the whole data set from the tactile image, but only a few parameters such as the moments of the tactile image. These parameters could be changed less by common errors and interferences, or at least their variations could be in the order of those caused by accepted limitations, like reduced spatial resolution. This paper shows results from experiments to support this idea. The experiments are carried out with a high performance commercial sensor as well as with a low-cost error-prone sensor built with a common procedure in robotics.

  19. Influence of Errors in Tactile Sensors on Some High Level Parameters Used for Manipulation with Robotic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Durán, José A; Hidalgo-López, José A; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando

    2015-08-19

    Tactile sensors suffer from many types of interference and errors like crosstalk, non-linearity, drift or hysteresis, therefore calibration should be carried out to compensate for these deviations. However, this procedure is difficult in sensors mounted on artificial hands for robots or prosthetics for instance, where the sensor usually bends to cover a curved surface. Moreover, the calibration procedure should be repeated often because the correction parameters are easily altered by time and surrounding conditions. Furthermore, this intensive and complex calibration could be less determinant, or at least simpler. This is because manipulation algorithms do not commonly use the whole data set from the tactile image, but only a few parameters such as the moments of the tactile image. These parameters could be changed less by common errors and interferences, or at least their variations could be in the order of those caused by accepted limitations, like reduced spatial resolution. This paper shows results from experiments to support this idea. The experiments are carried out with a high performance commercial sensor as well as with a low-cost error-prone sensor built with a common procedure in robotics.

  20. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa(-1)) and high pressure (0.039 kPa(-1)) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.

  1. Development of Soft Tactile Sensor for Prostatic Palpation Diagnosis: Sensor Structure Design and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Jiang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the development of a palpation probe for assessment of prostatic cancer and hypertrophy. The sensor is constructed by layering two polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF films into soft material layers such as vulcanized rubber and sponge rubber sheets. Since the contact condition between the sensor and soft objects influences the sensor output significantly, the improvement of its sensitivity is investigated by design of an attachment covered over the sensor surface. In this report, the theoretical model of the sensor and the design of the attachment are presented and the attachment is validated for soft substances due to experimental investigation. Finally, a compact probe developed for clinical testing is presented and the data obtained from the patients are treated by the wavelet transform for de-noising. Some representative clinical data show that the sensor could be a useful tool for group medical checkup on prostatic cancer and hypertrophy.

  2. Robotic Tactile Sensors Fabricated from a Monolithic Silicon Integrated Circuit and a Piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    quartz crystals has been in the communications industry , where the crystals were used in very selective band-pass filters in lbroad-bland carrier...PVDF on .Silicon Integrated Circuit."* Sensors and A4ctuators, 27:. 167-172 (191). 86. Park, 1K. and others. "’A PVDF Tactile Sensor for Industrial ...G. E. Neville. -Jr. "The Induced Vibration Touch Sensor - A New Dynamic Touch Sensing Systemn," Robotica , 4: 27-31 (1986). 88. Paul. C. R. and S. A

  3. Human-computer interface glove using flexible piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Seo, Jeonggyu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Park, Jung-Min

    2017-05-01

    In this note, we propose a human-computer interface glove based on flexible piezoelectric sensors. We select polyvinylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric material for the sensors because of advantages such as a steady piezoelectric characteristic and good flexibility. The sensors are installed in a fabric glove by means of pockets and Velcro bands. We detect changes in the angles of the finger joints from the outputs of the sensors, and use them for controlling a virtual hand that is utilized in virtual object manipulation. To assess the sensing ability of the piezoelectric sensors, we compare the processed angles from the sensor outputs with the real angles from a camera recoding. With good agreement between the processed and real angles, we successfully demonstrate the user interaction system with the virtual hand and interface glove based on the flexible piezoelectric sensors, for four hand motions: fist clenching, pinching, touching, and grasping.

  4. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localisation and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePatanè

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviours. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localising, probing and negotiating obstacles.Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe, and basal angular encoders allow tactile localisation in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behaviour of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material.The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: First, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localisation with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorisation. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the

  5. A Flexible Proximity Sensor Fully Fabricated by Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Tsan Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A flexible proximity sensor fully fabricated by inkjet printing is proposed in this paper. The flexible proximity sensor is composed of a ZnO layer sandwiched in between a flexible aluminum sheet and a web-shaped top electrode layer. The flexible aluminum sheet serves as the bottom electrode. The material of the top electrode layer is nano silver. Both the ZnO and top electrode layers are deposited by inkjet printing. The fully inkjet printing process possesses the advantages of direct patterning and low-cost. It does not require photolithography and etching processes since the pattern is directly printed on the flexible aluminum sheet. The prototype demonstrates that the presented flexible sensor is sensitive to the human body. It may be applied to proximity sensing or thermal eradiation sensing.

  6. Highly Sensitive, Flexible, and Wearable Pressure Sensor Based on a Giant Piezocapacitive Effect of Three-Dimensional Microporous Elastomeric Dielectric Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Donguk; Lee, Tae-Ik; Shim, Jongmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kim, Min Seong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Taek-Soo; Park, Inkyu

    2016-07-06

    We report a flexible and wearable pressure sensor based on the giant piezocapacitive effect of a three-dimensional (3-D) microporous dielectric elastomer, which is capable of highly sensitive and stable pressure sensing over a large tactile pressure range. Due to the presence of micropores within the elastomeric dielectric layer, our piezocapacitive pressure sensor is highly deformable by even very small amounts of pressure, leading to a dramatic increase in its sensitivity. Moreover, the gradual closure of micropores under compression increases the effective dielectric constant, thereby further enhancing the sensitivity of the sensor. The 3-D microporous dielectric layer with serially stacked springs of elastomer bridges can cover a much wider pressure range than those of previously reported micro-/nanostructured sensing materials. We also investigate the applicability of our sensor to wearable pressure-sensing devices as an electronic pressure-sensing skin in robotic fingers as well as a bandage-type pressure-sensing device for pulse monitoring at the human wrist. Finally, we demonstrate a pressure sensor array pad for the recognition of spatially distributed pressure information on a plane. Our sensor, with its excellent pressure-sensing performance, marks the realization of a true tactile pressure sensor presenting highly sensitive responses to the entire tactile pressure range, from ultralow-force detection to high weights generated by human activity.

  7. Flexible pulse-wave sensors from oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Tateyama, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    Flexible pulse-wave sensors were fabricated from density-packed oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns prepared on aluminum foils. The nanocolumns were prepared by the rf magnetron sputtering method and were perpendicularly oriented to the aluminum foil surfaces. The sensor structure is laminated, and the structure contributes to avoiding unexpected leakage of an electric charge. The resulting sensor thickness is 50 μm. The sensor is flexible like aluminum foil and can respond to frequencies from 0.1 to over 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the sensor to pressure is proportional to the surface area. The sensor sensitively causes reversible charge signals that correlate with the pulse wave form, which contains significant information on arteriosclerosis and cardiopathy of a man sitting on it.

  8. TACTILE SENSING FOR OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    2009-01-01

    in unstructured environments, tactile sensing can provide more than valuable to complementary vision information about mechanical properties such as recognition and characterization, force, pressure, torque, compliance, friction, and mass as well as object shape, texture, position and pose. In this paper, we......The artificial sense of touch is a research area that can be considered still in demand, compared with the human dexterity of grasping a wide variety of shapes and sizes, perform complex tasks, and switch between grasps in response to changing task requirements. For handling unknown objects...... described the working principles of a few types of tactile sensing cells, focusing on the piezoresistive materials. Starting from a set of requirements for developing a high resolution flexible array sensor we have investigated if CSA pressure sensitive conductive rubber could be a proper candidate and can...

  9. Design and finite element modeling of a novel optical microsystems-based tactile sensor for minimal invasive robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Mardasi, Amir; Ghanbari, Mahmood; Salmani Tehrani, Mehdi

    2014-09-01

    Although recently Minimal Invasive Robotic Surgery (MIRS) has been more addressed because of its wide range of benefits, however there are still some limitations in this regard. In order to address the shortcomings of MIRS systems, various types of tactile sensors with different sensing principles have been presented in the last few years. In the present paper a MEMS-based optical sensor, which has been recently proposed by researchers, is investigated using numerical simulation. By this type of sensors real time quantification of both dynamic and statics contact forces between the tissue and surgical instrument would be possible. The presented sensor has one moving part and works based on the intensity modulation principle of optical fibers. It is electrically-passive, MRI-compatible and it is possible to be fabricated using available standard micro fabrication techniques. The behavior of the sensor has been simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS 3.5 software. Stress analysis is conducted on the sensor to assess the deflection of the moving part of the sensor due to applied force. The optical simulation is then conducted to estimate the power loss due to the moving part deflection. Using FEM modeling, the relation between force and deflection is derived which is necessary for the calibration of the sensor.

  10. Flexible PVDF ferroelectric capacitive temperature sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Naveed

    2015-08-02

    In this paper, a capacitive temperature sensor based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) capacitor is explored. The PVDF capacitor is characterized below its Curie temperature. The capacitance of the PVDF capacitor changes vs temperature with a sensitivity of 16pF/°C. The linearity measurement of the capacitance-temperature relation shows less than 0.7°C error from a best fit straight line. An LC oscillator based temperature sensor is demonstrated based on this capacitor.

  11. Analytical Higher-Order Model for Flexible and Stretchable Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yongfang; ZHU Hongbin; LIU Cheng; LIU Xu; LIU Fuxi; L Yanjun

    2015-01-01

    The stretchable sensor wrapped around a foldable airfoil or embedded inside of it has great potential for use in the monitoring of the structural status of the foldable airfoil. The design methodology is important to the development of the stretchable sensor for status monitoring on the foldable airfoil. According to the requirement of mechanical flexibility of the sensor, the combined use of a layered flexible structural formation and a strain isolation layer is implemented. An analytical higher-order model is proposed to predict the stresses of the strain-isolation layer based on the shear-lag model for the safe design of the flexible and stretchable sensors. The normal stress and shear stress equations in the constructed structure of the sensors are obtained by the proposed model. The stress distribution in the structure is investigated when bending load is applied to the structures. The numerical results show that the proposed model can predict the variation of normal stress and shear stress along the thickness of the strain-isolation (polydimethylsiloxane) layer accurately. The results by the proposed model are in good agreement with the finite element method, in which the normal stress is variable while the shear stress is invariable along the thickness direction of strain-isolation layer. The high-order model is proposed to predict the stresses of the layered structure of the flexible and stretchable sensor for monitoring the status of the foldable airfoil.

  12. Pd thin films on flexible substrate for hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztürk, Sadullah [Fatih Sultan Mehmet Vakıf University, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Kılınç, Necmettin, E-mail: nkilinc@nigde.edu.tr [Nigde University, Mechatronics Engineering Department, 51245 Nigde (Turkey); Nigde University, Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, 51245 Nigde (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, palladium (Pd) thin films were prepared via RF sputtering method with various thicknesses (6 nm, 20 nm and 60 nm) on both a flexible substrate and a hard substrate. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensing properties of Pd films on flexible substrate have been investigated depending on temperatures (25–100 °C) and H{sub 2} concentrations (600 ppm – 10%). The effect of H{sub 2} on structural properties of the films was also studied. The films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. It is found that whole Pd films on hard substrate show permanent structural deformation after exposed to 10% H{sub 2} for 30 min. But, this H{sub 2} exposure does not causes any structural deformation for 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate and 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2} concentration without any structural deformation. On the other hand, Pd film sensors that have the thicknesses 20 nm and 60 nm on flexible substrate are irreversible for higher H{sub 2} concentration (>2%) with film deformation. The sensor response of 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate increased with increasing H{sub 2} concentration up 4% and then saturated. The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature. - Highlights: • Pd thin films fabricated by RF sputtering on both flexible and hard substrates. • Structural deformation observed for films on hard substrate after exposing 10% H{sub 2}. • 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2}. • H{sub 2} sensing properties of film on flexible substrate investigated depending on temperature and concentration. • The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature.

  13. Flexible pressure sensors for smart protective clothing against impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhu, Bo; Shu, Lin; Tao, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The development of smart protective clothing will facilitate the quick detection of injuries from contact sports, traffic collisions and other accidents. To obtain real-time information like spatial and temporal pressure distributions on the clothing, flexible pressure sensor arrays are required. Based on a resistive fabric strain sensor we demonstrate all flexible, resistive pressure sensors with a large workable pressure range (0-8 MPa), a high sensitivity (1 MPa-1) and an excellent repeatability (lowest non-repeatability ±2.4% from 0.8 to 8 MPa) that can be inexpensively fabricated using fabric strain sensors and biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pressure sensitivity is tunable by using elastomers with different elasticities or by the pre-strain control of fabric strain sensors. Finite element simulation further confirms the sensor design. The simple structure, large workable pressure range, high sensitivity, high flexibility, facile fabrication and low cost of these pressure sensors make them promising candidates for smart protective clothing against impact loading.

  14. Flexible strain sensor based on carbon nanotube rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Young-Ju; Baek, Woon Kyung; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kang, Inpil

    2010-04-01

    Electrically conducting rubber composites (CRC) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filler have received much attention as potential materials for sensors. In this work, Ethylene propylene diene M-class rubber (EPDM)/CNT composites as a novel nano sensory material were prepared to develop flexible strain sensors that can measure large deformation of flexible structures. The EPDM/CNT composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with multi-walled CNTs and organo-clay. A strain sensor made of EPDM/CNT composite was attached to the surface of a flexible beam and change of resistance of the strain sensor was measured with respect to the beam deflection. Resistance of the sensor was change quite linearly under the bending and compressive large beam deflection. Upon external forces, CRC deformation takes place with the micro scale change of inter-electrical condition in rubber matrix due to the change of contact resistance, and CRC reveals macro scale piezoresistivity. It is anticipated that the CNT/EPDM fibrous strain sensor can be eligible to develop a biomimetic artificial neuron that can continuously sense deformation, pressure and shear force.

  15. Tactile perception of cognitive robots

    OpenAIRE

    Schöpfer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Compared to other modalities like vision, tactile sensing has been so far neglected by robotic researchers. At the time of writing, tactile sensing devices that can just approach the performance of the human sense of touch seem out of reach. Despite this fact the use and exploitation of available sensors should not be disregarded. Tactile sensing is indispensable for in-hand manipulation and can reveal object properties that cannot be acquired by optical sensors. The aim of this dissertati...

  16. Flexible MEMS: A novel technology to fabricate flexible sensors and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hongen

    This dissertation presents the design and fabrication techniques used to fabricate flexible MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) devices. MEMS devices and CMOS(Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) circuits are traditionally fabricated on rigid substrates with inorganic semiconductor materials such as Silicon. However, it is highly desirable that functional elements like sensors, actuators or micro fluidic components to be fabricated on flexible substrates for a wide variety of applications. Due to the fact that flexible substrate is temperature sensitive, typically only low temperature materials, such as polymers, metals, and organic semiconductor materials, can be directly fabricated on flexible substrates. A novel technology based on XeF2(xenon difluoride) isotropic silicon etching and parylene conformal coating, which is able to monolithically incorporate high temperature materials and fluidic channels, was developed at Wayne State University. The technology was first implemented in the development of out-of-plane parylene microneedle arrays that can be individually addressed by integrated flexible micro-channels. These devices enable the delivery of chemicals with controlled temporal and spatial patterns and allow us to study neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis. The technology was further explored by adopting the conventional SOI-CMOS processes. High performance and high density CMOS circuits can be first fabricated on SOI wafers, and then be integrated into flexible substrates. Flexible p-channel MOSFETs (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistors) were successfully integrated and tested. Integration of pressure sensors and flow sensors based on single crystal silicon has also been demonstrated. A novel smart yarn technology that enables the invisible integration of sensors and electronics into fabrics has been developed. The most significant advantage of this technology is its post-MEMS and post-CMOS compatibility. Various high

  17. Transparent and flexible force sensor array based on optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsung; Park, Suntak; Park, Seung Koo; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk; Sun, Kyung

    2012-06-18

    This paper suggests a force sensor array measuring contact force based on intensity change of light transmitted throughout optical waveguide. For transparency and flexibility of the sensor, two soft prepolymers with different refractive index have been developed. The optical waveguide consists of two cladding layers and a core layer. The top cladding layer is designed to allow light scattering at the specific area in response to finger contact. The force sensor shows a distinct tendency that output intensity decreases with input force and measurement range is from 0 to -13.2 dB.

  18. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  19. Mechanisms and Materials of Flexible and Stretchable Skin Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicong Zhao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wearable technology has attracted significant public attention and has generated huge societal and economic impact, leading to changes of both personal lifestyles and formats of healthcare. An important type of devices in wearable technology is flexible and stretchable skin sensors used primarily for biophysiological signal sensing and biomolecule analysis on skin. These sensors offer mechanical compatibility to human skin and maximum compliance to skin morphology and motion, demonstrating great potential as promising alternatives to current wearable electronic devices based on rigid substrates and packages. The mechanisms behind the design and applications of these sensors are numerous, involving profound knowledge about the physical and chemical properties of the sensors and the skin. The corresponding materials are diverse, featuring thin elastic films and unique stretchable structures based on traditional hard or ductile materials. In addition, the fabrication techniques that range from complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS fabrication to innovative additive manufacturing have led to various sensor formats. This paper reviews mechanisms, materials, fabrication techniques, and representative applications of flexible and stretchable skin sensors, and provides perspective of future trends of the sensors in improving biomedical sensing, human machine interfacing, and quality of life.

  20. Object-shape recognition and 3D reconstruction from tactile sensor images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Singh, Garima; Jati, Arindam; Konar, Amit; Tibarewala, D N

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a novel approach of edged and edgeless object-shape recognition and 3D reconstruction from gradient-based analysis of tactile images. We recognize an object's shape by visualizing a surface topology in our mind while grasping the object in our palm and also taking help from our past experience of exploring similar kind of objects. The proposed hybrid recognition strategy works in similar way in two stages. In the first stage, conventional object-shape recognition using linear support vector machine classifier is performed where regional descriptors features have been extracted from the tactile image. A 3D shape reconstruction is also performed depending upon the edged or edgeless objects classified from the tactile images. In the second stage, the hybrid recognition scheme utilizes the feature set comprising both the previously obtained regional descriptors features and some gradient-related information from the reconstructed object-shape image for the final recognition in corresponding four classes of objects viz. planar, one-edged object, two-edged object and cylindrical objects. The hybrid strategy achieves 97.62 % classification accuracy, while the conventional recognition scheme reaches only to 92.60 %. Moreover, the proposed algorithm has been proved to be less noise prone and more statistically robust.

  1. An active tactile perception system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriu, E.; Greenspan, M.; Gelinas, F.; McMath, W. S.; Yeung, S. K.

    System development and application aspects are described for an experimental robotic system for the tactile perception of the global geometric profile of object surfaces which are larger than the dimensions of the tactile sensor. Local cutaneous information provided by a tactile sensor is integrated with the kinesthetic position parameters of a robot arm, resulting in a 3D geometric model of the tactile sensor pose on the explored object surface. Currently available tactile sensors provide poor information on the geometric profile of 3D object surfaces. In order to maximize the information available for 3D analysis, an instrumented passive compliant wrist was used to attach a pressure measuring tactile probe to the robot arm carrier. Data was collected by a noncompliant planar sensing array in direct contact with an object surface. Information recorded includes the following: positional and orientation data on the robot arm manipulator, passive compliance kinesthetic data as measured by the kinematics of the wrist, and cutaneous tactile data represented by the binary image of the sensors pose on the object. The dimensions of the sensor array were found to be a critical factor in system performance. Use of a large array results in fewer touch poses being required to explore an object's surface, on the other hand a large planar array will touch fewer and higher peaks thus missing surface detail. To improve performance, there is a need to design tactile sensors specifically for geometric profile measuring.

  2. Flexible Bond Wire Capacitive Strain Sensor for Vehicle Tyres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyang Cao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The safety of the driving experience and manoeuvrability of a vehicle can be improved by detecting the strain in tyres. To measure strain accurately in rubber, the strain sensor needs to be flexible so that it does not deform the medium that it is measuring. In this work, a novel flexible bond wire capacitive strain sensor for measuring the strain in tyres is developed, fabricated and calibrated. An array of 25 micron diameter wire bonds in an approximately 8 mm × 8 mm area is built to create an interdigitated structure, which consists of 50 wire loops resulting in 49 capacitor pairs in parallel. Laser machining was used to pattern copper on a flexible printed circuit board PCB to make the bond pads for the wire attachment. The wire array was finally packaged and embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, which acts as the structural material that is strained. The capacitance of the device is in a linear like relationship with respect to the strain, which can measure the strain up to at least ±60,000 micro-strain (±6% with a resolution of ~132 micro-strain (0.013%. In-tyre testing under static loading has shown the ability of the sensor to measure large tyre strains. The technology used for sensor fabrication lends itself to mass production and so the design is considered to be consistent with low cost commercialisable strain sensing technology.

  3. A flexible piezoelectric force sensor based on PVDF fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. R.; Zheng, J. M.; Ren, G. Y.; Zhang, P. H.; Xu, C.

    2011-04-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensor and transducer material due to its high piezo-, pyro- and ferroelectric properties. To activate these properties, PVDF films require a mechanical treatment, stretching or poling. In this paper, we report on a force sensor based on PVDF fabrics with excellent flexibility and breathability, to be used as a specific human-related sensor. PVDF nanofibrous fabrics were prepared by using an electrospinning unit and characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FTIR spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Preliminary force sensors have been fabricated and demonstrated excellent sensitivity and response to external mechanical forces. This implies that promising applications can be made for sensing garment pressure, blood pressure, heartbeat rate, respiration rate and accidental impact on the human body.

  4. Flexible carbon nanotube nanocomposite sensor for multiple physiological parameter monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-16

    The paper presents the design, development, and fabrication of a flexible and wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube nanocomposite for monitoring specific physiological parameters. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as the substrate with a thin layer of a nanocomposite comprising functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and PDMS as electrodes. The sensor patch functionalized on strain-sensitive capacitive sensing from interdigitated electrodes which were patterned with a laser on the nanocomposite layer. The thickness of the electrode layer was optimized regarding strain and conductivity. The sensor patch was connected to a monitoring device from one end and attached to the body on the other for examining purposes. Experimental results show the capability of the sensor patch used to detect respiration and limb movements. This work is a stepping stone of the sensing system to be developed for multiple physiological parameters.

  5. Explanatory models for a tactile resonance sensor system-elastic and density-related variations of prostate tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2008-07-01

    Tactile sensors based on piezoelectric resonance have been adopted for medical applications. The sensor consists of an oscillating piezoelectric sensor-circuit system, and a change in resonance frequency is observed when the sensor tip contacts a measured object such as tissue. The frequency change at a constant applied force or mass load is used as a stiffness-sensitive parameter in many applications. Differential relations between force and frequency have also been used for monitoring intraocular pressure and stiffness variations in prostate tissue in vitro. The aim of this study was to relate the frequency change (Deltaf), measured force (F) and the material properties, density and elasticity to an explanatory model for the resonance sensor measurement principle and thereby to give explanatory models for the stiffness parameters used previously. Simulations of theoretical equations were performed to investigate the relation between frequency change and contact impedance. Measurements with a resonance sensor system on prostate tissue in vitro were used for experimental validation of the theory. Tissue content was quantified with a microscopic-based morphometrical method. Simulation results showed that the frequency change was dependent upon density (rho) and contact area (S) according to Deltaf proportional, variant rhoS(3/2). The experiments followed the simulated theory at small impression depths. The measured contact force followed a theoretical model with the dependence of the elastic modulus (E) and contact area, F proportional, variant ES(3/2). Measured density variations related to histological variations were statistically weak or non-significant. Elastic variations were statistically significant with contributions from stroma and cancer relative to normal glandular tissue. The theoretical models of frequency change and force were related through the contact area, and a material-dependent explanatory model was found as Deltaf proportional, variant rhoE(-1

  6. CMOS vertical hall magnetic sensors on flexible substrate

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the realization of different\\ud Vertical Hall Sensors (VHSs) implemented using a 0.18-μm\\ud CMOS technology and mounted on flexible substrates. Various\\ud geometries of VHS have been studied to obtain the optimum\\ud sensor device dimension and shape. COMSOL multiphysics\\ud simulation results are validated with respect to the electrical\\ud behaviour of an 8-resistor Verilog-A model implemented in\\ud Cadence environment. Simulation and measurement results are in\\ud good agre...

  7. Design and optimization of a flexible arrayed eddy current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Zou, Cheng; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    The inspection of the hollow axle inner surfaces is a key process to guarantee the safety of high-speed trains. A novel flexible arrayed eddy current sensor was developed to improve the reliability of the non-destructive testing of the hollow axle inner surfaces, whose main innovative aspect was the new design of excitation/sensing traces to achieve a differential and arrayed configuration. Only two independent excitation traces were used in the sensor to induce eddy currents, which can be detected by 16 differential sensing elements. The lift-off effects and the influence of the excitation frequency and geometrical parameters of the proposed sensor was investigated and presented in this paper. Finite element models were built to analyze the effects of each parameter on the sensor response amplitude. Experimental validations were conducted using a representative set of sensors. Results from experiments and simulations were consistent with each other, which showed that the sensor design can substantially suppress the lift-off effects and modifications of the studied parameters can substantially improve the sensor performance.

  8. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  9. A flexible humidity sensor based on KC-MWCNTs composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Chu, Jin; Aldalbahi, Ali; Rivera, Manuel; Wang, Lidan; Duan, Shukai; Feng, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in the biopolymer kappa-carrageenan (KC) to form a flexible composite via evaporative casting method. The glycerin was used as plasticizer to increase the flexibility of the composite. The KC-CNTs was examined by using FESEM and Raman, and then the humidity sensing properties of the samples were characterized under alternating current (AC). The purpose for using AC power supply is to avoid the possible polarization effect during measurements of the humidity properties. The experimental data exhibit that the fabricated sensors have high response to relative humidity (RH) with good repeatability, stability, and low hysteresis. A phenomenon that the impedance of the sensor decreases with ascending RH was also found and the basic sensing mechanisms were discussed.

  10. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Electronics and Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyun SUN; Yugang SUN

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the use of electronic quality single-walled carbon nanotubes grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) approaches at high temperatures as building blocks for fabricating flexible field-effect devices, such as thin-film transistors (TFTs) and chemical sensors. Dry transfer printing technique is developed for forming films of CVD nanotubes on low-temperature plastic substrates. Examples of TFTs with the use of nanotubes and thin dielectrics and hydrogen sensors with the use of nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles are discussed in detail to demonstrate the promising potentiality of single-walled carbon nanotubes for building high performance flexible devices, which can find applications where traditional devices on rigid substrates are not suitable.

  11. Polymer-Based Self-Standing Flexible Strain Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martinez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and characterization of polymer-based self-standing flexible strain sensors are presented in this work. Properties as lightness and flexibility make them suitable for the measurement of strain in applications related with wearable electronics such as robotics or rehabilitation devices. Several sensors have been fabricated to analyze the influence of size and electrical conductivity on their behavior. Elongation and applied charge were precisely controlled in order to measure different parameters as electrical resistance, gauge factor (GF, hysteresis, and repeatability. The results clearly show the influence of size and electrical conductivity on the gauge factor, but it is also important to point out the necessity of controlling the hysteresis and repeatability of the response for precision-demanding applications.

  12. Embedding of fibre optic sensors within flexible host

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraris, Eleonora; Van Gijseghem, Tim; Yan, Chunxiao; Van Hoe, Bram; Van Steenberge, Geert; Van Daele, Peter; Dubruel, Peter; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the establishment of a UV polymerisation procedure combined with moulding technology towards the development of a mass production technology for the fabrication of flexible polymers with optical fibres embedded. The concept is to provide an artificial sensing skin based on fibre optic sensors which can be applied to irregular or moveable surfaces for distributed pressure applications, as for instance in structural monitoring or rehabilitation. The selected polymers for su...

  13. An MRI-readable wireless flexible pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Inoue, Yusuke; Kim, Dongmin; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -detectable wireless flexible pressure sensor with pressure-sensitive LC resonator fabricated on a flexible film substrate. Measuring pressures in the body such as blood vessels and cardiac ventricle are very important in making diagnoses and in postoperative observation. However, conventional wired pressure sensors have difficulty in maintaining their connections to external readout equipment, and they also increase the risk of infection during and after implantation. In this study, to read the pressure wirelessly using an MRI system, an LC resonator consisting of a spiral coil and a pressure-sensitive capacitor was designed resonate at 300 MHz which corresponds to the Larmor frequency in an external magnetic field of 7-T. In order to validate the operating principle of the fabricated device, the frequency-impedance characteristics were measured by changing the pressure. The resonance frequencies of complemented LC circuits were lower by approximately 10% than those of nonpressured conditions. After implanting these devices in a 1% agarose gel, MR images were acquired by inducing pressures close to blood pressures of 20 kPa. As a result, contrast changes in the MR images were observed around the integrated spiral coils. This result indicated that the developed flexible pressure sensor has sufficient sensitivity to measure physiological pressure such as blood pressure of 20 kPa wirelessly in the body. In the future, quantitative pressure sensing will be evaluated by comparing it to the contrast changes in MR images with flip angle mapping.

  14. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwon Seo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea.

  15. Flexible Touch Sensors Made of Two Layers of Printed Conductive Flexible Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sungwon; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Jiyeon; Ma, Rujun; Baik, Seunghyun; Moon, Hyungpil

    2016-01-01

    Touch sensors are crucial in controlling robotic manipulation when a robot interacts with environmental objects. In this study, multilayer flexible touch sensors in the form of an array were developed. The sensors use ink-type conductive flexible adhesives as electrodes which were printed on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films in a parallel equidistance stripe pattern. Between the two printed layers, a double-sided adhesive film was used to combine each layer and was perforated at the junctions of the top and bottom electrodes with different-sized circles. These holes represent switching mechanisms between the top and bottom electrodes, and their sizes make the sensor respond to different levels of external pressure. We showed the durability of the fabricated sensor with 1 mm diameter holes by repeated experiments of exerting normal pressure ranging from 0 to 159.15 kPa for 1000 cycles. In case of 1 mm diameter holes, the state of each sensor node was reliably determined by the threshold pressures of 127.3 kPa for increasing pressure and 111.4 kPa for decreasing pressure. On the other hand, decreasing the hole size from 3 to 0.5 mm caused an increase in the threshold pressure from 1.41 to 214 kPa. The relation between the hole size and the threshold pressure was analyzed by a mechanical model. The sensor performance was also verified on curved surfaces up to 60 mm radius of curvatures. Additionally, we fabricated a sensor with three levels of sensitivity with a conventional method which was a thermal evaporation to show the extendibility of the idea. PMID:27649205

  16. Pressure sensor based on flexible photonic crystal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrock, Torben; Gerken, Martina

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a pressure sensor based on deformation of a periodically nanostructured Bragg grating waveguide on a flexible 50 µm polydimethylsiloxane membrane and remote optical read out. A pressure change causes deformation of this 2 mm diameter photonic crystal membrane sealing a reference volume. The resulting shift of the guided mode resonances is observed by a remote camera as localized color change. Crossed polarization filters are employed for enhancing the visibility of the guided mode resonances. Pressure values are calculated from the intensity change in the green color channel using a calibration curve in the range of 2000 Pa to 4000 Pa. A limit of detection (LOD) of 160 Pa is estimated. This LOD combined with the small size of the sensor and its biocompatibility render it promising for application as an implantable intraocular pressure sensor.

  17. Design of Signal Detection System of Capacitive Tactile Sensor Array%电容式触觉传感器信号检测系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙一心; 钟莹; 王向鸿; 李醒飞

    2015-01-01

    信号检测系统对电容式触觉传感器的分辨力、稳定性和信噪比都有重要影响。设计了一种基于PCap01电容数字转换芯片的电容式触觉传感器的信号检测系统,采用FPGA控制多路开关选通电容式触觉传感器的触觉单元并进行阵列式扫描,通过SPI通信读取PCap01的测量结果后通过USB通信将数据传输给上位机,在上位机中以三维柱状图和曲面图动态显示电容式触觉传感器表面的受力情况,系统的采样速率可达15帧/秒。实验结果表明,设计的信号检测系统可以满足电容式触觉传感器的需求,通过采集的数据可以获取电容式触觉传感器表面的受力信息。%The resolution , stability , and signal noise ratio ( SNR ) of the capacitive tactile sensor array are influenced by the corresponding signal detection system .The signal detection system of a capacitive tactile sensor array is designed based on the commercial capacitance digital convertor ( CDC ) named PCap01 .The system proposed is mainly composed of a field-programmable gate array ( FPGA ) , a PCap01 and 6 multiplexers .After switching the row and column multiplexers sequentially by FPGA , the capacitance of each element of the tactile sensor is measured by PCap 01 .After all elements of the tactile sensor array are measured , FPGA transmits the data to host computer by frame .The result is displayed in 3D bar graph and surface graph in the host computer dynamically .The sampling frequency is up to 15 frames/s.Experiments show that the force distribution is obtained by the capacitive tactile sensor array and that the signal detection system meets the need of the tactile sensor .

  18. Human skin based triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting biomechanical energy and as self-powered active tactile sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Hulin; Lin, Zong-Hong; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Jing, Qingshen; Su, Yuanjie; Yang, Jin; Chen, Jun; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-10-22

    We report human skin based triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) that can either harvest biomechanical energy or be utilized as a self-powered tactile sensor system for touch pad technology. We constructed a TENG utilizing the contact/separation between an area of human skin and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film with a surface of micropyramid structures, which was attached to an ITO electrode that was grounded across a loading resistor. The fabricated TENG delivers an open-circuit voltage up to -1000 V, a short-circuit current density of 8 mA/m(2), and a power density of 500 mW/m(2) on a load of 100 MΩ, which can be used to directly drive tens of green light-emitting diodes. The working mechanism of the TENG is based on the charge transfer between the ITO electrode and ground via modulating the separation distance between the tribo-charged skin patch and PDMS film. Furthermore, the TENG has been used in designing an independently addressed matrix for tracking the location and pressure of human touch. The fabricated matrix has demonstrated its self-powered and high-resolution tactile sensing capabilities by recording the output voltage signals as a mapping figure, where the detection sensitivity of the pressure is about 0.29 ± 0.02 V/kPa and each pixel can have a size of 3 mm × 3 mm. The TENGs may have potential applications in human-machine interfacing, micro/nano-electromechanical systems, and touch pad technology.

  19. A new model based on adaptation of the external loop to compensate the hysteresis of tactile sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Durán, José A; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a novel method to compensate for hysteresis nonlinearities observed in the response of a tactile sensor. The External Loop Adaptation Method (ELAM) performs a piecewise linear mapping of the experimentally measured external curves of the hysteresis loop to obtain all possible internal cycles. The optimal division of the input interval where the curve is approximated is provided by the error minimization algorithm. This process is carried out off line and provides parameters to compute the split point in real time. A different linear transformation is then performed at the left and right of this point and a more precise fitting is achieved. The models obtained with the ELAM method are compared with those obtained from three other approaches. The results show that the ELAM method achieves a more accurate fitting. Moreover, the involved mathematical operations are simpler and therefore easier to implement in devices such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) for real time applications. Furthermore, the method needs to identify fewer parameters and requires no previous selection process of operators or functions. Finally, the method can be applied to other sensors or actuators with complex hysteresis loop shapes.

  20. A New Model Based on Adaptation of the External Loop to Compensate the Hysteresis of Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Sánchez-Durán

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to compensate for hysteresis nonlinearities observed in the response of a tactile sensor. The External Loop Adaptation Method (ELAM performs a piecewise linear mapping of the experimentally measured external curves of the hysteresis loop to obtain all possible internal cycles. The optimal division of the input interval where the curve is approximated is provided by the error minimization algorithm. This process is carried out off line and provides parameters to compute the split point in real time. A different linear transformation is then performed at the left and right of this point and a more precise fitting is achieved. The models obtained with the ELAM method are compared with those obtained from three other approaches. The results show that the ELAM method achieves a more accurate fitting. Moreover, the involved mathematical operations are simpler and therefore easier to implement in devices such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs for real time applications. Furthermore, the method needs to identify fewer parameters and requires no previous selection process of operators or functions. Finally, the method can be applied to other sensors or actuators with complex hysteresis loop shapes.

  1. Polymer thick-film sensors: possibilities for smartcard biometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henderson, N.J.; Papakostas, T.V.; White, N.M.; Hartel, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the potential of polymer thick-film sensors are assessed for use as biometric sensors on smartcards. Piezoelectric and piezoresistive sensors have been printed on flexible polyester, then bonded to smartcard blanks. The tactile interaction of a person with these sensors has been invest

  2. Zinc oxide nanowires on carbon microfiber as flexible gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonezzer, M.; Lacerda, R. G.

    2012-03-01

    In the past years, zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) have been proven to be an excellent material for gas sensors. In this work, we used ZnO nanowires in a novel architecture integrated on a carbon microfiber (μC) textile. This innovative design permits us to obtain mechanical flexibility, while the absence of any lithographic technique allows a large-area and low-cost fabrication of gas sensors. The performances of the devices are investigated for both oxidizing and reducing gases. The nano-on-micro structure of the sensor provides a high surface-to-volume ratio, leading to a fast and intense response for both oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The sensor response has an optimum temperature condition at 280 °C with a response value of 10 for oxygen and 11 for hydrogen. The limit of detection (LoD) has been found to be 2 and 4 ppm for oxygen and hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, the sensor response and recovery time is small being less than 10 s for both O2 and H2.

  3. A MEMS-based tactile sensor to study human digital touch: mechanical transduction of the tactile information and role of fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheibert J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present recent results showing that human epidermal ridges (fingerprints could play a central role in fine texture discrimination tasks by spatially modulating the contact stress field between the fingertip and the substrate. Using an original biomimetic finger whose surface is patterned with parallel ridges, we demonstrate that the subsurface stress signals elicited by continuous rubbing of randomly textured substrates is dominated by fluctuations at a frequency defined by the inter-ridge distance divided by the rubbing velocity. In natural exploratory conditions, this frequency matches the best frequency of one type of mechanoreceptors, namely the Pacinian corpuscles, which are specifically involved in the tactile coding of fine textures. The use of white-noise patterned stimuli has alloowed us to extract, using a reverse-correlation analysis, the stimulus-signal response function associated with roughness modality. Its shape could provides spectral, spatial and directional selectivity to the digital tactile system. It offers a physiological basis for the recently proposed hypothesis of a dual-coding (spatio-temporal and vibratory of tactile information.

  4. A MEMS-based tactile sensor to study human digital touch: mechanical transduction of the tactile information and role of fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibert, J.; Debregeas, G.; Prevost, A.

    2010-06-01

    We present recent results showing that human epidermal ridges (fingerprints) could play a central role in fine texture discrimination tasks by spatially modulating the contact stress field between the fingertip and the substrate. Using an original biomimetic finger whose surface is patterned with parallel ridges, we demonstrate that the subsurface stress signals elicited by continuous rubbing of randomly textured substrates is dominated by fluctuations at a frequency defined by the inter-ridge distance divided by the rubbing velocity. In natural exploratory conditions, this frequency matches the best frequency of one type of mechanoreceptors, namely the Pacinian corpuscles, which are specifically involved in the tactile coding of fine textures. The use of white-noise patterned stimuli has alloowed us to extract, using a reverse-correlation analysis, the stimulus-signal response function associated with roughness modality. Its shape could provides spectral, spatial and directional selectivity to the digital tactile system. It offers a physiological basis for the recently proposed hypothesis of a dual-coding (spatio-temporal and vibratory) of tactile information.

  5. Tactile shoe inlays for high speed pressure monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    pressure sensitive cells and the use of high speed electronics and multiplexing algorithms provides frame rates of 100 Hz. The sensors tolerate overloads while showing a consistent output. The developed prototypes show a high potential not only for robotics, but also for use in sensorised human prosthetics.......This work describes the development of flexible tactile sensor shoe inlays for humanoid robots. Their design is based on a sandwich structure of flexible layers with a thin sheet of piezoresistive rubber as main transducer element. The layout and patterning of top and bottom electrodes give 1024...

  6. Ceramic-polymer capacitive sensors for tactile/force awareness in harsh environment robotic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weadon, Timothy L.; Evans, Thomas H.; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2013-12-01

    The need for force feedback and spatial awareness of contact in harsh environment applications, such as space servicing, has been unsatisfied due to the inability of current sensor technology to resist environmental effects. In this work, capacitive sensors based on a thick film 0:3 connectivity ceramic:polymer composite structure were evaluated for potential use in future operations within robotic end effectors, withstanding temperatures ranging from -80 ° C to 120 ° C and forces up to 350 kPa. A thick film design is utilized to allow for ease of embedding, allowing sensors to be implemented into exciting robotic hardware with minimal intrusion, and protecting sensors from electron bombardment, radiation, and point concentrations from metal-on-metal contact. Taguchi design of experiments allows composition variables including sensor thickness, ceramic composition, ceramic particle size, ceramic volume loading, polymer character, modifier character, and the polymer:modifier ratio to be evaluated simultaneously. Dynamic thermal and mechanical loading techniques were implemented to characterize the composite sensors with in situ electrical acquisition. Individual composition variables were linked to the sensor magnitude, sensitivity, drift, and hysteresis, showing that the sensor response is optimized with a thickness of single microns, 10 vol% loading of nano-particle ceramics, and high molecular weight polymers with a low content of simple architecture modifiers lacking glass or melting temperatures in the working range.

  7. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-14

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source , is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons) on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake.

  8. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source , is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons) on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake. PMID:28098819

  9. Mimosa-inspired design of a flexible pressure sensor with touch sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Gong, Shu; Ma, Zheng; Yap, Lim Wei; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-04-24

    A bio-inspired flexible pressure sensor is generated with high sensitivity (50.17 kPa(-1)), quick responding time (sensor substrates results from the direct molding of natural mimosa leaves, presenting a simple, environment-friendly and easy scale-up fabrication process for these flexible pressure sensors.

  10. Flexible strain sensor for air muscles using polypyrrole coated rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahyono, Arief P.; Aw, Kean C.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Li, K. C.

    2010-04-01

    A novel flexible large strain sensor was developed to be use with an air muscle. A piece of butyl rubber was coated with the conducting polymer, polypyrrole through bulk solution and chemical vapour deposition method. The strain sensor was able to response to sudden movements represented by the multiple step functions of the applied strain. Consistency of the sensor's output was studied and the average error in the change of resistance was calculated to be 0.32% and 0.72% for elongation and contraction respectively for the sample made using chemical vapour deposition. However, a hysteresis was observed for this sample for a single cycle of elongation and contraction with the highest error calculated to be 3.2% at a 0% applied strain. SEM images showed the propagation of surface micro-cracks as the cause of the variation in surface resistance with applied strain. In addition, slower relaxation rate of the rubber prevented the surface micro-cracks to open and close at the same rate. The idea of utilizing conducting polymer coating can be applied to the inner rubber tube of the air muscle. As such, a complete integration between actuator and sensor can be realized.

  11. Fiber optical sensor system for shape and haptics for flexible instruments in minimally invasive surgery: overview and status quo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Christoph; Pauer, Hendrikje; Woern, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, exible mechatronic instruments promise to improve the overall performance of surgical interventions. However, those instruments require highly developed sensors in order to provide haptic feedback to the surgeon or to enable (semi-)autonomous tasks. Precisely, haptic sensors and a shape sensor are required. In this paper, we present our ber optical sensor system of Fiber Bragg Gratings, which consists of a shape sensor, a kinesthetic sensor and a tactile sensor. The status quo of each of the three sensors is described, as well as the concept to integrate them into one ber optical sensor system.

  12. An eight-legged tactile sensor to estimate coefficient of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Chen; Rodpongpun, Sura; Luo, William; Isaacson, Nathan; Kark, Lauren; Khamis, Heba; Redmond, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that a tangential force larger than the maximum static friction force is required to initiate the sliding motion between two objects, which is governed by a material constant called the coefficient of static friction. Therefore, knowing the coefficient of static friction is of great importance for robot grippers which wish to maintain a stable and precise grip on an object during various manipulation tasks. Importantly, it is most useful if grippers can estimate the coefficient of static friction without having to explicitly explore the object first, such as lifting the object and reducing the grip force until it slips. A novel eight-legged sensor, based on simplified theoretical principles of friction is presented here to estimate the coefficient of static friction between a planar surface and the prototype sensor. Each of the sensor's eight legs are straight and rigid, and oriented at a specified angle with respect to the vertical, allowing it to estimate one of five ranges (5 = 8/2 + 1) that the coefficient of static friction can occupy. The coefficient of friction can be estimated by determining whether the legs have slipped or not when pressed against a surface. The coefficients of static friction between the sensor and five different materials were estimated and compared to a measurement from traditional methods. A least-squares linear fit of the sensor estimated coefficient showed good correlation with the reference coefficient with a gradient close to one and an r(2) value greater than 0.9.

  13. Ultra-Thin Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array for Gap Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁天怀; 陈祥林; 黄毅平

    2004-01-01

    An ultra-thin flexible eddy current proximity sensor array was developed for online measurements of tiny gaps between large smooth metallic and nonmetallic surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The probe of the flexible eddy current sensor array, which includes a set of sensor coils, is fabricated on a thin flexible substrate using the flexible printed circuit board process which allows the probe to be very thin and flexible so that it can conform to the surface geometry of the measured objects. The sensor coils are connected to an inductance-capacitance oscillator, which converts the distance between the sensor coil and the metallic target to a frequency output. Experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the sensor system can reach ±0.5% for a 2-mm gap and the sensor system is suitable for online gap measurements.

  14. Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites Flexible Stress and Strain Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Scholl, Jonathan A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2008-01-01

    Conformable stress and strain sensors are required for monitoring the integrity of airframe structures as well as for sensing the mechanical stimuli in prosthetic arms. For this purpose, we have developed a series of piezoresistive single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer nanocomposites. The electromechanical coupling of pressure with resistance changes in these nanocomposites is exceptionally greater than that of metallic piezoresistive materials. In fact, the piezoresistive stress coefficient (pi) of a SWCNT/polymer nanocomposite is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of a typical metallic piezoresistive. The piezoresistive stress coefficient is a function of the nanotube concentration wherein the maximum value occurs at a concentration just above the percolation threshold concentration (phi approx. 0.05 %). This response appears to originate from a change in intrinsic resistivity under compression/tension. A systematic study of the effect of the modulus of the polymer matrix on piezoresistivity allowed us to make flexible and conformable sensors for biomedical applications. The prototype haptic sensors using these nanocomposites are demonstrated. The piezocapacitive properties of SWCNT/polymer are also characterized by monitoring the capacitance change under pressure.

  15. Tooteko: a Case Study of Augmented Reality for AN Accessible Cultural Heritage. Digitization, 3d Printing and Sensors for AN Audio-Tactile Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnano, F.; Balletti, C.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2015-02-01

    Tooteko is a smart ring that allows to navigate any 3D surface with your finger tips and get in return an audio content that is relevant in relation to the part of the surface you are touching in that moment. Tooteko can be applied to any tactile surface, object or sheet. However, in a more specific domain, it wants to make traditional art venues accessible to the blind, while providing support to the reading of the work for all through the recovery of the tactile dimension in order to facilitate the experience of contact with art that is not only "under glass." The system is made of three elements: a high-tech ring, a tactile surface tagged with NFC sensors, and an app for tablet or smartphone. The ring detects and reads the NFC tags and, thanks to the Tooteko app, communicates in wireless mode with the smart device. During the tactile navigation of the surface, when the finger reaches a hotspot, the ring identifies the NFC tag and activates, through the app, the audio track that is related to that specific hotspot. Thus a relevant audio content relates to each hotspot. The production process of the tactile surfaces involves scanning, digitization of data and 3D printing. The first experiment was modelled on the facade of the church of San Michele in Isola, made by Mauro Codussi in the late fifteenth century, and which marks the beginning of the Renaissance in Venice. Due to the absence of recent documentation on the church, the Correr Museum asked the Laboratorio di Fotogrammetria to provide it with the aim of setting up an exhibition about the order of the Camaldolesi, owners of the San Michele island and church. The Laboratorio has made the survey of the facade through laser scanning and UAV photogrammetry. The point clouds were the starting point for prototypation and 3D printing on different supports. The idea of the integration between a 3D printed tactile surface and sensors was born as a final thesis project at the Postgraduate Mastercourse in Digital

  16. Flexible and Stretchable Physical Sensor Integrated Platforms for Wearable Human-Activity Monitoringand Personal Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung, Tran Quang; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable physical sensors that can measure and quantify electrical signals generated by human activities are attracting a great deal of attention as they have unique characteristics, such as ultrathinness, low modulus, light weight, high flexibility, and stretchability. These flexible and stretchable physical sensors conformally attached on the surface of organs or skin can provide a new opportunity for human-activity monitoring and personal healthcare. Consequently, in recent years there has been considerable research effort devoted to the development of flexible and stretchable physical sensors to fulfill the requirements of future technology, and much progress has been achieved. Here, the most recent developments of flexible and stretchable physical sensors are described, including temperature, pressure, and strain sensors, and flexible and stretchable sensor-integrated platforms. The latest successful examples of flexible and stretchable physical sensors for the detection of temperature, pressure, and strain, as well as their novel structures, technological innovations, and challenges, are reviewed first. In the next section, recent progress regarding sensor-integrated wearable platforms is overviewed in detail. Some of the latest achievements regarding self-powered sensor-integrated wearable platform technologies are also reviewed. Further research direction and challenges are also proposed to develop a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform for monitoring human activity and personal healthcare in the near future.

  17. Gust alleviation of highly flexible UAVs with artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2015-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors (AHS) have been recently developed in Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) using carbon nanotube (CNT). The deformation of CNT in air flow causes voltage and current changes in the circuit, which can be used to quantify the dynamic pressure and aerodynamic load along the wing surface. AFRL has done a lot of essential work in design, manufacturing, and measurement of AHSs. The work in this paper is to bridge the current AFRL's work on AHSs and their feasible applications in flight dynamics and control (e.g., the gust alleviation) of highly flexible aircraft. A highly flexible vehicle is modeled using a strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation, coupled with finite-state inflow aerodynamics. A feedback control algorithm for the rejection of gust perturbations will be developed. A simplified Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller will be implemented based on the state-space representation of the linearized system. All AHS measurements will be used as the control input, i.e., wing sectional aerodynamic loads will be defined as the control output for designing the feedback gain. Once the controller is designed, closed-loop aeroelastic simulations will be performed to evaluate the performance of different controllers with the force feedback and be compared to traditional controller designs with the state feedback. From the study, the feasibility of AHSs in flight control will be assessed. The whole study will facilitate in building a fly-by-feel simulation environment for autonomous vehicles.

  18. 机器人指端应变式触觉传感器%The Robotic Fingertip Tactile Sensor Based on Strain-gauge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴士杰; 岳宏; 李慨; 李铁军

    2001-01-01

    叙述了机器人指端应变式触觉传感器的原理、分类和发展,介绍几种典型 的机器人指端应变式触觉传感器,同时提出一种新型的机器人指端应变式触觉传 感器,并对其工作原理进行详细说明.在传感器结构设计中采用合理结构,使被 抓物体的横截面尺寸不受弹性薄板薄板尺寸限制;当超过测量范围时,保证金属 薄板不受破坏,同时实现了柔顺抓握.%The principle、classification and development of robotic fin gertip tactile sensor which use strain-gauge is discussed in details. Several typical robotic fingertip tactile sensors based on strain-gaug e is introduced, meanwhile a new kind robotic fingertip tactile sensor based on strain-gauge is presented, and its work principle is explain ed thoroughly.Using proper construction,the size of the object's cros s section,which is grasped bu the gripper, isn't limited by the size o f the taetile thin metal plate; if the object overweight,then the thin metal plate is insured against damage,meauwhile,the more stable and c ompliant grasp can be realized

  19. Tribotronic Transistor Array as an Active Tactile Sensing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Zhang, Limin; Lu, Cunxin; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    Large-scale tactile sensor arrays are of great importance in flexible electronics, human-robot interaction, and medical monitoring. In this paper, a flexible 10 × 10 tribotronic transistor array (TTA) is developed as an active tactile sensing system by incorporating field-effect transistor units and triboelectric nanogenerators into a polyimide substrate. The drain-source current of each tribotronic transistor can be individually modulated by the corresponding external contact, which has induced a local electrostatic potential to act as the conventional gate voltage. By scaling down the pixel size from 5 × 5 to 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2), the sensitivities of single pixels are systematically investigated. The pixels of the TTA show excellent durability, independence, and synchronicity, which are suitable for applications in real-time tactile sensing, motion monitoring, and spatial mapping. The integrated tribotronics provides an unconventional route to realize an active tactile sensing system, with prospective applications in wearable electronics, human-machine interfaces, fingerprint identification, and so on.

  20. Textile Pressure Sensor Made of Flexible Plastic Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Clemens

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the successful development of pressure sensitive textile prototypes based on flexible optical fibers technology. Our approach is based on thermoplastic silicone fibers, which can be integrated into woven textiles. As soon as pressure at a certain area of the textile is applied to these fibers they change their cross section reversibly, due to their elastomeric character, and a simultaneous change in transmitted light intensity can be detected. We have successfully manufactured two different woven samples with fibers of 0.51 and 0.98 mm diameter in warp and weft direction, forming a pressure sensitive matrix. Determining their physical behavior when a force is applied shows that pressure measurements are feasible. Their usable working range is between 0 and 30 N. Small drifts in the range of 0.2 to 4.6%, over 25 load cycles, could be measured. Finally, a sensor array of 2 x 2 optical fibers was tested for sensitivity, spatial resolution and light coupling between fibers at intersections.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of flexible thermographic phosphor temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katherine E.; Gardner, Victor; Allison, Stephen W.; Sabri, Firouzeh

    2016-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the emission characteristics of thermographic phosphors has been used extensively for surface temperature measurements of systems where thermal management is critical for the safe operation of the system. The instantaneous, remote, and highly accurate nature of this form of temperature measurement makes it a very attractive measurement technique. However, the destructive nature of depositing phosphors directly onto the surface of interest and the complications of working with fine powders has limited the use of this technique in all areas. This work focuses on the design and characterization of polymer-encapsulated thermographic phosphor flexible sensors for surface temperature assessment. La2O2S:Eu powder was embedded in an elastomeric sleeve at concentrations of 10%, 25%, and 50% wt. and fully characterized. The effect of spin-coating on emission characteristics of La2O2S:Eu was tested and the decay times were compared to results obtained from bulk-doped samples previously created by the authors.

  2. 柔性温度压力仿生皮肤的模块化设计与实现%Modular Design and Implementation of Flexible Artificial Skin with Temperature and Pressure Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭小辉; 黄英; 腾珂; 刘平; 刘彩霞; 田合雷

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the modular design of electronic artificial skin, a fully compliant temperature and pressure tactile sensor is designed and used as artificial skin of intelligent robots, which is assembled into a modularized array structure with expandable characteristics. Taking graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) as the temperature-sensitive material of the sensor, carbon black (CB) filled silicone rubber (SR) as the elastic dielectric, and the silver conductive silicone rubber as the flexible top plate, a capacitive pressure sensitive cell is designed, and the temperature and pressure sensor array is constructed with polyimide (PI) film as the flexible substrate. The structure design, working principle and the signal acquisition and processing system of the flexible temperature/pressure tactile sensor array are introduced. The experimental results of temperature, pressure and the compound perception indicate that the flexible temperature/pressure multifunctional tactile sensor array and the signal extraction system can realize tactile perception, and it provides a design scheme for wearable artificial skin.%为实现电子仿生皮肤的模块化设计,以石墨烯纳米片制备薄膜温敏传感器,同时,以炭黑/硅橡胶复合材料为弹性电介质、有机硅导电银胶为柔性上极板设计电容式力敏传感器,在此基础上,以聚酰亚胺为柔性基体,提出一种可用作智能机器人仿生皮肤的全柔性温度/压力触觉传感器,并设计成具有可拼接特点的模块化阵列结构。介绍柔性温度/压力触觉传感器的结构设计、检测机理以及信号采集与处理系统。通过温度、压力及温度/压力复合感知实验表明,该柔性温度/压力复合式触觉传感阵列及信号提取系统可实现触觉感知功能,为可穿戴式人工皮肤的研究提供了一种设计方案。

  3. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  4. Flexible touchpads based on inductive sensors using embedded conductive composite polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, A.; Rahbar, M.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-04-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and preliminary testing of a flexible array of sensor switches intended for applications in wearable electronics and sensor systems. The touch pad sensor arrays feature flexible printed circuit board (flexible PCB) substrates and/or flexible conductive composite polymer (CCP) structures, resulting in highly flexible switch arrays. Each switch consists of 4 elements: fascia, target, spacer and a sensor coil. The user presses the fascia, bringing the target in contact with the sensor coil. Any change in the position of the target changes the coil inductance due to the generation of eddy currents, which are detected by an electronic circuit and custom software. Contact between the target and coil also measurably changes the inductance of the coils. Different sizes and geometries (square, circular, hexagonal and octagonal) of coils in both flexible PCB metal (copper) and CCP were investigated to determine which couple best with the CCP that forms the target for the inductive coils. We describe techniques for patterning two-layer inductive coils on flexible PCBs. Using this process, we demonstrate coil trace thicknesses of 200 micrometers. We also present a new low cost microfabrication technique to create inductive flexible coils using embedded CCP in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as an alternative to flexible PCB metal coils. We further describe an electronic circuit that accurately measures inductances as low as 500 nH that is used to detect the change in the inductance of a sensor's coil when the user presses the target element of the sensor. The inductance for a sensor composed of CCP square coils and CCP target was measured to be approximately 35 μH before being pressed. When pressed, the inductance dropped to 3.8 μH, a change which was easily detected.

  5. Flexible Conformal Metal Rubber Sensors for Entry/Landing Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic proposes to design and develop light-weight, low-modulus, and durable Metal Rubber sensors for aeroelastic analysis of inflatable/flexible entry, descent,...

  6. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong In Han

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  7. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong In Han

    2013-01-01

    IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV) were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC) lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC) substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD) processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superio...

  8. A flexible sensor technology for the distributed measurement of interaction pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donati, M.; Vitiello, N.; De Rossi, S.M.M.; Lenzi, T.; Crea, S.; Persichetti, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Koopman, Bram; Podobnik, J.; Munih, M.; Carrozza, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a sensor technology for the measure of the physical human-robot interaction pressure developed in the last years at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna. The system is composed of flexible matrices of opto-electronic sensors covered by a soft silicone cover. This sensory system is completely

  9. Piezoelectric Lead Zirconium Titanate Composite Touch Sensors for Integration with Flexible OLED Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, D.B.; Tempelman, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    To enable the design of more intuitive product user interfaces, the prospects of matching piezoelectric touch sensors with flexible organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology are investigated. Low stiffness piezoelectric composite sensors, combining piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 powder with a polyme

  10. Modal domain fiber optic sensor for closed loop vibration control of a flexible beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D.; Thomas, D.; Reichard, K.; Lindner, D.; Claus, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a modal domain sensor in a vibration control experiment is described. An optical fiber is bonded along the length of a flexible beam. A control signal derived from the output of the modal domain sensor is used to suppress vibrations induced in the beam. A distributed effect model for the modal domain sensor is developed and combined with models of the beam and actuator dynamics to produce a system suitable for control design.

  11. A NEW FABRICATION PROCESS FOR A FLEXIBLE SKIN WITH TEMPERATURE SENSOR ARRAY AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Gwo-Bin; HUANG Fu-Chun; Lee Chia-Yen; Mian Jiun-Jih

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a novel technique for fabrication of a flexible skin with a temperature sensor array (40 × 1 sensors). A simplified MEMS technology using platinum resistors as sensing materials, which are sandwiched between two polyimide layers as flexible substrates is developed. The two polyimide layers are deposited on top of a thin aluminum layer, which serves as a sacrificial layer such that the flexible skin can be released by metal etching and peeled off easily. The flexible skin with a temperature sensor array has a high mechanical flexibility and can be handily attached on a highly curved surface to detect tiny temperature distribution inside a small area. The sensor array shows a linear output and has a sensitivity of 7.SmV/℃ (prior to amplifiers) at a drive current of 1 mA. To demonstrate its applications, two examples have been demonstrated, including measurement of temperature distribution around a micro heater of a micro PCR (polymerase chain reaction) chip for DNA amplification and detection of separation point for flow over a circular cylinder. The development of the flexible skin with a temperature sensor array may be crucial for measuring temperature distribution on any curved surface in the fields of aerodynamics, space exploration, auto making and biomedical applications etc.

  12. TiO2 Nanotubes Membrane Flexible Sensor for Low-Temperature H2S Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Perillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a flexible gas sensor based on TiO2 nanotubes membrane, onto which array interdigitated gold electrodes in one side and a common heater in the backside were obtained using conventional microfabrication techniques. This was used to detect hydrogen sulphide within a concentration range of 6–38 ppm. The response to low concentrations of H2S at low temperature and good stability make the sensor a promising candidate for practical applications. These results support the proposal that the TiO2 nanotubes membrane flexible sensors are promising in portable on-site detection based on low cost nanomaterials.

  13. SixDOF position sensor: enabling manufacturing flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vann, C.S.

    1998-03-24

    A small, non-contact optical sensor invented by the author attaches to a robot (or other machines), enabling the robot to detect objects, adjust its alignment in all six degrees of freedom (SixDOF), and read a task from a code on the part. Thus, the SixDOF sensor provides robots more intelligence to operate autonomously and adapt to changes without human intervention. A description of the sensor is provided. Also, an operating arrangement of a robot using the SixDOF sensor is presented with performance results described.

  14. Highly Sensitive Flexible Pressure Sensor Based on Silver Nanowires-Embedded Polydimethylsiloxane Electrode with Microarray Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xingtian; Zhu, Pengli; Zeng, Wenjin; Hu, Yougen; Liang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-08-09

    Flexible pressure sensors have attracted increasing research interest because of their potential applications for wearable sensing devices. Herein, a highly sensitive flexible pressure sensor is exhibited based on the elastomeric electrodes and a microarray architecture. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, coated with silver nanowires (AgNWs), is used as the top electrode, while polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as the dielectric layer. Several transfer processes are applied on seeking facile strategy for the preparation of the bottom electrode via embedding AgNWs into the PDMS film of microarray structure. The flexible pressure sensor integrates the top electrode, dielectric layer, and microarray electrode in a sandwich structure. It is demonstrated that such sensors possess the superiorities of high sensitivity (2.94 kPa(-1)), low detection limit (flexible pressure sensor exhibits good performance even in a noncontact way, such as detecting voice vibrations and air flow. Due to its superior performance, this designed flexible pressure sensor demonstrates promising potential in the application of electronic skins, as well as wearable healthcare monitors.

  15. Electrospun ZnO/SiO2 hybrid nanofibrous mat for flexible ultraviolet sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Min; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhao, Yong; Zhu, Zhengtao; Fong, Hao

    2014-03-01

    A freestanding/flexible hybrid mat consisting of crystalline ZnO nanofibers (˜75 wt. %) and amorphous SiO2 nanofibers (˜25 wt. %) was prepared by the technique of electrospinning followed by the pyrolysis in air at 650 °C. The electrospun ZnO/SiO2 hybrid mat was then studied to fabricate a flexible ultraviolet (UV) sensor, and the photo-response of this sensor was characterized under varied UV light intensities; additionally, the sensor performance under the bending condition was also evaluated. The results indicated that the flexible UV sensor had excellent sensitivity and reproducibility/reversibility, and it also exhibited high performance under the bending condition.

  16. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system.

  17. Robotic compliant fingertips possessing strain typed tactile sensor%具有应变式触觉传感器的机器人柔顺指端

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴士杰; 岳宏; 王仲民; 李德仲

    2001-01-01

    Aimed at the operation of grasping a uniform sectioned and even massed bar by a robot situated in gravitational field this paper put forward a kind of structure of robot′s compliant fingertips,possessing strain typed tactile sensor.In the gripper of robot's parallel grasping the perception on length and mass of an object is realized by utilizing metal elastic sheet as elastic element and using strain slice as tactile sensor.The electrorheologic fluids are sealed in the fingertips to achieve soft and hard grasping.Moreover,the sensory principle of grasping system is being discussed emphatically.The experimental results indicated that the fingertips of this kind of robot possess good discriminative ability and stable grasping capability.%针对机器人抓握处于重力场中的等截面均质杆件操作,提出一种具有应变式触觉传感器的机器人柔顺指端的结构。在机器人平行抓握手爪中,利用金属弹性薄板做弹性元件,应变片做触觉敏感单元,实现对物体的长度和质量的感知;在指端的表面封装电流变流体实现软/硬抓握。另外,着重讨论了抓握系统的传感原理。试验表明,这种机器人指端具有良好的识别能力和稳定抓握能力。

  18. Patient Posture Monitoring System Based on Flexible Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsu Cha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring patients using vision cameras can cause privacy intrusion problems. In this paper, we propose a patient position monitoring system based on a patient cloth with unobtrusive sensors. We use flexible sensors based on polyvinylidene fluoride, which is a flexible piezoelectric material. Theflexiblesensorsareinsertedintopartsclosetothekneeandhipoftheloosepatientcloth. We measure electrical signals from the sensors caused by the piezoelectric effect when the knee and hip in the cloth are bent. The measured sensor outputs are transferred to a computer via Bluetooth. We use a custom-made program to detect the position of the patient through a rule-based algorithm and the sensor outputs. The detectable postures are based on six human motions in and around a bed. The proposed system can detect the patient positions with a success rate over 88 percent for three patients.

  19. Tactile Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaramossadat Homayuni

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Tactile aids, which translate sound waves into vibrations that can be felt by the skin, have been used for decades by people with severe/profound hearing loss to enhance speech/language development and improve speechreading.The development of tactile aids dates from the efforts of Goults and his co-workers in the 1920s; Although The power supply was too voluminous and it was difficult to carry specially by children, it was too huge and heavy to be carried outside the laboratories and its application was restricted to the experimental usage. Nowadays great advances have been performed in producing this instrument and its numerous models is available in markets around the world.

  20. A Flexible Flow Sensor System and Its Characteristics for Fluid Mechanics Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyi Que

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel micromachined hot-film flow sensor system realized by a technique using a film depositing processes and incorporating a standard printed circuit. Sensor electrodes and electronic circuits are preprinted on a flexible substrate of polyimide (PI, i.e., a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB. The sensing element, which is made of Cr/Ni/Pt with a temperature coefficient of resistance around 2,000 ppm/K, is fabricated on the FPCB by either magnetron sputtering technology or pulsed laser deposition (PLD. The sensor can be packed efficiently at high-density and integrated with signal processing circuits without additional pads. A simple fabrication process using mature technique and materials selection guarantees that the time and costs are greatly reduced. Both steady-state and transient characteristics of the sensors are experimentally tested, and the results presented to validate the effectiveness of the sensors.

  1. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-12-07

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson's ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process.

  2. Flexible DCP interface. [environmental sensor and signal conditioning interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system (DCS) must supply the sensors and signal-conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform. A universal signal-conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  3. Recent Advancements in Flexible and Stretchable Electrodes for Electromechanical Sensors: Strategies, Materials, and Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songfang; Li, Jinhui; Cao, Duxia; Zhang, Guoping; Li, Jia; Li, Kui; Yang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Jin, Yufeng; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-03-30

    Stretchable and flexible sensors attached onto the surface of the human body can perceive external stimuli, thus attracting extensive attention due to their lightweight, low modulus, low cost, high flexibility, and stretchability. Recently, a myriad of efforts have been devoted to improving the performance and functionality of wearable sensors. Herein, this review focuses on recent remarkable advancements in the development of flexible and stretchable sensors. Multifunction of these wearable sensors is realized by incorporating some desired features (e.g., self-healing, self-powering, linearity, and printing). Next, focusing on the characteristics of carbon nanomaterials, nanostructured metal, conductive polymer, or their hybrid composites, two major strategies (e.g., materials that stretch and structures that stretch) and diverse design approaches have been developed to achieve highly flexible and stretchable electrodes. Strain sensing performances of recently reported sensors indicate that the appropriate choice of geometric engineering as well as intrinsically stretchable materials is essential for high-performance strain sensing. Finally, some important directions and challenges of a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform are proposed to realize their potential applications for human motion monitoring and human-machine interfaces.

  4. Development and application of flexible substrate sensors in instantaneous heat flux measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Duo; GU JiaHua; WU Song

    2009-01-01

    A new type of sensor with the flexible substrate is introduced.It is applicable in measuring instanta-neous heat flux on the model surface in a hypersonic shock tunnel.The working principle,structure and manufacture process of the sensor are presented.The substrate thickness and the dynamic re-sponse parameter of the sensor are calculated.Because this sensor was successfully used in meas-uring the instantaneous heat flux on the surface of a flat plate in a detonation-driven shock tunnel,it may be effective in measuring instantaneous heat flux on the model surface.

  5. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou, E-mail: jyshao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on two-terminal microsensors eliminating the need for a reference electrode, is simple in structure and can be fabricated on a variety of substrates such as PET, PI and PVC. • SWNTs as an ideal one dimensional material are carboxyl-functionalized to make the pH sensor show high sensitivity and outstanding flexibility for practical applications. • DEP technique is used to manipulate and position SWNTs into appropriate locations and desired formations to improve the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of pH value, resulting in better overall device performance. • Mechanical bendability of the pH sensor, which arises from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs, offer a significant improvement for applications that are difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional sensors on rigid substrates. - Abstract: The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H{sup +}) and hydroxide (OH{sup −}) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H{sup +} and OH{sup −} ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results

  6. Magnetic nanocomposite sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-06

    A magnetic nanocomposite device is described herein for a wide range of sensing applications. The device utilizes the permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires to allow operation without the application of an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies miniaturization and integration into microsystems. In5 addition, the nanocomposite benefits from the high elasticity and easy patterning of the polymer-based material, leading to a corrosion-resistant, flexible material that can be used to realize extreme sensitivity. In combination with magnetic sensor elements patterned underneath the nanocomposite, the nanocomposite device realizes highly sensitive and power efficient flexible artificial cilia sensors for flow measurement or tactile sensing.

  7. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  8. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  9. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasulu Tadakaluru; Wiradej Thongsuwan; Pisith Singjai

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. U...

  10. Flexible and Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks for Detecting Rainfall-Induced Landslides

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The effect of climate change and human activities leads to a series of dangerous phenomena, such as landslides and flood. In such a context, building a system to monitor environmental hazards is seriously needed. Some studies propose to use wireless sensor network (WSN) technique for landslide monitoring systems. Two important factors for these systems are the flexibility and the energy management. This paper focuses on the development of a flexible and efficient WSN for detecting rainfall-in...

  11. High sensitivity flexible Lamb-wave humidity sensors with a graphene oxide sensing layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Xingli; Chen, Jinkai; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaozhi; Xu, Yang; Xu, Zhen; Fu, Y Q; Luo, J K

    2015-04-28

    This paper reports high performance flexible Lamb wave humidity sensors with a graphene oxide sensing layer. The devices were fabricated on piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited on flexible polyimide substrates. Two resonant peaks, namely the zero order antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) mode Lamb waves, were observed and fitted well with the theoretical analysis and modelling. With graphene oxide microflakes as the sensing layer, the sensing performance of both wave modes was investigated. The humidity sensitivity of the A0 mode is 145.83 ppm per %RH (at humidity 85%RH), higher than that of S0 mode of 89.35 ppm per %RH. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the flexible humidity sensors work as usual without noticeable deterioration in performance even under severe bending conditions up to 1500 με. Also the sensors showed an excellent stability upon repeated bending for thousand times. All the results demonstrated that the Lamb wave flexible humidity sensors have a great potential for application in flexible electronics.

  12. Transparent flexible nanogenerator as self-powered sensor for transportation monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Hu, Youfan; Lin, Long

    2016-06-14

    A traffic sensor includes a flexible substrate having a top surface. A piezoelectric structure extends from the first electrode layer. The piezoelectric structure has a top end. An insulating layer is infused into the piezoelectric structure. A first electrode layer is disposed on top of the insulating layer. A second electrode layer is disposed below the flexible substrate. A packaging layer is disposed around the substrate, the first electrode layer, the piezoelectric structure, the insulating layer and the second electrode layer. In a method of sensing a traffic parameter, a piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor is applied to a roadway. An electrical event generated by the piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor in response to a vehicle interacting with the piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor is detected. The electrical event is correlated with the traffic parameter.

  13. Flexible, highly sensitive pressure sensor with a wide range based on graphene-silk network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tao, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a flexible, simple-preparation, and low-cost graphene-silk pressure sensor based on soft silk substrate through thermal reduction was demonstrated. Taking silk as the support body, the device had formed a three-dimensional structure with ordered multi-layer structure. Through a simple and low-cost process technology, graphene-silk pressure sensor can achieve the sensitivity value of 0.4 kPa - 1 , and the measurement range can be as high as 140 kPa. Besides, pressure sensor can have a good combination with knitted clothing and textile product. The signal had good reproducibility in response to different pressures. Furthermore, graphene-silk pressure sensor can not only detect pressure higher than 100 kPa, but also can measure weak body signals. The characteristics of high-sensitivity, good repeatability, flexibility, and comfort for skin provide the high possibility to fit on various wearable electronics.

  14. Transparent flexible nanogenerator as self-powered sensor for transportation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Hu, Youfan; Lin, Long

    2016-06-14

    A traffic sensor includes a flexible substrate having a top surface. A piezoelectric structure extends from the first electrode layer. The piezoelectric structure has a top end. An insulating layer is infused into the piezoelectric structure. A first electrode layer is disposed on top of the insulating layer. A second electrode layer is disposed below the flexible substrate. A packaging layer is disposed around the substrate, the first electrode layer, the piezoelectric structure, the insulating layer and the second electrode layer. In a method of sensing a traffic parameter, a piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor is applied to a roadway. An electrical event generated by the piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor in response to a vehicle interacting with the piezoelectric nanostructure-based traffic sensor is detected. The electrical event is correlated with the traffic parameter.

  15. Three-dimensional multi-recognition flexible wearable sensor via graphene aerogel printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Boxing; Ma, Ying; Li, Wenbo; Su, Meng; Li, Fengyu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-09-21

    Multi-response, multi-function and high integration are the critical pursuits of advanced electronic wearable sensors. Graphene aerogel endows a three-dimensional (3D) deformation morphology with excellent flexible wearable electronics of sheeted graphene. Here we report the fabrication of a neat graphene aerogel with micro extrusion printing to electronic sensor devices with a 3D nanostructure. The printed neat graphene patterns have excellent conductivity and the controllable 3D nanostructure of graphene aerogel contributes multi-dimensional deformation responses, which are appropriately suitable for the multi-recognition flexible wearable electric sensor. With complicated movement perception, the printed graphene aerogel sensors run the remarkable gesture language analysis for a deaf-mute communication auxiliary device or gesture manipulation apparatuses.

  16. A Flexible Acoustic Sensor Network for Various Monitoring Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring using a sensor network is a powerful instrument to assess and manage complex noise situations. It can provide a basis to identify appropriate and cost effective measures, and to assess their effect by comparing before and after implementation. It can also be an instrument for com

  17. Magnetic optical sensor particles: a flexible analytical tool for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerböck, Birgit; Fellinger, Siegfried; Sulzer, Philipp; Abel, Tobias; Mayr, Torsten

    2014-05-21

    In this study we evaluate magnetic optical sensor particles (MOSePs) with incorporated sensing functionalities regarding their applicability in microfluidic devices. MOSePs can be separated from the surrounding solution to form in situ sensor spots within microfluidic channels, while read-out is accomplished outside the chip. These magnetic sensor spots exhibit benefits of sensor layers (high brightness and convenient usage) combined with the advantages of dispersed sensor particles (ease of integration). The accumulation characteristics of MOSePs with different diameters were investigated as well as the in situ sensor spot stability at varying flow rates. Magnetic sensor spots were stable at flow rates specific to microfluidic applications. Furthermore, MOSePs were optimized regarding fiber optic and imaging read-out systems, and different referencing schemes were critically discussed on the example of oxygen sensors. While the fiber optic sensing system delivered precise and accurate results for measurement in microfluidic channels, limitations due to analyte consumption were found for microscopic oxygen imaging. A compensation strategy is provided, which utilizes simple pre-conditioning by exposure to light. Finally, new application possibilities were addressed, being enabled by the use of MOSePs. They can be used for microscopic oxygen imaging in any chip with optically transparent covers, can serve as flexible sensor spots to monitor enzymatic activity or can be applied to form fixed sensor spots inside microfluidic structures, which would be inaccessible to integration of sensor layers.

  18. Effects of Fusion between Tactile and Proprioceptive Inputs on Tactile Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P.; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2011-01-01

    Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment. PMID:21464943

  19. Effects of fusion between tactile and proprioceptive inputs on tactile perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P Warren

    Full Text Available Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment.

  20. Effects of fusion between tactile and proprioceptive inputs on tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2011-03-25

    Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment.

  1. Laser-assisted fabrication of single-layer flexible touch sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Single-layer flexible touch sensor that is designed for the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free, bendable, durable, multi-sensible, and single layer transparent touch sensor was developed via a low-cost and one-step laser-induced fabrication technology. To this end, an entirely novel approach involving material, device structure, and even fabrication method was adopted. Conventional metal oxides based multilayer touch structure was substituted by the single layer structure composed of integrated silv...

  2. Development of flexible SAW sensors for non-destructive testing of structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takpara, R.; Duquennoy, M.; Courtois, C.; Gonon, M.; Ouaftouh, M.; Martic, G.; Rguiti, M.; Jenot, F.; Seronveaux, L.; Pelegris, C.

    2016-02-01

    In order to accurately examine structures surfaces, it is interesting to use surface SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave). Such waves are well suited for example to detect early emerging cracks or to test the quality of a coating. In addition, when coatings are thin or when emergent cracks are precocious, it is necessary to excite surface waves beyond 10MHz. Finally, when structures are not flat, it makes sense to have flexible or conformable sensors for their characterization. To address this problem, we propose to develop SAW type of interdigital sensors (or IDT for InterDigital Transducer), based on flexible piezoelectric plates. Initially, in order to optimize these sensors, we modeled the behavior of these sensors and identified the optimum characteristic sizes. In particular, the thickness of the piezoelectric plate and the width of the interdigital electrodes have been studied. Secondly, we made composites based on barium titanate foams in order to have flexible piezoelectric plates and to carry out thereafter sensors. Then, we studied several techniques in order to optimize the interdigitated electrodes deposition on this type of material. One of the difficulties concerns the fineness of these electrodes because the ratio between the length (typically several millimeters) and the width (a few tens of micrometers) of electrodes is very high. Finally, mechanical, electrical and acoustical characterizations of the sensors deposited on aluminum substrates were able to show the quality of our achievement.

  3. Tactile asymbolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmasov, Daniel; Ropper, Allan H

    2016-04-01

    Agraphesthesia has been attributed to impairment of the ability to detect more rudimentary directionality of lines written on the skin (directional cutaneous kinesthesia). We examined a patient who had a dissociation between preserved perception of line directionality and the loss of graphesthesia for letters and numbers. A man with a metastatic right parietal lesion was tested for the ability to determine the directionality of lines drawn on the palms and forehead and then evaluated for recognition of letters and numbers in these regions. Our patient could identify the directions of lines, letters and numbers drawn on paper. The ability to detect the direction and shape of lines drawn on the skin of the palms and on the forehead was preserved but he had agraphesthesia for numbers and letters in these same locations. The finding of isolated agraphesthesia for letters and numbers may be assigned to damage in the right parietal lobe. It represents a deficit of somatosensory processing that is of a higher order than detection of line directionality. The term "tactile asymbolia" may capture the dissociation. These clinical findings suggest that tactile cortex in humans, like visual cortex, may be hierarchically organized, as has been demonstrated in primates.

  4. A tactile sensing element based on a hetero-core optical fiber for force measurement and texture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yuya; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Tactile sensing technology can measure a given property of an object through physical contact between a sensing element and the object. Various tactile sensing techniques have been developed for several applications such as intelligent robots, tactile interface, medical support and nursing care support. A desirable tactile sensing element for supporting human daily life can be embedded in the soft material with high sensitivity and accuracy in order to prevent from damaging to human or object physically. This report describes a new tactile sensing element. Hetero-core optical fibers have high sensitivity of macro-bending at local sensor portion and temperature independency, including advantages of optical fiber itself; thin size, light weight, flexible transmission line, and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The proposed tactile sensing element could detect textures of touched objects through the optical loss caused by the force applied to the sensing element. The characteristics of the sensing element have been evaluated, in which the sensing element has the monotonic and non-linear sensitivity against the normal force ranged from 0 to 5 N with lower accuracy than 0.25 dB. Additionally, texture detection have been successfully demonstrated in which small surface figures of 0.1 mm in height were detected with spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  5. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source, is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collec...... of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons) on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake....

  6. A flexible touch-pressure sensor array with wireless transmission system for robotic skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Fang, Ding; Wu, Can; Wang, Weihua; Guo, Xiaohui; Liu, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Human skin contains multiple receptors and is able to sense various stimuli such as temperature, touch, pressure, and deformation, with high sensitivity and resolution. The development of skin-like sensors capable of sensing these stimuli is of great importance for various applications such as robots, touch detection, temperature monitoring, and strain gauges. Great efforts have been made to develop high performance touch sensor and pressure sensor. Compared with general sensor, the touch-pressure sensor which is reported in this paper not only can measure large pressure but also has a high resolution in the small range so that it can feel slight touch. The sensor has a vertical structure. The upper layer is made of silicone rubber as the capacitive layer and the lower layer employs multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon black filled silicone rubber as the resistive layer. The electrodes are made by conductive silver adhesives. In addition, the electrodes are connected to the pads on the top surface of the flexible printed circuit board by enamelled wires which made it easier to fabricate sensor array. The resolution of the touch-pressure sensor in the range of 0-10 N and 10-100 N are 0.1 N and 1 N, respectively. The experimental data of the sensor are sent by ZigBee wireless technology which reduces the complexity of the wiring and provides a convenient way to apply and maintain the sensor array.

  7. A flexible touch-pressure sensor array with wireless transmission system for robotic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Fang, Ding; Wu, Can; Wang, Weihua; Guo, Xiaohui; Liu, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Human skin contains multiple receptors and is able to sense various stimuli such as temperature, touch, pressure, and deformation, with high sensitivity and resolution. The development of skin-like sensors capable of sensing these stimuli is of great importance for various applications such as robots, touch detection, temperature monitoring, and strain gauges. Great efforts have been made to develop high performance touch sensor and pressure sensor. Compared with general sensor, the touch-pressure sensor which is reported in this paper not only can measure large pressure but also has a high resolution in the small range so that it can feel slight touch. The sensor has a vertical structure. The upper layer is made of silicone rubber as the capacitive layer and the lower layer employs multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon black filled silicone rubber as the resistive layer. The electrodes are made by conductive silver adhesives. In addition, the electrodes are connected to the pads on the top surface of the flexible printed circuit board by enamelled wires which made it easier to fabricate sensor array. The resolution of the touch-pressure sensor in the range of 0-10 N and 10-100 N are 0.1 N and 1 N, respectively. The experimental data of the sensor are sent by ZigBee wireless technology which reduces the complexity of the wiring and provides a convenient way to apply and maintain the sensor array.

  8. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  9. Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  10. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Man Lo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM, with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  11. Design and application of a flexible and implantable sensor for detecting uterine musculature contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Qin, Ling; Yang, Qing; Wu, Shangchun; He, Peiyu

    2009-09-15

    It is very important to obtain the parameters of deformation size and contraction frequency of women's uterine musculature in medical research. This paper proposes a type of sensor for measuring these parameters and analyzes its force situation. The flexibility of the sensor makes it easy for doctors to let the sensor pass through woman's narrow cervix and get to her uterine cavity. The experiment shows that the sensitivity of three coils in the sample sensor achieves 22.38 nH/mm(2) both for left and right coils, 22.84 nH/mm(2) for top coil, which can meet the requirements of sensitivity for testing the contraction situation of uterine musculature. Furthermore, an interface designed in the back end system can display the parameters of deformation size and vivid contraction situation of women's uterine musculature in real-time. The sensor has been applied in some medical fields.

  12. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Xie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM, the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm.

  13. Flexible tension sensor based on poly(l-lactic acid) film with coaxial structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mitsunobu; Onishi, Katsuki; Tanimoto, Kazuhiro; Nishikawa, Shigeo

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a tension sensor with a coaxial structure using a narrow slit ribbon made of a uniaxially stretched poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) film for application to a wearable device. The tension sensor is produced as follows. We used tinsel wire as the center conductor of the sensor. The tinsel wire consists of a yarn of synthetic fibers arranged at the center, with a spirally wound rolled copper foil ribbon on the side surface. Next, slit ribbons obtained from a uniaxially oriented film of PLLA are wound helically on the side surface of the center conductor in the direction of a left-handed screw, at an angle of 45° to the central axis. The rolled copper foil is used as an outer conductor and covers the yarn without a gap. The prototype of the fabricated tension sensor has good flexibility, since the sensor is in the form of a filament and consists of a highly flexible material. For the 1 mm tension sensor, it was found that for a tension of 1 N, a charge of 14 pC was output. It was also found that the sensor maintained its room-temperature sensitivity up to 60 °C. Compared with an existing coaxial line sensor using poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), the sensor using PLLA does not exhibit pyroelectricity, meaning that no undesirable voltage is generated when in contact with body heat, which is a significant advantage as wearable sensors. The result has demonstrated the potential application of the PLLA film to wearable devices for detecting heartbeat and respiration.

  14. A Wireless Flexible Sensorized Insole for Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Crea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the design and development of a novel pressure-sensitive foot insole for real-time monitoring of plantar pressure distribution during walking. The device consists of a flexible insole with 64 pressure-sensitive elements and an integrated electronic board for high-frequency data acquisition, pre-filtering, and wireless transmission to a remote data computing/storing unit. The pressure-sensitive technology is based on an optoelectronic technology developed at Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna. The insole is a low-cost and low-power battery-powered device. The design and development of the device is presented along with its experimental characterization and validation with healthy subjects performing a task of walking at different speeds, and benchmarked against an instrumented force platform.

  15. Design, dynamic modelling and experimental validation of a 2DOF flexible antenna sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Claudia F.; Naci Engin, Seref; Feliu Batlle, Vicente

    2014-04-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom flexible antenna sensor platform was designed to physically simulate the ability of a robotic arm, which rapidly reorients and targets itself towards specific surfaces from different approachable angles. An accurate antenna model involves non-linear expressions that represent the system dynamics. Therefore, a comprehensive study along with experimental work has been carried out in order to achieve accurate system identification and validate the dynamic model. The model developed has proven useful in controlling the antenna tip, minimising the effects of the non-linear flexural dynamics and the Coulomb friction. The system was driven by servo motors. Algebraic controllers were developed for the antenna tip to track the reference trajectory. The platform system used encoders to measure the joint angles and a loadcell sensor to obtain the flexible link tip position. To validate the sensory information, the results obtained by the integrated sensors were compared to that of an external camera system.

  16. Hierarchical graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite films for high-performance flexible electronic gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yunlong; Wang, Ting; Chen, Fanhong; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhongzhen; Wan, Pengbo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully interconnected and deposited onto flexible PET substrates to form hierarchical nanocomposite (PPANI/rGO-FPANI) network films. The assembled flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor exhibits high sensing performance towards NH3 gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 100 ppm, reliable transparency (90.3% at 550 nm) for the PPANI/rGO-FPANI film (6 h sample), fast response/recovery time (36 s/18 s), and robust flexibility without an obvious performance decrease after 1000 bending/extending cycles. The excellent sensing performance could probably be ascribed to the synergetic effects and the relatively high surface area (47.896 m2 g-1) of the PPANI/rGO-FPANI network films, the efficient artificial neural network sensing channels, and the effectively exposed active surfaces. It is expected to hold great promise for developing flexible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive electronic sensors with real-time analysis to be potentially integrated into wearable flexible electronics.A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully

  17. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-01

    The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H+ and OH- ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results shows that the relative resistance variations of the sensor increases linearly with increasing the pH values in the range from 5 to 9 and the response time ranges from 0.2 s to 22.6 s. The pH sensor also shows high performance in mechanical bendability, which benefited from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs. The SWNT-based flexible pH sensor demonstrates great potential in a wide range of areas due to its simple structure, excellent performance, low power consumption, and compatibility with integrated circuits.

  18. Fabrication of newspaper-based potentiometric platforms for flexible and disposable ion sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jo Hee; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Bae, Nam Ho; Sim, Gap Seop; Oh, Yong-Jun; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Tae Jae; Lee, Kyoung G; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-12-15

    Paper-based materials have attracted a great deal of attention in sensor applications because they are readily available, biodegradable, inexpensive, and mechanically flexible. Although paper-based sensors have been developed, but important obstacles remian, which include the retention of chemical and mechanical stabilities when paper is wetted. Herein, we develop a simple and scalable process for fabrication of newspaper-based platforms by coating of parylene C and patterning of metal layers. As-prepared parylene C-coated newspaper (PC-paper) provides low-cost, disposable, and mechanically and chemically stable electrochemical platforms for the development of potentiometric ion sensors for the detection of electrolyte cations, such as, H(+) and K(+). The pH and K(+) sensors produced show near ideal Nernstian sensitivity, good repeatability, good ion selectivity, and low potential drift. These disposable, flexible ion sensors based on PC-paper platforms could provide new opportunities for the development of point-of-care testing sensors, for diagnostics, healthcare, and environment testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Graphene films printable on flexible substrates for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Faris, Tsegie; Stoeva, Zlatka; Harris, Paul G.; Chen, J.; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Ray, Asim K.

    2017-03-01

    Fifteen-layered graphene films have been successfully deposited onto flexible substrates using a commercial ink consisting of graphene particles dispersed in an acrylic polymer binder. A value of 74.9× {10}5 {{{cm}}}-2 was obtained for the density of defects, primarily located at the flake edges, from the ratio of the D and G Raman peaks located at 1345 {{{cm}}}-1 and 1575 {{{cm}}}-1 respectively. 0.5 {μ }{{m}} thick drop-cast films on interdigitated silver electrodes exhibited Ohmic conduction with a small activation energy of 12 meV over the temperature range from 260 to 330 {{K}}. The photo-thermoelectric effect is believed to be responsible for photoconduction through graphene films under illumination intensity of 10 mW m-2 at 270 {{nm}}, corresponding to the UV absorption peak. The photo-transient decay at the bias of 1 {{V}} involves two relaxation processes when the illumination is switched off and values of 8.9× {10}3 and 4.3× {10}4 {{s}} are found for the relaxation time constant using the Kohlrauch stretched exponential function analysis.

  20. Flexible thermoelectric generator for ambient assisted living wearable biometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Farella, I.; Martucci, C.; Cretì, P.; Siciliano, P.; Perrone, A.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we proposed design, fabrication and functional characterization of a very low cost energy autonomous, maintenance free, flexible and wearable micro thermoelectric generator (μTEG), finalized to power very low consumption electronics ambient assisted living (AAL) applications. The prototype, integrating an array of 100 thin films thermocouples of Sb2Te3 and Bi2Te3, generates, at 40 °C, an open circuit output voltage of 430 mV and an electrical output power up to 32 nW with matched load. In real operation conditions of prototype, which are believed to be very close to a thermal gradient of 15 °C, the device generates an open circuit output voltage of about 160 mV, with an electrical output power up to 4.18 nW. In the first part of work, deposition investigation Sb2Te3 and Bi2Te3 thin films alloys on Kapton HN polyimide foil by RF magnetron co-sputtering technique is discussed. Deposition parameters have been optimized to gain perfect stoichiometric ratio and high thermoelectric power factor; fabricated thermogenerator has been tested at low gradient conditioned to evaluate applications like human skin wearable power generator for ambient assisted living applications.

  1. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasulu Tadakaluru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain. As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  2. Stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors made using carbon nanotubes and graphite films on natural rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-06

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  3. Virtual Sensor for Kinematic Estimation of Flexible Links in Parallel Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bengoa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The control of flexible link parallel manipulators is still an open area of research, endpoint trajectory tracking being one of the main challenges in this type of robot. The flexibility and deformations of the limbs make the estimation of the Tool Centre Point (TCP position a challenging one. Authors have proposed different approaches to estimate this deformation and deduce the location of the TCP. However, most of these approaches require expensive measurement systems or the use of high computational cost integration methods. This work presents a novel approach based on a virtual sensor which can not only precisely estimate the deformation of the flexible links in control applications (less than 2% error, but also its derivatives (less than 6% error in velocity and 13% error in acceleration according to simulation results. The validity of the proposed Virtual Sensor is tested in a Delta Robot, where the position of the TCP is estimated based on the Virtual Sensor measurements with less than a 0.03% of error in comparison with the flexible approach developed in ADAMS Multibody Software.

  4. Flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator in wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Jin, Y. M.; Ouyang, H.; Zou, Y.; Wang, X. X.; Xie, L. X.; Li, Z.

    2017-06-01

    A wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring was fabricated based on a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator. An electrospinning poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin film on silicone substrate was polarized to fabricate the flexible nanogenerator and its electrical property was measured. When periodically stretched by a linear motor, the flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator generated an output open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current of up to 1.5 V and 400 nA, respectively. Through integration with an elastic bandage, a wearable self-powered sensor was fabricated and used to monitor human respiration, subtle muscle movement, and voice recognition. As respiration proceeded, the electrical output signals of the sensor corresponded to the signals measured by a physiological signal recording system with good reliability and feasibility. This self-powered, wearable active sensor has significant potential for applications in pulmonary function evaluation, respiratory monitoring, and detection of gesture and vocal cord vibration for the personal healthcare monitoring of disabled or paralyzed patients.

  5. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  6. Strengthening of Back Muscles Using a Module of Flexible Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chun Chuang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at developing a flexible strain module applied to the strengthening of back muscles. Silver films were sputtered onto flexible substrates to produce a flexible sensor. Assuming that back muscle elongation is positively correlated with the variations in skin surface length, real-time resistance changes exhibited by the sensor during simulated training sessions were measured. The results were used to identify the relationship between resistance change of sensors and skin surface stretch. In addition, muscle length changes from ultrasound images were used to determine the feasibility of a proof of concept sensor. Furthermore, this module is capable of detecting large muscle contractions, some of which may be undesirable for the prescribed training strategy. Therefore, the developed module can facilitate real-time assessments of the movement accuracy of users during training, and the results are instantly displayed on a screen. People using the developed training system can immediately adjust their posture to the appropriate position. Thus, the training mechanism can be constructed to help user improve the efficiency of back muscle strengthening.

  7. An integrated temperature-compensated flexible shear-stress sensor microarray with concentrated leading-wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Liu, Wu; Zhang, Weiping; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Honghai

    2016-02-01

    Flexible shear stress sensor is quite important for characterizing curved surface flows. In this work, a novel integrated shear stress sensor microarray is designed with twenty parallel channels, which share the concentrated leading-wire to transmit the ground signal. Electrical pads in rows are easily connected to the circuits with two separate Wheatstone bridges and constant-temperature-difference mode operation is provided for the hot-wires. Temperature crosstalk between adjacent hot-wires is prevented well and the effectiveness of the temperature compensated circuits is verified. Relatively large output response is obtained as the shear stress varies and the sensitivity of the sensors is measured about 0.086 V(2)/Pa(1/3) with nonlinearity lower than 1%, revealing high performance characteristic of the sensors.

  8. A nafion coated capacitive humidity sensor on a flexible PET substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2017-03-07

    This paper reports a simple and low-cost technique for fabricating low-power capacitive humidity sensors without the use of a cleanroom environment. A maskless laser engraving system was utilized to fabricate two different gold electrode structures, interdigitated electrodes and Hilbert\\'s fifth-order fractal. The capacitive structures were implemented on a flexible PET substrate. The usage of Nafion, a well-known polymer for its hydrophilic properties as a sensing film, was attempted on the PET and outperformed the current efforts in flexible substrates. Its humidity sensing properties were evaluated in an automated gas setup with a relative humidity (RH %) ranging from 15% to 95 %.

  9. Optimal sensor configuration for flexible structures with multi-dimensional mode shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minwoo; Pakzad, Shamim N.

    2015-05-01

    A framework for deciding the optimal sensor configuration is implemented for civil structures with multi-dimensional mode shapes, which enhances the applicability of structural health monitoring for existing structures. Optimal sensor placement (OSP) algorithms are used to determine the best sensor configuration for structures with a priori knowledge of modal information. The signal strength at each node is evaluated by effective independence and modified variance methods. Euclidean norm of signal strength indices associated with each node is used to expand OSP applicability into flexible structures. The number of sensors for each method is determined using the threshold for modal assurance criterion (MAC) between estimated (from a set of observations) and target mode shapes. Kriging is utilized to infer the modal estimates for unobserved locations with a weighted sum of known neighbors. A Kriging model can be expressed as a sum of linear regression and random error which is assumed as the realization of a stochastic process. This study presents the effects of Kriging parameters for the accurate estimation of mode shapes and the minimum number of sensors. The feasible ranges to satisfy MAC criteria are investigated and used to suggest the adequate searching bounds for associated parameters. The finite element model of a tall building is used to demonstrate the application of optimal sensor configuration. The dynamic modes of flexible structure at centroid are appropriately interpreted into the outermost sensor locations when OSP methods are implemented. Kriging is successfully used to interpolate the mode shapes from a set of sensors and to monitor structures associated with multi-dimensional mode shapes.

  10. Flexible room-temperature resistive humidity sensor based on silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiwatcharanon, Pranlekha; Timsorn, Kriengkri; Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a low-cost and flexible room-temperature humidity sensor was developed from pure resistive silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized through a simple green route using Pistia stratiotes extract as a reducing agent for AgNO3 under light illuminations. UV-Vis spectroscopic results showed that various synthesis parameters including AgNO3 concentration, reaction time, pH value and light irradiation strongly affected on the formation of AgNPs. AgNPs were also confirmed to exhibit spherical shapes with different sizes depending on pH by transmission electron microscopy. To fabricate the sensor, AgNPs were deposited on a transparent polyethylene substrate with pre-patterned Ag interdigitated electrodes via a drop coating method. From humidity-sensing results, the flexible pure AgNPs sensor exhibited high sensitivity to relative humidity (RH) with high repeatability and stability at room temperature. Moreover, the sensor electrical resistance and sensor response showed linear relationships to RH in the range of 20-85% with short response and recovery times of 10 s and 11 s, respectively.

  11. A flexible liquid crystal polymer MEMS pressure sensor array for fish-like underwater sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, A. G. P.; Asadnia, M.; Miao, J. M.; Barbastathis, G.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to perform underwater surveillance, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) require flexible, light-weight, reliable and robust sensing systems that are capable of flow sensing and detecting underwater objects. Underwater animals like fish perform a similar task using an efficient and ubiquitous sensory system called a lateral-line constituting of an array of pressure-gradient sensors. We demonstrate here the development of arrays of polymer microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors which are flexible and can be readily mounted on curved surfaces of AUV bodies. An array of ten sensors with a footprint of 60 (L) mm × 25 (W) mm × 0.4 (H) mm is fabricated using liquid crystal polymer (LCP) as the sensing membrane material. The flow sensing and object detection capabilities of the array are illustrated with proof-of-concept experiments conducted in a water tunnel. The sensors demonstrate a pressure sensitivity of 14.3 μV Pa-1. A high resolution of 25 mm s-1 is achieved in water flow sensing. The sensors can passively sense underwater objects by transducing the pressure variations generated underwater by the movement of objects. The experimental results demonstrate the array’s ability to detect the velocity of underwater objects towed past by with high accuracy, and an average error of only 2.5%.

  12. A Flexible Arrayed Eddy Current Sensor for Inspection of Hollow Axle Inner Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A reliable and accurate inspection of the hollow axle inner surface is important for the safe operation of high-speed trains. In order to improve the reliability of the inspection, a flexible arrayed eddy current sensor for non-destructive testing of the hollow axle inner surface was designed, fabricated and characterized. The sensor, consisting of two excitation traces and 28 sensing traces, was developed by using the flexible printed circuit board (FPCB technique to conform the geometric features of the inner surfaces of the hollow axles. The main innovative aspect of the sensor was the new arrangement of excitation/sensing traces to achieve a differential configuration. Finite element model was established to analyze sensor responses and to determine the optimal excitation frequency. Experimental validations were conducted on a specimen with several artificial defects. Results from experiments and simulations were consistent with each other, with the maximum relative error less than 4%. Both results proved that the sensor was capable of detecting longitudinal and transverse defects with the depth of 0.5 mm under the optimal excitation frequency of 0.9 MHz.

  13. Design and development of RFID and RFID-enabled sensors on flexible low cost substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Li

    2009-01-01

    This book presents a step-by-step discussion of the design and development of radio frequency identification (RFID) and RFID-enabled sensors on flexible low cost substrates for UHF frequency bands. Various examples of fully function building blocks (design and fabrication of antennas, integration with ICs and microcontrollers, power sources, as well as inkjet-printing techniques) demonstrate the revolutionary effect of this approach in low cost RFID and RFID-enabled sensors fields. This approach could be easily extended to other microwave and wireless applications as well. The first chapter de

  14. Universal Robot Hand Equipped with Tactile and Joint Torque Sensors: Development and Experiments on Stiffness Control and Object Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki NAKAMOTO; Kobayashi, Futoshi; Nobuaki IMAMURA; Shirasawa, Hidenori; Kojima, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Various humanoid robots have been developed and multifunction robot hands which are able to attach those robots like human hand is needed. But a useful robot hand has not been depeveloped, because there are a lot of problems such as control method of many degrees of freedom and processing method of enormous sensor outputs. Realizing such robot hand, we have developed five-finger robot hand. In this paper, the detailed structure of developed robot hand is described. The robot hand we developed...

  15. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Lebioda, Marcin; Rymaszewski, Jacek; Szymanski, Witold; Kolodziejczyk, Lukasz; Kula, Piotr

    2016-12-28

    Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common -65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications-superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

  16. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Pawlak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common −65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications—superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor.

  17. Tactile Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project has developed a set of tactile display garments that will be used to evaluate various tactile display methodologies. The garments include two sleeves...

  18. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA, notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  19. Flexible Time-Triggered Sampling in Smart Sensor-Based Wireless Control Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Feng

    2008-01-01

    Wireless control systems (WCSs) often have to operate in dynamic environments where the network traffic load may vary unpredictably over time. The sampling in sensors is conventionally time triggered with fixed periods. In this context, only worse-than-possible quality of control (QoC) can be achieved when the network is underloaded, while overloaded conditions may significantly degrade the QoC, even causing system instability. This is particularly true when the bandwidth of the wireless network is limited and shared by multiple control loops. To address these problems, a flexible time-triggered sampling scheme is presented in this work. Smart sensors are used to facilitate dynamic adjustment of sampling periods, which enhances the flexibility and resource efficiency of the system based on time-triggered sampling. Feedback control technology is exploited for adapting sampling periods in a periodic manner. The deadline miss ratio in each control loop is maintained at/around a desired level, regardless of workl...

  20. In situ monitoring of temperature inside lithium-ion batteries by flexible micro temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  1. Flexible and printable paper-based strain sensors for wearable and large-area green electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xinqin; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Qingliang; Liang, Qijie; Ou, Yang; Xu, Minxuan; Li, Minghua; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control.Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02172g

  2. A flexible dual-mode proximity sensor based on cooperative sensing for robot skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Cai, Xia; Kan, Wenqing; Qiu, Shihua; Guo, Xiaohui; Liu, Caixia; Liu, Ping

    2017-08-01

    A flexible dual-mode proximity sensor has been designed and implemented, which is capable of combining capacitive-resistive detection in this paper. The capacitive type proximity sensor detecting is defined as mode-C, and the resistive type proximity sensor detecting is defined as mode-R. The characteristics of the proximity sensor are as follows: (1) the theoretical mode is developed which indicates that this proximity sensor can reflect proximity information accurately; (2) both sensing modes are vertically integrated into a sandwich-like chip with an 8 mm × 12 mm unit area. The thickness of a mode-R sensing material (graphene nanoplatelets) and mode-C dielectric (the mixture of carbon black and silicone rubber) is 1 mm and 2.5 mm, respectively; (3) for mode-R, the linearity of temperature-resistance curve can achieve 0.998 in the temperature range from 25°C to 65°C. And for mode-C, various materials can be successfully detected with fast response and high reversibility. Meanwhile, the study compensated the influence of object temperature to ensure mode-C properly works. A cooperative sensing test shows that R-C dual modes sense effectively which can enlarge the sensing distance compared with the single mode proximity sensor. The fabrication of this sensor is convenient, and the integrity of a flexible sandwich-like structure based on dual modes is beneficial to form arrays, which is suitable to be used in skin-like sensing applications.

  3. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Elmer K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm, mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is

  4. Experiments on Optimal Vibration Control of a Flexible Beam Containing Piezoelectric Sensors and Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo L.C.M. Abreu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a digital regulator is designed and experimentally implemented for a flexible beam type structure containing piezoelectric sensors and actuators by using optimal control design techniques. The controller consists of a linear quadratic regulator with a state estimator, namely a Kalman observer. The structure is a cantilever beam containing a set of sensor/actuator PVDF/PZT ceramic piezoelectric patches bonded to the beam surface at the optimal location obtained for the first three vibration modes. The equations of motion of the beam are developed by using the assumed modes technique for flexible structures in infinite-dimensional models. This paper uses a method of minimizing the effect of the removed higher order modes on the low frequency dynamics of the truncated model by adding a zero frequency term to the low order model of the system. A measure of the controllability and observability of the system based on the modal cost function for flexible structures containing piezoelectric elements (intelligent structures is used. The observability and controllability measures are determined especially to guide the placement of sensors and actuators, respectively. The experimental and numerical transfer functions are adjusted by using an optimization procedure. Experimental results illustrate the optimal control design of a cantilever beam structure.

  5. Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert P; Ross, Michael P.

    2013-08-01

    Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inchestypically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

  6. Laser-Assisted Reduction of Highly Conductive Circuits Based on Copper Nitrate for Flexible Printed Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shi; Zhang, Shigang; Zhou, Weiping; Ma, Delong; Ma, Ying; Joshi, Pooran; Hu, Anming

    2017-10-01

    Stretchable electronic sensing devices are defining the path toward wearable electronics. High-performance flexible strain sensors attached on clothing or human skin are required for potential applications in the entertainment, health monitoring, and medical care sectors. In this work, conducting copper electrodes were fabricated on polydimethylsiloxane as sensitive stretchable microsensors by integrating laser direct writing and transfer printing approaches. The copper electrode was reduced from copper salt using laser writing rather than the general approach of printing with pre-synthesized copper or copper oxide nanoparticles. An electrical resistivity of 96 μΩ cm was achieved on 40-μm-thick Cu electrodes on flexible substrates. The motion sensing functionality successfully demonstrated a high sensitivity and mechanical robustness. This in situ fabrication method leads to a path toward electronic devices on flexible substrates.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Free-standing and flexible graphene papers as disposable non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Minwei; Halder, Arnab; Hou, Chengyi

    2016-01-01

    ) disclosed AuNPs coated uniformly by a 5 nm thick PB layer. Au@PB NPs were attached to single-layer graphene oxide (GO) to form Au@PB decorated GO sheets. The resulting hybrid material was filtered layer-by-layer into flexible and freestanding GO paper, which was further converted into conductive reduced GO...... (RGO)/Au@PB paper via hydrazine vapour reduction. High-resolution TEM images suggested that RGO papers are multiply sandwich-like structures functionalized with core-shell NPs. Resulting sandwich functionalized graphene papers have high conductivity, sufficient flexibility, and robust mechanical...... response range (1-30 μM), the detection limit (100 nM), and the high amperometric sensitivity (5 A cm-2 M-1). With the advantages of low cost and scalable production capacity, such graphene supported functional papers are of particular interest in the use as flexible disposable sensors....

  8. Polymer-based flexible capacitive sensor for three-axial force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzynska, J. A.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a flexible-substrate-based three-axial force sensor, composed of finger-shaped electrode capacitors, whose operation is based on the measurement of a capacitance change induced upon applying a three-axial load. The electrode design supports high sensitivity to shear forces. An overall flexibility of the sensor and elasticity of the capacitor's dielectric is obtained by integrating three polymers in the sensor's technology process, namely polyimide, parylene-C, and polydimethylsiloxane, combined with standard metallization processes. We have theoretically modeled the sensor's capacitance and its three-axial force sensitivity. The unit capacitors have static capacitances in the range of 20 pF. The electro-mechanical characterization of the capacitors reveals in the normal direction a sensitivity Sz = 0.024 kPa-1 for pressures <10 kPa, whereas for higher pressures the measured sensitivity Sz = 6.6 × 10-4 kPa-1. Typical measured shear force sensitivity Sx = 2.8 × 10-4 kPa-1. These values give our transducer high potential for use in skin-like sensing applications.

  9. Nanoalloy Printed and Pulse-Laser Sintered Flexible Sensor Devices with Enhanced Stability and Materials Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wei; Rovore, Thomas; Weerawarne, Darshana; Osterhoudt, Gavin; Kang, Ning; Joseph, Pharrah; Luo, Jin; Shim, Bonggu; Poliks, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-06-02

    While conformal and wearable devices have become one of the most desired formats for printable electronics, it is challenging to establish a scalable process that produces stable conductive patterns but also uses substrates compatible with widely available wearable materials. Here, we describe findings of an investigation of a nanoalloy ink printed and pulsed laser sintered conductive patterns as flexible functional devices with enhanced stability and materials compatibility. While nanoparticle inks are desired for printable electronics, almost all existing nanoparticle inks are based on single-metal component, which, as an electronic element, is limited by its inherent stabilities of the metal such as propensity of metal oxidation and mobility of metal ions, especially in sintering processes. The work here has demonstrated the first example in exploiting plasmonic coupling of nanoalloys and pulsed-laser energy with controllable thermal penetration. The experimental and theoretical results have revealed clear correlation between the pulsed laser parameters and the nanoalloy structural characteristics. The superior performance of the resulting flexible sensor device, upon imparting nanostructured sensing materials, for detecting volatile organic compounds has significant implications to developing stable and wearable sensors for monitoring environmental pollutants and breath biomarkers. This simple “nanoalloy printing 'laser sintering' nanostructure printing” process is entirely general to many different sensor devices and nanostructured sensing materials, enabling the ability to easily construct sophisticated sensor array.

  10. Piezoresistive effects in controllable defective HFTCVD graphene-based flexible pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Haniff, Muhammad Aniq Shazni; Muhammad Hafiz, Syed; Wahid, Khairul Anuar Abd; Endut, Zulkarnain; Wah Lee, Hing; Bien, Daniel C S; Abdul Azid, Ishak; Abdullah, Mohd Zulkifly; Ming Huang, Nay; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the piezoresistive effects of defective graphene used on a flexible pressure sensor are demonstrated. The graphene used was deposited at substrate temperatures of 750, 850 and 1000 °C using the hot-filament thermal chemical vapor deposition method in which the resultant graphene had different defect densities. Incorporation of the graphene as the sensing materials in sensor device showed that a linear variation in the resistance change with the applied gas pressure was obtained in the range of 0 to 50 kPa. The deposition temperature of the graphene deposited on copper foil using this technique was shown to be capable of tuning the sensitivity of the flexible graphene-based pressure sensor. We found that the sensor performance is strongly dominated by the defect density in the graphene, where graphene with the highest defect density deposited at 750 °C exhibited an almost four-fold sensitivity as compared to that deposited at 1000 °C. This effect is believed to have been contributed by the scattering of charge carriers in the graphene networks through various forms such as from the defects in the graphene lattice itself, tunneling between graphene islands, and tunneling between defect-like structures.

  11. Strain Sensing Characteristics of Rubbery Carbon Nanotube Composite for Flexible Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyong Rak; Park, Hyung-ki; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Young-Ju; Ham, Heon; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kim, Sung Yong; Kang, Inpil

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the piezoresistive properties of CNT (Carbon Nanotube)/EPDM composite are characterized for the applications of a flexible sensor. The CNT/EPDM composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with MWCNT (Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube) and organoclay. The static and quasi-dynamic voltage output responses of the composite sensor were also experimentally studied and were compared with those of a conventional foil strain gage. The voltage output by using a signal processing system was fairly stable and it shows somehow linear responses at both of loading and unloading cases with hysteresis. The voltage output was distorted under a quasi-dynamic test due to its unsymmetrical piezoresistive characteristics. The CNT/EPDM sensor showed quite tardy response to its settling time test under static deflections and that would be a hurdle for its real time applications. Furthermore, since the CNT/EPDM sensor does not have directional voltage output to tension and compression, it only could be utilized as a mono-directional force sensor such as a compressive touch sensor.

  12. Multivariable passive RFID vapor sensors: roll-to-roll fabrication on a flexible substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Burns, Andrew; Surman, Cheryl; Lee, D J; McGinniss, Edward

    2012-06-21

    We demonstrate roll-to-roll (R2R) fabrication of highly selective, battery-free radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymeric substrate. Selectivity of our developed RFID sensors is provided by measurements of their resonance impedance spectra, followed by the multivariate analysis of spectral features, and correlation of these spectral features to the concentrations of vapors of interest. The multivariate analysis of spectral features also provides the ability for the rejection of ambient interferences. As a demonstration of our R2R fabrication process, we employed polyetherurethane (PEUT) as a "classic" sensing material, extruded this sensing material as 25, 75, and 125-μm thick films, and thermally laminated the films onto RFID inlays, rapidly producing approximately 5000 vapor sensors. We further tested these RFID vapor sensors for their response selectivity toward several model vapors such as toluene, acetone, and ethanol as well as water vapor as an abundant interferent. Our RFID sensing concept features 16-bit resolution provided by the sensor reader, granting a highly desired independence from costly proprietary RFID memory chips with a low-resolution analog input. Future steps are being planned for field-testing of these sensors in numerous conditions.

  13. Polysilicon-based flexible temperature sensor for brain monitoring with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhizhen; Li, Chunyan; Hartings, Jed; Ghosh, Sthitodhi; Narayan, Raj; Ahn, Chong

    2017-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important variables in brain monitoring, since changes of focal brain temperature are closely coupled to cerebral physiology and pathophysiological phenomena in injured brain. In this work, a highly accurate temperature sensor with polysilicon thermistors has been developed on flexible polyimide for monitoring brain temperature with high spatial resolution. The temperature sensors have a response time of 1.5 s and sensitivity of  -0.0031 °C-1. Thermal hysteresis of the sensor in the physiological temperature range of 30-45 °C was found to be less than 0.1 °C. With silicon nitride as the passivation layer, the temperature sensor exhibits drift of less than 0.3 °C for 3 d in water. In vivo tests of the sensor show a low noise level of 0.025  ±  0.03 °C, and the expected transient increases in cortical temperature associated with cortical spreading depolarization. The temperature sensor developed in this work is suitable for monitoring brain temperature with the desired high sensitivity and resolution.

  14. Highly wearable galvanic skin response sensor using flexible and conductive polymer foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehoon; Kwon, Sungjun; Seo, Sangwon; Park, Kwangsuk

    2014-01-01

    Owing to advancements in daily physiological monitoring technology, diverse healthcare applications have emerged recently. The monitoring of skin conductance responses has extensive feasibility to support healthcare applications such as detecting emotion changes. In this study, we proposed a highly wearable and reliable galvanic skin response (GSR) sensor that measures the signals from the back of the user. To enhance its wearability and usability, we employed flexible conductive foam as the sensing material and designed it to be easily attachable to (and detachable from) a wide variety of clothes. We evaluated the sensing reliability of the proposed sensor by comparing its signal with a reference GSR. The average correlation between the two signals was 0.768; this is sufficiently high to validate the feasibility of the proposed sensor for reliable GSR sensing on the back.

  15. Design of a Capacitive Flexible Weighing Sensor for Vehicle WIM System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Highway Transportation and Business Trade, vehicle weigh-in-motion (WIM technology has become a key technology and trend of measuring traffic loads. In this paper, a novel capacitive flexible weighing sensor which is light weight, smaller volume and easy to carry was applied in the vehicle WIM system. The dynamic behavior of the sensor is modeled using the Maxwell-Kelvin model because the materials of the sensor are rubbers which belong to viscoelasticity. A signal processing method based on the model is presented to overcome effects of rubber mechanical properties on the dynamic weight signal. The results showed that the measurement error is less than ���±10%. All the theoretic analysis and numerical results demonstrated that appliance of this system to weigh in motion is feasible and convenient for traffic inspection.

  16. Split-Ring Resonator-Based Strain Sensor on Flexible Substrates for Glaucoma Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Gizem; Deniz Yalcinkaya, Arda; Dundar, Gunhan; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents split-ring resonator-based strain sensors designed and characterized for glaucoma detection application. The geometry of the sensor is optimized such that it can be embedded in a contact lens. Silver conductive paint is to form the sensors realized on flexible substrates made of cellulose acetate and latex rubber. The devices are excited and interrogated using a pair of monopole antennas and the characteristics of devices with different curvature profiles are obtained. The sensitivity of the device, i.e. the change in resonant frequency for a unit change in radius of curvature, on acetate film is calculated as -4.73 MHz/mm and the sensitivity of the device on latex is 33.2 MHz/mm. The results indicate that the demonstrated device is suitable for glaucoma diagnosis.

  17. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nonlinear effects of a modal domain optical fiber sensor in a vibration suppression control loop for a flexible structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, D. K.; Zvonar, G. A.; Baumann, W. T.; Delos, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system for vibration suppression of a flexible cantilevered beam. This sensor responds to strain through a mechanical attachment to the structure. Because this sensor is of the interferometric type, the output of the sensor has a sinusoidal nonlinearity. For small levels of strain, the sensor can be operated in its linear region. For large levels of strain, the detection electronics can be configured to count fringes. In both of these configurations, the sensor nonlinearity imposes some restrictions on the performance of the control system. In this paper we investigate the effects of these sensor nonlinearities on the control system, and identify the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters.

  19. Tactile Sensing for Dexterous Robotic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2000-01-01

    Robotic systems will be used as precursors to human exploration to explore the solar system and expand our knowledge of planetary surfaces. Robotic systems will also be used to build habitats and infrastructure required for human presence in space and on other planetary surfaces . Such robots will require a high level of intelligence and automation. The ability to flexibly manipulate their physical environment is one characteristic that makes humans so effective at these building and exploring tasks . The development of a generic autonomous grasp ing capability will greatly enhance the efficiency and ability of robotics to build, maintain and explore. To tele-operate a robot over vast distances of space, with long communication delays, has proven to be troublesome. Having an autonomous grasping capability that can react in real-time to disturbances or adapt to generic objects, without operator intervention, will reduce the probability of mishandled tools and samples and reduce the number of re-grasp attempts due to dropping. One aspect that separates humans from machines is a rich sensor set. We have the ability to feel objects and respond to forces and textures. The development of touch or tactile sensors for use on a robot that emulates human skin and nerves is the basis for this discussion. We will discuss the use of new piezo-electric and resistive materials that have emerged on the market with the intention of developing a touch sensitive sensor. With viable tacti le sensors we will be one step closer to developing an autonomous grasping capability.

  20. A Flexible and Highly Sensitive Pressure Sensor Based on a PDMS Foam Coated with Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rinaldi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for high performance multifunctional wearable devices is more and more pushing towards the development of novel low-cost, soft and flexible sensors with high sensitivity. In the present work, we describe the fabrication process and the properties of new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS foams loaded with multilayer graphene nanoplatelets (MLGs for application as high sensitive piezoresistive pressure sensors. The effective DC conductivity of the produced foams is measured as a function of MLG loading. The piezoresistive response of the MLG-PDMS foam-based sensor at different strain rates is assessed through quasi-static pressure tests. The results of the experimental investigations demonstrated that sensor loaded with 0.96 wt.% of MLGs is characterized by a highly repeatable pressure-dependent conductance after a few stabilization cycles and it is suitable for detecting compressive stresses as low as 10 kPa, with a sensitivity of 0.23 kPa−1, corresponding to an applied pressure of 70 kPa. Moreover, it is estimated that the sensor is able to detect pressure variations of ~1 Pa. Therefore, the new graphene-PDMS composite foam is a lightweight cost-effective material, suitable for sensing applications in the subtle or low and medium pressure ranges.

  1. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-21

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa(-1). The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.

  2. Free-standing and flexible graphene papers as disposable non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minwei; Halder, Arnab; Hou, Chengyi; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    2016-06-01

    We have explored AuNPs (13 nm) both as a catalyst and as a core for synthesizing water-dispersible and highly stable core-shell structural gold@Prussian blue (Au@PB) nanoparticles (NPs). Systematic characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) disclosed AuNPs coated uniformly by a 5 nm thick PB layer. Au@PB NPs were attached to single-layer graphene oxide (GO) to form Au@PB decorated GO sheets. The resulting hybrid material was filtered layer-by-layer into flexible and free-standing GO paper, which was further converted into conductive reduced GO (RGO)/Au@PB paper via hydrazine vapour reduction. High-resolution TEM images suggested that RGO papers are multiply sandwich-like structures functionalized with core-shell NPs. Resulting sandwich functionalized graphene papers have high conductivity, sufficient flexibility, and robust mechanical strength, which can be cut into free-standing electrodes. Such electrodes, used as non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors, were tested systematically for electrocatalytic sensing of hydrogen peroxide. The high performance was indicated by some of the key parameters, for example the linear H2O2 concentration response range (1-30 μM), the detection limit (100 nM), and the high amperometric sensitivity (5 A cm(-2) M(-1)). With the advantages of low cost and scalable production capacity, such graphene supported functional papers are of particular interest in the use as flexible disposable sensors.

  3. Heart Rate Detection During Sleep Using a Flexible RF Resonator and Injection-Locked PLL Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Choi, Soo Beom; An, Yong-Jun; Kim, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Deok Won; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2015-11-01

    Novel nonintrusive technologies for wrist pulse detection have been developed and proposed as systems for sleep monitoring using three types of radio frequency (RF) sensors. The three types of RF sensors for heart rate measurement on wrist are a flexible RF single resonator, array resonators, and an injection-locked PLL resonator sensor. To verify the performance of the new RF systems, we compared heart rates between presleep time and postsleep onset time. Heart rates of ten subjects were measured using the RF systems during sleep. All three RF devices detected heart rates at 0.2 to 1 mm distance from the skin of the wrist over clothes made of cotton fabric. The wrist pulse signals of a flexible RF single resonator were consistent with the signals obtained by a portable piezoelectric transducer as a reference. Then, we confirmed that the heart rate after sleep onset time significantly decreased compared to before sleep. In conclusion, the RF system can be utilized as a noncontact nonintrusive method for measuring heart rates during sleep.

  4. The mechanical design of a humanoid robot with flexible skin sensor for use in psychiatric therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alec; Tadesse, Yonas

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a humanoid robot is presented for ultimate use in the rehabilitation of children with mental disorders, such as autism. Creating affordable and efficient humanoids could assist the therapy in psychiatric disability by offering multimodal communication between the humanoid and humans. Yet, the humanoid development needs a seamless integration of artificial muscles, sensors, controllers and structures. We have designed a human-like robot that has 15 DOF, 580 mm tall and 925 mm arm span using a rapid prototyping system. The robot has a human-like appearance and movement. Flexible sensors around the arm and hands for safe human-robot interactions, and a two-wheel mobile platform for maneuverability are incorporated in the design. The robot has facial features for illustrating human-friendly behavior. The mechanical design of the robot and the characterization of the flexible sensors are presented. Comprehensive study on the upper body design, mobile base, actuators selection, electronics, and performance evaluation are included in this paper.

  5. Screen printable flexible conductive nanocomposite polymer with applications to wearable sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, D.; Khosla, A.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a conductive nanocomposite polymer that possesses both good conductivity and flexibility, and screen printed it onto fabric to realize wearable flexible electrodes and electronic routing. The conductive polymer consists of dispersed silver nanoparticles (90~210nm) in a screen printable plastisol polymer. The conductive polymer is conductive for weight-percentages above approximately 61 wt-% of Ag nanoparticles, and has a resistivity of 2.12×10-6 ohm·m at 70 wt-% of Ag nanoparticles. To test the screen printed conductive polymer's flexibility and its effect on conductivity, we measured the resistivity of the Ag-doped composite polymer at different bending angles (-90˚ ~ 90˚) with a 10° step angle at different wt-% of silver particles, and compared the results. We also tested washability of the screen printed conductive polymer as applied to fabric for long-term use in wearable sensors systems. We also used the screen printed Ag composite polymer to realize an example wearable system. Flexible wearable dry electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes were developed and ECG signal was measured via the electrodes. The sensing ECG electrodes (3mm diameter circle) were chloridized to form Ag/AgCl electrodes. We measured an ECG signal using a simple right-leg driven ECG circuit and observed normal ECG signals even without application of electrolyte gel.

  6. Lightweight, Superelastic, and Mechanically Flexible Graphene/Polyimide Nanocomposite Foam for Strain Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuyang; Peng, Qingyu; Ding, Yujie; Lin, Zaishan; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Ying; Xu, Fan; Li, Jianjun; Yuan, Ye; He, Xiaodong; Li, Yibin

    2015-09-22

    The creation of superelastic, flexible three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based architectures is still a great challenge due to structure collapse or significant plastic deformation. Herein, we report a facile approach of transforming the mechanically fragile reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogel into superflexible 3D architectures by introducing water-soluble polyimide (PI). The rGO/PI nanocomposites are fabricated using strategies of freeze casting and thermal annealing. The resulting monoliths exhibit low density, excellent flexibility, superelasticity with high recovery rate, and extraordinary reversible compressibility. The synergistic effect between rGO and PI endows the elastomer with desirable electrical conductivity, remarkable compression sensitivity, and excellent durable stability. The rGO/PI nanocomposites show potential applications in multifunctional strain sensors under the deformations of compression, bending, stretching, and torsion.

  7. Touch sensitive electrorheological fluid based tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Davidson, Rob; Taylor, Paul

    2005-12-01

    A tactile display is programmable device whose controlled surface is intended to be investigated by human touch. It has a great number of potential applications in the field of virtual reality and elsewhere. In this research, a 5 × 5 tactile display array including electrorheological (ER) fluid has been developed and investigated. Force responses of the tactile display array have been measured while a probe was moved across the upper surface. The purpose of this was to simulate the action of touch performed by human finger. Experimental results show that the sensed surface information could be controlled effectively by adjusting the voltage activation pattern imposed on the tactels. The performance of the tactile display is durable and repeatable. The touch sensitivity of this ER fluid based tactile display array has also been investigated in this research. The results show that it is possible to sense the touching force normal to the display's surface by monitoring the change of current passing through the ER fluid. These encouraging results are helpful for constructing a new type of tactile display based on ER fluid which can act as both sensor and actuator at the same time.

  8. A Fluidically Tunable Metasurface Absorber for Flexible Large-Scale Wireless Ethanol Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel flexible tunable metasurface absorber is proposed for large-scale remote ethanol sensor applications. The proposed metasurface absorber consists of periodic split-ring-cross resonators (SRCRs) and microfluidic channels. The SRCR patterns are inkjet-printed on paper using silver nanoparticle inks. The microfluidic channels are laser-etched on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can detect changes in the effective permittivity for different liquids. Therefore, the absorber can be used for a remote chemical sensor by detecting changes in the resonant frequencies. The performance of the proposed absorber is demonstrated with full-wave simulation and measurement results. The experimental results show the resonant frequency increases from 8.9 GHz to 10.04 GHz when the concentration of ethanol is changed from 0% to 100%. In addition, the proposed absorber shows linear frequency shift from 20% to 80% of the different concentrations of ethanol. PMID:27509498

  9. Design and Fabrication of Single-Walled Carbon Nanonet Flexible Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Kien Vu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel flexible strain sensor for real-time strain sensing. The material for strain sensing is single-walled carbon nanonets, grown using the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method, that were encapsulated between two layers of Parylene-C, with a polyimide layer as the sensing surface. All of the micro-fabrication was compatible with the standard IC process. Experimental results indicated that the gauge factor of the proposed strain sensor was larger than 4.5, approximately 2.0 times greater than those of commercial gauges. The results also demonstrated that the gauge factor is small when the growth time of SWCNNs is lengthier, and the gauge factor is large when the line width of the serpentine pattern of SWCNNs is small.

  10. A Flexible and Efficient Key Distribution Scheme for Renewable Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Ni Shen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of wireless sensor network require secure data communications, especially in a hostile environment. In order to protect the sensitive data and the sensor readings, secret keys should be used to encrypt the exchanged messages between communicating nodes. Traditional asymmetric key cryptosystems are infeasible in WSN due to its low capacity at each senor node. In this paper, we propose a new key distribution scheme for hierarchical WSNs with renewable network devices. Compared to some of the existing schemes, our key establishment methods possess the following features that are particularly beneficial to the resource-constrained large-scale WSNs: (1 robustness to the node capture attack, (2 flexibility for adding new network devices, (3 scalability in terms of storage cost, and (4 low communication overhead.

  11. Using thin-film piezoelectret to detect tactile and slip signals for restoring sensation of prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; Tian, Lan; Zheng, Yue; Huang, Jianping; Li, Guanglin

    2014-01-01

    Most of the currently available prosthetic hands do not have a proper sensation of touching and slipping. Thus it is not easy for arm amputees to grasp objects properly only with an assistance of visual feedback. In this pilot work, a sensor based on thin-film piezoelectret was used to detect the possible tactile and slip information of a prosthetic hand. The piezoelectret sensor is flexible and is able to be bended, and therefore it could be properly mounted on the surface of prosthetic finger. Our preliminary results demonstrated that both the tactile and slip information could be acquired with the same sensor unit. For a grasp without slippage, the tactile signal was usually a single large peak, whereas the slip signal was a series of vibrations in a small range. Thus these two types of signals could be easily separated based on their different characteristics. This study suggested that by using thin-film piezoelectret sensor, a primary control with involuntary feedback might be achieved for the present prosthetic hands. More studies would be required on the detailed signal processing and control strategy for the restoration of sensation function in prosthetic hands.

  12. Laser-assisted fabrication of single-layer flexible touch sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seokwoo; Park, Jong Eun; Lee, Joohyung; Yang, Minyang; Kang, Bongchul

    2016-01-01

    Single-layer flexible touch sensor that is designed for the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free, bendable, durable, multi-sensible, and single layer transparent touch sensor was developed via a low-cost and one-step laser-induced fabrication technology. To this end, an entirely novel approach involving material, device structure, and even fabrication method was adopted. Conventional metal oxides based multilayer touch structure was substituted by the single layer structure composed of integrated silver wire networks of sensors and bezel interconnections. This structure is concurrently fabricated on a glass substitutive plastic film via the laser-induced fabrication method using the low-cost organometallic/nanoparticle hybrid complex. In addition, this study addresses practical solutions to heterochromia and interference problem with a color display unit. As a result, a practical touch sensor is successfully demonstrated through resolving the heterochromia and interference problems with color display unit. This study could provide the breakthrough for early realization of wearable device. PMID:27703204

  13. Integrated pressure and temperature sensor with high immunity against external disturbance for flexible endoscope operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yusaku; Maeda, Kohei; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Takao, Hidekuni

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an integrated pressure and temperature sensor device for a flexible endoscope with long-term stability in in vivo environments was developed and demonstrated. The sensor, which is embedded in the thin wall of the disposable endoscope hood, is intended for use in endoscopic surgery. The device surface is coated with a Cr layer to prevent photoelectronic generation induced by the strong light of the endoscope. The integrated temperature sensor allows compensation for the effect of the temperature drift on a pressure signal. The fabricated device pressure resolution is 0.4 mmHg; the corresponding pressure error is 3.2 mmHg. The packaged device was used in a surgical simulation in an animal experiment. Pressure and temperature monitoring was achieved even in a pH 1 acid solution. The device enables intraluminal pressure and temperature measurements of the stomach, which facilitate the maintenance of internal stomach conditions. The applicability of the sensor was successfully demonstrated in animal experiments.

  14. Laser-assisted fabrication of single-layer flexible touch sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seokwoo; Park, Jong Eun; Lee, Joohyung; Yang, Minyang; Kang, Bongchul

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer flexible touch sensor that is designed for the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free, bendable, durable, multi-sensible, and single layer transparent touch sensor was developed via a low-cost and one-step laser-induced fabrication technology. To this end, an entirely novel approach involving material, device structure, and even fabrication method was adopted. Conventional metal oxides based multilayer touch structure was substituted by the single layer structure composed of integrated silver wire networks of sensors and bezel interconnections. This structure is concurrently fabricated on a glass substitutive plastic film via the laser-induced fabrication method using the low-cost organometallic/nanoparticle hybrid complex. In addition, this study addresses practical solutions to heterochromia and interference problem with a color display unit. As a result, a practical touch sensor is successfully demonstrated through resolving the heterochromia and interference problems with color display unit. This study could provide the breakthrough for early realization of wearable device.

  15. Improving tactile sensation in laparoscopic surgery by overcoming size restrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederer C.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic tumors appear as stiff inclusions within the surrounding soft, healthy tissue. In open surgery they are searched for by manual palpation with the gloved fingertip. However, to exploit the benefits of MIS it is mandatory to implement a substitution for the human sense of touch. Therefore, a tactile instrument has been developed with the aim of enlarging the sensing area at the tool tip once it enters the abdominal cavity through the trocar. The provision of a large sensitive surface enables the detection of nearly all sizes of tumors and decreases the time needed for the performance of this task. A prototype was manufactured by laser sintering in PA serving as a carrier for an existing flexible silicone sensor. Automated as well as manual subject palpation tests have shown that a prototypical instrument with a laterally opening lid would be a suitable device for tumor detection in laparoscopic liver surgery.

  16. Human tactile perception as a standard for artificial tactile sensing--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, J; Najarian, S

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the most important features of human skin tactile properties with special emphasis on the characteristics which are vital in the design of artificial systems. Contrary to the visual and auditory senses, the touch signal is not a well-defined quantity. As a result, the researchers of this field are still dealing with the basics of collecting the most relevant data. Following this, mimicking the sense of touch by producing artificial tactile skin is a challenging process. Although the sense of touch is widely distributed all over the human body, the tactile perception in the human hand is of great importance in terms of surgical and medical robotics applications. In this study, the role of various mechanoreceptors in the human hand, such as, RA, SA I, SA II, and PC units are discussed in relation to the stimuli like force, position, softness, and surface texture. Taking human hand as a suitable tactile model, the necessary engineering features of an artificial tactile sensor, such as, spatial and temporal resolutions, force sensitivity, and linearity, are being reviewed. In this work, we also report on the current and possible future applications of tactile sensors in various surgical procedures.

  17. Calibration of a flexible measurement system based on industrial articulated robot and structured light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nan; Wang, Kun; Xie, Zexiao; Ren, Ping

    2017-05-01

    To realize online rapid measurement for complex workpieces, a flexible measurement system based on an articulated industrial robot with a structured light sensor mounted on the end-effector is developed. A method for calibrating the system parameters is proposed in which the hand-eye transformation parameters and the robot kinematic parameters are synthesized in the calibration process. An initial hand-eye calibration is first performed using a standard sphere as the calibration target. By applying the modified complete and parametrically continuous method, we establish a synthesized kinematic model that combines the initial hand-eye transformation and distal link parameters as a whole with the sensor coordinate system as the tool frame. According to the synthesized kinematic model, an error model is constructed based on spheres' center-to-center distance errors. Consequently, the error model parameters can be identified in a calibration experiment using a three-standard-sphere target. Furthermore, the redundancy of error model parameters is eliminated to ensure the accuracy and robustness of the parameter identification. Calibration and measurement experiments are carried out based on an ER3A-C60 robot. The experimental results show that the proposed calibration method enjoys high measurement accuracy, and this efficient and flexible system is suitable for online measurement in industrial scenes.

  18. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-01

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa-1. The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present

  19. SensorKit: A Flexible and Extensible System for In-Situ Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Chang, J.; Westrich, S.; Cho, Y. H.; Gullapalli, S.; Benzel, T.; Graham, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Over the years, sensor networks technology has evolved tremendously and has great potential in environmental sensing applications. However, because sensor networks are usually designed and built by computer scientists and engineers with little input from the scientific community, the resulting technology is often complex and out of reach for most field scientists. A few sensor, and data logger vendors have released data acquisition systems that can be used with their products. Unfortunately, these are generally vendor-specific, requiring scientists with heterogeneous sensors to use multiple systems to acquire data from all their sensors. A few, more generic systems, are compatible with multiple brands. However, these often offer only limited functionality, little flexibility, and no extensibility. We built SensorKit to overcome these limitations and to accelerate the adoption of sensor networks by field scientists. Using a simplicity-through-sophistication approach, we provide scientists with a powerful tool for field data collection. SensorKit is hardware agnostic, and was built using commercial off-the-shelf components. By employing a Linux-based ultra low-power generic embedded processing platform with a variety of dataloggers (including Berkeley motes, National Instruments' Compact RIOs, as well as legacy and newer PakBus-based Campbell data loggers), we support requirements from a large number of scientists. The user interfaces are designed to be intuitive so that most scientists can deploy, configure, and operate the system without extensive training. Working in close collaboration with field scientists allowed us to better understand scientific requirements and ensure system relevancy. The requirements for data acquisition, data storage, and data communication vary significantly for each deployment. Data acquisition needs to include capabilities for different analog, digital, and other complex sensors (e.g. cameras, and robotic sensors). Moreover, the

  20. Nano-engineered flexible pH sensor for point-of-care urease detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardarinejad, A.; Maurya, D. K.; Tay, C. Y.; Marshall, B. J.; Alameh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate pH monitoring is crucial for many applications, such as, water quality monitoring, blood monitoring, chemical and biological analyses, environmental monitoring and clinical diagnostic. The most common technique for pH measurement is based on the use of conventional glass pH electrodes. Glass electrodes have several limitations, such as mechanical fragility, large size, limited shapes and high cost, making them impractical for implementation as Lab-onchips and pH sensor capsules. Various metal oxides, such as RuO2, IrO2, TiO2, SnO2, Ta2O5 and PdO have recently been proposed for the realization of pH sensing electrodes. Specifically, ruthenium oxide exhibits unique properties including thermal stability, excellent corrosion resistance, low hysteresis high sensitivity, and low resistivity. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a miniaturized ion selective electrode (ISE) based pH sensor for point-of-care urease monitoring. The sensor comprises a thin film RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode, deposited using E-beam and R.F. magnetron sputtering, in conjunction with an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance and characterization of the developed pH/urea sensors in terms of sensitivity, resolution, reversibility and hysteresis are investigated. Experimental results show a linear potential-versus-urea-concentration response for urea concentrations in the range 0 - 180 mg/ml. Experimental results demonstrate super-Nernstian slopes in the range of 64.33 mV/pH - 73.83 mV/pH for RF sputtered RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode using a 80%:20% Ar:O2 gas ratio. The RuO2 sensor exhibits stable operation and fast dynamic response, making it attractive for in vivo use, wearable and flexible biomedical sensing applications.

  1. Virtual environment tactile system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters.

  2. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  3. Fully integrated carbon nanotube composite thin film strain sensors on flexible substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Kurata, M.; Law, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Multifunctional thin film materials have opened many opportunities for novel sensing strategies for structural health monitoring. While past work has established methods of optimizing multifunctional materials to exhibit sensing properties, comparatively less work has focused on their integration into fully functional sensing systems capable of being deployed in the field. This study focuses on the advancement of a scalable fabrication process for the integration of multifunctional thin films into a fully integrated sensing system. This is achieved through the development of an optimized fabrication process that can create a broad range of sensing systems using multifunctional materials. A layer-by-layer deposited multifunctional composite consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in a polyvinyl alcohol and polysodium-4-styrene sulfonate matrix are incorporated with a lithography process to produce a fully integrated sensing system deposited on a flexible substrate. To illustrate the process, a strain sensing platform consisting of a patterned SWNT-composite thin film as a strain-sensitive element within an amplified Wheatstone bridge sensing circuit is presented. Strain sensing is selected because it presents many of the design and processing challenges that are core to patterning multifunctional thin film materials into sensing systems. Strain sensors fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate are experimentally tested under cyclic loading using standard four-point bending coupons and a partial-scale steel frame assembly under lateral loading. The study reveals the material process is highly repeatable to produce fully integrated strain sensors with linearity and sensitivity exceeding 0.99 and 5 {{V}}/{ε }, respectively. The thin film strain sensors are robust and are capable of high strain measurements beyond 3000 μ {ε }.

  4. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ∼50 and ∼120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors. PMID:24399158

  5. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhang, Dan; Shi, Zhongpan; Zhao, Tieshi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR) joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications. PMID:27529244

  6. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhi Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  7. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhang, Dan; Shi, Zhongpan; Zhao, Tieshi

    2016-08-11

    Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR) joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  8. Development of flexible plasmonic plastic sensor using nanograting textured laminating film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2017-02-01

    The work presented in this paper describes the development of a cost-effective, flexible plasmonic plastic sensor using gold-coated nanograting nanoimprinted on a laminating plastic. The fabrication of plasmonic plastic sensor involved the transfer of nanograting pattern from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer stamp to laminating plastic via thermal nanoimprint lithography, and subsequent gold film deposition. Gold-coated nanograting sample acted as a plasmonic chip, which exhibited surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mode in reflectance spectra under the white light illumination. The theoretical calculation was performed to study and analyze the excited SPR mode on the plasmonic chip. Further, the bulk refractive index sensitivity was demonstrated with respect to changing surrounding dielectric medium giving a value about 800  ±  27 nm/RIU (refractive index unit). In addition, the surface binding sensitivity upon adsorption of bovine serum albumin protein on the sensor surface was approximately 4.605 nm/(ng/mm2).We believe that our proposed low-cost plastic based plasmonic sensing device could be a potential candidate for the label-free and high-throughput screening of biological molecules.

  9. Flexible quality of service model for wireless body area sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yangzhe; Leeson, Mark S; Higgins, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    Wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs) are becoming an increasingly significant breakthrough technology for smart healthcare systems, enabling improved clinical decision-making in daily medical care. Recently, radio frequency ultra-wideband technology has developed substantially for physiological signal monitoring due to its advantages such as low-power consumption, high transmission data rate, and miniature antenna size. Applications of future ubiquitous healthcare systems offer the prospect of collecting human vital signs, early detection of abnormal medical conditions, real-time healthcare data transmission and remote telemedicine support. However, due to the technical constraints of sensor batteries, the supply of power is a major bottleneck for healthcare system design. Moreover, medium access control (MAC) needs to support reliable transmission links that allow sensors to transmit data safely and stably. In this Letter, the authors provide a flexible quality of service model for ad hoc networks that can support fast data transmission, adaptive schedule MAC control, and energy efficient ubiquitous WBASN networks. Results show that the proposed multi-hop communication ad hoc network model can balance information packet collisions and power consumption. Additionally, wireless communications link in WBASNs can effectively overcome multi-user interference and offer high transmission data rates for healthcare systems.

  10. Design and Development of a Flexible Strain Sensor for Textile Structures Based on a Conductive Polymer Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Claude Dufour; Maryline Lewandowski; Vladan Koncar; Cédric Cochrane

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a smart flexible sensor adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain deformations. The sensors are “smart†because of their capacity to adapt to the specific mechanical properties of textile structures that are lightweight, highly flexible, stretchable, elastic, etc. Because of these properties, textile structures are continuously in movement and easily deformed, even under very low stresses. It is therefore important that the integra...

  11. Learning tactile skills through curious exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo ePape

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present curiosity-driven, autonomous acquisition of tactile exploratory skills on a biomimetic robot finger equipped with an array of microelectromechanical touch sensors. Instead of building tailored algorithms for solving a specific tactile task, we employ a more general curiosity-driven reinforcement learning approach that autonomously learns a set of motor skills in absence of an explicit teacher signal. In this approach, the acquisition of skills is driven by the information content of the sensory input signals relative to a learner that aims at representing sensory inputs using fewer and fewer computational resources. We show that, from initially random exploration of its environment, the robotic system autonomously develops a small set of basic motor skills that lead to different kinds of tactile input. Next, the system learns how to exploit the learned motor skills to solve supervised texture classification tasks. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of autonomous acquisition of tactile skills on physical robotic platforms through curiosity-driven reinforcement learning, overcomes typical difficulties of engineered solutions for active tactile exploration and underactuated control, and provides a basis for studying developmental learning through intrinsic motivation in robots.

  12. Robotic Tactile Sensing Technologies and System

    CERN Document Server

    Dahiya, Ravinder S

    2013-01-01

    Future robots are expected to work closely and interact safely with real-world objects and humans alike. Sense of touch is important in this context, as it helps estimate properties such as shape, texture, hardness, material type and many more; provides action related information, such as slip detection; and helps carrying out actions such as rolling an object between fingers without dropping it. This book presents an in-depth description of the solutions available for gathering tactile data, obtaining aforementioned tactile information from the data and effectively using the same in various robotic tasks. Better integration of tactile sensors on a robot’s body is prerequisite for the effective utilization of tactile data. For this reason, the hardware, software and application related issues (and resulting trade-offs) that must be considered to make tactile sensing an effective component of robotic platforms are discussed in-depth.To this end, human touch sensing has also been explored. The design hints co...

  13. Generation of tactile maps for artificial skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon McGregor

    Full Text Available Prior research has shown that representations of retinal surfaces can be learned from the intrinsic structure of visual sensory data in neural simulations, in robots, as well as by animals. Furthermore, representations of cochlear (frequency surfaces can be learned from auditory data in neural simulations. Advances in hardware technology have allowed the development of artificial skin for robots, realising a new sensory modality which differs in important respects from vision and audition in its sensorimotor characteristics. This provides an opportunity to further investigate ordered sensory map formation using computational tools. We show that it is possible to learn representations of non-trivial tactile surfaces, which require topologically and geometrically involved three-dimensional embeddings. Our method automatically constructs a somatotopic map corresponding to the configuration of tactile sensors on a rigid body, using only intrinsic properties of the tactile data. The additional complexities involved in processing the tactile modality require the development of a novel multi-dimensional scaling algorithm. This algorithm, ANISOMAP, extends previous methods and outperforms them, producing high-quality reconstructions of tactile surfaces in both simulation and hardware tests. In addition, the reconstruction turns out to be robust to unanticipated hardware failure.

  14. Vibration Control of Manipulators with Flexible Nonprismatic Links Using Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir Bottega

    2009-01-01

    robotic manipulator using simultaneously motor torques and piezoelectric actuators. The dynamic model of the flexible manipulator is obtained in a closed form through the Lagrange equations. The control uses the motor torques for the joints tracking control and also to reduce the low-frequency vibration induced in the manipulator links. The stability of this control is guaranteed by the Lyapunov stability theory. Piezoelectric actuators and sensors are added for controlling vibrations with frequencies beyond the reach of motor torque control. The naturals frequencies are calculated by the finite element method, and the approximated eigenfunctions are interpolated by polynomials. Three eigenfunctions are used for the dynamics of the arm, while only two are used for the control. Numerical experiments on Matlab/Simulink are used to verify the efficiency of the control model.

  15. Flexible, all-organic ammonia sensor based on dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid-doped polyaniline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Messina (Italy); Arena, A.; Donato, N.; Latino, M.; Saitta, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita degli Studi di Messina (Italy); Bonavita, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Messina (Italy); Neri, G., E-mail: neri@ingegneria.unime.i [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Messina (Italy)

    2010-09-30

    A stable chlorobenzene dispersion of conducting polyaniline (PANI) has been obtained by doping emeraldine base with dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and studied by spectrophotometric measurements in the UV-vis-IR range. The electrical properties of PANI: DBSA films obtained from the above dispersion have been investigated under different temperature and relative humidity conditions. All-organic chemoresistive devices have been developed by spin-coating the PANI: DBSA dispersion on flexible substrates, and then by depositing electrodes on the top, from a carbon nanotube conducting ink. Sensing tests performed under exposition to calibrated amounts of ammonia reveal that these simple and inexpensive sensors are able to detect ammonia at room temperature in a reliable way, with a sensitivity linearly related to concentration in the range between 5 ppm and 70 ppm.

  16. Force Sensor of a Climbing Robot Derived from Its Own Flexible Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Andrés Somolinos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important design constraints of a climbing robot is its own weight. When links or legs are used as a locomotion system they tend to be composed of special lightweight materials, or four‐bars‐linkage mechanisms are designed to reduce the weight with small rigidity looses. In these cases, flexibility appears and undesirable effects, such as dynamics vibrations, must be avoided at least when the robot moves at low speeds. The knowledge of the real tip position requires the computation of its compliance or stiffness matrix and the external forces applied to the structure. Gravitational forces can be estimated, but external tip forces need to be measured. This paper proposes a strain gauge system which achieves the following tasks: (i measurement of the external tip forces, and (ii estimation of the real tip position (including flexibility effects. The main advantages of the proposed system are: (a the use of external force sensors is avoided, and (b a substantial reduction of the robot weight is achieved in comparison with other external force measurement systems. The proposed method is applied to a real symmetric climbing robot and experimental results are presented.

  17. A Flexible Sensor Technology for the Distributed Measurement of Interaction Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Munih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensor technology for the measure of the physical human-robot interaction pressure developed in the last years at Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna. The system is composed of flexible matrices of opto-electronic sensors covered by a soft silicone cover. This sensory system is completely modular and scalable, allowing one to cover areas of any sizes and shapes, and to measure different pressure ranges. In this work we present the main application areas for this technology. A first generation of the system was used to monitor human-robot interaction in upper- (NEUROExos; Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna and lower-limb (LOPES; University of Twente exoskeletons for rehabilitation. A second generation, with increased resolution and wireless connection, was used to develop a pressure-sensitive foot insole and an improved human-robot interaction measurement systems. The experimental characterization of the latter system along with its validation on three healthy subjects is presented here for the first time. A perspective on future uses and development of the technology is finally drafted.

  18. Smart piezoresistive tunnelling composite for flexible robotic sensing skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, S.; Canavese, G.; Cosiansi, F.; Gazia, R.; Fallauto, C.; Corbellini, S.; Pirola, M.; Cocuzza, M.

    2013-12-01

    A highly mechanically flexible tactile device based on a metal-elastomer composite material was prepared by an efficient and simple process. The microcasting fabrication technique, used for the preparation of a selfstanding sheet of functional material, gives the possibility of easily fabricating complex-shaped structures suitable for integration on robot surfaces for tactile sensing applications. Under the action of a compressive stress the composite material exhibits a giant piezoresistive effect, varying its electrical resistance by several orders of magnitude. This phenomenon can be tuned by changing the material composition parameters, which directly modify the sensitivity of the sensor. After a comprehensive characterization of the functional properties of the material, an 8 × 8 pressure sensor matrix with dedicated electronics was fabricated and tested.

  19. Structural damage detection using sparse sensors installation by optimization procedure based on the modal flexibility matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Hosseinzadeh, A.; Ghodrati Amiri, G.; Seyed Razzaghi, S. A.; Koo, K. Y.; Sung, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting a novel and effective method to detect and estimate structural damage by introducing an efficient objective function which is based on Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) and modal flexibility matrix. The main strategy in the proposed objective function relies on searching a geometrical correlation between two vectors. Democratic Particle Swarm Optimization (DPSO) algorithm, a modified version of original PSO approach, is used to minimize the objective function resulting in the assessment of damage in different structure types. Finally, the presented method is generalized for a condition in which a limited number of sensors are installed on the structure using Neumann Series Expansion-based Model Reduction (NSEMR) approach. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method, different damage patterns in three numerical examples of engineering structures are simulated and the proposed method is employed for damage identification. Moreover, the stability of the method is investigated by considering the effects of a number of important challenges such as effects of different locations for sensor installation, prevalent modeling errors and presence of random noises in the input data. It is followed by different comparative studies to evaluate not only the robustness of the proposed method, but also the necessity of using introduced techniques for problem solution. Finally, the applicability of the presented method in real conditions is also verified by an experimental study of a five-story shear frame on a shaking table utilizing only three sensors. All of the obtained results demonstrate that the proposed method precisely identifies damages by using only the first several modes' data, even when incomplete noisy modal data are considered as input data.

  20. Silver nanowire-embedded PDMS with a multiscale structure for a highly sensitive and robust flexible pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yunsik; Byun, Junghwan; Seong, Narkhyeon; Ha, Jewook; Kim, Hyunjong; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Taehoon; Im, Hwarim; Kim, Donghyun; Hong, Yongtaek

    2015-04-14

    The development of highly sensitive pressure sensors with a low-cost and facile fabrication technique is desirable for electronic skins and wearable sensing devices. Here a low-cost and facile fabrication strategy to obtain multiscale-structured elastomeric electrodes and a highly sensitive and robust flexible pressure sensor is presented. The principles of spontaneous buckle formation of the PDMS surface and the embedding of silver nanowires are used to fabricate the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode. By laminating the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode onto the dielectric layer/bottom electrode template, the pressure sensor can be obtained. The pressure sensor is based on the capacitive sensing mechanism and shows high sensitivity (>3.8 kPa(-1)), fast response and relaxation time (pressure sensor arrays and they can detect the spatial distribution of the applied pressure. It is also demonstrated that the fingertip pressure sensing device can sense the pressure distribution of each finger, when grabbing an object.

  1. The Slip Hypothesis: Tactile Perception and its Neuronal Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    The slip hypothesis of epicritic tactile perception interprets actively moving sensor and touched objects as a frictional system, known to lead to jerky relative movements called 'slips'. These slips depend on object geometry, forces, material properties, and environmental factors, and, thus, have the power to incorporate coding of the perceptual target, as well as perceptual strategies (sensor movement). Tactile information as transferred by slips will be encoded discontinuously in space and time, because slips sometimes engage only parts of the touching surfaces and appear as discrete and rare events in time. This discontinuity may have forced tactile systems of vibrissae and fingertips to evolve special ways to convert touch signals to a tactile percept.

  2. Sensing Senses: Tactile Feedback for the Prevention of Decubitus Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Verbunt, MNC Marcel; Bartneck, C Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers, also known as pressure sores, is a major problem in health care, in particular for patients with spinal cord injuries. These patients cannot feel the discomfort that would urge healthy people to change their posture. We describe a system that uses a sensor mat to detect problematic postures and provides tactile feedback to the user. The results of our preliminary study with healthy subjects show that the tactile feedback is a viable option to spoken feedback. We envision the...

  3. Experimental study of PDMS mechanical properties for the optimization of polymer based flexible pressure micro-sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, T. H. N.; Martincic, E.; Dufour-Gergam, E.; Joubert, P.-Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on the optimization of flexible PDMS-based normal pressure capacitive micro-sensors dedicated to wearable applications. The deformation under a normal force of PDMS thin films of thicknesses ranging from 40 μm to 10 mm is firstly experimentally studied. This study points out that for capacitive micro-sensors using bulky PDMS thin films as deformable dielectric material, the sensitivity to an applied normal load can be optimized thanks to an adequate choice of the so-called form ratio of the involved PDMS thin film. Indeed, for capacitive micro-sensors exhibiting 9 mm2 electrodes, the capacitance change under a 6 N load can be adjusted from a few percent up to over 35% according to the choice of the load-free thickness of the used PDMS film. These results have been validated thanks to electromechanical characterizations carried out on two flexible PDMS based capacitive normal pressure micro-sensor samples fabricated with two different thicknesses. The obtained results open the way to the enhanced design of PDMS based pressure sensors dedicated to wearable and medical applications. Further works will extend this study to a wider range of sensor dimensions, and using numerical modelling.

  4. Design, Fabrication, and Experimental Validation of Novel Flexible Silicon-Based Dry Sensors for Electroencephalography Signal Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Shao-Wei; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, including conventional wet and dry sensors, can cause skin irritation and user discomfort owing to the foreign material. The EEG products, especially sensors, highly prioritize the comfort level during devices wear. To overcome these drawbacks for EEG sensors, this paper designs Societe Generale de Surveillance S [Formula: see text] A [Formula: see text] (SGS)-certified, silicon-based dry-contact EEG sensors (SBDSs) for EEG signal measurements. According to the SGS testing report, SBDSs extract does not irritate skin or induce noncytotoxic effects on L929 cells according to ISO10993-5. The SBDS is also lightweight, flexible, and nonirritating to the skin, as well as capable of easily fitting to scalps without any skin preparation or use of a conductive gel. For forehead and hairy sites, EEG signals can be measured reliably with the designed SBDSs. In particular, for EEG signal measurements at hairy sites, the acicular and flexible design of SBDS can push the hair aside to achieve satisfactory scalp contact, as well as maintain low skin-electrode interface impedance. Results of this paper demonstrate that the proposed sensors perform well in the EEG measurements and are feasible for practical applications.

  5. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Popp, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Schneider, J. J.; Garth, D.; Schüttler, F.; Battenberg, G.

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al2O3) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ˜35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  6. Design and Development of a Flexible Strain Sensor for Textile Structures Based on a Conductive Polymer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Dufour

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a smart flexible sensor adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain deformations. The sensors are “smart” because of their capacity to adapt to the specific mechanical properties of textile structures that are lightweight, highly flexible, stretchable, elastic, etc. Because of these properties, textile structures are continuously in movement and easily deformed, even under very low stresses. It is therefore important that the integration of a sensor does not modify their general behavior. The material used for the sensor is based on a thermoplastic elastomer (Evoprene/carbon black nanoparticle composite, and presents general mechanical properties strongly compatible with the textile substrate. Two preparation techniques are investigated: the conventional melt-mixing process, and the solvent process which is found to be more adapted for this particular application. The preparation procedure is fully described, namely the optimization of the process in terms of filler concentration in which the percolation theory aspects have to be considered. The sensor is then integrated on a thin, lightweight Nylon fabric, and the electromechanical characterization is performed to demonstrate the adaptability and the correct functioning of the sensor as a strain gauge on the fabric. A normalized relative resistance is defined in order to characterize the electrical response of the sensor. Finally, the influence of environmental factors, such as temperature and atmospheric humidity, on the sensor performance is investigated. The results show that the sensor’s electrical resistance is particularly affected by humidity. This behavior is discussed in terms of the sensitivity of the carbon black filler particles to the presence of water.

  7. LEFT: A Latency and Energy Efficient Flexible TDMA Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Gajjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes latency and energy efficient flexible TDMA (LEFT, a medium access control (MAC combined with routing protocol for data gathering from number of source nodes to a master station (MS in a wireless sensor network (WSN. TDMA provides fairness, collision-free communication and reduces idle listening, which saves network energy. Data latency is reduced by allocating same transmission slots to nodes falling out of interference range of each other. Unlike a conventional TDMA, LEFT provides flexibility through slot seizing, wherein a non-holder of a slot can use slot when holder does not have data to send. This increases channel utilization and adaption to dynamic traffic patterns of WSN applications. Further, a node on a multi-hop path towards MS decides to participate in routing based on (i its location with respect to MS, to forward data in correct direction, (ii its current status of residual energy, to uniformly distribute energy across network, (iii its transit traffic load, to prevent local congestion, (iv its communication link quality, to guarantee reliable data delivery. This decision requires simple comparisons against thresholds, and thus is very simple to implement on energy, storage and computationally constrained nodes. LEFT also encompasses techniques to cater to link and node breakdowns. Experimental analysis of LEFT; Advertisement-based TDMA; Data gathering MAC; Energy Efficient Fast Forwarding and Cross layer MAC protocols using TI's EZ430-RF2500T nodes shows that LEFT is 65% more energy efficient compared to Cross layer MAC. Data latency of LEFT is 27 % less, delivery ratio is 17 % more and goodput is 11 % more compared to Cross layer MAC.

  8. Flexible Pressure Sensor Based on PVDF Nanocomposites Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide-Titania Hybrid Nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Al-Saygh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel flexible nanocomposite pressure sensor with a tensile strength of about 47 MPa is fabricated in this work. Nanolayers of titanium dioxide (titania nanolayers, TNL synthesized by hydrothermal method are used to reinforce the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF by simple solution mixing. A hybrid composite is prepared by incorporating the TNL (2.5 wt % with reduced graphene oxide (rGO (2.5 wt % synthesized by improved graphene oxide synthesis to form a PVDF/rGO-TNL composite. A comparison between PVDF, PVDF/rGO (5 wt %, PVDF/TNL (5 wt % and PVDF/rGO-TNL (total additives 5 wt % samples are analyzed for their sensing, thermal and dielectric characteristics. The new shape of additives (with sharp morphology, good interaction and well distributed hybrid additives in the matrix increased the sensitivity by 333.46% at 5 kPa, 200.7% at 10.7 kPa and 246.7% at 17.6 kPa compared to the individual PVDF composite of TNL, confirming its possible application in fabricating low cost and light weight pressure sensing devices and electronic devices with reduced quantity of metal oxides. Increase in the β crystallinity percentage and removal of α phase for PVDF was detected for the hybrid composite and linked to the improvement in the mechanical properties. Tensile strength for the hybrid composite (46.91 MPa was 115% higher than that of the neat polymer matrix. Improvement in the wettability and less roughness in the hybrid composites were observed, which can prevent fouling, a major disadvantage in many sensor applications.

  9. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kojima

    Full Text Available A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH and poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min. We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG.

  10. 基于PVDF的欠驱动多指手滑触觉硬件系统%Underactuated multi-fingered hand with tactile sensor hardware system based on PVDF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘孝业; 胡挺; 刘凤臣; 高大牛

    2012-01-01

    In order to solve the inaccurate problem of a traditional fruit-vegetable harvesting underactuated multi-fingered hand grasping force, a underactuated multi-fingered hand with tactile system was presented based on polyvinylidene fluorine (PVDF) piezoelectric film technology. The system consists of signal acquisition and signal processing,there were respectively designed that tactile sensor,a charge amplifier circuit,a low pass filtering,a industrial frequency trapped wave,voltage amplifier and so on. The experimental results show that fruits and vegetables be unwounded grabbed by the underactuated multi-fingers hand,and has the wide application prospect.%为解决传统果蔬采摘欠驱动多指手抓取力控制精度不高的问题,提出了一种基于聚偏二氟乙烯(PVDF)压电薄膜技术的新型欠驱动多指手滑触觉系统,该系统由信号采集和信号处理两个模块组成;分别设计了滑触觉传感器,电荷放大、低通滤波、工频限波、电压放大等电路,并进行了捏取和抓取实验.实验结果表明,该系统能较好地控制多指手的抓取精度,实现无损伤抓取,且具有广阔的应用前景.

  11. Measuring Complexity and Predictability of Time Series with Flexible Multiscale Entropy for Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Yang, Chen; Wan, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Bo; Xiong, Naixue

    2017-04-06

    Measurement of time series complexity and predictability is sometimes the cornerstone for proposing solutions to topology and congestion control problems in sensor networks. As a method of measuring time series complexity and predictability, multiscale entropy (MSE) has been widely applied in many fields. However, sample entropy, which is the fundamental component of MSE, measures the similarity of two subsequences of a time series with either zero or one, but without in-between values, which causes sudden changes of entropy values even if the time series embraces small changes. This problem becomes especially severe when the length of time series is getting short. For solving such the problem, we propose flexible multiscale entropy (FMSE), which introduces a novel similarity function measuring the similarity of two subsequences with full-range values from zero to one, and thus increases the reliability and stability of measuring time series complexity. The proposed method is evaluated on both synthetic and real time series, including white noise, 1/f noise and real vibration signals. The evaluation results demonstrate that FMSE has a significant improvement in reliability and stability of measuring complexity of time series, especially when the length of time series is short, compared to MSE and composite multiscale entropy (CMSE). The proposed method FMSE is capable of improving the performance of time series analysis based topology and traffic congestion control techniques.

  12. Flexible strain sensors with high performance based on metallic glass thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, H. J.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Zhu, X. S.; Hu, Y. C.; Huang, Y. F.; Meng, S.; Gu, L.; Liu, Y. H.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-09-01

    Searching strain sensitive materials for electronic skin is of crucial significance because of the restrictions of current materials such as poor electrical conductivity, large energy consumption, complex manufacturing process, and high cost. Here, we report a flexible strain sensor based on the Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 metallic glass thin film which we name metallic glass skin. The metallic glass skin, synthesized by ion beam deposition, exhibits piezoresistance effects with a gauge factor of around 2.86, a large detectable strain range (˜1% or 180° bending angle), and good conductivity. Compared to other e-skin materials, the temperature coefficient of resistance of the metallic glass skin is extremely low (9.04 × 10-6 K-1), which is essential for the reduction in thermal drift. In addition, the metallic glass skin exhibits distinct antibacterial behavior desired for medical applications, also excellent reproducibility and repeatability (over 1000 times), nearly perfect linearity, low manufacturing cost, and negligible energy consumption, all of which are required for electronic skin for practical applications.

  13. Experimental Parametric Identification of a Flexible Beam Using Piezoelectric Sensors and Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Saraygord Afshari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental system identification of a flexible beam based on sweep square excitation is studied. For the purpose of nonparametric identification, an excitation signal is conducted to evaluate the frequency response of the system. The experiment is designed to excite the beam using a piezo actuator, in a way to raise the chance of exciting first three natural modes. In order to find the best linear representation of the real system, two different identification methods are applied. First, autoregressive moving average eXogenous method is employed to identify the transfer function of the beam. Then, the identification is carried out using the subspace identification method to obtain the state space model. A comparison is made between different orders of prediction and the best chosen models of the two identification methods are compared with each other to select the most accurate linear system. Furthermore, as the identified model has to fulfill the controllability and observability conditions, the amenable system is achieved after some order reductions. Two reduction methods called minimum truncation and maximum DC gains matching are utilized to find the most effective reduced order. The outcome of this study will bring in the best linear representation of the beam coupled with piezoelectric sensors/actuators.

  14. Magnetic Nanocomposite Cilia Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-07-19

    Recent progress in the development of artificial skin concepts is a result of the increased demand for providing environment perception such as touch and flow sensing to robots, prosthetics and surgical tools. Tactile sensors are the essential components of artificial skins and attracted considerable attention that led to the development of different technologies for mimicking the complex sense of touch in humans. This dissertation work is devoted to the development of a bioinspired tactile sensing technology that imitates the extremely sensitive hair-like cilia receptors found in nature. The artificial cilia are fabricated from permanent magnetic, biocompatible and highly elastic nanocomposite material, and integrated on a giant magneto-impedance magnetic sensor to measure the stray field. A force that bends the cilia changes the stray field and is therefore detected with the magnetic sensor, providing high performance in terms of sensitivity, power consumption and versatility. The nanocomposite is made of Fe nanowires (NWs) incorporated into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fe NWs have a high remanent magnetization, due the shape anisotropy; thus, they are acting as permanent nano-magnets. This allows remote device operation and avoids the need for a magnetic field to magnetize the NWs, benefiting miniaturization and the possible range of applications. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposite can be easily tuned by modifying the NWs concentration or by aligning the NWs to define a magnetic anisotropy. Tactile sensors are realized on flexible and rigid substrates that can detect flow, vertical and shear forces statically and dynamically, with a high resolution and wide operating range. The advantage to operate the sensors in liquids and air has been utilized to measure flows in different fluids in a microfluidic channel. Various dynamic studies were conducted with the tactile sensor demonstrating the detection of moving objects or the texture of objects. Overall

  15. Light-controlling, flexible and transparent ethanol gas sensor based on ZnO nanoparticles for wearable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z Q; Yao, J D; Wang, B; Yang, G W

    2015-06-16

    In recent years, owing to the significant applications of health monitoring, wearable electronic devices such as smart watches, smart glass and wearable cameras have been growing rapidly. Gas sensor is an important part of wearable electronic devices for detecting pollutant, toxic, and combustible gases. However, in order to apply to wearable electronic devices, the gas sensor needs flexible, transparent, and working at room temperature, which are not available for traditional gas sensors. Here, we for the first time fabricate a light-controlling, flexible, transparent, and working at room-temperature ethanol gas sensor by using commercial ZnO nanoparticles. The fabricated sensor not only exhibits fast and excellent photoresponse, but also shows high sensing response to ethanol under UV irradiation. Meanwhile, its transmittance exceeds 62% in the visible spectral range, and the sensing performance keeps the same even bent it at a curvature angle of 90(o). Additionally, using commercial ZnO nanoparticles provides a facile and low-cost route to fabricate wearable electronic devices.

  16. A Novel Flexible Room Temperature Ethanol Gas Sensor Based on SnO2 Doped Poly-Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel flexible room temperature ethanol gas sensor was fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. The polyimide (PI substrate-based sensor was formed by depositing a mixture of SnO2 nanopowder and poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDAC on as-patterned interdigitated electrodes. PDDAC acted both as the binder, promoting the adhesion between SnO2 and the flexible PI substrate, and the dopant. We found that the response of SnO2-PDDAC sensor is significantly higher than that of SnO2 alone, indicating that the doping with PDDAC effectively improved the sensor performance. The SnO2-PDDAC sensor has a detection limit of 10 ppm at room temperature and shows good selectivity to ethanol, making it very suitable for monitoring drunken driving. The microstructures of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR, and the sensing mechanism is also discussed in detail.

  17. Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, Saba; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.3390/s110908626

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects' shapes and, more specifically, the objects' surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 \\times 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Na\\"ive Bayes (NB), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) were implemented and compared ...

  18. A resistive-type sensor based on flexible multi-walled carbon nanotubes and polyacrylic acid composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongah; Cho, Daehwan; Jeong, Youngjin

    2013-09-01

    A humidity sensor film was fabricated by loading high numbers of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer matrix containing poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) to enhance the MWCNT dispersion. Cross-section images demonstrate that the MWCNTs distribute evenly throughout the matrix. The fabrication processes and sensing mechanisms of the film are explained to investigate the flexible properties and humidity-sensing characteristics of the film. The film loaded with 33 wt% MWCNTs is much more flexible than an overhead projector (OHP) film and shows similar electrical resistance to pure CNT Bucky paper. The sensor film composed of 1:2 MWCNTs:PAA is highly sensitive to humidity (0.069/%RH) and displays good linearity (0.99).

  19. Synthesis of CdS nanorod arrays and their applications in flexible piezo-driven active H2S sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penglei; Deng, Ping; Nie, Yuxin; Zhao, Yayu; Zhang, Yan; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2014-02-21

    A flexible piezo-driven active H2S sensor has been fabricated from CdS nanorod arrays. By coupling the piezoelectric and gas sensing properties of CdS nanorods, the piezoelectric output generated by CdS nanorod arrays acts not only as a power source, but also as a response signal to H2S. Under externally applied compressive force, the piezoelectric output of CdS nanorod arrays is very sensitive to H2S. Upon exposure to 600 ppm H2S, the piezoelectric output of the device decreased from 0.32 V (in air) to 0.12 V. Such a flexible device can be driven by the tiny mechanical energy in our living environment, such as human finger pinching. Our research can stimulate a research trend on designing new material systems and device structures for high-performance piezo-driven active gas sensors.

  20. Towards the Tactile Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, Dávid; Gulyás, András; Fitzek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    5G communication networks enable the steering and control of Internet of Things and therefore require extreme low latency communication referred to as the tactile Internet. In this paper we show that the massive use of network coding throughout the network significantly improves latency and reduce...... the frequency of packet re-transmission, so an architecture built around network coding may be a feasible road towards realizing the tactile internet vision. Our contribution is threefold: (i) we show how network coding improves latency and reduces packet re-transmission with respect to other coding schemes...

  1. Spatial patterns in tactile perception: is there a tactile field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Patrick; Giovagnoli, Giulia

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies of tactile spatial perception focussed either on a single point of stimulation, on local patterns within a single skin region such as the fingertip, on tactile motion, or on active touch. It remains unclear whether we should speak of a tactile field, analogous to the visual field, and supporting spatial relations between stimulus locations. Here we investigate this question by studying perception of large-scale tactile spatial patterns on the hand, arm and back. Experiment 1 investigated the relation between perception of tactile patterns and the identification of subsets of those patterns. The results suggest that perception of tactile spatial patterns is based on representing the spatial relations between locations of individual stimuli. Experiment 2 investigated the spatial and temporal organising principles underlying these relations. Experiment 3 showed that tactile pattern perception makes reference to structural representations of the body, such as body parts separated by joints. Experiment 4 found that precision of pattern perception is poorer for tactile patterns that extend across the midline, compared to unilateral patterns. Overall, the results suggest that the human sense of touch involves a tactile field, analogous to the visual field. The tactile field supports computation of spatial relations between individual stimulus locations, and thus underlies tactile pattern perception.

  2. A large-area, flexible pressure sensor matrix with organic field-effect transistors for artificial skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Takao; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Iba, Shingo; Kato, Yusaku; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Takayasu

    2004-07-01

    It is now widely accepted that skin sensitivity will be very important for future robots used by humans in daily life for housekeeping and entertainment purposes. Despite this fact, relatively little progress has been made in the field of pressure recognition compared to the areas of sight and voice recognition, mainly because good artificial "electronic skin" with a large area and mechanical flexibility is not yet available. The fabrication of a sensitive skin consisting of thousands of pressure sensors would require a flexible switching matrix that cannot be realized with present silicon-based electronics. Organic field-effect transistors can substitute for such conventional electronics because organic circuits are inherently flexible and potentially ultralow in cost even for a large area. Thus, integration of organic transistors and rubber pressure sensors, both of which can be produced by low-cost processing technology such as large-area printing technology, will provide an ideal solution to realize a practical artificial skin, whose feasibility has been demonstrated in this paper. Pressure images have been taken by flexible active matrix drivers with organic transistors whose mobility reaches as high as 1.4 cm2/V·s. The device is electrically functional even when it is wrapped around a cylindrical bar with a 2-mm radius.

  3. The Art of Tactile Sensing: A State of Art Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royson Donate D’Souza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes about tactile sensors, its transduction methods, state-of-art and various application areas of these sensors. Here we are taking in consideration the sense of touch. This provides the robots with tactile perception. In most of the robotic application the sense of touch is very helpful. The ability of robots to touch and feel the object, grasping an object by controlled pressure, mainly to categorize the surface textures. Tactile sensors can measure the force been applied on an area of touch. The data which is interpreted from the sensor is accumulated by the array of coordinated group of touch sensors. The sense of touch in human is distributed in four kinds by tactile receptors: Meissner corpuscles, the Merkel cells, the Rufina endings, and the Pacinian corpuscles. There has many innovations done to mimic the behaviour of human touch. The contact forces are measured by the sensor and this data is used to determine the manipulation of the robot.

  4. Highly Sensitive NO2 Detection and DMP Sensing at Room Temperature using Flexible SWNT Thick Film Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available   Low cost; easy to fabricate and flexible single wall carbon nanotubes thick film resistor (SWNT-TFR for detailed study of NO2 detection is reported. SWNT-TFR was fabricated by vacuum filtration technique on flexible polycarbonate membrane. SWNT-TFR sensor shows selective response to NO2. The response increases from 1.47 per cent to 17.34 per cent with increasing the NO2 concentration from 0.2 ppm to 10 ppm, respectively. Different energy sources, IR, thermal and UV were explored for achieving fast recovery of the SWNT-TFR sensor. The results showed that the gas sensor gives immediate and fast recovery in the presence of UVC light. The calculated detection limit is less than 764 ppt for NO2. We are also presenting sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP as a simulant of sarin. SWNT-TFR gives repeatable response of ~2.7 per cent for 500 ppm of DMMP. This work suggests the possibility to utilise SWNTs-TFR as NO2 sensors for air-quality monitoring. 

  5. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Wu, Chin-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Lin, Tse-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC) testing. PMID:28025507

  6. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chern Chiou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC, polyethylene oxide (PEO, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC testing.

  7. A Flexible Optical pH Sensor Based on Polysulfone Membranes Coated with pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Thabit, Nedal; Umar, Yunusa; Ratemi, Elaref; Ahmad, Ayman; Ahmad Abuilaiwi, Faraj

    2016-06-27

    A new optical pH sensor based on polysulfone (PSU) and polyaniline (PANI) was developed. A transparent and flexible PSU membrane was employed as a support. The electrically conductive and pH-responsive PANI was deposited onto the membrane surface by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization (COP). The absorption spectra of the PANI-coated PSU membranes exhibited sensitivity to pH changes in the range of 4-12, which allowed for designing a dual wavelength pH optical sensor. The performance of the membranes was assessed by measuring their response starting from high pH and going down to low pH, and vice versa. It was found that it is necessary to precondition the sensor layers before each measurement due to the slight hysteresis observed during forward and backward pH titrations. PSU membranes with polyaniline coating thicknesses in the range of ≈100-200 nm exhibited fast response times of sensor was characterized by a sigmoidal response (R² = 0.997) which allows for pH determination over a wide dynamic range. All membranes were stable for a period of more than six months when stored in 1 M HCl solution. The reproducibility of the fabricated optical pH sensors was found to be sensor was tested and the obtained pH values were compared with the results obtained using a pH meter device.

  8. Tactile Navigation Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    The use of the tactile modality is not common in Human Computer Interaction. However, there may be good reasons to do so. For example in situations in which the visual sense is restricted (e.g., in virtual environments lacking a wide field of view, or for the visually handicapped persons), or overlo

  9. Design and fabrication of a flexible MEMS-based electro-mechanical sensor array for breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hardik J.; Park, Kihan; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2015-07-01

    The use of flexible micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based devices provides a unique opportunity in bio-medical robotics such as the characterization of normal and malignant tissues. This paper reports on the design and development of a flexible MEMS-based sensor array integrating mechanical and electrical sensors on the same platform to enable the study of the change in electro-mechanical properties of benign and cancerous breast tissues. In this work, we present the analysis of the electrical characterization of the tissue specimens and also demonstrate the feasibility of using the sensor for the mechanical characterization of tissue specimens. Eight strain gauges acting as mechanical sensors were fabricated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conducting polymer on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as the substrate material. Eight electrical sensors were fabricated using SU-8 pillars on gold (Au) pads which were patterned on the strain gauges separated by a thin insulator (SiO2 1.0 μm). These pillars were coated with gold to make them conducting. The electro-mechanical sensors are integrated on the same substrate. The sensor array covers a 180 μm  ×  180 μm area and the size of the complete device is 20 mm in diameter. The diameter of each breast tissue core used in the present study was 1 mm and the thickness was 8 μm. The region of interest was 200 μm  ×  200 μm. A microindentation technique was used to characterize the mechanical properties of the breast tissues. The sensor is integrated with conducting SU-8 pillars to study the electrical property of the tissue. Through electro-mechanical characterization studies using this MEMS-based sensor, we were able to measure the accuracy of the fabricated device and ascertain the difference between benign and cancers breast tissue specimens.

  10. High-performance, mechanically flexible, and vertically integrated 3D carbon nanotube and InGaZnO complementary circuits with a temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Wataru; Harada, Shingo; Ishida, Shohei; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-08-26

    A vertically integrated inorganic-based flexible complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with a temperature sensor with a high inverter gain of ≈50 and a low power consumption of process. In addition, the negligible influence of the mechanical flexibility on the performance of the CMOS inverter and the temperature dependence of the CMOS inverter characteristics are discussed.

  11. Printing of CNT/silicone rubber for a wearable flexible stretch sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Agee S.; Giffney, Tim; Lee, Jim; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Aw, Kean C.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a simple printing method for a highly resilient stretch sensor. The stretch sensors, based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/silicon rubber (Ecoflex® 00-30) polymer nanocomposites, were printed on silicon rubber (SR) substrate. The sensors exhibit good hysteresis with high linearity and small drift. Due to the biocompatibility of SR and is very soft, strong and able to be stretched many times its original size without tearing and will rebound to its original form without distortion, the proposed stretch sensor is suitable for many biomedical and wearable sensors application.

  12. Tactile Signing with One-Handed Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous; rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especially in turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language, tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Language focused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partially blind or…

  13. Expandable Fully Compliant Capacitive Tactile Sensing Array:Design and Experiment%可拼接式全柔性电容触觉阵列传感器设计与实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄英; 郭小辉; 刘家俊; 马阳洋; 刘彩霞; 刘平; 田合雷

    2015-01-01

    针对现有机器人触觉传感器存在可穿戴性与可移植性差、不易维护及扩展等缺点,提出了一种可用于机器人仿生皮肤的全柔性电容式触觉传感器,并设计成12×12正方形触觉传感阵列和正六边形触觉模块两种可拼接式阵列结构。以炭黑填充硅橡胶作为电容式触觉传感器的弹性电介质,聚酰亚胺为柔性基体,有机硅导电银胶和金属膜为上下两柔性极板,共同构成压力敏感单元。介绍了电容式柔性触觉传感器的工作原理、结构设计及两种与之对应的电容触觉阵列无线数据采集与处理系统。实验结果表明,该全柔性电容式触觉阵列传感器及信号提取系统具有良好的稳定性与灵敏度,可用作人工皮肤实现全触觉感知。%Current robot tactile sensors have shortcomings such as poor wearability and portability, as well as being unpleasant to be maintained and expanded. An expandable, fully compliant capacitive tactile sensor is presented to counteract these shortcomings, which can be used as bio-inspired skin. The structure is designed with two kinds of expandable arrays, the 12×12 square tactile sensing array and the hexagon tactile model. The pressure-sensitive unit is constituted of carbon black filled silicone rubber uniformly as the elastic dielectric of the capacitive sensor, polyimide film as the flexible substrate, as well as silver conductive adhesive and metal film as the flexible parallel-plates of capacitor. In addition, the working principle and the structure design of the capacitive flexible tactile sensor are introduced, and also the wireless signal acquisition and processing systems of two corresponding capacitive arrays are proposed. The experiment results indicate that the fully compliant capacitive sensing array and capacitive signal extraction system has good stability and sensitivity to be used as artificial skin to achieve tactile perception.

  14. A flexible, transparent and high-performance gas sensor based on layer-materials for wearable technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Yao, Jiandong; Wang, Bing; Yang, Guowei

    2017-10-01

    Gas sensors play a vital role among a wide range of practical applications. Recently, propelled by the development of layered materials, gas sensors have gained much progress. However, the high operation temperature has restricted their further application. Herein, via a facile pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method, we demonstrate a flexible, transparent and high-performance gas sensor made of highly-crystalline indium selenide (In2Se3) film. Under UV–vis-NIR light or even solar energy activation, the constructed gas sensors exhibit superior properties for detecting acetylene (C2H2) gas at room temperature. We attribute these properties to the photo-induced charger transfer mechanism upon C2H2 molecule adsorption. Moreover, no apparent degradation in the device properties is observed even after 100 bending cycles. In addition, we can also fabricate this device on rigid substrates, which is also capable to detect gas molecules at room temperature. These results unambiguously distinguish In2Se3 as a new candidate for future application in monitoring C2H2 gas at room temperature and open up new opportunities for developing next generation full-spectrum activated gas sensors.

  15. Metal oxide nanostructures synthesized on flexible and solid substrates and used for catalysts, UV detectors, and chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, Magnus; Sadollahkhani, Azar; Echresh, Ahmad; Nur, Omer

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the visibility of the low temperature chemical synthesis for developing device quality material grown on flexible and solid substrates. Both colorimetric sensors and UV photodetectors will be presented. The colorimetric sensors developed on paper were demonstrated for heavy metal detection, in particular for detecting copper ions in aqueous solutions. The demonstrated colorimetric copper ion sensors developed here are based on ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs). These sensors demonstrated an excellent low detection limit of less than 1 ppm of copper ions. Further the colorimetric sensors operate efficiently in a wide pH range between 4 and 11, and even in turbulent water. The CSNPs were additionally used as efficient photocatalytic degradation element and were found to be more efficient than pure ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Also p-NiO/n-ZnO thin film/nanorods pn junctions were synthesized by a two-step synthesis process and were found to act as efficient UV photodetectors. Additionally we show the effect of the morphology of different CuO nanostructures on the efficiency of photo catalytic degradation of Congo red organic dye.

  16. Ferroelectric hybrid fibers to develop flexible sensors for shape sensing of smart textiles and soft condensed matter bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Tutu; Lusiola, Tony; Clemens, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Piezoelectric fibers are widely used in composites for actuator and sensor applications due to its ability to convert electrical pulses into mechanical vibrations and transform the returned mechanical vibrations back into electrical signal. They are beneficial for the fabrication of composites especially 1–3 composites, active fiber composites (unidirectional axially aligned PZT fibers sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes and embedded in a polymer matrix) etc, with potential applications in medical imaging, structural health monitoring, energy harvesting, vibration and noise control. However, due to the brittle nature of PZT fibers, maximum strain is limited to 0.2% and cannot be integrated into flexible sensor applications. In this contribution, a new approach to develop flexible ferroelectric hybrid fibers for soft body shape sensing is investigated. Piezoelectric particles incorporated in a polymer matrix and extruded as fiber, 0–3 composite in fibrous form is studied. Commercially obtained calcined PZT and calcined BaTiO3 powders were used in the unsintered form to obtain flexible soft condensed matter ferroelectric hybrid fibers. The extruded fibers were subjected to investigation for their electromechanical behavior as a function of electric field. The hybrid fibers reached 10% of the maximum polarization of their sintered counterpart.

  17. A biomimetic tactile sensing system based on polyvinylidene fluoride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Tian, Hongying; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hongshuai; Wang, Peiyuan; Qian, Chenghui; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensing material due to its outstanding properties such as biocompatibility, high thermal stability, good chemical resistance, high piezo-, pyro- and ferro-electric properties. This paper reports on the design, test, and analysis of a biomimetic tactile sensor based on PVDF film. This sensor consists of a PVDF film with aluminum electrodes, a pair of insulating layers, and a "handprint" friction layer with a copper foil. It is designed for easy fabrication and high reliability in outputting signals. In bionics, the fingerprint of the glabrous skin plays an important role during object handling. Therefore, in order to enhance friction and to provide better manipulation, the ridges of the fingertips were introduced into the design of the proposed tactile sensor. And, a basic experimental study on the selection of the high sensitivity fingerprint type for the biomimetic sensor was performed. In addition, we proposed a texture distinguish experiment to verify the sensor sensitivity. The experiment's results show that the novel biomimetic sensor is effective in discriminating object surface characteristics. Furthermore, an efficient visual application program (LabVIEW) and a quantitative evaluation method were proposed for the verification of the biomimetic sensor. The proposed tactile sensor shows great potential for contact force and slip measurements.

  18. Tailoring percolating conductive networks of natural rubber composites for flexible strain sensors via a cellulose nanocrystal templated assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuman; Zhang, Xinxing; Wu, Xiaodong; Lu, Canhui

    2016-01-21

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) just above the percolation threshold exhibit a unique strain-reversible electric response upon application of tensile strain, which can be used to prepare strain sensors. However, it is difficult to balance the electric conductivity which is fundamental to a stable output signal and the strain sensing sensitivity due to the relatively dense conductive pathways of the traditional CPCs. Constructing a "brittle" but effective conductive network structure in CPCs is the essential foundation of a desirable sensing material. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that highly flexible, stretchable, sensitive, and reversible strain sensors can be fabricated by a facile latex assembly approach, in which nontoxic, sustainable and biodegradable cellulose nanocrystals played a key role in tailoring the percolating network of conductive natural rubber (NR)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites. The resulting nanocomposites with a continuous 3D conductive structure exhibited a very low electrical conductivity percolation threshold (4-fold lower than that of the conventional NR/CNT composites), high resistivity and sensitivity (gauge factor ≈ 43.5) and meanwhile good reproducibility of up to 100% strain. The proposed materials and principles in this study open up a novel practical approach to design high performance flexible sensors for a broad range of multifunctional applications.

  19. Tactile device utilizing a single magnetorheological sponge: experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soomin; Kim, Pyunghwa; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In the field of medicine, several new areas have been currently introduced such as robot-assisted surgery. However, the major drawback of these systems is that there is no tactile communication between doctors and surgical sites. When the tactile system is brought up, telemedicine including telerobotic surgery can be enhanced much more than now. In this study, a new tactile device is designed using a single magnetorhological (MR) sponge cell to realize the sensation of human organs. MR fluids and an open celled polyurethane foam are used to propose the MR sponge cell. The viscous and elastic sensational behaviors of human organs are realized by the MR sponge cell. Before developing the tactile device, tactile sensation according to touch of human fingers are quantified in advance. The finger is then treated as a reduced beam bundle model (BBM) in which the fingertip is comprised of an elastic beam virtually. Under the reduced BBM, when people want to sense an object, the fingertip is investigated by pushing and sliding. Accordingly, while several magnitudes of magnetic fields are applied to the tactile device, normal and tangential reaction forces and bending moment are measured by 6-axis force/torque sensor instead of the fingertip. These measured data are used to compare with soft tissues. It is demonstrated that the proposed MR sponge cell can realize any part of the organ based on the obtained data.

  20. Tactile Instrument for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-30

    of cat sensory development (from Turner and Bateson , 1988).............................14 Figure 12: Helmet mounted tactile display (from Morag, 1987...Matthews and Gregory , 1999; Braithwaite, Groh, and Alvarez, 1997). The cost of spatial disorientation mishaps also includes mission failure, the...3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Conception Gestation Birth Figure 11: Ontology of cat sensory development (from Turner and Bateson , 1988). 3

  1. An EGaIn-based flexible piezoresistive shear and normal force sensor with hysteresis analysis in normal force direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaomei; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Zheng, Yongping; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a flexible piezoresistive shear and normal force sensor based on eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) with fabrication and testing results, which includes further study on the hysteresis analysis in the normal force direction. By using EGaIn as a gauge material, it can detect force on a flexible and stretchable substrate without breaking the gauge wires. However, the liquid-metal gauge wire needs to be packaged and protected in an elastomeric substrate, which creates hysteresis on the sensed resistance with respect to the change of applied force. This paper shows measurement results in static force and also under different speeds of loading force cycles. The relationship between the applied normal force and hysteresis of signal was observed, mainly owing to larger deformation and slower recovering time of the elastomeric substrate that defines the shape of the liquid-metal gauge wire for resistance measurement.

  2. Tactile perception during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Roberta; Inuggi, Alberto; Vargas, Claudia D; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Jacono, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that tactile perception becomes less acute during movement to optimize motor control and to prevent an overload of afferent information generated during action. This empirical phenomenon, known as "tactile gating effect," has been associated with mechanisms of sensory feedback prediction. However, less attention has been given to the tactile attenuation effect during the observation of an action. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how the observation of a goal-directed action influences tactile perception as during overt action. In a first experiment, we recorded vocal reaction times (RTs) of participants to tactile stimulations during the observation of a reach-to-grasp action. The stimulations were delivered on different body parts that could be either congruent or incongruent with the observed effector (the right hand and the right leg, respectively). The tactile stimulation was contrasted with a no body-related stimulation (an auditory beep). We found increased RTs for tactile congruent stimuli compared to both tactile incongruent and auditory stimuli. This effect was reported only during the observation of the reaching phase, whereas RTs were not modulated during the grasping phase. A tactile two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task was then conducted in order to quantify the changes in tactile sensitivity during the observation of the same goal-directed actions. In agreement with the first experiment, the tactile perceived intensity was reduced only during the reaching phase. These results suggest that tactile processing during action observation relies on a process similar to that occurring during action execution.

  3. Categorical perception of tactile distance

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, F. L. C.; Longo, M. R.; Bremner, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased ...

  4. Low-temperature and solution-processed indium tin oxide films and their applications in flexible transparent capacitive pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jian; Ye, Zhizhen [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Sujie; Guo, Xiaojun [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai (China); Wang, Nana [Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergistic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials SICAM, Nanjing (China); Qi, Hang [Zhejiang University, Center for Chemistry of High-Performance and Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, Hangzhou (China); Jin, Yizheng [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Center for Chemistry of High-Performance and Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    It is of great interest to fabricate indium tin oxide (ITO) films by solution-based techniques at low temperatures. Here, we combined the use of colloidal ITO nanoflowers synthesized by the strategy of limited ligand protection and oxygen plasma treatment which effectively remove the surface ligands of ITO nanocrystals to meet this goal. These efforts led to high-quality ITO films with resistivity as low as 2.33 x 10{sup -2} Ωcm, which is the best result for solution-processed ITO nanocrystal films deposited at temperatures lower than 200 C. The annealing-free processing allowed us to deposit ITO nanoflower films onto plastic substrates and apply them in flexible capacitive pressure sensors. The single-pixel device showed decent sensitivity and reproducibility, and the arrayed sensors exhibited good spatial resolution. (orig.)

  5. Force control in the absence of visual and tactile feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Abbink, D.A.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Motor control tasks like stance or object handling require sensory feedback from proprioception, vision and touch. The distinction between tactile and proprioceptive sensors is not frequently made in dynamic motor control tasks, and if so, mostly based on signal latency. We previously found that

  6. Flexible Thick-Film Electrochemical Sensors: Impact of Mechanical Bending and Stress on the Electrochemical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaying; Cizek, Karel; Long, Brenton; McAferty, Kenyon; Campbell, Casey G.; Allee, David R.; Vogt, Bryan D.; La Belle, Jeff; Wang, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the mechanical bending, rolling and crimping of flexible screen-printed electrodes upon their electrical properties and electrochemical behavior has been elucidated. Three different flexible plastic substrates, Mylar, polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), and Kapton, have been tested in connection to the printing of graphite ink working electrodes. Our data indicate that flexible printed electrodes can be bent to extremely small radii of curvature and still function well, despite a marginal increase the electrical resistance. Below critical radii of curvature of ~8 mm, full recovery of the electrical resistance occurs upon strain release. The electrochemical response is maintained for sub-mm bending radii and a 180° pinch of the electrode does not lead to device failure. The electrodes appear to be resistant to repeated bending. Such capabilities are demonstrated using model compounds, including ferrocyanide, trinitrotoluene (TNT) and nitronaphthalene (NN). These printed electrodes hold great promise for widespread applications requiring flexible, yet robust non-planar sensing devices. PMID:20160861

  7. Transparent biocompatible sensor patches for touch sensitive prosthetic limbs

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-12-26

    The paper presents the fabrication of transparent, flexible sensor patches developed using a casting technique with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as substrate and a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and PDMS as interdigital electrodes. The electrodes act as strain sensitive capacitor. The prototypes were used as touch sensitive sensors attached to the limbs. Experiments results show the sensitivity of the patches towards tactile sensing. The results are very promising and can play a key role in the development of a cost efficient sensing system attached to prosthetic limbs.

  8. Integrating Flexible Sensor and Virtual Self-Organizing DC Grid Model With Cloud Computing for Blood Leakage Detection During Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Tzan; Jong, Tai-Lang; Li, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2017-08-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious complications during hemodialysis. From the hemodialysis survey reports, these life-threatening events occur to attract nephrology nurses and patients themselves. When the venous needle and blood line are disconnected, it takes only a few minutes for an adult patient to lose over 40% of his / her blood, which is a sufficient amount of blood loss to cause the patient to die. Therefore, we propose integrating a flexible sensor and self-organizing algorithm to design a cloud computing-based warning device for blood leakage detection. The flexible sensor is fabricated via a screen-printing technique using metallic materials on a soft substrate in an array configuration. The self-organizing algorithm constructs a virtual direct current grid-based alarm unit in an embedded system. This warning device is employed to identify blood leakage levels via a wireless network and cloud computing. It has been validated experimentally, and the experimental results suggest specifications for its commercial designs. The proposed model can also be implemented in an embedded system.

  9. A Novel Wearable Electronic Nose for Healthcare Based on Flexible Printed Chemical Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panida Lorwongtragool

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities.

  10. A Novel Wearable Electronic Nose for Healthcare Based on Flexible Printed Chemical Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorwongtragool, Panida; Sowade, Enrico; Watthanawisuth, Natthapol; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2014-01-01

    A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities. PMID:25340447

  11. Inkjet-printed dissolved oxygen and pH sensors on flexible plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, A.; Zea, M.; Sowade, E.; Villa, R.; Ramon, E.; Baumann, R. R.; Gabriel, G.

    2017-06-01

    There are a broad range of applications such as analytical sensors, biosensing and medical applications that require the monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH using sensitive, stable, compact and low cost sensors. Here we develop full inkjet printing sensors to measure DO and pH. They have been fabricated using commercially available gold and platinum inks in plastic substrates. The inks are specially designed formulation which allows their sintering at temperatures as low as 150 and 190 °C for Au and Pt respectively. This is a key point in the development of low-cost sensors made on plastic and paper substrates. These sensors integrate in a single platform all the basic elements for pH and DO recording, allowing the measures without any external electrode. The DO is directly measured with a gold working electrode, and the pH sensors is achieved after electrodepositing iridium oxide film over platinum working electrode. The printed electrodes for DO sensing exhibits excellent linearity between 0 and 8 mg L _ 1 range, with correlation factors greater than 0.99, obtaining low limits of detection, 0.17 mgL _ 1 and a sensitivity of 0.06 A(mgL) _ 1. IrOx pH sensors exhibit a super-Nernstian response in sensitivity repeatedly and reversibly between 65 mV/pH in the pH range of 3 to 10. This work demonstrates that these sensors are suitable for the determination of DO and pH and provide a cost-effective solution for future electrochemical monitoring systems.

  12. Flexible DCP interface. [signal conditioning system for use with Kansas environmental sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemasu, E. T. (Principal Investigator); Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system must supply the sensors and signal conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform (DCP). A universal signal conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  13. Sensing senses: tactile feedback for the prevention of decubitus ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbunt, Marcel; Bartneck, Christoph

    2010-09-01

    Decubitus ulcers, also known as pressure sores, is a major problem in health care, in particular for patients with spinal cord injuries. These patients cannot feel the discomfort that would urge healthy people to change their posture. We describe a system that uses a sensor mat to detect problematic postures and provides tactile feedback to the user. The results of our preliminary study with healthy subjects show that the tactile feedback is a viable option to spoken feedback. We envision the system being used for rehabilitation games, but also for everyday Decubitus ulcers prevention.

  14. Alcohol Recognition by Flexible, Transparent and Highly Sensitive Graphene-Based Thin-Film Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2017-06-22

    Chemical sensors detect a variety of chemicals across numerous fields, such as automobile, aerospace, safety, indoor air quality, environmental control, food, industrial production and medicine. We successfully assemble an alcohol-sensing device comprising a thin-film sensor made of graphene nanosheets (GNs) and bacterial cellulose nanofibers (BCNs). We show that the GN/BCN sensor has a high selectivity to ethanol by distinguishing liquid-phase or vapor-phase ethanol (C2H6O) from water (H2O) intelligently with accurate transformation into electrical signals in devices. The BCN component of the film amplifies the ethanol sensitivity of the film, whereby the GN/BCN sensor has 12400% sensitivity for vapor-phase ethanol compared to the pure GN sensor, which has only 21% sensitivity. Finally, GN/BCN sensors demonstrate fast response/recovery times and a wide range of alcohol detection (10-100%). The superior sensing ability of GN/BCN compared to GNs alone is due to the improved wettability of BCNs and the ionization of liquids. We prove a facile, green, low-cost route for the assembly of ethanol-sensing devices with potential for vast application.

  15. Tactile display for virtual 3D shape rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Mansutti, Alessandro; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel system for the simultaneous visual and tactile rendering of product shapes which allows designers to simultaneously touch and see new product shapes during the conceptual phase of product development. This system offers important advantages, including potential cost and time savings, compared with the standard product design process in which digital 3D models and physical prototypes are often repeatedly modified until an optimal design is achieved. The system consists of a tactile display that is able to represent, within a real environment, the shape of a product. Designers can explore the rendered surface by touching curves lying on the product shape, selecting those curves that can be considered style features and evaluating their aesthetic quality. In order to physically represent these selected curves, a flexible surface is modeled by means of servo-actuated modules controlling a physical deforming strip. The tactile display is designed so as to be portable, low cost, modular,...

  16. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  17. Highly sensitive and multifunctional tactile sensor using free-standing ZnO/PVDF thin film with graphene electrodes for pressure and temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James S; Shin, Keun-Young; Cheong, Oug Jae; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-01-20

    We demonstrate an 80-μm-thick film (which is around 15% of the thickness of the human epidermis), which is a highly sensitive hybrid functional gauge sensor, and was fabricated from poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and ZnO nanostructures with graphene electrodes. Using this film, we were able to simultaneously measure pressure and temperature in real time. The pressure was monitored from the change in the electrical resistance via the piezoresistance of the material, and the temperature was inferred based on the recovery time of the signal. Our thin film system enabled us to detect changes in pressure as small as 10 Pa which is pressure detection limit was 10(3)-fold lower than the minimum level required for artificial skin, and to detect temperatures in the range 20-120 °C.

  18. Fuzzy fast terminal sliding mode vibration control of a two-connected flexible plate using laser sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Si-ma

    2016-10-01

    A kind of non-contact vibration measurement method for a two-connected flexible piezoelectric plate using laser sensors is proposed. Decoupling of the bending and torsional vibration on measurement and driving control is carried out via using two laser displacement sensors and piezoelectric actuators. The fuzzy fast terminal sliding mode controller (FFTSMC) is investigated to suppress both the larger and the smaller amplitude vibrations quickly. In order to alleviate the chattering phenomenon and enhance the control effect, the fuzzy logic adaptive algorithm is used to adjust the switching control gain for softening the signum function adaptively. To verify the non-contact measurement method and the designed controller, the experimental setup is built up. Experiments on active vibration control using the designed FFTSMC are conducted, compared with the classical proportional derivative (PD) control algorithm. The experimental identification results demonstrate that the laser displacement sensors can detect the low-frequency bending and torsional vibration effectively, after using the decoupling method. Furthermore, the designed FFTSMC can suppress both bending and torsional vibration more quickly than the designed PD controller owing to the adjustment of the switching control gains and the softening factors, especially for the small amplitude residual vibrations.

  19. Self-powered pH sensor based on a flexible organic-inorganic hybrid composite nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Soyoon, Shin; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2014-08-27

    In this study, we developed an innovative, flexible, organic-inorganic hybrid composite nanogenerator, which was used to drive a self-powered microwire-based pH sensor. The hybrid composite nanogenerator was fabricated using ZnO nanowire and piezoelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride), through a simple, inexpensive solution-casting technique. The fabricated hybrid composite nanogenerator delivered a maximum open-circuit voltage of 6.9 V and a short-circuit current of 0.96 μA, with an output power of 6.624 μW under uniaxial compression. This high-performance, electric poling free composite nanogenerator opens up the possibility of industrial-scale fabrication. The hybrid nanogenerator demonstrated its ability to drive five green LEDs simultaneously, without using an energy-storage device. Additionally, we constructed a self-powered pH sensor, using a ZnO microwire powered with our hybrid nanogenerator. The output voltage varied according to changes in the pH level. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a hybrid nanogenerator as a self-powered device that can be extended for use as a biosensor for environmental monitoring and/or as a smart, wearable, vibration sensor in future applications.

  20. Photogrammetric Verification of Fiber Optic Shape Sensors on Flexible Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason P.; Rogge, Matthew D.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-core fiber (MCF) optic shape sensing offers the possibility of providing in-flight shape measurements of highly flexible aerospace structures and control surfaces for such purposes as gust load alleviation, flutter suppression, general flight control and structural health monitoring. Photogrammetric measurements of surface mounted MCF shape sensing cable can be used to quantify the MCF installation path and verify measurement methods.

  1. Extremely robust and conformable capacitive pressure sensors based on flexible polyurethane foams and stretchable metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeparre, H.; Watson, D.; Lacour, S. P.

    2013-11-01

    Microfabricated capacitive sensors prepared with elastomeric foam dielectric films and stretchable metallic electrodes display robustness to extreme conditions including stretching and tissue-like folding and autoclaving. The open cellular structure of the elastomeric foam leads to significant increase of the capacitance upon compression of the dielectric membrane. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted locally with the foam density to detect normal pressure in the 1 kPa to 100 kPa range. Such pressure transducers will find applications in interfaces between the body and support surfaces such as mattresses, joysticks or prosthetic sockets, in artificial skins and wearable robotics.

  2. Research progress of flexible sensor for smart textiles%用于智能纺织品的柔性传感器研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳丽; 刘茜; 刘玮

    2015-01-01

    Sensors are the core parts of smart textiles,especially for flexible sensors. According to different operating principles,five kinds of flexible sensors applied to smart textiles are presented and measurement principles,materials and structures,combining ways with textile materials and specific application are also discussed respectively. Meanwhile,existing defects of various flexible sensors are analyzed. Finally,developing direction of flexible sensor in the future is prospected.%传感器是智能纺织品实现智能化的核心部分,其中柔性传感器发挥着极为重要的作用。以传感器的工作原理为分类依据,分别从测量原理、制作材料及结构、传感器与纺织材料的结合方式、应用现状各方面介绍了五类常用于智能纺织品的柔性传感器,并分析了各自存在的缺点,对未来柔性传感器的发展方向进行了展望。

  3. A Study on Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors for Vibration Control of Flexible Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-23

    design successful stabilizing control laws. Once again, the nearly co-located sensor/actuator system makes it possible to build a stabilizing set of... stabilizing control laws used in this thesis, in combination with optimal performance requirements 36 RBZRBZNCZB 1. Newman, Scott M., Active Damping Control of

  4. Evaluation of a flexible force sensor for measurement of helmet foam impact performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouckama, Ryan; Pearsall, David J

    2011-03-15

    The association between translational head acceleration and concussion remains unclear and provides a weak predictive measure for this type of injury; thus, alternative methods of helmet evaluation are warranted. Recent finite element analysis studies suggest that better estimates of concussion risk can be obtained when regional parameters of the cranium, brain and surrounding tissues are included. Lacking, however, are empirical data at the head-helmet interface with regards to contact area and force. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate a system to capture the impact force distribution of helmet foams. Thirteen Flexiforce(®) sensors were arranged in a 5 × 5 cm array, secured to a load cell. Three densities of foam were repeatedly impacted with 5 J of energy during ambient (20°C) and cold (-25°C) conditions. RMS error, calculated relative to the global force registered by the load cell, was Flexiforce(®) sensors. RMS error was 5% of the measured range for the global force estimated by the sensor array. Load distribution measurement revealed significant differences between repeated impacts of cold temperature foams for which acceleration results were non-significant. The sensor array, covering only 36% of the total area, possessed sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to capture dynamic load distribution patterns. Implementation of this force mapping system is not limited to helmet testing. Indeed it may be adopted to assess other body regions vulnerable to contact injuries (e.g., chest, hip and shin protectors).

  5. Tactile feedback to the palm using arbitrarily shaped DEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mößinger, Holger; Haus, Henry; Kauer, Michaela; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2014-03-01

    Tactile stimulation enhances user experience and efficiency in human machine interaction by providing information via another sensory channel to the human brain. DEA as tactile interfaces have been in the focus of research in recent years. Examples are (vibro-) tactile keyboards or Braille displays. These applications of DEA focus mainly on interfacing with the user's fingers or fingertips only - demonstrating the high spatial resolution achievable with DEA. Besides providing a high resolution, the flexibility of DEA also allows designing free form surfaces equipped with single actuators or actuator matrices which can be fitted to the surface of the human skin. The actuators can then be used to provide tactile stimuli to different areas of the body, not to the fingertips only. Utilizing and demonstrating this flexibility we designed a free form DEA pad shaped to fit into the inside of the human palm. This pad consists of four single actuators which can provide e.g. directional information such as left, right, up and down. To demonstrate the value of such free form actuators we manufactured a PC-mouse using 3d printing processes. The actuator pad is mounted on the back of the mouse, resting against the palm while operating it. Software on the PC allows control of the vibration patterns displayed by the actuators. This allows helping the user by raising attention to certain directions or by discriminating between different modes like "pick" or "manipulate". Results of first tests of the device show an improved user experience while operating the PC mouse.

  6. RCTS: A flexible environment for sensor integration and control of robot systems; the distributed processing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, R.; Mack, B.; Bayoumi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Most robot systems lack a suitable hardware and software environment for the efficient research of new control and sensing schemes. Typically, engineers and researchers need to be experts in control, sensing, programming, communication and robotics in order to implement, integrate and test new ideas in a robot system. In order to reduce this time, the Robot Controller Test Station (RCTS) has been developed. It uses a modular hardware and software architecture allowing easy physical and functional reconfiguration of a robot. This is accomplished by emphasizing four major design goals: flexibility, portability, ease of use, and ease of modification. An enhanced distributed processing version of RCTS is described. It features an expanded and more flexible communication system design. Distributed processing results in the availability of more local computing power and retains the low cost of microprocessors. A large number of possible communication, control and sensing schemes can therefore be easily introduced and tested, using the same basic software structure.

  7. Bristle-sensors--low-cost flexible passive dry EEG electrodes for neurofeedback and BCI applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozea, Cristian; Voinescu, Catalin D; Fazli, Siamac

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new, low-cost dry electrode for EEG that is made of flexible metal-coated polymer bristles. We examine various standard EEG paradigms, such as capturing occipital alpha rhythms, testing for event-related potentials in an auditory oddball paradigm and performing a sensory motor rhythm-based event-related (de-) synchronization paradigm to validate the performance of the novel electrodes in terms of signal quality. Our findings suggest that the dry electrodes that we developed result in high-quality EEG recordings and are thus suitable for a wide range of EEG studies and BCI applications. Furthermore, due to the flexibility of the novel electrodes, greater comfort is achieved in some subjects, this being essential for long-term use.

  8. Presentation of Various Tactile Sensations Using Micro-Needle Electrotactile Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Mayuko; Kitamura, Norihide; Tanaka, Kohei; Miki, Norihisa

    2016-01-01

    Tactile displays provoke tactile sensations by artificially stimulating tactile receptors. While many types of tactile displays have been developed, electrotactile displays that exploit electric stimulation can be designed to be thin, light, flexible and thus, wearable. However, the high voltages required to stimulate tactile receptors and limited varieties of possible sensations pose problems. In our previous work, we developed an electrotactile display using a micro-needle electrode array that can drastically reduce the required voltage by penetrating through the high-impedance stratum corneum painlessly, but displaying various tactile sensations was still a challenge. In this work, we demonstrate presentation of tactile sensation of different roughness to the subjects, which is enabled by the arrangement of the electrodes; the needle electrodes are on the fingertip and the ground electrode is on the fingernail. With this arrangement, the display can stimulate the tactile receptors that are located not only in the shallow regions of the finger but also those in the deep regions. It was experimentally revealed that the required voltage was further reduced compared to previous devices and that the roughness presented by the display was controlled by the pulse frequency and the switching time, or the stimulation flow rate. The proposed electrotactile display is readily applicable as a new wearable haptic device for advanced information communication technology.

  9. Texture- and deformability-based surface recognition by tactile image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Pal, Monalisa; Tibarewala, D N; Konar, Amit; Pal, Kunal

    2016-08-01

    Deformability and texture are two unique object characteristics which are essential for appropriate surface recognition by tactile exploration. Tactile sensation is required to be incorporated in artificial arms for rehabilitative and other human-computer interface applications to achieve efficient and human-like manoeuvring. To accomplish the same, surface recognition by tactile data analysis is one of the prerequisites. The aim of this work is to develop effective technique for identification of various surfaces based on deformability and texture by analysing tactile images which are obtained during dynamic exploration of the item by artificial arms whose gripper is fitted with tactile sensors. Tactile data have been acquired, while human beings as well as a robot hand fitted with tactile sensors explored the objects. The tactile images are pre-processed, and relevant features are extracted from the tactile images. These features are provided as input to the variants of support vector machine (SVM), linear discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour (kNN) for classification. Based on deformability, six household surfaces are recognized from their corresponding tactile images. Moreover, based on texture five surfaces of daily use are classified. The method adopted in the former two cases has also been applied for deformability- and texture-based recognition of four biomembranes, i.e. membranes prepared from biomaterials which can be used for various applications such as drug delivery and implants. Linear SVM performed best for recognizing surface deformability with an accuracy of 83 % in 82.60 ms, whereas kNN classifier recognizes surfaces of daily use having different textures with an accuracy of 89 % in 54.25 ms and SVM with radial basis function kernel recognizes biomembranes with an accuracy of 78 % in 53.35 ms. The classifiers are observed to generalize well on the unseen test datasets with very high performance to achieve efficient material

  10. Tactile score a knowledge media for tactile sense

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with one of the most novel advances in natural computing, namely, in the field of tactile sense analysis. Massage, which provides relaxation and stimulation for human beings, is analyzed in this book for the first time by encoding the motions and tactile senses involved. The target audience is not limited to researchers who are interested in natural computing but also includes those working in ergonomic design, biomedical engineering, Kansei engineering, and cognitive science.

  11. A flexible multifunctional sensor based on carbon nanotube/polyurethane composite

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodian, Petr; Říha, Pavel; Benlikaya, Ruhan; Svoboda, Petr; Petráš, David

    2013-01-01

    A sensor was made of a polymer composite composed of electrically-conductive carbon nanotubes embedded in elastic polyurethane. The composite was prepared by using a polyurethane filter membrane, enmeshing it and melding together with carbon nanotubes. Testing has shown that the composite can be elongated as much as 400 % during which the electrical resistance is increased 270 times. The composite is also sensitive to compression and to organic solvent vapors. These properties indicat...

  12. Synthesis of indium oxide cubic crystals by modified hydrothermal route for application in room temperature flexible ethanol sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetha, M., E-mail: seetha.phy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Kancheepuram Dt 603 203 (India); Meena, P. [Department of Physics, PSGR Krishnammal College for Women, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com [DRDO-BU Centre for Life Sciences, Bharathiar University Campus, Coimbatore (India); Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 014 (India); Masuda, Yoshitake [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Senthil, K. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Suwon Campus), Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time HMT is used in the preparation of indium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HMT itself acts as base for the precursor and results in cubic indium hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified hydrothermal route used for the preparation of cubic indium oxide crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As a new approach a composite film synthesized with prepared indium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film showed good response to ethanol vapours with quick response and recovery times. - Abstract: Indium oxide cubic crystals were prepared by using hexamethylenetetramine and indium chloride without the addition of any structure directing agents. The chemical route followed in the present work was a modified hydrothermal synthesis. The average crystallite size of the prepared cubes was found to be 40 nm. A blue emission at 418 nm was observed at room temperature when the sample was excited with a 380 nm Xenon lamp. This emission due to oxygen vacancies made the material suitable for gas sensing applications. The synthesized material was made as a composite film with polyvinyl alcohol which was more flexible than the films prepared on glass substrates. This flexible film was used as a sensing element and tested with ethanol vapours at room temperature. The film showed fast response as well as recovery to ethanol vapours with a sensor response of about 1.4 for 100 ppm of the gas.

  13. Adaptive Robust Sliding Mode Vibration Control of a Flexible Beam Using Piezoceramic Sensor and Actuator: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo Lin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of an adaptive robust sliding mode control scheme based on the Lyapunov’s direct method for active vibration control of a flexible beam using PZT (lead zirconate titanate sensor and actuator. PZT, a type of piezoceramic material, has the advantages of high reliability, high bandwidth, and solid state actuation and is adopted here in forms of surface-bond patches for vibration control. Two adaptive robust sliding mode controllers for vibration suppression are designed: one uses a discontinuous bang-bang robust compensator and the other uses a smooth compensator with a hyperbolic tangent function. Both controllers guarantee asymptotic stability, as proved by the Lyapunov’s direct method. Experimental results verified the effectiveness and the robustness of both adaptive sliding mode controllers. However, from the experimental results, the bang-bang robust compensator causes small-magnitude chattering because of the discontinuous switching actions. With the smooth compensator, vibration is quickly suppressed and no chattering is induced. Furthermore, the robustness of the controllers is successfully demonstrated with ensured effectiveness in vibration control when masses are added to the flexible beam.

  14. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  15. Force Sensor of a Climbing Robot Derived from Its Own Flexible Structure

    OpenAIRE

    José Andrés Somolinos; Amable López; Rafael Morales; Carlos Morón

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important design constraints of a climbing robot is its own weight. When links or legs are used as a locomotion system they tend to be composed of special lightweight materials, or four‐bars‐linkage mechanisms are designed to reduce the weight with small rigidity looses. In these cases, flexibility appears and undesirable effects, such as dynamics vibrations, must be avoided at least when the robot moves at low speeds. The knowledge of the real tip position requires the comput...

  16. Tactile Data Entry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on our successful Phase I Tactile Data Entry program, Barron Associates proposes development of a Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system to permit...

  17. The Effect of Flexible Pavement Mechanics on the Accuracy of Axle Load Sensors in Vehicle Weigh-in-Motion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnos, Piotr; Rys, Dawid

    2017-09-07

    Weigh-in-Motion systems are tools to prevent road pavements from the adverse phenomena of vehicle overloading. However, the effectiveness of these systems can be significantly increased by improving weighing accuracy, which is now insufficient for direct enforcement of overloaded vehicles. Field tests show that the accuracy of Weigh-in-Motion axle load sensors installed in the flexible (asphalt) pavements depends on pavement temperature and vehicle speeds. Although this is a known phenomenon, it has not been explained yet. The aim of our study is to fill this gap in the knowledge. The explanation of this phenomena which is presented in the paper is based on pavement/sensors mechanics and the application of the multilayer elastic half-space theory. We show that differences in the distribution of vertical and horizontal stresses in the pavement structure are the cause of vehicle weight measurement errors. These studies are important in terms of Weigh-in-Motion systems for direct enforcement and will help to improve the weighing results accuracy.

  18. Bodily Illusions Modulate Tactile Perception

    OpenAIRE

    De Vignemont, Frédérique; H. Ehrsson, Henrik; Haggard, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Touch differs from other exteroceptive senses in that the body itself forms part of the tactile percept. Interactions between proprioception and touch provide a powerful way to investigate the implicit body representation underlying touch. Here, we demonstrate that an intrinsic primary quality of a tactile object, for example its size, is directly affected by the perceived size of the body part touching it. We elicited proprioceptive illusions that the left index finger was either elongating ...

  19. Tactile Stimulation and Consumer Response.

    OpenAIRE

    Hornik, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Tactile behavior is a basic communication form as well as an expression of interpersonal involvement. This article presents three studies offering evidence for the positive role of casual interpersonal touch on consumer behavior. More specifically, it provides initial support for the view that tactile stimulation in various consumer behavior situations enhances the positive feeling for and evaluation of both the external stimuli and the touching source. Further, customers touched by a request...

  20. A CMOS-compatible large-scale monolithic integration of heterogeneous multi-sensors on flexible silicon for IoT applications

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2017-02-07

    We report CMOS technology enabled fabrication and system level integration of flexible bulk silicon (100) based multi-sensors platform which can simultaneously sense pressure, temperature, strain and humidity under various physical deformations. We also show an advanced wearable version for body vital monitoring which can enable advanced healthcare for IoT applications.

  1. Flexible room-temperature formaldehyde sensors based on rGO film and rGo/MoS2 hybrid film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Wang, Jing; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Xia, Yi; Li, Weiwei; Xiang, Lan; Li, Zhemin; Xu, Shiwei; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2017-08-01

    Gas sensors based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films and rGO/MoS2 hybrid films were fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate substrates by a simple self-assembly method, which yielded flexible devices for detection of formaldehyde (HCHO) at room temperature. The sensing test results indicated that the rGO and rGO/MoS2 sensors were highly sensitive and fully recoverable to a ppm-level of HCHO. The bending and fatigue test results revealed that the sensors were also mechanically robust, durable and effective for long-term use. The rGO/MoS2 sensors showed higher sensitivities than rGO sensors, which was attributed to the enhanced HCHO adsorption and electron transfer mediated by MoS2. Furthermore, two kinds of MoS2 nanosheets were prepared by either hydrothermal synthesis or chemical exfoliation and were compared for their detection of HCHO, which revealed that the hydrothermally produced MoS2 nanosheets with rich defects led to enhanced sensitivity of the rGO/MoS2 sensors. Moreover, these fabricated flexible sensors can be applied for the HCHO detection in food packaging.

  2. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-17

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated electrodes to make sensor prototypes. The interdigitated electrodes were patterned on the substrate with a laser cutter. Characterization of the prototypes was done to determine their operating frequency followed by experimentation. The prototypes have been used as a tactile sensor showing promising results for using these patches in applications with contact pressures considerably lesser than normal human contact pressure.

  3. Ultrasensitive nanostructure sensor arrays on flexible substrates for multiplexed and simultaneous electrochemical detection of a panel of cardiac biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Chaudhry, Shajee; Anguiano, Jonathan; Prasad, Shalini

    2017-03-15

    Multiplexed detection of protein biomarkers offers new opportunities for early diagnosis and efficient treatment of complex diseases. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has the highest mortality risk in USA and Europe with 15-20 million cases being reported annually. Cardiac Troponins (T and I) are well established protein biomarkers associated with heart muscle damage and point-of-care monitoring of both these two biomarkers has significant benefits on patient care. A flexible disposable electrochemical biosensor device comprising of vertically oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures was developed for rapid and simultaneous screening of cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI) and cardiac-Troponin-T (cTnT) in a point-of-care sensor format. The biosensors were designed by selective hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures onto the working electrodes of polyimide printed circuit board platforms, resulting in the generation of high density nanostructure ZnO arrays based electrodes. The size, density and surface terminations of the nanostructures were leveraged towards achieving surface confinement of the target cTnT and cTnI molecules on to the electrode surface. Multiplexing and simultaneous detection was achieved through sensor platform design comprising of arrays of Troponin functionalized ZnO nanostructure electrodes. The sensitivity and specificity of the biosensor was characterized using two types of electrochemical techniques; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky analysis on the same sensor platform to demonstrate multi-configurable modes. Limit of detection of 1pg/mL in human serum was achieved for both cTnI and cTnT. Cross reactivity analysis showed the selectivity of detecting cTnT and cTnI in human serum with wide dynamic range.

  4. Soft pneumatic actuator skin with piezoelectric sensors for vibrotactile feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Arun Sonar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest wearable technologies demand more intuitive and sophisticated interfaces for communication, sensing, and feedback closer to the body. Evidently, such interfaces require flexibility and conformity without losing their functionality even on rigid surfaces. Although there has been various research efforts in creating tactile feedback to improve various haptic interfaces and master-slave manipulators, we are yet to see a comprehensive device that can both supply vibratory actuation and tactile sensing. This paper describes a soft pneumatic actuator (SPA based, SPA-skin prototype that allows bidirectional tactile information transfer to facilitate simpler and responsive wearable interface. We describe the design and fabrication of a 1.4 mm-thick vibratory SPA - skin that is integrated with piezoelectric sensors. We examine in detail the mechanical performance compared to the SPA model and the sensitivity of the sensors for the application in vibrotactile feedback. Experimental findings show that this ultra-thin SPA and the unique integration process of the discrete lead zirconate titanate (PZT based piezoelectric sensors achieve high resolution of soft contact sensing as well as accurate control on vibrotactile feedback by closing the control loop.

  5. Contralateral tactile masking between forearms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-03-01

    Masking effects have been demonstrated in which tactile sensitivity is affected when one touch is close to another on the body surface. Such effects are likely a result of local lateral inhibitory circuits that sharpen the spatial tuning of a given tactile receptor. Mutually inhibitory pathways have also been demonstrated between cortical tactile maps of the two halves of the body. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations. Here, we measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on this contralateral masking effect. Tactile sensitivity was measured on one forearm, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to the opposite arm. Results were compared to sensitivity while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the right shoulder. Sensitivity on the forearm was reduced by over 3 dB when the arms were touching and by 0.52 dB when they were held parallel. The masking effect depended on the position of the masking stimulus. Its effectiveness fell off by 1 STD when the stimulus was 29 % of arm length from the corresponding contralateral point. This long-range inhibitory effect in the tactile system suggests a surprisingly intimate relationship between the two sides of the body.

  6. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  7. Decentralized harmonic active vibration control of a flexible plate using piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Matthieu; Micheau, Philippe; Berry, Alain

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated decentralized active control of periodic panel vibration using multiple pairs combining PZT actuators and PVDF sensors distributed on the panel. By contrast with centralized MIMO controllers used to actively control the vibrations or the sound radiation of extended structures, decentralized control using independent local control loops only requires identification of the diagonal terms in the plant matrix. However, it is difficult to a priori predict the global stability of such decentralized control. In this study, the general situation of noncollocated actuator-sensor pairs was considered. Frequency domain gradient and Newton-Raphson adaptation of decentralized control were analyzed, both in terms of performance and stability conditions. The stability conditions are especially derived in terms of the adaptation coefficient and a control effort weighting coefficient. Simulations and experimental results are presented in the case of a simply supported panel with four PZT-PVDF pairs distributed on it. Decentralized vibration control is shown to be highly dependent on the frequency, but can be as effective as a fully centralized control even when the plant matrix is not diagonal-dominant or is not strictly positive real (not dissipative).

  8. Evaluation of Circle Diameter by Distributed Tactile Information in Active Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active touch with voluntary movement on the surface of an object is important for human to obtain the local and detailed features on it. In addition, the active touch is considered to enhance the human spatial resolution. In order to improve dexterity performance of multifinger robotic hands, it is necessary to study an active touch method for robotic hands. In this paper, first, we define four requirements of a tactile sensor for active touch and design a distributed tactile sensor model, which can measure a distribution of compressive deformation. Second, we suggest a measurement process with the sensor model, a synthesis method of distributed deformations. In the experiments, a five-finger robotic hand with tactile sensors traces on the surface of cylindrical objects and evaluates the diameters. We confirm that the hand can obtain more information of the diameters by tracing the finger.

  9. On the placement of actuators and sensors for flexible structures with closely spaced modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzed the fundamental limitations of previous work and developed a new method to optimally locate actuators and sensors for structures with close modes. Optimization criteria were defined based on the distinguishing modal controllability and observability measures of close modes. An appropriate genetic algorism was adopted as the optimization algorism. Solving the high order Lyapunov functions was avoided by means of the closed-form expressions for controllability and observability Grammians. Since structure with widely separated natural frequencies is approximately balanced, computational efficiency was improved by grouping close modes together and dealing with the resulting subsystems independently. Finally, the effectiveness and optimality of the novel placement scheme were verified on a model structure with close modes.

  10. ZnO nanorods/polyaniline heterojunctions for low-power flexible light sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talib, Rawnaq A.; Abdullah, M.J. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology (NOR) Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Al-Salman, Husam S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Mohammad, Sabah M. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology (NOR) Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Allam, Nageh K., E-mail: nageh.allam@aucegypt.edu [Energy Materials Laboratory (EML), School of Sciences and Engineering, The American University in Cairo, New Cairo, 11835 (Egypt)

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) were directly grown on p-type polyaniline (PAni)/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using chemical bath deposition method at low temperature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the morphology and structure of the fabricated films. The resulted ZnO NRs are hexagonal and grew vertically on the PAni surface in the (002) direction along the c-axis. The compressive strain, Raman and photoluminescence measurements confirmed the high-quality crystal structure of the formed ZnO NRs with no damage of the PAni surface. The photodetector made using ZnO NRs/PAni junction showed a sensitivity of 85% and a quantum efficiency of 12.3% at 5 V. - Highlights: • ZnO NRs/polyaniline p-n junction photodetectors were fabricated on flexible substrates. • The fabricated ZnO NRs grew along the (002) direction. • The fabricated ZnO NRs have low compressive strain. • The ZnO NRs/PAni junction showed a high sensitivity of 85%. • The photodetectors showed quantum efficiency as high as 12%.

  11. Eraser-based eco-friendly fabrication of a skin-like large-area matrix of flexible carbon nanotube strain and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahatiya, Parikshit; Badhulika, Sushmee

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a new type of electronic, recoverable skin-like pressure and strain sensor, produced on a flexible, biodegradable pencil-eraser substrate and fabricated using a solvent-free, low-cost and energy efficient process. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film, the strain sensing element, was patterned on pencil eraser with a rolling pin and a pre-compaction mechanical press. This induces high interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which enables the sensor to achieve recoverability under ambient conditions. The eraser serves as a substrate for strain sensing, as well as acting as a dielectric for capacitive pressure sensing, thereby eliminating the dielectric deposition step, which is crucial in capacitive-based pressure sensors. The strain sensing transduction mechanism is attributed to the tunneling effect, caused by the elastic behavior of the MWCNTs and the strong mechanical interlock between MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which restricts slippage of MWCNTs on the eraser thereby minimizing hysteresis. The gauge factor of the strain sensor was calculated to be 2.4, which is comparable to and even better than most of the strain and pressure sensors fabricated with more complex designs and architectures. The sensitivity of the capacitive pressure sensor was found to be 0.135 MPa‑1.To demonstrate the applicability of the sensor as artificial electronic skin, the sensor was assembled on various parts of the human body and corresponding movements and touch sensation were monitored. The entire fabrication process is scalable and can be integrated into large areas to map spatial pressure distributions. This low-cost, easily scalable MWCNT pin-rolled eraser-based pressure and strain sensor has huge potential in applications such as artificial e-skin in flexible electronics and medical diagnostics, in particular in surgery as it provides high spatial resolution without a complex nanostructure architecture.

  12. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Me...

  13. A flexible fiber displacement sensor with tunable resolution and dynamic range based on a few-mode fiber loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Zhang, Jiangshan; Jiang, Shibin

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we propose a fiber displacement sensor based on a few mode fiber loop sandwiched between two single mode fibers (SMF). The proposed sensor is flexible due to the tunable resolution and dynamic range. The FMF is coiled to a fiber loop by making a knot. The in-line MZI sensing structure is fixed on a two dimensional (2D) translation stages. By moving one stage while another stage is fixed, the displacement is applied on the sensing structure. The resolution of the translation stage is 10μm. The few mode fiber loop acts as the transducer for the displacement sensing. The displacement will change the radius of the few mode fiber loop, which leads to a wavelength shift of the interference pattern. When the fiber loop has different initial radius, the same displacement will cause a different curvature variation. So the sensitivity of the wavelength shift to the displacement is dependent on the initial radius. A smaller initial radius of the loop will lead to a larger sensitivity, higher resolution but smaller dynamic range, so it is proper for micro displacement sensing. On the contrary is the lager initial radius that is proper for sensing in a large dynamic range. By simply adjusting the initial radius of the transducer loop, different sensitivity and resolution can be reached. Experimental results show the sensitivities of 0.267nm/mm, 0.384nm/mm, 0.749nm/mm and 1.06nm/mm for initial loop radius of 1.9cm, 1.5cm, 1cm and 0.75cm, respectively.

  14. Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Sam Ge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects’ shapes and, more specifically, the objects’ surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 × 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Naïve Bayes (NB, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, and Support Vector Machines (SVM were implemented and compared for various parameters. Finally, the most accurate method was selected to evaluate the proposed skin structure in recognition of three different curvatures. The results showed an accuracy rate of 97.5% in surface curvature discrimination.

  15. Availability of vision and tactile gating: vision enhances tactile sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Francisco L; Lee, Ji-Hang; Binsted, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    A multitude of events bombard our sensory systems at every moment of our lives. Thus, it is important for the sensory and motor cortices to gate unimportant events. Tactile suppression is a well-known phenomenon defined as a reduced ability to detect tactile events on the skin before and during movement. Previous experiments (Buckingham et al. in Exp Brain Res 201(3):411-419, 2010; Colino et al. in Physiol Rep 2(3):e00267, 2014) found detection rates decrease just prior to and during finger abduction and decrease according to the proximity of the moving effector. However, what effect does vision have on tactile gating? There is ample evidence (see Serino and Haggard in Neurosci Biobehav Rev 34:224-236, 2010) observing increased tactile acuity when participants see their limbs. The present study examined how tactile detection changes in response to visual condition (vision/no vision). Ten human participants used their right hand to reach and grasp a cylinder. Tactors were attached to the index finger and the forearm of both the right and left arm and vibrated at various epochs relative to a "go" tone. Results replicate previous findings from our laboratory (Colino et al. in Physiol Rep 2(3):e00267, 2014). Also, tactile acuity decreased when participants did not have vision. These results indicate that the vision affects the somatosensation via inputs from parietal areas (Konen and Haggard in Cereb Cortex 24(2):501-507, 2014) but does so in a reach-to-grasp context.

  16. A flexible sensor based on polyaniline hybrid using ZnO as template and sensing properties to triethylamine at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Le; Sun, Jianhua; Bai, Shouli; Luo, Ruixian; Li, Dianqing; Chen, Aifan; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-03-01

    A network structure of PANI/SnO2 hybrid was synthesized by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization using cheaper ZnO nanorods as sacrificial template and the hybrid was loaded on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) thin film to construct a flexible smart sensor. The sensor not only exhibits high sensitivity which is 20 times higher than that of pure PANI to 10 ppm triethylamine, good selectivity and linear response at room temperature but also has flexible, structure simple, economical and portable characters compared with recently existing sensors. Room temperature operating of the sensor is also particularly interesting, which leads to low power consumption, environmental safety and long life times. The improvement of sensing properties is attributed to the network structure of hybrid and formation of p-n heterojunction at the interface between the PANI and SnO2. The research is expected to open a new window for development of a kind of wearable electronic devices based on the hybrid of conducting polymer and metal oxides.

  17. Two-Time Scale Virtual Sensor Design for Vibration Observation of a Translational Flexible-Link Manipulator Based on Singular Perturbation and Differential Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jinyong; Li, Wei; Wang, Yuqiao; Fan, Mengbao; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Effective feedback control requires all state variable information of the system. However, in the translational flexible-link manipulator (TFM) system, it is unrealistic to measure the vibration signals and their time derivative of any points of the TFM by infinite sensors. With the rigid-flexible coupling between the global motion of the rigid base and the elastic vibration of the flexible-link manipulator considered, a two-time scale virtual sensor, which includes the speed observer and the vibration observer, is designed to achieve the estimation for the vibration signals and their time derivative of the TFM, as well as the speed observer and the vibration observer are separately designed for the slow and fast subsystems, which are decomposed from the dynamic model of the TFM by the singular perturbation. Additionally, based on the linear-quadratic differential games, the observer gains of the two-time scale virtual sensor are optimized, which aims to minimize the estimation error while keeping the observer stable. Finally, the numerical calculation and experiment verify the efficiency of the designed two-time scale virtual sensor. PMID:27801840

  18. Two-Time Scale Virtual Sensor Design for Vibration Observation of a Translational Flexible-Link Manipulator Based on Singular Perturbation and Differential Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jinyong; Li, Wei; Wang, Yuqiao; Fan, Mengbao; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-10-28

    Effective feedback control requires all state variable information of the system. However, in the translational flexible-link manipulator (TFM) system, it is unrealistic to measure the vibration signals and their time derivative of any points of the TFM by infinite sensors. With the rigid-flexible coupling between the global motion of the rigid base and the elastic vibration of the flexible-link manipulator considered, a two-time scale virtual sensor, which includes the speed observer and the vibration observer, is designed to achieve the estimation for the vibration signals and their time derivative of the TFM, as well as the speed observer and the vibration observer are separately designed for the slow and fast subsystems, which are decomposed from the dynamic model of the TFM by the singular perturbation. Additionally, based on the linear-quadratic differential games, the observer gains of the two-time scale virtual sensor are optimized, which aims to minimize the estimation error while keeping the observer stable. Finally, the numerical calculation and experiment verify the efficiency of the designed two-time scale virtual sensor.

  19. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Quad Chart 37 1. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this research is to equip a myoelectric prosthetic hand with contact detecting sensors and a...controller to perform contact detection reflex (11-13 mos.) 80% • Program controller to perform software functions for clinical studies (12-13 mos.) 60...candidates have been ordered, and are having pressure relief holes laser drilled . A custom flexible component board that holds the pressure sensor

  20. Microfabrication of Three-Axis Tactile Feedback Actuator for Robot-Assisted Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Eunhyup; Yoo, Jihyung; Lee, Hyungkew; Park, Joonah; Yun, Kwang-Seok

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a three-axis tactile feedback actuator using pneumatic balloons for human perception applications such as robot-assisted surgery systems. A tactile actuator is composed of a center structure having four balloons, sidewalls with one lateral balloon on each sidewall, and a bottom structure supporting the center structure. We fabricated the proposed device using flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) and hard polyurethane with final dimensions of 18 ×18 ×18 mm3. The four balloons on the center structure produce normal tactile display during pneumatic-pressure-assisted inflation. The lateral movement of the center structure driven by sidewall balloons generates a shear tactile display on fingertips. The center deflections of the circular and rectangular balloons were calculated and measured experimentally.

  1. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  2. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  3. Tactile Modulation of Emotional Speech Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Salminen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally only speech communicates emotions via mobile phone. However, in daily communication the sense of touch mediates emotional information during conversation. The present aim was to study if tactile stimulation affects emotional ratings of speech when measured with scales of pleasantness, arousal, approachability, and dominance. In the Experiment 1 participants rated speech-only and speech-tactile stimuli. The tactile signal mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech. In the Experiment 2 the aim was to study whether the way the tactile signal was produced affected the ratings. The tactile signal either mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech sample in question, or the amplitude changes of another speech sample. Also, concurrent static vibration was included. The results showed that the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing and dominant than the speech-only stimuli. The speech-only stimuli were rated as more approachable than the speech-tactile stimuli, but only in the Experiment 1. Variations in tactile stimulation also affected the ratings. When the tactile stimulation was static vibration the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing than when the concurrent tactile stimulation was mimicking speech samples. The results suggest that tactile stimulation offers new ways of modulating and enriching the interpretation of speech.

  4. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF, a photomultiplier tube (PMT-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137 and cobalt-60 (Co-60, were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes.

  5. Simultaneous Piezoelectric Actuator and Sensor Placement Optimization and Control Design of Manipulators with Flexible Links Using SDRE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Molter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a control design for flexible manipulators using piezoelectric actuators bonded on nonprismatic links. The dynamic model of the manipulator is obtained in a closed form through the Lagrange equations. Each link is discretized using finite element modal formulation based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The control uses the motor torques and piezoelectric actuators for controlling vibrations. An optimization problem with genetic algorithm (GA is formulated for the location and size of the piezoelectric actuator and sensor on the links. The natural frequencies and mode shapes are computed by the finite element method, and the irregular beam geometry is approximated by piecewise prismatic elements. The State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE technique is used to derive a suboptimal controller for a robot control problem. A state-dependent equation is solved at each new point obtained for the variables from the problem, along the trajectory to obtain a nonlinear feedback controller. Numerical tests verify the efficiency of the proposed optimization and control design.

  6. Design and image processing for tactile endoscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kenji; Susuki, Yuto; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ken; Ohno, Yuko

    2010-08-01

    We have developed new type tactile endoscope with silicone rubber membrane. The system consists of silicone rubber membrane, image sensor and illumination system. A surface of the Silicone rubber membrane has any patterns which made by nanotechnology. This pattern is deformed by pressing tissue such as cancer, colon and so on. The deformed pattern is captured by image sensor. This pattern is analyzed by image processing. In this paper, the proposed architecture is presented. With several test targets, the characteristics of the prototype systems are evaluated in the computation simulation.

  7. Design and Static Calibration of a Novel Tactile Sensor for Five-fingered Dexterous Robot Hand%新型五指仿人型机器人灵巧手触觉传感器设计及其静态标定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴克; 樊绍巍; 陈兆芃; 刘宏; 蔡鹤皋

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel miniature tactile sensor for HIT/DLR II five - fingered dexterous robot hand and explains its operating principle. The sensor is based on a pie-zoresistive mechanism with a highly integrated and miniaturized design. The elastic architecture of the proposed sensor is also described. Multiple electrodes are mounted on the sensor surface, using rows - column scanning for the data acquisition. The static calibration experiment results indicate satisfactory correlation between the measured characteristic and the model' s calculation has been achieved within the measured range.%介绍一种应用于HIT/DLR 11五指仿人型机器人灵巧手的新型触觉传感器,并对该传感器的工作原理进行阐述.该触觉传感器基于压阻原理,具有高度集成和微型化的特点.该传感器采用了柔性结构设计,表面嵌入多个电极,传感器数据通过电极列阵进行扫描采集.最后,进行了传感器的静态标定实验,验证了传感器性能.

  8. Tactile function of educable mentally retarded children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, A

    1975-08-01

    The tactile perception ability of 29 seven-and eight-year-old educable mentally retarded children was evaluated by using the tactile perception portions of the Southern California Sensory Integration Tests. The children were also observed for tactile defensive behavior. Compared to normal children of the same age (as reported in normative data), this sample of children was significantly inferior in manual form, finger identification, graphesthesia, and perception of simultaneous stimuli, but not in the localization of single stimuli. During the testing, 62 percent showed tactile defensive behavior. The role of tactile perception in the development of symbolic communications is reviewed.

  9. An Accurate, Flexible and Small Optical Fiber Sensor: A Novel Technological Breakthrough for Real-Time Analysis of Dynamic Blood Flow Data In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao-ying Yuan; Ling Zhang; Dan Xiao,; Kun Zhao; Chun Lin; Liang-yi Si

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the bloo...

  10. The Role of Exploratory Conditions in Bio-Inspired Tactile Sensing of Single Topogical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Debrégeas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the mechanism of tactile transduction during active exploration of finely textured surfaces using a tactile sensor mimicking the human fingertip. We focus in particular on the role of exploratory conditions in shaping the subcutaneous mechanical signals. The sensor has been designed by integrating a linear array of MEMS micro-force sensors in an elastomer layer. We measure the response of the sensors to the passage of elementary topographical features at constant velocity and normal load, such as a small hole on a flat substrate. Each sensor’s response is found to strongly depend on its relative location with respect to the substrate/skin contact zone, a result which can be quantitatively understood within the scope of a linear model of tactile transduction. The modification of the response induced by varying other parameters, such as the thickness of the elastic layer and the confining load, are also correctly captured by this model. We further demonstrate that the knowledge of these characteristic responses allows one to dynamically evaluate the position of a small hole within the contact zone, based on the micro-force sensors signals, with a spatial resolution an order of magnitude better than the intrinsic resolution of individual sensors. Consequences of these observations on robotic tactile sensing are briefly discussed.

  11. Integration of force reflection with tactile sensing for minimally invasive robotics-assisted tumor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasaz, A; Patel, R V

    2013-01-01

    Tactile sensing and force reflection have been the subject of considerable research for tumor localization in soft-tissue palpation. The work presented in this paper investigates the relevance of force feedback (presented visually as well as directly) during tactile sensing (presented visually only) for tumor localization using an experimental setup close to one that could be applied for real robotics-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The setup is a teleoperated (master-slave) system facilitated with a state-of-the-art minimally invasive probe with a rigidly mounted tactile sensor at the tip and an externally mounted force sensor at the base of the probe. The objective is to capture the tactile information and measure the interaction forces between the probe and tissue during palpation and to explore how they can be integrated to improve the performance of tumor localization. To quantitatively explore the effect of force feedback on tactile sensing tumor localization, several experiments were conducted by human subjects to locate artificial tumors embedded in the ex vivo bovine livers. The results show that using tactile sensing in a force-controlled environment can realize, on average, 57 percent decrease in the maximum force and 55 percent decrease in the average force applied to tissue while increasing the tumor detection accuracy by up to 50 percent compared to the case of using tactile feedback alone. The results also show that while visual presentation of force feedback gives straightforward quantitative measures, improved performance of tactile sensing tumor localization is achieved at the expense of longer times for the user. Also, the quickness and intuitive data mapping of direct force feedback makes it more appealing to experienced users.

  12. Perceptual dimensions for a dynamic tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Tartter, Vivien C.; Seward, Andrew G.; Genzer, Boris; Gourgey, Karen; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2009-02-01

    We propose a new approach for converting graphical and pictorial information into tactile patterns that can be displayed in a static or dynamic tactile device. The key components of the proposed approach are (1) an algorithm that segments a scene into perceptually uniform segments; (2) a procedure for generating perceptually distinct tactile patterns; and (3) a mapping of the visual textures of the segments into tactile textures that convey similar concepts. We used existing digital halftoning and other techniques to generate a wide variety of tactile textures. We then conducted formal and informal subjective tests with sighted (but visually blocked) and visually-impaired subjects to determine the ability of human tactile perception to perceive differences among them. In addition to generating perceptually distinguishable tactile patterns, our goal is to identify significant dimensions of tactile texture perception, which will make it possible to map different visual attributes into independent tactile attributes. Our experimental results indicate that it is poosible to generate a number of perceptually distinguishable tactile patterns, and that different dimensions of tactile texture perception can indeed be identified.

  13. 柔性涡流阵列传感器的磁场计算分析%Magnetic field computational analysis of flexible eddy current array sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹青松; 毕彬杰; 周继惠

    2016-01-01

    A flexible eddy current array sensor consists of six array units( spiral coil)is designed,establish electromagnetic field model for flexible eddy current array units based on electromagnetic field theory,the magnetic field strength formula in radial and axial of flexible array unit coil are derived,simulation analysis on relationship between array unit coil magnetic field strength and current,coil gap,inner and outer diameters and other parameters,which have a certain reference value for development of flexible eddy current array sensor.%设计了一种由6个阵列单元(螺旋线圈)所组成的柔性涡流阵列传感器,基于电磁场理论建立柔性涡流阵列单元的电磁场模型,推导出柔性阵列单元线圈径向和轴向的磁场强度计算公式,仿真分析阵列单元线圈磁场强度与电流、线圈间隙、内外径等参数的关系,对柔性涡流阵列传感器的发展具有一定参考价值。

  14. A flexible proximity sensor formed by duplex screen/screen-offset printing and its application to non-contact detection of human breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kaji, Ryosaku; Iwata, Shiro; Otao, Shinobu; Imawaka, Naoto; Yoshino, Katsumi; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Sato, Junya; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-Ichiro; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2016-01-01

    We describe a flexible capacitance-type sensor that can detect an approaching human without contact, fabricated by developing and applying duplex conductive-ink printing to a film substrate. The results of our calculations show that the difference in size between the top and bottom electrodes of the sensor allows for the spatial extension of the electric field distribution over the electrodes. Hence, such a component functions as a proximity sensor. This thin and light device with a large form factor can be arranged at various places, including curved surfaces and the back of objects such that it is unnoticeable. In our experiment, we attached it to the back of a bed, and found that our device successfully detected the breathing of a subject on the bed without contacting his body. This should contribute to reducing the physical and psychological discomfort among patients during medical checks, or when their condition is being monitored.

  15. Feasibility Test of a Liquid Film Thickness Sensor on a Flexible Printed Circuit Board Using a Three-Electrode Conductance Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Byung; Kim, Jong Rok; Park, Goon Cherl; Cho, Hyoung Kyu

    2016-12-27

    Liquid film thickness measurements under temperature-varying conditions in a two-phase flow are of great importance to refining our understanding of two-phase flows. In order to overcome the limitations of the conventional electrical means of measuring the thickness of a liquid film, this study proposes a three-electrode conductance method, with the device fabricated on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB). The three-electrode conductance method offers the advantage of applicability under conditions with varying temperatures in principle, while the FPCB has the advantage of usability on curved surfaces and in relatively high-temperature conditions in comparison with sensors based on a printed circuit board (PCB). Two types of prototype sensors were fabricated on an FPCB and the feasibility of both was confirmed in a calibration test conducted at different temperatures. With the calibrated sensor, liquid film thickness measurements were conducted via a falling liquid film flow experiment, and the working performance was tested.

  16. Demonstrating the application of dielectric polymer actuators for tactile feedback in a mobile consumer device.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moessinger, H.M.; Brokken, D.

    2010-01-01

    User interfaces of mobile consumer devices are becoming increasingly complex. To address this complexity touch-screen interfaces are used. They allow flexible design of the user interfaces but lack the tactile feedback mechanical buttons provide, limiting ease of use. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator

  17. Demonstrating the application of dielectric polymer actuators for tactile feedback in a mobile consumer device.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moessinger, H.M.; Brokken, D.

    2010-01-01

    User interfaces of mobile consumer devices are becoming increasingly complex. To address this complexity touch-screen interfaces are used. They allow flexible design of the user interfaces but lack the tactile feedback mechanical buttons provide, limiting ease of use. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (

  18. Demonstrating the application of dielectric polymer actuators for tactile feedback in a mobile consumer device.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moessinger, H.M.; Brokken, D.

    2010-01-01

    User interfaces of mobile consumer devices are becoming increasingly complex. To address this complexity touch-screen interfaces are used. They allow flexible design of the user interfaces but lack the tactile feedback mechanical buttons provide, limiting ease of use. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (

  19. An accurate, flexible and small optical fiber sensor: a novel technological breakthrough for real-time analysis of dynamic blood flow data in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiao-ying; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Dan; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Chun; Si, Liang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86) was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of -0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of -0.839, Preal time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain partially real-time vascular rheology information and may thus enable the early diagnosis of blood rheology disorders and

  20. Pressure effects reveal that changes in the redox states of the heme iron complexes in the sensor domains of two heme-based oxygen sensor proteins, EcDOS and YddV, have profound effects on their flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzenbacher, Pavel; Marchal, Stéphane; Palacký, Jan; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Domaschke, Thomas; Lange, Reinhard; Shimizu, Toru; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Stranava, Martin; Stiborová, Marie; Martinkova, Marketa

    2014-12-01

    The catalytic activity of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (EcDOS) towards cyclic diGMP is regulated by the redox state of the heme iron complex in the enzyme's sensing domain and the association of external ligands with the iron center. Specifically, the Fe(II) complex is more active towards cyclic diGMP than the Fe(III) complex, and its activity is further enhanced by O2 or CO binding. In order to determine how the redox state and coordination of the heme iron atom regulate the catalytic activity of EcDOS, we investigated the flexibility of its isolated N-terminal heme-binding domain (EcDOS-heme) by monitoring its spectral properties at various hydrostatic pressures. The most active form of the heme-containing domain, i.e. the Fe(II)-CO complex, was found to be the least flexible. Conversely, the oxidized Fe(III) forms of EcDOS-heme and its mutants had relatively high flexibilities, which appeared to be linked to the low catalytic activity of the corresponding intact enzymes. These findings corroborate the suggestion, made on the basis of crystallographic data, that there is an inverse relationship between the flexibility of the heme-containing domain of EcDOS and its catalytic activity. The Fe(II)-CO form of the heme domain of a second heme-based oxygen sensor, diguanylate cyclase (YddV), was also found to be quite rigid. Interestingly, the incorporation of a water molecule into the heme complex of YddV caused by mutation of the Leu65 residue reduced the flexibility of this heme domain. Conversely, mutation of the Tyr43 residue increased its flexibility.

  1. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  2. Market study: Tactile paging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A market survey was conducted regarding the commercialization potential and key market factors relevant to a tactile paging system for deaf-blind people. The purpose of the tactile paging system is to communicate to the deaf-blind people in an institutional environment. The system consists of a main console and individual satellite wrist units. The console emits three signals by telemetry to the wrist com (receiving unit) which will measure approximately 2 x 4 x 3/4 inches and will be fastened to the wrist by a strap. The three vibration signals are fire alarm, time period indication, and a third signal which will alert the wearer of the wrist com to the fact that the pin on the top of the wrist is emitting a morse coded message. The Morse code message can be felt and recognized with the finger.

  3. Synthesis and Characterizations of Novel Ca-Mg-Ti-Fe-Oxides Based Ceramic Nanocrystals and Flexible Film of Polydimethylsiloxane Composite with Improved Mechanical and Dielectric Properties for Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Ashis; Pramanik, Sumit; Manna, Ayan; Azrin Shah, Nabila Farhana; Shasmin, Hanie Nadia; Radzi, Zamri; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    Armalcolite, a rare ceramic mineral and normally found in the lunar earth, was synthesized by solid-state step-sintering. The in situ phase-changed novel ceramic nanocrystals of Ca-Mg-Ti-Fe based oxide (CMTFOx), their chemical reactions and bonding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were determined by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and microscopy. Water absorption of all the CMTFOx was high. The lower dielectric loss tangent value (0.155 at 1 MHz) was obtained for the ceramic sintered at 1050 °C (S1050) and it became lowest for the S1050/PDMS nanocomposite (0.002 at 1 MHz) film, which was made by spin coating at 3000 rpm. The excellent flexibility (static modulus ≈ 0.27 MPa and elongation > 90%), viscoelastic property (tanδ = E″/E′: 0.225) and glass transition temperature (Tg: −58.5 °C) were obtained for S1050/PDMS film. Parallel-plate capacitive and flexible resistive humidity sensors have been developed successfully. The best sensing performance of the present S1050 (3000%) and its flexible S1050/PDMS composite film (306%) based humidity sensors was found to be at 100 Hz, better than conventional materials. PMID:26927116

  4. Synthesis and Characterizations of Novel Ca-Mg-Ti-Fe-Oxides Based Ceramic Nanocrystals and Flexible Film of Polydimethylsiloxane Composite with Improved Mechanical and Dielectric Properties for Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Tripathy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Armalcolite, a rare ceramic mineral and normally found in the lunar earth, was synthesized by solid-state step-sintering. The in situ phase-changed novel ceramic nanocrystals of Ca-Mg-Ti-Fe based oxide (CMTFOx, their chemical reactions and bonding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS were determined by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and microscopy. Water absorption of all the CMTFOx was high. The lower dielectric loss tangent value (0.155 at 1 MHz was obtained for the ceramic sintered at 1050 °C (S1050 and it became lowest for the S1050/PDMS nanocomposite (0.002 at 1 MHz film, which was made by spin coating at 3000 rpm. The excellent flexibility (static modulus ≈ 0.27 MPa and elongation > 90%, viscoelastic property (tanδ = E″/E′: 0.225 and glass transition temperature (Tg: −58.5 °C were obtained for S1050/PDMS film. Parallel-plate capacitive and flexible resistive humidity sensors have been developed successfully. The best sensing performance of the present S1050 (3000% and its flexible S1050/PDMS composite film (306% based humidity sensors was found to be at 100 Hz, better than conventional materials.

  5. Blind Braille readers mislocate tactile stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterr, Annette; Green, Lisa; Elbert, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    In a previous experiment, we observed that blind Braille readers produce errors when asked to identify on which finger of one hand a light tactile stimulus had occurred. With the present study, we aimed to specify the characteristics of this perceptual error in blind and sighted participants. The experiment confirmed that blind Braille readers mislocalised tactile stimuli more often than sighted controls, and that the localisation errors occurred significantly more often at the right reading hand than at the non-reading hand. Most importantly, we discovered that the reading fingers showed the smallest error frequency, but the highest rate of stimulus attribution. The dissociation of perceiving and locating tactile stimuli in the blind suggests altered tactile information processing. Neuroplasticity, changes in tactile attention mechanisms as well as the idea that blind persons may employ different strategies for tactile exploration and object localisation are discussed as possible explanations for the results obtained.

  6. Optimization-Based Wearable Tactile Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alvaro G; Lobo, Daniel; Chinello, Francesco; Cirio, Gabriel; Malvezzi, Monica; San Martin, Jose; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2016-10-20

    Novel wearable tactile interfaces offer the possibility to simulate tactile interactions with virtual environments directly on our skin. But, unlike kinesthetic interfaces, for which haptic rendering is a well explored problem, they pose new questions about the formulation of the rendering problem. In this work, we propose a formulation of tactile rendering as an optimization problem, which is general for a large family of tactile interfaces. Based on an accurate simulation of contact between a finger model and the virtual environment, we pose tactile rendering as the optimization of the device configuration, such that the contact surface between the device and the actual finger matches as close as possible the contact surface in the virtual environment. We describe the optimization formulation in general terms, and we also demonstrate its implementation on a thimble-like wearable device. We validate the tactile rendering formulation by analyzing its force error, and we show that it outperforms other approaches.

  7. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  8. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  9. Freezing in Touch: Sound Enhances Tactile Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Yeh Tsai; Su-Ling Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Perceptual segregation in rapidly changing visual displays can be facilitated by a synchronized salient sound that segregates itself from other sounds in the sequence (Vroomen & de Gelder, 2000). We examined whether this “freezing” phenomenon can also be found in tactile perception. Three vibrators were placed on the participant's palm to produce four different tactile patterns. Four sounds were presented separately and simultaneously with each of the four tactile patterns. Among the three sa...

  10. Tactile Perception - Role of Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Skedung, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to interconnect human tactile perception with various physical properties of materials. Tactile perception necessitates contact and relative motion between the skin and the surfaces of interest. This implies that properties such as friction and surface roughness ought to be important physical properties for tactile sensing. In this work, a method to measure friction between human fingers and surfaces is presented. This method is believed to best represent friction in...

  11. The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties during Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Walters, Eliza K.; Ditman, Tali; Gagnon, Stephanie A.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., "Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while…

  12. The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties during Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Walters, Eliza K.; Ditman, Tali; Gagnon, Stephanie A.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., "Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while…

  13. A flexible strain sensor based on a Conductive Polymer Composite for in situ measurement of parachute canopy deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Cédric; Lewandowski, Maryline; Koncar, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    A sensor based on a Conductive Polymer Composite (CPC), fully compatible with a textile substrate and its general properties, has been developed in our laboratory, and its electromechanical characterization is presented herein. In particular the effects of strain rate (from 10 to 1,000 mm/min) and of repeated elongation cycles on the sensor behaviour are investigated. The results show that strain rate seems to have little influence on sensor response. When submitted to repeated tensile cycles, the CPC sensor is able to detect accurately fabric deformations over each whole cycle, taking into account the mechanical behaviour of the textile substrate. Complementary information is given concerning the non-effect of aging on the global resistivity of the CPC sensor. Finally, our sensor was tested on a parachute canopy during a real drop test: the canopy fabric deformation during the critical inflation phase was successfully measured, and was found to be less than 9%.

  14. Flexible thermoelectric nanogenerator based on the MoS2/graphene nanocomposite and its application for a self-powered temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yannan; Chou, Ting-Mao; Yang, Weifeng; He, Minghui; Zhao, Yingru; Li, Ning; Lin, Zong-Hong

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we report on a flexible thermoelectric nanogenerator (NG) based on the MoS2/graphene nanocomposite. The nanocomposite thermoelectric nanogenerator shows enhanced thermoelectric performance, compared with that based solely on MoS2 nanomaterials, which may be due to the enhanced electrical conductivity resulting from the graphene acting as a charge transfer channel in the composites. The NG can be further applied as a self-powered sensor for temperature measurement. This work indicates that the MoS2/graphene nanocomposite is a promising thermoelectric material for harvesting environmental thermal energy.

  15. An accurate, flexible and small optical fiber sensor: a novel technological breakthrough for real-time analysis of dynamic blood flow data in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-ying Yuan

    Full Text Available Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8, and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86 was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of -0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of -0.839, P<0.05. The novel fiber sensor can thus obtain in vivo blood pressure data accurately, stably, and in real time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain

  16. Misunderstanding and Repair in Tactile Auslan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa; Manns, Howard; Iwasaki, Shimako; Bartlett, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses ways in which misunderstandings arise in Tactile Australian Sign Language (Tactile Auslan) and how they are resolved. Of particular interest are the similarities to and differences from the same processes in visually signed and spoken conversation. This article draws on detailed conversation analysis (CA) and demonstrates…

  17. Distilling the underlying dimensions of tactile melodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Spapé, M.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We created 59 tactile melodies by transforming pieces of music from the auditory domain to the vibrotactile domain. Sixteen observers judged these tactile melodies on a set of 16 characteristics such as 'melodious', 'bombastic', and 'alarming'. By using advanced multivariate statistical methods, we

  18. Tactile information presentation in the cockpit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes two aspects of the application of tactile information presentation in the cockpit. The first half of the paper discusses why the tactile channel might be used instead of, or in addition to, the more common visual and auditory channels. It lists several categories of information

  19. Ergonomics of tactile and haptic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, J.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2006-01-01

    The area of tactile and haptic interactions has produced a number of exemplar systems and an even greater number of research papers. The time has come to systematize the knowledge that has been gained in order to produce guidance. The Ergonomics of Tactile and Haptic Interactions symposium provides

  20. The Design of Tactile Thematic Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Megan M.; Lobben, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the design and legibility of tactile thematic maps, focusing on symbolization and the comprehension of spatial patterns on the maps. The results indicate that discriminable and effective tactile thematic maps can be produced using classed data with a microcapsule paper production method. The participants…

  1. Air/Liquid-pressure and heartbeat-driven flexible fiber nanogenerators as a micro/nano-power source or diagnostic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zetang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-01-04

    We present a new approach for fabricating flexible fiber nanogenerators (FNGs) that can be used for smart shirts, flexible electronics, and medical applications. These FNGs are based on carbon fibers that are covered cylindrically by textured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. Once subjected to uni-compression by applying a pressure, the cylindrical ZnO thin film is under a compressive strain, resulting in a macroscopic piezopotential across its inner and exterior surfaces owing to the textured structure of the film, which is the driving force for generating an electric current in the external load. Using such a structure, an output peak voltage of 3.2 V and average current density of 0.15 μA cm(-2) are demonstrated. The FNGs rely on air pressure, so that it can work in a non-contact mode in cases of rotating tires, flowing air/liquid, and even in blood vessels. Pressure-driven FNGs added to a syringe show potential to harvest energy in blood vessels, gas pipes, and oil pipes, as long as there is a fluctuation in pressure (or turbulence). Heart-pulse driven FNGs can serve as ultrasensitive sensors for monitoring the behavior of the human heart, which may possibly be applied to medical diagnostics as sensors and measurement tools.

  2. A new dynamic tactile display for reconfigurable braille: implementation and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motto Ros, Paolo; Dante, Vittorio; Mesin, Luca; Petetti, Erminio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-01-01

    Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille) or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users' preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction. We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8 × 8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7mm) as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50s(-1). It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs. Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p < 0.01), obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p < 0.05). Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  3. A New Dynamic Tactile Display for Reconfigurable Braille: Implementation and Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eMotto Ros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction.We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8×8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7 mm as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50 s-1. It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs.Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p< 0.01, obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p< 0.05. Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed

  4. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0-100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa-1 for the best devices.

  5. A Dual-Organic-Transistor-Based Tactile-Perception System with Signal-Processing Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yaping; Shen, Hongguang; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2017-02-22

    Organic-device-based tactile-perception systems can open up new opportunities for the next generation of intelligent products. To meet the critical requirements of artificial perception systems, the efficient construction of organic smart elements with integrated sensing and signal processing functionalities is highly desired, but remains a challenge. This study presents a dual-organic-transistor-based tactile-perception element (DOT-TPE) with biomimetic functionality by the construction of organic synaptic transistors with integrated sensing transistors. The unique geometry of the DOT-TPE permits instantaneous sensing of pressure stimuli and synapse-like processing of an electric signal in a single element. More importantly, these organic-transistor-based tactile-perception elements can be built into arrays to serve as bionic tactile-perception systems. The combined biomimetic functionality of tactile-perception systems, together with their promising features of flexibility and large-area fabrication, makes this work represent a step forward toward novel e-skin devices for artificial intelligence.

  6. VARIATIONS IN TACTILE SIGNING – THE CASE OF ONE-HANDED SIGNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mesch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sign language is a variety of a national sign language. Tactile signing among persons with deafblindness also includes some minor variations. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language (e.g. Mesch 1998, 2001 show how interactants use both their hands in tactile communication in two different positions: dialogue position and monologue position. This paper examines the signing variations that partially or functionally blind signers encounter when using one hand to communicate with each other in a conversation dyad in what is one of the most advanced types of sign language communication. In tactile one-handed signing, the signer uses her right hand both for producing and receiving signs, while the addressee uses her left hand not only for receiving but also for producing signs after turn-taking, even though it is the non-dominant hand and, therefore, is not normally used to produce one-handed signs. In this study, conversation analysis was conducted on the discourse of four groups. The results show that some variations depend on the linguistic background of individuals and their everyday communication. A comparative study of a two-handed and a one-handed system is then presented, focusing on issues of simplicity, flexibility, turn-taking, and feedback. Some results showing changes in the sign structures of both communication types are also presented.

  7. Flexible, Hybrid Piezoelectric Film (BaTi(1-x)Zr(x)O3)/PVDF Nanogenerator as a Self-Powered Fluid Velocity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Nagamalleswara Rao; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator (PNG) constructed using a hybrid (or composite) film composed of highly crystalline BaTi(1-x)Zr(x)O3 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2) nanocubes (abbreviated as BTZO) synthesized using a molten-salt process embedded into a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix solution via ultrasonication. The potential of a BTZO/PVDF hybrid film is realized in fabricating eco-friendly devices, active sensors, and flexible nanogenerators to interpret its functionality. Our strategy is based on the incorporation of various Zr(4+) doping ratios into the Ti(4+) site of BaTiO3 nanocubes to enhance the performance of the PNG. The flexible nanogenerator (BTZO/PVDF) exhibits a high electrical output up to ∼11.9 V and ∼1.35 μA compared to the nanogenerator (BTO/PVDF) output of 7.99 V and 1.01 μA upon the application of cyclic pushing-releasing frequencies with a constant load (11 N). We also demonstrate another exciting application of the PNG as a self-powered sensor to measure different water velocities at an outlet pipe. The average maximum peak power of the PNG varies from 0.2 to 15.8 nW for water velocities ranging from 31.43 to 125.7 m/s during the water ON condition. This study shows the compositional dependence approach, fabrication of nanostructures for energy harvesting, and self-powered devices in the field of monitoring for remote area applications.

  8. Inert gas narcosis has no influence on thermo-tactile sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, Miroljub; Vidmar, Gaj; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2012-05-01

    Contribution of skin thermal sensors under inert gas narcosis to the raising hypothermia is not known. Such information is vital for understanding the impact of narcosis on behavioural thermoregulation, diver safety and judgment of thermal (dis)comfort in the hyperbaric environment. So this study aimed at establishing the effects of normoxic concentration of 30% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) on thermo-tactile threshold sensation by studying 16 subjects [eight females and eight males; eight sensitive (S) and eight non-sensitive (NS) to N(2)O]. Their mean (SD) age was 22.1 (1.8) years, weight 72.8 (15.3) kg, height 1.75 (0.10) m and body mass index 23.8 (3.8) kg m(-2). Quantitative thermo-tactile sensory testing was performed on forearm, upper arm and thigh under two experimental conditions: breathing air (air trial) and breathing normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O (N(2)O trial) in the mixed sequence. Difference in thermo-tactile sensitivity thresholds between two groups of subjects in two experimental conditions was analysed by 3-way mixed-model analysis of covariance. There were no statistically significant differences in thermo-tactile thresholds either between the Air and N(2)O trials, or between S and NS groups, or between females and males, or with respect to body mass index. Some clinically insignificant lowering of thermo-tactile thresholds occurred only for warm thermo-tactile thresholds on upper arm and thigh. The results indicated that normoxic mixture of 30% N(2)O had no influence on thermo-tactile sensation in normothermia.

  9. Development of a tactile sensing system using piezoelectric robot skin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. K.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Since service robots perform their functions in close proximity to humans, they are much more likely than other types of robot to come into contact with humans. This means that safety regarding robot-human interaction is of particular concern and requires investigation. Existing tactile sensing methods are very effective at detecting external dangerous loadings; however, until now, they have been very expensive. Recently, a new type of self-sensing tactile technology for service robots has been introduced, which harnesses the piezoelectric effect of several robot skin materials. In these kinds of system, relatively cheap materials are used as sensors themselves. In this research, a robot system with a self-sensing tactile technology was developed using piezoelectric robot skin materials. The test results indicate that this type of system is appropriate for application to service robots.

  10. Investigation of the touch sensitivity of ER fluid based tactile display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Davidson, Rob; Taylor, Paul

    2005-05-01

    A tactile display is programmable device whose controlled surface is intended to be investigated by human touch. It has a great number of potential applications in the field of virtual reality and elsewhere. In this research, a 5x5 touch sensitive tactile display array including electrorheological (ER) fluid has been developed and investigated. Experimental results show that the sensed surface information could be controlled effectively by adjusting the voltage activation pattern imposed on the tactels. In the meantime, it is possible to sense the touching force normal to the display"s surface by monitoring the change of current passing through the ER fluid. These encouraging results are helpful for constructing a new type of tactile display based on ER fluid which can act as both sensor and actuator at the same time.

  11. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed.

  12. The Development of Tactile Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, A J; Spence, C

    2017-01-01

    Touch is the first of our senses to develop, providing us with the sensory scaffold on which we come to perceive our own bodies and our sense of self. Touch also provides us with direct access to the external world of physical objects, via haptic exploration. Furthermore, a recent area of interest in tactile research across studies of developing children and adults is its social function, mediating interpersonal bonding. Although there are a range of demonstrations of early competence with touch, particularly in the domain of haptics, the review presented here indicates that many of the tactile perceptual skills that we take for granted as adults (e.g., perceiving touches in the external world as well as on the body) take some time to develop in the first months of postnatal life, likely as a result of an extended process of connection with other sense modalities which provide new kinds of information from birth (e.g., vision and audition). Here, we argue that because touch is of such fundamental importance across a wide range of social and cognitive domains, it should be placed much more centrally in the study of early perceptual development than it currently is.

  13. A Computational Model of a Descending Mechanosensory Pathway Involved in Active Tactile Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Ache

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many animals, including humans, rely on active tactile sensing to explore the environment and negotiate obstacles, especially in the dark. Here, we model a descending neural pathway that mediates short-latency proprioceptive information from a tactile sensor on the head to thoracic neural networks. We studied the nocturnal stick insect Carausius morosus, a model organism for the study of adaptive locomotion, including tactually mediated reaching movements. Like mammals, insects need to move their tactile sensors for probing the environment. Cues about sensor position and motion are therefore crucial for the spatial localization of tactile contacts and the coordination of fast, adaptive motor responses. Our model explains how proprioceptive information about motion and position of the antennae, the main tactile sensors in insects, can be encoded by a single type of mechanosensory afferents. Moreover, it explains how this information is integrated and mediated to thoracic neural networks by a diverse population of descending interneurons (DINs. First, we quantified responses of a DIN population to changes in antennal position, motion and direction of movement. Using principal component (PC analysis, we find that only two PCs account for a large fraction of the variance in the DIN response properties. We call the two-dimensional space spanned by these PCs 'coding-space' because it captures essential features of the entire DIN population. Second, we model the mechanoreceptive input elements of this descending pathway, a population of proprioceptive mechanosensory hairs monitoring deflection of the antennal joints. Finally, we propose a computational framework that can model the response properties of all important DIN types, using the hair field model as its only input. This DIN model is validated by comparison of tuning characteristics, and by mapping the modelled neurons into the two-dimensional coding-space of the real DIN population. This

  14. A Computational Model of a Descending Mechanosensory Pathway Involved in Active Tactile Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache, Jan M; Dürr, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Many animals, including humans, rely on active tactile sensing to explore the environment and negotiate obstacles, especially in the dark. Here, we model a descending neural pathway that mediates short-latency proprioceptive information from a tactile sensor on the head to thoracic neural networks. We studied the nocturnal stick insect Carausius morosus, a model organism for the study of adaptive locomotion, including tactually mediated reaching movements. Like mammals, insects need to move their tactile sensors for probing the environment. Cues about sensor position and motion are therefore crucial for the spatial localization of tactile contacts and the coordination of fast, adaptive motor responses. Our model explains how proprioceptive information about motion and position of the antennae, the main tactile sensors in insects, can be encoded by a single type of mechanosensory afferents. Moreover, it explains how this information is integrated and mediated to thoracic neural networks by a diverse population of descending interneurons (DINs). First, we quantified responses of a DIN population to changes in antennal position, motion and direction of movement. Using principal component (PC) analysis, we find that only two PCs account for a large fraction of the variance in the DIN response properties. We call the two-dimensional space spanned by these PCs 'coding-space' because it captures essential features of the entire DIN population. Second, we model the mechanoreceptive input elements of this descending pathway, a population of proprioceptive mechanosensory hairs monitoring deflection of the antennal joints. Finally, we propose a computational framework that can model the response properties of all important DIN types, using the hair field model as its only input. This DIN model is validated by comparison of tuning characteristics, and by mapping the modelled neurons into the two-dimensional coding-space of the real DIN population. This reveals the versatility

  15. A flexibility-based method via the iterated improved reduction system and the cuckoo optimization algorithm for damage quantification with limited sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Hosseinzadeh, Ali; Bagheri, Abdollah; Ghodrati Amiri, Gholamreza; Koo, Ki-Young

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a novel and effective damage diagnosis algorithm is proposed to localize and quantify structural damage using incomplete modal data, considering the existence of some limitations in the number of attached sensors on structures. The damage detection problem is formulated as an optimization problem by computing static displacements in the reduced model of a structure subjected to a unique static load. The static responses are computed through the flexibility matrix of the damaged structure obtained based on the incomplete modal data of the structure. In the algorithm, an iterated improved reduction system method is applied to prepare an accurate reduced model of a structure. The optimization problem is solved via a new evolutionary optimization algorithm called the cuckoo optimization algorithm. The efficiency and robustness of the presented method are demonstrated through three numerical examples. Moreover, the efficiency of the method is verified by an experimental study of a five-story shear building structure on a shaking table considering only two sensors. The obtained damage identification results for the numerical and experimental studies show the suitable and stable performance of the proposed damage identification method for structures with limited sensors.

  16. On using an array of fiber bragg grating sensors for closed-loop control of flexible minimally invasive surgical instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roesthuis, Roy; Janssen, Sander; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Flexible minimally invasive surgical instruments can be used to target difficult-to-reach locations within the human body. Accurately steering these instruments requires information about the three-dimensional shape of the instrument. In the current study, we use an array of Fiber Bragg Grating

  17. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  18. Auditory adaptation improves tactile frequency perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommett, Lexi E; Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Yau, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-11

    Our ability to process temporal frequency information by touch underlies our capacity to perceive and discriminate surface textures. Auditory signals, which also provide extensive temporal frequency information, can systematically alter the perception of vibrations on the hand. How auditory signals shape tactile processing is unclear: perceptual interactions between contemporaneous sounds and vibrations are consistent with multiple neural mechanisms. Here we used a crossmodal adaptation paradigm, which separated auditory and tactile stimulation in time, to test the hypothesis that tactile frequency perception depends on neural circuits that also process auditory frequency. We reasoned that auditory adaptation effects would transfer to touch only if signals from both senses converge on common representations. We found that auditory adaptation can improve tactile frequency discrimination thresholds. This occurred only when adaptor and test frequencies overlapped. In contrast, auditory adaptation did not influence tactile intensity judgments. Thus, auditory adaptation enhances touch in a frequency- and feature-specific manner. A simple network model in which tactile frequency information is decoded from sensory neurons that are susceptible to auditory adaptation recapitulates these behavioral results. Our results imply that the neural circuits supporting tactile frequency perception also process auditory signals. This finding is consistent with the notion of supramodal operators performing canonical operations, like temporal frequency processing, regardless of input modality.

  19. Attitude and vibration control of a satellite containing flexible solar arrays by using reaction wheels, and piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Rade, Domingos A.; Goes, Luiz C. S.; de Paula Sales, Thiago

    2017-10-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide insight into control-structure interaction for satellites comprising flexible appendages and internal moving components. The physical model considered herein aiming to attend such purpose is a rigid-flexible satellite consisting of a rigid platform containing two rotating flexible solar panels. The solar panels rotation is assumed to be in a sun-synchronous configuration mode. The panels contain surface-bonded piezoelectric patches that can be used either as sensors for the elastic displacements or as actuators to counteract the vibration motion. It is assumed that in the normal mode operation the satellite platform points towards the Earth while the solar arrays rotate so as to follow the Sun. The vehicle moves in a low Earth polar orbit. The technique used to obtain the mathematical model combines the Lagrangian formulation with the Finite Elements Method used to describe the dynamics of the solar panel. The gravity-gradient torque as well as the torque due to the interaction of the Earth magnetic field and the satellite internal residual magnetic moment is included as environmental perturbations. The actuators are three reaction wheels for attitude control and piezoelectric actuators to control the flexible motion of the solar arrays. Computer simulations are performed using the MATLAB® software package. The following on-orbit satellite operating configurations are object of analysis: i) Satellite pointing towards the Earth (Earth acquisition maneuver) by considering the initial conditions in the elastic displacement equal to zero, aiming the assessment of the flexible modes excitation by the referred maneuver; ii) the satellite pointing towards the Earth with the assumption of an initial condition different from zero for the flexible motion such that the attitude alterations are checked against the elastic motion disturbance; and iii) attitude acquisition accomplished by taking into account initial conditions

  20. Bayesian Alternation During Tactile Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar Mathias Goeke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition, rotation only (native condition, and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition. Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants’ responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND. Then we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67 than the Bayesian integration model (χred2= 4.34. Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all model (χred2= 1.64, which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2= 1.09 utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in