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Sample records for flash x-ray source

  1. Flash x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Q.; Pellinen, D.

    1976-01-01

    The complementary techniques of flash x-ray radiography (FXR) and flash x-ray diffraction (FXD) provide access to a unique domain in nondestructive materials testing. FXR is useful in studies of macroscopic properties during extremely short time intervals, and FXD, the newer technique, is used in studies of microscopic properties. Although these techniques are similar in many respects, there are some substantial differences. FXD generally requires low-voltage, line-radiation sources and extremely accurate timing; FXR is usually less demanding. Phenomena which can be profitably studied by FXR often can also be studied by FXD to permit a complete materials characterization

  2. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  3. Flash X-ray sources powered by Blumlein pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanloo, F.; Coogan, J. J.; Krause, R. K.; Bhawalkar, J. D.; Collins, C. B.

    1991-05-01

    Described here is the progress in construction and characterization of pulse-power generators capable of discharging at high repetition rates. These devices consist of several triaxial Blumleins stacked in series at one end. The lines are charged in parallel and synchronously commuted with a single thyratron at the other end. In this way relatively low charging voltages are multiplied to give the desired discharge voltage without the need for complex Marx bank circuitry. Scaling of these stacked Blumlein generators to obtain open circuit voltages in excess of 0.5 MV is reported. Peak power generated by discharging into an X-ray diode exceeds 10 7 R/s and high repetition rates allow for an average emitted X-ray exposure rate of 25 R/s from a sequence of 40 ns pulses.

  4. Experimental Comparison of 2-3MV X-Ray Sources for Flash Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MENGE, PETER RICHARD; JOHNSON, DAVID LEE; MAENCHEN, JOHN E.; OLSON, CRAIG L.; ROVANG, DEAN C.; DROEMER, D.; HUNT, E.; OLIVER, BRYAN VELTEN; ROSE, DAVID VINCENT; WELCH, DALE ROBERT

    2002-01-01

    High-brightness flash x-ray sources are needed for penetrating dynamic radiography for a variety of applications. Various bremsstrahlung source experiments have been conducted on the TriMeV accelerator (3MV, 60 Ω 20 ns) to determine the best diode and focusing configuration in the 2-3 MV range. Three classes of candidate diodes were examined: gas cell focusing, magnetically immersed, and rod pinch. The best result for the gas cell diode was 6 rad at 1 meter from the source with a 5 mm diameter x-ray spot. Using a 0.5 mm diameter cathode immersed in a 17 T solenoidal magnetic field, the best shot produced 4.1 rad with a 2.9 mm spot. The rod pinch diode demonstrated very reproducible radiographic spots between 0.75 and 0.8 mm in diameter, producing 1.2 rad. This represents a factor of eight improvement in the TriMeV flash radiographic capability above the original gas cell diode to a figure of merit (dose/spot diameter) > 1.8 rad/mm. These results clearly show the rod pinch diode to be the choice x-ray source for flash radiography at 2-3 M V

  5. Flash x-ray cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments intended to provide an overview of the potential capabilities and limitations of flash x-ray cinematography as a diagnostic technique for a Fast Reactor Safety Test Facility are described. The results provide estimates of the x-ray pulse intensity required to obtain adequate radiographs of an array of fuel pins in a typical reactor configuration. An estimate of the upper limit on the pulse duration imposed by the reactor background radiation was also determined. X-ray cinematography has been demonstrated at a repetition rate limited only by the recording equipment on hand at the time of these measurements. These preliminary results indicate that flash x-ray cinematography of the motion of fuel in a Fast Reactor Test Facility is technically feasible

  6. Repetitive flash x-ray generator as an energy transfer source utilizing a compact-glass body diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikoda, Arimitsu; Sato, Eiichi; Kimura, Shingo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    The studies of a repetitive flash x-ray generator as an energy source achieved with a compact diode with a permeable anode are described. This source consisted of the following essential components: a constant negative high-voltage power supply of up to -100kV, a modified two-stage Marx pulser, a repetitive trigger device, and an x-ray tube. Two condensers in the pulser were charged from -50 to -80kV, and the output voltages (no-load) were less than -130kV. Since the capacity of each condenser was 85OpF, the total capacity during discharge was 425pF. The maximum tube voltage and the tube current were about 85kV and 0. 3kA, respectively. The xray pulse widths were less than l2Ons, and the repetitive rate was less than 40Hz. The time-integrated x-ray intensity was about 25pC/kg at 24mm per pulse with a charged voltage of 60kV and an anode-cathode (A-C) space of 9. 0mm, and the maximum size of the x-ray source was equivalent to an anode diameter of 27mm.

  7. Design and development of a portable flash X-ray source driven by battery powered compact Marx generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, E.; Shukla, R.; Banerjee, P.; Prabaharan, T.; Sagar, K.; Meena, M.; Shyam, Anurag, E-mail: rishiv9@gmail.com [Energetics and Electromagnetics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam (India)

    2014-07-01

    The design, construction and operational characteristics of a portable flash X-ray source driven by battery-powered compact Marx is reported. The novel configuration of compact Marx utilizes hollow capacitors in successive stages to enhance the erection reliability. The characteristic impedance of this system is ∼ 200 Ω. At discharge of ∼ 22 kV, >200 kV output pulse of 60 ns duration (FWHM) with rise time of <5 ns (10% - 90%) is produced. The pulser requires Nitrogen gas pressurization up to 3 atm for operation at maximum rating. The Marx generator assembly is fitted in to a stainless steel tube of 10 cm diameter and 1.2 m length. While using a demountable sealed X-ray tube of matched impedance, this device produces an X-ray pulse of approximately ∼ 30 ns duration and has maximum energy of ∼ 200 keV. This true tabletop device is able to produce dose up to 100 mR per shot, measured at the distance of 30 cm from output window. The focal spot size has been passively confirmed to be in the sub-millimeter (<1 mm) range. (author)

  8. Demonstration of the self-magnetic-pinch diode as an X-ray source for flash core-punch radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Portillo, Salvador; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Bruner, Nichelle Lee; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Minimization of the radiographic spot size and maximization of the radiation dose is a continuing long-range goal for development of electron beam driven X-ray radiography sources. In collaboration with members of the Atomic Weapons Establishment(AWE), Aldermaston UK, the Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept. 1645 is conducting research on the development of X-ray sources for flash core-punch radiography. The Hydrodynamics Dept. at AWE has defined a near term radiographic source requirement for scaled core-punch experiments to be 250 rads(at)m with a 2.75 mm source spot-size. As part of this collaborative effort, Dept. 1645 is investigating the potential of the Self-Magnetic-Pinched (SMP) diode as a source for core-punch radiography. Recent experiments conducted on the RITS-6 accelerator [1,2] demonstrated the potential of the SMP diode by meeting and exceeding the near term radiographic requirements established by AWE. During the demonstration experiments, RITS-6 was configured with a low-impedance (40 (Omega)) Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITL), which provided a 75-ns, 180-kA, 7.5-MeV forward going electrical pulse to the diode. The use of a low-impedance MITL enabled greater power coupling to the SMP diode and thus allowed for increased radiation output. In addition to reconfiguring the driver (accelerator), geometric changes to the diode were also performed which allowed for an increase in dose production without sacrificing the time integrated spot characteristics. The combination of changes to both the pulsed power driver and the diode significantly increased the source x-ray intensity

  9. Development of cable fed flash X-ray (FXR) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Rakhee; Mitra, S.; Patel, A. S.; Kumar, R.; Singh, G.; Senthil, K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Kolge, T. S.; Roy, Amitava; Acharya, S.; Biswas, D.; Sharma, Archana

    2017-08-01

    Flash X-ray sources driven by pulsed power find applications in industrial radiography, and a portable X-ray source is ideal where the radiography needs to be taken at the test site. A compact and portable flash X-ray (FXR) system based on a Marx generator has been developed with the high voltage fed to the FXR tube via a cable feed-through arrangement. Hard bremsstrahlung X-rays of few tens of nanosecond duration are generated by impinging intense electron beams on an anode target of high Z material. An industrial X-ray source is developed with source size as low as 1 mm. The system can be operated from 150 kV to 450 kV peak voltages and a dose of 10 mR has been measured at 1 m distance from the source window. The modeling of the FXR source has been carried out using particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations for the electron beam dynamics and X-ray generation, respectively. The angular dose profile of X-ray has been measured and compared with the simulation.

  10. Cosmic X-ray Flashes Reveal Their Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Astronomers using X-ray, radio, and optical telescopes have announced a big leap in solving the origin of mysterious objects known as X-ray flashes (XRFs) by finding that they originate from blue star forming galaxies. This discovery of the cosmic distance scale effectively ends the widely-held speculation that XRFs are the death-cries from stars exploding in the infant universe. X-ray flashes resemble a lower energy and longer-duration version of a gamma-ray burst, an energetic explosion thought to signal the death of a massive star. The properties of XRFs led to speculation that they were gamma-ray bursts that occurred less than a few billion years after the Big Bang, and whose light had been subsequently weakened and time-stretched by the expansion of the universe. "Now that the very distant origin has been ruled out, X-ray flashes could be due to exploding massive stars, just like gamma-ray bursts" explained Dr. Joshua Bloom at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author on the paper announcing the results to be published in The Astrophysical Journal. Bloom continued: "But the explosion from an X-ray flash would need to contain less matter or less energy than a typical gamma-ray burst. Alternatively, X-ray flashes could be gamma-ray bursts viewed off-axis." These results are being discussed at the "30th Anniversary of the Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts" conference currently being held in Sante Fe, New Mexico. The location of the sources studied by Bloom's group required a careful coordination of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, along with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA) in Socorro, New Mexico. Chandra and the VLA provided a precise location of the fading X-ray and radio "afterglow" of two X-ray flashes known as XRF 011030 and XRF 020427. The Hubble Space Telescope was used to identify and study galaxies at these locations and estimate their distances to between

  11. Miniature x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  12. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, George

    2010-01-01

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  13. Portable flash X-ray systems: applications and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Three portable flash x-ray equipments are described, and applications such as jet and high explosive studies, bullet impact and lead casting experiments are given as well as techniques for triggering and protection of equipment and film

  14. Compact x-ray source and panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampayon, Stephen E [Manteca, CA

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  15. Pulsating X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumper, J.

    1986-01-01

    The discovery of pulsating X-ray sources in close binary systems was one of the major achievements of the Uhuru satellite. Today one knows about two dozens of these sources with pulsational periods between 69 ms and 835 s. In most cases the X-ray source orbits an early-type star of high mass having a rather large optical luminosity. There are a few exceptions: GX1+4 is associated with a late-type (M6) giant, 4U1616-67 has a comparison of very low mass (≤ 0.1 M/sub sub solar/), and Her X-1 is a borderline case, since its counterpart HZ Her is an A-F star of -- 2/sub sub solar/. It is clear that the X-ray sources in these systems are rotating magnetized neutron stars accreting from their normal companion, probably in most cases via Roche lobe overflow which leads to the formation of an accretion disk. In some cases (e.g. Vela X-1) the accretion proceeds via a stellar wind. Pulsations occur because in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star the matter is funneled by the strong magnetic field onto the polar caps where a hot and very luminous plasma is formed. Typical luminosities are huge, namely of the order of 10/sup 37/ erg/s which are radiated at effective temperatures of -- 10/sup 8/ K. Much has been learned about these systems and about neutron stars from studies of pulse arrival times and source spectra. The author briefly summarizes some of the major results and discusses some very recent results obtained with EXOSAT

  16. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich GRBs Observed by Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H.; Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Barbier, L.; Fenimore, E.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2005 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) and conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs)observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirmed that our known redshift samples are consistent with the correlation between the peak energy (Epeak) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows are similar to those of gamma-ray burst afterglows, but the temporal properties of the two classes are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRBs afterglow show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of X-ray afterglows of XRFs are systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared with that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences in the X-ray afterglow between XRFs and C-GRBs are key to understanding not only a mysterious shallow-to-steep phase in the X-ray afterglow but also the unique nature of XRFs.

  17. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  18. Portable flash x-ray systems: applications and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, L.E. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Three energies of portable flash x-ray equipment are described, and applications such as jetting and high explosive studies, bullet impact and casting of lead experiments are given as well as techniques for triggering and protection of equipment and film

  19. The SWARF high energy flash X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.F.; Dove, E.W.D.

    1976-06-01

    A description is presented of the SWARF flash radiography facility at AWRE Foulness, which is stated to be the most powerful flash x-ray system available, in the U.K. The machine consists essentially of a Marx generator, a coaxial Blumlein system and an x-ray tube. The voltage output from the Marx generator (about 2.5 MV from an 80 kV input) is applied to a large re-entrant Blumlein pulse-forming line. Near maximum voltage, an adjustable oil switch short-circuits one end of the Blumlein generator and so applies a square voltage pulse of 65 ns duration to the x-ray tube. The x-rays are produced from a tantalum target which forms the anode of a vacuum field emission diode. The facility consists of two field machines positioned so that radiographs can be obtained from different angles. The description is given under the following heads: modus operandi; constructional details; oil installation; electrical details; commissioning, calibration and electrical data; flash radiography in explosives research; operational control of facility, film packs; radiographic results; further developments; overall performance. (U.K.)

  20. A FOURIER-TRANSFORMED BREMSSTRAHLUNG FLASH MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS IN ACCRETING BLACK HOLE SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Accreting black hole sources show a wide variety of rapid time variability, including the manifestation of time lags during X-ray transients, in which a delay (phase shift) is observed between the Fourier components of the hard and soft spectra. Despite a large body of observational evidence for time lags, no fundamental physical explanation for the origin of this phenomenon has been presented. We develop a new theoretical model for the production of X-ray time lags based on an exact analytical solution for the Fourier transform describing the diffusion and Comptonization of seed photons propagating through a spherical corona. The resulting Green's function can be convolved with any source distribution to compute the associated Fourier transform and time lags, hence allowing us to explore a wide variety of injection scenarios. We show that thermal Comptonization is able to self-consistently explain both the X-ray time lags and the steady-state (quiescent) X-ray spectrum observed in the low-hard state of Cyg X-1. The reprocessing of bremsstrahlung seed photons produces X-ray time lags that diminish with increasing Fourier frequency, in agreement with the observations for a wide range of sources

  1. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  2. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roecker, Caleb Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schirato, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Charge trapping, resulting in a decreased and spatially dependent electric field, has long been a concern for wide bandgap semiconductor detectors. While significant work has been performed to characterize this degradation at varying temperatures and radiation environments, this work concentrates upon examining the event-to-event response in a flash X-ray environment. The following work investigates if charge trapping is a problem for CZT detectors, with particular emphasis on flash X-ray radiation fields at cold temperatures. Results are compared to a non-flash radiation field, using an Am-241 alpha source and similar temperature transitions. Our ability to determine if a response change occurred was hampered by the repeatability of our flash X-ray systems; a small response change was observed with the Am-241 source. Due to contrast of these results, we are in the process of revisiting the Am-241 measurements in the presence of a high radiation environment. If the response change is more pronounced in the high radiation environment, a similar test will be performed in the flash X-ray environment.

  3. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  4. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    An attempt is made to distill from observational and theoretical information on the galactic bulge X-ray sources in general, and on the X-ray burst sources in particular, those aspects which seem to have the greatest relevance to the understanding of these sources. Galactic bulge sources appear to be collapsed objects of roughly solar mass, in most cases neutron stars, which are accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions. Type I bursts seem to result from thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of some of these neutron stars, while the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster are almost certainly due to an instability in the accretion flow onto a neutron star. It is concluded that the studies cited offer a new and powerful observational handle on the fundamental properties of neutron stars and of the interacting binary systems in which they are often contained.

  5. Nuclear Malaysia Plasma Focus Device as a X-ray Source For Radiography Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokiah Mohd Sabri; Abdul Halim Baijan; Siti Aiasah Hashim; Mohd Rizal Mohd Chulan; Wah, L.K.; Mukhlis Mokhtar; Azaman Ahmad; Rosli Che Ros

    2013-01-01

    A 3.375 kJ plasma focus is designed to operate at 13.5 kV for the purpose of studying x-ray source for radiography in Argon discharge. X-rays is detected by using x-ray film from the mammography radiographic plate. The feasibility of the plasma focus as a high intensity flash x-ray source for good contrast in radiography image is presented. (author)

  6. Miniature x-ray point source for alignment and calibration of x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Boyle, M.J.; Glaros, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature x-ray point source of high brightness similar to that of Rovinsky, et al. is described. One version of the x-ray source is used to align the x-ray optics on the Argus and Shiva laser systems. A second version is used to determine the spatial and spectral transmission functions of the x-ray optics. The spatial and spectral characteristics of the x-ray emission from the x-ray point source are described. The physical constraints including size, intensity and thermal limitations, and useful lifetime are discussed. The alignment and calibration techniques for various x-ray optics and detector combinations are described

  7. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  8. High-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-10-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the Laser Synchrotron Light Source (LSLS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power C0 2 laser may be used as prototype LSLS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps C0 2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 70 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of well-collimated, up to 9.36-keV (∼ Angstrom) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ∼10 19 photons/sec will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to a variable e-beam energy. A natural short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to a 10 21 -10 22 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO 2 laser upgrade to 1 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps. The ATF LSLS x-ray beamline, exceeding by orders of magnitude the peak fluxes attained at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray storage ring, may become attractive for certain users, e.g., for biological x-ray microscopy. In addition, a terawatt CO 2 laser will enable harmonic multiplication of the x-ray spectrum via nonlinear Compton scattering

  9. On the origin of X-ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2003-01-01

    We use the very simple and successful cannonball (CB) model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observational data on X-ray flashes (XRFs) and their AGs. We show that the observations support the CB-model interpretation that XRFs, like GRBs, are produced by the explosions of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) akin to SN1998bw, by jets of highly-relativistic CBs. The XRFs and GRBs are intrinsically identical objects, but the XRFs are viewed from angles (relative to the jet direction) which are typically a few times larger than the typical viewing angles of ``classical'', long-duration GRBs. XRFs of shorter duration than the ones observed so far, like short GRBs, may be produced in Type Ia SNe akin to SN1997cy.

  10. The galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gursky, H.; Schreier, E.

    1975-01-01

    The current observational evidence on galactic X-ray sources is presented both from an astrophysical and astronomical point of view. The distributional properties of the sources, where they appear in the Galaxy, and certain average characteristics are discussed. In this way, certain properties of the X-ray sources can be deduced which are not apparent in the study of single objects. The properties of individual X-ray sources are then described. The hope is that more can be learnt about neutron stars and black holes, their physical properties, their origin and evolution, and their influence on other galactic phenomena. Thus attention is paid to those elements of data which appear to have the most bearing on these questions. (Auth.)

  11. Intense microfocus X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    An intense microfocus X-ray source comprises a chamber, a turbomolecular pump to evacuate the chamber, an anode and a cathode within the chamber and electromagnet coils to focus electrons from the cathode on to a small spot on the anode to produce a divergent X-ray beam. The pump has a shaft to which the anode is connected, so that operation of the pump causes rotation of the anode. Heat generated in the anode by the incident electron beam is spread over a larger area than if the anode were stationary. Consequently a more intense electron beam can be used, leading to a more intense X-ray beam, without melting the anode. (author)

  12. Predicted flash x-ray environments using standard converter configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Sanford, T.W.L.

    1985-09-01

    Using a sophisticated Monte Carlo model, we have obtained predictions of the forward radiation fields generated by a series of monoenergetic electron sources, with kinetic energies ranging from 0.5 to 15.0 MeV, normally incident on standard converter configurations. The tantalum converter foil thickness that maximizes the total forward-going x-ray energy ranges from 0.3 times the continuous-slowing-down-approximation electron range at 0.5 MeV to 0.6 times that range at 15.0 MeV. This result is not very sensitive to the presence or absence of typical electron absorbers or debris shields. The forward extraction efficiency exhibits a slightly superlinear dependence on source electron kinetic energy. Electron backscatter and photon absorption are shown to be the chief transport phenomena that limit x-ray extraction. Dependence of x-ray spectra on emission angle results from the complicated interplay of cross-section kinematics, slant-thickness absorption, and slant-thickness buildup. The response of common dosimetry materials to the radiation fields was also studied. The systematics of energy deposition in high-Z and low-Z dosimetry materials as a function of source energy, converter geometry, and emission angle are presented in terms of an effective absorption coefficient. The utility of this coefficient for predicting the energy deposition in one material from the measured dose in another material is demonstrated. It is shown that the converter thickness that optimizes dose is less than the thickness that optimizes the forward extraction efficiency. 11 refs., 32 figs.

  13. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    features in the X ray light curve include flickering, strong quasi periodic oscillations, irregular X ray bursts, pronounced dips and rapid high low transitions both in soft and hard X ray bands (Greiner et al. 1996; Morgan et al. 1997; Yadav et al. 1999). Among the main dynamical features of the source are the emission of two.

  14. Observation of extragalactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui-Van, Andre.

    1973-01-01

    A narrow angular resolution detection apparatus using a high performance collimator has proved particularly well suited for the programs of observation of X ray sources. The experimental set-up and its performance are described. One chapter deals with the particular problems involved in the observation of X ray sources with the aid of sounding balloons. The absorption of extraterrestrial photons by the earth atmosphere is taken into account in the procesing of the observation data using two methods of calculation: digital and with simulation techniques. The results of three balloon flights are then presented with the interpretation of the observations carried out using both thermal and non thermal emission models. This analysis leads to some possible characteristics of structure of the Perseus galaxy cluster [fr

  15. Laser-produced X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, L.T.; Seely, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    A formidable array of advanced laser systems are emerging that produce extreme states of light and matter. By irradiating solid and gaseous targets with lasers of increasing energy densities, new physical regimes of radiation effects are being explored for the first time in controlled laboratory settings. One result that is being accomplished or pursued using a variety of techniques, is the realization of novel sources of X-rays with unprecedented characteristics and light-matter interactions, the mechanisms of which are in many cases still being elucidated. Examples include the megajoule class of laser-produced plasmas designed in pursuit of alternative-energy and security applications and the petawatt class of lasers used for fast ignition and X-ray radiographic applications such as medical imaging and real-time imaging of plasma hydrodynamics. As these technologies mature, increased emphasis will need to be placed on advanced instrumentation and diagnostic metrology to characterize the spectra, time structure, and absolute brightness of X-rays emitted by these unconventional sources. Such customized and absolutely calibrated measurement tools will serve as an enabling technology that can help in assessing the overall system performance and progress, as well as identification of the underlying interaction mechanisms of interest to basic and applied strong-field and high-energy-density science.

  16. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, W.H.G.; Joss, P.C.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1981-01-01

    In this article we shall discuss the observed X-ray, optical, infrared and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, with an emphasis on those that produce type I X-ray bursts. There is persuasive evidence that these burst sources and many other galactic bulge sources are neutron stars in low-mass, close-binary stellar systems. (orig./WL)

  17. Some observational aspects of compact galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis contains the following observations of compact galactic X-ray sources: i) the X-ray experiments onboard the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ANS, ii) a rocket-borne ultra soft X-ray experiment and iii) the Objective Grating Spectrometer onboard the EINSTEIN observatory. In Chapter I the various types of compact galactic X-ray sources are reviewed and put into the perspective of earlier and following observations. In Chapter II the author presents some of the observations of high luminosity X-ray sources, made with ANS, including the detection of soft X-rays from the compact X-ray binary Hercules X-1 and the ''return to the high state'' of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. Chapter III deals with transient X-ray phenomena. Results on low luminosity galactic X-ray sources are collected in Chapter IV. (Auth.)

  18. Ultraluminous supersoft X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Song; Justham, Stephen; Lu, You-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Qing-Zhong; di Stefano, Rosanne; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Álvarez, Pedro; Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shri

    2017-06-01

    While ultraluminous supersoft X-ray sources (ULSs) bear features for intermediate mass black holes or very massive white dwarfs possibly close to Chandrasekhar mass limit, our recent discovery of processing relativistic baryonic jets from a prototype ULS in M81 demonstrate that they are not IMBHs or WDs, but black holes accreting at super-Eddington rates. This discovery strengthens the recent ideas that ULXs are stellar black holes with supercritical accretion, and provides a vivid manifestation of what happens when a black hole devours too much, that is, it will generate thick disk winds and fire out sub-relativistic baryonic jets along the funnel as predicted by recent numerical simulations.

  19. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. We report the spectral measurement of GRS 1915+105 in the hard X ray energy band of 20 140keV. The observations were made on. March 30th, 1997 during a quiescent phase of the source. We discuss the mechanism of emission of hard X ray photons and the evolution of the spectrum by comparing the data ...

  20. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  1. Analysis of the X-ray microbeam test result of the flash memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yihua; Ding Lili; Chen Wei; Guo Hongxia; Guo Xiaoqiang; Lin Dongsheng; Zhang Keying; Zhang Fengqi; Deng Yuliang; Fan Ruyu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The failure phenomenon is difficult to analyze for the flash memories when the whole chip is exposed to irradiation since both the memory array and the peripheral circuits might be degraded. Purpose: In order to detect the radiation susceptibility and corresponding phenomenon of the related circuits that included in the flash memories, the X-ray microbeam is used as the radiation source instead of 60 Co. Methods: The failure phenomenon is studied respectively when the memory array, decoder circuits, the charge pump circuits as well as the I/O circuits are exposed to radiation. The errors are mapped according to the logical address and the failure mechanism is analyzed based on the circuits. Results: Irradiated on the memory .array win lead to regularly distributed 0→1 bit flips, while only 1→0 are found when the row decoder is under exposure. Degradation of the charge pump circuits would lead to the erase/program functional failure. Conclusions: The results suggest that the X-ray microbeam radiation test is a good method for detecting the radiation susceptibility of the integrated circuits that contains lots of circuit modules. (authors)

  2. Flash X-Ray Generator At High Energy: GREC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchet, J.; Biero, H.; Fourrier, G.

    1983-08-01

    GREC, an acronym for "Generateur de Radiographie EClair" was designed for visualisation, measurements and studies on dynamic behavior of materials under high explosive loading. GREC was built in 1974 by Physics International for the CEA. Since the first operating time, 1975, this facility has been improving, taking advantage of progress in the techniques involved, especialy focusing and transport of intense electron beams. In this paper, we describe the X-ray machine and give some details on the image detection device. The pulse generator, a 80 stages Marx Generator can deliver a peak voltage of 9 MV in 1.2/us by series erection of 2 x 80 capacitors charged at + 60 kV. The Hulse-forming network, a tri-axial Blumlein, delivers a 80 ns-pulse via a 26 ohms impedance transmission line to the transport section. This transport section is a 24 cm diameter, 2 meters long, magnetic-insulated coaxial line. At the end, the X-ray radiation is emitted by bremstrahlung of the electrons impinging the tantalum anode of the dis-charge diode. The main specifications are : - electrical : 7 -MV - 180 kA - 30 ns - X-ray : Diode 1 : 400 R at 1 meter ; spot size : 20 mm Diode 2 : 100 - 300 R at 1 meter ; spot size : 4-8 mm The image acouisition device has been designed for X-raying of objects under loading of un to 50 kg of high explosives. In the paper, we give some details on the exnerimental arrangement used. Despite the severe environmental shock constraints, reasonable measurements of line-integrated density are possible.

  3. Network based multi-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingjin; Yuan Jie; Liu Yaqiang; Lin Yong; Song Zheng; Liu Keyin; Zhang Qi; Zheng Futang

    2000-01-01

    A network based multi-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system has been developed. It can be used to acquire and digitize orthogonal flash X-ray images in multi-interval, and to distribute the images on the network. There is no need of films and chemical process, no anxiety of waiting and no trouble of film archiving. This system is useful for testing ballistics, jet, explode, armour-piercing and fast running machines. The system composing and acquired images are presented. The software for object separating, mass calculating, 3D positioning, speed determining and cavity reconstruction are described

  4. Network based multi-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingjin; Yuan Jie; Liu Yaqiang; Lin Yong; Song Zheng; Liu Keyin

    2003-01-01

    A network based multi-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system has been developed. It can be used to acquire and digitize orthogonal flash X-ray images in multi-interval, and to distribute the images on the network. There is no need of films and chemical process, no anxiety of waiting and no trouble of film archiving. This system is useful for testing ballistics, jet, explode, armour-piercing and fast running machines. The system composing and acquired images of terminal ballistics are presented. The software for object separating, profile calculating and 3D cavity reconstruction are described

  5. Multiple station beamline at an undulator x-ray source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Freund, A.K.; Grübel, G.

    1994-01-01

    The undulator X-ray source is an ideal source for many applications: the beam is brilliant, highly collimated in all directions, quasi-monochromatic, pulsed and linearly polarized. Such a precious source can feed several independently operated instruments by utilizing a downstream series of X......-ray transparent monochromator crystals. Diamond in particular is an attractive monochromator as it is rather X-ray transparent and can be fabricated to a high degree of crystal perfection. Moreover, it has a very high heat conductivity and a rather small thermal expansion so the beam X-ray heat load problem...

  6. Intense X-ray and EUV light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Joshua; Ekdahl, Carl; Oertel, John

    2017-06-20

    An intense X-ray or EUV light source may be driven by the Smith-Purcell effect. The intense light source may utilize intense electron beams and Bragg crystals. This may allow the intense light source to range from the extreme UV range up to the hard X-ray range.

  7. Design of a 7-MV Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) for down-hole flash x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Welch, Dale Robert; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Rose, David Vincent; Johnson, David Lee; Bruner, Nichelle Lee; Leckbee, Joshua J.

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed power driven flash x-ray radiography is a valuable diagnostic for subcritical experiments at the Nevada Test Site. The existing dual-axis Cygnus system produces images using a 2.25 MV electron beam diode to produce intense x-rays from a small source. Future hydrodynamic experiments will likely use objects with higher areal mass, requiring increased x-ray dose and higher voltages while maintaining small source spot size. A linear transformer driver (LTD) is a compact pulsed power technology with applications ranging from pulsed power flash x-ray radiography to high current Z-pinch accelerators. This report describes the design of a 7-MV dual-axis system that occupies the same lab space as the Cygnus accelerators. The work builds on a design proposed in a previous report [1]. This new design provides increased diode voltage from a lower impedance accelerator to improve coupling to low impedance diodes such as the self magnetic pinch (SMP) diode. The design also improves the predicted reliability by operating at a lower charge voltage and removing components that have proven vulnerable to failure. Simulations of the new design and experimental results of the 1-MV prototype are presented

  8. Medical X-ray sources now and for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the use of X-rays in their largest field of application: medical diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapy. For this purpose, vacuum electronics in the form of X-ray tubes as the source of bremsstrahlung (braking radiation) have been the number one choice for X-ray production in the range of photon energies between about 16 keV for mammography and 150 keV for general radiography. Soft tissue on one end and bony structures on the other are sufficiently transparent and the contrast delivered by difference of absorption is sufficiently high for this spectral range. The dominance of X-ray tubes holds even more than 120 years after Conrad Roentgen's discovery of the bremsstrahlung mechanism. What are the specifics of current X-ray tubes and their medical diagnostic applications? How may the next available technology at or beyond the horizon look like? Can we hope for substantial game changers? Will flat panel sources, less expensive X-ray "LED's", compact X-ray Lasers, compact synchrotrons or equivalent X-ray sources appear in medical diagnostic imaging soon? After discussing the various modalities of imaging systems and their sources of radiation, this overview will briefly touch on the physics of bremsstrahlung generation, key characteristics of X-ray tubes, and material boundary conditions, which restrict performance. It will discuss the deficits of the bremsstrahlung technology and try to sketch future alternatives and their prospects of implementation in medical diagnostics.

  9. Optical observations of binary X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boynton, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    The contribution to the recent progress in astronomy made by optical observations is pointed out. The optical properties of X-ray sources help to establish the physical nature of these objects. The current observational evidence on the binary X-ray sources HZ Her/Her X-1 and HDE 226868/Cyg X-1 is reported. (P.J.S.)

  10. Fragmentation mechanisms based on single drop steam explosion experiments using flash X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Frost, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Flash X-ray and high-speed regular photography were used to investigate the fragmentation processes during the vapor explosion of single drops of molten metal immersed in water. For relatively low ambient flow velocities ( 45 m/s), vapor bubble growth is diminished and high-speed motion of vapor within the bubble leads to an enhanced fragmentation rate. (orig.)

  11. Application Of Flash X-Ray Radiography To Problems In The Pulp And Paper Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Theodore E.

    1988-02-01

    The use of flash x-ray radiography to investigate high speed multiphase flows is demonstrated. Both fundamental and practical problems of interest to the pulp and paper industry are used as examples. More specifically, studies of concentrated fiber suspension flows, kraft black liquor sprays and impulse drying are discussed.

  12. Compact stellar X-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewin, W.H.G.; van der Klis, M.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray astronomy is the prime available window on astrophysical compact objects: black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs. In the last ten years new observational opportunities have led to an explosion of knowledge in this field. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the astrophysics of

  13. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  14. Diagnostic X-ray sources-present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf; Grüner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This paper compares very different physical principles of X-ray production to spur ideation. Since more than 120 years, bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes has been the workhorse of medical diagnostics. Generated by X-ray segments comprised of X-ray tubes and high-voltage generators in the various medical systems, X-ray photons in the spectral range between about 16 keV and 150 keV deliver information about anatomy and function of human patients and in pre-clinical animal studies. Despite of strides to employ the wave nature of X-rays as phase sensitive means, commercial diagnostic X-ray systems available until the time of writing still rely exclusively on measuring the attenuation and scattering of X-rays by matter. Significant activities in research aim at building highly brilliant short pulse X-ray sources, based on e.g. synchrotron radiation, free electron lasers and/or laser wake-field acceleration of electrons followed by wiggling with magnetic structures or Thomson scattering in bunches of light. While both approaches, non-brilliant and brilliant sources, have different scope of application, we speculate that a combination may expand the efficacy in medical application. At this point, however, severe technical and commercial difficulties hinder closing this gap. This article may inspire further development and spark innovation in this important field.

  15. Parameters estimation for X-ray sources: positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avni, Y.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the sizes of the positional error boxes for x-ray sources can be determined by using an estimation method which we have previously formulated generally and applied in spectral analyses. It is explained how this method can be used by scanning x-ray telescopes, by rotating modulation collimators, and by HEAO-A (author)

  16. Carbon nanotubes in pyroelectric X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Ivashchuk, O. O.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Klenin, A. A.; Kubankin, A. S.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Oleinik, A. N.; Pavlov, A. A.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Results of experimental investigation for application carbon nanotubes (CNT) array in a pyroelectric X-ray source are presented. It is shown that CNT allows increasing X-ray yield and energy, but the orientation of CNT array should be taken into account since the accidentally oriented CNT array is more efficient. Also, an optimal residual gas pressure condition for the pyroelectric X-ray source with CNT arrays has been found. It has been determined that the maximum of X-ray yield observed at 0.1 mTorr. Effects that lead to an increasing of the X-ray yield and perspectives of the pyroelectric source with CNT arrays are discussed.

  17. Flash X-Ray Cinematography At Framing Rates Up To 4.10 7 Images/Sec: Application To Terminal Ballistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet, Francis; Hatterer, Francis

    1983-08-01

    The two following cinematographic methods can be considered : 1. generation of an X-ray pulse train with a single X-ray tube. The deionization time between two discharges limits the upper value of the frame repetition rate ; 2. cineradiography with multiple tubes. The time interval has no lower limit, but errors can result from the parallax and this method is not suitable for the visualization of phenomena lacking axial symetry. We present a novel tube including four flash X-ray sources equally spaced by 20 mm only so that parallax can be neglected in most cases. The electrodes consist of four cathodes and an single anode on which deflectors are mounted in order to prevent the vapors produced in a discharge space from attaining the other discharge spaces. The shortest time interval separating two successive discharges is only limited by the X-ray pulse duration, i.e. 25ns. The novel flash X-ray tube is used in connection with four 500 kV, 60 J, Marx-surge generators. A dose of 1.94 μC/kg per pulse at 1 meter from the anode is reached. The frame recording method uses a fluorescent screen converting X-rays in light photons and a high speed electronic camera ("Imacon 790"). This new flash X-ray cinematographic device has been used for recording phenomena in terminal ballistics. Examples are given of frames showing the penetration of projectiles into a target.

  18. Miniaturized High-Speed Modulated X-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith C. (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor); Kenyon, Steven J. (Inventor); Spartana, Nick Salvatore (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized high-speed modulated X-ray source (MXS) device and a method for rapidly and arbitrarily varying with time the output X-ray photon intensities and energies. The MXS device includes an ultraviolet emitter that emits ultraviolet light, a photocathode operably coupled to the ultraviolet light-emitting diode that emits electrons, an electron multiplier operably coupled to the photocathode that multiplies incident electrons, and an anode operably coupled to the electron multiplier that is configured to produce X-rays. The method for modulating MXS includes modulating an intensity of an ultraviolet emitter to emit ultraviolet light, generating electrons in response to the ultraviolet light, multiplying the electrons to become more electrons, and producing X-rays by an anode that includes a target material configured to produce X-rays in response to impact of the more electrons.

  19. Sources of the X-rays Based on Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Mytsykov, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of the intense X-rays generation by laser beam scattering on a relativistic electron beam are described and description of facilities assigned to produce the X-rays based on Compton scattering is presented. The possibilities of various types of such facilities are estimated and discussed. The source of the X-rays based on a storage ring with low beam energy is described in details and advantages of the sources of such type are discussed.The results of calculation and numerical simulation carried out for laser electron storage ring NESTOR that is under development in NSC KIPT show wide prospects of the accelerator facility of such type

  20. Environments of x-ray sources in external galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David M.

    Star clusters provide a unique opportunity to study both the environments and progenitors associated with compact objects. Star-forming galaxies are abundant in both star clusters and X-ray point sources. The latter are candidates for X- ray binaries (XRBs) containing a compact object left behind after the death of a massive star. I study the environments of compact objects by focusing on X- ray point sources and massive star clusters in the two star-forming galaxies, the Antennae and NGC 1569. I develop a successful technique for this study using the Antennae. I establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with an rms positional uncertainty of ~0.5". I find 19 IR counterparts within 1.5" of an X-ray source. Performing an IR photometric study, I find that the cluster counterparts are more luminous and massive than the general cluster population in the Antennae. I define the quantity, e, relating the fraction of observed X-ray sources per unit mass as a function of cluster mass. I find a constant value of e = 6×10 -8 [Special characters omitted.] , which I demonstrate indicates more massive clusters are more likely to harbor XRBs only because they have more stars. Using my IR-to-X-ray frame tie as an intermediary, I match Chandra X-ray positions to HST optical positions. Applying spectral photometric models to IR/ optical counterparts I determine cluster mass, age and metallicity, which further characterize the environments of Antennae XRBs. My analysis also includes a multiwavelength and spectroscopic study of the unusual X-ray source, X-37. After finding an optical and IR counterpart to this X-ray source, an optical/IR spectrum revealed this source is a background quasar at a redshift of z = 0.26. Extending my study to the dwarf, starburst galaxy, NGC 1569, I produce a frame tie between ground-based, IR and Chandra, X-ray images with an rms positional uncertainty of 0.2". I then identify seven cluster counterparts within 0.6" of an X-ray source. Unlike the

  1. X-Ray and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Dim X-Ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Morihana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of X-ray and Near-Infrared observations of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE. We extracted 2,002 X-ray point sources in the Chandra Bulge Field (l =0°.113, b = 1°.424 down to ~10-14.8 ergscm-2s-1 in 2-8 keV band with the longest observation (900 ks of the GRXE. Based on X-ray brightness and hardness, we classied the X-ray point sources into three groups: A (hard, B (soft and broad spectrum, and C (soft and peaked spectrum. In order to know populations of the X-ray point sources, we carried out NIR imaging and spectroscopy observation. We identied 11% of X-ray point sources with NIR and extracted NIR spectra for some of them. Based on X-ray and NIR properties, we concluded that non-thermal sources in the group A are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf binaries such as cataclysmic variables (CVs and Pre-CVs. We concluded that the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flare and quiescence, respectively.

  2. Application of GaAs and CdTe photoconductor detectors to X-ray flash radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathy, F.; Cuzin, M.; Gagelin, J.J.; Mermet, R.; Piaget, B.; Rustique, J.; Verger, L. (CEA, Direction des Technologies Avancees, Lab. d' Electronique, de Technologie et d' Instrumentation, DSYS, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Hauducoeur, A.; Nicolas, P.; Le Dain, L.; Hyvernage, M. (CEA, Direction des Applications Militaires, 77 - Courtry (France))

    1992-11-15

    Some insulating GaAs and CdTe:Cl photoconductor probes were qualified on high energy X-ray single-shot flash generators. The estimated minimum detected dose per flash corresponding to a 230 mrad direct beam attenuated by 200 mm lead was 20 [mu]rad. The dynamic range was about 4 decades in amplitude or charge, with a good linearity. Such detectors, by locating the origin of the parasitic scattered beam, could be used to eliminate this parasitic beam in X-ray flash radiography in detonics experiments. Imaging possibilities are mentioned, as well as X-ray generator monitoring with such detectors or with neutron preirradiated photoconductors. (orig.).

  3. Application of GaAs and CdTe photoconductor detectors to x-ray flash radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathy, F.; Cuzin, M.; Gagelin, J.J.; Mermet, R.; Piaget, B.; Rustique, J.; Verger, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (FR). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Hauducoeur, A.; Nicolas, P.; Le Dain, L.; Hyvernage, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Vaujours, 77 - Courtry (FR)

    1991-12-31

    Semi-insulating GaAs and CdTe:Cl photoconductor probes were qualified on high energy X ray single shot flash generators. The estimated minimum detected dose per flash corresponding to a 230 mrad direct beam attenuated by 200 mm lead was 20 {mu}rad. The dynamic range was about 4 decades in amplitude or charges, with a good linearity. Such detectors, by locating the origin of the parasitic scattered beam, could be used to eliminate this parasitic beam in X ray flash radiography in detonics experiments. Imaging possibilities are mentioned, as well as X ray generator monitoring with such detectors or with neutron preirradiated photoconductors.

  4. High Brightness Electron Gun for X-Ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Kanno, K; Sugimura, Takashi; Tawada, Masafumi

    2005-01-01

    A new electron-gun system is under development in order to increase X-ray from a rotating target. In commercial X-ray sources electron beams usually hit targets at the outer part. Owing to deformation by centrifugal force, there has been a limit on electron beam intensities. In order to overcome this difficulty, we adopted a new injection system which strikes inside of a ring-shape projection on a rotating target. It has an advantage in that heated-up points have supports back side against centrifugal force. This merit allows us to raise electron beam to give stronger X-rays.

  5. X-ray flash photography of spark discharges in layers of liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Rudolf K.

    2001-04-01

    When W. Schaaffs developed X-ray flash machines after World War II at Siemens in Germany, he used spark discharges in layers of liquid between solid plates as a nonmilitary test object. W. Schaaffs discovered the so-called compression ring in 1947 during his experiments with spark discharges. This paper discusses the construction of triode X-ray flash tubes, the evolution of the discharge into the vacuum of the tube and the tubes characteristics depending on this mechanism. It will be found, that the special geometry of the tube shows an important influence on the discharge. The electrons will need a long time to reach the anode while positive ions are strongly accelerated near the anode. The duration of the x-ray flash is limited by the size and speed of the evaporated material from the anode. In the second part of this paper the spark discharge in a layer of liquid between solid plates is described. With this spark discharge it is possible to produce a shock wave in the liquid which finally moves to a vortex. Faster waves propagate in the plates at both sides of the layer. The plate waves induce a low pressure region in front of the ring and there it is possible to detect cavitation bubbles. The spatial arrangement of these bubbles in the layer of liquid between the solid plates depends on the excitation strength of the pulse waves in the plates. Their amplitude depends on the distance to the spark. Thus in a single X-ray flash picture it is possible to study the distribution of the cavitation bubbles for different excitation power. The spatial arrangement of the bubbles can show a periodic structure or it might be chaotic. X-ray flash experiments of this phenomenon will be presented. A model for the birth of cavitation bubbles will be shown. It explains how seeds of phase changes can be distributed in space under special conditions. This idea might also be valid for controlling the crystal growth.

  6. Assembling x-ray sources by carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, V.; Lucci, M.; Toschi, F.; Orlanducci, S.; Tamburri, E.; Terranova, M. L.; Ciorba, A.; Rossi, M.; Hampai, D.; Cappuccio, G.

    2007-05-01

    By the use of a chemical vapour deposition technique a series of metal wires (W, Ta, Steel ) with differently shaped tips have been coated by arrays of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The field emission properties of the SWNT deposits have been measured by a home made apparatus working in medium vacuum (10 -6- 10 -7 mbar) and the SWNT-coated wires have been used to fabricate tiny electron sources for X-ray tubes. To check the efficiency of the nanotube coated wires for X-ray generation has, a prototype X-ray tube has been designed and fabricated. The X-ray tube works at pressures about 10 -6 mbar. The target ( Al film) is disposed on a hole in the stainless steel sheath: this configuration makes unnecessary the usual Be window and moreover allows us to use low accelerating potentials (< 6 kV).

  7. Beam conditioning multilayer optics for laboratory x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, Yuriy; Verman, Boris; Jiang, Licai; Kim, Bonglea

    2015-08-01

    Practically, all modern x-ray diffractometers, SAXS, TXRF systems and many other laboratory X-ray instruments are equipped with multilayer X-ray optics. It is due to a much higher flux these instruments have comparing with those having no optics or having a grazing incidence optics without multilayer coatings. There are variety of the multilayer optics designs - from one bounce collimating parabolic mirror to four corners double bounce focusing mirrors. Design of multilayer optics depends on application, X-ray source parameters, requirements on divergence, focal spot, available room for the optics, manufacturing capability and cost. Key characteristics of the optics, requirements on multilayers d-spacing accuracy, optics slope errors, and substrates surface roughness are discussed in the paper. Different optics designs are considered including recently developed optics for a laboratory topography system and a Hybrid optics combining multilayer and crystal optics for XRR and XRD.

  8. Statistical algorithms for identification of astronomical X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaeepour, H.; Rosen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Observations of present and future X-ray telescopes include a large number of ipitous sources of unknown types. They are a rich source of knowledge about X-ray dominated astronomical objects, their distribution, and their evolution. The large number of these sources does not permit their individual spectroscopical follow-up and classification. Here we use Chandra Multi-Wavelength public data to investigate a number of statistical algorithms for classification of X-ray sources with optical imaging follow-up. We show that up to statistical uncertainties, each class of X-ray sources has specific photometric characteristics that can be used for its classification. We assess the relative and absolute performance of classification methods and measured features by comparing the behaviour of physical quantities for statistically classified objects with what is obtained from spectroscopy. We find that among methods we have studied, multi-dimensional probability distribution is the best for both classifying source type and redshift, but it needs a sufficiently large input (learning) data set. In absence of such data, a mixture of various methods can give a better final result. We discuss some of potential applications of the statistical classification and the enhancement of information obtained in this way. We also assess the effect of classification methods and input data set on the astronomical conclusions such as distribution and properties of X-ray selected sources.

  9. Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

    2009-09-29

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array

  10. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today's X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today's resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting

  11. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  12. Temporal characteristic analysis of laser-modulated pulsed X-ray source for space X-ray communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Da

    2018-04-01

    X-ray communication (XCOM) is a new communication type and is expected to realize high-speed data transmission in some special communication scenarios, such as deep space communication and blackout communication. This study proposes a high-speed modulated X-ray source scheme based on the laser-to-X-ray conversion. The temporal characteristics of the essential components of the proposed laser-modulated pulsed X-ray source (LMPXS) were analyzed to evaluate its pulse emission performance. Results show that the LMPXS can provide a maximum modulation rate up to 100 Mbps which is expected to significantly improve the data rate of XCOM.

  13. X-ray source safety shutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, M.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for controlling the activation of a high energy radiation source having a shutter. The apparatus includes magnets and magnetically responsive switches appropriately placed and interconnected so that only with the shutter and other parts of the source in proper position can safe emission of radiation out an open shutter occur

  14. A JEM-X catalog of X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt; Chenevez, Jerome; Lund, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The JEM-X catalog of X-ray sources presented here is based on detections in individual science windows with a sensitivity limit of about 10 mCrab (5-15 keV). It contains 127 sources and only those that can be identified from the existing reference catalog. The input data are taken from the, up...

  15. On the Relation Between GRB Classes and X-ray Flashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bagoly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts are usually classified into either short-duration or long-duration bursts. Going beyond the short-long classification scheme, it has been shown on statistical grounds that a third, intermediate population is needed in this classification scheme. We are looking for physical properties which discriminate the intermediate duration bursts from the other two classes. As the intermediate group is the softest, we argue that we have related them with X-ray flashes among the GRBs. We give a new, probabilistic definition for this class of events.

  16. Progress on the Flash X-Ray Optical Transition Radiation Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Houck, T; Brown, C

    2008-03-30

    This document summarizes the Flash X-Ray accelerator (FXR) optical transition radiation (OTR) spot-size diagnostics efforts in FY07. During this year, new analysis, simulation, and experimental approaches were utilized to interpret OTR spot data from both dielectric foils such as Kapton (VN type) and metal coated foils. Significant new findings of the intricacies involved in the diagnostic and of FXR operational issues were achieved. Geometry and temperature based effects were found to affect the beam image profiles from the OTR foils. These effects must be taken into account in order to deduce accurately the beam current density profile.

  17. X-ray topographic investigation of the deformation field around spots irradiated by FLASH single pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Balcer, T.; Klinger, D.; Sobierajski, R.; Zymierska, D.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Burian, Tomáš; Gleeson, A.J.; Juha, Libor; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wabnitz, H.; Gaudin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 10 (2011), s. 1036-1040 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : silicon * FLASH irradiation * x-ray topography * deformation fields Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.227, year: 2011

  18. Ultrafast X-ray science at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenlein, R.W.; Chin, A.H.; Chong, H.H.W.; Falcone, R.W.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Johnson, S.L.; Lindenberg, A.M.; Shank, C.V.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Our scientific understanding of the static or time-averaged structure of condensed matter on the atomic scale has been dramatically advanced by direct structural measurements using x-ray techniques and modern synchrotron sources. Of course the structure of condensed matter is not static, and to understanding the behavior of condensed matter at the most fundamental level requires structural measurements on the time scale on which atoms move. The evolution of condensed-matter structure, via the making and breaking of chemical bonds and the rearrangement of atoms, occurs on the fundamental time scale of a vibrational period, ∼100 fs. Atomic motion and structural dynamics on this time scale ultimately determine the course of phase transitions in solids, the kinetic pathways of chemical reactions, and even the efficiency and function of biological processes. The integration of x-ray measurement techniques, a high-brightness femtosecond x-ray source, femtosecond lasers, and stroboscopic pump-probe techniques will provide the unique capability to address fundamental scientific questions in solid-state physics, chemistry, AMO physics, and biology involving structural dynamics. In this paper, we review recent work in ultrafast x-ray science at the ALS including time-resolved diffraction measurements and efforts to develop dedicated beamlines for femtosecond x-ray experiments

  19. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  20. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  1. Rockets for Extended Source Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntaffer, Randall

    The soft X-ray background surrounds our local galactic environment yet very little is known about the physical characteristics of this plasma. A high-resolution spectrum could unlock the properties of this million degree gas but the diffuse, low intensity nature of the background have made it difficult to observe, especially with a dispersive spectrograph. Previous observations have relied on X-ray detector energy resolution which produces poorly defined spectra that are poorly fit by complex plasma models. Here we propose a series of suborbital rocket flights that will begin the characterization of this elusive source through high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy. The rocket-based spectrograph can resolve individual emission lines over the soft X-ray band and place tight constraints on the temperature, density, abundance, ionization state and age of the plasma. These payloads will draw heavily from the heritage gained from previous rocket missions, while also benefiting from related NASA technology development programs. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) team has a history of designing and flying spectrometer components onboard rockets while also being scientific leaders in the field of diffuse soft X-ray astronomy. The PSU program will provide hands-on training of young scientists in the techniques of instrumental and observational X-ray astronomy. The proposed rocket program will also expose these researchers to a full experiment cycle: design, fabrication, tolerance analysis, assembly, flight-qualification, calibration, integration, launch, and data analysis; using a combination of technologies suitable for adaptation to NASA's major missions. The PSU program in suborbital X-ray astronomy represents an exciting mix of compelling science, heritage, cutting-edge technology development, and training of future scientists.

  2. X-Ray Outflows and Super-Eddington Accretion in the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg IX X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walton, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Harrison, F.A.; Fabian, A.C.; Roberts, T.P.; Middleton, M.J.; Reis, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of X-ray continuum emission and flux variability have not conclusively revealed the nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) at the high-luminosity end of the distribution (those with L X ≥ 1040 erg s-1). These are of particular interest because the luminosity requires either

  3. Soft X-ray microscope constructed with 130-nm spatial resolution using a high harmonic X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deuk Su; Park, Jong Ju; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Park, Juyun; Nam, Chang Hee

    2009-01-01

    Using high harmonic radiation as an X-ray light source, a soft X-ray microscope with nanometer-scale spatial resolution was investigated. A transmission soft X-ray microscope was constructed using a Mo/Si multilayer concave mirror as a condenser and a Fresnel zone plate as a microscope objective. The high-order harmonic source at 13 nm, emitted from neon atoms driven by intense femtosecond laser pulses, was optimized by controlling laser chirp. Objects, patterned on 160-nm-thick hydrogen silsesquioxane coated on a 100-nm-thick Si 3 N 4 membrane, were used for imaging. The analysis of object images, captured on an X-ray charge-coupled device, showed that the spatial resolution of the microscope was about 130 nm, verifying the usefulness of the tabletop soft X-ray source. (author)

  4. Toward a fourth-generation X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monction, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The field of synchrotron radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research that is possible with them. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in flee-electron lasers. A major facility of this type based upon a superconducting linac could produce a cost-effective facility that spans wave-lengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotrons facilities, immense new scientific opportunities would result from fourth-generation sources.

  5. Soft X-Ray Thomson Scattering in Warm Dense Hydrogen at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustlin, R R; Toleikis, S; Bornath, T; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Mithen, J; Przystawik, A; Redlin, H; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-07-15

    We present collective Thomson scattering with soft x-ray free electron laser radiation as a method to track the evolution of warm dense matter plasmas with {approx}200 fs time resolution. In a pump-probe scheme an 800 nm laser heats a 20 {micro}m hydrogen droplet to the plasma state. After a variable time delay in the order of ps the plasma is probed by an x-ray ultra violet (XUV) pulse which scatters from the target and is recorded spectrally. Alternatively, in a self-Thomson scattering experiment, a single XUV pulse heats the target while a portion of its photons are being scattered probing the target. From such inelastic x-ray scattering spectra free electron temperature and density can be inferred giving insight on relaxation time scales in plasmas as well as the equation of state. We prove the feasibility of this method in the XUV range utilizing the free electron laser facility in Hamburg, FLASH. We recorded Thomson scattering spectra for hydrogen plasma, both in the self-scattering and in the pump-probe mode using optical laser heating.

  6. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify...... persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr. A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra...... indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Gamma = 1.5-2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high...

  7. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  8. The superconducting x-ray lithography source program at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. P.; Heese, R. N.; Vignola, G.; Murphy, J. B.; Godel, J. B.; Hsieh, H.; Galayda, J.; Seifert, A.; Knotek, M. L.

    1989-07-01

    A compact electron storage ring with superconducting dipole magnets, is being developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven. The parameters of the source have been optimized for its future use as an x-ray source for lithography. This first ring is a prototype which will be used to study the operating characteristics of machines of this type with particular attention being paid to low-energy injection and long beam lifetime.

  9. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  10. X-ray time and spectral variability as probes of ultraluminous x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj Ranga Reddy

    A long-standing debate in the field of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs: luminosities > 3x1039 ergs s-1) is whether these objects are powered by stellar-mass black holes (mass range of 3-25 solar masses) undergoing hyper-accretion/emission or if they host the long-sought after class of intermediate-mass black holes (mass range of a few 100-1000 solar masses) accreting material at sub-Eddington rates. We present X-ray time and energy spectral variability studies of ULXs in order to understand their physical environments and accurately weigh their compact objects. A sample of ULXs exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with centroid frequencies in the range of 10-200 mHz. The nature of the power density spectra (PDS) of these sources is qualitatively similar to stellar-mass black holes when they exhibit the so-called type-C low-frequency QPOs (frequency range of 0.2-15 Hz). However, the crucial difference is that the characteristic frequencies within the PDS of ULXs, viz., the break frequencies and the centroid frequencies of the QPOs, are scaled down by a factor of approximately 10-100 compared to stellar-mass black holes. It has thus been argued that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C low-frequency QPO analogs of stellar-mass black holes and that the observed difference in the frequencies (a fewx0.01 Hz compared with a few Hz) is due to the presence of intermediate-mass black holes ( MULX = (QPOstellar-mass black hole }/QPOULX)xM stellar-mass black hole, where M and QPO are the mass and the QPO frequency, respectively) within these ULXs. We analyzed all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1 in order to test the hypothesis that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C analogs by searching for a correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the energy spectral power-law index as type-C QPOs show such a dependence. From our multi-epoch timing and spectral analysis of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1, we found that the mHz QPOs of these sources vary

  11. The Lack of Halo Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    2006-01-01

    The premise that Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) exist beyond the optical extent of nearby galaxies is investigated. A published catalog containing 41 ULX candidates located between 1 and approx. 3 times the standard D-{25} isophotal radius of their putative host galaxies is examined. Twenty-one of these sources have spectroscopically-confirmed distances. All 21 are background objects giving a 95\\% probability that at least 37 of the 41 candidates are background sources. Thirty-nine of the 41 sources have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios, -1.61.6.) The uniform spatial distribution of the sample is also consistent with a background population. This evidence suggests that ULXs rarely, if at all, exist beyond the distribution of luminous matter in nearby galaxies and, as a consequence, there is no correlation between the population of ULXs and halo objects such as old globular clusters or Population III remnants.

  12. Quasi-Monochromatic Flash X-Ray Generator Utilizing Disk-Cathode Molybdenum Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Tanaka, Etsuro; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-10-01

    High-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -40 to -60 kV using a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an X-ray tube after closing the gap switches in the surge generator using a trigger device. The X-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Sharp K-series characteristic X-rays of molybdenum are produced without using a monochromatic filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. The peak tube voltage increased with increasing charging voltage and increasing space between the target and cathode electrodes. At a charging voltage of -60 kV and a target-cathode space of 1.0 mm, the peak tube voltage and current were 110 kV and 0.75 kA, respectively. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the maximum dimension of the X-ray source was 3.0 mm in diameter. The number of generator-produced K photons was approximately 7× 1014 photons/cm2\\cdots at 0.5 m from the source.

  13. Linear polarization observations of some X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhovskoy, N.M.; Efimov, Yu.S.

    1975-01-01

    Multicolour linear polarization of optical radiation of the X-ray sources Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-1 and Her X-1 was measured at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in 1970-1973. These observations indicate that polarization of Sco X-1 in the ultraviolet, blue and red spectral regions appears to be variable. No statistically significant variations of polarization were found for the other three sources observed. (Auth.)

  14. The central X-ray source in SS 433

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Seward, F.; Leahy, D.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Marshall, F. E.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Numerous observations of SS 433 were obtained with the Einstein X-ray Observatory over an 18 month period from 1979 March through 1980 October. MPC (as well as imaging) data from these observations show that the central object in SS 433 is variable in intensity and spectrum on a wide range of time scales. Flares appear to be correlated with the 13 day binary period, and may be more numerous at particular phases of the 164 day period. No evidence for variability on time scales less than 5 minutes is seen, suggesting the central X-ray source is extended and that the compact object itself is not directly visible. A model for SS 433 is suggested wherein the companion star has a spin misaligned with the orbital angular momentum. The volume of the Roche lobe reaches a minimum twice per binary orbit, giving rise to enhanced accretion which results in X-ray and radio flares. Additional constraints imposed by the X-ray and optical data suggest the compact object in SS 433 is an approximately 10-solar-mass black hole.

  15. An improved edge detection method with sobel operator in high-energy flash X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaolin; Jing Yuefeng; Liu Jun

    2009-01-01

    Edge detection of flash X-ray radiography image is a principal means to extract quantitative boundary information of primary implosion material. The precision of edge detection is an important index for judging flash X-ray radiography diagnostic level . In terms of feature of high-energy flash X-ray radiography image, typical Sobel edge detection algorithm in digital image processing is analyzed in this paper. A simple algorithm for threshold alternative and localization criteria based on maximum gradient is proposed to overcome typical Sobel operater's disadvantages of the obtained image edges being thick and causing edge point misjudgement. The simulated result shows that the obtained edges of the image are thin and the edge position extracted by the algorithm is accurate. (authors)

  16. Projection x-ray topography system at 1-BM x-ray optics test beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Liu, Zunping; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Lang, Keenan; Goetze, Kurt; Sullivan, Joseph; Macrander, Albert [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Projection X-ray topography of single crystals is a classic technique for the evaluation of intrinsic crystal quality of large crystals. In this technique a crystal sample and an area detector (e.g., X-ray film) collecting intensity of a chosen crystallographic reflection are translated simultaneously across an X-ray beam collimated in the diffraction scattering plane (e.g., [1, 2]). A bending magnet beamline of a third-generation synchrotron source delivering x-ray beam with a large horizontal divergence, and therefore, a large horizontal beam size at a crystal sample position offers an opportunity to obtain X-ray topographs of large crystalline samples (e.g., 6-inch wafers) in just a few exposures. Here we report projection X-ray topography system implemented recently at 1-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. A selected X-ray topograph of a 6-inch wafer of 4H-SiC illustrates capabilities and limitations of the technique.

  17. 13.1 micrometers hard X-ray focusing by a new type monocapillary X-ray optic designed for common laboratory X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuepeng; zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yabing; Shang, Hongzhong; Zhang, Fengshou; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2018-04-01

    A new type of monocapillary X-ray optic, called 'two bounces monocapillary X-ray optics' (TBMXO), is proposed for generating a small focal spot with high power-density gain for micro X-ray analysis, using a common laboratory X-ray source. TBMXO is consists of two parts: an ellipsoidal part and a tapered part. Before experimental testing, the TBMXO was simulated by the ray tracing method in MATLAB. The simulated results predicted that the proposed TBMXO would produce a smaller focal spot with higher power-density gain than the ellipsoidal monocapillary X-ray optic (EMXO). In the experiment, the TBMXO performance was tested by both an optical device and a Cu target X-ray tube with focal spot of 100 μm. The results indicated that the TBMXO had a slope error of 57.6 μrad and a 13.1 μm focal spot and a 1360 gain in power density were obtained.

  18. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-08-04

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of {proportional_to}17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in {proportional_to}70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of {proportional_to}10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  19. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of ∝17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in ∝70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of ∝10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  20. The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, Keith; Kallman, Timothy R.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Angelini, Lorella; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jaeger, Theodore; Kaaret, Philip E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Okajima, Takashi; Petre, Robert; Schnittman, Jeremy; Soong, Yang; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Tamagawa, Toru; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-07-01

    The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) is one of three Small Explorer (SMEX) missions selected by NASA for Phase A study, with a launch date in 2020. The PRAXyS Observatory exploits grazing incidence X-ray mirrors and Time Projection Chamber Polarimeters capable of measuring the linear polarization of cosmic X-ray sources in the 2-10 keV band. PRAXyS combines well-characterized instruments with spacecraft rotation to ensure low systematic errors. The PRAXyS payload is developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Iowa, and RIKEN (JAXA) collaborating on the Polarimeter Assembly. The LEOStar-2 spacecraft bus is developed by Orbital ATK, which also supplies the extendable optical bench that enables the Observatory to be compatible with a Pegasus class launch vehicle. A nine month primary mission will provide sensitive observations of multiple black hole and neutron star sources, where theory predicts polarization is a strong diagnostic, as well as exploratory observations of other high energy sources. The primary mission data will be released to the community rapidly and a Guest Observer extended mission will be vigorously proposed.

  1. Optical, Infrared, and Ultraviolet Observations of the X-Ray Flash XRF 050416A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, S. T.; Boyd, P. T.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Schady, P.; Thomsen, B.; Augusteijn, T.; Blustin, A. J.; Breeveld, A.; De Pasquale, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S.; Ivanushkina, M.; Landsman, W.; Laursen, P.; McGowan, K.; Mangano, V.; Markwardt, C. B.; Marshall, F.; Mason, K. O.; Moretti, A.; Page, M. J.; Poole, T.; Roming, P.; Rosen, S.; Still, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry of the afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF 050416A taken between approximately 100 s and 36 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope between 1930 and 22200 Å of β=-1.14+/-0.20 and a decay rate of α=-0.86+/-0.15. There is no evidence for a change in the decay rate between approximately 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst. Our data imply that there is no spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands between 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst and are consistent with the cooling break being redward of the Ks band (22200 Å) at 0.7 days. The combined ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution shows no evidence for a significant amount of extinction in the host galaxy along the line of sight to XRF 050416A. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is only approximately AV=0.2 mag, which is significantly less than the extinction expected from the hydrogen column density inferred from X-ray observations of XRF 050416A assuming a dust-to-gas ratio similar to what is found for the Milky Way. The observed extinction, however, is consistent with the dust-to-gas ratio seen in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that XRF 050416A may have a two-component jet similar to what has been proposed for GRB 030329. If this is the case, the lack of an observed jet break between 0.7 and 42 days is an illusion due to emission from the wide jet dominating the afterglow after approximately 1.5 days.

  2. On the Connection of Gamma-Ray Bursts and X-Ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa, J.; Meszaros, A.

    2017-12-01

    Classification of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into groups has been intensively studied by various statistical tests since 1998. It has been suggested that next to the groups of short/hard and long/soft GRBs there could be another class of intermediate durations. For the Swift/BAT database Veres et al. 2010 (ApJ, 725, 1955) it was found that the intermediate-duration bursts might be related to X-ray flashes (XRFs). On the other hand, Ripa and Meszaros 2016 (Ap&SS, 361, 370) and Ripa et al. 2012 (ApJ, 756, 44) found that the intermediate-duration GRBs in the RHESSI database are spectrally too hard to be given by XRFs. Also, in the BATSE database the intermediate-duration GRBs can be only partly populated by XRFs. The key ideas of the Ripa and Meszaros 2016 (Ap&SS, 361, 370) article are summarized in this poster.

  3. Measuring the black hole mass in ultraluminous X-ray sources with the X-ray scaling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, I.; Gliozzi, M.; Satyapal, S.; Titarchuk, L.

    2018-01-01

    In our recent work, we demonstrated that a novel X-ray scaling method, originally introduced for Galactic black holes (BH), could be reliably extended to estimate the mass of supermassive black holes accreting at moderate to high level. Here, we apply this X-ray scaling method to ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) to constrain their MBH. Using 49 ULXs with multiple XMM-Newton observations, we infer that ULXs host both stellar mass BHs and intermediate mass BHs. The majority of the sources of our sample seem to be consistent with the hypothesis of highly accreting massive stellar BHs with MBH ∼ 100 M⊙. Our results are in general agreement with the MBH values obtained with alternative methods, including model-independent variability methods. This suggests that the X-ray scaling method is an actual scale-independent method that can be applied to all BH systems accreting at moderate-high rate.

  4. Optical observations of binary X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, P.

    1982-01-01

    Here I shall consider only those systems where the compact object is a neutron star (or in a few cases perhaps a black hole). Since van Paradijs (1982) has recently produced an excellent and comprehensive review of optical observations of compact galactic X-ray sources I shall summarise the basic properties of the optical counterparts and discuss a few representative systems in some detail. (orig./WL)

  5. Fragmentation mechanisms based on single drop steam explosion experiments using flash X-ray radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Dept. of Advanced Technology, Upton, NY (United States)); Frost, D.L. (Mechanical Engineering Dept., McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada))

    1994-02-01

    Flash X-ray and high-speed regular photography were used to investigate the fragmentation processes during the vapor explosion of single drops of molten metal immersed in water. For relatively low ambient flow velocities (<5 m/s), a comparison of the breakup of hot and cold drops shows that whereas cold drops breakup due to the stripping of fragments by the relative flow, the fragmentation of a hot drop is dominated by the growth and collapse of a vapor bubble. X-ray radiographs show during the growth of the bubble, that fine filaments of metal protrude from the drop and the drop surface becomes highly convoluted. Using a simple model for the bubble dynamics, an estimate of the energy budget shows that the majority (about 80%) of the thermal energy transfer occurs during bubble collapse. For hot drops at higher flow velocities (>45 m/s), vapor bubble growth is diminished and high-speed motion of vapor within the bubble leads to an enhanced fragmentation rate. (orig.)

  6. Geometry calibration between X-ray source and detector for tomosynthesis with a portable X-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sekine, Masashi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Tomosynthesis is attracting attention as a low-dose tomography technology compared with X-ray CT. However, conventional tomosynthesis imaging devices are large and stationary. Furthermore, there is a limitation in the working range of the X-ray source during image acquisition. We have previously proposed the use of a portable X-ray device for tomosynthesis that can be used for ward rounds and emergency medicine. The weight of this device can be reduced by using a flat panel detector (FPD), and flexibility is realized by the free placement of the X-ray source and FPD. Tomosynthesis using a portable X-ray device requires calibration of the geometry between the X-ray source and detector at each image acquisition. We propose a method for geometry calibration and demonstrate tomosynthesis image reconstruction by this method. An image processing-based calibration method using an asymmetric and multilayered calibration object (AMCO) is presented. Since the AMCO is always attached to the X-ray source housing for geometry calibration, the additional setting of a calibration object or marker around or on the patients is not required. The AMCO's multilayer structure improves the calibration accuracy, especially in the out-of-plane direction. Two experiments were conducted. The first was performed to evaluate the calibration accuracy using an XY positioning stage and a gonio stage. As a result, an accuracy of approximately 1 mm was achieved both in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions. An angular accuracy of approximately [Formula: see text] was confirmed. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the reconstructed image using a foot model phantom. Only the sagittal plane could be clearly observed with the proposed method. We proposed a tomosynthesis imaging system using a portable X-ray device. From the experimental results, the proposed method could provide sufficient calibration accuracy and a clear sagittal plane of the reconstructed tomosynthesis image.

  7. High-durability surface-discharge flash X-ray tube driven by a two-stage Marx pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikoda, Arimitsu; Sato, Eiichi; Kimura, Shingo; Oizumi, Teiji; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1993-01-01

    The authors developed a high-durability flash X-ray tube with a plate-shaped ferrite cathode for the use in the field of biomedical engineering and technology. The surface-discharge cathode was very useful for generating stable flash X rays. This flash X-ray generator consisted of the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, an energy-storage condenser of 97 nF, a two-stage Marx type pulser, an oil diffusion pump, and a flash X-ray tube. This X-ray tube was of a diode which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and had plate-shaped anode and cathode electrodes. The cathode electrode was made of ferrite, and its edge was covered with a thin gold film by means of the spattering in order to decrease contact resistance. The space between the anode and cathode electrodes could be regulated from the outside of the X-ray tube. The two condensers in Marx circuit were charged from 50 to 70 kV by a power supply, and the condensers were connected in series after closing a gap switch. Thus the maximum output voltages from the pulser were about two times the charged voltages. In this experiment, the maximum tube voltage and the current were about 110 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The pulse widths were less than 140 ns, and the maximum X-ray intensity was 1.27 μC/kg at 0.5 m per pulse. The size of the focal spot and the maximum repetition rate were about 2 x 2.5 mm and 50 Hz (fps), respectively

  8. Towards brilliant, compact x-ray sources: a new x-ray photonic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Brian; Mandal, Sudeep; Salisbury, Joshua; Edic, Peter; Hopkins, Forrest; Lee, Susanne M.

    2017-05-01

    General Electric has designed an innovative x-ray photonic device that concentrates a polychromatic beam of diverging x-rays into a less divergent, parallel, or focused x-ray beam. The device consists of multiple, thin film multilayer stacks. X-rays incident on a given multilayer stack propagate within a high refractive index transmission layer while undergoing multiple total internal reflections from a novel, engineered multilayer containing materials of lower refractive index. Development of this device could lead to order-of-magnitude flux density increases, over a large broadband energy range from below 20 keV to above 300 keV. In this paper, we give an overview of the device and present GE's progress towards fabricating prototype devices.

  9. Optimized K (alpha) x-ray flashes from femtosecond-laser-irradiated foils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lu, W.; Nicoul, M.; Shymanovich, U.; Tarasevitch, A.; Zhou, P.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; von der Linde, D.; Mašek, Martin; Gibbon, P.; Teubner, U.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 2 (2009), 026404/1-026404/10 ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : copper * electron density * high-speed optical techniques * plasma density * plasma production by laser * plasma simulation * plasma x-ray sources * titanium Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.400, year: 2009

  10. X-ray photoelectron microscope with a compact x-ray source generated by line-focused laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, N.; Okamoto, Y.; Hara, T.; Takahashi, Z.; Nishimura, Y.; Sakata, A.; Watanabe, K.; Azuma, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A laboratory-sized microscopic system of x-ray photoelectrons has been developing using a compact x-ray source produced by line-focused laser irradiation. The system is a scanning type photoelectron microscope where x-ray beam is micro-focused via a Schwartzschild optics. A compact laser-plasma x-ray source has been developed with a YAG laser system, a line-focus lens system, a tape-target driving system and a debris prevention system, that was operated at repetition rate of 10 Hz or 50 Hz. X-rays were delivered along line plasma whose length was 0.6 to 11 mm with higher intensity than that from a point-focused source. Because the transition line of Al V (13.1 nm) was prominent in the soft x-ray spectrum when the Al tape target irradiated at the lower power density of 10 11 W/cm 2 , the 13.1 nm x-ray was used as an excitation source. The Schwartzschild optics was set on the beamline at a distance about 1 m from the source, which was coated with Mo/Si multilayers for 13.1 nm x-ray. The designed demagnification is 224 that was confirmed in the previous experiment. Therefore, an x-ray micro spot of sub-micron size can be formed on a sample surface when the source size is less than about 0.2 mm. Samples were set on a two-axis high-precision piezo stage mounted to a four-axis manipulator. The electron energy analyzer was a spherical capacitor analyzer with mean diameter of 279.4 mm. The electron detector was a microchannel plate (MCP) with a phosphor screen and the optical image of electrons on the exit plane of the analyzer was taken and recorded by using an ultra low dark noise CCD camera, that was suited for detection of vast photoelectrons excited by x-ray pulse of ns-order duration. We performed spatial resolution test measurements by using a GaAs wafer coated with photo-resist that formed a stripe pattern. The spatial resolution less than 3 micron has been obtained from the variation of As 3d electron intensity along the position of the GaAs sample

  11. Matching microlensing events with X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore, N.; Treves, A.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: The detection of old neutron stars and stellar mass black holes in isolation is one of the most sought after goals of compact object astrophysics. Microlensing surveys may help in achieving this aim because the lensing mechanism is independent of the emission properties of the lens. Several black hole candidates have indeed been detected by means of microlensing observations have been reported in the literature. The identification of counterparts, especially in the X-rays, would be a strong argument in favor of the compact nature of these lenses. Methods: We perform a cross-correlation between the catalogs of microlensing events produced by the OGLE, MACHO, and MOA teams, and those of X-rays sources from the data acquired by the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. On the basis of our previous work, we select only microlensing events with durations longer than one hundred days, which should contain a large fraction of lenses as compact objects. Our matching criterion takes into account the positional coincidence on the sky. Results: We find a single match between a microlensing event, OGLE-2004-BLG-081 (tE ~ 103 days), and the X-ray source 2XMM J180540.5-273427. The angular separation is ~0.5 arcsec, i.e. well within the 90% error box of the X-ray source. The hardness ratios reported in the 2XMM catalog imply that it has a hard spectrum with a peak between 2 keV and 4.5 keV or it has a softer but highly absorbed spectrum. Moreover, the microlensing event is not fully constrained, and other authors propose a possible association of the source star with either a flaring cataclysmic variable or a RS Canum Venaticorum-like star. Conclusions: The very small angular separation (within uncertainties) is a strong indicator that 2XMM J180540.5-273427 is the X-ray counterpart of the OGLE event. However, the uncertainties in the nature of both the lensed system and the lens itself challenge the interpretation of 2XMM J180540.5-273427 as the first confirmed isolated black

  12. Flash X-Ray Apparatus With Spectrum Control Functions For Medical Use And Fuji Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Sato, E.; Hayasi, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Arima, H.; Hoshino, F.

    1985-02-01

    Flash radiographic bio-medical studies at sub-microsecond intervals were performed by using both a new type of flash X-ray(FX) apparatus with spectrum control functions and Fuji Computed Radiography(FCR). This single flasher tends to have a comparatively long exposure time and the electric pulse width of the FX wave form is about 0.3,usec. The maximum FX dose is about 50mR at 1m per pulse, and the effective focal spot varies according to condenser charging voltage, A-C distance, etc., ranging from 1.0 to 3.0mm in diameter, but in the low dose rate region it can be reduced to less than 1.0mm in diameter. The FX dose is determined by the condenser charging voltage and the A-C distance, while the FX spectrum is determined by the average voltage of the FX tube and filters. Various clear FX images were obtained by controlling the spectrum and dose. FCR is a new storage medium for medical radiography developed by the Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. and this apparatus has various image forming functions: low dose radiography, film density control, image contrast control, subtraction management and others. We have used this new apparatus in conjunction with our FX radiography and have obtained some new and interesting biomedical radiograms: the edge enhancement image, the instantaneous enlarged image, and the single exposure energy subtraction image using the FX spectrum distribution.

  13. Mass transfer in stellar X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbunt, F.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with mass transfer in the binary stars that emit X-rays. Optical observations on two sources are presented: 2A0311-227 and Cen X-4. The transferred matter will often enter a gaseous disk around the compact star, and spiral inwards slowly through this disk. The conditions for the formation of such a disk are investigated and the equations governing its structure are presented. Different models are discussed and it is concluded that different models lead to very similar results for those regions of the disk where gas pressure is more important than radiative pressure, and that these results agree fairly well with observations. No consistent model has been constructed as yet for the region where radiative pressure is dominant. Theoretically one predicts that the optical light emitted by a disk around a neutron star is mainly caused by X-ray photons from the immediate surroundings of the neutron star that hit the outer disk surface, are absorbed, thermalised, and re-emitted in the optical and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. This expectation is verified by comparison with the collected observational data of low-mass X-ray binaries. Finally the author investigates which mechanism is responsible for the mass transfer in systems where the mass-losing star is less massive than the sun. (Auth.)

  14. Compact X-ray source based on Compton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zelinsky, A; Karnaukhov, I; Kononenko, S; Lapshin, V G; Mytsykov, A; Telegin, Yu P; Khodyachikh, A; Shcherbakov, A; Molodkin, V; Nemoshkalenko, V; Shpak, A

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility study of an intense X-ray source based on the interaction between the electron beam in a compact storage ring and the laser pulse accumulated in an optical resonator is carried out. We propose to reconstruct the 160 MeV electron storage ring N-100, which was shutdown several years ago. A new magnetic lattice will provide a transverse of electron beam size of approx 35 mu m at the point of electron beam-laser beam interaction. The proposed facility is to generate X-ray beams of intensity approx 2.6x10 sup 1 sup 4 s sup - sup 1 and spectral brightness approx 10 sup 1 sup 2 phot/0.1%bw/s/mm sup 2 /mrad sup 2 in the energy range from 10 keV up to 0.5 MeV. These X-ray beam parameters meet the requirements for most of technological and scientific applications. Besides, we plan to use the new facility for studying the laser cooling effect.

  15. Compact X-ray source based on Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Karnaukhov, I.; Kononenko, S.; Lapshin, V.; Mytsykov, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Khodyachikh, A.; Shcherbakov, A.; Molodkin, V.; Nemoshkalenko, V.; Shpak, A

    2002-07-21

    The feasibility study of an intense X-ray source based on the interaction between the electron beam in a compact storage ring and the laser pulse accumulated in an optical resonator is carried out. We propose to reconstruct the 160 MeV electron storage ring N-100, which was shutdown several years ago. A new magnetic lattice will provide a transverse of electron beam size of {approx}35 {mu}m at the point of electron beam-laser beam interaction. The proposed facility is to generate X-ray beams of intensity {approx}2.6x10{sup 14} s{sup -1} and spectral brightness {approx}10{sup 12} phot/0.1%bw/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2} in the energy range from 10 keV up to 0.5 MeV. These X-ray beam parameters meet the requirements for most of technological and scientific applications. Besides, we plan to use the new facility for studying the laser cooling effect.

  16. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray diffraction using an optimized laser-plasma based X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are invaluable tools to investigate the structural dynamics triggered by a femtosecond laser pulse. These ultrashort X-ray pulses can be provided by lab-sized laser-produced plasma X-ray sources. This thesis is dedicated to optimizing the X-ray emission from the X-ray source at the University of Duisburg-Essen and using this source to investigate ultrafast structural dynamics in laser excited materials. For these purposes, detailed investigations on how the laser intensities, target thicknesses, angles of incidence and different pre-pulse/pre-plasma conditions affecting the emission of Kα-photons from Cu and Ti targets were performed. The outcomes from these studies are applied to optimize the X-ray production of the existing X-ray source for time resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) experiments. In the mean time, in order to improve the measurement sensitivity/accuracy, and automatize and speed up the experimental procedures, several other improvements have been implemented in the experimental setup for TRXD experiments. These improvements of the setup are essential to achieve the results of the three TRXD experiments discussed in this thesis. In the first experiment, Debye-Waller effect in a thin laser-excited Au film was observed. The drop of measured diffraction signal with a decay time constant of 4.3±1 ps was measured for high excitation fluences. This result is in good agreement with previous experimental results as well as the Two-Temperature Model (TTM) calculations at high fluences. The second experiment extends the studies of coherent optical phonons in laser-excited Bi to a higher excitation fluence range that has not been investigated previously. Large amplitude coherent atomic motion and a complete softening of the A1g phonon mode were observed. These observations represents conclusive experimental evidence that the Peierls distortion, which defines the equilibrium structure of Bi, vanishes and the material is transformed into

  17. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Zelinsky, A

    2002-05-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center.

  18. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2002-01-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center

  19. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P; Telegin, Yu P; Shcherbakov, A; Zelinsky, A

    2002-01-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center.

  20. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode silver tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf K. F., II; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Onagawa, Jun; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-09-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean silver Kα lines are produced using a 30-μm-thick palladium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current are 90 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths are approximately 80 ns, and the instantaneous number of generator-produced Kα photons is approximately 4×107photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.3 m from the source 3.0 mm in diameter.

  1. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing disk-cathode silver tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf K.; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean silver Kα lines are produced using a 30 μm-thick palladium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 90 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 80 ns, and the instantaneous number of generator-produced Kα photons was approximately 40 M photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.3 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  2. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing copper-target diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Komatsu, Makoto; Germer, Rudolf; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    High-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV using a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing the gap switches in the surge generator using a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean copper Kα lines are produced using a 10-μm-thick nickel filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. The peak tube voltage increased with increasing charging voltage. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the peak tube voltage and current were 140 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The pulse widths were approximately 30 ns, and the maximum dimension of the x-ray source was 3.0 mm in diameter. The number of generator-produced Kα photons was approximately 2.5x106 photons/cm2 at 0.5 m per pulse.

  3. Uhuru observations of 4U 1608-52 - The 'steady' X-ray source associated with the X-ray burst source in Norma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Chaisson, L. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Matilsky, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the X-ray source 4U 1608-52, summarizing its light curve, location, and spectral parameters. Evidence is presented showing that this source is the 'steady' X-ray counterpart of the X-ray burst source in Norma. The spectrum of the 'steady' source is compared with the spectrum observed during two bursts, and it is noted that there is substantially more low-energy absorption during the bursts. The 'steady' source spectral data are used to examine the optical data, and it is concluded that if the X-ray spectrum is thermal, then a globular-cluster counterpart probably would have been detected (whereas none has been). Further X-ray and optical observations are suggested for this source, since an optical identification may be central in determining whether all X-ray bursts have a common origin and if this origin requires a globular-cluster environment.

  4. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... structures. The x-ray source (a tube) is located inside the mouth. This generic type of device may include... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a...

  5. Measuring the black hole mass in Ultraluminous X-ray Sources with the X-ray Scaling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insuk; Gliozzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The black hole mass is a crucial parameter to shed light on the physics of accretion. While the presence of stellar mass black holes (sMBHs) in binary systems and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the center of galaxies is widely accepted, the very existence of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) is still a matter of debate. It has been suggested that this type of black holes within the mass range of MBH=10^2-10^5 Msun may reside in Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) which are very bright off nuclear X-ray sources. Recently, a new method to constrain the mass of BH systems, based solely on X-ray data, was successfully used for sMBHs and SMBHs. Since the X-ray emission is thought to be produced by the same process (Comptonization) in all accretion objects, in principle, this method can be applied to estimate the mass of black holes in ULXs. We have carried out a systemic analysis of a sample of 43 ULXs with multiple X-ray observations and applied this novel method. Our preliminary results suggest that ~70% of the sample harbor IMBHs and indicates a good agreement with those derived with different methods present in the literature.

  6. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name "HVL Jig" was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter direction, which can serve as input for accurate

  7. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  8. Field trials of mobile x-ray source for mine detection using backscattered x rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Shope, Steve L.; Lockwood, Grant J.; Selph, Michael M.; Jojola, John; Jacobs, Jennifer A.; Turman, Bob N.

    1998-09-01

    The implementation of a backscattered x-ray landmine detection system has been demonstrated in laboratories at both Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Florida (UF). The next step was to evaluate the modality by assembling a system for field work. To assess the system's response to a variety of objects, buried plastic and metal antitank landmines, surface plastic antipersonnel landmines, and surface metal fragments were used as targets. The location of the test site was an unprepared field at SNL. The x-ray machine used for the outside landmine detection system was a Philips industrial x-ray machine, model MCN 225, which was operated at 150 kV and 5 mA and collimated to create a 2 cm diameter x-ray spot on the soil. The detectors used were two BICRON plastic scintillation detectors: one collimated (30 cm X 30 cm active area) to respond primarily to photons that have undergone multiple collision and the other uncollimated (30 cm X 7.6 cm active area) to respond primarily to photons that have had only one collision. To provide motion, the system was mounted on a gantry and rastered side-to-side using a computer-controlled stepper motor with a come-along providing the forward movement. Data generated from the detector responses were then analyzed to provide the images and locations of landmines. Changing from the lab environment to the field did not decrease the system's ability to detect buried or obscured landmines. The addition of rain, blowing dust, rocky soil and native plant-life did not lower the system's resolution or contrast for the plastic or the metal landmines.

  9. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  10. A soft x-ray split-and-delay unit for FLASH II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Sebastian; Rollnik, Matthias; Kuhlmann, Marion; Plönjes, Elke; Wahlert, Frank; Zacharias, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    For the soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH II at DESY in Hamburg a new split-and-delay unit (SDU) is built for photon energies in the range of 30 eV reflectance (shallow angles) and a large possible maximum delay (steeper angles) has been chosen. The maximum possible delay is -6 ps total transmission between T = 57 % at hν = 30 eV and still T > 30 % at hν = 800 eV. For photon energies up to hν = 1800 eV a different beam path with platinum coated mirrors is used enabling a total transmission in the fixed beam path of T > 29 % at hν = 800 eV and T = 24 % at hν = 1800 eV, respectively. In the variable beam path the total transmission in this photon energy range is considerably lower but still sufficient with T = 13 % at hν = 800 eV and T > 6 % at hν = 1800 eV.

  11. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  12. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  13. X-ray diffraction from single molecules at the worlds first X-ray free-electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan; Kuepper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry; Rolles, Daniel [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The advent of the first X-ray Free-Electron Laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), opens up a new approach for diffractive imaging of even single molecules that cannot be crystallized into macromolecular crystals of sufficient size necessary for conventional X-ray crystallography. Here, we present the concept, the experimental parametric space that has to be addressed together with first experimental results of X-ray diffractive imaging of single molecules in the gas phase at LCLS. We use a supersonically cooled molecular beam to provide an ensemble of test-molecules, laser-align them, and subsequently probe them with the LCLS in order to get diffraction patterns of single molecules.

  14. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  15. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity. We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  16. What SWIFT has taught us about X-ray flashes and long-duration gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Recent data gathered and triggered by the SWIFT satellite have greatly improved our knowledge of long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs). This is particularly the case for the X-ray data at all times, and for UV and optical data at very early times. I show that the optical and X-ray observations are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the "cannonball" model of GRBs and XRFs. Elementary physics and just two mechanisms underlie these predictions: inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation, generally dominant at early and late times, respectively. I put this result in its proper context and dedicate the paper to those who planed, built and operate SWIFT, a true flying jewel.

  17. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  18. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuta, Akira; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst.,; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    transition between the GRBs, X-ray rich GRBs (XRRs) and X-ray Flashes (XRFs) by the same model but with different {epsilon}{sub 0} values.

  19. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  20. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Anderson, S.; Mattigod, S.

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography

  1. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  2. Study of minimizing X-ray source region of calcium and phosphorous in hard tissue by X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tsuneyoshi; Egawa, Kaoru; Nonaka, Naoko; Takiguchi, Reiji

    1999-01-01

    X-ray microprobe analysis (XMA) is the best method at present to analyze the quantitative concentration of calcium (Ca) or phosphorous (P) in hard tissues. However, the analytic area on intertubular dentin was not larger than the X-ray source region of Ca or P under the usual conditions of the XMA system. In this study, we considered reduction of the X-ray source region. XMA was conducted using a S-2500 CX scanning electron microscope (SEM: Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) fitted with a Quantum delta IV energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system (EDX: Kevex, San Carlos, USA). We observed changes in X-ray source region with accelerated voltages (ACC. voltage) of SEM, and changes in analytic contents in a sample surface at various tilt angles. Consequently, the analytic area was able to be decreased on a sample surface at a tilt angle of 27.5 deg under a lower ACC. voltage of SEM. Actually, we analyzed Ca and P in the incisor rat dentin surface at the tilt angle 27.5 deg. Analytic portions were intertubular or peritubular dentin on the labial side in an incisor dentin. In this case, the SEM was operated at 7, 10 and 15 kV ACC. voltage with a 0.1 nA probe current. Then, XMAs were conducted for quantitative Ca and P in the intertubular and peritubular dentin on the lingual, proximal, distal, and labial sides in the incisor dentin. Though an ACC. voltage of 7 kV was able to obtain the most exact concentration in the results for intertubular or peritubular dentin, there was no significant difference against measurement values with 10 kV. The Ca content in the peritubular dentin on the labial side was higher than the measured value of peritubular dentin on the lingual side. (author)

  3. Feasibility study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Rui; Li Junli

    2007-01-01

    In order to verify the feasibility of study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method, and optimize the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system, an X-ray pinhole imaging equipment was set up. The change of image due to the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source was estimated with mathematical method and validated with experiment. The results show that the change of the spot position and gray of the spot is linearly related with the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source, so it is feasible to study X-ray source with pinhole imaging method in this application. The results provide some references for the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system. (authors)

  4. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-Ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-Ray Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Haugh

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. It determines how accurately NIF can point the laser beams and is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 2mA, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 12. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1.5% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. The efficiency pattern follows the properties of Si. The maximum quantum efficiency is 0.71. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation was >8% at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was less than the measurement uncertainty below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris on the CCD chip. The debris showed maximum contrast at the lowest energy used, 930 eV, and disappeared by 4 keV. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  5. OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE NEAREST ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladstone, Jeanette C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Cartwright, Taylor F. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Copperwheat, Chris [Department of Physics, Liverpool John Moores University, Wirral CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Roberts, Timothy P. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7VL (United Kingdom); Goad, Mike R., E-mail: j.c.gladstone@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    We present a photometric survey of the optical counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in nearby ({approx}<5 Mpc) galaxies. Of the 33 ULXs with HST and Chandra data, 9 have no visible counterpart, placing limits on their M{sub V} of {approx} -4 to -9, enabling us to rule out O-type companions in 4 cases. The refined positions of two ULXs place them in the nucleus of their host galaxy. They are removed from our sample. Of the 22 remaining ULXs, 13 have one possible optical counterpart, while multiple are visible within the error regions of other ULXs. By calculating the number of chance coincidences, we estimate that 13 {+-} 5 are the true counterparts. We attempt to constrain the nature of the companions by fitting the spectral energy distribution and M{sub V} to obtain candidate spectral types. We can rule out O-type companions in 20 cases, while we find that one ULX (NGC 253 ULX2) excludes all OB-type companions. Fitting with X-ray irradiated models provides constraints on the donor star mass and radius. For seven ULXs, we are able to impose inclination-dependent upper and/or lower limits on the black holes' mass, if the extinction to the assumed companion star is not larger than the Galactic column. These are NGC 55 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX2, NGC 253 XMM6, Ho IX X-1, IC342 X-1, and NGC 5204 X-1. This suggests that 10 ULXs do not have O companions, while none of the 18 fitted rule out B-type companions.

  6. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  7. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0±0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be γ e / γ i = (0.5±0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A 1g mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase and its development for excitations close to the

  8. Reasearches of Thomson Scattering X-Ray Source at Tsinghua University

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wenhui; Cheng, C; Cheng, Y; Du, Q; Du Tai Bin; Du, Y C; Ge, Y; He, X Z; Hua, J F; Huang, G; Lin, Y Z; Tang, C X; Xia, B; Xu, M J; Yuan, X D; Zheng, Sh X

    2004-01-01

    The bright and tunable short pulse X-ray sources are being widely used in various research fields including materials, chemistry, biology and solid physics. Thomson scattering source is one of the most promising approaches to short pulsed X-ray sources. Researches on Thomson scattering x-ray sources are being carried out in Tsinghua University. Some theoretical results and the preliminary experiment on the Thomson scattering between electron beams and laser pulses are described in this paper.

  9. Repetitive flash x-ray generator utilizing an enclosed-type diode with a ring-shaped graphite cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Eiichi; Kimura, Shingo; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru; Honda, Keiji; Yokota, Yoshiharu

    1991-04-01

    The fundamental studies of the repetitive type of flash x-ray generator utilizing an enclosed-type diode with a ring-shaped graphite cathode for soft radiography are described. This generator consisted of the following essential components: a constant high-voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser of lOOnF, a highvoltage pulser, a repetitive impulse switching system, and a flash x-ray tube. The pulser employed a modified two-stage Marx circuit with a capacity during main discharge of 425pF. The x-ray tube was of the enclosed-diode type and consisted of the following major devices: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a ring cathode made of graphite, an x-ray window made of beryllium, a spattering shield made of stainless steel, and a tube body made of glass. Two condensers in the pulser were charged from 50 to 70kV, and the output voltage was about 1. 6 times the charged voltage. Both the peak tube voltage and the peak tube current increased according to increases in the charged voltage, and the maximum values of the voltage and the current were about 90kV and 0. 5kA, respectively. The pulse width was about lOOns, and the x-ray intensity was less than 2. OpC/kg at 0. 5m per pulse. The repetition frequency was less than 50Hz, and the maximum size of the effective focal spot was nearly equivalent to the anode diameter of 3. 0mm.

  10. King's College laser plasma x-ray source design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaimi, Radhwan; Adjei, Daniel; Alatabi, Saleh; Appuhamilage, Indika Arachchi; Michette, Alan

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design and build a source for a range of applications, with optimized multilayer structures in order to use the source output as efficiently as possible. The source is built around a Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength 1064 nm, frequency doubled 532 nm (green) and tripled 355 nm, with a pulse length of about 800 ps and a repetition rate up to 50 Hz. The target material is Mylar (C10H8O4) tape, which is cheap, readily available and has many benefits as explained in this article. A versatile cubic target chamber and a set of computer controlled stage motors are used to allow positioning of the X-ray emission point. A range of measures is used to protect delicate components and optics, including a glass slide between the focusing lens and the target to prevent the lens being coated with debris. A low pressure gas (typically 3-6 mbar) is used inside the chamber as collision of atomic size debris particles with gas molecules reduces their kinetic energy and consequently their adhesion to the surrounding surfaces. The gas used is typically helium or nitrogen, the latter also acting as a spectral filter. Finally, the chamber is continually pumped to ensure that more than 70% of the debris particles are pumped out of the chamber.

  11. In situ flash x-ray high-speed computed tomography for the quantitative analysis of highly dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Stefan; Nau, Siegfried; Salk, Manfred; Thoma, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    The in situ investigation of dynamic events, ranging from car crash to ballistics, often is key to the understanding of dynamic material behavior. In many cases the important processes and interactions happen on the scale of milli- to microseconds at speeds of 1000 m s-1 or more. Often, 3D information is necessary to fully capture and analyze all relevant effects. High-speed 3D-visualization techniques are thus required for the in situ analysis. 3D-capable optical high-speed methods often are impaired by luminous effects and dust, while flash x-ray based methods usually deliver only 2D data. In this paper, a novel 3D-capable flash x-ray based method, in situ flash x-ray high-speed computed tomography is presented. The method is capable of producing 3D reconstructions of high-speed processes based on an undersampled dataset consisting of only a few (typically 3 to 6) x-ray projections. The major challenges are identified, discussed and the chosen solution outlined. The application is illustrated with an exemplary application of a 1000 m s-1 high-speed impact event on the scale of microseconds. A quantitative analysis of the in situ measurement of the material fragments with a 3D reconstruction with 1 mm voxel size is presented and the results are discussed. The results show that the HSCT method allows gaining valuable visual and quantitative mechanical information for the understanding and interpretation of high-speed events.

  12. Analytical X-ray microscopy using laboratory sources: Method and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulveryck, J.M.; Odof, S.; Patat, J.M.; Mouze, D.

    2000-01-01

    The implementation of X-ray imaging techniques (X-Ray Projection Microscopy or X-Ray Microtomography) for analytical purpose with laboratory equipment is not easily obtainable, due to the use of polychromatic X-ray sources. To overcome this drawback, we propose here a mathematical technique based upon the calculation of the X-ray emission spectra and the knowledge of the spectral response of the camera. For example, we show that the composition of a ternary sample can be deduced from two images measurements recorded from two primary radiation. The accuracy of the method is discussed

  13. Characteristics of hard X-ray double sources in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, T.; Kosugi, T.; Masuda, S.; Yaji, K.; Inda-Koide, M.; Makishima, K.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging observations of solar flare hard X-ray sources with the Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) aboard the Yohkoh satellite have revealed that hard X-ray emissions (greater than 30 ke V) originate most frequently from double sources. The double sources are located on both sides of the magnetic neutral line, suggesting that the bulk of hard X-rays is emitted from footpoints of flaring magnetic loops. We also found that hard X-rays from the double sources are emitted simultaneously within a fraction of second and that the weaker source tends to be located in the stronger magnetic field region, showing a softer spectrum. Physcial implications on the observed characteristics of the hard X-ray double sources are discussed.

  14. LIGHT SOURCE: A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Huang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Huai-Bi; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Du, Tai-Bin; He, Xiao-Zhong; Hua, Jian-Fei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Qian, Hou-Jun; Shi, Jia-Ru; Xiang, Dao; Yan, Li-Xin; Yu, Pei-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and affordable facilities that produce short duration, high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies, and also medical and industrial applications. Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University, and upgrade is in progress. In this paper, we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation, aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness, and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam. Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  15. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  16. The DARPA compact Superconducting X-Ray Lithography Source features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, R.; Kalsi, S.; Leung, E.

    1991-01-01

    Under DARPA sponsorship, a compact Superconducting X-Ray Lithography Source (SXLS) is being designed and built by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with industry participation from Grumman Corporation and General Dynamics. This source is optimized for lithography work for sub-micron high density computer chips, and is about the size of a billiard table (1.5 m x 4.0 m). The machine has a racetrack configuration with two 180 degree bending magnets being designed and built by General Dynamics under a subcontract with Grumman Corporation. The machine will have 18 photon ports which would deliver light peaked at a wave length of 10 Angstroms. Grumman is commercializing the SXLS device and plans to book orders for delivery of industrialized SXLS (ISXLS) versions in 1995. This paper will describe the major features of this device. The commercial machine will be equipped with a fully automated user-friendly control systems, major features of which are already working on a compact warm dipole ring at BNL. This ring has normal dipole magnets with dimensions identical to the SXLS device, and has been successfully commissioned

  17. Spectral variability of ultraluminous X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajava, Jari J. E.; Poutanen, Juri

    2008-01-01

    We study spectral variability of 11 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) using archived XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. We use three models to describe the observed spectra; a power-law, a multi-colour disk (MCD) and a combination of these two models. We find that out of the 11 ULXs in our sample, 7 ULXs show a correlation between the luminosity and the photon index Γ(hereafter L--Γ correlation). Furthermore, out of the 7 ULXs that have the L--Γ correlation, 4 ULXs also show spectral pivoting in the observed energy band. We also find that two ULXs show an L--Γ anti-correlation. The spectra of 4 ULXs in the sample can be adequately fitted with a MCD model. We compare these sources to known black hole binaries (BHB) and find that they follow similar paths in their luminosity-temperature (hereafter L--T) diagrams. Finally we show that the 'soft excess' reported for many of these ULXs at ∼0.2 keV seem to follow a trend L ∝ T -4 when modeled with a power-law plus a 'cool' MCD model. This is contrary to the expected L ∝ T 4 relation that is expected from theory and what is seen for many accreting BHBs.

  18. Inductive-energy power flow for X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, K.D.; Filios, P.G.; Gullickson, R.L.; Hebert, M.P.; Rowley, J.E.; Schneider, R.F.; Summa, W.J.; Vitkovski, I.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) has been developing inductive energy storage (IES) technology for generating intense x-rays from electron beam-target interactions and from plasma radiating sources (PRS). Because of the complex interaction between the commutation of the current from the plasma and the stable dissipation of the energy in the load, DNA has supported several variations of power flow technology. Major variations include: (1) current interruption using a plasma opening switch (POS); (2) continuous current commutation through current-plasma motion against neutral, ionized, or magnetized medium [i.e., dense plasma focus-like (DPF) and plasma flow switch (PFS) technologies]; and, in addition, possible benefits of (3) directly driven complex PRS loads are being investigated. DNA programs include experimental and theoretical modeling and analysis with investigations (1) on Hawk and a Decade module in conjunction with the development of the bremsstrahlung sources (BRS), and (2) on Hawk, ACE-4 and Shiva-Star, as well as cooperative research on GIT-4 and GIT-8, in conjunction with PRS. (author). 1 tab., 12 figs., 17 refs

  19. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  20. Quantum electrodynamics of the internal source x-ray holographies: Bremsstrahlung, fluorescence, and multiple-energy x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.; Sorensen, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to derive the differential cross sections measured in the three new experimental internal source ensemble x-ray holographies: bremsstrahlung (BXH), fluorescence (XFH), and multiple-energy (MEXH) x-ray holography. The polarization dependence of the BXH cross section is also obtained. For BXH, we study analytically and numerically the possible effects of the virtual photons and electrons which enter QED calculations in summing over the intermediate states. For the low photon and electron energies used in the current experiments, we show that the virtual intermediate states produce only very small effects. This is because the uncertainty principle limits the distance that the virtual particles can propagate to be much shorter than the separation between the regions of high electron density in the adjacent atoms. We also find that using the asymptotic form of the scattering wave function causes about a 5 10% error for near forward scattering. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. The prospects for soft x-ray contact microscopy using laser plasmas as an x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Page, A.M.; Ford, T.W. [Univ. of London, Egham (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Since its invention, a major concern of those using a microscope has been to improve the resolution without the introduction of artifacts. While light microscopy carries little risk of the introduction of artifacts, because the preparative techniques are often minimal, the resolution is somewhat limited. The advent of the electron microscope offered greatly improved resolution but since biological specimens require extensive preparation, the possibility of causing structural damage to the specimen is also increased. The ideal technique for structural studies of biological specimens would enable hydrated material to be examined without any preparation and with a resolution equal to that of electron microscopy. Soft x-ray microscopy certainly enables living material to be examined and whilst the resolution does not equal that of electron microscopy it exceeds that attainable by light microscopy. This paper briefly reviews the limitations of light and electron microscopy for the biologist and considers the various ways that soft x-rays might be used to image hydrated biological material. Consideration is given to the different sources that have been used for soft x-ray microscopy and the relative merits of laser-plasma sources are discussed.

  2. A characterization and optimization study of Gamble II as an X-ray bremsstrahlung source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliphant, W.F.; Boller, J.R.; Brown, D.G.; Cooperstein, G.; Dozier, C.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    The adverse effects of radiation on solid state devices are strongly spectrum dependent. It is thus essential that the radiation spectrum from flash x-ray sources be available when they are used as facilities for testing electronic components. This paper describes a preliminary study in which previously developed computer codes were used to calculate the radiation spectrum produced by NRL's Gamble II pulsed power generator. To determine how well the calculated spectrum matched the experimental one, doses in CaF 2 -Mn TLD's were computed for the dosimeters placed behind various thicknesses of Cu and Pb filters and compared with the experimentally measured doses. Using a diode model that was consistent with presently understood electron beam behavior, a spectrum was generated which predicted TLD doses to within about 15% of the experimentally measured values

  3. Ultraluminous X-ray sources as neutrino pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtukov, Alexan6der A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2018-02-01

    The classical limit on the accretion luminosity of a neutron star is given by the Eddington luminosity. The advanced models of accretion onto magnetized neutron stars account for the appearance of magnetically confined accretion columns and allow the accretion luminosity to be higher than the Eddington value by a factor of tens. However, the recent discovery of pulsations from ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in NGC 5907 demonstrates that the accretion luminosity can exceed the Eddington value up to by a factor of 500. We propose a model explaining observational properties of ULX-1 in NGC 5907 without any ad hoc assumptions. We show that the accretion column at extreme luminosity becomes advective. Enormous energy release within a small geometrical volume and advection result in very high temperatures at the bottom of accretion column, which demand to account for the energy losses due to neutrino emission which can be even more effective than the radiation energy losses. We show that the total luminosity at the mass accretion rates above 1021 g s-1 is dominated by the neutrino emission similarly to the case of core-collapse supernovae. We argue that the accretion rate measurements based on detected photon luminosity in case of bright ULXs powered by neutron stars can be largely underestimated due to intense neutrino emission. The recently discovered pulsating ULX-1 in galaxy NGC 5907 with photon luminosity of ˜ 10^{41} {erg s^{-1}} is expected to be even brighter in neutrinos and is thus the first known Neutrino Pulsar.

  4. Development of full-field x-ray phase-tomographic microscope based on laboratory x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, H.; Wu, Y.; Momose, A.

    2017-09-01

    An X-ray phase tomographic microscope that can quantitatively measure the refractive index of a sample in three dimensions with a high spatial resolution was developed by installing a Lau interferometer consisting of an absorption grating and a π/2 phase grating into the optics of an X-ray microscope. The optics comprises a Cu rotating anode X-ray source, capillary condenser optics, and a Fresnel zone plate for the objective. The microscope has two optical modes: a large-field-of-view mode (field of view: 65 μm x 65 μm) and a high-resolution mode (spatial resolution: 50 nm). Optimizing the parameters of the interferometer yields a self-image of the phase grating with 60% visibility. Through the normal fringe-scanning measurement, a twin phase image, which has an overlap of two phase image of opposite contrast with a shear distance much larger than system resolution, is generated. Although artifacts remain to some extent currently when a phase image is calculated from the twin phase image, this system can obtain high-spatial-resolution images resolving 50-nm structures. Phase tomography with this system has also been demonstrated using a phase object.

  5. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Borges, B. W., E-mail: tribeiro@ufs.br, E-mail: rlopes@ufs.br, E-mail: bernardo@astro.ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Araranguá, 88905-120 Araranguá, SC (Brazil)

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  6. Current status and future perspectives of accelerator-based x-ray light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    State-of-the-art x-ray light sources are nowadays based on large-scale electron accelerators, because the synchrotron radiation (SR) and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) radiation generated by high-energy electron beams have many advantages over other alternatives in terms of the wavelength tunability, high brightness and flux, high coherence, flexible polarization states, and so on. This is the reason why SR and XFEL light sources have largely contributed to the evolution of x-ray science. This paper reviews the current status of such accelerator-based x-ray light source facilities and discusses their future perspectives.

  7. Synchrotron radiation sources and condensers for projection x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.B.; MacDowell, A.A.; White, D.L.; Wood, O.R. II

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements for a compact electron storage ring that could be used as a soft x-ray source for projection lithography are discussed. The design concepts of the x-ray optics that are required to collect and condition the radiation in divergence, uniformity and direction to properly illuminate the mask and the particular x-ray projection camera used are discussed. Preliminary designs for an entire soft x-ray projection lithography system using an electron storage ring as a soft X-ray source are presented. It is shown that by combining the existing technology of storage rings with large collection angle condensers, a powerful and reliable source of 130 Angstrom photons for production line projection x-ray lithography is possible

  8. Repetitive flash x-ray generator utilizing a simple diode with a new type of energy-selective function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, E.; Kimura, S.; Kawasaki, S.; Isobe, H.; Takahashi, K.; Tamakawa, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    1990-09-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies of a repetitive flash x-ray generator having a simple diode with an energy-selective function are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage pulser, a repetitive high-energy impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and a flash x-ray tube. The circuit of this pulser employed a modified two-stage surge Marx generator with a capacity during main discharge of 425pF. The x-ray tube was of the demountable-diode type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and consisted of the following major devices: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a disk cathode made of graphite, an aluminum filter, and a tube body made of glass. Two condensers inside of the pulser were charged from 40 to 60 kV, and the output voltage was about 1.9 times the charging voltage. The peak tube voltage was primarily determined by the anode-cathode (A-C) space, and the peak tube current was less than 0.6 kA. The peak tube voltage slightly increased when the charging voltage was increased, but the amount of change rate was small. Thus, the maximum photon energy could be easily controlled by varying the A-C space. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the x-ray intensity was less than 1.0 μC/kg at 0.3 m per pulse. The repetitive frequency was less than 50 Hz, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode tip and ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mm in diameter.

  9. Development of scanning X-ray microscopes for materials science spectromicroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Ade, H.

    1997-07-01

    Third generation synchrotron sources of soft x-rays provide an excellent opportunity to apply established x-ray spectroscopic materials analysis techniques to surface imaging on a sub-micron scale. This paper describes an effort underway at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to pursue this development using Fresnel zone plate lenses. These are used to produce a sub-micron spot of x-rays for use in scanning microscopy. Several groups have developed microscopes using this technique. A specimen is rastered in the focused x-ray spot and a detector signal is acquired as a function of position to generate an image. Spectroscopic capability is added by holding the small spot on a feature of interest and scanning through the spectrum. The authors are pursuing two spectroscopic techniques: Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) which together provide a powerful capability for light element analysis in materials science

  10. Mechanically driven millimeter source of nanosecond X-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, C. G.; Escobar, J. V.; Hird, J. R.; Putterman, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    The emission of nanosecond pulses of ≈20 keV photons having a total energy of GeVs which are generated by peeling millimeter wide strips of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape in a partial pressure of air (≈10-3 Torr) is demonstrated. The X-ray spectrum is similar to that obtained by peeling much wider bands of PSA, implying that the characteristic length for the sequence of processes that govern this phenomenon is less than 1 mm. These experiments demonstrate that MEMS-type X-ray generators are technologically feasible.

  11. Ultraluminous X-ray sources as neutrino pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2018-05-01

    The classical limit on the accretion luminosity of a neutron star is given by the Eddington luminosity. The advanced models of accretion on to magnetized neutron stars account for the appearance of magnetically confined accretion columns and allow the accretion luminosity to be higher than the Eddington value by a factor of tens. However, the recent discovery of pulsations from ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in NGC 5907 demonstrates that the accretion luminosity can exceed the Eddington value up to by a factor of 500. We propose a model explaining observational properties of ULX-1 in NGC 5907 without any ad hoc assumptions. We show that the accretion column at extreme luminosity becomes advective. Enormous energy release within a small geometrical volume and advection result in very high temperatures at the bottom of accretion column, which demand to account for the energy losses due to neutrino emission which can be even more effective than the radiation energy losses. We show that the total luminosity at the mass accretion rates above 1021 g s-1 is dominated by the neutrino emission similarly to the case of core-collapse supernovae. We argue that the accretion rate measurements based on detected photon luminosity in case of bright ULXs powered by neutron stars can be largely underestimated due to intense neutrino emission. The recently discovered pulsating ULX-1 in galaxy NGC 5907 with photon luminosity of {˜ } 10^{41} {erg s^{-1}} is expected to be even brighter in neutrinos and is thus the first known Neutrino Pulsar.

  12. Development and characterization of a laser-based hard x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillman, C.

    1996-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma was generated by focusing 100 fs laser pulses, with an energy of 150 mJ, onto metal targets. The laser intensity was expected to reach 10 17 W/cm -2 . Radiation was emitted from the created plasma, with photon energies up to the MeV region. The laser-based X-ray source was optimized, with the purpose of making it a realistic source of hard X-rays (>10 keV). Dedicated equipment was developed for efficient generation and utilization of the hard X-rays. The X-ray source was characterized with respect to its spatial extent and the X-ray yield. Measurements were made of the spectral distribution, by the use of single-photon-counting detectors in different geometries, crystal spectrometers and dose measurements in combination with absorption filters. Ablation of the target material in the laser produced plasma was investigated. Imaging applications have been demonstrated, including ultrafast (picosecond) X-ray imaging, magnification imaging of up to x80, differential imaging in the spectral domain, and imaging of various biological and technical objects. The biological response of ultra-intense X-ray pulses was assessed in cell-culture exposures. The results indicate that the biological response from ultra-intense X-ray exposures is similar to the response with conventional X-ray tubes. 82 refs., 14 figs

  13. Development and characterization of a laser-based hard x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillman, C.

    1996-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma was generated by focusing 100 fs laser pulses, with an energy of 150 mJ, onto metal targets. The laser intensity was expected to reach 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup -2}. Radiation was emitted from the created plasma, with photon energies up to the MeV region. The laser-based X-ray source was optimized, with the purpose of making it a realistic source of hard X-rays (>10 keV). Dedicated equipment was developed for efficient generation and utilization of the hard X-rays. The X-ray source was characterized with respect to its spatial extent and the X-ray yield. Measurements were made of the spectral distribution, by the use of single-photon-counting detectors in different geometries, crystal spectrometers and dose measurements in combination with absorption filters. Ablation of the target material in the laser produced plasma was investigated. Imaging applications have been demonstrated, including ultrafast (picosecond) X-ray imaging, magnification imaging of up to x80, differential imaging in the spectral domain, and imaging of various biological and technical objects. The biological response of ultra-intense X-ray pulses was assessed in cell-culture exposures. The results indicate that the biological response from ultra-intense X-ray exposures is similar to the response with conventional X-ray tubes. 82 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Laser interaction with matter as a source of U.V. and soft X-ray radiation: application to X-ray cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonon, G.F.; Colombant, Denis; Delmare, Claude; Rabeau, Maxime

    A new detecting device is described. It allows one to get the frequency, the time and space resolution of pictures of U.V. and soft X ray emission of a laser created plasma in a single shot: X ray pictures of such a plasma are presented. After these preliminary results, it is possible to set up readily an X ray framing camera. A laser created plasma is an X ray source of special interest: the emitted power can be 10% of the laser intensity and the emitted spectrum is centered around 1A wavelength [fr

  15. Investigations concerning the applicability of X-ray flash interference and laser technology to shock-induced solidification of organic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, Peter; Schaaffs, Werner

    By a dielectric discharge through a thin layer of liquid a hot plasma is created, which expands very fast and builds up around a compression ring of very highly compressed matter. X-ray flash interferences and laser light are applied to investigate the structure of the compression rings. To perform investigation of the fine structure, an X-ray flash machine was developed which permits to obtain with a single flash in less than 1μs Laue patterns of monocrystals, and Debye-Scherrer patterns of polycrystalline substances. The investigation of the compression rings in diverse substances by laser light resulted that the optical transparency and solidification is different in different regions of the compression ring. Therefore important hints for experiments with X-ray flash interferences were obtained

  16. Void fraction measurements by means of flash x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, S.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss X-ray radiography as a means of obtaining quantitative space distributions of void fractions in highly-transient, multiphase flows. The technique and the calibration of the instrument are discussed in detail, and its application in the MAGICO-2000 experiments is used to illustrate its potential in providing unique information about the interactions. (author)

  17. A hard X-ray study of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, E. S.; Walton, D. J.; Bachetti, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from coordinated X-ray observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 performed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and XMM-Newton in early 2013. These observations provide the first detection of NGC 5204 X-1 above 10 keV, extending the broadband...

  18. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation.

  19. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation.

  20. Manipulating Electronic States at Oxide Interfaces Using Focused Micro X-Rays from Standard Lab Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Coneri, F.; Stehno, Martin; Campi, Gaetano; Demitri, Nicola; Bais, Giorgio; Wang, X. Renshaw; Hilgenkamp, H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, X-ray illumination, using synchrotron radiation, has been used to manipulate defects, stimulate self-organization, and to probe their structure. Here, we explore a method of defect-engineering low-dimensional systems using focused laboratory-scale X-ray sources. We demonstrate an

  1. Hard X-ray sources from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first stage of a program to design a repetitive pulsed radiation generator for industrial applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Hard X-rays are being studied in these devices operating with hydrogen. Images of metallic plates with different thickness were obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize the energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge chamber of PF-400 J. An effective energy of the order of 90 keV was measured under those conditions. X ray images of different metallic objects also have been obtained. (authors)

  2. Searching for outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources through high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosec, P.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A. C.; Walton, D. J.

    2018-02-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are non-nuclear point sources exceeding the Eddington luminosity of a 10 M⊙ black hole. Modern consensus for a majority of the ULX population is that they are powered by stellar-mass black holes or neutron stars accreting well above the Eddington limit. Theoretical models of super-Eddington accretion predict existence of powerful outflows of moderately ionized gas at mildly relativistic velocities. So far, these winds have been found in three systems: NGC 1313 X-1, NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 55 ULX. In this work, we create a sample of all ULXs with usable archival high-resolution X-ray data, with 10 sources in total, in which we aim to find more signatures of outflows. We perform Gaussian line scans to find any narrow spectral signatures, and physical wind model scans where possible. We tentatively identify an outflow in NGC 5204 X-1, blueshifted to 0.34c, which produces emission features with a total significance of at least 3σ. Next we compare ULXs with similar hardness ratios. Holmberg IX X-1 shows absorption features that could be associated with a photoionized outflowing absorber, similar to that seen in NGC 1313 X-1. The spectrum of Holmberg II X-1 possesses features similar to NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 6946 X-1 shows O VIII rest-frame emission. All other sources from the sample also show tentative evidence of spectral features in their high-resolution spectra. Further observations with the XMM-Newton and Chandra gratings will place stronger constraints. Future missions like XARM and Athena will be able to detect them at larger distances and increase our sample.

  3. Multi-wavelength classification of X-ray sources in M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangelov, Blagoy

    2017-09-01

    We propose an archival study of the X-ray source population of M33. The final ChASeM33 source catalog (based on 1.4 Ms of Chandra data) contains 662 sources. Only a small fraction (1/4) of those have plausible identifications. The newly released Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) offers photometry for the large archival HST (often multi-band) data available for M33. We will use HSC jointly with X-ray data, to perform classifications with our existing automated machine-learning classification pipeline. We propose to modify our pipeline and apply it to all X-ray sources in the ChASeM33 source catalog. We expect to classify hundreds of previously unidentified X-ray sources in M33.

  4. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  5. On the methods of determination of x-ray sources protection quality in x-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, L.V.

    1973-01-01

    Existing procedures for assessing the quality of shielding of X-ray radiators are compared; these procedures are shown to have a number of shortcomings and to be very time-consuming. A procedure is offered in which shielding quality is tested in two stages: (1) X-ray tests aimed at determining the quality of protection of the X-ray tube unit; and (2) dosimeter tests proper. The results of measurements are compared with maximum permissible dosage rate

  6. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor' ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A

    2001-07-21

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described.

  7. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor'ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described

  8. Long-term Lightcurves of M31 X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Garcia, M. R.; Di Stefano, R.; Murray, S. S.; Primini, F. A.

    2001-09-01

    M31 has been monitored by a Chandra GTO program, which used both the HRC and ACIS from 1999 to 2001 and a GO program, which used ACIS-S during 2000-2001. We report here the lightcurves of X-ray sources in M31 during the past two years. X-ray sources in M31, like in our Galaxy, exhibit variability on long timescales (days to months). Some sources also show spectral state transitions, analogous to the soft/hard state of Galactic sources (like Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4). We present a statistical overview and also focus on some particularly interesting classes of sources. Luminous (> 1038 ergs s-1) X-ray sources in M31 are often associated with globular clusters (Di Stefano et al. 2001); some of these luminous sources are variables, and the lightcurves provide clues to the nature of the compact object. We present data on a few intriguing globular cluster sources. We also present the spectral and time evolution of the X-ray transient near the nucleus (CXOGMP J004242.0+411608; Garcia et al. 2000), which has finally turned off after more than one year in outburst. We compare the long-term X-ray lightcurves of M31 sources to those of Galactic sources (obtained by RXTE/ASM). Such a comparison allows us to probe the nature of M31 X-ray sources.

  9. Development of X-ray photoelectron microscope with a compact X-ray source generated by line-focused laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, N.; Takahashi, Z.; Nishimura, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Sakata, A.; Azuma, H.; Hara, T.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory-sized X-ray photoelectron microscope was constructed using a compact X-ray source produced by line-focused laser irradiation. The system is a scanning type photoelectron microscope where X-ray beam is micro-focused via Schwarzschild optics. A compact laser-plasma X-ray source has been developed with a YAG laser, a line-focus lens assembly, an Al tape-target driver and a debris prevention system. The 13.1 nm X-ray was delivered along line plasma whose length was 0.6 or 11 mm with higher intensity than that from a point-focused source. The Schwarzschild optics having the designed demagnification of 224, which was coated with Mo/Si multilayers for 13.1 nm X-ray, was set on the beamline 1 m distant from the source. The electron energy analyser was a spherical capacitor analyser with the photoelectron image detection system that was suited for detection of vast photoelectrons excited by an X-ray pulse of ns-order duration. The spatial resolution less than 5 μm has been confirmed from the variation of As 3d electron intensity along the position of the GaAs sample coated with a photo-resist test pattern

  10. Hard x-ray spectrum emitted by a plasma focus optimized for flash radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, V.; Moreno, C.; Sigaut, L.; Clausse, A.

    2008-10-01

    The effective spectrum of the hard x-ray output of a Mather-type tabletop plasma focus device was determined from attenuation data on metallic samples using commercial radiographic film coupled to a Gd2O2S: Tb phosphor intensifier screen. It was found that the radiation has relevant spectral components in the 40-150 keV range, with a single maximum around 60-80 keV. The radiation output allows for 50 ns resolution, good contrast, introspective imaging of metallic objects even through metallic walls. A numerical estimation of the induced voltage on the focus during the compressional stage is briefly discussed.

  11. X-ray microscopy resource center at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Koike, M.; Beguiristain, R.; Maser, J.; Attwood, D.

    1992-07-01

    An x-ray microscopy resource center for biological x-ray imaging vvill be built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley. The unique high brightness of the ALS allows short exposure times and high image quality. Two microscopes, an x-ray microscope (XM) and a scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) are planned. These microscopes serve complementary needs. The XM gives images in parallel at comparable short exposure times, and the SXM is optimized for low radiation doses applied to the sample. The microscopes extend visible light microscopy towards significantly higher resolution and permit images of objects in an aqueous medium. High resolution is accomplished by the use of Fresnel zone plates. Design considerations to serve the needs of biological x-ray microscopy are given. Also the preliminary design of the microscopes is presented. Multiple wavelength and multiple view images will provide elemental contrast and some degree of 3D information

  12. Neon dense plasma focus point x-ray source for <= 0.25 um lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rahul R.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Mangano, Joseph; Greene, Philip A.; Qi, Niansheng

    1994-05-01

    A discharge driven, dense plasma focus (DPF) in Neon has been developed at SRL as a point x-ray source for sub-micron lithography. This source is presently capable of delivering approximately 25 J/pulse of Neon K-shell x rays (8 - 14 angstrom) into 4 (pi) steradians with an approximately equals 1.4% wall plug efficiency at a 20 Hz repetition rate. This corresponds to 500 W of average x-ray power. The discharge is produced by a capacitor bank circuit (8 kV, 1.8 kJ) that drives approximately equals 320 kA currents into the DPF load, with approximately equals 1 microsecond(s) rise-times. X rays are produced when a dense pinch of Neon is formed along the axis of the DPF electrodes. Four X ten5 discharges using a cooled DPF head have been fired producing x rays. The variation in the measured x-ray output, over several 104 shots, corresponds to a variation in the dose delivered to a resist 40 cm from the source, of less than 1%. Data showing the measurement of the x-ray output, size, dose delivered to a resist, spectra of the source output, novel beam line concepts, and potential lithographic applications are discussed.

  13. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    OpenAIRE

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, FA; Walton, Dominic James; Grefenstette, BW; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, SE; Christensen, FE; Craig, WW; Fabian, Andrew Christopher; Hailey, CJ; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5–10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10^(39) to 10^(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have f...

  14. Quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography by the balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    A quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) system utilizing balanced filters has recently been developed for acquiring quantitative CT images. This system consisted of basic components such as a conventional x-ray generator for radiography, a stage for mounting and rotating objects, and an x-ray line sensor camera. Metallic sheets of Er and Yb were used as the balanced filters for obtaining quasimonochromatic incident x rays that include the characteristic lines of the W Kα doublet from a tungsten target. The mean energy and energy width of the quasimonochromatic x rays were determined to be 59.0 and 1.9 keV, respectively, from x-ray spectroscopic measurements using a high-purity Ge detector. The usefulness of the present x-ray CT system was demonstrated by obtaining spatial distributions of the linear attenuation coefficients of three selected samples--a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom, a 3.5 cm diameter aluminum rod, and a human head phantom. The results clearly indicate that this apparatus is surprisingly effective for estimating the distribution of the linear attenuation coefficients without any correction of the beam-hardening effect. Thus, implementing the balanced filter method on an x-ray CT scanner has promise in producing highly quantitative CT images

  15. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  16. Scanning soft x-ray microscopy with a fresnel zoneplate at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, J.M.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.; Howells, M.

    1983-01-01

    We have built a scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope located at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Images of biological specimens have been formed with submicron resolution. A Fresnel zoneplate serves as the focusing element

  17. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  18. Miniature X-ray Source for Planetary Exploration Instruments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop a rugged, low power, passively cooled X-Ray source that is compatible with miniaturized XRD systems. The XRD...

  19. Static characteristic and transient behavior of a N+PNN+ transistor irradiated with flash-X ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudre, Christophe; Dachs, Charles; Pelancho, Frederic; Palau, J.-N.; Gasiot, Jean

    1996-01-01

    This work concerns a parasitic N + PNN + transistor appearing in a power MOSFET. 2D Medici simulations point out a close correlation between the static characteristic and the transient values of both the current and the reverse bias of the transistor irradiated by a flash-X ray. The static characteristic points out a steady-state where the transistor behaves as a resistor. If the dose rate is sufficient, it can bring the transistor to the same steady-state. In both cases, this steady-state is reached after the same physical process: conduction of the emitter-base junction, shift of the electric field towards the NN + junction and highly avalanching conditions in the device. (author)

  20. Design, development and integration of a large scale multiple source X-ray computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, Andrew A.; Liu, Tong; Ng, Ivan Kee Beng; Teng, Wei Yuen; Yap, Tsi Tung; Wan, Siew Ping; Kong, Chun Jeng

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows visualisation of the physical structures in the interior of an object without physically opening or cutting it. This technology supports a wide range of applications in the non-destructive testing, failure analysis or performance evaluation of industrial products and components. Of the numerous factors that influence the performance characteristics of an X-ray CT system the energy level in the X-ray spectrum to be used is one of the most significant. The ability of the X-ray beam to penetrate a given thickness of a specific material is directly related to the maximum available energy level in the beam. Higher energy levels allow penetration of thicker components made of more dense materials. In response to local industry demand and in support of on-going research activity in the area of 3D X-ray imaging for industrial inspection the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) engaged in the design, development and integration of large scale multiple source X-ray computed tomography system based on X-ray sources operating at higher energies than previously available in the Institute. The system consists of a large area direct digital X-ray detector (410 x 410 mm), a multiple-axis manipulator system, a 225 kV open tube microfocus X-ray source and a 450 kV closed tube millifocus X-ray source. The 225 kV X-ray source can be operated in either transmission or reflection mode. The body of the 6-axis manipulator system is fabricated from heavy-duty steel onto which high precision linear and rotary motors have been mounted in order to achieve high accuracy, stability and repeatability. A source-detector distance of up to 2.5 m can be achieved. The system is controlled by a proprietary X-ray CT operating system developed by SIMTech. The system currently can accommodate samples up to 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m in size with weight up to 50 kg. These specifications will be increased to 1.0 x 1.0 x 1.0 m and 100 kg in future

  1. Astronomy and astrophysics of galactic X-ray binaries: from the nature of the X-ray sources to the physics of accretion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    In this HDR (Accreditation to supervise research) report, the author proposes an overview of his research works in the field of accretion of X-ray binaries. After a presentation of X-ray binaries, neutron stars and black holes, micro-quasars, and of the main issues regarding X-ray binaries, the author presents and comments his activities in X-ray astronomy and gamma-ray astronomy (the INTEGRAL observatory, the discovery of new sources of X and gamma radiation, studies of new sources at different wavelengths). The second part addresses the understanding of source accretion: phenomenological studies in astronomy, relationships between accretion and ejection. The third part presents and comments several studies of the physics of phenomena related to matter accretion and ejection. (author) [fr

  2. Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes with home-lab source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaran; Xie, Qing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Xin, Qiuqi; Wang, Xin; Mu, Baozhong; Wang, Zhanshan; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes is urgently needed in quantitative studies of X-ray emission from laser plasma sources in inertial confinement fusion. The existing calibration methods for single reflecting mirrors, crystals, gratings, filters, and X-ray detectors are not applicable for such X-ray microscopes due to the specific optical structure and the restrictions of object-image relation. This article presents a reliable and efficient method that can be performed using a divergent X-ray source and an energy dispersive Si-PIN (silicon positive-intrinsic-negative) detector in an ordinary X-ray laboratory. The transmission theory of X-ray flux in imaging diagnostics is introduced, and the quantities to be measured are defined. The calibration method is verified by a W/Si multilayer-coated Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope with a field of view of ∼95 μm at 17.48 keV. The mirror reflectance curve in the 1D coordinate is drawn with a peak value of 20.9% and an uncertainty of ∼6.0%.

  3. Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes with home-lab source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaran; Xie, Qing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Xin, Qiuqi; Wang, Xin; Mu, Baozhong; Wang, Zhanshan; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes is urgently needed in quantitative studies of X-ray emission from laser plasma sources in inertial confinement fusion. The existing calibration methods for single reflecting mirrors, crystals, gratings, filters, and X-ray detectors are not applicable for such X-ray microscopes due to the specific optical structure and the restrictions of object-image relation. This article presents a reliable and efficient method that can be performed using a divergent X-ray source and an energy dispersive Si-PIN (silicon positive-intrinsic-negative) detector in an ordinary X-ray laboratory. The transmission theory of X-ray flux in imaging diagnostics is introduced, and the quantities to be measured are defined. The calibration method is verified by a W/Si multilayer-coated Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope with a field of view of ˜95 μm at 17.48 keV. The mirror reflectance curve in the 1D coordinate is drawn with a peak value of 20.9% and an uncertainty of ˜6.0%.

  4. Evidence for Precession due to Supercritical Accretion in Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shan-Shan; Feng, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are thought to be supercritical accreting compact objects, where massive outflows are inevitable. Using the long-term monitoring data with the Swift X-ray Telescope, we identified a common feature in bright, hard ULXs: they display a quasi-periodic modulation in their hard X-ray band but not in their soft band. As a result, some sources show a bimodal distribution on the hardness intensity map. We argue that these model-independent results can be well interpreted in a picture that involves supercritical accretion with precession, where the hard X-ray emission from the central funnel is more or less beamed, while the soft X-rays may arise from the photosphere of the massive outflow and be nearly isotropic. It implies that precession may be ubiquitous in supercritical systems, such as the Galactic microquasar SS 433. How the hard X-rays are modulated can be used to constrain the angular distribution of the hard X-ray emission and the geometry of the accretion flow. We also find that two ULX pulsars (NGC 5907 ULX-1 and NGC 7793 P13) show similar behaviors but no bimodal distribution, which may imply that they have a different beaming shape or mechanism.

  5. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  6. Prospects for X-ray absorption with the super-bright light sources of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, D

    2001-03-01

    The immense growth in applications of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been enabled by the widespread availability of intense tunable X-rays from synchrotron radiation sources. Recently, new concepts have been proposed for fourth-generation light sources, such as the SASE (self-amplified stimulated emission) X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) being pursued at Hamburg (TESLA) and Stanford (LCLS), and the recirculator ring (MARS) at Novosibirsk. These sources offer expected gains of many orders of magnitude in instantaneous brilliance, which will unlock opportunities for qualitatively different science. Examples of new or greatly expanded techniques in XAS could include Raman X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), pump-probe experiments, time-resolved XAFS and small-spot X-ray spectromicroscopy, although the limited tunability of the sources might not allow conventional XAFS measurements. Multi-photon X-ray absorption could become a new field of study. There should not be a collective stampede to these new sources, however, and it is likely that storage rings will continue to be necessary for most XAFS applications. The extreme brightness of these future light sources will present difficult challenges in instrumentation, especially detectors and sample containment. Practitioners will also have to exercise caution, because the intensity of the beam will surely destroy many samples and in some cases there will be so many photons absorbed per atom that XAFS will be impossible.

  7. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  8. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  9. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  10. A Compact Soft X-Ray Microscope using an Electrode-less Z-Pinch Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silterra, J; Holber, W

    2009-01-01

    Soft X-rays (microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported. PMID:20198115

  11. Development of a Novel Tunable X-Ray Source for the RPI-LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Danon; R.C. Block

    2004-11-30

    This document summarizes the results of a three year effort to develop a parametric x-ray (PXR) source. The emphasis of this research was to demonstrate production of high yield monoenergetic x-rays. Production of PXR is accomplished by placing a crystal in a relativistic electron beam. The process was first demonstrated in 1985 in Russia. Numerous papers were written about the characteristics of PXR from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The advantage of PXR over other monoenergetic x-ray sources is that it is produced at large angle relative to the electron beam and at high intensity. None of the previous work described in the literature capitalized on this effect to study what is required in order to generate an effective monoenergetic x-ray source that can be used for practical applications. The work summarized here describes the process done in order to optimize the PXR production process by selecting an appropriate crystal and the optimal conditions. The research focused on production of 18 keV x-rays which are suitable for mammography however the results are not limited to this application or energy range. We are the first group to demonstrate x-ray imaging using PXR. Such sources can improve current medical imaging modalities. More research is required in order to design a prototype of a compact source.

  12. Detector development for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, M. A.; Herr, D. A.; Brewer, K. J.; Ojason, N.; Tarpine, H. A.

    2010-02-01

    X-ray imaging requires unique optical detector system configuration for optimization of image quality, resolution, and contrast ratio. A system is described whereby x-ray photons from multiple anode sources create a series of repetitive images on fast-decay scintillator screens, from which an intensified image is transferred to a fast phosphor on a GEN II image intensifier and collected as a cineradiographic video with high speed digital imagery. The work addresses scintillator material formulation, flash x-ray implementation, image intensification, and high speed video processing and display. Novel determination of optimal scintillator absorption, x-ray energy and dose relationships, contrast ratio determination, and test results are presented.

  13. Impact of ultraluminous X-ray sources on photoabsorption in the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2018-02-01

    In the local Universe, integrated X-ray emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) is dominated by the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with luminosity ≳ 1040 erg s-1. Such rare objects probably also dominated the production of X-rays in the early Universe. We demonstrate that a ULX with LX ˜ 1040-1041 erg s-1 (isotropic-equivalent luminosity in the 0.1-10 keV energy band) shining for ˜105 years (the expected duration of a supercritically accreting phase in HMXBs) can significantly ionise the ISM in its host dwarf galaxy of total mass M ˜ 107-108M⊙ and thereby reduce its opacity to soft X-rays. As a result, the fraction of the soft X-ray (below 1 keV) radiation from the ULX escaping into the intergalactic medium (IGM) can increase from ˜20-50% to ˜30-80% over its lifetime. This implies that HMXBs can induce a stronger heating of the IGM at z ≳ 10 compared to estimates neglecting the ULX feedback on the ISM. However, larger galaxies with M ≳ 3 × 108M⊙ could not be significantly ionised even by the brightest ULXs in the early Universe. Since such galaxies probably started to dominate the global star-formation rate at z ≲ 10, the overall escape fraction of soft X-rays from the HMXB population probably remained low, ≲ 30%, at these epochs.

  14. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I. The naked T Tauri stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but naked T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope. 72 references

  15. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by ∼tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities

  16. Plasma instability control toward high fluence, high energy x-ray continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Kirkwood, Robert; Wilks, Scott; Blue, Brent

    2017-10-01

    X-ray source development at Omega and NIF seeks to produce powerful radiation with high conversion efficiency for material effects studies in extreme fluence environments. While current K-shell emission sources can achieve tens of kJ on NIF up to 22 keV, the conversion efficiency drops rapidly for higher Z K-alpha energies. Pulsed power devices are efficient generators of MeV bremsstrahlung x-rays but are unable to produce lower energy photons in isolation, and so a capability gap exists for high fluence x-rays in the 30 - 100 keV range. A continuum source under development utilizes instabilities like Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) to generate plasma waves that accelerate electrons into high-Z converter walls. Optimizing instabilities using existing knowledge on their elimination will allow sufficiently hot and high yield electron distributions to create a superior bremsstrahlung x-ray source. An Omega experiment has been performed to investigate the optimization of SRS and high energy x-rays using Au hohlraums with parylene inner lining and foam fills, producing 10× greater x-ray yield at 50 keV than conventional direct drive experiments on the facility. Experiment and simulation details on this campaign will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W.; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error over 100 meter of glass fiber. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1 10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with a piezoelectric phase modulator. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several tera Hertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes

  18. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W

    2005-01-01

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short x-ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error. For the sub-100fs range we use an amplitude modulated CW laser at 1GHz to transmit RF phase information, and control the delay through a 100m fiber by observing the retroreflected signal. Initial results show 40fs peak-to-peak error above 10Hz, and 200fs long term drift, mainly due to amplitude sensitivity in the analog mixers. For the sub-10fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes. For attosecond synchronization we propose a stabilized, free space link using bulk lens wavegu...

  19. Demonstration of Laser Plasma X-Ray Source with X-Ray Collimator Final Report CRADA No. TC-1564-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Forber, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and JMAR Research, Inc. (JRI), was to demonstrate that LLNL x-ray collimators can effectively increase the wafer throughput of JRI's laser based x-ray lithography systems. The technical objectives were expected to be achieved by completion of the following tasks, which are separated into two task lists by funding source. The organization (LLNL or JMAR) having primary responsibility is given parenthetically for each task.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source soft x-ray materials science instrument optical design and monochromator commissioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Schlotter, W.F.; Turner, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Messerschmidt, M.; Bernstein, D.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Hau-Riege, S.; Holmes, M.; Juha, Libor; Kelez, N.; Lüning, J.; Nordlund, D.; Perea, M.F.; Scherz, A.; Soufli, R.; Wurth, W.; Rowen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 9 (2011), 093104/1-093104/8 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : diffraction gratings * light sources * linear accelerators * optical materials * x-ray monochromators * x-ray optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.367, year: 2011

  1. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  2. TH-F-209-00: Pitfalls: Reliability and Performance of Diagnostic X-Ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Performance and reliability of medical X-ray tubes for imaging are crucial from an ethical, clinical and economic perspective. This lecture will deliver insight into the aspects to consider during the decision making process to invest in X-ray imaging equipment. Outdated metric still hampers realistic product comparison. It is time to change this and to comply with latest standards, which consider current technology. Failure modes and ways to avoid down-time of the equipment shall be discussed. In view of the increasing number of interventional procedures and the hazards associated with ionizing radiation, toxic contrast agents, and the combination thereof, the aspect of system reliability is of paramount importance. Methods: A comprehensive picture of trends for different modalities (CT, angiography, general radiology) has been drawn and led to the development of novel X-ray tube technology. Results: Recent X-ray tubes feature enhanced reliability and unprecedented performance. Relevant metrics for product comparison still have to be implemented in practice. Conclusion: The speed of scientific and industrial development of new diagnostic and therapeutic X-ray sources remains tremendous. Still, users suffer from gaps between desire and reality in day-to-day diagnostic routine. X-ray sources are still limiting cutting-edge medical procedures. Side-effects of wear and tear, limitations of the clinical work flow, costs, the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and others topics need to be further addressed. New applications and modalities, like detection-based color-resolved X-ray and phase-contrast / dark-field imaging will impact the course of new developments of X-ray sources. Learning Objectives: Understand the basic requirements on medical diagnostic X-ray sources per modality Learn to select the optimal equipment employing state-of-the-art metric Know causes of failures, depending on the way X-ray sources are operated Understand methods to remediate

  3. TH-F-209-01: Pitfalls: Reliability and Performance of Diagnostic X-Ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behling, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Performance and reliability of medical X-ray tubes for imaging are crucial from an ethical, clinical and economic perspective. This lecture will deliver insight into the aspects to consider during the decision making process to invest in X-ray imaging equipment. Outdated metric still hampers realistic product comparison. It is time to change this and to comply with latest standards, which consider current technology. Failure modes and ways to avoid down-time of the equipment shall be discussed. In view of the increasing number of interventional procedures and the hazards associated with ionizing radiation, toxic contrast agents, and the combination thereof, the aspect of system reliability is of paramount importance. Methods: A comprehensive picture of trends for different modalities (CT, angiography, general radiology) has been drawn and led to the development of novel X-ray tube technology. Results: Recent X-ray tubes feature enhanced reliability and unprecedented performance. Relevant metrics for product comparison still have to be implemented in practice. Conclusion: The speed of scientific and industrial development of new diagnostic and therapeutic X-ray sources remains tremendous. Still, users suffer from gaps between desire and reality in day-to-day diagnostic routine. X-ray sources are still limiting cutting-edge medical procedures. Side-effects of wear and tear, limitations of the clinical work flow, costs, the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and others topics need to be further addressed. New applications and modalities, like detection-based color-resolved X-ray and phase-contrast / dark-field imaging will impact the course of new developments of X-ray sources. Learning Objectives: Understand the basic requirements on medical diagnostic X-ray sources per modality Learn to select the optimal equipment employing state-of-the-art metric Know causes of failures, depending on the way X-ray sources are operated Understand methods to remediate

  4. Polarization of TGFs and X-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning and its association with source geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, M.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma rays produced by thunderstorms, most often observed by spacecraft in the low-Earth orbit. Two important properties of TGFs are their source altitudes and the width and direction of the gamma-ray beam. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to disentangle these properties using single point spacecraft measurements, which has hampered attempts to constrain TGF models. X-ray and gamma-ray polarization measurements of astrophysical sources has been of interest for many decades, and new space missions are being proposed to make such measurements. This raises the question, do TGFs and the related X-ray emissions from lightning have observable gamma-ray or X-ray polarization, and, if so, what would this polarization tell us about their source? In this work, the REAM Monte Carlo code, which has been used to model TGFs for many years, has been modified to record the linear polarization of X-rays and gamma rays. The predicted polarization and fluence of TGFs and X-rays from lightning are presented as a function of source altitude and beam geometry. It is found that mid-altitude TGFs, near of just above the tops of thunderclouds, could have polarizations as high as 10%, but because only a few tens of counts are typically detected by spacecraft in low-Earth orbit from TGFs, detecting this polarization level is unlikely. It is also found that low-altitude TGFs ( 3.5 km) could produce gamma ray polarizations up to about 5% on the ground, which may be detectable since the number of counts detected during ground-level TGFs can be large. For both TGFs seen from space and ground-level TGFs, the dominant process for producing the polarization is found to be Compton scattering. On the other hand, avalanches of X-rays produced from rocket-triggered lightning measured on the ground showed a maximum polarization of 13% which is also due to Compton scattering. This level of polarization seems detectable by polarimeters on the

  5. Multiwavelength classification of Galactic X-ray sources using machine-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jeremy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George G.; Posselt, Bettina; Volkov, Igor

    2018-01-01

    Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories have detected a large number of Galactic sources serendipitously. The X-ray properties of these sources are extracted and placed into catalogs where they remain largely unexplored. These rich datasets hold excellent potential for population studies of various types of astrophysical sources and may also hide rare source types, which we are yet to discover. However, X-ray data alone is often not enough to classify these sources and multiwavelength data must be used. We have developed a multiwavelength machine-learning pipeline (MUWCLASS), which uses a rich training dataset (of about 10,000 sources of known types) to classify X-ray sources. We describe the pipeline, training dataset, and verification and validation procedures used to build the pipeline. We then present and discuss the results of the classifications of X-ray sources, as well as the code's performance in multiple example environments, including dwarf galaxies, stellar clusters, SNRs, unidentified TeV sources, and a wide Galactic disk field.

  6. The X-ray source content of the XMM-Newton Galactic plane survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motch, C.; Warwick, R.; Cropper, M. S.; Carrera, F.; Guillout, P.; Pineau, F.-X.; Pakull, M. W.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Tedds, J.; Webb, N.; Negueruela, I.; Watson, M. G.

    2010-11-01

    We report the results of an optical campaign carried out by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre with the specific goal of identifying the brightest X-ray sources in the XMM-Newton Galactic plane survey. In addition to photometric and spectroscopic observations obtained at the ESO-VLT and ESO-3.6 m, we used cross-correlations with the 2XMMi, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS, and GLIMPSE catalogues to advance the identification process. Active coronae account for 16 of the 30 positively or tentatively identified X-ray sources and exhibit the softest X-ray spectra. Many of the identified hard X-ray sources are associated with massive stars, possible members of binary systems and emitting at intermediate X-ray luminosities of 1032-34 erg s-1. Among these are (i) a very absorbed, likely hyper-luminous star with X-ray/optical spectra and luminosities comparable to those of η Carina; (ii) a new X-ray-selected WN8 Wolf-Rayet star in which most of the X-ray emission probably arises from wind collision in a binary; (iii) a new Be/X-ray star belonging to the growing class of γ-Cas analogues; and (iv) a possible supergiant X-ray binary of the kind discovered recently by INTEGRAL. One of the sources, XGPS-25, has a counterpart of moderate optical luminosity that exhibits HeII λ4686 and Bowen CIII-NIII emission lines, suggesting that this may be a quiescent or X-ray shielded low mass X-ray binary, although its X-ray properties might also be consistent with a rare kind of cataclysmic variable (CV). We also report the discovery of three new CVs, one of which is a likely magnetic system displaying strong X-ray variability. The soft (0.4-2.0 keV) band log N(>S) - log S curve is completely dominated by active stars in the flux range of 1×10-13 to 1×10-14 erg cm-2 s-1. Several active coronae are also detected above 2 keV suggesting that the population of RS CVn binaries contributes significantly to the hard X-ray source population. In total, we are able to identify a large fraction of the hard

  7. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5-9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ˜460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  8. Providing Bright-Hard X-ray Beams from a Lower Energy Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, David

    2002-04-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) there had been an increasing demand for more high brightness harder X-ray sources in the 7 to 40 KeV range. In response to that demand, the ALS storage ring was modified in August 2001. Three 1.3 Tesla normal conducting bending magnets were removed and replaced with three 5 Tesla superconducting magnets (Superbends). The radiation produced by these Superbends is an order of magnitude higher in photon brightness and flux at 12 keV than the 1.3 Tesla bends, making them excellent sources of harder x-rays for protein crystallography and other harder x-ray applications. At the same time the Superbends do not compromise the performance of the facility in the UV and Soft X-ray regions of the spectrum. The Superbends will eventually feed 12 new x-ray beam lines greatly enhancing the facility's capacity in the hard x-ray region. The Superbend project is the biggest upgrade to the ALS storage ring since the ring was commissioned in 1993. In this paper we present, a history of the project, details of the magnet, installation, commissioning, and resulting performance of the ALS with Superbends.

  9. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  10. ROSAT X-ray sources embedded in the rho Ophiuchi cloud core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Sophie; Montmerle, Thierry; Feigelson, Eric D.; Andre, Philippe

    1995-02-01

    We present a deep ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the central region of the rho Oph star-forming region. The selected area, about 35 x 35 arcmins in size, is rich with dense molecular cores and young stellar objects (YSOs). Fifty-five reliable X-ray sources are detected (and up to 50 more candidates may be present) above approximately 1 keV,, doubling the number of Einstein sources in this area. These sources are cross-identified with an updated list of 88 YSOs associated with the rho Oph cloud core. A third of the reliable X-ray sources do not have optical counterparts on photographic plates. Most can be cross-identified wth Class II and Class III infrared (IR) sources, which are embedded T Tauri stars, but three reliable X-ray sources and up to seven candidate sources are tentatively identified with Class I protostars. Eighteen reliable, and up to 20 candidate, X-ray sources are probably new cloud members. The overall detection rate of the bona fide cloud population is very high (73% for the Class II and Class III objects). The spatial distribution of the X-ray sources closely follows that of the moleclar gas. The visual extinctions Av estimated from near-IR data) of the ROSAT sources can be as high as 50 or more, confirming that most are embedded in the cloud core and are presumably very young. Using bolometric luminosities Lbol estimated from J-magnitudes a tight correlation between Lx and Lbol is found, similar to that seen for older T Tauri stars in the Cha I cloud: Lx approximately 10-4 Lbol. A general relation Lxproportional to LbolLj seems to apply to all T Tauri-like YSOs. The near equality of the extintion in the IR J band and in the keV X-ray rage implies that this relation is valid for the detected fluxes as well as for the dereddened fluxes. The X-ray luminosity function of the embedded sourced in rho Oph spans a range of Lx approximately 1028.5 to approximately equal to or greater than 1031.5 ergs/s and is statistically

  11. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  12. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved

  13. A compact soft X-ray microscope using an electrode-less Z-pinch source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, S. F.; Silterra, J.; Holber, W.

    2009-09-01

    Soft X-rays (medical interest both for imaging and microdosimetry applications. X-ray sources at this low energy present a technological challenge. Synchrotrons, while very powerful and flexible, are enormously expensive national research facilities. Conventional X-ray sources based on electron bombardment can be compact and inexpensive, but low x-ray production efficiencies at low electron energies restrict this approach to very low power applications. Laser-based sources tend to be expensive and unreliable. Energetiq Technology, Inc. (Woburn, MA, USA) markets a 92 eV, 10W(2pi sr) electrode-less Z-pinch source developed for advanced semiconductor lithography. A modified version of this commercial product has produced 400 mW at 430 eV (2pi sr), appropriate for water window soft X-ray microscopy. The US NIH has funded Energetiq to design and construct a demonstration microscope using this source, coupled to a condenser optic, as the illumination system. The design of the condenser optic matches the unique characteristics of the source to the illumination requirements of the microscope, which is otherwise a conventional design. A separate program is underway to develop a microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported. (Supported by NIH grants 5R44RR022488-03 and 5R44RR023753-03)

  14. Optical technologies for extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray coherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Poletto, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The book reviews the most recent achievements in optical technologies for XUV and X-ray coherent sources. Particular attention is given to free-electron-laser facilities, but also to other sources available at present, such as synchrotrons, high-order laser harmonics and X-ray lasers. The optical technologies relevant to each type of source are discussed. In addition, the main technologies used for photon handling and conditioning, namely multilayer mirrors, adaptive optics, crystals and gratings are explained. Experiments using coherent light received during the last decades a lot of attention for the X-ray regime. Strong efforts were taken for the realization of almost fully coherent sources, e.g. the free-electron lasers, both as independent sources in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes and as seeding sources for free-electron-lasers and X-ray gas lasers. In parallel to the development of sources, optical technologies for photon handling and conditioning of such coherent and intense X-ray beams advance...

  15. Phase-contrast imaging with a compact x-ray light source: system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yongjin; Gupta, Rajiv; Nelson, Brandon; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H; Graves, William S

    2017-10-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) overcomes the problem of low contrast between different soft tissues achieved in conventional x-ray imaging by introducing x-ray phase as an additional contrast mechanism. This work describes a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) and compares, via simulations, the high quality XPCI results that can be produced from this source to those produced using a microfocus x-ray source. The simulation framework is first validated using an image acquired with a microfocus-source, propagation-based XPCI (PB-XPCI) system. The phase contrast for a water sphere simulating a simple cyst submersed in muscle is evaluated and the evolution of PB-XPCI signal as the object to detector distance is increased is demonstrated. The proposed design of a PB-XPCI system using the CXLS is described and simulated images of a coronary artery compared between CXLS and microfocus source PB-XPCI systems. To generate images with similar noise levels, a microfocus source would require a 3000 times longer exposure than would the CXLS. We conclude that CXLS technology has the potential to provide high-quality XPCI in a medical environment using extremely short exposure times relative to microfocus source approaches.

  16. Environments of High Luminosity X-Ray Sources in the Antennae Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Brandl, B. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Carson, J. C.; Henderson, C. P.; Hayward, T. P.; Barry, D. J.; Houck, J. R.; Ptak, A.; Colbert, E.

    2003-12-01

    We use deep J (1.25 μ m) and Ks (2.15 μ m) images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/9) obtained with the Wide-field InfraRed Camera on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, together with the Chandra X-ray source list of Zezas et al. (2001), to establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with ˜ 0.5 ″ RMS residuals over a ˜ 5 ‧ field. We find 13 ``strong" IR counterparts 99.9% confidence), and that the X-ray/IR matches are concentrated in the spiral arms and ``bridge" regions of the Antennae. This implies that these X-ray sources lie in the most ``super" of the Antennae's Super Star Clusters, and thus trace the recent massive star formation history here. Based on the NH inferred from the X-ray sources without IR counterparts, we determine that the absence of most of the ``missing" IR counterparts is not due to extinction, but that these sources are intrinsically less luminous in the IR, implying that they trace a different (older?) stellar population. We find no clear correlation between X-ray luminosity classes and IR properties of the sources, though small number statistics hamper this analysis. Finally, we find a Ks = 16.2 mag counterpart to the Ultra-Luminous X-ray (ULX) source X-37 within <0.5 ″ , eliminating the need for the ``runaway binary" hypothesis proposed by previous authors for this object. We discuss some of the implications of this detection for models of ULX emission. This work is funded by an NSF CAREER grant.

  17. Development and characterization of a tunable ultrafast X-ray source via inverse-Compton-scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochmann, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort, nearly monochromatic hard X-ray pulses enrich the understanding of the dynamics and function of matter, e.g., the motion of atomic structures associated with ultrafast phase transitions, structural dynamics and (bio)chemical reactions. Inverse Compton backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright X-ray pulses which can be used in a pump-probe experiment, but also for the investigation of the electron beam dynamics at the interaction point. The focus of this PhD work lies on the detailed understanding of the kinematics during the interaction of the relativistic electron bunch and the laser pulse in order to quantify the influence of various experiment parameters on the emitted X-ray radiation. The experiment was conducted at the ELBE center for high power radiation sources using the ELBE superconducting linear accelerator and the DRACO Ti:sapphire laser system. The combination of both these state-of-the-art apparatuses guaranteed the control and stability of the interacting beam parameters throughout the measurement. The emitted X-ray spectra were detected with a pixelated detector of 1024 by 256 elements (each 26μm by 26μm) to achieve an unprecedented spatial and energy resolution for a full characterization of the emitted spectrum to reveal parameter influences and correlations of both interacting beams. In this work the influence of the electron beam energy, electron beam emittance, the laser bandwidth and the energy-anglecorrelation on the spectra of the backscattered X-rays is quantified. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to ab-initio 3D simulations enabled, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard X-ray source PHOENIX (Photon electron collider for Narrow bandwidth Intense X-rays) and potential all optical gamma-ray sources. The results

  18. The X-Ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA, 01854 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Binder, Breanna [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Prestwich, Andrea [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Christodoulou, Dimitris M. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA, 01854 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3 σ level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find four transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further eight objects with ratios >5. The observations span the years 2003–2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magellanic Clouds (40–200 My) where most of the known HMXBs reside. We find 10 strong HMXB candidates, 2 probable background Active Galactic Nuclei, 4 foreground flare-stars or active binaries, and 5 not yet classifiable sources. Complete classification of the sample requires optical spectroscopy for radial velocity analysis and deeper X-ray observations to obtain higher S/N spectra and search for pulsations. A catalog and supporting data set are provided.

  19. Development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray sources using ultrahigh power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hojbota, Calin; Jeon, Jong Ho; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seong Ku; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Pathak, Vishwa B.; Pae, Ki Hong; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Malka, Victor; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-05-01

    Short-pulse x-ray/gamma-ray sources have become indispensable light sources for investigating material science, bio technology, and photo-nuclear physics. In past decades, rapid advancement of high intensity laser technology led extensive progresses in the field of radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions - x-ray lasers, betatron radiation and Compton gamma-rays. Ever since the installation of a 100-TW laser in 2006, we have pursued the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiations, such as x-ray lasers, relativistic high-order harmonics, betatron radiation and all-optical Compton gamma-rays. With the construction of two PW Ti:Sapphire laser beamlines having peak powers of 1.0 PW and 1.5 PW in 2010 and 2012, respectively [1], we have investigated the generation of multi-GeV electron beams [2] and MeV betatron radiations. We plan to carry out the Compton backscattering to generate MeV gamma-rays from the interaction of a GeV electron beam and a PW laser beam. Here, we present the recent progress in the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiation sources based on laser plasma interactions and the plan for developing Compton gamma-ray sources driven by the PW lasers. In addition, we will present the applications of laser-plasma x-ray lasers to x-ray holography and coherent diffraction imaging. [references] 1. J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. J. Yu, T. M. Jeong, and J. Lee, Opt. Lett. 35, 3021 (2010). 2. H. T. Kim, K. H. Pae, H. J. Cha, I J. Kim, T. J. Yu, J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. M. Jeong, J. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165002 (2013).

  20. Compact source of narrowband and tunable X-rays for radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Chen, Shouyuan; Powers, Nathan; Haden, Daniel; Liu, Cheng; Golovin, G.; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, S.; Pozzi, S.; Silano, J.; Karwowski, H.; Umstadter, Donald

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the development of a compact X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering with a laser-driven electron beam. This source produces a beam of high-energy X-rays in a narrow cone angle (5–10 mrad), at a rate of 10 8 photons-s −1 . Tunable operation of the source over a large energy range, with energy spread of ∼50%, has also been demonstrated. Photon energies >10 MeV have been obtained. The narrowband nature of the source is advantageous for radiography with low dose, low noise, and minimal shielding

  1. Phase-contrast and magnification radiography at diagnostic X-ray energies using a pseudo-microfocus X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotre, C J; Robson, K J

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the use of conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes for applications in which specialist microfocus sources are normally required. A conventional diagnostic X-ray tube was used in conjunction with a range of apertures to investigate improvements in spatial resolution using a line-pairs test object. Phase-contrast effects were investigated by varying source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances using a 2-French catheter as a clinically realistic test object. For magnification radiography using a computed radiography receptor and conventional X-ray tube with a 1-mm nominal focus size, the limiting spatial resolution was improved from 3.55 line-pairs per millimetre, for a conventional contact image, to 5.6 line-pairs per millimetre, for a ×2 magnified view with a 250-µm aperture. For inline phase-contrast radiography, phase contrast enhancement of a 2-French catheter was demonstrated, and the expected trends with variations in source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances were found. Images of a neonatal phantom demonstrated a subtle improvement in visibility of a superimposed 1-French catheter simulating a percutaneously inserted central catheter for no increase in patient radiation dose. Spatial resolution improvement and visible phase contrast can be produced in clinically relevant objects using a pseudo-microfocus geometry at X-ray energies in the normal diagnostic range, using conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes and image receptors. The disadvantages of the proposal are the large distances required to produce phase contrast and limitations imposed by the resulting tube loading. It is possible to use conventional diagnostic X-ray equipment in applications that normally require microfocus X-ray sources. This presents some possibilities for clinical applications.

  2. An Ultradeep Chandra Catalog of X-Ray Point Sources in the Galactic Center Star Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenlin; Li, Zhiyuan; Morris, Mark R.

    2018-04-01

    We present an updated catalog of X-ray point sources in the inner 500″ (∼20 pc) of the Galactic center (GC), where the nuclear star cluster (NSC) stands, based on a total of ∼4.5 Ms of Chandra observations taken from 1999 September to 2013 April. This ultradeep data set offers unprecedented sensitivity for detecting X-ray sources in the GC, down to an intrinsic 2–10 keV luminosity of 1.0 × 1031 erg s‑1. A total of 3619 sources are detected in the 2–8 keV band, among which ∼3500 are probable GC sources and ∼1300 are new identifications. The GC sources collectively account for ∼20% of the total 2–8 keV flux from the inner 250″ region where detection sensitivity is the greatest. Taking advantage of this unprecedented sample of faint X-ray sources that primarily traces the old stellar populations in the NSC, we revisit global source properties, including long-term variability, cumulative spectra, luminosity function, and spatial distribution. Based on the equivalent width and relative strength of the iron lines, we suggest that in addition to the arguably predominant population of magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), nonmagnetic CVs contribute substantially to the detected sources, especially in the lower-luminosity group. On the other hand, the X-ray sources have a radial distribution closely following the stellar mass distribution in the NSC, but much flatter than that of the known X-ray transients, which are presumably low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) caught in outburst. This, together with the very modest long-term variability of the detected sources, strongly suggests that quiescent LMXBs are a minor (less than a few percent) population.

  3. A JEM-X Catalog of X-ray Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2009-01-01

    . A search for weaker, persistent, sources has been done in deep mosaic images that have been produced with all available observations for a large number of sky regions. The two resulting catalogs hold 158 and 179 sources respectively, but the combined catalog consists of 209 sources. This catalog can...... be downloaded as a FITS binary table file with source information such as names, positions, and fluxes at the PoS web page for the conference....

  4. Semi-analytic off-axis X-ray source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, M.; Anjomrouz, M.; Smithies, D. J.; Largeau, A.; Lu, G.; Atharifard, A.; Vanden Broeke, L.; Aamir, R.; Panta, R. K.; Walsh, M. F.; Goulter, B. P.; Healy, J. L.; Bheesette, S.; Bell, S. T.; Bateman, C. J.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2017-10-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) systems are employed with energy-resolving photon counting detectors. Incorporation of a spectrally accurate x-ray beam model in image reconstruction helps to improve material identification and quantification by these systems. Using an inaccurate x-ray model in spectral reconstruction can lead to severe image artifacts, one of the extreme cases of this is the well-known beam-hardening artifacts. An often overlooked spectral feature of x-ray beams in spectral reconstruction models is the angular dependence of the spectrum with reference to the central beam axis. To address these factors, we have developed a parameterized semi-analytical x-ray source model in the diagnostic imaging range (30-120 kVp) by applying regression techniques to data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc). This x-ray beam model is generalized to describe the off-axis spectral information within ±17o along θ (vertical direction), ±5o along phi (horizontal direction) of the central axis, and can be parameterized for specific x-ray tube models. Comparisons of our model with those generated by SpekCalc, TOPAS, and IPEM78 at central axis show good agreement (within 2 %). We have evaluated the model with experimental data collected with a small animal spectral scanner.

  5. Speckle-based at-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Zhou, Tunhe; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal

    2017-08-01

    To achieve high resolution and sensitivity on the nanometer scale, further development of X-ray optics is required. Although ex-situ metrology provides valuable information about X-ray optics, the ultimate performance of X-ray optics is critically dependent on the exact nature of the working conditions. Therefore, it is equally important to perform in-situ metrology at the optics' operating wavelength (`at-wavelength' metrology) to optimize the performance of X-ray optics and correct and minimize the collective distortions of the upstream beamline optics, e.g. monochromator, windows, etc. Speckle-based technique has been implemented and further improved at Diamond Light Source. We have demonstrated that the angular sensitivity for measuring the slope error of an optical surface can reach an accuracy of two nanoradians. The recent development of the speckle-based at-wavelength metrology techniques will be presented. Representative examples of the applications of the speckle-based technique will also be given - including optimization of X-ray mirrors and characterization of compound refraction lenses. Such a high-precision metrology technique will be extremely beneficial for the manufacture and in-situ alignment/optimization of X-ray mirrors for next-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  6. Suzaku X-Ray Study of an Anomalous Source XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Kei; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu

    2009-08-01

    We report on the results of a Suzaku X-ray observation of XSSJ12270-4859, one of the hard X-ray sources in the INTEGRAL catalogue. This object has been classified as an intermediate polar (IP) by its optical spectra, and a putative X-ray period of ˜860s. With a 30ks exposure by Suzaku, we obtained a well-exposed spectrum in the 0.2--70keV band. We conclude against a previous IP classification based on a lack of Fe Kα emission features in the spectrum and a failure to confirm the previously reported X-ray period. Instead, the X-ray light curve is filled with exotic phenomena, including repetitive flares lasting for ˜100s, occasional dips with no apparent periodicities, spectral hardening after some flares, and bimodal changes pivoting between quiet and active phases. The rapid flux changes, the dips, and the power-law spectrum point toward an interpretation that this is a low-mass X-ray binary. Some temporal characteristics are similar to those in the Rapid Burster and GRO J1744-28, making XSS J12270-4859 a very rare object.

  7. Multiband Diagnostics of Unidentified 1FGL Sources with Suzaku and Swift X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Maeda, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamori, T.; Tahara, M.

    2013-10-01

    We have analyzed all the archival X-ray data of 134 unidentified (unID) gamma-ray sources listed in the first Fermi/LAT (1FGL) catalog and subsequently followed up by the Swift/XRT. We constructed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from radio to gamma-rays for each X-ray source detected, and tried to pick up unique objects that display anomalous spectral signatures. In these analyses, we target all the 1FGL unID sources, using updated data from the second Fermi/LAT (2FGL) catalog on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) position and spectra. We found several potentially interesting objects, particularly three sources, 1FGL J0022.2-1850, 1FGL J0038.0+1236, and 1FGL J0157.0-5259, which were then more deeply observed with Suzaku as a part of an AO-7 program in 2012. We successfully detected an X-ray counterpart for each source whose X-ray spectra were well fitted by a single power-law function. The positional coincidence with a bright radio counterpart (currently identified as an active galactic nucleus, AGN) in the 2FGL error circles suggests these sources are definitely the X-ray emission from the same AGN, but their SEDs show a wide variety of behavior. In particular, the SED of 1FGL J0038.0+1236 is not easily explained by conventional emission models of blazars. The source 1FGL J0022.2-1850 may be in a transition state between a low-frequency peaked and a high-frequency peaked BL Lac object, and 1FGL J0157.0-5259 could be a rare kind of extreme blazar. We discuss the possible nature of these three sources observed with Suzaku, together with the X-ray identification results and SEDs of all 134 sources observed with the Swift/XRT.

  8. Laser-produced multi-charged heavy ions as efficient soft x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yuhei; Kawasaki, Masato

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate EUV and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6x nm and a water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on a high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to x-ray optics. We will discuss the progress and Z-scaling of UTA emission spectra to achieve lab-scale table-top, efficient, high-brightness high-Z plasma EUV-soft x-ray sources for in vivo bio-imaging applications. (author)

  9. Debris-free soft x-ray source with gas-puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiliang; Chen, Bo; Gong, Yan; Cao, Jianlin; Lin, Jingquan; Lee, Hongyan

    2001-12-01

    We have been developing a debris-free laser plasma light source with a gas-puff target system whose nozzle is driven by a piezoelectric crystal membrane. The gas-puff target system can utilize gases such as CO2, O2 or some gas mixture according to different experiments. Therefore, in comparison with soft X-ray source using a metal target, after continuously several-hour laser interaction with gas from the gas-puff target system, no evidences show that the light source can produce debris. The debris-free soft X-ray source is prepared for soft X-ray projection lithography research at State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics. Strong emission from CO2, O2 and Kr plasma is observed.

  10. Spectroscopic classification of X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Nelemans, G.; Heinke, C.; Mata Sánchez, D.; Johnson, C. B.; Gazer, R.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Maccarone, T. J.; Hynes, R. I.; Casares, J.; Udalski, A.; Wetuski, J.; Britt, C. T.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2017-10-01

    We present the classification of 26 optical counterparts to X-ray sources discovered in the Galactic Bulge Survey. We use (time-resolved) photometric and spectroscopic observations to classify the X-ray sources based on their multiwavelength properties. We find a variety of source classes, spanning different phases of stellar/binary evolution. We classify CX21 as a quiescent cataclysmic variable (CV) below the period gap, and CX118 as a high accretion rate (nova-like) CV. CXB12 displays excess UV emission, and could contain a compact object with a giant star companion, making it a candidate symbiotic binary or quiescent low-mass X-ray binary (although other scenarios cannot be ruled out). CXB34 is a magnetic CV (polar) that shows photometric evidence for a change in accretion state. The magnetic classification is based on the detection of X-ray pulsations with a period of 81 ± 2 min. CXB42 is identified as a young stellar object, namely a weak-lined T Tauri star exhibiting (to date unexplained) UX Ori-like photometric variability. The optical spectrum of CXB43 contains two (resolved) unidentified double-peaked emission lines. No known scenario, such as an active galactic nucleus or symbiotic binary, can easily explain its characteristics. We additionally classify 20 objects as likely active stars based on optical spectroscopy, their X-ray to optical flux ratios and photometric variability. In four cases we identify the sources as binary stars.

  11. OSO-7 observations of high galactic latitude x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, T.H.; Canizares, C.R.; Clark, G.W.; Li, F.K.; Northridge, P.L.; Sprott, G.F.; Wargo, G.F.

    1976-01-01

    Six hundred days of observations by the MIT X-ray detectors aboard OSO-7 have been analyzed. All-sky maps of X-ray intensity have been constructed from these data. A sample map is displayed. Seven sources with galactic latitude vertical-barb/subi//subi/vertical-bar>10degree, discovered during the mapping process, are reported, and upper limits are set on other high-latitude sources. The OSO-7 results are compared with those of Uhuru and an implication of this comparison, that many of the high-latitude sources may be variable, is discussed

  12. Two new supersoft X-ray sources in M31 identified as classical novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T.; Liu, J. F.; di Stefano, R.; Orio, M.; Patel, B.; Primini, F.; Shafter, A. W.

    2008-08-01

    We report the identification of two previously unpublished supersoft X-ray sources (SSS) in M31 as classical novae. The X-ray sources were discovered during a comprehensive search of all archival Chandra/ACIS images of M31 for so-called "Very Soft Sources" (VSS, see Di Stefano & Kong 2003 ApJ, 592, 884). The identification with classical novae was made as part of a larger campaign aimed at optical identification and classification of SSS in M31, and made use of the list of novae in M31 compiled by Pietsch et al.

  13. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H. [Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Sakaecho 35-2, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015 (Japan); Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center (KITC) Shimoimazumi 705-1, Ebina-shi, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) Komagome 2-28-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  14. Phase-contrast imaging and tomography at 60 keV using a conventional x-ray tube source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, Tilman; Bunk, Oliver; Groot, Waldemar; Bednarzik, Martin; Gruenzweig, Christian; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hempel, Eckhard; Popescu, Stefan; Hoheisel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Phase-contrast imaging at laboratory-based x-ray sources using grating interferometers has been developed over the last few years for x-ray energies of up to 28 keV. Here, we show first phase-contrast projection and tomographic images recorded at significantly higher x-ray energies, produced by an x-ray tube source operated at 100 kV acceleration voltage. We find our measured tomographic phase images in good agreement with tabulated data. The extension of phase-contrast imaging to this significantly higher x-ray energy opens up many applications of the technique in medicine and industrial nondestructive testing.

  15. Influence of Bernstein modes on the efficiency of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Nikitin, G.V.; Savanovich, V.Yu.; Umnov, A.M.; Elizarov, L.I.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    The article considers the factors influencing the temperature of hot electron component in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. In such sources the electron heating occurs often due to extraordinary electromagnetic wave propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. In this case the possibility of the absorption of Bernstein modes is regarded as an additional mechanism of electron heating. The Bernstein modes in an ECR x-ray source can arise due to either linear transformation or parametric instability of external transversal wave. The article briefly reviews also the further experiments which will be carried out to study the influence of Bernstein modes on the increase of hot electron temperature and consequently of x-ray emission

  16. A quasi-monochromatic X-rays source for art painting pigments investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertin, F.; Franconieri, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Petrucci, F.; Chiozzi, S.; Moro, D.

    2009-01-01

    Monochromatic X-ray sources can be used for several applications, like in medicine or in studying our cultural heritage. We are investigating imaging systems based on a tuneable energy band X-ray source, to obtain an element mapping of painting layers using the K-edge technique. The narrow energy band beams are obtained with conventional X-ray source via Bragg diffraction on a mosaic crystal; such an analysis has been performed at different diffraction angles, tuning the energy to investigate spectra of interest from the artistic point of view, like zinc and copper. In this paper the characteristics of the system in terms of fluence rate are reported, and first results of this technique on canvas samples and painting are presented. (orig.)

  17. The Ultraluminous X-Ray Source X-37 Is a Background Quasar in the Antennae Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. M.; Christopher, M. H.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Brandl, B. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Carson, J. C.; Henderson, C. P.; Hayward, T. L.; Barry, D. J.; Ptak, A. F.; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2005-10-01

    In this Letter we report that a bright, X-ray source in the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9), previously identified as an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), is in fact a background quasar. We identify an isolated infrared and optical counterpart within 0.3" +/- 0.5" of the X-ray source X-37. After acquiring an optical spectrum of its counterpart, we use the narrow [O III] and broad Hα emission lines to identify X-37 as a quasar at a redshift of z=0.26. Through a U, V, and Ks photometric analysis, we demonstrate that most of the observable light along this line of sight is from the quasar. We discuss the implications of this discovery and the importance of acquiring spectra for optical and IR counterparts to ULXs.

  18. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  19. Development of a stationary chest tomosynthesis system using carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing

    X-ray imaging system has shown its usefulness for providing quick and easy access of imaging in both clinic settings and emergency situations. It greatly improves the workflow in hospitals. However, the conventional radiography systems, lacks 3D information in the images. The tissue overlapping issue in the 2D projection image result in low sensitivity and specificity. Both computed tomography and digital tomosynthesis, the two conventional 3D imaging modalities, requires a complex gantry to mechanically translate the x-ray source to various positions. Over the past decade, our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based x-ray source technology. The CNT x-ray sources allows compacting multiple x-ray sources into a single x-ray tube. Each individual x-ray source in the source array can be electronically switched. This technology allows development of stationary tomographic imaging modalities without any complex mechanical gantries. The goal of this work is to develop a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) system, and implement it for a clinical trial. The feasibility of s-DCT was investigated. It is found that the CNT source array can provide sufficient x-ray output for chest imaging. Phantom images have shown comparable image qualities as conventional DCT. The s-DBT system was then used to study the effects of source array configurations and tomosynthesis image quality, and the feasibility of a physiological gated s-DCT. Using physical measures for spatial resolution, the 2D source configuration was shown to have improved depth resolution and comparable in-plane resolution. The prospective gated tomosynthesis images have shown substantially reduction of image blur associated with lung motions. The system was also used to investigate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a diagnosis and monitoring tools for cystic fibrosis patients. A new scatter reduction methods for s-DCT was also studied. Finally, a s-DCT system was constructed by

  20. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Walton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    .5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second(3). Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems(1,2). The most challenging sources to explain are those......The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes(1,2). Their X-ray luminosities in the 0...... at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear...

  1. ON THE NATURE OF HARD X-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES OBSERVED WITH XMM-NEWTON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Chavushyan, V.; Schartel, N.; Santos-Lleó, M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, X-ray surveys have provided outstanding new results due to the lack of the common selection effects present at other wavelengths. Here, we have selected a sample of unidentified sources from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey Catalog, likely to be extragalactic. Five of them were observed with the XMM-Newton observatory. In this work, we present the results of the spectral analysis of these objects in the X-ray and optical bands. Only three of them had useful spectroscopic X-ray data, and follow up observations were carried out in the optical range to determine their coordinates, classification, and redshift. The sources are different types of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with redshifts ranging from 0.059 to 0.386. The properties at both spectral ranges (X-rays and optical) are compatible with the common properties of their types of AGNs. Although the sources were selected by their hard X-ray properties, none of the three detected objects turned out to be an obscured AGN.

  2. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measur...

  3. High Repetition Rate Krf Laser Plasma X-Ray Source for Microlithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; E. Louis,; Turcu, E. C. I.; Tallents, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a development programme for a high-intensity laser-plasma X-ray source, experiments have been carried out using a high repetition rate excimer laser (up to 100 Hz; 249 nm, 300 mJ). Remedies are given to problems inherent to operating this type of source at high repetition rates. The

  4. X-ray system with coupled source drive and detector drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An electronic coupling replacing the (more expensive) mechanical coupling which controls the speed of two sets of two electric motors, one driving an X-ray source and the other an X-ray detector, is described. Source and detector are kept rotating in parallel planes with a fairly constant velocity ratio. The drives are controlled by an electronic system comprising a comparator circuit comparing the position-indicative signals, a process control circuit and an inverter switch. The control system regulates the speed of the electric motors. The signal processing is described

  5. Soft x-ray microradiography and lithograph using a laser produced plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    Considering the hardware characteristics of the laser-induced plasma X-ray source and the limitations of the conventional cone-beam reconstruction algorithm, a general cone-beam reconstruction algorithm has been developed at our laboratory, in which the motion locus of the X-ray source is an arbitrary curve corresponding to at least a 2π continuous horizontal angular displacement in the coordinate system of the specimen. The preliminary simulation shows that the general cone-beam reconstruction algorithm consistently results in visually satisfactory images

  6. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  7. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanier, M., E-mail: mspanier@physik.tu-berlin.de; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Malzer, W.; Kanngießer, B. [Institute for Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  8. Computerized tomography using high resolution X-ray imaging system with a microfocus source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaprazny, Z.; Korytar, D.; Konopka, P.; Ac, V.; Bielecki, J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there is an effort to image an internal structure of an object by using not only conventional 2D X-ray radiography but also using high resolution 3D tomography which is based on reconstruction of multiple 2D projections at various angular positions of the object. We have previously reported [1] the development and basic parameters of a high resolution x-ray imaging system with a microfocus source. We report the recent progress using this high resolution X-ray laboratory system in this work. These first findings show that our system is particularly suitable for light weight and nonmetallic objects such as biological objects, plastics, wood, paper, etc. where phase contrast helps to increase the visibility of the finest structures of the object. Phase-contrast X-ray Computerized Tomography is of our special interest because it is an emerging imaging technique that can be implemented at third generation synchrotron radiation sources and also in laboratory conditions using a microfocus X-ray tube or beam conditioning optics. (authors)

  9. Development of Compact Soft X-ray Source Based on Laser Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Minamiguchi, S; Saitô, T; Ueyama, D; Washio, Masakazu

    2004-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on backward Compton scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser and 4 MeV high quality electron beam generated from rf gun system. The range of energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein’s coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. As a preliminary experiment, about 300 eV X-ray generation was carried out. As next step, soft X-ray optics with zone plate was proposed for Soft X-ray microscopy. In this conference, we will report details and results of the experiment.

  10. Flash X-ray cinematography analysis of dwell and penetration of small caliber projectiles with three types of SiC ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Strassburger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of ceramic composite armor it is essential to know the mechanisms during each phase of the projectile–target interaction and their influence on the penetration resistance. Since the view on the crater zone and the tip of a projectile penetrating a ceramic is rapidly getting obscured by damaged material, a flash X-ray technique has to be applied in order to visualize projectile penetration. For this purpose, usually several flash X-ray tubes are arranged around the target and the radiographs are recorded on film. At EMI a flash X-ray imaging method has been developed, which provides up to eight flash radiographs in one experiment. A multi-anode 450 kV flash X-ray tube is utilized with this method. The radiation transmitted through the target is then detected on a fluorescent screen. The fluorescent screen converts the radiograph into an image in the visible wavelength range, which is photographed by means of a high-speed camera. This technique has been applied to visualize and analyze the penetration of 7.62 mm AP projectiles into three different types of SiC ceramics. Two commercial SiC grades and MICASIC (Metal Infiltrated Carbon derived SiC, a C-SiSiC ceramic developed by DLR, have been studied. The influences, not only of the ceramic but also the backing material, on dwell time and projectile erosion have been studied. Penetration curves have been determined and their relevance to the ballistic resistance is discussed.

  11. Dynamical effects on binary X-ray sources in dense stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    We examine the model in which the globular-cluster X-ray sources are binaries. Collisions of field stars in cores of dense clusters may shrink the orbits of tightly bound (''hard'') binaries, with important consequences for the evolution of X-ray sources if one component is a collapsed star. Exchange capture of field stars enables the binary to recycle its mass supplier and to undergo a number of intermittent stages of X-ray activity. ''Hard'' binaries may be formed by three-body encounters or by two-body tidal capture in clusters with large core densities and low velocity dispersions. Alternatively, as suggested by Hills, such objects may form by neutron-star or black-hole capture in exchange collisions with primordial binaries

  12. Impact of ultraluminous X-ray sources on photoabsorption in the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2018-05-01

    In the local Universe, integrated X-ray emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) is dominated by the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with luminosity ≳1040 erg s-1. Such rare objects probably also dominated the production of X-rays in the early Universe. We demonstrate that a ULX with LX ˜ 1040-1041 erg s-1 (isotropic-equivalent luminosity in the 0.1-10 keV energy band) shining for ˜105 yr (the expected duration of a supercritically accreting phase in HMXBs) can significantly ionize the ISM in its host dwarf galaxy of total mass M ˜ 107-108 M⊙ and thereby reduce its opacity to soft X-rays. As a result, the fraction of the soft X-ray (below 1 keV) radiation from the ULX escaping into the intergalactic medium (IGM) can increase from ˜20-50 per cent to ˜30-80 per cent over its lifetime. This implies that HMXBs can induce a stronger heating of the IGM at z ≳ 10 compared to estimates neglecting the ULX feedback on the ISM. However, larger galaxies with M ≳ 3 × 108 M⊙ could not be significantly ionized even by the brightest ULXs in the early Universe. Since such galaxies probably started to dominate the global star formation rate at z ≲ 10, the overall escape fraction of soft X-rays from the HMXB population probably remained low, ≲30 per cent, at these epochs.

  13. A Compact Light Source: Design and Technical Feasibility Study of a Laser-Electron Storage Ring X-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, R

    2004-02-02

    Thomson scattering infrared photons off energetic electrons provides a mechanism to produce hard X-rays desirable for applied sciences research. Using a small, modest energy (25MeV) electron storage ring together with a resonantly-driven optical storage cavity, a narrow spectrum of hard X-rays could be produced with the quality and monochromatic intensity approaching that of beamline sources at large synchrotron radiation laboratories. The general design of this X-ray source as well as its technical feasibility are presented. In particular, the requirements of optical pulse gain enhancement in an external cavity are described and experimentally demonstrated using a CW mode-locked laser.

  14. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); XinRay Systems, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Hologic, Inc., Bedford, Massachusetts 01730 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  15. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  16. A Machine-learning approach to classification of X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jeremy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George; Posselt, Bettina; Volkov, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories have serendipitously detected a large number of Galactic sources. Although their properties are automatically extracted and stored in catalogs, most of these sources remain unexplored. Classifying these sources can enable population studies on much larger scales and may also reveal new types of X-ray sources. For most of these sources the X-ray data alone are not enough to identify their nature, and multiwavelength data must be used. We developed a multiwavelength classification pipeline (MUWCLASS), which relies on supervised machine learning and a rich training dataset. We describe the training dataset, the pipeline and its testing, and will show/discuss how the code performs in different example environments, such as unidentified gamma-ray sources, supernova remnants, dwarf galaxies, stellar clusters, and the inner Galactic plane. We also discuss the application of this approach to the data from upcoming new X-ray observatories (e.g., eROSITA, Athena).

  17. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  18. Soft x-ray imaging with incoherent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P.; Torrisi, A.; Ayele, M.; Bartnik, A.; Czwartos, J.; Wegrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Parkman, T.; Vondrová, Š.; Turnová, J.; Odstrcil, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present experimental, compact desk-top SXR microscope, the EUV microscope which is at this stage a technology demonstrator, and finally, the SXR contact microscope. The systems are based on laser-plasma EUV and SXR sources, employing a double stream gas puff target. The EUV and SXR full field microscopes, operating at 13.8 nm and 2.88 nm wavelengths, respectively, are capable of imaging nanostructures with a sub-50 nm spatial resolution with relatively short (seconds) exposure times. The SXR contact microscope operates in the "water-window" spectral range, to produce an imprint of the internal structure of the sample in a thin layer of SXR light sensitive photoresist. Applications of such desk-top EUV and SXR microscopes for studies of variety of different samples - test objects for resolution assessment and other objects such as carbon membranes, DNA plasmid samples, organic and inorganic thin layers, diatoms, algae and carcinoma cells, are also presented. Details about the sources, the microscopes as well as the imaging results for various objects will be presented and discussed. The development of such compact imaging systems may be important to the new research related to biological, material science and nanotechnology applications.

  19. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  20. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-09

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  1. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

    2010-09-30

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  2. High-power excimer laser-generated plasma source for x-ray microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Harry; Powers, Michael F.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Ross, Ian N.; Maldonado, Juan R.; Burkhalter, Philip G.; Newman, D. A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a high-intensity, high pulse-repetition-rate picosecond-pulse excimer laser system and plasma x-ray source, which generates up to 3 W of average x-ray power, into 2(pi) steradians, in a spectral band from 10-16 angstrom. The XeCl excimer laser system output, at 308 nm, consists of a train of 16 pulses, each approximately 45 ps in duration and spaced by 2 ns. The energy of each pulse in the train is approximately 25 mJ, and the pulse-train repetition rate is 60 Hz. Each pulse in the train is focused to a spot of < 10 micrometers diameter on a metal tape target, resulting in an intensity of 1 X 1015 W cm-2. Spectral and spatial characteristics of the x-ray emission have been studied, and the laser energy to x-ray dose conversion efficiency has been measured in an experiment which simulates the x-ray lithography process. Lithographic efficiencies of 5.9% and 10.9% have been measured for copper and stainless steel targets, respectively.

  3. A free-electron laser fourth-generation X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The field of synchrotrons radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research those beams make possible. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the.optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission in free electron lasers. The use of a superconducting linac could produce a major, cost-effective facility that spans wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotron facilities, immense new scientific opportunities from fourth-generation sources

  4. Operation and Characteristics of the Flash X-Ray Generator at the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    t lu:.ca.. : Nt.::-S(if aplicable ) .c Address clft.,t rez a’u Z’ ,:.. , IC Source of Funding Numbers Program Element No I Propect No Task No Work...calibrated in a co-axial line and the field calculated from the Biot-Savart Law [Ref. 31- 2 x 10- 7 (amps)(14) B( TESLA ) = r(meters) The sensitivity of the...current is then simply (17 - 2aB(- (17) Ba Amps 2 z 10 - 7 where B = magnetic field in Tesla a = 0.128 m (from figure 15) for the Pulserad 112A. C

  5. Colors and absolute magnitudes of the optical afterglows of X-ray flashes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2006), s. 1579-1581 ISSN 1594-9982. [Swift and GRBs: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe. Venezia, 05.06.2006-09.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; EU(XE) ESA PRODEX INTEGRAL 90108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : gamma-ray bursts * supernovae * radiation mechanisms Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.351, year: 2006

  6. Optical Counterparts for Low-Luminosity X-ray Sources in Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Adrienne

    2002-07-01

    We propose to use narrow-band HAlpha imaging with ACS to search for the optical counterparts of low-luminosity X-ray sources {Lx 2 x 10^30 - 5 x 10^32 erg/s} in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. With 9 WFC fields, we will cover the inner two core radii of the cluster, and encompass about 90 of the faint sources we have identified with Chandra. Approximately 30-50 of these sources should be cluster members, the remainder being mostly background galaxies plus a smaller number of foreground stars. This large population of low-Lx cluster X-ray sources is second only to the more than 100 faint sources recently discovered in 47 Tuc with Chandra {Grindlay et al. 2001a}, which have been identified as a mixture of cataclysmic variables, quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries, millisecond pulsars, and coronally active main-sequence binaries. Our Cycle 6 WFPC2 program successfully identified 2 of the 3 then-known faint X-ray sources in the core of Omega Cen using H-alpha imaging. We now propose to expand the areal coverage by a factor of about 18 to encompass the much larger number of sources that have since been discovered with Chandra. The extreme crowding in the central regions of Omega Cen requires the resolution of HST to obtain optical IDs. These identifications are key to making meaningful comparisons between the populations of faint X-ray sources in different clusters, in an effort to understand their origins and role in cluster dynamics.

  7. The Broadband XMM-Newton and NuSTAR X-ray Spectra of Two Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in the Galaxy IC 342

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Harrison, Fiona A.; Bachetti, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present results for two Ultraluminous X-ray Sources (ULXs), IC 342 X-1 and IC 342 X-2, using two epochs of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations separated by ∼7 days. We observe little spectral or flux variability above 1 keV between epochs, with unabsorbed 0.3-30 keV luminosities being $1...... ULXs exhibit strong curvature in their broadband X-ray spectra. This curvature rules out models that invoke a simple reflection-dominated spectrum with a broadened iron line and no cutoff in the illuminating power-law continuum. X-ray spectrum of IC 342 X-1 can be characterized by a soft disk...

  8. Filtered x-ray diode diagnostics fielded on the Z-accelerator for source power measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C.; Cuneo, M.

    1998-01-01

    Filtered x-ray diode, (XRD), detectors are used as primary radiation flux diagnostics on Sandia's Z-accelerator, which generates nominally a 200 TW, 2 MJ, x-ray pulse. Given such flux levels and XRD sensitivities the detectors are being fielded 23 meters from the source. The standard diagnostic setup and sensitivities are discussed. Vitreous carbon photocathodes are being used to reduce the effect of hydrocarbon contamination present in the Z-machine vacuum system. Nevertheless pre- and post-calibration data taken indicate spectrally dependent changes in the sensitivity of these detectors by up to factors up to 2 or 3

  9. Source of X-ray radiation based on back compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Karnaukhov, I M; Kononenko, S G; Lapshin, V G; Mytsykov, A O; Telegin, Yu P; Shcherbakov, A A; Zelinsky, Andrey Yurij

    2000-01-01

    Applicability was studied and previous estimation was done of power X-ray beams generation by backward Compton scattering of a laser photon beam on a cooled down electron beam. The few MeV electron beam circulating in a compact storage ring can be cooled down by interaction of that beam with powerful laser radiation of micrometer wavelength to achieve normalized emittance of 10 sup - sup 7 m. A tunable X-ray source of photons of energy ranging from few keV up to a hundred keV could result from the interaction of the laser beam with a dense electron beam.

  10. Source of X-ray radiation based on back compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.I.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kononenko, S.G.; Lapshin, V.I.; Mytsykov, A.O.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Shcherbakov, A.A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Zelinsky, A.Yu

    2000-06-21

    Applicability was studied and previous estimation was done of power X-ray beams generation by backward Compton scattering of a laser photon beam on a cooled down electron beam. The few MeV electron beam circulating in a compact storage ring can be cooled down by interaction of that beam with powerful laser radiation of micrometer wavelength to achieve normalized emittance of 10{sup -7} m. A tunable X-ray source of photons of energy ranging from few keV up to a hundred keV could result from the interaction of the laser beam with a dense electron beam.

  11. Source of X-ray radiation based on back compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.I.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kononenko, S.G.; Lapshin, V.I.; Mytsykov, A.O.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Shcherbakov, A.A.; Zelinsky, A.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Applicability was studied and previous estimation was done of power X-ray beams generation by backward Compton scattering of a laser photon beam on a cooled down electron beam. The few MeV electron beam circulating in a compact storage ring can be cooled down by interaction of that beam with powerful laser radiation of micrometer wavelength to achieve normalized emittance of 10 -7 m. A tunable X-ray source of photons of energy ranging from few keV up to a hundred keV could result from the interaction of the laser beam with a dense electron beam

  12. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  13. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomer, Chris, E-mail: chris.bloomer@diamond.ac.uk; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  14. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomer, Chris; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  15. I20; the Versatile X-ray Absorption spectroscopy beamline at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Moreno, S; Hayama, S; Amboage, M; Freeman, A; Sutter, J; Duller, G

    2009-01-01

    The Versatile Spectroscopy beamline at Diamond Light Source, I20, is currently under construction and aims to begin operation in late 2009 and early 2010. The beamline aims to cover applications from physics, chemistry and biology through materials, environmental and geological science. Three very distinctive modes of operation will be offered at the beamline: scanning X-ray Absorption spectroscopy (XAS), XAS in dispersive mode, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). To achieve this, the beamline has been designed around two independent experimental end-stations operating from a pair of canted wigglers located in a 5m diamond straight section. One branch of the beamline will deliver monochromatic x-ray radiation of high spectral purity to one of the experimental hutches, whilst the other branch will constitute an energy dispersive spectrometer. The novel design of the beamline allows both branches to operate simultaneously.

  16. Problems of exposure measurement with extended sources. Case of X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, J.L.

    A number of problems involved in the measurement of exposure rates in X-ray or gamma-ray beams from extended sources were studied. A mathematical model simulating an experimental device producing practically monoenergetic X-ray beams (X-ray fluorescence method) was developed. The theoretical results were in good agreement with experimental data previously published. From this theoretical analogy, it was possible to determine the influence of various parameters of a free-air ionization chamber, and several corrective coefficients were evaluated and measured. The experiments were performed with a mesh-grid free-air chamber especially fitted to wide beams. The results were compared with those of cavity chambers used in the same expermental conditions [fr

  17. Development of contamination-free x-ray optics for next-generation light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Haruhiko, E-mail: hohashi@spring8.or.jp; Senba, Yasunori; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Koyama, Takahisa; Miura, Takanori; Kishimoto, Hikaru [JASRI / SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 JAPAN (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    We studied typical forms of contamination on X-ray mirrors that cause degradation of beam quality, investigated techniques to remove the contaminants, and propose methods to eliminate the sources of the contamination. The total amount of carbon-containing substances on various materials in the vicinity of a mirror was measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was found that cleanliness and ultra-high vacuum techniques are required to produce the contamination-free surfaces that are essential for the propagation of high-quality X-ray beams. The reduction of carbonaceous residue adsorbed on the surfaces, and absorbed into the bulk, of the materials in the vicinity of the mirrors is a key step toward achieving contamination-free X-ray optics.

  18. ESO 103-G35 - A new Seyfert galaxy and possible X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. M.; Feldman, F. R.; Marshall, F. E.; Wamsteker, W.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an objective prism plate, two emission-line galaxies have been identified within the 0.7-sq deg HEAO-A2 error box for the X-ray source H1834-653. Optical spectrophotometric observations are reported for both objects as well as the galaxy NGC 6684, which also lies near the position of H1834-653. These data show that one of the emission-line galaxies, ESO 103-G35, is a Seyfert galaxy with a high-excitation forbidden-line spectrum and weak broad emission wings at H-alpha. Further measurements of this galaxy reveal an infrared excess at wavelengths longer than 2.2 microns. The H-alpha luminosity of ESO 103-G35 is consistent with the X-ray luminosity estimated from the HEAO-A2 data, thus strengthening the likelihood of association of this galaxy with the X-ray emission.

  19. Phase-locked MHz pulse selector for x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Daniel F; Lindenau, Bernd; Leyendecker, Marko; Janssen, Franz; Winkler, Carsten; Schumann, Frank O; Kirschner, Jürgen; Holldack, Karsten; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-05-15

    Picosecond x-ray pulses are extracted with a phase-locked x-ray pulse selector at 1.25 MHz repetition rate from the pulse trains of the accelerator-driven multiuser x-ray source BESSY II preserving the peak brilliance at high pulse purity. The system consists of a specially designed in-vacuum chopper wheel rotating with ≈1  kHz angular frequency. The wheel is driven in an ultrahigh vacuum and is levitated on magnetic bearings being capable of withstanding high centrifugal forces. Pulses are picked by 1252 high-precision slits of 70 μm width on the outer rim of the wheel corresponding to a temporal opening window of the chopper of 70 ns. We demonstrate how the electronic phase stabilization of ±2  ns together with an arrival time jitter of the individual slits of the same order of magnitude allows us to pick short single bunch x-ray pulses out of a 200 ns ion clearing gap in a multibunch pulse train as emitted from a synchrotron facility at 1.25 MHz repetition rate with a pulse purity below the shot noise detection limit. The approach is applicable to any high-repetition pulsed radiation source, in particular in the x-ray spectral range up to 10 keV. The opening window in a real x-ray beamline, its stability, as well as the limits of mechanical pulse picking techniques in the MHz range are discussed.

  20. Ultraluminous X-ray sources forming in low metallicity natal environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zampieri, L.; Colpi, M.; Mapelli, M.; Patruno, A.; Roberts, T.P.

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years multiwavelength observations have boosted our understanding of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources (ULXs). Yet, the most fundamental questions on ULXs still remain to be definitively answered: do they contain stellar or intermediate mass black holes? How do they form? We investigate

  1. Study of a new portable x-ray source with micro-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaige; Li, Ji; Yang, Qinlao; Guo, Jinchuan; Guo, Baoping; Kuo, Xiaomei; Zhou, Junlan; Niu, Hanben

    2006-02-01

    A novel X-ray source with micro-beam has been studied in theory and experiment. The source is composed of three portions: LaB 6 crystal cathode electron gun emitting system, electrostatic focusing system, and permutable metal target system. The electronic current emitted by the electron-gun are controlled by modulating cathode temperature and Wehnelt grid voltage and ratio D w/H, two-equal-radius-cylinder-electrodes focusing system concentrates electron beam, the X-ray photons are irradiated by high energy electron beam bombarding the metal target. The new x-ray source's general-purpose capabilities such as continuous radiation and pulse radiation, focus size and luminance, are also tested. When the temperature of LaB6 cathode is about 1900K and partial pressures being kept below 10 -7 torr, the minimal focus diameter is merely about 10 microns. The new micro focus x-ray source has other lots of advantages such as economy, safety and facility.

  2. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate .... of an arc of radius 13 cm with the anode tip at the centre. The first cassette covered an angular ...

  3. AGN classification for X-ray sources in the 105 month Swift/BAT survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, N.; Bassani, L.; Palazzi, E.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.

    2018-03-01

    We here provide classifications for 8 hard X-ray sources listed as 'unknown AGN' in the 105 month Swift/BAT all-sky survey catalogue (Oh et al. 2018, ApJS, 235, 4). The corresponding optical spectra were extracted from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (Jones et al. 2009, MNRAS, 399, 683).

  4. Design Considerations of a Virtual Laboratory for Advanced X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginsland, J. W.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Watrous, J. J.; Heileman, G. L.

    2004-11-01

    The field of scientific computation has greatly advanced in the last few years, resulting in the ability to perform complex computer simulations that can predict the performance of real-world experiments in a number of fields of study. Among the forces driving this new computational capability is the advent of parallel algorithms, allowing calculations in three-dimensional space with realistic time scales. Electromagnetic radiation sources driven by high-voltage, high-current electron beams offer an area to further push the state-of-the-art in high fidelity, first-principles simulation tools. The physics of these x-ray sources combine kinetic plasma physics (electron beams) with dense fluid-like plasma physics (anode plasmas) and x-ray generation (bremsstrahlung). There are a number of mature techniques and software packages for dealing with the individual aspects of these sources, such as Particle-In-Cell (PIC), Magneto-Hydrodynamics (MHD), and radiation transport codes. The current effort is focused on developing an object-oriented software environment using the Rational© Unified Process and the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to provide a framework where multiple 3D parallel physics packages, such as a PIC code (ICEPIC), a MHD code (MACH), and a x-ray transport code (ITS) can co-exist in a system-of-systems approach to modeling advanced x-ray sources. Initial software design and assessments of the various physics algorithms' fidelity will be presented.

  5. Micro-fresnel structures for microscopy of laser generated bright x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Shavers, D.C.; Flanders, D.C.; Smith, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    A brief parametric survey of the x-ray characteristics of a gold micro-disk irradiated at 3 x 10 14 watt/cm 2 by a 1 nsec Nd-glass laser pulse has been provided as an example of a laser generated bright x-ray source. It was shown that a simple phenomenological model of the laser generated x-ray source as a microscopic equilibrium plasma radiating as a blackbody for a finite time determined by its hydrodynamic disassembly and radiation losses, serves to provide an adequate approximation to the x-ray characteristics of such sources. The current state of x-ray microscopy within the LLL laser fusion program was briefly reviewed. Kirpatrick--Baez grazing incidence reflection x-ray microscopes are being used to provide 3 to 5 μm resolution, broadband images (ΔE/E approx. 0.3) over a spectral range from .6 keV to 3.5 keV. Zone Plate Coded Imaging is used to provide 5 to 10 μm resolution, broadband (ΔE/E approx. 0.5) images over a spectral range from 3 keV to 50 keV. Efficient x-ray lensing elements with anticipated submicron resolution are being developed for narrowband (ΔE/E approx. 10 -2 ) imaging applications over a spectral range .1 keV to 8 keV. The x-ray lens design is that of a transmission blazed Fresnel phase plate. Micro--Fresnel zone plates with 3200 A minimum linewidth have been fabricated and preliminary resolution tests begun. The first resolution test pattern, having minimum linewidth of 2.5 μm, was imaged in lambda = 8.34 A light with no difficulty. Newer test patterns with submicron minimum line are being prepared for the next stage of resolution testing. An off-axis Fresnel zone plate with 1600 A minimum linewidth is presently being fabricated for use as an imaging spectrometer in order to provide spatially separated, chromatically distinct images of characteristic line emissions from laser fusion targets

  6. Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and intermediate-mass black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseh, David

    2012-01-01

    More than ten years ago, the discovery of Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has opened up an entirely new field in astrophysics. Many ideas were developed to explain the nature of these sources, like their emission mechanism, mass, and origin, without any strong conclusions. Their discovery boosted the fields of X-ray binaries, accretion physics, stellar evolution, cosmology, black hole formation and growth, due to the concept of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Since their discovery is related to the domain of X-ray astrophysics, there have been very few studies made in other wavelengths. This thesis focuses on the multiwavelength nature of Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and intermediate-mass black holes from various aspects, which help to overcome some difficulties we face today. First, I investigated the accretion signatures of a putative intermediate-mass black hole in a particular globular cluster. To this purpose, I characterized the nature of the innermost X-ray sources in the cluster. Then I calculated an upper limit on the mass of the black hole by studying possible accretion efficiencies and rates based on the dedicated X-ray and radio observations. The accreting properties of the source was described with standard spherical accretion and in the context of inefficient accretion. Secondly, I attempted to dynamically measure the mass of the black hole in a particular ULX via optical spectroscopy. I discovered that a certain emission line has a broad component that markedly shifts in wavelength. I investigated the possibility whether this line originates in the accretion disk, and thus might trace the orbital motion of the binary system. I also characterized the parameters of the binary system, such as the mass function, possible orbital separation, the size of the line-emitting region, and an upper limit on the mass of the black hole. Then I studied the environment of a number of ULXs that are associated with large-scale optical and radio nebulae. I

  7. EXOSAT X-ray and optical observations of the X-ray source EXO 020528 + 1454.8 = G 035-027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Peresty, R.; Valnicek, B.; Tremko, J.; Lovas, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the EXOSAT X-ray observations and quasi-simultaneous optical photographic photometry of the X-ray source EXO 020528+1454.8 = 1 E 0205+149, found independently as a serendipitous source both with EXOSAT and Einstein satellites, are presented and discussed. The optical counterpart represents a pair of faint (16 mag.) dMe stars and is variable both in X-rays and optical wavelenghts. The integral X-ray luminosity represents ∼5.3=10 2' 8 erg s -1 and the L x /L 0 ratios were estimated to be of the order of 10 -4 to 10 -3 for the individual components, too high for non-flaring dMe stars. It is concluded that the source belongs to the dMe flaring stars. One possible flare was detected in visible light on Sep 15, 1985. The characteristics of the object are discussed. (author). 7 figs., 4 tabs., 19 refs

  8. Theoretical modeling of Comptonized X-ray spectra of super-Eddington accretion flow: Origin of hard excess in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaki, Takaaki; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Kawashima, Tomohisa

    2017-12-01

    X-ray continuum spectra of super-Eddington accretion flow are studied by means of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations based on the radiation hydrodynamic simulation data, in which both thermal- and bulk-Compton scatterings are taken into account. We compare the calculated spectra of accretion flow around black holes with masses of MBH = 10, 102, 103, and 104 M⊙ for a fixed mass injection rate (from the computational boundary at 103 rs) of 103 LEdd/c2 (with rs, LEdd, and c being the Schwarzschild radius, the Eddington luminosity, and the speed of light, respectively). The soft X-ray spectra exhibit mass dependence in accordance with the standard-disk relation; the maximum surface temperature is scaled as T ∝ M_{ BH}^{ -1/4}. The spectra in the hard X-ray band, by contrast with soft X-ray, look to be quite similar among different models, if we normalize the radiation luminosity by MBH. This reflects that the hard component is created by thermal- and bulk-Compton scatterings of soft photons originating from an accretion flow in the overheated and/or funnel regions, the temperatures of which have no dependence on mass. The hard X-ray spectra can be reproduced by a Wien spectrum with the temperature of T ˜ 3 keV accompanied by a hard excess at photon energy above several keV. The excess spectrum can be fitted well with a power law with a photon index of Γ ˜ 3. This feature is in good agreement with that of the recent NuSTAR observations of ULXs (ultra-luminous X-ray sources).

  9. New active galactic nuclei among the INTEGRAL and SWIFT X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenin, R. A.; Mescheryakov, A. V.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Sazonov, S. Yu.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Pavlinsky, M. N.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-06-01

    We present the results of our optical identifications of a set of X-ray sources from the INTEGRAL and SWIFT all-sky surveys. The optical data have been obtained with the 1.5-m Russian-Turkish Telescope (RTT-150). Nine X-ray sources have been identified with active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two of them are located in the nearby spiral galaxies MCG-01-05-047 and NGC 973 seen almost edge-on. One source, IGR J16562-3301, is probably a BL Lac object (blazar). The remaining AGNs are observed as the starlike nuclei of spiral galaxies whose spectra exhibit broad emission lines. The relation between the hard X-ray (17-60 keV) luminosity and the [O III] 5007 line luminosity, log L x/ L [O III] ≈ 2.1, holds good for most of the AGNs detected in hard X rays. However, the luminosities of some AGNs deviate from this relation. The fraction of such objects can reach ˜20%. In particular, the [O III] line flux is lower for two nearby edge-on spiral galaxies. This can be explained by the effect of absorption in the galactic disks.

  10. Novel x-ray source using collisions of circulating relativistic electrons and a wire target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hironari

    1995-01-01

    The novel method for generating brilliant x-ray beams is proposed, in which inelastic collisions of circulating relativistic electrons and a thin wire target are used. High brilliance of this new photon source stands on narrow angular divergence due to the kinematics of relativistic electrons, and repeatedly use of electron beams. The estimated brilliance of this source based on a 50 MeV electron storage ring is comparable to that of compact synchrotron light sources. (author)

  11. Demonstration of the X-Pinch as a Laboratory Scale Soft X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, C.

    1994-03-01

    The X-pinch plasma is generated by passing a high electric current through a crossed wire load. X-pinches investigated in this work are driven by two current generators: a 4kJ, 30kV capacitor bank with a quarter-period of 1.2μs and maximum current of 320kA; and a 4kJ, 360kV generator with a maximum current of 100kA and a 90ns rise-time. Plasma light and X-ray emission are monitored, and pinch dynamics are studied using schlieren photography. The X-pinch is observed to be axially asymmetric about the central crossing point and a plasma column is seen to form along the bisector of the angle between the two twisted wires. X-ray emission is dependent on the plasma atomic number, Z, with substantial emission from the anode side of the X-pinch for a high Zload, but a single intense source with low Z Hard X-rays are always generated at the anode. Emission characteristics are compared with z-pinches driven by the same generators. X-pinch X-ray yield in the 3 to 12Å range is measured to be up to 1J per shot, and analysis of soft X-ray continuum emission indicates the presence of a 1 to 2keV plasma in the aluminium X-pinch. This point-like, intensely emitting plasma has potential applications in X-ray microscopy and lithography.

  12. Liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemberg, O.; Otendal, M.; Hertz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an anode concept, based on a liquid-metal jet, for improved brightness in compact electron-impact x-ray sources. The source is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle experiment where a 50 keV, ∼100 W electron beam is focused on a 75 μm liquid-solder jet. The generated x-ray flux and brightness is quantitatively measured in the 7-50 keV spectral region and found to agree with theory. Compared to rotating-anode sources, whose brightness is limited by intrinsic thermal properties, the liquid-jet anode could potentially be scaled to achieve a brightness >100x higher than current state-of-the-art sources. Applications such as mammography, angiography, and diffraction would benefit from such a compact high-brightness source

  13. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei

    2004-01-01

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates ∼100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a ΔS = 2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented

  14. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates ~100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a ΔS=2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented.

  15. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-01-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  16. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  17. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron

  18. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  19. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  20. Finding X-ray counterparts for unidentified sources in the 105 months BAT survey - 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J. B.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Masetti, N.; Ubertini, P.

    2018-02-01

    We provide X-ray counterparts for the unidentified Swift/BAT sources listed in the 105 month catalogue (Oh et al. 2018, ApJS in press). These associations were found by cross-correlating the list of U1,U2 and U3 sources with the ROSAT Bright (RASSBSC, Voges et al. 1999, A & A, 349, 389) and the XMM-Newton Slew (XMMSlew, Saxton et al. 2008, A & A, 480, 611) catalogues.

  1. Finding X-ray counterparts for unidentified sources in the 105 months BAT survey - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J. B.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Masetti, N.; Ubertini, P.

    2018-02-01

    We provide X-ray counterparts for unidentified Swift/BAT sources in the 105 month catalogue (Oh et al. 2018, ApJS in press). They were found by cross-correlating the list of U1,U2 and U3 sources with the ROSAT Bright (RASSBSC, Voges et al. 1999, A & A, 349, 389) and XMM-Newton Slew (XMMSlew, Saxton et al. 2008, A & A, 480, 611) catalogues and optically identified as reported in Atel #11340.

  2. X-ray Properties and the Environment of Compact Radio Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sobolewska, Malgorzata; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hardcastle, Martin; Migliori, Giulia; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Lukasz

    2018-01-01

    Compact extragalactic radio sources provide important insights into the initial stages of radio source evolution and probe states of a black hole activity at the time of the formation of the relativistic outflow. Such outflows propagate out to hundreds kpc distances from the origin and impact environment on many scales, and thus influence evolution of structures in the universe. These compact sources show radio features typically observed in large-scale radio galaxies (jets, lobes, hot spots), but contained within the central 1 kpc region of the host galaxy. Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs, a subclass of GigaHertz Peaked spectrum radio sources) are symmetric and not affected by beaming. Their linear radio size can be translated into a source age if one measures the expansion velocity of the radio structures. Such ages has been measured for a small sample of CSOs. Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton we observed a pilot samples of 16 CSOs in X-rays (6 for the first time). Our results show heterogeneous nature of the CSOs X-ray emission indicating a range of AGN luminosities and a complex environment. In particular, we identified four Compton Thick sources with a dense medium (equivalent column > 1e24 cm^-2) capable of disturbing/slowing down the jet and confining the jet to a small region. Thus for the first time we gain the observational evidence in X-ray domain in favor of the hypothesis that in a sub-population of CSOs the radio jets may be confined by the dense X-ray obscuring medium. As a consequence, the kinematic ages of these CSOs may be underestimated.. We discuss the implications of our results on the emission models of CSOs, the earliest stages of the radio source evolution, jet interactions with the ISM, diversity of the environments in which the jets expand, and jet-galaxy co-evolution.Partial support for this work was provided by the NASA grants GO1-12145X, GO4-15099X, NNX10AO60G, NNX17AC23G and XMM AO15 project 78461. This work supported

  3. X-ray phase contrast imaging: From synchrotrons to conventional sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivo, A.; Castelli, E.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-based approaches can revolutionize X-ray imaging and remove its main limitation: poor image contrast arising from low attenuation differences. They exploit the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index, typically 1000 times larger than the imaginary part driving attenuation. This increases the contrast of all details, and enables the detection of features classically considered 'X-ray invisible'. Following pioneering experiments dating back to the mid-sixties, X-ray phase contrast imaging 'exploded' in the mid-nineties, when third generation synchrotron sources became more widely available. Applications were proposed in fields as diverse as material science, palaeontology, biology, food science, cultural heritage preservation, and many others. Among these applications, medicine has been constantly considered the most important; among medical applications, mammography is arguably the one that attracted most attention. Applications to mammography were pioneered by the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) group in Trieste, which was already active in the area through a combination of innovative ways to do imaging at synchrotrons and development of novel X-ray detectors. This pioneering phase led to the only clinical experience of phase contrast mammography on human patients, and spawned a number of ideas as to how these advances could be translated into clinical practice.

  4. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  5. Enigmatic X-Ray Sources Point to Possible New Black Hole Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Mysterious, powerful X-ray sources found in nearby galaxies may represent a new class of objects, according to data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These sources, which are not as hot as typical neutron-star or black-hole X- ray sources, could be a large new population of black holes with masses several hundred times that of the sun. "The challenge raised by the discovery of these sources is to understand how they produce so much X-ray power at temperatures of a few million degrees," said Rosanne Di Stefano from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and Tufts University in Medford, Mass. Di Stefano is lead author of a series of papers published in or submitted to The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Until a few years ago, astronomers only knew of two sizes of black holes: stellar black holes, with masses about 10 times the sun, and supermassive black holes located at the centers of galaxies, with masses ranging from millions to billions times the sun. Recent evidence suggests a class of "intermediate- mass" black holes may also exist. M83 M83 Searching for quasisoft sources may be a new way to identify those X-ray sources most likely to be intermediate-mass black holes," said Albert Kong of the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and a member of the team. The enigmatic objects found by the Chandra team are called "quasisoft" sources, because they have a temperature in the range of 1 million to 4 million degrees Celsius. On the one hand this temperature range is below the 10 million to 100 million-degree gas associated with "hard" X-ray sources, such as neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes. On the other hand the quasisoft-source temperatures are hotter than the several hundred-thousand-degree gas associated with "supersoft" X-ray sources due to white dwarfs. M51 M51 Di Stefano and her colleagues determined the temperatures of individual X-ray emitting objects in four galaxies by measuring their X-ray

  6. Compact soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benk, Markus; Bergmann, Klaus; Schäfer, David; Wilhein, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    We report on a soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge plasma with pseudo spark-like electrode geometry as a light source. The source produces a radiant intensity of 4 x 10(13) photons/(sr pulse) for the 2.88 nm emission line of helium-like nitrogen. At a demonstrated 1 kHz repetition rate a brilliance of 4.3 x 10(9) photons/(microm2 sr s) is obtained for the 2.88 nm line. Ray-tracing simulations show that, employing an adequate grazing incidence collector, a photon flux of 1 x 10(7) photons/(microm2 s) can be achieved with the current source. The applicability of the presented pinch plasma concept to soft x-ray microscopy is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle experiment.

  7. On syntheses of the X-ray background with power-law sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, G.; Boldt, E. A.; Marshall, F. E.; Swank, J. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Cavaliere, A.; Danese, L.; Franceschini, A.

    1982-01-01

    The conditions under which the combined emission from power-law sources can mimic the X-ray background (XRB) spectrum in the 3-50 keV range are considered in view of HEAO 1 A-2 experiment measurements, and it is confirmed that a good fit may be obtained. The required spectral properties of the component sources differ, however, from those observed for local active galactic nuclei. Constraints are deduced for both the low-luminosity extension and evolution of such local objects, and it is shown that any other class of sources contributing to the X-ray background must be characterized by an energy spectral index lower than about 0.4, which is the mean index of the XRB, and exhibit steeper spectra at higher energies.

  8. Coherence properties of third and fourth generation X-ray sources. Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Andrej

    2013-06-15

    Interference effects are among the most fascinating optical phenomena. For instance, the butterflies and soap bubbles owe their beautiful colors to interference effects. They appear as a result of the superposition principle, valid in electrodynamics due to the linearity of the wave equation. If two waves interfere, the total radiation field is a sum of these two fields and depends strongly on the relative phases between these fields. While the oscillation frequency of individual fields is typically too large to be observed by a human eye or other detection systems, the phase differences between these fields manifest themselves as relatively slowly varying field strength modulations. These modulations can be detected, provided the oscillating frequencies of the superposed fields are similar. As such, the interference provides a superb measure of the phase differences of optical light, which may carry detailed information about a source or a scattering object. The ability of waves to interfere depends strongly on the degree of correlation between these waves, i.e. their mutual coherence. Until the middle of the 20th century, the coherence of light available to experimentalists was poor. A significant effort had to be made to extend the degree of coherence, which made the electromagnetic field determination using of the interference principle very challenging. Coherence is the defining feature of a laser, whose invention initiated a revolutionary development of experimental techniques based on interference, such as holography. Important contributions to this development were also provided by astronomists, as due to enormous intergalactic distances the radiation from stars has a high transverse coherence length at earth. With the construction of third generation synchrotron sources, partially coherent X-ray sources have become feasible. New areas of research utilizing highly coherent X-ray beams have emerged, including X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), X-ray

  9. Application Research of Quasi-monochromatic X-ray Machine Replacing 241Am Radioactive Source in Thickness Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIN Hui1;XIAO Xue-fu2;HOU Yue-xin3;ZHAO Jing1;JIAN Li-min1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the research of BS-03 thickness detector, a self-designed quasi-monochromatic (50-60 keV X-ray machine was studied as a substitution to Am-241 low energy photon source(1.11×109 Bq)The range of output current, the attenuation of X rays through the steel plate, the aluminum plate, and the organic glass plate and stability of quasi-monochromatic X-ray machine was tested. The result showed that quasi-monochromatic X-ray machine could be an applicable replacement of Am-241 radioactive source.

  10. Multiband counterparts of two eclipsing ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.; Johnston, H. M.; Pakull, M. W.; Motch, C.; Schwope, A.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Anderson, G. E.

    2018-04-01

    We present the discovery and interpretation of ionized nebulae around two ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51; both sources share the rare property of showing X-ray eclipses by their companion stars and are therefore prime targets for follow-up studies. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we found an elongated, 100-pc-long emission-line structure associated with one X-ray source (CXOM51 J132940.0+471237; ULX-1 for simplicity), and a more circular, ionized nebula at the location of the second source (CXOM51 J132939.5+471244; ULX-2 for simplicity). We observed both nebulae with the Large Binocular Telescope's Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. From our analysis of the optical spectra, we argue that the gas in the ULX-1 bubble is shock-ionized, consistent with the effect of a jet with a kinetic power of ≈2 × 1039 erg s-1. Additional X-ray photoionization may also be present, to explain the strength of high-ionization lines such as He II λ4686 and [Ne V] λ3426. On the other hand, the emission lines from the ULX-2 bubble are typical for photoionization by normal O stars suggesting that the nebula is actually an H II region not physically related to the ULX but is simply a chance alignment. From archival Very Large Array data, we also detect spatially extended, steep-spectrum radio emission at the location of the ULX-1 bubble (consistent with its jet origin), but no radio counterpart for ULX-2 (consistent with the lack of shock-ionized gas around that source).

  11. Near K-edge measurement of the X-ray attenuation coefficient of heavy elements using a tuneable X-ray source based on an electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Materna, T; Mondelaers, W; Masschaele, B

    2000-01-01

    The X-ray attenuation coefficients of bismuth and of uranium were measured in the regions of 40-240 and 70-240 keV, respectively, using a tuneable hard X-ray source based on the linear electron accelerator at the University of Ghent. Results were compared with the semi-empirical values of Storm and Israel and to the theoretical values of Berger and Hubbell. We also propose a simple function for the attenuation coefficient in the vicinity of the K-edge for uranium and in an extended range of energy for bismuth. The set-up of the source at Ghent is described and the future improvements are explained.

  12. Toward a clean sample of ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Gutiérrez, C. M.

    2006-07-01

    Context: .Observational follow-up programmes for the characterization of ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) require the construction of clean samples of such sources in which the contamination by foreground/background sources is minimum. Aims: .We calculate the degree of foreground/background contaminants among the ULX sample candidates in a published catalogue and compare these computations with available spectroscopic identifications. Methods: .We use statistics based on known densities of X-ray sources and AGN/QSOs selected in the optical. The analysis is done individually for each parent galaxy. The existing identifications of the optical counterparts are compiled from the literature. Results: .More than a half of the ULXs, within twice the distance of the major axis of the 25 mag/arcsec2 isophote from RC3 nearby galaxies and with X-ray luminosities L_X[ 2-10 keV] ≥ 1039 erg/s, are expected to be high redshift background QSOs. A list of 25 objects (clean sample) confirmed to be real ULXs or to have a low probability of being contaminant foreground/background objects is provided.

  13. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  14. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  15. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multiwavelength photometry of CDFS X-ray sources (Brusa+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Santini, P.; Grazian, A.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Hasinger, G.; Merloni, A.; Civano, F.; Fontana, A.; Mainieri, V.

    2010-03-01

    The co-evolution of host galaxies and the active black holes which reside in their centre is one of the most important topics in modern observational cosmology. Here we present a study of the properties of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected in the CDFS 1 Ms observation and their host galaxies. We limited the analysis to the MUSIC area, for which deep K-band observations obtained with ISAAC@VLT are available, ensuring accurate identifications of the counterparts of the X-ray sources as well as reliable determination of photometric redshifts and galaxy parameters, such as stellar masses and star formation rates. In particular, we: 1) refined the X-ray/infrared/optical association of 179 sources in the MUSIC area detected in the Chandra observation; 2) studied the host galaxies observed and rest frame colors and properties. (2 data files).

  17. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    Among the many instruments carried on the first EURECA mission was also one aimed at doing astrophysical research. This instrument, WATCH, (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is sensitive in the 6 to 150 keV energy range and has a total field of view covering a quarter of the sky. During...... its 11 month operational life, EURECA tracked the Sun, and WATCH gradually scanned across the entire sky. The signals from more than two dozen known galactic X-ray sources have been identified in the data, and the activity state of each source has been recorded as a function of time. For several...... a special “offset pointing” program was initiated on request from the WATCH PI. This program proved very successful and allowed WATCH to scan more than 80% of the sky in the course of only two weeks....

  18. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization. (LEW)

  19. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization

  20. Lighthouses, Light Sources, and Kinoform Hard X-Ray Optics (428th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutterodt-Evans, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    BNL's planned National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is designed to be a world-leading light source facility, promising advances in nanoscience, energy, biology, and materials research. In designing and developing this new facility, breakthrough research is a must to ensure that appropriate tools are available for the new science that will be studied. At BNL, a team of researchers has overcome a major x-ray focusing obstacle to allow the study of molecules, atoms, and advanced materials at the nanoscale, which is on the order of billionths of a meter. Their innovative method uses a type of refractive lens called a kinoform lens -- similar to the kind found in lighthouses -- in order to focus the x-rays down to the extremely small spots needed for a sharp image at small dimensions.

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS

  2. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  3. Is there an isotope on your books? Advice to receivers and liquidators on dealing with X-ray sources and X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, Tony.

    1987-01-01

    The paper outlines advice to receivers and liquidators on dealing with radioactive sources and X-ray equipment. When companies go into liquidation it is important that the accountants handling the winding up are aware of the law and their responsibilities if radioactive materials are present. Guidelines are presented here which may help indicate to the accountant the likely presence of radioactive materials and the procedure which should be followed when arranging sale or disposal of these items

  4. HST/ACS Imaging of Omega Centauri: Optical Counterparts of Chandra X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Haggard, Daryl; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian; Anderson, Jay

    2013-02-01

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with nine pointings we cover the central ~10' × 10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, ~40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M 625 =10.4-12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously reported quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. We also identify 3 foreground stars and 11 probable active galactic nuclei. Finally, we report the discovery of a group of seven stars whose X-ray properties are suggestive of magnetically active binaries, and whose optical counterparts lie on or very near the metal-rich anomalous giant and subgiant branches in ω Cen. If the apparent association between these seven stars and the RGB/SGB-a stars is real, then the frequency of X-ray sources in this metal-rich population is enhanced by a factor of at least five relative to the other giant and subgiant populations in the cluster. If these stars are not members of the metal-rich population, then they bring the total number of red stragglers (also known as sub-subgiants) that have been identified in ω to Cen 20, the largest number yet known in any globular cluster.

  5. Superconducting Cavity Design for Short-Pulse X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Waldschmidt, R. Nassiri, G. Cheng, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting cavities have been analyzed for the short-pulse x-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Due to the strong damping requirements in the APS storage ring, single-cell superconducting cavities have been designed. The geometry has been optimized for lower-order and higher-order mode damping, reduced peak surface magnetic fields, and compact size. The integration of the cavity assembly, with dampers and waveguide input coupler, into a cryomodule will be discussed.

  6. Stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fender, Rob; Belloni, Tomaso

    2012-08-03

    We review the likely population, observational properties, and broad implications of stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources. We focus on the clear empirical rules connecting accretion and outflow that have been established for stellar-mass black holes in binary systems in the past decade and a half. These patterns of behavior are probably the keys that will allow us to understand black hole feedback on the largest scales over cosmological time scales.

  7. Long-term X-ray Observations of Galactic Superluminal Sources with GRANAT/WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    The authors present X-ray time histories for the radio-jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 observed by the GRANAT/WATCH all-sky monitor at 8-20 keV. GRS 1915+105 is extremely variable on the time scales of months to years. The analysis of a 3-year data set gives no evidence for periodicity...

  8. Synchrotron radiation sources: their properties and applications for VUV and X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation from accelerators and storage rings offers far reaching possibilities for many fields of basic and applied physics. The properties of synchrotron radiation, existing and planned synchrotron radiation facilities, as well as instrumental aspects are discussed. In order to illustrate the usefulness of the synchrotron radiation sources a few highlights from atomic, molelucar, and solid state spectroscopy are presented and examples from x-ray experiments and from the field of applied physics are given. (orig.) [de

  9. A new hard X-ray source discovered by INTEGRAL: IGR J16442-554

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    . The IBIS/ISGRI spectrum in the 20-100 keV energy range is well described by a power-law with photon index 2.2+/-0.5. The 20-100 keV flux is 1.2e-10 erg/cm^2/s. The light curve exhibits pronounced variability on a few hours time scale. We did not find any previously known X-ray source in the Simbad database...

  10. Stellar-Mass Black Holes and Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fender, Rob; Belloni, Tomaso

    2012-08-01

    We review the likely population, observational properties, and broad implications of stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources. We focus on the clear empirical rules connecting accretion and outflow that have been established for stellar-mass black holes in binary systems in the past decade and a half. These patterns of behavior are probably the keys that will allow us to understand black hole feedback on the largest scales over cosmological time scales.

  11. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  13. Perspectives on Ultraluminous X-ray sources after the discovery of Ultraluminous Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, L.; Ambrosi, E.; Fiore, A.; Pintore, F.; Turolla, R.; Israel, GL.; Stella, L.; Casella, P.; Papitto, A.; Rodriguez Castillo, G. A.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.; Belfiore, A.; Esposito, P.; Marelli, M.; Novara, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Salvetti, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Wolter, A.

    2017-10-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are observationally defined as non-nuclear extragalactic X-ray point sources with inferred (isotropic) luminosity exceeding the Eddington limit for a ˜ 10 M_{⊙} compact object. While in the past few years a certain evidence (and a general consensus) has been gathered in favour of the existence of black hole (BH) remnants in ULXs, the recent discovery of three Ultraluminous X-ray Pulsars has unexpectedly revealed what is likely to be a significant population of neutron star (NS) ULXs. These findings challenge more than ever our present understanding of these sources, their accretion mechanism/history, and their formation pathways. After reviewing some of these intriguing observational facts, we will summarize some perspective studies that we are carrying out to model the multiwavelength variability and broadband spectra of ULXs, including the contribution of an accretion column for NS systems. We derive the luminosity emitted by the latter assuming that a multipolar component dominates the magnetic field close to the NS. The focus is on comparing the simulated multiwavelength emission properties of stellar-mass/massive BHs to those of NS systems, and on confronting the model predictions with the available observations of Pulsar ULXs.

  14. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  15. Development of cancer medical treatment/diagnostic equipment using the source of X-rays in space coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Isamu; Shintomi, Kazutaka; Hayakawa, Ken

    2009-01-01

    In Nihon University, the research and development of Parametric X-rays radiation (PXR) by the 100 MeV electron linac are advanced. It was proved by basic experiment that PXR was a source of coherent X-rays. Coherent X-rays have the characteristic that a refraction action is guided with an irradiation matter. According to this action, the contrast image pick-up of an irradiation matter is attained, and X-rays becomes possible to focus a point itself. Research of cancer medical treatment and diagnosis are advanced using the new source of X-ray. Miniaturization of the source is important for the spread of cancer medical new treatment and diagnoses. Recently, the tabletop type 100 MeV class cryogenic linac with energy recovery is under development. In symposium, we report progress of these research and development. (author)

  16. A Study on Mono-energetic Beam Source Using Characteristic X-ray for Substance Identification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwan Soo

    2009-02-01

    A new mono-energetic beam source was developed by using characteristic X-ray for improving performance of the substance identification system. Most of inspection systems use X-ray tubes for their source modules. However, the broad energy spectrum of X-ray tube causes an increase of uncertainty. In this study, it was found that mono-energetic beam sources can be generated by using X-ray tube and the designed target filter assembly. In order to investigate the monoenergetic beam source, the sensitivity study was conducted with a series of different X-ray tube potentials, radiator and filter materials using Monte Carlo simulation. The developed beam sources have a mono-energy peak at 69 keV, 78 keV and 99 keV, and they are named as characteristic X-ray beam BEAM69, BEAM78 and BEAM99, respectively. The characteristic X-ray beam intensity was over thirty three times more than that of hardening beam used previous work at Hanyang University. And BEAM69 and BEAM99 were applied to the substance identification system as a source. The relative error between results of characteristic X-ray beams and 69 keV and 99 keV photons was about 2% on the average for five unknown materials. In comparison with experiment results by using hardening beam, characteristic X-ray beam achieves better accuracy which is about 6.46 % on the average. Hence, it is expected that the developed characteristic X-ray beam source helps lower uncertainty of the inspection system, and the inspection time will be reduced considerably due to its high beam intensity

  17. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous x-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X...... exhibits a spectrum consistent with emission from the standard low/hard accretion state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, which would have been expected if Holmberg IX X-1 harbors a truly massive black hole accreting at substantially sub-Eddington accretion rates. The NuSTAR data confirm...... at the highest energies, which may further support this scenario. The available data allow for either of the two thermal components to dominate the spectral evolution, although both scenarios require highly nonstandard behavior for thermal accretion disk emission....

  18. Elemental analysis of the ancient bronze coins by x-ray fluorescence technique using simultaneously radioisotope source and x-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen The Quynh; Truong Thi An; Tran Duc Thiep; Nguyen Dinh Chien; Dao Tran Cao; Nguyen Quang Liem

    2004-01-01

    The results on elemental analysis of the Vietnamese ancient bronze coins during the time of the Nguyen dynasty (19th century) are presented. The samples were provided by the vietnam National Historical Museum and the elemental analysis was performed on the home-made model EDS-XT-99-01 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in the Institute of Materials Science, NCST of Vietnam. The samples exited simultaneously by radioisotope source and X-ray tube. The analytical results show the similarity in the elemental composition of the coins issued by different kings of the Nguyen dynasty, but there is the difference in the concentration of the used elements. Another interesting point is that all the coins have zinc (Zn) in their composition, which shows clearly the influence of the occidental metallurgical technology on the money-making technique in Vietnam during the 19th century. (author)

  19. X-ray optics research for linac coherent light source: Interaction of ultra-short X-ray pulses with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, Jaroslav; Wootton, Alan; Bionta, Richard M.; Shepherd, Ronnie; Dunn, James; Smith, Raymond F.; London, Richard A.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Bajt, Sasa; Feit, Michael D.; Levesque, Rick; McKernan, Mark; Conant, Ronald H.; Fill, Ernst E.; Ditmire, Todd; Dyer, Gilliss

    2002-01-01

    Free electron lasers operating in the 0.1 to 1.5 nm wavelength range have been proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (USA) and DESY (Germany). The unprecedented brightness and associated fluence predicted for pulses <300 fs pose new challenges for optical components. A criterion for optical component design is required, implying an understanding of x-ray - matter interactions at these extreme conditions. In our experimental effort, the extreme conditions are simulated by currently available sources ranging from optical lasers, through x-ray lasers (at 14.7 nm) down to K-alpha sources (∼0.15 nm). In this paper we present an overview of our research program, including (a) Results from the experimental campaign at a short pulse (100 fs - 5 ps) power laser at 800 nm, (b) K-α experiments, and (c) Computer modeling and experimental project using a tabletop high brightness ps x-ray laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  20. Development of confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, A.R.; Huang, R.; Mass, J.; Bisulca, C.; Bilderback, D.H.; Gruner, S.; Gao, N.

    2006-01-01

    A confocal X-ray fluorescence microscope was built at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to obtain compositional depth profiles of historic paintings. The microscope consists of a single-bounce, borosilicate monocapillary optic to focus the incident beam onto the painting and a commercial borosilicate polycapillary lens to collect the fluorescent X-rays. The resolution of the microscope was measured by scanning a variety of thin metal films through this confocal volume while monitoring the fluorescence signal. The capabilities of the technique were then probed using test paint microstructures with up to four distinct layers, each having a thickness in the range of 10-80 microns. Results from confocal XRF were compared with those from stand-alone XRF and visible light microscopy of the paint cross-sections. A large area, high-resolution scanner is currently being built to perform 3D scans on moderately sized paintings. (orig.)

  1. Optics for protein microcrystallography using synchrotron and laboratory X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, J.N.; Van Donkelaar, A.; Balaic, D.X.; Barnea, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For protein crystallography, a highly-intense focused beam overcomes a serious constraint in current biological research: the inability of many protein molecules to form crystals larger than a few tens of microns in size. High structure-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals is currently only being studied at synchrotron X-ray sources. We shall examine how this is being carried out, and also report the development of a novel tapered glass monocapillary toroidal-mirror optic, which achieves a high-intensity, low-divergence focused beam from a rotating-anode Xray generator. We have used this optic, which demonstrates an ∼28x intensity gain at the beam focus to solve the structure of a plant exoglucanse/inhibtor complex microcrystal to 2.8 Angstroms, with volume equivalent to a 30-micron-edge cube

  2. Soft x-ray spectroscopy undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, K.J.; Xu, Z.; Moore, J.F.; Gluskin, E.

    1997-09-01

    Construction of the high-resolution soft x ray spectroscopy undulator beamline, 2ID-C, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been completed. The beamline, one of two soft x ray beamlines at the APS, will cover the photon energy range from 500 to 3,000 eV, with a maximum resolving power between 7,000 and 14,000. The optical design is based on a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) giving both high resolution and high flux throughput. Photon flux is calculated to be approximately 10{sup 12}--10{sup 13} photons per second with a beam size of approximately 1 x 1 mm{sup 2} at the sample.

  3. Estimates of Imaging Times for Conventional and Synchrotron X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, J

    2003-01-01

    The following notes are to be taken as estimates of the time requirements for imaging NIF targets in three-dimensions with absorption contrast. The estimates ignore target geometry and detector inefficiency, and focus only on the statistical question of detecting compositional (structural) differences between adjacent volume elements in the presence of noise. The basic equations, from the classic reference by Grodzins, consider imaging times in terms of the required number of photons necessary to provide an image with given resolution and noise. The time estimates, therefore, have been based on the calculated x-ray fluxes from the proposed Advanced Light Source (ALS) imaging beamline, and from the calculated flux for a tungsten anode x-ray generator operated in a point focus mode.

  4. A XMM-Newton Observation of Nova LMC 1995, a Bright Supersoft X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Marina; Hartmann, Wouter; Still, Martin; Greiner, Jochen

    2003-01-01

    Nova LMC 1995, previously detected during 1995-1998 with ROSAT, was observed again as a luminous supersoft X-ray source with XMM-Newton in December of 2000. This nova offers the possibility to observe the spectrum of a hot white dwarf, burning hydrogen in a shell and not obscured by a wind or by nebular emission like in other supersoft X-ray sources. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the calibration of the EPIC instruments at energy E0.6 keV, and an upper limit Fx,hard = 10 sup-14 erg s sup-l cm sup-2 to the X-ray flux above this energy. The background corrected count rate measured by the EPIC instruments was variable on time scales of minutes and hours, but without the flares or sudden obscuration observed for other novae. The power spectrum shows a peak at 5.25 hours, possibly due to a modulation with the orbital period. We also briefly discuss the scenarios in which this nova may become a type Ia supernova progenitor.

  5. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a microfocus source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, A. W.; Gao, D.; Pogany, A.; Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.

    1999-01-01

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X rays in 1895 the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. In recent years the possibility of utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, much of this activity stemming from the possibility of producing X-ray beams of suitably high coherence at synchrotron sources (1). A description of a phase-contrast imaging (PCI) technique which utilizes a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source to achieve the required spatial coherence, and does not rely on there being a high degree of chromatic coherence, will be described (2). The method employs a relatively large object-to-image distance to allow wave interference (Fresnel diffraction) to occur and manifest itself as contrast formation in the intensity distribution recorded at the image plane. PCI is particularly relevant to the nondestructive characterization of materials and this will be demonstrated by way of some examples. A theoretical description of image structure in terms of the Kirchhoff formulation will be used to elucidate some of the important features of the technique. These include the ability to provide improved information from weakly-absorbing features of an object; edge enhancement; inherent magnification; improved signal-to-noise. Another aspect of PCI which will be discussed is phase-(and absorption-) retrieval (3), whereby images can be used to obtain quantitative physical information about the sample structure

  6. Recent Measurements And Plans for the SLAC Compton X-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Akre, R.; Caryotakis, G.; DeStefano, C.; Frederick, W.J.; Heritage, J.P.; Luhmann, N.C.; Martin, D.; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UC, Davis /UCLA

    2006-02-14

    A compact source of monoenergetic X-rays, generated via Compton backscattering, has been developed in a collaboration between U.C Davis and SLAC. The source consists of a 5.5 cell X-band photoinjector, a 1.05 m long high gradient accelerator structure and an interaction chamber where a high power (TW), short pulse (sub-ps) infrared laser beam is brought into a nearly head-on collision with a high quality focused electron beam. Successful completion of this project will result in the capability of generating a monoenergetic X-ray beam, continuously tunable from 20 - 85 keV. We have completed a series of measurements leading up to the generation of monoenergetic X-rays. Measurements of essential electron beam parameters and the techniques used in establishing electron/photon collisions will be presented. We discuss the design of an improved interaction chamber, future electro-optic experiments using this chamber and plans for expanding the overall program to the generation of Terahertz radiation.

  7. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, M., E-mail: mjacquet@lal.in2p3.fr

    2014-07-15

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  8. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  9. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  10. A quasi-realtime x-ray microtomography system at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Foster, I.; Insley, J.; Kesselman, C.; Lane, P.; Mancini, D.; McNulty, I.; Su, M.; Tieman, B.; Wang, Y.; Laszewski, G. von

    1999-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance x-ray sources, fast detector systems, wide-bandwidth networks, and parallel computers can substantially reduce the time required to acquire, reconstruct, and visualize high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic datasets. A quasi-realtime computed x-ray microtomography system has been implemented at the 2-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. With this system, a complete tomographic data set can be collected in about 15 minutes. Immediately after each projection is obtained, it is rapidly transferred to the Mathematics and Computing Sciences Division where preprocessing and reconstruction calculations are performed concurrently with the data acquisition by a SGI parallel computer. The reconstruction results, once completed, are transferred to a visualization computer that performs the volume rendering calculations. Rendered images of the reconstructed data are available for viewing back at the beamline experiment station minutes after the data acquisition was complete. The fully pipelined data acquisition and reconstruction system also gives us the option to acquire the tomographic data set in several cycles, initially with coarse then with fine angular steps. At present the projections are acquired with a straight-ray projection imaging scheme using 5-20 keV hard x rays in either phase or amplitude contrast mode at a 1-10 pm resolution. In the future, we expect to increase the resolution of the projections to below 100 nm by using a focused x-ray beam at the 2-ID-B beamline and to reduce the combined acquisition and computation time to the 1 min scale with improvements in the detectors, network links, software pipeline, and computation algorithms

  11. X-Ray Observations of Unidentified H.E.S.S. Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, S.; /SLAC

    2007-10-10

    In a survey of the inner part of the Galaxy, performed with the H.E.S.S. Instrument (High energy stereoscopic system) in 2004 and 2005, a large number of new unidentified very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray sources above an energy of 100 GeV was discovered. Often the {gamma}-ray spectra in these sources reach energies of up to {approx} 10 TeV. These are the highest energy particles ever attributed to single astrophysical objects. While a few of these sources can be identified at other wavebands, most of these sources remain unidentified so far. A positive identification of these new g-ray sources with a counterpart object at other wavebands requires (a) a positional coincidence between the two sources,( b) a viable {gamma}-ray emission mechanism and (c) a consistent multiwavelength behavior of the two sources. X-ray observations with satellites such as XMM-Newton, Chandra or Suzaku provide one of the best channels to studying these enigmatic {gamma}-ray sources at other wavebands, since they combine high angular resolution and sensitivity with the ability to access non-thermal electrons through their synchrotron emission. We therefore have started a dedicated program to investigate VHE {gamma}-ray sources with high-sensitivity X-ray instruments.

  12. Intense high-contrast femtosecond K-shell x-ray source from laser-driven Ar clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L M; Liu, F; Wang, W M; Kando, M; Mao, J Y; Zhang, L; Ma, J L; Li, Y T; Bulanov, S V; Tajima, T; Kato, Y; Sheng, Z M; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J

    2010-05-28

    Bright Ar quasimonochromatic K-shell x ray with very little background has been generated using an Ar clustering gas jet target irradiated with a 30 fs ultrahigh-contrast laser, with a measured flux of 2.2×10(11)   photons/J into 4π. This intense x-ray source critically depends on the laser contrast and intensity. The optimization of source output with interaction length is addressed. Simulations point to a nonlinear resonant mechanism of electron heating during the early stage of laser interaction, resulting in enhanced x-ray emission. The x-ray pulse duration is expected to be only 10 fs, opening the possibility for single-shot ultrafast keV x-ray imaging applications.

  13. Theoretical considerations for X-ray phase contrast mammography by Thomson source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFN-CNR), via Cineto Romano 42, I-00156 Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro2, 00185 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cedola@ifn.cnr.it; Bukreeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFN-CNR), via Cineto Romano 42, I-00156 Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Petrillo, V.; Maroli, C. [Universita di Milano, Physics Department and INFN Sezione di Milano Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    The advent, in the near future, of compact X-ray sources like Thomson Back-Scattering (TBS) will allow the clinical application of advanced X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase contrast, with higher sensitivity and lower impact in terms of dose delivery. In this work, we theoretically investigated the possibility of using such sources for phase contrast imaging of micro-calcifications included in a breast tissue. In our study we analyzed the phase and amplitude distribution of the TBS source and we showed that this source can be used for phase contrast imaging since the source coherence at the sample position is sufficiently high for achieving good contrast and micrometer spatial resolution. Indeed the spatial coherence of a TBS source is closer to that of a synchrotron radiation source, and much better than that of a laboratory source. Moreover, we showed the advantages of phase imaging with respect to standard absorption imaging, in the specific case of micro-calcifications detection.

  14. Theoretical considerations for X-ray phase contrast mammography by Thomson source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedola, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S.; Petrillo, V.; Maroli, C.

    2009-01-01

    The advent, in the near future, of compact X-ray sources like Thomson Back-Scattering (TBS) will allow the clinical application of advanced X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase contrast, with higher sensitivity and lower impact in terms of dose delivery. In this work, we theoretically investigated the possibility of using such sources for phase contrast imaging of micro-calcifications included in a breast tissue. In our study we analyzed the phase and amplitude distribution of the TBS source and we showed that this source can be used for phase contrast imaging since the source coherence at the sample position is sufficiently high for achieving good contrast and micrometer spatial resolution. Indeed the spatial coherence of a TBS source is closer to that of a synchrotron radiation source, and much better than that of a laboratory source. Moreover, we showed the advantages of phase imaging with respect to standard absorption imaging, in the specific case of micro-calcifications detection.

  15. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutet, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  16. Design parameters for a small storage ring optimized as an x-ray lithography source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobman, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the design parameters for a ''compact storage ring'' which is matched well to x-ray lithographic requirements, but is as small as possible. This calculation uses a model of a lithographic system which obtains its input parameters from a technology of mask, resist and beam line based on the IBM program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory vacuum ultraviolet electron storage ring. Based on this lithographic system, we model exposure throughput as a function of storage ring parameters to understand which storage ring designs provide adequate but not excessive soft x-ray flux in the lithographically important region. Our scan of storage ring sources will cover a wide range of energies and magnetic fields, to permit consideration of superconducting as well as more standard strong- or weak-focusing designs. Furthermore, we will show that the results of the calculations presented here can be scaled in a simple way to cover a wide range of x-ray lithography system assumptions

  17. A soft X-ray source based on a low divergence, high repetition rate ultraviolet laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, E. A.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.; Quimby, D. C.; Albrecht, G. F.

    The CORK code is utilized to evaluate the applicability of low divergence ultraviolet lasers for efficient production of soft X-rays. The use of the axial hydrodynamic code wih one ozone radial expansion to estimate radial motion and laser energy is examined. The calculation of ionization levels of the plasma and radiation rates by employing the atomic physics and radiation model included in the CORK code is described. Computations using the hydrodynamic code to determine the effect of laser intensity, spot size, and wavelength on plasma electron temperature are provided. The X-ray conversion efficiencies of the lasers are analyzed. It is observed that for a 1 GW laser power the X-ray conversion efficiency is a function of spot size, only weakly dependent on pulse length for time scales exceeding 100 psec, and better conversion efficiencies are obtained at shorter wavelengths. It is concluded that these small lasers focused to 30 micron spot sizes and 10 to the 14th W/sq cm intensities are useful sources of 1-2 keV radiation.

  18. Practical Aspects of X-ray Imaging Polarimetry of Supernova Remnants and Other Extended Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco Vink

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of X-ray polarisation detectors, the gas pixel detectors, which will be employed by the future space missions IXPE and eXTP, allows for spatially resolved X-ray polarisation studies. This will be of particular interest for X-ray synchrotron emission from extended sources like young supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Here we report on employing a polarisation statistic that can be used to makes maps in the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters, a method that we expand by correcting for the energy-dependent instrumental modulation factor, using optimal weighting of the signal. In order to explore the types of Stokes maps that can be obtained, we present a Monte Carlo simulation program called xpolim, with which different polarisation weighting schemes are explored. We illustrate its use with simulations of polarisation maps of young supernova remnants, after having described the general science case for polarisation studies of supernova remnants, and its connection to magnetic-field turbulence. We use xpolim simulations to show that in general deep, ~2 Ms observations are needed to recover polarisation signals, in particular for Cas A, for which in the polarisation fraction may be as low as 5%.

  19. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  1. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Hernandez, Victor H. [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Moser, Tobias [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  2. X-ray radiation source based on a plasma filled diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popkov, N.F.; Kargin, V.I.; Ryaslov, E.A.; Pikar, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The results are given of studies on a plasma X-ray source providing 2.5 krad of radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm 2 in the quantum energy range between 20 and 500 keV. The pulse duration was 100 ns. The spectral radiation distribution was obtained under various operating conditions of plasma and diode. A Marx generator served as the starting power source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4=10 -6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10 -7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs

  3. Electron multiplier as a detector for soft x rays from synchrotron and laser plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher J.; Dermody, Geraint; Khaleque, Naz I.; Michette, Alan G.; Pfauntsch, Slawka J.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.

    1998-11-01

    An electron-tubes-LTD 129EM electron multiplier tube has been modified to act as a detector of soft x-rays. the first dynode was coated with 100 nm of CsI and the assembly was mounted in a small vacuum chamber with 100 nm thick silicon nitride entrance window. Initial tests show the detector is linear up to an input flux of approximately 1MHz on a synchrotron source and has proved effective in providing pulse height discrimination when used on a pulsed laser plasma source.

  4. Efficient 'water window' soft x-ray high-Z plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, T; Otsuka, T; Jiang, W; Endo, A; Li, B; Dunne, P; O'Sullivan, G

    2013-01-01

    Unresolved transition array (UTA) is scalable to shorter wavelengths, and we demonstrate a table-top broadband emission 'water window' soft x-ray source based on laser-produced plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense UTAs in the 2 to 4 nm region, extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on a bismuth (Bi) plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics

  5. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Kroll, Thomas; Chollet, Mathieu; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Kern, Jan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nordlund, Dennis; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    A description of hard X-ray photon-in photon-out spectroscopy techniques for X-ray free electron laser applications is given. A discussion of the instrumentation suitable for taking full advantage of these new sources and a description of recent measurements performed and related examples are also presented. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure and its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source

  6. Prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using CNT X-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Burk, Laurel; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose 3-D imaging modality that has been shown to have comparable sensitivity as CT in detecting lung nodules and other lung pathologies. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a distributed CNT X-ray source array. The technology allows acquisition of tomographic projections without moving the X-ray source. The electronically controlled CNT x-ray source also enables physiologically gated imaging, which will minimize image blur due to the patient's respiration motion. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using a bench-top s-DCT system with a CNT source array, a high- speed at panel detector and realistic patient respiratory signals captured using a pressure sensor. Tomosynthesis images of inflated pig lungs placed inside an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired at different respiration rate, with and without gating for image quality comparison. Metal beads of 2 mm diameter were placed on the pig lung for quantitative measure of the image quality. Without gating, the beads were blurred to 3:75 mm during a 3 s tomosynthesis acquisition. When gated to the end of the inhalation and exhalation phase the detected bead size reduced to 2:25 mm, much closer to the actual bead size. With gating the observed airway edges are sharper and there are more visible structural details in the lung. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of prospective gating in the s-DCT, which substantially reduces image blur associated with lung motion.

  7. Bright galactic x-ray binary sources: temporal and spectral studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrtilek, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The author carried out a detailed analysis of the time-dependent X-ray spectra of five bright binary sources: Cygnus X-2, GX9 + 9, 1820-30 (a globular cluster burst source), Serpens X-1 (also a burster), and Hercules X-1. For Hercules X-1, an unusual, possibly periodic (approx.108 minute) spiking phenomenon was detected during the pre-eclipse and anomalous dip states. Spectra fits suggest a constant intrinsic source spectrum (a flat power law of photon index ..cap alpha.. = 0.93) from 1-20 keV, plus an absorber of varying covering fraction: approx.0% in the high state, approx.50% during the spikes, and approx.90% during the low state. Broadband spectra of the remaining systems are well fitted by either a single thermal bremsstrahlung model with temperatures of approx.4-14 keV or two-component blackbody spectra with temperatures of approx.0.6 keV and approx.2.0 keV. The hard and soft blackbody components imply, respectively, emitting regions of 2-10 km radius (perhaps originating on the neutron star surface) and 15-90 km radius (possibly associated with a surrounding accretion disk). For Cygnus X-2, the x-ray light curve appears to be correlated with the 0.843-day optical period, implying a partial eclipse of the x-ray source. During the high states there are irregular dips of up to 30% in intensity that last for 300-700 seconds.

  8. A French proposal for an innovative accelerators based coherent UV-X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couprie, M.E. E-mail: marie-emmanuelle.couprie@lure.u-psud.fr; Belakhovsky, M.; Gilquin, B.; Garzella, D.; Jablonka, M.; Meot, F.; Monot, P.; Mosnier, A.; Nahon, L.; Rousse, A

    2004-08-01

    At the initiative of the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), discussions were conducted in France on fourth generation light sources. A new independent accelerator based radiation facility ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator Radiation Complex for ENhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light) is proposed, aiming at providing coherent femtosecond light pulses in the UV- to X-ray range for scientific applications. The project is based on a 700 MeV superconducting LINAC, providing low emittance 200 fs RMS electron bunches. They can be injected in undulators used in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE), or in the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG), seeded with high harmonics in gases at 20 nm.The SASE source covers the 100-5 nm spectral range, the HGHG goes down to 0.8 nm.Two optional loops, for Energy Recovery or energy enhancement (1.4 GeV), will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR-, VUV- and X-ray ranges, together with a FEL oscillator providing radiation down to 10 nm, taking advantage of the optical development for lithography. The facility also proposes to test plasma acceleration and to provide a Thomson radiation source. Characteristics of the light source will be described.

  9. A French proposal for an innovative accelerators based coherent UV-X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couprie, M. E.; Belakhovsky, M.; Gilquin, B.; Garzella, D.; Jablonka, M.; Méot, F.; Monot, P.; Mosnier, A.; Nahon, L.; Rousse, A.

    2004-08-01

    At the initiative of the CEA (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique), discussions were conducted in France on fourth generation light sources. A new independent accelerator based radiation facility ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator Radiation Complex for ENhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light) is proposed, aiming at providing coherent femtosecond light pulses in the UV- to X-ray range for scientific applications. The project is based on a 700 MeV superconducting LINAC, providing low emittance 200 fs RMS electron bunches. They can be injected in undulators used in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE), or in the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG), seeded with high harmonics in gases at 20 nm.The SASE source covers the 100-5 nm spectral range, the HGHG goes down to 0.8 nm.Two optional loops, for Energy Recovery or energy enhancement (1.4 GeV), will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR-, VUV- and X-ray ranges, together with a FEL oscillator providing radiation down to 10 nm, taking advantage of the optical development for lithography. The facility also proposes to test plasma acceleration and to provide a Thomson radiation source. Characteristics of the light source will be described.

  10. Double-coronal X-Ray and Microwave Sources Associated with a Magnetic Breakout Solar Eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yao; Wu, Zhao; Zhao, Di; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Liu, Wei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Schwartz, Richard A., E-mail: yaochen@sdu.edu.cn [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and American University, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Double-coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources are believed to be critical observational evidence of bi-directional energy release through magnetic reconnection in large-scale current sheets in solar flares. Here, we present a study on double-coronal sources observed in both HXR and microwave regimes, revealing new characteristics distinct from earlier reports. This event is associated with a footpoint-occulted X1.3-class flare (2014 April 25, starting at 00:17 UT) and a coronal mass ejection that were likely triggered by the magnetic breakout process, with the lower source extending upward from the top of the partially occulted flare loops and the upper source co-incident with rapidly squeezing-in side lobes (at a speed of ∼250 km s{sup −1} on both sides). The upper source can be identified at energies as high as 70–100 keV. The X-ray upper source is characterized by flux curves that differ from those of the lower source, a weak energy dependence of projected centroid altitude above 20 keV, a shorter duration, and an HXR photon spectrum slightly harder than those of the lower source. In addition, the microwave emission at 34 GHz also exhibits a similar double-source structure and the microwave spectra at both sources are in line with gyrosynchrotron emission given by non-thermal energetic electrons. These observations, especially the co-incidence of the very-fast squeezing-in motion of side lobes and the upper source, indicate that the upper source is associated with (and possibly caused by) this fast motion of arcades. This sheds new light on the origin of the corona double-source structure observed in both HXRs and microwaves.

  11. 2XMM ultraluminous X-ray source candidates in nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Roberts, T. P.; Mateos, S.; Heard, V.

    2011-09-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are some of the most enigmatic X-ray bright sources known to date. It is generally accepted that they cannot host black holes as large as those associated with active galaxies, but they appear to be significantly more luminous than their better understood Galactic X-ray binary (XRB) cousins, while displaying an intriguing combination of differences and similarities with them. Through studying large, representative samples of these sources we may hope to enhance our understanding of them. To this end, we derive a large catalogue of 650 X-ray detections of 470 ULX candidates, located in 238 nearby galaxies, by cross-correlating the 2XMM Serendipitous Survey with the Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The presented dedicated catalogue offers a significant improvement over those previously published in terms of both the number and the contribution of background contaminants, e.g. distant quasars, which we estimate to be at most 24 per cent, but more likely ˜17 per cent. To undertake population studies, we define a 'complete' sub-sample of sources compiled from observations of galaxies with sensitivity limits below 1039 erg s-1. The luminosity function of this sample is consistent with a simple power law of form N(>LX) ∝ L-0.96 ± 0.11X. Although we do not find any statistical requirement for a cut-off luminosity of Lc˜ 1040 erg s-1, as has been reported previously, we are not able to rule out its presence. Also, we find that the number of ULXs per unit galaxy mass, Su, decreases with increasing galaxy mass for ULXs associated with spiral galaxies, and is well modelled with a power law of form Su ∝ M-0.64 ± 0.07. This is in broad agreement with previous results, and is likely to be a consequence of the decrease in specific star formation and increase in metallicity with increasing spiral galaxy mass. Su is consistent with being constant with galaxy mass for sources associated with elliptical galaxies, implying this

  12. Low-dose phase contrast mammography with conventional x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, A; Gkoumas, S; Endrizzi, M; Hagen, C K; Szafraniec, M B; Diemoz, P C; Munro, P R T; Ignatyev, K; Johnson, B; Horrocks, J A; Vinnicombe, S J; Jones, J L; Speller, R D

    2013-09-01

    To provide an x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) method working with conventional sources that could be readily translated into clinical practice. XPCI shows potential in synchrotron studies but attempts at translating it for use with conventional sources are subject to limitations in terms of field of view, stability, exposure time, and possibly most importantly, delivered dose. Following the adaptation of our "edge-illumination" XPCI technique for use with conventional x-ray sources through the use of x-ray masks, the authors have further modified the design of such masks to allow further reducing the dose delivered to the sample without affecting the phase sensitivity of the method. The authors have built a prototype based on the new mask design and used it to image ex vivo breast tissue samples containing malignant lesions. The authors compared images acquired with this prototype to those obtained with a conventional system. The authors demonstrate and quantify image improvements, especially in terms of microcalcification detection. On calcifications detected also by the conventional system, the authors measure contrast increases from five to nine fold; calcifications and other features were also detected which are completely invisible in the conventional image. Dose measurements confirmed that the above enhancements were achieved while delivering doses compatible with clinical practice. The authors obtained phase-related image enhancements in mammography by means of a system built with components available off-the-shelf that operates under exposure time and dose conditions compatible with clinical practice. This opens the way to a straightforward translation of phase enhanced imaging methods into clinical practice.

  13. HST/ACS IMAGING OF OMEGA CENTAURI: OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian; Haggard, Daryl; Anderson, Jay

    2013-01-01

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with nine pointings we cover the central ∼10' × 10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, ∼40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M 625 =10.4-12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously reported quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. We also identify 3 foreground stars and 11 probable active galactic nuclei. Finally, we report the discovery of a group of seven stars whose X-ray properties are suggestive of magnetically active binaries, and whose optical counterparts lie on or very near the metal-rich anomalous giant and subgiant branches in ω Cen. If the apparent association between these seven stars and the RGB/SGB-a stars is real, then the frequency of X-ray sources in this metal-rich population is enhanced by a factor of at least five relative to the other giant and subgiant populations in the cluster. If these stars are not members of the metal-rich population, then they bring the total number of red stragglers (also known as sub-subgiants) that have been identified in ω to Cen 20, the largest number yet known in any globular cluster.

  14. A traveling wave approach to plasma pumping for X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in high-brightness excimer lasers and in optical angular multiplexing of excimer lasers presents an opportunity to provide very intense pumping of X-ray sources, both in favorable geometry and in travelling waves, all at low cost. The traveling-wave strategy can be tailored to the parameters of the system to be pumped. This design option can be of great importance for systems lasing at wavelengths in the kilovolt regime where upper level lifetimes are short, and where mirror technology is presently tenuous. Features of several design strategies are explored. (author)

  15. The x-ray source application test cassette for radiation exposures at the OMEGA laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Rekow, V.; Emig, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D. [Fifth Gait Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States); Horton, R. [Gray Research, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama 35806 (United States); Davis, J. [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have designed a sample cassette that can be used to position up to six samples in the OMEGA laser chamber. The cassette accommodates round samples up to 38.1 mm (1.5{sup Double-Prime }) in diameter and square samples up to 27 mm on a side, any of which can be up to 12.7 mm thick. Smaller specimens are centered with spacers. The test cassette allows each sample to have a unique filter scheme, with multiple filter regions in front of each sample. This paper will present mechanical design considerations and operational aspects of the x-ray source application cassette.

  16. Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography at Modern X-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies protein structure determination with chemical kinetics. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources the time-resolution can be on the order of 10-40 fs, which opens the ultrafast time scale to structure determination. Fundamental motions and transitions associated with chemical reactions in proteins can now be observed. Moreover, new experimental approaches at synchrotrons allow for the straightforward investigation of all kind of reactions in biological macromolecules. Here, recent developments in the field are reviewed.

  17. State/Spectral Transition of the Ultraluminous Supersoft X-ray Source in M101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.; di Stefano, R.

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed recent archival Chandra observations of the spiral galaxy, M101, taken between 2004 Jan 19 and 2004 Jan 24. The ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source (CXOU J140332.3+542103) reported by Mukai et al. (2003) and Di Stefano and Kong (2003) was detected in 2 of 3 recent Chandra ACIS-S observations. In the first 56 ksec observation taken on 2004 Jan 19, 27 counts were detected in 0.1-7 keV, with 19 counts below 1.1 keV.

  18. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kunnus, K.; Rajkovic, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Eckert, S.; Beye, M.; Suljoti, E.; Weniger, C.; Kalus, C.; Grübel, S.; Scholz, M.; Nordlund, D.; Zhang, W.; Hartsock, R.W.; Gaffney, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak f...

  19. The Vacuum Spark VSX-200 as a Soft X-Ray Point Source for Laboratory Microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panarella, Emilio

    2001-10-01

    The technology of X-ray point plasma sources is taking over the role that previously was retained by the multiple beam synchrotrons as radiation source for submicron lithography. A Plasma Point Source System (VSX 200) has been designed by our company ALFT as an entrance tool for Universities and other Research Laboratories working in the field of semiconductors. Because the radiation is emitted in small dose in each spark, it is necessary to repeat the phenomenon at high frequency in order to have a quasi-continuous wave. The soft X-ray power distribution is uniform, thus meeting the requirement for microlithography. The output of the VSX 200 is 200 mW of 0.93 keV radiation ( ~14 angstroms) in the copper line emitted continuously and reliably. Our plan is to increase the power level to 2 W for a low volume market that requires performance of 1 Wafer Layer per Hour (WLPH) or less, and then scale the device to eventually reach the silicon market that requires 20 WLPH. We expect to be able to support R&D and low volume applications such as Military Communication GaAs Chips by year-end. A demonstration system will be available in California at that time.

  20. The epoch of cosmic heating by early sources of X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Marius B.; Graziani, Luca; Ciardi, Benedetta; Feng, Yu; Kakiichi, Koki; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2018-05-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen indicate that an epoch of heating (EoH) might have preceded the later epoch of reionization. Here we study the effects on the ionization state and the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the EoH induced by different assumptions on ionizing sources in the high-redshift Universe: (i) stars; (ii) X-ray binaries (XRBs); (iii) thermal bremsstrahlung of the hot interstellar medium (ISM); and (iv) accreting nuclear black holes (BHs). To this aim, we post-process outputs from the (100 h-1 comoving Mpc)3 hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II with the cosmological 3D radiative transfer code CRASH, which follows the propagation of ultraviolet and X-ray photons, computing the thermal and ionization state of hydrogen and helium through the EoH. We find that stars determine the fully ionized morphology of the IGM, while the spectrally hard XRBs pave way for efficient subsequent heating and ionization by the spectrally softer ISM. With the seeding prescription in MassiveBlack-II, BHs do not contribute significantly to either ionization or heating. With only stars, most of the IGM remains in a cold state (with a median T = 11 K at z = 10), however, the presence of more energetic sources raises the temperature of regions around the brightest and more clustered sources above that of the cosmic microwave background, opening the possibility to observing the 21 cm signal in emission.

  1. The Epoch of IGM heating by early sources of X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Marius B.; Graziani, Luca; Ciardi, Benedetta; Feng, Yu; Kakiichi, Koki; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2018-02-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen indicate that an Epoch of Heating (EoH) might have preceded the later Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Here we study the effects on the ionization state and the thermal history of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) during the EoH induced by different assumptions on ionizing sources in the high redshift Universe: (i) stars, (ii) X-ray binaries (XRBs), (iii) thermal bremsstrahlung of the hot Interstellar Medium (ISM), and (iv) accreting nuclear black holes (BHs). To this aim, we post-process outputs from the (100 h-1 cMpc)3 hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II with the cosmological 3D radiative transfer code CRASH, which follows the propagation of UV and X-ray photons, computing the thermal and ionization state of hydrogen and helium through the EoH. We find that stars determine the fully ionized morphology of the IGM, while the spectrally hard XRBs pave way for efficient subsequent heating and ionization by the spectrally softer ISM. With the seeding prescription in MassiveBlack-II, BHs do not contribute significantly to either ionization or heating. With only stars, most of the IGM remains in a cold state (with a median T = 11 K at z = 10), however, the presence of more energetic sources raises the temperature of regions around the brightest and more clustered sources above that of the CMB, opening the possibility to observing the 21 cm signal in emission.

  2. Point source detection performance of Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope imaging observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Zhuo-Xi; Li, Yi-Ming; Li, Xiao-Bo; Zhou, Jian-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will perform an all-sky survey in the hard X-ray band as well as deep imaging of a series of small sky regions. We expect various compact objects to be detected in these imaging observations. Point source detection performance of HXMT imaging observation depends not only on the instrument but also on the data analysis method that is applied since images are reconstructed from HXMT observed data with numerical methods. The denoising technique used plays an important part in the HXMT imaging data analysis pipeline along with demodulation and source detection. In this paper we have implemented several methods for denoising HXMT data and evaluated the point source detection performances in terms of sensitivities and location accuracies. The results show that direct demodulation with 1-fold cross-correlation should be the default reconstruction and regularization method, although both sensitivity and location accuracy could be further improved by selecting and tuning numerical methods in data analysis used for HXMT imaging observations. (paper)

  3. The Einstein Observatory catalog of IPC x ray sources. Volume 1E: Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. E.; Forman, W.; Gioia, I. M.; Hale, J. A.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Jones, C.; Karakashian, T.; Maccacaro, T.; Mcsweeney, J. D.; Primini, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory (HEAO-2, launched November 13, 1978) achieved radically improved sensitivity over previous x-ray missions through the use of focusing optics, which simultaneously afforded greatly reduced background and produced true images. During its 2.5-yr mission, the Einstein X-Ray Telescope was pointed toward some 5,000 celestial targets, most of which were detected, and discovered several thousand additional 'serendipitous' sources in the observed fields. This catalog contains contour diagrams and source data, obtained with the imaging proportional counter in the 0.16 to 3.5 keV energy band, and describes methods for recovering upper limits for any sky position within the observed images. The main catalog consists of six volumes (numbered 2 through 7) of right ascension ordered pages, each containing data for one observation. Along with the primary documentation describing how the catalog was constructed, volume 1 contains a complete source list, results for merged fields, a reference system to published papers, and data useful for calculating upper limits and fluxes.

  4. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-01

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  5. Magnetic field strength of a neutron-star-powered ultraluminous X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Fürst, F.; Middleton, M. J.; Walton, D. J.; Stern, D.; Fabian, A. C.; Heida, M.; Barret, D.; Bachetti, M.

    2018-04-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are bright X-ray sources in nearby galaxies not associated with the central supermassive black hole. Their luminosities imply they are powered by either an extreme accretion rate onto a compact stellar remnant, or an intermediate mass ( 100-105M⊙) black hole1. Recently detected coherent pulsations coming from three bright ULXs2-5 demonstrate that some of these sources are powered by accretion onto a neutron star, implying accretion rates significantly in excess of the Eddington limit, a high degree of geometric beaming, or both. The physical challenges associated with the high implied accretion rates can be mitigated if the neutron star surface field is very high (1014 G)6, since this suppresses the electron scattering cross-section, reducing the radiation pressure that chokes off accretion for high luminosities. Surface magnetic field strengths can be determined through cyclotron resonance scattering features7,8 produced by the transition of charged particles between quantized Landau levels. Here, we present the detection at a significance of 3.8σ of an absorption line at 4.5 keV in the Chandra spectrum of a ULX in M51. This feature is likely to be a cyclotron resonance scattering feature produced by the strong magnetic field of a neutron star. Assuming scattering off electrons, the magnetic field strength is implied to be 1011 G, while protons would imply a magnetic field of B 1015 G.

  6. The SPARX Project R&D Activity towards X-rays FEL Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, David; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, M E; Boni, R; Boscolo, Manuela; Castellano, Michele; Clozza, A; Di Pirro, G; Drago, A; Esposito, A; Ferrario, Massimo; Filippetto, D; Fusco, V; Gallo, A; Ghigo, A; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, M; Ligi, C; Marcellini, F; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, L; Preger, Miro; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Ricci, R; Sanelli, C; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, F; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, A; Stella, A; Tazzioli, Franco; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, C

    2004-01-01

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Università di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FEL-SASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on the R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities. The R&D plans for the FEL source will be developped along two lines: (a) use of the SPARC high brightness photo-injector to develop experimental test on RF compression techniques and other beam physics issues, like emittance degradation in magnetic compressors due to CSR; (b) development of new undulator design concepts and up-grading of the FEL SPARC source to enhance the non linear harmonic generation mechanism, design and test of e-beam conditioning, prebunching and seeding. A parallel program will be aimed at the development of high repetition rate S-band gun, high Quantum Efficiency cathodes, high gradient X-band RF acceleratin...

  7. Optimization of in-line phase contrast particle image velocimetry using a laboratory x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, I.; Fouras, A.; Paganin, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a laboratory x-ray microfocus source is investigated using a numerical model. Phase contrast images of 75 μm air bubbles, embedded within water exhibiting steady-state vortical flow, are generated under the paraxial approximation using a tungsten x-ray spectrum at 30 kVp. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast speckle images at a range of source-object and object-detector distances are generated, and used as input into a simulated PIV measurement. The effects of source-size-induced penumbral blurring, together with the finite dynamic range of the detector, are accounted for in the simulation. The PIV measurement procedure involves using the cross-correlation between temporally sequential speckle images to estimate the transverse displacement field for the fluid. The global error in the PIV reconstruction, for the set of simulations that was performed, suggests that geometric magnification is the key parameter for designing a laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast PIV system. For the modeled system, x-ray phase-contrast PIV data measurement can be optimized to obtain low error ( 15 μm) of the detector, high geometric magnification (>2.5) is desired, while for large source size system (FWHM > 30 μm), low magnification (<1.5) would be suggested instead. The methods developed in this paper can be applied to optimizing phase-contrast velocimetry using a variety of laboratory x-ray sources.

  8. The supersoft X-ray source in V5116 Sagittarii. I. The high resolution spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, G.; Ness, J. U.; Hernanz, M.; Greiner, J.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Classical nova explosions occur on the surface of an accreting white dwarf in a binary system. After ejection of a fraction of the envelope and when the expanding shell becomes optically thin to X-rays, a bright source of supersoft X-rays arises, powered by residual H burning on the surface of the white dwarf. While the general picture of the nova event is well established, the details and balance of accretion and ejection processes in classical novae are still full of unknowns. The long-term balance of accreted matter is of special interest for massive accreting white dwarfs, which may be promising supernova Ia progenitor candidates. Nova V5116 Sgr 2005b was observed as a bright and variable supersoft X-ray source by XMM-Newton in March 2007, 610 days after outburst. The light curve showed a periodicity consistent with the orbital period. During one third of the orbit the luminosity was a factor of seven brighter than during the other two thirds of the orbital period. Aims: In the present work we aim to disentangle the X-ray spectral components of V5116 Sgr and their variability. Methods: We present the high resolution spectra obtained with XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra LETGS/HRC-S in March and August 2007. Results: The grating spectrum during the periods of high-flux shows a typical hot white dwarf atmosphere dominated by absorption lines of N VI and N VII. During the low-flux periods, the spectrum is dominated by an atmosphere with the same temperature as during the high-flux period, but with several emission features superimposed. Some of the emission lines are well modeled with an optically thin plasma in collisional equilibrium, rich in C and N, which also explains some excess in the spectra of the high-flux period. No velocity shifts are observed in the absorption lines, with an upper limit set by the spectral resolution of 500 km s-1, consistent with the expectation of a non-expanding atmosphere so late in the evolution of the post-nova. Based on

  9. Detailed characterization of electron sources yielding first demonstration of European X-ray Free-Electron Laser beam quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoinjector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ, was built to develop and optimize photoelectron sources for superconducting linacs for high-brilliance, short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL applications like the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the European x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. In this paper, the detailed characterization of two laser-driven rf guns with different operating conditions is described. One experimental optimization of the beam parameters was performed at an accelerating gradient of about 43  MV/m at the photocathode and the other at about 60  MV/m. In both cases, electron beams with very high phase-space density have been demonstrated at a bunch charge of 1 nC and are compared with corresponding simulations. The rf gun optimized for the lower gradient has surpassed all the FLASH requirements on beam quality and rf parameters (gradient, rf pulse length, repetition rate and serves as a spare gun for this facility. The rf gun studied with increased accelerating gradient at the cathode produced beams with even higher brightness, yielding the first demonstration of the beam quality required for driving the European XFEL: The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in the two transverse directions was measured to be 1.26±0.13  mm mrad for a 1-nC electron bunch. When a 10% charge cut is applied excluding electrons from those phase-space regions where the measured phase-space density is below a certain level and which are not expected to contribute to the lasing process, the normalized projected rms emittance is about 0.9 mm mrad.

  10. Soft X-ray optics for spectromicroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmore, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of systems for performing spectromicroscopy, spatially resolved spectroscopy, are in operation or under construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). For example, part of our program is centered around the surface analysis problems of local semiconductor industries, and this has required the construction of a microscope with wafer handling, fiducialization, optical microscopy, coordinated ion beam etching, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) integrated in this case with Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) grazing incidence micro-focusing optics. The microscope is to be used in conjunction with a highly efficient entrance slitless Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM). The design and expected performance of this instrument will be described, with emphasis on the production of the elliptically curved surfaces of the K-B mirrors by elastic bending of flat mirror substrates. For higher resolution, zone-plate (Z-P) focusing optics are used and one instrument, a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) is in routine operation on undulator beamline 7.0. A second Z-P based system is being commissioned on the same beamline, and differs from the STXM in that it will operate at Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) and will be able to perform XPS at 0.1 μm spatial resolution. Spatially resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) can be performed by imaging electrons photoemitted from a material with a Photo-Emission Electron Microscope (PEEM). The optical requirements of a beamline designed for PEEM are very different to those of micro-focus systems and we give examples of bending magnet and undulator based instruments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Soft x-ray optics for spectromicroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmore, H.A.

    1996-09-01

    A variety of systems for performing spectromicroscopy, spatially resolved spectroscopy, are in operation or under construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). For example, part of the program is centered around the surface analysis problems of local semiconductor industries, and this has required the construction of a microscope with wafer handling, fiducialization, optical microscopy, coordinated ion beam etching, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) integrated in this case with Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) grazing incidence micro-focusing optics. The microscope is to be used in conjunction with a highly efficient entrance slitless Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM). The design and expected performance of this instrument will be described, with emphasis on the production of the elliptically curved surfaces of the K-B mirrors by elastic bending of flat mirror substrates. For higher resolution, zone-plate (Z-P) focusing optics are used and one instrument, a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) is in routine operation on undulator beamline 7.0. A second Z-P based system is being commissioned on the same beamline, and differs from the STXM in that it will operate at Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) and will be able to perform XPS at 0.1 microm spatial resolution. Spatially resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) can be performed by imaging electrons photoemitted from a material with a Photo-Emission Electron Microscope (PEEM). The optical requirements of a beamline designed for PEEM are very different to those of micro-focus systems and they give examples of bending magnet and undulator based instruments

  12. Generating picosecond x-ray pulses in synchrotron light sources using dipole kickers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Guo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The duration of the x-ray pulse generated at a synchrotron light source is typically tens of picoseconds. Shorter pulses are highly desired by the users. In electron storage rings, the vertical beam size is usually orders of magnitude less than the bunch length due to radiation damping; therefore, a shorter pulse can be obtained by slitting the vertically tilted bunch. Zholents proposed tilting the bunch using rf deflection. We found that tilted bunches can also be generated by a dipole magnet kick. A vertical tilt is developed after the kick in the presence of nonzero chromaticity. The tilt was successfully observed and a 4.2-ps pulse was obtained from a 27-ps electron bunch at the Advanced Photon Source. Based on this principle, we propose a short-pulse generation scheme that produces picosecond x-ray pulses at a repetition rate of 1–2 kHz, which can be used for pump-probe experiments.

  13. DABAM: an open-source database of X-ray mirrors metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel, E-mail: srio@esrf.eu [ESRF - The European Synchrotron, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Bianchi, Davide [AC2T Research GmbH, Viktro-Kaplan-Strasse 2-C, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Cocco, Daniele [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Glass, Mark [ESRF - The European Synchrotron, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Idir, Mourad [NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Metz, Jim [InSync Inc., 2511C Broadbent Parkway, Albuquerque, NM 87107 (United States); Raimondi, Lorenzo; Rebuffi, Luca [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Reininger, Ruben; Shi, Xianbo [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Siewert, Frank [BESSY II, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Spielmann-Jaeggi, Sibylle [Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Takacs, Peter [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Tomasset, Muriel [Synchrotron Soleil (France); Tonnessen, Tom [InSync Inc., 2511C Broadbent Parkway, Albuquerque, NM 87107 (United States); Vivo, Amparo [ESRF - The European Synchrotron, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Yashchuk, Valeriy [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 15-R0317, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8199 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    DABAM, an open-source database of X-ray mirrors metrology to be used with ray-tracing and wave-propagation codes for simulating the effect of the surface errors on the performance of a synchrotron radiation beamline. An open-source database containing metrology data for X-ray mirrors is presented. It makes available metrology data (mirror heights and slopes profiles) that can be used with simulation tools for calculating the effects of optical surface errors in the performances of an optical instrument, such as a synchrotron beamline. A typical case is the degradation of the intensity profile at the focal position in a beamline due to mirror surface errors. This database for metrology (DABAM) aims to provide to the users of simulation tools the data of real mirrors. The data included in the database are described in this paper, with details of how the mirror parameters are stored. An accompanying software is provided to allow simple access and processing of these data, calculate the most usual statistical parameters, and also include the option of creating input files for most used simulation codes. Some optics simulations are presented and discussed to illustrate the real use of the profiles from the database.

  14. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  15. The REX survey a search for Radio Emitting X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Wolter, A; Ceca, R D; Gioia, I M

    1999-01-01

    We present the scientific goals, the strategy and the first results of the REX project, an effort aimed at creating a sizable and statistically complete sample of Radio Emitting X-ray sources (REX) using the available data from a VLA survey and the ROSAT PSPC archive. Through a positional cross-correlation of the two data sets we have derived a sample of about 1600 REX. Among the 393 REX identified so far a high fraction is represented by AGNs, typically radio loud QSOs and BL Lacs. The remaining sources are galaxies, typically radio galaxies isolated or in cluster. Thanks to the low flux limits in the radio and in the X-ray band and the large area of sky covered by the survey, we intend to derive a new complete and unbiased sample of BL Lacs which will contain both ``RBL'' and ``XBL'' type objects. In this way, the apparent dichotomy resulting from the current samples of BL Lacs will be directly analyzed in a unique sample. Moreover, the high number of BL Lacs expected in the REX sample (about 200) will allo...

  16. Supersoft X-Ray Source CAL 83: A Possible AE Aqr-like System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Odendaal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available CAL83 is a close binary supersoft X-ray source in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A ~67 s periodicity detected in supersoft X-rays is most probably associated with the spin period of a highly spun-up white dwarf (WD. The variability in the period is ascribed to the obscuration of the WD by the hydrogen burning envelope surrounding it, rotating with a period that is close to, but not quite synchronized with, the WD rotation period. Optical spectra obtained with SALT exhibit accretion disc emission lines with broad wing structures and P Cyg profiles, indicating mass outflows. Timing analysis of photometrical observations performed at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO revealed variable signals at ≤1 mHz which are thought to be associated with quasi-periodic oscillations from an accretion disc. The short spin period inferred for CAL83 can be the result of spin-up by accretion disc torques during a long mass transfer history, placing this source on a similar evolutionary track as the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr.

  17. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  18. New type of x-ray source for lensless laboratory nano-CT with 50-nm resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasov, Alexander; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Most X-ray systems are limited in spatial resolution by the x-ray source performance. In laboratory sources, x-rays are generated by the interaction of an electron beam with a metal target. Bulk target sources produce a spot size in the micron range. Thin layer targets allow a spot size improvement down to hundreds of nanometers, but with a significant flux reduction. Until now a spatial resolution under 100 nm could only be achieved by imaging with Fresnel zone plates with limited depth of focus, typically - several microns. This is acceptable for imaging of flat objects, but it creates a problem for tomography, which requires all parts of a bulk object to be in focus. To overcome the limitations, we invented an x-ray source with a new type of target. Because x-ray cameras can only collect photons from a small angle, the new emitter is physically shaped in such way that the camera can see it as a small dot, but it has a big length along the direction perpendicular to the camera creating a significant flux without compromising the resolution. Evaluation shows that structures down to 50 nm can be distinguished while maintaining a significant x-ray flux and infinite depth of focus required for nano-tomographical reconstruction.

  19. INTEGRAL discovered a new hard X-ray source: IGRJ17511-3057

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldovin, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Ferrigno, C.

    2009-01-01

    During the latest observations of the Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438), carried out between 2009-09-12 03:21:34 and 2009-09-12 05:27:22 (UTC), INTEGRAL discovered a new bright hard X-ray source, which we designate IGRJ17511-3057. The source is detected in the INTEGRAL/IBIS mosaic image...... by a single power-law with photon index 2.0+/-0.2. The source flux is 5.7e-10 erg/cm2/s in the 3-20 keV energy band and 4.8e-10 erg/cm2/s in the 20-100 keV energy band....

  20. NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku Observations of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Middleton, M. J.; Rana, V.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first broadband 0.3-25.0 keV X-ray observations of the bright ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1, performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in 2013 September. The NuSTAR data provide the first observations of Holmberg II X-1 above 10 keV and reveal a very steep high...

  1. X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

    2007-10-29

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

  2. Metrology of a mirror at the Advanced Photon Source : comparison between optical and x-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assoufid, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes metrology of a vertically focusing mirror on the bending magnet beamline in sector-1 of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The mirror was evaluated using measurements from both an optical long trace profiler and x-rays. Slope error profiles obtained with the two methods were compared and were found to be in a good agreement. Further comparisons were made between x-ray measurements and results from the SHADOW ray-tracing code

  3. Quasisoft X-Ray Sources: White Dwarfs? Neutron Stars? Black Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    Two of the most exciting areas of current research in astrophysics are black holes and Type Ia supernovae. We propose archival work that has the potential to shed light on both areas. The focus of our research is a newly-established class of x-ray sources called Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSSs). Although they comprise a significant fraction of the x- ray sources in galaxies of all types, including M31, it has proved difficult to identify members of this class in the Milky Way or Magellanic Clouds. We have developed methods to find these sources, and have begun to meet with success in the application of our methods. The three-year project we propose will allow us to identify QSSs. We will then use the full range of archived data to determine which QSS candidates are highly luminous, and which are members of less luminous classes, such as quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries (qLMXBs), or even isolated neutron stars. Many will be nearby x-ray active stars, or else distant AGN, whose discovery will also be of interest to a range of researchers. In the end, we will have a subset of intriguing physical systems, some of which may be accreting black holes and some of which may be unusual states of neutron stars or even of nuclear-burning white dwarfs. The systems identified through this ADAP program will be targets of future observing programs, from space and from the ground. The information we derive from NASA archived data will provide insight into important astrophysical questions. Do intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) exist? It has only been during the past 15 years or so that accreting compact objects that were considered as black hole candidates have been promoted to black holes. This achievement required years of observations of candidates in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. The discovery of ultraluminous X- ray source in external galaxies suggests that there are black holes with masses larger than the 10-30 solar masses typical of the known black holes. To

  4. Hard X-ray submicrometer tomography of human brain tissue at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimchenko, A.; Bikis, C.; Schulz, G.; Zdora, M.-C.; Zanette, I.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Schweighauser, G.; Hench, J.; Hieber, S. E.; Deyhle, H.; Thalmann, P.; Müller, B.

    2017-06-01

    There is a lack of the necessary methodology for three-dimensional (3D) investigation of soft tissues with cellular resolution without staining or tissue transformation. Synchrotron radiation based hard X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography using single-distance phase reconstruction (SDPR) provides high spatial resolution and density contrast for the visualization of individual cells using a standard specimen preparation and data reconstruction. In this study, we demonstrate the 3D characterization of a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human cerebellum specimen by SDPR at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, UK) at pixel sizes down to 0.45 μm. The approach enables visualization of cerebellar layers (Stratum moleculare and Stratum granulosum), the 3D characterization of individual cells (Purkinje, stellate and granule cells) and can even resolve some subcellular structures (nucleus and nucleolus of Purkinje cells). The tomographic results are qualitatively compared to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histological sections. We demonstrate the potential benefits of hard X-ray microtomography for the investigations of biological tissues in comparison to conventional histology.

  5. Hard X-ray submicrometer tomography of human brain tissue at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khimchenko, A; Bikis, C; Schulz, G; Hieber, S E; Deyhle, H; Thalmann, P; Müller, B; Zdora, M-C; Zanette, I; Vila-Comamala, J; Schweighauser, G; Hench, J

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of the necessary methodology for three-dimensional (3D) investigation of soft tissues with cellular resolution without staining or tissue transformation. Synchrotron radiation based hard X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography using single-distance phase reconstruction (SDPR) provides high spatial resolution and density contrast for the visualization of individual cells using a standard specimen preparation and data reconstruction. In this study, we demonstrate the 3D characterization of a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human cerebellum specimen by SDPR at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, UK) at pixel sizes down to 0.45 μm. The approach enables visualization of cerebellar layers ( Stratum moleculare and Stratum granulosum ), the 3D characterization of individual cells (Purkinje, stellate and granule cells) and can even resolve some subcellular structures (nucleus and nucleolus of Purkinje cells). The tomographic results are qualitatively compared to hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained histological sections. We demonstrate the potential benefits of hard X-ray microtomography for the investigations of biological tissues in comparison to conventional histology. (paper)

  6. Vacuum system design for a superconducting X-ray lithography light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchman, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    A superconducting electron storage ring for X-ray lithography (SXLS) is to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The goal is to design and construct a light source specifically dedicated to X-ray lithography production and which would be used as a prototype in a technology transfer to American industry. The machine will be built in two phases: phase I, a low energy ring (200 MeV, 500 mA) using all room temperature magnets which will be used primarily for low energy injection studies. Phase II will be a full energy machine (690 MeV, 500 mA) where the room temperature 180 0 dipole magnets of phase I will be replaced with superconducting magnets. The machine, with a racetrack shape and a circumference of 8.5 m, is designed to be portable and replaceable as a single unit. This paper will discuss the vacuum system design for both phases; i.e. gas desorption, warm bore vs cold bore, ion trapping, clearing electrodes, and diagnostic instrumentation. (author)

  7. X-ray source for irradiation of large-area objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petin, V. K.; Shljakhtun, S. V.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2008-06-01

    The results of experiments with a three-ring large-area diode that were conducted on an MIG pulse generator are reported. The MIG generator makes it possible to produce in a matched load electrical pulses up to 2 TW in power with an FWHM of 50-60 ns (1.2-1.4 TW and 80-90 ns in our experiments). In the operating mode of the generator, the current amplitude through the load is 2 MA (the current of a relativistic electron beam) at a diode voltage of ≈ 500 kV. As a load, a large-area vacuum diode with three ring-shaped cathodes is used. It is shown that about 20% of the energy stored in the capacitor bank can be converted to the energy of a relativistic electron beam by matching the output resistance of the MIG generator to the load resistance. When the beam slows down on a condensed foil target, the parameters of the resulting source are the following: the mean energy of X-ray quanta is ≈ 70 keV; irradiated area, 500 cm2; pulse FWHM, 65 ns; energy flux in the spectrum, 2 J/cm2; and percentage of X-ray radiation (10-100 keV) in the flux, ≈ 50%.

  8. The current status of small-angle x-ray scattering beamline at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Katsuaki; Doutch, James; Terrill, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) covers the major disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics delivering structural and dynamic information in nanoscience, mesoscopic architectures, supramolecular structures, and nucleation/growth of crystals. SAXS is also proving to be important in archaeological, environmental, and conservation sciences, and has further indicated its ability to span wide-ranging scientific disciplines. Thus, strong needs for SAXS studies are increasing significantly in a broad range of scientific fields year by year. Based on such a background, the demand for high throughput SAXS experiments is increasing. At the synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, one SAXS beamline, Non-crystalline diffraction I22 is now operational and highly automated throughput small-angle X-ray scattering (HATSAXS) beamline B21 is now under construction. I22 is the Undulator beamline and wide varieties of experiments, including time-resolved experiments are attempted. Based on the concept of HATSAXS, the key feature of B21 will focuses on the automation of end-station equipment. A automated sample changer has been purchased for solution SAXS measurements on biomolecules. A robotic-arm-type automated sample changer that is capable of handling several kinds of samples in material science is also being constructed. B21 is expected to successfully provide all users highly automated throughput measurements with the highest possible reliability and accuracy. Construction of this beamline will end in the second half of 2012, and will be open for users in the early summer of 2013 after commissioning. (author)

  9. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  10. XID II: STATISTICAL CROSS-ASSOCIATION OF ROSAT BRIGHT SOURCE CATALOG X-RAY SOURCES WITH 2MASS POINT SOURCE CATALOG NEAR-INFRARED SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The 18,806 ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources are quantitatively cross-associated with near-infrared (NIR) sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS/PSC). An association catalog is presented, listing the most likely counterpart for each RASS/BSC source, the probability P id that the NIR source and X-ray source are uniquely associated, and the probability P no-id that none of the 2MASS/PSC sources are associated with the X-ray source. The catalog includes 3853 high quality (P id >0.98) X-ray-NIR matches, 2280 medium quality (0.98 ≥ P id >0.9) matches, and 4153 low quality (0.9 ≥ P id >0.5) matches. Of the high quality matches, 1418 are associations that are not listed in the SIMBAD database, and for which no high quality match with a USNO-A2 optical source was presented for the RASS/BSC source in previous work. The present work offers a significant number of new associations with RASS/BSC objects that will require optical/NIR spectroscopy for classification. For example, of the 6133 P id >0.9 2MASS/PSC counterparts presented in the association catalog, 2411 have no classification listed in the SIMBAD database. These 2MASS/PSC sources will likely include scientifically useful examples of known source classes of X-ray emitters (white dwarfs, coronally active stars, active galactic nuclei), but may also contain previously unknown source classes. It is determined that all coronally active stars in the RASS/BSC should have a counterpart in the 2MASS/PSC, and that the unique association of these RASS/BSC sources with their NIR counterparts thus is confusion limited.

  11. Electromagnetic diagnostics of ECR-Ion Sources plasmas: optical/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Mazzaglia, M.; Romano, F. P.; Leone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Naselli, E.; Reitano, R.; Torrisi, G.; Celona, L.; Cosentino, L. G.; Giarrusso, M.; Gammino, S.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetoplasmas in ECR-Ion Sources are excited from gaseous elements or vapours by microwaves in the range 2.45-28 GHz via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. A B-minimum, magnetohydrodynamic stable configuration is used for trapping the plasma. The values of plasma density, temperature and confinement times are typically ne= 1011-1013 cm-3, 01 eVelectromagnetic emission of such plasmas, in the optical/X-ray domain. Fast Silicon Drift detectors with high energy resolution of 125 eV at 5.9 keV have been used for the characterization of plasma emission at 02atoms/molecules in the plasmas have been measured for different values of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile (they are critical for high-power proton sources).

  12. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical sources: current and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerels, Frits

    High resolution spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources has become a well-established technique over the last decade, with the wide variety of investigations performed with the diffraction grating spectrometers on Chandra and XMM-Newton. I will review some of the common themes that have emerged from these studies, which comprises observations of "sources" as varied as the intergalactic medium and the atmospheres of hot neutron stars. With the microcalorimeter spectrometer array on Astro-H, we will be making two more big steps: true imaging spectroscopy, and extension of the high resolution to the Fe K band. I will outline some of the issues we will encounter, against the background of possible discoveries we may make.

  13. Optimization of a fluorescence X-ray source and background studies for a prospective CNNS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, Andreas; Ciemniak, Christian; Feilitzsch, Franz von; Guetlein, Achim; Haag, Nils; Hofmann, Martin; Isaila, Christian; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Oberauer, Lothar; Pfister, Sebastian; Potzel, Walter; Roth, Sabine; Schoenert, Stefan; Sivers, Moritz von; Strauss, Raimund [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, E15 (Germany); Lachenmaier, Tobias [Eberhard Karls Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CNNS) is predicted by the Standard Model but hasn't been measured yet. A good background discrimination and shielding is essential for the achievement of a prospective experiment. We show the results of simulations for background discrimination and suppression using a myon veto system in combination with a shielding around a cryostat. With CNNS, the expected nuclear recoil energy for reactor anti-neutrinos is in the range of source within this energy region is necessary. Two different methods to create fluorescence are discussed and measured energy spectra will be shown. Finally results of an improved fluorescence x-ray source with nine clearly separated energy lines between {proportional_to}1 keV and 6.5 keV are shown.

  14. Determination of combustible volatile matter in coal mine roadway dusts by backscatter of x-rays from a radioisotope source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailwood, C.R.; Bunch, K.; Fookes, R.A.; Gravitis, V.L.; Watt, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The combustible volatile matter in coal mine roadway dusts (CVM) has been determined using x-ray backscatter techniques. The correlation between x-ray and chemical techniques is reasonably good for the 92 samples from collieries on the Bulli seam, and the maximum error expected at the maximum level of 11.5 weight per cent CVM permitted in the N.S.W. Coal Mines Regulation Act, 1912, as amended, is about +- 2.5 weight per cent. This x-ray technique can be used only when the combustible volatile content of the coal matter (CVM) varies within a limited range, and a separate calibration is required for each coal seam. Portable equipment based on a radioisotope x-ray source and digital ratemeter makes possible simple and rapid analysis, and with adaptation to use in coal mines should lead to much more comprehensive testing of roadways and hence improved overall prevention of coal dust explosions. (author)

  15. The source of X-rays and high-charged ions based on moderate power vacuum discharge with laser triggering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhimova Mariya A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The source of X-ray radiation with the energy of quanta that may vary in the range hν = 1÷12 keV was developed for studies in X-ray interaction with matter and modification of solid surfaces. It was based on a vacuum spark discharge with the laser triggering. It was shown in our experiments that there is a possibility to adjust X-ray radiation spectrum by changing the configuration of the electrode system when the energy stored in the capacitor is varied within the range of 1÷17 J. A comprehensive study of X-ray imaging and quanta energy was carried out. These experiments were carried out for the case of both direct and reverse polarity of the voltage on the electrodes. Additionally, ion composition of plasma created in a laser-triggered vacuum discharge was analyzed. Highly charged ions Zn(+21, Cu(+20 and Fe(+18 were observed.

  16. R&D Toward a Compact High-Brilliance X-Ray Source Based on Channeling Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.; Brau, C.A.; Choi, B.K.; Gabella, W.E.; Jarvis, J.D.; Mendenhall, M.H.; /Vanderbilt U.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Naval Postgraduate School; Mihalcea, D.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-08-01

    X-rays have been valuable to a large number of fields including Science, Medicine, and Security. Yet, the availability of a compact high-spectral brilliance X-ray sources is limited. A technique to produce X-rays with spectral brilliance B {approx} 10{sup 12} photons.(mm-mrd){sup -2}.(0.1% BW){sup -1} .s{sup -1} is discussed. The method is based on the generation and acceleration of a low-emittance field-emitted electron bunches. The bunches are then focused on a diamond crystal thereby producing channeling radiation. In this paper, after presenting the overarching concept, we discuss the generation, acceleration and transport of the low-emittance bunches with parameters consistent with the production of high-brilliance X-rays through channeling radiation. We especially consider the example of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in construction at Fermilab where a proof-of-principle experiment is in preparation.

  17. Speckle-based portable device for in-situ metrology of x-ray mirrors at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Zhou, Tunhe; Sawhney, Kawal

    2017-09-01

    For modern synchrotron light sources, the push toward diffraction-limited and coherence-preserved beams demands accurate metrology on X-ray optics. Moreover, it is important to perform in-situ characterization and optimization of X-ray mirrors since their ultimate performance is critically dependent on the working conditions. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a portable metrology device, which can be easily implemented on a range of beamlines for in-situ metrology. An X-ray speckle-based portable device for in-situ metrology of synchrotron X-ray mirrors has been developed at Diamond Light Source. Ultra-high angular sensitivity is achieved by scanning the speckle generator in the X-ray beam. In addition to the compact setup and ease of implementation, a user-friendly graphical user interface has been developed to ensure that characterization and alignment of X-ray mirrors is simple and fast. The functionality and feasibility of this device is presented with representative examples.

  18. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  19. Super-Eddington accretion on to the neutron star NGC 7793 P13: Broad-band X-ray spectroscopy and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Fürst, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Brightman, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Middleton, M. J.; Ptak, A.; Tao, L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed, broad-band X-ray spectral analysis of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) pulsar NGC 7793 P13, a known super-Eddington source, utilizing data from the XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Chandra observatories. The broad-band XMM-Newton+NuSTAR spectrum of P13 is qualitatively similar to the rest of the ULX sample with broad-band coverage, suggesting that additional ULXs in the known population may host neutron star accretors. Through time-averaged, phase-resolved and multi-epoch studies, we find that two non-pulsed thermal blackbody components with temperatures ∼0.5 and 1.5 keV are required to fit the data below 10 keV, in addition to a third continuum component which extends to higher energies and is associated with the pulsed emission from the accretion column. The characteristic radii of the thermal components appear to be comparable, and are too large to be associated with the neutron star itself, so the need for two components likely indicates the accretion flow outside the magnetosphere is complex. We suggest a scenario in which the thick inner disc expected for super-Eddington accretion begins to form, but is terminated by the neutron star's magnetic field soon after its onset, implying a limit of B ≲ 6 × 1012 G for the dipolar component of the central neutron star's magnetic field. Evidence of similar termination of the disc in other sources may offer a further means of identifying additional neutron star ULXs. Finally, we examine the spectrum exhibited by P13 during one of its unusual 'off' states. These data require both a hard power-law component, suggesting residual accretion on to the neutron star, and emission from a thermal plasma, which we argue is likely associated with the P13 system.

  20. X-ray Transient Sources (Multifrequency Laboratories The Case of the Prototype A0535+26/HDE 245770

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Giovannelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss the behaviour of the X-ray transient source A0535+26 which is considered for historical reasons and for the huge amount of multifrequency data, spread over a period of 35 years, as the prototype of this class of objects. Transient sources are formed by a Be star — the primary — and a neutron star X-ray pulsar — the secondary — and constitute a sub-class of X-ray binary systems. We will emphasize the discovery of low-energy indicators of high-energy processes. They are UBVRI magnitudes and Balmer lines of the optical companion. Particular unusual activity of the primary star — usually at the periastron passage of the neutron star – indicates that an X-ray flare is drawing near. The shape and intensity of X-ray outbursts are dependent on the strength of the activity of the primary. We derive the optical orbital period of the system as 110.856 ± 0.02 days. By using the optical flare of December 5, 1981 (here after 811205-E that triggered the subsequent X-ray outburst of December 13, 1981, we derive the ephemeris of the system as JD Popt−outb = JD0 (2, 444, 944 ± n(110.856 ± 0.02. Thus the passage of the neutron star at the periastron occurs with a periodicity of 110.856 ± 0.02 days and the different kinds of X-ray outbursts of A0535+26 — following the definitions reported in the review by Giovannelli & Sabau-Graziati (1992 — occur just after ∼ 8 days. The delay between optical and X-ray outbursts is just the transit time of the material coming out from the optical companion to reach the neutron star X-ray pulsar. The occurrence of X-ray “normal outbursts”, “anomalous outbursts” or “casual outbursts” is dependent on the activity of the Be star: “quiet state: steady stellar wind”, “excited state: stellar wind plus puffs of material”, and “expulsion of a shell”, respectively. In the latter case, the primary manifests a strong optical activity and the consequent strong

  1. Overview of high intensity x-ray and gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.; Lee, J.R.; Ramirez, J.J.; Sanford, T.W.L.; Agee, F.J.; Frazier, G.B.; Miller, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for intense x-ray and gamma-ray sources to simulate the radiation effects from nuclear weapons has led to the development of several types of terawatt-pulsed power systems. One example of a major gamma-ray source is Aurora, a 10-MV, 1.6-MA, 120-ns four-module, electron-beam generator. Recent requirements to improve the dose rate has led to the Aurora upgrade program and to the development of the 20-MV, 800-kA, 40-ns Hermes-III electron-beam accelerator. The Aurora program includes improvements to the pulsed power system and research on techniques to improve the pulse shape of the electron beam. Hermes III will feature twenty 1-MV, 800-kA induction accelerator cavities supplying energy to a magnetically insulated transmission line adder. Hermes III will become operational in 1988. Intense x-ray sources consist of pulsed power systems that operate with 1-MV to 2-MV output voltages and up to 25-TW output powers. These high powers are achieved with either low impedance electron-beam generators or multimodular pulsed power systems. The low-impedance generators have high voltage Marx generators that store the energy and then sequentially transfer this energy to pulse-forming transmission lines with lower and lower impedance until the high currents are reached. In the multimode machines, each module produces 0.7-TW to 4-TW output pulses, and all of the modules are connected together to supply energy to a single diode

  2. Demonstration of a long pulse X-ray source at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Opachich, Y. P.; Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Widmann, K. W.; Fournier, K. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Regan, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    A long duration high fluence x-ray source has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The target was a 14.4 mm tall, 4.1 mm diameter, epoxy walled, gas filled pipe. Approximately 1.34 MJ from the NIF laser was used to heat the mixture of (55:45) Kr:Xe at 1.2 atm (˜5.59 mg/cm3) to emit in a fairly isotropic radiant intensity of 400-600 GW/sr from the Ephoton = 3-7 keV spectral range for a duration of ≈ 14 ns. The HYDRA simulated radiant intensities were in reasonable agreement with experiments but deviated at late times.

  3. Monitor of ash content of coal with X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawrzonek, L.

    1983-01-01

    The coal ash monitor is used on-line to measure the ash content of raw, washed and blended coals. The instrument consists of a presentation unit and electronic unit. In the presentation unit a compact layer of coal is formed and there is also a radiation measuring system. A plutonium 238 source is used and the backscattered X-rays are detected by a proportional counter. The count rate is processed in the electronic unit and displayed as the ash percentage in the coal. A wide range of Polish coals was analysed. The monitor was tested in a power plant over the period of one year. The ash content in the coal analysed was in the range 5 to 50%. The gauge readings were compared with the pyrolysis results. An accuracy of 3.2% (95% confidence limit) was reached. These results were not corrected for the free moisture content which varied in the range 5 to 15 %. (author)

  4. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanis, A De; Pešić, Z D; Wagner, U; Rau, C

    2013-01-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm 2 . This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with 'pink' beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  5. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fanis, A.; Pešić, Z. D.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm2. This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with "pink" beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  6. Transient periodic x-ray source in Taurus, A0535+26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, H.; Mayer, W.; Buff, J.; Clark, G.W.; Doxsey, R.; Hearn, D.; Jernigan, G.; Joss, P.C.; Laufer, B.; Lewin, W.; Li, F.; Matilsky, T.; McClintock, J.; Primini, F.; Rappaport, S.; Schnopper, H.

    1976-01-01

    Light curves of the 104 s periodicity in the transient X-ray source in Taurus (A0535+26) are presented for six energy intervals in the range 1-35 keV for the period 1975 May 30-June 2. The pulse structure ranges from an apparently simple modulation at higher energies to a very complex pattern at lower energies. No Doppler shift is observed in the 104 s pulse period during the three days of observations. This places severe constraints upon possible binary orbital motion. Upper limits on the power at other periodicities are approximately-less-than10 percent for 2 ms-2s and approximately-less-than2 percent for 2 s-2000 s

  7. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassiri, A; Berenc, T G; Borland, M; Brajuskovic, B; Bromberek, D J; Carwardine, J; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Kaluzny, J; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Liu, J; Ma, H; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Stillwell, B K; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Yang, Y; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Dhakal, P; Eremeev, G V; Feingold, J J; Geng, R L; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Macha, K; Mammosser, J D; Matalevich, J; Palczewski, A D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Wilson, K M; Wiseman, M; Li, Z

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) Project at Argonne will include generation of short-pulse x-rays based on Zholents deflecting cavity scheme. We have chosen superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous train of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. In collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, we are prototyping and testing a number of single-cell deflecting cavities and associated auxiliary systems with promising initial results. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are working to develop state-of-the-art timing, synchronization, and differential rf phase stability systems that are required for SPX. Collaboration with Advanced Computations Department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is looking into simulations of complex, multi-cavity geometries with lower- and higher-order modes waveguide dampers using ACE3P. This contribution provides the current R&D status of the SPX project.

  8. Coherent Sources of XUV Radiation Soft X-Ray Lasers and High-Order Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeglé, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet radiation, also referred to as soft X-rays or XUV, offers very special optical properties. The X-UV refractive index of matter is such that normal reflection cannot take place on polished surfaces whereas beam transmission through one micrometer of almost all materials reduces to zero. Therefore, it has long been a difficult task to imagine and to implement devices designed for complex optics experiments in this wavelength range. Thanks to new sources of coherent radiation - XUV-lasers and High Order Harmonics - the use of XUV radiation, for interferometry, holography, diffractive optics, non-linear radiation-matter interaction, time-resolved study of fast and ultrafast phenomena and many other applications, including medical sciences, is ubiquitous.

  9. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  10. Energy-resolved visibility analysis of grating interferometers operated at polychromatic X-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, A; Willner, M; Herzen, J; Auweter, S; Chabior, M; Meiser, J; Achterhold, K; Mohr, J; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-12-15

    Grating interferometry has been successfully adapted at standard X-ray tubes and is a promising candidate for a broad use of phase-contrast imaging in medical diagnostics or industrial testing. The achievable image quality using this technique is mainly dependent on the interferometer performance with the interferometric visibility as crucial parameter. The presented study deals with experimental investigations of the spectral dependence of the visibility in order to understand the interaction between the single contributing energies. Especially for the choice which type of setup has to be preferred using a polychromatic source, this knowledge is highly relevant. Our results affirm previous findings from theoretical investigations but also show that measurements of the spectral contributions to the visibility are necessary to fully characterize and optimize a grating interferometer and cannot be replaced by only relying on simulated data up to now.

  11. Online monitoring the detector calibration process at a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huapng; Zhao, Yidong; Zheng, Lei; Tang, Kun; Liu, Shuhu; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Yashuai; Li, Fan

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes an online noble gas monitor used for the detector calibration process with a cryogenic radiometer. The process is implemented under a high-flux synchrotron radiation X-ray source in the energy range from 2100 to 6000 eV at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). This online monitoring system aims to lower the uncertainty of the calibration results caused by electron beam decay in the storage ring during the detector calibration process. Because the calibration process is performed under the high vacuum condition, an ionization chamber with adjustable Kr gas pressure is chosen as the monitoring device. To decrease the electronic noise, a method for obtaining the signal by collecting the counts within a specified time has been applied. Under the properly controlled conditions, the uncertainty of the calibration results introduced by the online monitoring system is estimated to be better than 0.15%, which can meet the demands of various high-precision calibration processes.

  12. A mass of less than 15 solar masses for the black hole in an ultraluminous X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motch, C; Pakull, M W; Soria, R; Grisé, F; Pietrzyński, G

    2014-10-09

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources have a typical set of properties not seen in Galactic stellar-mass black holes. They have luminosities of more than 3 × 10(39) ergs per second, unusually soft X-ray components (with a typical temperature of less than about 0.3 kiloelectronvolts) and a characteristic downturn in their spectra above about 5 kiloelectronvolts. Such puzzling properties have been interpreted either as evidence of intermediate-mass black holes or as emission from stellar-mass black holes accreting above their Eddington limit, analogous to some Galactic black holes at peak luminosity. Recently, a very soft X-ray spectrum was observed in a rare and transient stellar-mass black hole. Here we report that the X-ray source P13 in the galaxy NGC 7793 is in a binary system with a period of about 64 days and exhibits all three canonical properties of ultraluminous sources. By modelling the strong optical and ultraviolet modulations arising from X-ray heating of the B9Ia donor star, we constrain the black hole mass to be less than 15 solar masses. Our results demonstrate that in P13, soft thermal emission and spectral curvature are indeed signatures of supercritical accretion. By analogy, ultraluminous X-ray sources with similar X-ray spectra and luminosities of up to a few times 10(40) ergs per second can be explained by supercritical accretion onto massive stellar-mass black holes.

  13. Fabrication of compact electron gun for 6 MeV X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Barnwal, Rajesh; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    The 6 MeV X-Ray source for container cargo scanning application has been designed and developed by the Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, BARC, Mumbai. This compact linac has been designed as a mobile system, to be mounted on a moving container. In linac-based cargo-scanning system, to work electron gun on a movable container, it has to be robust. Electron gun is to work at 10 -7 mbar vacuum and 2000 degree Celsius temperature. An effort is made to engineer the gun assembly to make it more robust and aligned. The linac acts as the source of X-rays, which fall on the cargo and are then detected by the detector system. Many components are indigenously developed like grid, insulating ring, Tungsten filament and filament guide, which are made from alumina ceramic and Tantalum which is to work at 1500 degree Celsius. Filament connector is made from Invar to reduce heat loss and to make rigid connection. It was CNC machined and wire cut by EDM. Invar and Copper electrode feed through is shrink fitted with the help of liquid Nitrogen. Shrink fit tolerances of 15 micrometer are achieved by jig boring machining processes. Tantalum cup for LaB6 cathode and heat shield are made from die and punch mechanism. For alignment of electron emitter with beam axis this Tantalum cup is a crucial component. Electron gun is assembled and aligned its components with the help of precision jigs. The whole assembly was Helium leak tested by MSLD up to 4 x 10 -10 mbar.l/s vacuum, no leak was found. This paper will describe the machining, Tantalum cup forming, ceramic components development, heat shields, ceramic feed through etc of electron gun. (author)

  14. Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for application in science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Mirosław; Adjei, Daniel; Ahad, Inam Ul; Ayele, Mesfin G.; Fok, Tomasz; Szczurek, Anna; Torrisi, Alfio; Wegrzyński, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) developed in our laboratory for application in various areas of technology and science are presented. The sources are based on a laser-irradiated gas puff target approach. The targets formed by pulsed injection of gas under high-pressure are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from Nd:YAG lasers. We use commercial lasers generating pulses with time duration from 1ns to 10ns and energies from 0.5J to 10J at 10Hz repetition rate. The gas puff targets are produced using a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which secures high conversion efficiency without degradation of the nozzle. The use of a gas puff target instead of a solid target makes generation of laser plasmas emitting soft x-rays and EUV possible without target debris production. The sources are equipped with various optical systems, including grazing incidence axisymmetric ellipsoidal mirrors, a "lobster eye" type grazing incidence multi-foil mirror, and an ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating, to collect soft x-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beams. In this paper new applications of these sources in various fields, including soft x-ray and EUV imaging in nanoscale, EUV radiography and tomography, EUV materials processing and modification of polymer surfaces, EUV photoionization of gases, radiobiology and soft x-ray contact microscopy are reviewed.

  15. A Compact 5 MeV S-Band Electron Linac Based X-Ray Source for Industrial Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Auditore, Lucrezia; De Pasquale, Domenico; Emanuele, Umberto; Italiano, Antonio; Trifirò, Antonio; Trimarchi, Marina

    2005-01-01

    A compact and reliable X-ray source, based on a 5 MeV, 1 kW, S-band electron linac, has been set up at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit\\'a di Messina. This source, coupled with a GOS scintillator screen and a CCD camera, represents an innovative transportable system for industrial radiography and X-ray tomography. Optimization of the parameters influencing the e-gamma conversion and the X-ray beam characteristics have been studied by means of the MCNP-4C2 code. The converter choice is the result of the study of the e-gamma conversion performances for different materials and materials thicknesses. Also the converter position with respect to the linac exit window was studied. The chosen converter consists in a Ta-Cu target inserted close to the linac window. The Cu layer acts as a filter both on the electrons from the source and on the low energy X-rays. The X-ray beam angular profile was studied by means of GafChromic films with and without collimation. In the final source project, a collimation system pr...

  16. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  17. Short-term X-ray variability of the globular cluster source 4U 1820 - 30 (NGC 6624)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, L.; Kahn, S. M.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical techniques for improved identification of the temporal and spectral variability properties of globular cluster and galactic bulge X-ray sources are described in terms of their application to a large set of observations of the source 4U 1820 - 30 in the globular cluster NGC 6624. The autocorrelation function, cross-correlations, time skewness function, erratic periodicities, and pulse trains are examined. The results are discussed in terms of current models with particular emphasis on recent accretion disk models. It is concluded that the analyzed observations provide the first evidence for shot-noise variability in a globular cluster X-ray source.

  18. The feasibility of 10 keV X-ray as radiation source in total dose response radiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruoyu; Li Bin; Luo Hongwei; Shi Qian

    2005-01-01

    The standard radiation source utilized in traditional total dose response radiation test is 60 Co, which is environment-threatening. X-rays, as a new radiation source, has the advantages such as safety, precise control of dose rate, strong intensity, possibility of wafer-level test or even on-line test, which greatly reduce cost for package, test and transportation. This paper discussed the feasibility of X-rays replacing 60 Co as the radiation source, based on the radiation mechanism and the effects of radiation on gate oxide. (authors)

  19. Opportunities and challenges for photon diagnostics at the soft X-ray FEL FLASH in simultaneous operation mode (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Plönjes-Palm, Elke; Faatz, Bart; Tiedtke, Kai; Braune, Markus; Keitel, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    FLASH operates two distinguished undulator sections driven by one linear accelerator. In the 11th year of user operation the grown demands for detailed photon beam performances are doubled approached. The more complex machine settings and setup times require a more and more efficient determination of its characteristics concerning electron- and photon-beams. The photon diagnostics systems, e.g. gas monitor detection, photon-ion spectroscopy, or diffractive tools, not only have to deal on a regular basis with fundamental wavelengths between 4nm and 90nm, also they have to be reliable from 1µJ up to 1mJ of average single pulse energy. For the success of the experiments the error bars of many diagnostics measurements need to be pushed into their current limits and developments to go further are always issued. Especial, the pulse duration in conjunction with the spectral width has been accessed in the last year. Direct approaches of fundamental wavelengths below the Nitrogene K-edge and higher harmonics in and below the water window were achieved. While in principal distinguished to each other, the photon diagnostics tools of FLASH1 and FLASH2 add-up to a more complete understanding of the other. Together they allow for a better perspective towards further developments and a more suitable use of beam times. The intermingled knowledge of electron- and photon-beams is essential for an FEL particular in simultaneous operation mode. Examples out of regular user operation and distinguished FEL-studies are given to illustrate the current state of the photon diagnostics at FLASH.

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources using spherical harmonic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P. L.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Grim, G.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray imaging are important diagnostic tools at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measuring the two-dimensional (2D) size and shape of the neutron producing region, for probing the remaining ablator and measuring the extent of the DT plasmas during the stagnation phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. Due to the difficulty and expense of building these imagers, at most only a few two-dimensional projections images will be available to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) sources. In this paper, we present a technique that has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources from a minimal number of 2D projections using spherical harmonics decomposition. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from experimental neutron and x-ray data collected at OMEGA and NIF.

  1. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-15

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  2. Measuring the radiative properties of astrophysical matter using the Z X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James; ZAPP Team

    2017-06-01

    The Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties (ZAPP) collaboration is staging Z experiments that simultaneously investigate multiple topics in radiative properties of hot dense matter. The four astrophysics questions presently guiding this research are: 1) Why can’t we predict the location of the convection zone base in the Sun?; 2) How does radiation transport affect spectrum formation in accretion-powered objects?; 3) Why doesn’t spectral fitting provide the correct properties for White Dwarfs?; and 4) Why can’t we predict the heating and charge state distribution in photoionized plasmas? Recent progress using Z, the most energetic x-ray source on earth, to address these questions will be described. We emphasize the first two topics. Opacity models are an essential ingredient of stellar models and are highly sophisticated, but laboratory opacity tests have only now become possible at the conditions existing inside stars. Our opacity research emphasizes measuring iron at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, where the electron temperature and density are believed to be 190 eV and 9x1022 e/cc, respectively. The results exhibit large disagreements between iron opacity measurements and models and ongoing research is aimed at testing hypotheses for this discrepancy. The second project is motivated by the fact that emission lines from L-shell ions are not observed from iron in black hole accretion disks, but are observed from silicon in x-ray binaries. These disparate observations may be explained by differences in the radiation transport within the plasmas, but models for the spectral line formation and transport in photoionized plasmas have never been tested. We investigate photoionized silicon plasmas using absorption spectroscopy to infer the plasma conditions and emission spectroscopy to determine the dependence of spectral emission on plasma column density.++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed

  3. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  4. Instrumentation of x-ray diffraction and materials research on the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1984-11-01

    MATRIX was organized in 1980 to formulate a research team to design and construct a beam line at NSLS for x-ray diffraction studies of materials. A versatile system was designed to allow a full range of experimental capabilities for wide angle x-ray scattering experiments including surface diffraction studies. The design and construction of the system has been completed. Testing of parts of the system was completed at CHESS and with x-ray sources or other equipment at member institutions. Installation of the beam line at NSLS is in progress and will proceed in parallel with the commissioning of the x-ray ring at NSLS. Full operation of the beam line is expected to be ready by December 1, 1984 being limited only by the source power of NSLS at that time. Useful experiments could be started if the power is at least 2 GeV and 100ma. The MATRIX beam line was one of the first x-ray beam lines to see light in the beam line in early spring of 1984. In July of 1984, the MATRIX beam line as the first port at NSLS to have a monochromatic beam and to scan part of the spectrum from the source. As part of this contract, six publications have resulted from the various projects. Three publications are concerned directly with the beam line and/or its operation while the other three publications are the result of research associated with the project

  5. Systematic search for spherical crystal X-ray microscopes matching 1-25 keV spectral line sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollmeier, Marius S; Loisel, Guillaume P

    2016-12-01

    Spherical-crystal microscopes are used as high-resolution imaging devices for monochromatic x-ray radiography or for imaging the source itself. Crystals and Miller indices (hkl) have to be matched such that the resulting lattice spacing d is close to half the spectral wavelength used for imaging, to fulfill the Bragg equation with a Bragg angle near 90 ∘ which reduces astigmatism. Only a few suitable crystal and spectral-line combinations have been identified for applications in the literature, suggesting that x-ray imaging using spherical crystals is constrained to a few chance matches. In this article, after performing a systematic, automated search over more than 9 × 10 6 possible combinations for x-ray energies between 1 and 25 keV, for six crystals with arbitrary Miller-index combinations hkl between 0 and 20, we show that a matching, efficient crystal and spectral-line pair can be found for almost every He α or K α x-ray source for the elements Ne to Sn. Using the data presented here it should be possible to find a suitable imaging combination using an x-ray source that is specifically selected for a particular purpose, instead of relying on the limited number of existing crystal imaging systems that have been identified to date.

  6. An examination of mass thickness measurements with X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Mincong; Li Hongmei; Chen Ziyu; Shen Ji

    2008-01-01

    A method using X-rays to measure mass thickness is discussed. The method utilizes a filter to absorb low energy and characteristic photons so that the hardened X-ray spectra have a peaked energy distribution. An equivalent X-ray energy, which defines the attenuation in a material of interest can be used. The effect on the X-ray spectra of different filters is examined with Monte Carlo simulation using the EGSnrc package. A theoretical model for X-ray absorption that shows that the method can achieve good precision for a certain range of mass thicknesses is advanced. Experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis. It is found that for a certain range of mass thicknesses, the relative error can be less than 1% for the aluminum alloy sample at the tube voltage of 30 or 45 kV

  7. An examination of mass thickness measurements with X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Mincong; Li Hongmei; Chen Ziyu [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Jin Zhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Shen Ji [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Jin Zhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China)], E-mail: shenji@ustc.edu.cn

    2008-10-15

    A method using X-rays to measure mass thickness is discussed. The method utilizes a filter to absorb low energy and characteristic photons so that the hardened X-ray spectra have a peaked energy distribution. An equivalent X-ray energy, which defines the attenuation in a material of interest can be used. The effect on the X-ray spectra of different filters is examined with Monte Carlo simulation using the EGSnrc package. A theoretical model for X-ray absorption that shows that the method can achieve good precision for a certain range of mass thicknesses is advanced. Experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis. It is found that for a certain range of mass thicknesses, the relative error can be less than 1% for the aluminum alloy sample at the tube voltage of 30 or 45 kV.

  8. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  9. Observation of K-shell soft X ray emission of nitrogen irradiated by XUV-free electron laser FLASH at intensities greater than 1016 W/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F.B.; Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F.B.; Renner, O.; Juha, L.; Chalupsky, J.; Gauthier, J.C.; White, S.; Riley, D.; Vinko, S.; Witcher, T.; Wark, J.; Nagler, B.; Lee, R.W.; Nelson, A.J.; Toleikis, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, the development of light sources of the 4. generation, namely XUV/X-ray Free Electron Lasers provides to the scientific community outstanding tools to investigate matter under extreme conditions never obtained in laboratories so far. As theory is at its infancy, the analysis of matter via the self-emission of the target is of central importance. The characterization of such dense matter is possible if photons can escape the medium. As the absorption of K-shell X-ray transitions is minimal, it plays a key role in this study. We report here the first successful observation of K-shell emission of Nitrogen at 430 eV using an XUV-Free Electron Laser to irradiate solid Boron Nitride targets under exceptional conditions: photon energy of 92 eV, pulse duration of similar to 20 fs, micro focusing leading to intensities larger than 10 16 W/cm 2 . Using a Bragg crystal of THM coupled to a CCD, we resolved K-shell line emission from different charge states. We demonstrate that the spectroscopic data allow characterization of electron heating processes when X-ray radiation is interacting with solid matter. As energy transport is non-trivial because the light source is monochromatic, these results have an important impact on the theory. (authors)

  10. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  11. Imaging x-ray sources at a finite distance in coded-mask instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnarumma, Immacolata; Pacciani, Luigi; Lapshov, Igor; Evangelista, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for the correction of beam divergence in finite distance sources imaging through coded-mask instruments. We discuss the defocusing artifacts induced by the finite distance showing two different approaches to remove such spurious effects. We applied our method to one-dimensional (1D) coded-mask systems, although it is also applicable in two-dimensional systems. We provide a detailed mathematical description of the adopted method and of the systematics introduced in the reconstructed image (e.g., the fraction of source flux collected in the reconstructed peak counts). The accuracy of this method was tested by simulating pointlike and extended sources at a finite distance with the instrumental setup of the SuperAGILE experiment, the 1D coded-mask x-ray imager onboard the AGILE (Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero) mission. We obtained reconstructed images of good quality and high source location accuracy. Finally we show the results obtained by applying this method to real data collected during the calibration campaign of SuperAGILE. Our method was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate the imaging response of the experiment, particularly the absorption due to the materials intercepting the line of sight of the instrument and the conversion between detector pixel and sky direction

  12. Sodium source development for pulsed power driven, photopumped NA/NE x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhalter, P.G.; Cooperstein, G.; Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P.F.; Scherrer, V.E.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Mehlman, G.; Welch, B.L.; Jones, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    A sodium plasma source is being developed for a resonant photopumping x-ray laser scheme in which the 11A 1s 2 - 1s2rho 1 P 1 line in heliumlike Na X is used to pump the Ne IX n=4 singlet level. In their experiment the NRL Gamble II generator is used to produce two z-pinch plasmas in a side-by-side geometry. The sodium plasma is produced on axis and conducts the full 1 MA machine current. A fraction of this current returns through a neon gas puff located 5 cm from the sodium. This separation is determined by the need to prevent the plasmas from mixing and the need to have each plasma's azimuthal magnetic field as symmetric as possible. A minimum separation is desirable to increase coupling efficiency. To improve the pump source, a more confined source of pure sodium involving a coaxial plasma gun is being developed. They are currently studying both the operation of this source on a test stand and implosions of the resulting plasma on Gamble II. In initial experiments aluminum is substituted for sodium. Test stand diagnostics include photodiodes, witness plates, and current monitors designed to investigate the early motion of the annular plasma. Results from test stand and Gamble II experiments with both aluminum and sodium, as well as sodium handling techniques, are presented

  13. X-ray diffraction measurement of liquid As2Se3 by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Yukio; Inui, Masanori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Hosokawa, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XD) measurements of liquid As2Se3 were carried out in the temperature range up to 1600◦C where the temperature is well beyond the semiconductor to metal (SC-M) transition temperature around 1000◦C . The measurements were done by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8 and the obtained structure factors have much improvements over the previous XD measurements by using in house X-ray sources with regard to the momentum transfer range and the data stati...

  14. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  15. Flares from a new Integral hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808 likely associated with the ROSAT source SBM 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmar, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Hermsen, W.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.; Brandt, S.; Diehl, R.

    2004-01-01

    On Oct 9, 2004 Integral observed hard X-ray flares from a source located at R.A.=17h 40.7m, Dec.=-28s 08' (J2000, error radius 2.3'). This new hard X-ray source, IGRJ17407-2808, is positionally coincident with a faint ROSAT source listed as no. 10 in the catalogue of sources in the Galactic Center

  16. Efficient soft x-ray sources from laser-irradiated gold foam targets with well-controlled impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunsong; Yang, Jiamin; Song, Tianming; Shang, Wanli; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Chengwu; Zhu, Tuo; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    As an important x-ray source, enhancement of x-ray emissions from laser-produced plasmas is significant for various applications. Due to less expanding kinetic loss, gold foam with low initial density can have an enhanced x-ray conversion efficiency compared with solid-density gold. However, low-Z impurities within gold foam targets will diminish the enhancement remarkably, and should be tightly controlled. This paper presents an experimental study of a high brightness laser plasma soft x-ray source, based on a 0.36 g cm-3 gold foam target with negligible impurities irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses with power density around 3  ×  1014 W cm-2 at the Shenguang II laser facility. A conversion efficiency, from multi-eV to multi-keV, of 51.2 % is achieved in the x-ray emissions—about 21% relative enhancement compared with a solid-density gold target, and the highest conversion efficiency for Au foam planar targets yet. Good agreement has been achieved between the semi-analytical model prediction and the experimental results.

  17. Transition radiation in metal-metal multilayer nanostructures as a medical source of hard x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A. L.; Kaplan, A. E.; Shkolnikov, P. L.

    2006-01-01

    We show that a periodic metal-metal multilayer nanostructure can serve as an efficient source of hard x-ray transition radiation. Our research effort is aimed at developing an x-ray source for medical applications, which is based on using low-energy relativistic electrons. The approach toward choosing radiator-spacer couples for the generation of hard x-ray resonant transition radiation by few-MeV electrons traversing solid multilayer structures for the energies of interest to medicine (30-50 keV) changes dramatically compared with that for soft x-ray radiation. We show that one of the main factors in achieving the required resonant line is the absence of the contrast of the refractive indices between the spacer and the radiator at the far wings of the radiation line; for that purpose, the optimal spacer, as a rule, should have a higher atomic number than the radiator. Having experimental goals in mind, we have considered also the unwanted effects due to bremsstrahlung radiation, absorption and scattering of radiated photons, detector-related issues, and inhibited coherence of transition radiation due to random deviation of spacing between the layers. Choosing as a model example a Mo-Ag radiator-spacer pair of materials, we demonstrate that the x-ray transition radiation line can be well resolved with the use of spatial and frequency filtering

  18. Long-term observations of x-ray sources: The aquila-serpens-scutum region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Terrell, J.

    1984-05-15

    We present long-term (1969-1976) observations of galactic X-ray sources in the Aquila-Serpens-Scutum region. Data were obtained by the 3--12 keV detector on the Vela 5B satellite. The time histories of nine sources were derived from sky maps of this confused region: Scutum X-1, 4U 1823--00, 4U 1915--05, Aquila X-1, Serpens X-1, 4U 1907+09, A1850-087, 4U 1901+03, and 4U 1957+11. These observations reveal new long-term variations for several sources. AqlX-1, which averages about one eruption per year, is shown to have an underlying cycle of 122-125 days, with an rms phase walk of 10% per cycle. A regular 199 day period is observed from the vicinity of 4U 1915-05. This period appears too long to reconcile with the standard model of that system as a low-mass binary with a 50 minute period. The OB system 4U 1907+09 shows a possible 41.6 day period, with substantial phase jitter. We discuss these variations as possible precessions in binary systems.

  19. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was less than 3.50%. Thirty-five out of a total of 36 simulation conditions were

  20. Energy-angle correlation correction algorithm for monochromatic computed tomography based on Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhijun; Du, Yingchao; Huang, Wenhui; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-12-01

    The necessity for compact and relatively low cost x-ray sources with monochromaticity, continuous tunability of x-ray energy, high spatial coherence, straightforward polarization control, and high brightness has led to the rapid development of Thomson scattering x-ray sources. To meet the requirement of in-situ monochromatic computed tomography (CT) for large-scale and/or high-attenuation materials based on this type of x-ray source, there is an increasing demand for effective algorithms to correct the energy-angle correlation. In this paper, we take advantage of the parametrization of the x-ray attenuation coefficient to resolve this problem. The linear attenuation coefficient of a material can be decomposed into a linear combination of the energy-dependent photoelectric and Compton cross-sections in the keV energy regime without K-edge discontinuities, and the line integrals of the decomposition coefficients of the above two parts can be determined by performing two spectrally different measurements. After that, the line integral of the linear attenuation coefficient of an imaging object at a certain interested energy can be derived through the above parametrization formula, and monochromatic CT can be reconstructed at this energy using traditional reconstruction methods, e.g., filtered back projection or algebraic reconstruction technique. Not only can monochromatic CT be realized, but also the distributions of the effective atomic number and electron density of the imaging object can be retrieved at the expense of dual-energy CT scan. Simulation results validate our proposal and will be shown in this paper. Our results will further expand the scope of application for Thomson scattering x-ray sources.

  1. Space-time structure of neutron and X-ray sources in a plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.H.; Nardi, V.; Prior, W.

    1977-01-01

    Systematic measurements with paraffin collimators of the neutron emission intensity have been completed on a plasma focus with a 15-20 kV capacitor bank (hollow centre electrode; discharge period T approximately 8 μs; D 2 filling at 4-8 torr). The space resolution was 1 cm or better. These data indicate that at least 70% of the total neutron yield originates within hot-plasma regions where electron beams and high-energy D beams (approximately > 0.1-1 MeV) are produced. The neutron source is composed of several (approximately > 1-10) space-localized sources of different intensity, each with a duration approximately less than 5 ns (FWHM). Localized neutron sources and hard (approximately > 100 keV) X-ray sources have the same time multiplicity and are usually distributed in two groups over a time interval 40-400 ns long. By the mode of operation used by the authors one group of localized sources (Burst II) is observed 200-400 ns after the other group (Burst I) and its space distribution is broader than for Burst I. The maximum intensity of a localized source of neutrons in Burst I is much higher than the maximum intensity in Burst II. Secondary reactions T(D,n) 4 He (from the tritium produced only by primary reactions in the same discharge; no tritium was used in filling the discharge chamber) are observed in a time coincidence with the strongest D-D neutron pulse of Burst I. The neutron signal from a localized source with high intensity has a relatively long tail of small amplitude (area tail approximately less than 0.2 X area peak). This tail can be generated by the D-D reactions of the unconfined part of an ion beam in the cold plasma. Complete elimination of scattered neutrons on the detector was achieved in these measurements. (author)

  2. X-ray television area detectors for macromolecular structural studies with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns may be recorded quantitatively by means of X-ray-to-electron converters which are scanned in a television-type raster scan. Detectors of this type are capable of operating over the whole range of counting rates from very low to higher than those with which other types of converters can deal. The component parts of an X-ray television detector are examined and the limits to the precision of the measurements are analysed. (Auth.)

  3. ELECTRON ENERGY PARTITION IN THE ABOVE-THE-LOOPTOP SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Mitsuo; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares produce non-thermal electrons with energies up to tens of MeVs. To understand the origin of energetic electrons, coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources, in particular above-the-looptop sources, have been studied extensively. However, it still remains unclear how energies are partitioned between thermal and non-thermal electrons within the above-the-looptop source. Here we show that the kappa distribution, when compared to conventional spectral models, can better characterize the above-the-looptop HXRs (≳15 keV) observed in four different cases. The widely used conventional model (i.e., the combined thermal plus power-law distribution) can also fit the data, but it returns unreasonable parameter values due to a non-physical sharp lower-energy cutoff E c . In two cases, extreme-ultraviolet data were available from SDO/AIA and the kappa distribution was still consistent with the analysis of differential emission measure. Based on the kappa distribution model, we found that the 2012 July 19 flare showed the largest non-thermal fraction of electron energies about 50%, suggesting equipartition of energies. Considering the results of particle-in-cell simulations, as well as density estimates of the four cases studied, we propose a scenario in which electron acceleration is achieved primarily by collisionless magnetic reconnection, but the electron energy partition in the above-the-looptop source depends on the source density. In low-density above-the-looptop regions (few times 10 9  cm –3 ), the enhanced non-thermal tail can remain and a prominent HXR source is created, whereas in higher-densities (>10 10  cm –3 ), the non-thermal tail is suppressed or thermalized by Coulomb collisions

  4. The Sandia laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Laser produced plasmas have been shown to be extremely bright sources of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) radiation; however, certain practical difficulties have hindered the development of this source as a routinely usable laboratory device. To explore solutions to these difficulties, Sandia has constructed an XUV laser plasma source (LASPS) with the intention of developing an instrument that can be used for experiments requiring intense XUV radiation from 50-300 eV. The driving laser for this source is a KrF excimer with a wavelength of 248 nm, divergence of 200 μrad, pulse width of 23 ns at 20 Hz and typical pulse energy of 500 mJ which allows for good energy coupling to the plasma at moderate (10/sup 12/ W cm/sup 2/) power densities. This source has been pulsed approximately 2 x 10/sup 5/ times, demonstrating good tolerance to plasma debris. The source radiates from the visible to well above 1000 eV, however, to date attention has been concentrated on the 50-300 eV region. In this paper, spectral data and plasma images for both stainless steel and gold targets are presented with the gold target yielding a 200 μm plasma and reradiating 3.9% of the pump energy into 15-73 eV band, a flux of 1.22 x 10/sup 13/ photons/pulse/eV into 2π sr. Further efforts will expand these measurements to rare earth targets and to higher spectral energies. A special high throughput wide angle XUV (50-300 eV) monochromator and associated optics is being concurrently developed to collect the plasma radiation, perform energy dispersion and focus the radiation onto the experimental area

  5. Demonstration experiment of a laser synchrotron source for tunable, monochromatic x-rays at 500 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, A.; Fischer, R.; Fisher, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) was proposed to generate short-pulsed, tunable x-rays by Thomson scattering of laser photons from a relativistic electron beam. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed to generate x-ray photons of 20 eV. A demonstration experiment is being planned and constructed to generate x-ray photons in the range of {approximately}500 eV. Laser photons of {lambda}=1.06 {mu}m are Thomson backscattered by a 4.5 MeV electron beam which is produced by an S-band RF electron gun. The laser photons are derived from either (i) a 15 Joules, 3 nsec Nd:glass laser, (ii) the uncompressed nsec: pulse of the NRL table-top terawatt (T{sup 3}) laser, or (iii) the compressed sub-picosec pulse of the T{sup 3} laser. The RF electron gun is being constructed with initial operation using a thermionic cathode. It will be upgraded to a photocathode to produce high quality electron beams with high current and low emittance. The x-ray pulse structure consists of {approximately}10 psec within an envelope of a macropulse whose length depends on the laser used. The estimated x-ray photon flux is {approximately}10{sup 18} photons/sec, and the number of photons per macropulse is {approximately}10{sup 8}. Design parameters and progress of the experiment will be presented.

  6. Downsizing of Johansson spectrometer for X-ray fluorescence trace analysis with brilliant undulator source

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, K; Inoue, K; Yagi, N

    2001-01-01

    The downsizing of a Johansson-type X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer has been examined as a way of enhancing detection efficiency with a tolerable loss of energy resolution. A compact spectrometer equipped with a Ge(2 2 0) analyzing crystal with a Rowland radius of 120 mm has been tested with a highly brilliant helical undulator source at BL40XU, SPring-8. The energy resolution obtained for cobalt K alpha sub 1 (6930.32 eV) was 8.8 eV, which is 10-20 times better than that obtained using a Si(Li) detector, and effectively improved the signal-to-background ratio for XRF spectra. The combination of the present spectrometer and a third generation synchrotron source could provide new opportunities for trace analytical applications, which have been difficult so far by conventional synchrotron XRF experiments based on a Si(Li) detector system. The detection limit obtained for solid bulk samples has reached a level of several tens of ppb.

  7. X-ray lithography using wiggler and undulator synchrotron-radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neureuther, A.R.; Kim, K.J.; Thompson, A.C.; Hoyer, E.

    1983-08-01

    A systems design approach is used to identify feasible options for wiggler and undulator beam lines for x-ray lithography in the 0.5 to 0.2 μm linewidth region over 5 cm by 5 cm fields. Typical parameters from the Wiggler and Undulator in the Advanced Light Source designed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are used as examples. Moving from the conventional wavelengths of 4 to 9 A to very soft wavelengths around 15 A is shown to be very promising. The mask absorber thickness can be reduced a factor of three so that 0.2 μm features can be made with a 1:1 mask aspect ratio. The mask heating limited exposure time is also reduced a factor of three to 3 sec/cm 2 . However, extremely thin beam line windows (1/4 mil Be) and mask supports (1 μm Si) must be used. A wiggler beam line design using a small slit window at a scanning mirror appears feasible. A unconventional, windowless differentially pumped beam line with dual deflecting mirrors could be used with an undulator source

  8. Evaluation of Collateral Source Characteristics With 3-Dimensional Analysis Using Micro-X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Yuichiro; Hokimoto, Seiji; Tabata, Noriaki; Nakagawa, Osamu; Oshima, Asahi; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Otani, Jun; Ishii, Masanobu; Uchikawa, Michie; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Kaikita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hisao; Nishiyama, Koichi; Tsujita, Kenichi

    2018-03-23

    Collateral arteries provide an alternative blood supply and protect tissues from ischemic damage in patients with peripheral artery disease. However, the mechanism of collateral artery development is difficult to validate. Collateral arteries were visualized using micro-x-ray computed tomography. Developmental characteristics were assessed using confocal microscopy. We conducted a single-center, retrospective, observational study and assessed the dilatation of collateral arteries on ischemic sides. We quantified the vascular volume in both ischemic and nonischemic legs. A prominent increase in vascular volume was observed in the ischemic leg using a murine hind-limb ischemia model. We also performed qualitative assessment and confirmed that the inferior gluteal artery functioned as a major collateral source. Serial analysis of murine hind-limb vessel development revealed that the inferior gluteal artery was a remnant of the ischial artery, which emerged as a representative vessel on the dorsal side during hind-limb organogenesis. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients who were admitted for the diagnosis or treatment of peripheral artery disease. The diameter of the inferior gluteal artery on the ischemic side showed significant dilatation compared with that on the nonischemic side. Our findings indicate that an embryonic remnant artery can become a collateral source under ischemic conditions. Flow enhancement in the inferior gluteal artery might become a novel therapeutic approach for patients with peripheral artery disease. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Miniature X-ray Source for Planetary Exploration Instruments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop a design model for a CNT cold cathode, low power, passively cooled, and grounded-anode X-ray tube that is compatible...

  10. Celestial X-ray Source Modeling and Catalogues for Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microcosm X-ray pulsar-based navigation and timing (XNAV) team will provide the software and modeling infrastructure for NASA to support XNAV operations,...

  11. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Efthimion, P; Pablant, N A; Lu, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Magee, E

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10,000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  12. Formation of Sub-Millimeter-Size Powerful X-Ray Sources in Low-Impedance Rod-Pinch Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the paper, experiments on the formation of a low-impedance diode and a focused electron beam as a result of detachment of radial wires, accelerated by the current of a high-current generator, from the rod anode have been described. In the experiments, along with studies of conditions for compact focusing of the electron beam and effective generation of hard x-rays, the shape of the tip of the anode rod is determined at which the x-ray source is point-sized when viewed in the radial direction.

  13. Recent results and future plans for a 45 actuator adaptive x-ray optics experiment at the advanced light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F., E-mail: brejnholt1@llnl.gov; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Hill, Randal M.; Pardini, Tommaso; Hagler, Lisle; Jackson, Jessie; Jeon, Jae; McCarville, Thomas J.; Palmer, David W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Celestre, Richard [Advanced Light Source - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Brooks, Audrey D. [Northrop Grumman - AOA Xinetics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report on the current status of the Adaptive X-ray Optics project run by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is collaborating with the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to demonstrate a near real-time adaptive X-ray optic. To this end, a custom-built 45 cm long deformable mirror has been installed at ALS beamline 5.3.1 (end station 2) for a two-year period that started in September 2014. We will outline general aspects of the instrument, present results from a recent experimental campaign and touch on future plans for the project.

  14. First Detection of Mid-infrared Variability from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ryan; Heida, Marianne; Kasliwal, Mansi; Walton, Dominic

    2018-01-01

    We present mid-infrared (IR) light curves of the Ultraluminous X-ray Source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1 from observations taken between 2014 January 13 and 2017 January 5 with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 4.5 μm in the Spitzer Infrared Intensive Transients Survey. The mid-IR light curves, which reveal the first detection of mid-IR variability from a ULX, is determined to arise primarily from dust emission rather than from a jet or an accretion disk outflow. We derived the evolution of the dust temperature (Td ~ 600 - 800 K), IR luminosity LIR ~ 3 × 104 L⊙ ), mass (Md ~ 1 - 3 × 10-6 M⊙), and equilibrium temperature radius (Req ~ 10 - 20 AU). A comparison of X-1 with a sample of spectroscopically identified massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud on a mid-IR color-magnitude diagram suggests that the mass donor in X-1 is a supergiant (sg) B[e]-star. The sgB[e]-interpretation is consistent with the derived dust properties and the presence of the [Fe II] (λ = 1.644 μm) emission line revealed from previous near-IR studies of X-1. We attribute the mid-IR variability of X-1 to the increased heating of dust located in a circumbinary torus. It is unclear what physical processes are responsible for the increased dust heating; however, it does not appear to be associated with the X-ray flux from the ULX, given the constant X-ray luminosities provided by serendipitous, near-contemporaneous X-ray observations around the first mid-IR variability event in 2014. Our results highlight the importance of mid-IR observations of luminous X-ray sources traditionally studied at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  15. Urban airborne lead: X-ray absorption spectroscopy establishes soil as dominant source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E Pingitore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the dramatic decrease in airborne lead over the past three decades, there are calls for regulatory limits on this potent pediatric neurotoxin lower even than the new (2008 US Environmental Protection Agency standard. To achieve further decreases in airborne lead, what sources would need to be decreased and what costs would ensue? Our aim was to identify and, if possible, quantify the major species (compounds of lead in recent ambient airborne particulate matter collected in El Paso, TX, USA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used synchrotron-based XAFS (x-ray absorption fine structure to identify and quantify the major Pb species. XAFS provides molecular-level structural information about a specific element in a bulk sample. Pb-humate is the dominant form of lead in contemporary El Paso air. Pb-humate is a stable, sorbed complex produced exclusively in the humus fraction of Pb-contaminated soils; it also is the major lead species in El Paso soils. Thus such soil must be the dominant source, and its resuspension into the air, the transfer process, providing lead particles to the local air. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Current industrial and commercial activity apparently is not a major source of airborne lead in El Paso, and presumably other locales that have eliminated such traditional sources as leaded gasoline. Instead, local contaminated soil, legacy of earlier anthropogenic Pb releases, serves as a long-term reservoir that gradually leaks particulate lead to the atmosphere. Given the difficulty and expense of large-scale soil remediation or removal, fugitive soil likely constrains a lower limit for airborne lead levels in many urban settings.

  16. The Height of a White-Light Flare and its Hard X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Juan-Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Kriucker, Saem; Lin, R. P.; Lindsey, Charles; Couvidat, Sebastien; Schou, Jesper; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe observations of a white-light (WL) flare (SOL2011-02-24T07:35:00, M3.5) close to the limb of the Sun, from which we obtain estimates of the heights of the optical continuum sources and those of the associated hard X-ray (HXR) sources. For this purpose, we use HXR images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager and optical images at 6173 Ang. from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.We find that the centroids of the impulsive-phase emissions in WL and HXRs (30 -80 keV) match closely in central distance (angular displacement from Sun center), within uncertainties of order 0".2. This directly implies a common source height for these radiations, strengthening the connection between visible flare continuum formation and the accelerated electrons. We also estimate the absolute heights of these emissions as vertical distances from Sun center. Such a direct estimation has not been done previously, to our knowledge. Using a simultaneous 195 Ang. image from the Solar-Terrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft to identify the heliographic coordinates of the flare footpoints, we determine mean heights above the photosphere (as normally defined; tau = 1 at 5000 Ang.) of 305 +/- 170 km and 195 +/- 70 km, respectively, for the centroids of the HXR and WL footpoint sources of the flare. These heights are unexpectedly low in the atmosphere, and are consistent with the expected locations of tau = 1 for the 6173 Ang and the approx 40 keV photons observed, respectively.

  17. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: roman.klein@ptb.de; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Scheer, M. [BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-10-11

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its-compared to bending magnets-higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed.

  18. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its-compared to bending magnets-higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed

  19. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R.; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.; Scheer, M.

    2007-10-01

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its—compared to bending magnets—higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed.

  20. DABAM: an open-source database of X-ray mirrors metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel; Bianchi, Davide; Cocco, Daniele; Glass, Mark; Idir, Mourad; Metz, Jim; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Rebuffi, Luca; Reininger, Ruben; Shi, Xianbo; Siewert, Frank; Spielmann-Jaeggi, Sibylle; Takacs, Peter; Tomasset, Muriel; Tonnessen, Tom; Vivo, Amparo; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2016-05-01

    An open-source database containing metrology data for X-ray mirrors is presented. It makes available metrology data (mirror heights and slopes profiles) that can be used with simulation tools for calculating the effects of optical surface errors in the performances of an optical instrument, such as a synchrotron beamline. A typical case is the degradation of the intensity profile at the focal position in a beamline due to mirror surface errors. This database for metrology (DABAM) aims to provide to the users of simulation tools the data of real mirrors. The data included in the database are described in this paper, with details of how the mirror parameters are stored. An accompanying software is provided to allow simple access and processing of these data, calculate the most usual statistical parameters, and also include the option of creating input files for most used simulation codes. Some optics simulations are presented and discussed to illustrate the real use of the profiles from the database.