WorldWideScience

Sample records for flare source sizes

  1. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  2. NIR Flare of radio source GB60713+5738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Chavushyan, V.

    2018-02-01

    In ATel#11331, we reported the NIR detection of the radio source GB60713+5738 and the suggestion of it being in flaring state. However, we found a previous observation in our archive that fully confirms a recent giant flare of this object.

  3. Hybrid simulations of chromospheric HXR flare sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, Z.; Varady, Michal; Kašparová, Jana; Kramoliš, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 337, č. 10 (2016), s. 1020-1023 ISSN 0004-6337. [Dynamic Sun - Exploring the Many Facets of Solar Eruptive Events. Potsdam, 26.10.2015-29.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.916, year: 2016

  4. A method for untriggered time-dependent searches for multiple flares from neutrino point sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gora, D.; Bernardini, E.; Cruz Silva, A.H.

    2011-04-01

    A method for a time-dependent search for flaring astrophysical sources which can be potentially detected by large neutrino experiments is presented. The method uses a time-clustering algorithm combined with an unbinned likelihood procedure. By including in the likelihood function a signal term which describes the contribution of many small clusters of signal-like events, this method provides an effective way for looking for weak neutrino flares over different time-scales. The method is sensitive to an overall excess of events distributed over several flares which are not individually detectable. For standard cases (one flare) the discovery potential of the method is worse than a standard time-dependent point source analysis with unknown duration of the flare by a factor depending on the signal-to-background level. However, for flares sufficiently shorter than the total observation period, the method is more sensitive than a time-integrated analysis. (orig.)

  5. A method for untriggered time-dependent searches for multiple flares from neutrino point sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gora, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Cracow (Poland); Bernardini, E.; Cruz Silva, A.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Cracow (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    A method for a time-dependent search for flaring astrophysical sources which can be potentially detected by large neutrino experiments is presented. The method uses a time-clustering algorithm combined with an unbinned likelihood procedure. By including in the likelihood function a signal term which describes the contribution of many small clusters of signal-like events, this method provides an effective way for looking for weak neutrino flares over different time-scales. The method is sensitive to an overall excess of events distributed over several flares which are not individually detectable. For standard cases (one flare) the discovery potential of the method is worse than a standard time-dependent point source analysis with unknown duration of the flare by a factor depending on the signal-to-background level. However, for flares sufficiently shorter than the total observation period, the method is more sensitive than a time-integrated analysis. (orig.)

  6. Sizes of flaring kernels in various parts of the Hα line profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Radziszewski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present new results of spectra-photometrical investigations of the flaring kernels' sizes and their intensities measured simultaneously in various parts of the Hα line profile. Our investigations were based on the very high temporal resolution spectral-imaging observations of the solar flares collected with Large Coronagraph (LC, Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph and Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (MSDP-SECIS at Białkow Observatory (University of Wrocław, Poland.

    We have found that the areas of the investigated individual flaring kernels vary in time and in wavelengths, as well as the intensities and areas of the Hα flaring kernels decreased systematically when observed in consecutive wavelengths toward the wings of the Hα line. Our result could be explained as an effect of the cone-shaped lower parts of the magnetic loops channeling high energy particle beams exciting chromospheric plasma.

  7. Feature Selection, Flaring Size and Time-to-Flare Prediction Using Support Vector Regression, and Automated Prediction of Flaring Behavior Based on Spatio-Temporal Measures Using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghraibah, Amani

    Solar flares release stored magnetic energy in the form of radiation and can have significant detrimental effects on earth including damage to technological infrastructure. Recent work has considered methods to predict future flare activity on the basis of quantitative measures of the solar magnetic field. Accurate advanced warning of solar flare occurrence is an area of increasing concern and much research is ongoing in this area. Our previous work 111] utilized standard pattern recognition and classification techniques to determine (classify) whether a region is expected to flare within a predictive time window, using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) classification method. We extracted 38 features which describing the complexity of the photospheric magnetic field, the result classification metrics will provide the baseline against which we compare our new work. We find a true positive rate (TPR) of 0.8, true negative rate (TNR) of 0.7, and true skill score (TSS) of 0.49. This dissertation proposes three basic topics; the first topic is an extension to our previous work [111, where we consider a feature selection method to determine an appropriate feature subset with cross validation classification based on a histogram analysis of selected features. Classification using the top five features resulting from this analysis yield better classification accuracies across a large unbalanced dataset. In particular, the feature subsets provide better discrimination of the many regions that flare where we find a TPR of 0.85, a TNR of 0.65 sightly lower than our previous work, and a TSS of 0.5 which has an improvement comparing with our previous work. In the second topic, we study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using support vector regression (SVR). When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a GOES class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average

  8. ECR plasma source in a flaring magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meis, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Louvet, P.

    1992-01-01

    The propagation and absorption of an electromagnetic wave, near the electron cyclotron zone, of a cold plasma (T e ∼ 1-5 eV) confined in a flaring magnetic field is studied. The case of both extraordinary and ordinary modes has been considered. Temperature effects and electron-neutral collisions have been taken account in the dielectric tensor

  9. Characteristics of hard X-ray double sources in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, T.; Kosugi, T.; Masuda, S.; Yaji, K.; Inda-Koide, M.; Makishima, K.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging observations of solar flare hard X-ray sources with the Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) aboard the Yohkoh satellite have revealed that hard X-ray emissions (greater than 30 ke V) originate most frequently from double sources. The double sources are located on both sides of the magnetic neutral line, suggesting that the bulk of hard X-rays is emitted from footpoints of flaring magnetic loops. We also found that hard X-rays from the double sources are emitted simultaneously within a fraction of second and that the weaker source tends to be located in the stronger magnetic field region, showing a softer spectrum. Physcial implications on the observed characteristics of the hard X-ray double sources are discussed.

  10. A simple 2D SOC model for one of the main sources of geomagnetic disturbances: Flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles, M.C.; Dias, V.H.A.; Oliva, D.; Papa, A.R.R.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a simple model for solar flares, one of the main sources of geomagnetic disturbances. We have obtained power-laws for the probability distribution functions of some relevant physical characteristics of flares which could serve as the fingerprint of a critical state at the base of such phenomena and, given that we have not introduced a fine tune mechanism, of self-organized criticality. We compare our results with some recent experimental work on the statistics of flares and analyze the possible connection of these power laws with others already found by our group in geomagnetic disturbances distributions. We also present some limitations of our model as well as possible extensions and corrections to be taken into account in future works.

  11. LAT 2-year Point Source Catalog Aperture Photometry Lightcurves Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Due to a glitch in the analysis pipeline there are apparent increases in flux around MJD 56810 for many sources. These increases are not real and should be...

  12. The Height of a White-Light Flare and its Hard X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Juan-Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Kriucker, Saem; Lin, R. P.; Lindsey, Charles; Couvidat, Sebastien; Schou, Jesper; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe observations of a white-light (WL) flare (SOL2011-02-24T07:35:00, M3.5) close to the limb of the Sun, from which we obtain estimates of the heights of the optical continuum sources and those of the associated hard X-ray (HXR) sources. For this purpose, we use HXR images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager and optical images at 6173 Ang. from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.We find that the centroids of the impulsive-phase emissions in WL and HXRs (30 -80 keV) match closely in central distance (angular displacement from Sun center), within uncertainties of order 0".2. This directly implies a common source height for these radiations, strengthening the connection between visible flare continuum formation and the accelerated electrons. We also estimate the absolute heights of these emissions as vertical distances from Sun center. Such a direct estimation has not been done previously, to our knowledge. Using a simultaneous 195 Ang. image from the Solar-Terrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft to identify the heliographic coordinates of the flare footpoints, we determine mean heights above the photosphere (as normally defined; tau = 1 at 5000 Ang.) of 305 +/- 170 km and 195 +/- 70 km, respectively, for the centroids of the HXR and WL footpoint sources of the flare. These heights are unexpectedly low in the atmosphere, and are consistent with the expected locations of tau = 1 for the 6173 Ang and the approx 40 keV photons observed, respectively.

  13. The Second Catalog of Flaring Gamma-Ray Sources from the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, S.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Conrad, J.; Costantin, D.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desai, A.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Donaggio, B.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giomi, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    We present the second catalog of flaring gamma-ray sources (2FAV) detected with the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool that blindly searches for transients over the entire sky observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. With respect to the first FAVA catalog, this catalog benefits from a larger data set, the latest LAT data release (Pass 8), as well as from an improved analysis that includes likelihood techniques for a more precise localization of the transients. Applying this analysis to the first 7.4 years of Fermi observations, and in two separate energy bands 0.1-0.8 GeV and 0.8-300 GeV, a total of 4547 flares were detected with significance greater than 6σ (before trials), on the timescale of one week. Through spatial clustering of these flares, 518 variable gamma-ray sources were identified. Based on positional coincidence, likely counterparts have been found for 441 sources, mostly among the blazar class of active galactic nuclei. For 77 2FAV sources, no likely gamma-ray counterpart has been found. For each source in the catalog, we provide the time, location, and spectrum of each flaring episode. Studying the spectra of the flares, we observe a harder-when-brighter behavior for flares associated with blazars, with the exception of BL Lac flares detected in the low-energy band. The photon indexes of the flares are never significantly smaller than 1.5. For a leptonic model, and under the assumption of isotropy, this limit suggests that the spectrum of freshly accelerated electrons is never harder than p˜ 2.

  14. Motion of the sources for type II and type IV radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type II radio bursts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type IV radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves and bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the bottles behave quite differently from the waves and that the bottles are generally much slower than the waves. It has been suggested that the waves are related to flare-associated interplanetary disturbances which produce SSC geomagnetic storms. These disturbances may, therefore, be identified as interplanetary shock waves. The relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space is briefly discussed.

  15. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  16. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  17. Motion of the sources for type 2 and type 4 radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type 2 radio brusts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type 4 radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the behavior of the bottles is quite different from that of the waves and that the speed of the former is generally much lower. It is shown that the transit times of disturbances between the sun and the earth give information about the deceleration of shock waves to their local speeds observed near the earth's orbit. A brief discussion is given on the relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space.

  18. Central Africa Energy: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Explore Flared Gas as an Energy Source Alternative to Biomass in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amber; White, Charles; Castillo, Christopher; Hitimana, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Kenny; Mishra, Shikher; Clark, Walt

    2014-01-01

    Much of Central Africa's economy is centered on oil production. Oil deposits lie below vast amounts of compressed natural gas. The latter is often flared off during oil extraction due to a lack of the infrastructure needed to utilize it for productive energy generation. Though gas flaring is discouraged by many due to its contributions to greenhouse emissions, it represents a waste process and is rarely tracked or recorded in this region. In contrast to this energy waste, roughly 80% of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and in turn uses biomass such as wood for heat and light. In addition to the dangers incurred from collecting and using biomass, the practice commonly leads to ecological change through the acquisition of wood from forests surrounding urban areas. The objective of this project was to gain insight on domestic energy usage in Central Africa, specifically Angola, Gabon, and the Republic of Congo. This was done through an analysis of deforestation, an estimation of gas flared, and a suitability study for the infrastructure needed to realize the natural gas resources. The energy from potential natural gas production was compared to the energy equivalent of the biomass being harvested. A site suitability study for natural gas pipeline routes from flare sites to populous locations was conducted to assess the feasibility of utilizing natural gas for domestic energy needs. Analyses and results were shared with project partners, as well as this project's open source approach to assessing the energy sector. Ultimately, Africa's growth demands energy for its people, and natural gas is already being produced by the flourishing petroleum industry in numerous African countries. By utilizing this gas, Africa could reduce flaring, recuperate the financial and environmental loss that flaring accounts for, and unlock a plentiful domestic energy source for its people. II. Introduction Background Africa is home to numerous burgeoning economies; a

  19. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro Exposure Tool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 (micro)m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features

  20. Flares from a new Integral hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808 likely associated with the ROSAT source SBM 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmar, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Hermsen, W.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.; Brandt, S.; Diehl, R.

    2004-01-01

    On Oct 9, 2004 Integral observed hard X-ray flares from a source located at R.A.=17h 40.7m, Dec.=-28s 08' (J2000, error radius 2.3'). This new hard X-ray source, IGRJ17407-2808, is positionally coincident with a faint ROSAT source listed as no. 10 in the catalogue of sources in the Galactic Center

  1. Relationship between Hard X-Ray Footpoint Sources and Photospheric Electric Currents in Solar Flares: a Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, I. V.; Sharykin, I. N.; Wang, R.; Liu, Y. D.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    It is believed that solar flares are a result of release of free magnetic energy contained in electric currents (ECs) flowing in active regions (ARs). However, there are still debates whether the primary energy release and acceleration of electrons take place in coronal current sheets or in chromospheric footpoints of current-carrying magnetic flux tubes (loops). We present results of an observational statistical study of spatial relationship between hard X-ray (HXR; EHXR≥50keV) footpoint sources detected by RHESSI and vertical photospheric ECs calculated using vector magnetograms obtained from the SDO/HMI data. We found that for a sample of 47 flares (from C3.0 to X3.1 class) observed on the solar disk by both instruments in 2010-2016, at least one HXR source was in a region of strong (within 20% of the maximum EC density in the corresponding ARs) vertical ECs having the form of a ribbon (79%) or an island (21%). The total vertical ECs in such HXR sources are in the range of 1010-1013 A. The EC density is in the range of 0.01-1.0 A/m2. We found no correlation between intensity of the HXR sources and the EC density. By comparing pre-flare and post-flare EC maps we did not find evidences of significant dissipation of vertical ECs in the regions corresponding to the HXR sources. In some cases, we found amplification of ECs during flares. We discuss effects of sensitivity and angular resolution of RHESSI and SDO/HMI. In general, the results indicate that there is a link between the flare HXR footpoint sources and enhanced vertical ECs in the photosphere. However, the results do not support a concept of electron acceleration by the electric field excited in footpoints of current-carrying loops due to some (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities (Zaitsev et al., 2016), since strong correlation between the HXR intensity and the EC density is expected in such concept.

  2. Flare magnetic reconnection fluxes as possible signatures of flare contributions to gradual SEP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Kazachenko, M.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.

    2017-09-01

    The primary sources of solar energetic (E > 20 MeV) particle (SEP) events are flares and CME-driven shocks. Some studies claim that even up to GeV energies solar flares are major contributors to SEP events. There are several candidate flare processes for producing SEPs, but acceleration in magnetic reconnection regions is probably the most efficient. Previous studies have relied on flare radiation signatures to determine the times and locations of SEP injections. An alternative approach is to use the amount of magnetic flux that gets reconnected during solar flares. The photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons is thought to be directly related to the amount of magnetic reconnection in the corona and is therefore a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes in flares and CMEs. We use the database of flare magnetic reconnection fluxes to compare these parameters with peak intensities of SEP events. We find that while sizes of 15 ∼25-MeV SEP events in the western hemisphere correlate with both CME speeds and reconnection fluxes, there are many cases of large reconnection fluxes with no observed SEP events. The occurrence of large reconnection fluxes accompanied by slow CMEs but no SEP events suggests that the CME shocks are the primary, if not the only, sources of high energy (E > 100 MeV) SEP events.

  3. Numerical Prediction for the Size and Shape of a Flare in a Cross–Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Vicente y Rodríguez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A computational fluid–dynamics model is used to simulate the turbulent combustion in a flare exposed to a cross–wind. Our research is mostly focused on the cross flow velocity influence to flame aerodynamics. The flow simulation is performed as three dimensional along a Cartesian coordinates system. In order to simulate the combustion process, a fast–chemistry model with a 1–step global irreversible reaction to form CO2 and H2O is used. A radiation model is used to identify the mean flame trajectory. The simulated configuration consists in a propane discharge into an air stream, get ting oxygen supply from the cross–wind. The velocity of this cross–flow is increased from 0.8 m/s to 12 m/s. Comparative analysis of our predicted values with respect to available experimental results shows good agreement in terms of flame length as well as inclination angles.

  4. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF MULTIPLE EVAPORATING RIBBON SOURCES IN A SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D. R.; Cauzzi, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present new results from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) showing the dynamic evolution of chromospheric evaporation and condensation in a flare ribbon, with the highest temporal and spatial resolution to date. IRIS observed the entire impulsive phase of the X-class flare SOL2014-09-10T17:45 using a 9.4 s cadence “sit-and-stare” mode. As the ribbon brightened successively at new positions along the slit, a unique impulsive phase evolution was observed for many tens of individual pixels in both coronal and chromospheric lines. Each activation of a new footpoint displays the same initial coronal upflows of up to ∼300 km s −1 and chromospheric downflows up to 40 km s −1 . Although the coronal flows can be delayed by over 1 minute with respect to those in the chromosphere, the temporal evolution of flows is strikingly similar between all pixels and consistent with predictions from hydrodynamic flare models. Given the large sample of independent footpoints, we conclude that each flaring pixel can be considered a prototypical, “elementary” flare kernel

  5. THE ROLE OF KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY FOR PRODUCING LOOP-TOP HARD X-RAY SOURCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xia; Yuan, Ding; Xia, Chun; Doorsselaere, Tom Van; Keppens, Rony [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-12-10

    We propose a model for the formation of loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) sources in solar flares through the inverse Compton mechanism, scattering the surrounding soft X-ray (SXR) photons to higher energy HXR photons. We simulate the consequences of a flare-driven energy deposit in the upper chromosphere in the impulsive phase of single loop flares. The consequent chromosphere evaporation flows from both footpoints reach speeds up to hundreds of kilometers per second, and we demonstrate how this triggers Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in the loop top, under mildly asymmetric conditions, or more toward the loop flank for strongly asymmetric cases. The KHI vortices further fragment the magnetic topology into multiple magnetic islands and current sheets, and the hot plasma within leads to a bright loop-top SXR source region. We argue that the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that appears at the loop apex could be an efficient accelerator of non-thermal particles, which the island structures can trap at the loop-top. These accelerated non-thermal particles can upscatter the surrounding thermal SXR photons emitted by the extremely hot evaporated plasma to HXR photons.

  6. Bremsstrahlung Hard X-Rays Produced By Solar Flare Electrons Escaping a High-Temperature Thermal Source

    OpenAIRE

    Nocera, Luigi; Skrynnikov, Yuryi; Somov, Boris

    1988-01-01

    We study the kinetics of energetic electrons escaping from a hot thermal source (T_0=100 keV) along a homogeneous magnetic field and colliding with ambient particles in what is meant to mimic the impulsive phase of a solar flare. We solve analytically the 3-D stationary Fokker-Planck equation and show that collisions create anisotropy in an even almost isotropic boundary distribution of electrons. We finally compute the spectrum and polarization of Bremsstrahlung hard X-rays and show that the...

  7. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    combine to form a single well-defined power- law size distribution over several orders of magnitude in SXR intensity. E.W.C. thanks Karel Schrijver...and Jürg Beer for organizing a series of stimulating ISSI workshops on Extreme Solar Events. We thank Hugh Hudson and Karel Schrijver for helpful

  8. Solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods is presented. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood. (IAA)

  9. The source of visual size adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hang; Kreutzer, Sylvia; Fink, Gereon R; Weidner, Ralph

    2017-12-01

    Size adaptation describes the tendency of the visual system to adjust neural responsiveness of size representations after prolonged exposure to particular stimulations. A larger (or smaller) adaptor stimulus influences the perceived size of a similar test stimulus shown subsequently. Size adaptation may emerge on various processing levels. Functional representations of the adaptor to which the upcoming stimulus is adapted may be coded early in the visual system mainly reflecting retinal size. Alternatively, size adaptation may involve higher order processes that take into account additional information such as an object's estimated distance from the observer, hence reflecting perceived size. The present study investigated whether size adaptation is based on the retinal or the perceived size of an adaptor stimulus. A stimulus' physical and perceived sizes were orthogonally varied using perceived depth via binocular disparity, employing polarized 3D glasses. Four different adaptors were used, which varied in physical size, perceived size, or both. Two pairs of adaptors which were identical in physical size did not cause significantly different adaptation effects although they elicited different perceived sizes which were sufficiently large to produce differential aftereffects when induced by stimuli that physically differed in size. In contrast, there was a significant aftereffect when adaptors differed in physical size but were matched in perceived size. Size adaptation was thus unaffected by perceived size and binocular disparity. Our data suggest that size adaptation emerges from neural stages where information from both eyes is still coded in separate channels without binocular interactions, such as the lateral geniculate nucleus.

  10. A survey of stellar X-ray flares from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue: HIPPARCOS-Tycho cool stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, J. P.; Rosen, S.; Fyfe, D.; Schröder, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The X-ray emission from flares on cool (i.e. spectral-type F-M) stars is indicative of very energetic, transient phenomena, associated with energy release via magnetic reconnection. Aims: We present a uniform, large-scale survey of X-ray flare emission. The XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue and its associated data products provide an excellent basis for a comprehensive and sensitive survey of stellar flares - both from targeted active stars and from those observed serendipitously in the half-degree diameter field-of-view of each observation. Methods: The 2XMM Catalogue and the associated time-series ("light-curve") data products have been used as the basis for a survey of X-ray flares from cool stars in the Hipparcos-Tycho-2 catalogue. In addition, we have generated and analysed spectrally-resolved (i.e. hardness-ratio), X-ray light-curves. Where available, we have compared XMM OM UV/optical data with the X-ray light-curves. Results: Our sample contains ~130 flares with well-observed profiles; they originate from ~70 stars. The flares range in duration from ~103 to ~104 s, have peak X-ray fluxes from ~10-13 to ~10-11erg cm-2 s-1, peak X-ray luminosities from ~1029 to ~1032erg s-1, and X-ray energy output from ~1032 to ~1035 erg. Most of the ~30 serendipitously-observed stars have little previously reported information. The hardness-ratio plots clearly illustrate the spectral (and hence inferred temperature) variations characteristic of many flares, and provide an easily accessible overview of the data. We present flare frequency distributions from both target and serendipitous observations. The latter provide an unbiased (with respect to stellar activity) study of flare energetics; in addition, they allow us to predict numbers of stellar flares that may be detected in future X-ray wide-field surveys. The serendipitous sample demonstrates the need for care when calculating flaring rates, especially when normalising the number of flares to a total

  11. Energy Release in Solar Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Plasma Research, Stanford University P. Kaufmanu CRAA/CNPq -Conseiho lacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico, Slo Paulo, SP, Brasil D.F...In this case, the two flare filaments drift slowly apart (receding from the magnetic neutral line) so that, late in a flare, regions of the...that the soft X-ray emission was confined to an area small compared to the I alpha flaring region and that the images did not increase in size during

  12. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  13. Solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaastra, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis an electrodynamic model for solar flares is developed. The main theoretical achievements underlying the present study are treated briefly and the observable flare parameters are described within the framework of the flare model of this thesis. The flare model predicts large induced electric fields. Therefore, acceleration processes of charged particles by direct electric fields are treated. The spectrum of the accelerated particles in strong electric fields is calculated, 3 with the electric field and the magnetic field perpendicular and in the vicinity of an X-type magnetic neutral line. An electromagnetic field configuration arises in the case of a solar flare. A rising current filament in a quiescent background bipolar magnetic field causes naturally an X-type magnetic field configuration below the filament with a strong induced electric field perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. This field configuration drives particles and magnetic energy towards the neutral line, where a current sheet is generated. The global evolution of the fields in the flare is determined by force balance of the Lorentz forces on the filament and the force balance on the current sheet. The X-ray, optical and radio observations of a large solar flare on May 16, 1981 are analyzed. It is found that these data fit the model very well. (Auth.)

  14. Source term estimation for small sized HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.

    1992-08-01

    Accidents which have to be considered are core heat-up, reactivity transients, water of air ingress and primary circuit depressurization. The main effort of this paper belongs to water/air ingress and depressurization, which requires consideration of fission product plateout under normal operation conditions; for the latter it is clearly shown, that absorption (penetration) mechanisms are much less important than assumed sometimes in the past. Source term estimation procedures for core heat-up events are shortly reviewed; reactivity transients are apparently covered by them. Besides a general literature survey including identification of areas with insufficient knowledge this paper contains some estimations on the thermomechanical behaviour of fission products in water in air ingress accidents. Typical source term examples are also presented. In an appendix, evaluations of the AVR experiments VAMPYR-I and -II with respect to plateout and fission product filter efficiency are outlined and used for a validation step of the new plateout code SPATRA. (orig.)

  15. MINIFILAMENT ERUPTION AS THE SOURCE OF A BLOWOUT JET, C-CLASS FLARE, AND TYPE-III RADIO BURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Li, Haidong; Xu, Zhe, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China); Center for Astronomical Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2017-01-20

    We report a strong minifilament eruption associated with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite C1.6 flare and WIND type-III radio burst. The minifilament, which lies at the periphery of active region 12259, is detected by H α images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. The minifilament undergoes a partial and then a full eruption. Simultaneously, two co-spatial jets are successively observed in extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamic Observatory . The first jet exhibits a typical fan-spine geometry, suggesting that the co-spatial minifilament is possibly embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine structure. However, the second jet displays blowout morphology when the entire minifilament erupts upward, leaving behind a hard X-ray emission source in the base. Differential emission measure analyses show that the eruptive region is heated up to about 4 MK during the fan-spine jet, while up to about 7 MK during the blowout jet. In particular, the blowout jet is accompanied by an interplanetary type-III radio burst observed by WIND /WAVES in the frequency range from above 10 to 0.1 MHz. Hence, the minifilament eruption is correlated with the interplanetary type-III radio burst for the first time. These results not only suggest that coronal jets can result from magnetic reconnection initiated by erupting minifilaments with open fields, but also shed light on the potential influence of minifilament eruption on interplanetary space.

  16. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  17. 'Crystal Collimator' Measurement of CESR particle-beam Source Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Bazarov, Ivan; White, Jeffrey; Revesz, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We have measured electron and positron beam source size at CHESS when the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) is run dedicated for the production of synchrotron radiation. Horizontal source size at several beamlines is expected to shrink by a factor of two but synchrotron (visible) light measurements only provide the vertical size. Therefore a 'crystal collimator' using two Bragg reflection in dispersive (+,+) orientation has been built to image the horizontal (vertical) source by passing x-rays parallel to within 5 microradians to an imaging screen and camera. With the 'crystal collimator' we observe rms sizes of 1.2 mm horizontal by 0.28 mm vertical, in good agreement with the 1.27 mm size calculated from lattice functions, and 0.26 mm observed using a synchrotron light interferometer

  18. Source of finance, growth and firm size: Evidence from China

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jun; Girma, Sourafel

    2009-01-01

    Using a comprehensive firm-level dataset spanning the period 1998-2005, this paper provides a thorough investigation of the relationship between firm size, total factor productivity growth and financial structure in China, controlling for the endogeneity of the latter. Generally, it finds financing source matters for firms of different size, and the extent to which financing source matters for firm growth is greater for small firms than big firms. Self-raised finance appears to be most effect...

  19. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H-, D-) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  20. A Statistical Study of Flare Productivity Associated with Sunspot Properties in Different Magnetic Types of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Yu, Hsiu-Shan; Chen, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    It is often believed that intense flares preferentially originate from the large-size active regions (ARs) with strong magnetic fields and complex magnetic configurations. This work investigates the dependence of flare activity on the AR properties and clarifies the influence of AR magnetic parameters on the flare productivity, based on two data sets of daily sunspot and flare information as well as the GOES soft X-ray measurements and HMI vector magnetograms. By considering the evolution of magnetic complexity, we find that flare behaviors are quite different in the short- and long-lived complex ARs and the ARs with more complex magnetic configurations are likely to host more impulsive and intense flares. Furthermore, we investigate several magnetic quantities and perform the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to examine the similarity/difference between two populations in different types of ARs. Our results demonstrate that the total source field strength on the photosphere has a good correlation with the flare activity in complex ARs. It is noted that intense flares tend to occur at the regions of strong source field in combination with an intermediate field-weighted shear angle. This result implies that the magnetic free energy provided by a complex AR could be high enough to trigger a flare eruption even with a moderate magnetic shear on the photosphere. We thus suggest that the magnetic free energy represented by the source field rather than the photospheric magnetic complexity is a better quantity to characterize the flare productivity of an AR, especially for the occurrence of intense flares.

  1. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF FLARE PRODUCTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH SUNSPOT PROPERTIES IN DIFFERENT MAGNETIC TYPES OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ya-Hui [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Min-Shiu [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320 (United States); Yu, Hsiu-Shan [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Chen, P. F., E-mail: yhyang@jupiter.ss.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsieh2@alaska.edu, E-mail: hsyu@ucsd.edu, E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-01-10

    It is often believed that intense flares preferentially originate from the large-size active regions (ARs) with strong magnetic fields and complex magnetic configurations. This work investigates the dependence of flare activity on the AR properties and clarifies the influence of AR magnetic parameters on the flare productivity, based on two data sets of daily sunspot and flare information as well as the GOES soft X-ray measurements and HMI vector magnetograms. By considering the evolution of magnetic complexity, we find that flare behaviors are quite different in the short- and long-lived complex ARs and the ARs with more complex magnetic configurations are likely to host more impulsive and intense flares. Furthermore, we investigate several magnetic quantities and perform the two-sample Kolmogorov–Smirnov test to examine the similarity/difference between two populations in different types of ARs. Our results demonstrate that the total source field strength on the photosphere has a good correlation with the flare activity in complex ARs. It is noted that intense flares tend to occur at the regions of strong source field in combination with an intermediate field-weighted shear angle. This result implies that the magnetic free energy provided by a complex AR could be high enough to trigger a flare eruption even with a moderate magnetic shear on the photosphere. We thus suggest that the magnetic free energy represented by the source field rather than the photospheric magnetic complexity is a better quantity to characterize the flare productivity of an AR, especially for the occurrence of intense flares.

  2. Effective source size as related to 252Cf neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Nobuo; Enomoto, Shigemasa; Tachikawa, Noboru; Nojiri, Toshiaki.

    1977-01-01

    The effective source size in 252 Cf thermal neutron radiography, relating to its geometrical unsharpness in image formation, is experimentally studied. A neutron radiographic system consists of a 160 μg 252 Cf neutron source, water moderator and divergent cadmium lined collimator. Thermal neutron image detection is performed with using a LiF scintillator and a high speed X-ray film to employ direct exposure method. The modulation transfer function, used for describing image quality, is derived from radiographic image corresponding to a cadmium plate with sharp edge. The modulation transfer function for the system is expressed by the product of the function for both geometrical and inherent unsharpness, and allows isolation of geometrical unsharpness as related to the effective size of the thermal neutron source. It is found to be 80 -- 90% of the collimator inlet diameter. (auth.)

  3. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantz, U., E-mail: ursel.fantz@ipp.mpg.de; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-08

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H{sup −}, D{sup −}) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  4. THE FERMI ALL-SKY VARIABILITY ANALYSIS: A LIST OF FLARING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRANSIENTS IN OUR GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: majello@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: allafort@stanford.edu, E-mail: rolf.buehler@desy.de [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool to systematically study the variability of the gamma-ray sky measured by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. For each direction on the sky, FAVA compares the number of gamma-rays observed in a given time window to the number of gamma-rays expected for the average emission detected from that direction. This method is used in weekly time intervals to derive a list of 215 flaring gamma-ray sources. We proceed to discuss the 27 sources found at Galactic latitudes smaller than 10 Degree-Sign and show that, despite their low latitudes, most of them are likely of extragalactic origin.

  5. THE FERMI ALL-SKY VARIABILITY ANALYSIS: A LIST OF FLARING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRANSIENTS IN OUR GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool to systematically study the variability of the gamma-ray sky measured by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. For each direction on the sky, FAVA compares the number of gamma-rays observed in a given time window to the number of gamma-rays expected for the average emission detected from that direction. This method is used in weekly time intervals to derive a list of 215 flaring gamma-ray sources. We proceed to discuss the 27 sources found at Galactic latitudes smaller than 10° and show that, despite their low latitudes, most of them are likely of extragalactic origin.

  6. Simulations of HXR Foot-point Source Sizes for Modified Thick-target Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, Z.; Varady, Michal; Karlický, Marian; Kašparová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 535-540 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/1680; GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar flares * hard X-rays * foot-point sources Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  7. X-ray line coincidence photopumping in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F. P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Mathioudakis, M.; Rose, S. J.; Flowerdew, J.; Hynes, D.; Christian, D. J.; Nilsen, J.; Johnson, W. R.

    2018-03-01

    Line coincidence photopumping is a process where the electrons of an atomic or molecular species are radiatively excited through the absorption of line emission from another species at a coincident wavelength. There are many instances of line coincidence photopumping in astrophysical sources at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, with the most famous example being Bowen fluorescence (pumping of O III 303.80 Å by He II), but none to our knowledge in X-rays. However, here we report on a scheme where a He-like line of Ne IX at 11.000 Å is photopumped by He-like Na X at 11.003 Å, which predicts significant intensity enhancement in the Ne IX 82.76 Å transition under physical conditions found in solar flare plasmas. A comparison of our theoretical models with published X-ray observations of a solar flare obtained during a rocket flight provides evidence for line enhancement, with the measured degree of enhancement being consistent with that expected from theory, a truly surprising result. Observations of this enhancement during flares on stars other than the Sun would provide a powerful new diagnostic tool for determining the sizes of flare loops in these distant, spatially unresolved, astronomical sources.

  8. CO-ANALYSIS OF SOLAR MICROWAVE AND HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTIONS. II. IN THREE SOURCES OF A FLARING LOOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guangli; Li Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on the spatially resolvable data of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH), co-analysis of solar hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolution is performed in three separate sources located in one looptop (LT) and two footpoints (FPs) of a huge flaring loop in the 2003 October 24 flare. The RHESSI image spectral evolution in 10-100 keV is always fitted by the well-known soft-hard-soft (SHS) pattern in the three sources. When the total energy is divided into four intervals similar to the Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope, i.e., 12.5-32.5 keV, 32.5-52.5 keV, 52.5-72.5 keV, and 72.5-97.5 keV, the SHS pattern in lower energies is converted gradually to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern in higher energies in all three sources. However, the break energy in the LT and the northeast FP (∼32.5 keV) is evidently smaller than that in the southwest FP (∼72.5 keV). Regarding microwave spectral evolution of the NoRH data, the well-known soft-hard-harder pattern appeared in the southwest FP, while the HSH pattern coexisted in the LT and the northeast FP. The different features of the hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions in the three sources may be explained by the loop-loop interaction with another huge loop in the LT and with a compact loop in the northeast FP, where the trapping effect is much stronger than that in the southwest FP. The comparison between the LT and FP spectral indices suggests that the radiation mechanism of X-rays may be quite different in different energy intervals and sources. The calculated electron spectral indices from the predicted mechanisms of X-rays gradually become closer to those from the microwave data with increasing X-ray energies.

  9. Evidence of significant energy input in the late phase of a solar flare from NuSTAR x-ray observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.

    2017-01-01

    STAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.......We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium......-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused...

  10. COPD flare-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms and signs of a COPD flare-up. Warning Signs of COPD Flare-up Signs of a ... 25321320 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25321320 . Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) website. ...

  11. A search for flaring Very-High-Energy cosmic-ray sources with the L3+C muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiarusi, T; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, H; Grabosch, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberría, M I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, i; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmitt, V; Schöneich, B; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R F; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L

    2006-01-01

    The L3+C muon detector at the Cern electron-position collider, LEP, is used for the detection of very-high-energy cosmic \\gamma-ray sources through the observation of muons of energies above 20, 30, 50 and 100 GeV. Daily or monthly excesses in the rate of single-muon events pointing to some particular direction in the sky are searched for. The periods from mid July to November 1999, and April to November 2000 are considered. Special attention is also given to a selection of known \\gamma-ray sources. No statistically significant excess is observed for any direction or any particular source.

  12. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman MT (United States); Cassak, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown WV (United States); Priest, Eric R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-20

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s{sup −1}. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  13. Flares from a new Integral hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808, likely associated with the ROSAT source SBM 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kretschmar, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Hermsen, W.

    2004-01-01

    This new hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808, is positionally coincident with a faint ROSAT source listed as no. 10 in the catalogue of sources in the Galactic Center region by Sidoli, Belloni & Mereghetti 2001, A&A 368, 835 and as 2RXP J174040.9-280852 in the ROSAT Source Browser. No other observ...

  14. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Montani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼1015 cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼109, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  15. EFFECTIVE SOURCE SIZES OF LOW RAPIDITY SOFT PARTICLE-EMISSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PEITZMANN, T; ALBRECHT, R; AWES, TC; BECKMANN, P; BERGER, F; BLOOMER, M; BLUME, C; BOCK, D; BOCK, R; CLAESSON, G; CLEWING, G; DRAGON, L; EKLUND, A; FERGUSON, RL; FRANZ, A; GARPMAN, S; GLASOW, R; GUSTAFSSON, HA; GUTBROD, HH; HOLKER, G; IDH, J; JACOBS, P; KAMPERT, KH; KOLB, BW; LOHNER, H; LUND, [No Value; OBENSHAIN, FE; OSKARSSON, A; OTTERLUND, [No Value; PLASIL, F; POSKANZER, AM; PURSCHKE, M; ROTERS, B; SAINI, S; SANTO, R; SCHMIDT, HR; SORENSEN, SP; STEFFENS, K; STEINHAEUSER, P; STENLUND, E; STUKEN, D; YOUNG, GR

    1994-01-01

    Correlations of positive pions and protons measured with the Plastic Ball detector in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied. Source parameters are extracted for various projectile-target combinations. While the proton source can be explained by geometry, the pion source shows more

  16. Optical spectrum of the HDE 245770 and X-ray flares of the transient sources A 0535+26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aab, O.Eh.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation results are presented for the optical component of the transient X-ray source A 0535+26, the Be star HDE 245770. The investigation is based on the spectrograms with dispersions 9, 14 and 28 A/mm obtained during three years with the 6-meter telescope. A list of lines and their parameters within the range lambdalambda 3450-7000 A is given. Variability of the spectrum for the three years and a violent change in the spectrum in January 1981 are noted

  17. The Relationship of Body Size and Adiposity to Source of Self-Esteem in College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncur, Breckann; Bailey, Bruce W.; Lockhart, Barbara D.; LeCheminant, James D.; Perkins, Annette E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies looking at self-esteem and body size or adiposity generally demonstrate a negative relationship. However, the relationship between the source of self-esteem and body size has not been examined in college women. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of body size and adiposity to source of…

  18. The regulatory context of gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, B.S.; Cook, C.

    1999-01-01

    The legislative and regulatory regime regarding gas flaring in Alberta was reviewed. The issue of gas flaring has received much attention from petroleum industry regulators in Alberta. Residents living in the vicinity of flares have identified them as sources of odour, smoke, noise and air quality-related health concerns. Sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide emissions from the flare stacks may contribute to acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The Strosher Report, released by the Alberta Research Council in 1996, has also identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other products of incomplete combustion. The public opposition to solution gas flaring has caused regulators to consider new options designed to reduce the adverse economic and environmental impacts that may be associated with gas flaring. This paper discusses the roles of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection in administering legislation that impacts on gas flaring. In March 1999, the EUB released a guide containing the following five major points regarding gas flaring: (1) implementation of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance's (CASA's) recommendations to eventually eliminate flaring, by starting immediately to reduce flaring, and improve the efficiency of flares, (2) adoption of the CASA schedule of reduction targets for solution gas flaring, (3) conducting a review of the current approval process for small-scale electrical generation systems to encourage co-generation as a productive use of solution gas that is being flared, (4) creating better public notification requirements for new and existing facilities, and (5) discussing conflict resolution between operators and landowners. 26 refs

  19. Toxicity of Flare and Crude Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja V. Cook

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of whole, saturate, and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures from flare pit and crude oil sources were evaluated using Lumbricus terrestris. Body burden analysis was used to analyze the intrinsic toxicity of the six hydrocarbon mixtures. The major fractions of the whole mixtures, the saturate, and aromatic fractions had different intrinsic toxicities; the aromatics were more toxic than the saturates. The toxicity of the saturate and aromatic fractions also differed between the mixtures. The flare saturate mixture was more toxic than the crude saturate mixture, while the crude aromatic mixture was more toxic than the flare aromatic mixture. The most dramatic difference in toxicity of the two sources was between the flare whole and crude whole mixtures. The crude whole mixture was very toxic; the toxicity of this mixture reflected the toxicity of the crude aromatic fraction. However, the flare whole mixture was not toxic, due to a lack of partitioning from the whole mixture into the lipid membrane of the exposed worms. This lack of partitioning appears to be related to the relatively high concentrations of asphaltenes and polar compounds in the flare pit whole mixture.

  20. Investigation of Relationship between High-energy X-Ray Sources and Photospheric and Helioseismic Impacts of X1.8 Solar Flare of 2012 October 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Zimovets, I. V. [Space Research Institute (IKI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G.; Sadykov, V. M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Myshyakov, I. I., E-mail: ivan.sharykin@phystech.edu [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Research (ISTP) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    The X-class solar flare of 2012 October 23 generated continuum photospheric emission and a strong helioseismic wave (“sunquake”) that points to an intensive energy release in the dense part of the solar atmosphere. We study properties of the energy release with high temporal and spatial resolutions, using photospheric data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory , and hard X-ray observations made by RHESSI . For this analysis we use level-1 HMI data (filtergrams), obtained by scanning the Fe i line (6731 Å) with the time cadence of ∼3.6 s and spatial resolution of ∼0.″5 per pixel. It is found that the photospheric disturbances caused by the flare spatially coincide with the region of hard X-ray emission but are delayed by ≲4 s. This delay is consistent with predictions of the flare hydrodynamics RADYN models. However, the models fail to explain the magnitude of variations observed by the HMI. The data indicate that the photospheric impact and helioseismic wave might be caused by the electron energy flux, which is substantially higher than that in the current flare radiative hydrodynamic models.

  1. EVIDENCE OF SIGNIFICANT ENERGY INPUT IN THE LATE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM NuSTAR X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Hannah, Iain G.; Wright, Paul J. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Glesener, Lindsay [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Hudson, Hugh S.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1216 E. California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J. [Physics Department and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray ( NuSTAR ) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/ AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 10{sup 46} cm{sup −3}, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  2. Recent big flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Fumio; Miyazawa, Masahide; Yamaguchi, Yoshisuke

    1978-01-01

    The features of three big solar flares observed at Tokyo Observatory are described in this paper. The active region, McMath 14943, caused a big flare on September 16, 1977. The flare appeared on both sides of a long dark line which runs along the boundary of the magnetic field. Two-ribbon structure was seen. The electron density of the flare observed at Norikura Corona Observatory was 3 x 10 12 /cc. Several arc lines which connect both bright regions of different magnetic polarity were seen in H-α monochrome image. The active region, McMath 15056, caused a big flare on December 10, 1977. At the beginning, several bright spots were observed in the region between two main solar spots. Then, the area and the brightness increased, and the bright spots became two ribbon-shaped bands. A solar flare was observed on April 8, 1978. At first, several bright spots were seen around the solar spot in the active region, McMath 15221. Then, these bright spots developed to a large bright region. On both sides of a dark line along the magnetic neutral line, bright regions were generated. These developed to a two-ribbon flare. The time required for growth was more than one hour. A bright arc which connects two ribbons was seen, and this arc may be a loop prominence system. (Kato, T.)

  3. Point source atom interferometry with a cloud of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoth, Gregory W., E-mail: gregory.hoth@nist.gov; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a two axis gyroscope by the use of light pulse atom interferometry with an expanding cloud of atoms in the regime where the cloud has expanded by 1.1–5 times its initial size during the interrogation. Rotations are measured by analyzing spatial fringe patterns in the atom population obtained by imaging the final cloud. The fringes arise from a correlation between an atom's initial velocity and its final position. This correlation is naturally created by the expansion of the cloud, but it also depends on the initial atomic distribution. We show that the frequency and contrast of these spatial fringes depend on the details of the initial distribution and develop an analytical model to explain this dependence. We also discuss several challenges that must be overcome to realize a high-performance gyroscope with this technique.

  4. Distribution of dislocation source length and the size dependent yield strength in freestanding thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shishvan, Siamak Soleymani; Van der Giessen, Erik

    A method is proposed to estimate the size-dependent yield strength of columnar-grained freestanding thin films. The estimate relies on assuming a distribution of the size of Frank-Read sources, which is then translated into a log-normal distribution of the source strength, depending on film

  5. Effect of source and seed size on yield component of corn S.C704 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seed source of corn production (hybrid SC704), desirable seed size and the relationship between seed vigor and seed size on the grain yield of field corn conducted at the Agricultural Research center, Safiabad Dezful in 2008 with 3 replicates was evaluated. In this study, seed source (Khoozestan, Moghan and Khorasan) ...

  6. Gas flaring: Carbon dioxide contribution to global warming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flaring been a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide, is a concern to skeptics and local oil producing communities as a significant contributor to global warming, environmental degradation, health risk and economic loss. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the impacts of gas flaring on global warming and the local ...

  7. Proton solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikova, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of proton solar flares have been carried out in 1950-1958 using the extrablackout coronograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory. The experiments permit to determine two characteristic features of flares: the directed motion of plasma injection flux from the solar depths and the appearance of a shock wave moving from the place of the injection along the solar surface. The appearance of the shock wave is accompanied by some phenomena occuring both in the sunspot zone and out of it. The consistent flash of proton flares in the other groups of spots, the disappearance of fibres and the appearance of eruptive prominences is accomplished in the sunspot zone. Beyond the sunspot zone the flares occur above spots, the fibres disintegrate partially or completely and the eruptive prominences appear in the regions close to the pole

  8. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  9. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  10. Radio-flaring Ultracool Dwarf Population Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Route, Matthew, E-mail: mroute@purdue.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Over a dozen ultracool dwarfs (UCDs), low-mass objects of spectral types ≥M7, are known to be sources of radio flares. These typically several-minutes-long radio bursts can be up to 100% circularly polarized and have high brightness temperatures, consistent with coherent emission via the electron cyclotron maser operating in approximately kilogauss magnetic fields. Recently, the statistical properties of the bulk physical parameters that describe these UCDs have become described adequately enough to permit synthesis of the population of radio-flaring objects. For the first time, I construct a Monte Carlo simulator to model the population of these radio-flaring UCDs. This simulator is powered by Intel Secure Key (ISK), a new processor technology that uses a local entropy source to improve random number generation that has heretofore been used to improve cryptography. The results from this simulator indicate that only ∼5% of radio-flaring UCDs within the local interstellar neighborhood (<25 pc away) have been discovered. I discuss a number of scenarios that may explain this radio-flaring fraction and suggest that the observed behavior is likely a result of several factors. The performance of ISK as compared to other pseudorandom number generators is also evaluated, and its potential utility for other astrophysical codes is briefly described.

  11. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Solar flare impulsivity and its relationship with white-light flares and with CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Masuda, S.

    2017-12-01

    There are many types of classification in solar flares. One of them is a classification by flare duration in soft X-rays; so-called impulsive flare and long duration event (LDE). Typically, the duration of an impulsive flare is shorter than 1 hour, and that of an LDE is longer than 1 hour. These two types of flare show different characteristics. In soft X-rays, impulsive flares usually have a compact loop structure. On the other hand, LDEs show a large-scale loop, sometimes a large arcade structure. In hard X-rays (HXRs), the difference appears clear, too. The former shows a strong and short-time (10 minutes) emissions and show a large coronal source. These facts suggest that HXR observation becomes one of a good indicator to classify solar flares, especially for the study on the particle acceleration and the related phenomena. However, HXR data do not always exist due to the satellite orbit and the small sensitivity of HXR instruments. So, in this study, based on the concept of the Neupert effect (Neupert, 1968), we use soft X-ray derivative data as the proxy of HXR. From this data, we define impulsivity (IP) for each flare. Then we investigate solar flares using this new index. First we apply IP index to white-light flare (WLF) research. We investigate how WL enhancement depends on IP, then it is found that WLF tend to have large IP values. So the flare impulsivity (IP) is one of the important factors if WL enhancement appears or not in a solar flare. Next we investigate how CME itself and/or its physical parameters depend on IP index. It has been believed that most of CMEs are associated with LDEs, but we found that there is only a weak correlation between the existence of CME and IP index. Finally, we also search for the relationship between WLF and CME as a function of IP and discuss the physical condition of WLF.

  13. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  14. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  15. Relevance of aerosol size spectrum analysis as support to qualitative source apportionment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manigrasso, M.; Febo, A.; Guglielmi, F.; Ciambottini, V.; Avino, P.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a diagnostic methodology in support to source apportionment studies to identify remote and local pollution sources. It is based on the temporal analysis of both PM size distributions and PM size fraction correlation along with natural radioactivity measurements as index of Planetary Boundary Layer dynamic. A correlation drop is indicative of changing aerosol sources. When this observation is coupled with decreasing level of natural radioactivity and increasing aerosol concentration, be it coarse or fine, it is indicative of the inflow of remote polluted air masses. The methodology defines in which size range operates the contribution of remote pollution sources. It was applied to two PM10 pollution episodes: the first involved the advection of coarse PM, the second entailed the inflow of two air masses, one transporting coarse dust and the other fine PM. Dust models and backward trajectories analysis confirmed such results, indicating the air mass provenience. - Highlights: ► Tool as a qualitative support to source apportionment studies. ► Time and size resolved aerosol and natural radioactivity measurements. ► Methodology gives immediate information on PM presence from local/remote sources. ► Long range transport episodes are demonstrated without any chemical analysis. ► Dust models and backward-trajectory analysis used for confirming the results found. - Long range transport episodes are clearly demonstrated by time and size resolved aerosol and natural radioactivity measurements without any chemical analysis.

  16. Technical Overview and First Results of the Half-Size ITER NNBI Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froeschle, M.; Leyer, S.; Franzen, P.; Martens, Ch.; Speth, E.; Heinemann, B.; Falter, H.D.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.

    2006-01-01

    IPP Garching is currently developing a RF driven negative ion source for the ITER neutral beam injection system as an alternative to the presently foreseen filamented source. The RF source has demonstrated the ITER requirements concerning negative ion current and electron/ion ratio at the required source pressure for small pulse length and small extraction area. The next goals are the extension to long pulses and large area sources at two further test facilities. The Half-Size source at the test bed RADI, recently commissioned at the IPP Garching, has roughly half the size of the ITER source. It is devoted to demonstrate the required plasma homogeneity of a large RF driven source, to test an ITER relevant RF circuit and to show the scalability of the IPP RF source. Having no large area extraction the source performance will be demonstrated with an extensive diagnostic and modeling program. This paper will present the results of the first plasma discharges and describe the main technical features of RADI. (author)

  17. Variable Step-Size Method Based on a Reference Separation System for Source Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional variable step-size methods are effective to solve the problem of choosing step-size in adaptive blind source separation process. But the initial setting of learning rate is vital, and the convergence speed is still low. This paper proposes a novel variable step-size method based on reference separation system for online blind source separation. The correlation between the estimated source signals and original source signals increases along with iteration. Therefore, we introduce a reference separation system to approximately estimate the correlation in terms of mean square error (MSE, which is utilized to update the step-size. The use of “minibatches” for the computation of MSE can reduce the complexity of the algorithm to some extent. Moreover, simulations demonstrate that the proposed method exhibits superior convergence and better steady-state performance over the fixed step-size method in the noise-free case, while converging faster than classical variable step-size methods in both stationary and nonstationary environments.

  18. Evolution in linear sizes and the Faraday effects in radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anene, G.; Ugwoke, A.C.

    2001-05-01

    It is still a matter of conjecture whether the observed depolarization in radio sources originate from an external Faraday screen lying in our line of sight, or is largely due to internal processes occurring within these sources. This paper argues for an external origin. By applying recent evidences from the evolution of linear sizes while allowing for selection effects, it is shown that the density parameters within radio sources do not depend on redshift, implying that the observed depolarizations is epoch independent and may therefore, be largely external in origin. We also show that the observed low correlation between λ 1/2 and linear size(D) cannot be improved much even when allowance is made for evolution in D. (author)

  19. Metre-wavelength fine structure in 30 extragalactic radio sources with sizes of a few arcsec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banhatti, D.G.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Pramesh Rao, A.

    1983-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations at 327 MHz of an unbiased sample of 30 extragalactic radio sources having overall sizes between 1 and 4 arcsec, and flux densities greater than 1 Jy at 327 MHz are reported. From VLBI observations, these sources have been reported to contain compact components of sizes < approx.= to 0.02 arcsec contributing on an average about 25 per cent of the total emission at 5 HGz. The IPS observations show that about 45 per cent of the total emission at 327 MHz arises from structures of sizes between 0.05 and 0.5 arcsec (corresponding typically to 0.5 to 5 kpc). A comparison of the VLBI and IPS results indicates that the VLBI and IPS components probably refer to the same physical features in these sources. (author)

  20. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J.M.; Grenier, I.A.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Tibaldo, L.

    2011-01-01

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10 15 electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 * 10 -2 parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory. (authors)

  1. Dynamics of flare sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable pass-band filters, multi-slit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronographs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occured between 1969-1974 we conclude that (i) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (ii) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumably magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the material draining back down along one or both legs of the loop. (orig.)

  2. Stabilization of microgrid with intermittent renewable energy sources by SMES with optimal coil size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saejia, M.; Ngamroo, I.

    2011-01-01

    A controller design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is proposed. The structure of a power controller is the practical proportional-integral (PI). The PI parameters and coil size are tuned by a particle swarm optimization. The proposed method is able to effectively alleviate power fluctuations. It is well known that the superconducting coil is the vital part of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit. This paper deals with the power controller design of a SMES unit with an optimal coil size for stabilization of an isolated microgrid. The study microgrid consists of renewable energy sources with intermittent power outputs i.e., wind and photovoltaic. Since power generations from such renewable sources are unpredictable and variable, these result in power fluctuations in a microgrid. To stabilize power fluctuations, a SMES unit with a fast control of active and reactive power can be applied. The structure of a power controller is the practical proportional-integral (PI). Based on the minimization of the variance of power fluctuations from renewable sources as well as the initial stored energy of SMES, the optimal PI parameters and coil size are automatically and simultaneously tuned by a particle swarm optimization. Simulation studies show that the proposed SMES controller with an optimal coil size is able to effectively alleviate power fluctuations under various power patterns from intermittent renewable sources.

  3. E-line: A new crystal collimator beam line for source size measurements at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Jeffrey A.; Revesz, Peter; Finkelstein, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A new X-ray beam line has been constructed at cornell high energy synchrotron source (CHESS) to measure the vertical and horizontal source size of the positron particle beam. The cornell laboratory of elementary particle physics (LEPP) operates the storage ring (CESR) for X-ray generation for the CHESS user community by circulating electrons and their antimatter counterpart positrons in counter-rotating beams. As the laboratory reduces the emittances of particle beams to increase X-ray brilliance, there has been an increasing need for diagnostic tools to measure and monitor source size. A beam line front end that accesses the positron synchrotron light has been fitted with an experimental chamber and apparatus of compact design capable of horizontal and vertical source size measurement using the 'crystal collimator' technique, and an additional setup for vertical beam position monitoring using a luminescence-based X-ray video beam position monitoring system. The crystal collimators each consist of two Si(2 2 0) crystals in a dispersive (+,+) arrangement that diffract X-rays to a fluorescent material coated on a view port observed with a CCD camera. Measurements of the positron vertical beam size using the crystal collimation method at E-line are compared with measurements of visible synchrotron light at a remotely located dedicated port on the storage ring

  4. Source and Size of Social Support Network on Sedentary Behavior Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Crush, Elizabeth A

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association of source of social support and size of social support network on sedentary behavior among older adults. Cross-sectional. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2006. 2519 older adults (60+ years). Sedentary behavior was assessed via accelerometry over a 7-day period. Social support was assessed via self-report. Sources evaluated include spouse, son, daughter, sibling, neighbor, church member, and friend. Regarding size of social network, participants were asked, "In general, how many close friends do you have?" Multivariable linear regression. After adjustment, there was no evidence of an association between the size of social support network and sedentary behavior. With regard to specific sources of social support, spousal social support was associated with less sedentary behavior (β = -11.6; 95% confidence interval: -20.7 to -2.5), with evidence to suggest that this was only true for men. Further, an inverse association was observed between household size and sedentary behavior, with those having a greater number of individuals in the house having lower levels of sedentary behavior. These associations occurred independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, age, gender, race-ethnicity, measured body mass index, total cholesterol, self-reported smoking status, and physician diagnosis of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, stroke, cancer, hypertension, or diabetes. Spouse-specific emotion-related social support (particularly for men) and household size were associated with less sedentary behavior.

  5. Flares on a Bp Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    Two large X-ray flares have been reported from the direction of a magnetic B2p star (σ Ori E). Sanz-Forcada et al. have suggested that the flares did not occur on the B2p star but on a companion of late spectral type. A star which is a candidate for a late-type flare star near σ Ori E has recently been identified by Bouy et al. However, based on the properties of the flares, and based on a recent model of rotating magnetospheres, we argue that, rather than attributing the two flares to a late-type dwarf, it is a viable hypothesis that the flares were magnetic phenomena associated with the rotating magnetosphere of the B2p star itself.

  6. FLARES ON A Bp STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    Two large X-ray flares have been reported from the direction of a magnetic B2p star (σ Ori E). Sanz-Forcada et al. have suggested that the flares did not occur on the B2p star but on a companion of late spectral type. A star which is a candidate for a late-type flare star near σ Ori E has recently been identified by Bouy et al. However, based on the properties of the flares, and based on a recent model of rotating magnetospheres, we argue that, rather than attributing the two flares to a late-type dwarf, it is a viable hypothesis that the flares were magnetic phenomena associated with the rotating magnetosphere of the B2p star itself.

  7. Optimal sizing of a multi-source energy plant for power heat and cooling generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, E.S.; Dai, Y.J.; Morini, M.; Pinelli, M.; Spina, P.R.; Sun, P.; Wang, R.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-source systems for the fulfilment of electric, thermal and cooling demand of a building can be based on different technologies (e.g. solar photovoltaic, solar heating, cogeneration, heat pump, absorption chiller) which use renewable, partially renewable and fossil energy sources. Therefore, one of the main issues of these kinds of multi-source systems is to find the appropriate size of each technology. Moreover, building energy demands depend on the climate in which the building is located and on the characteristics of the building envelope, which also influence the optimal sizing. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of different climatic scenarios on the multi-source energy plant sizing. For this purpose a model has been developed and has been implemented in the Matlab ® environment. The model takes into consideration the load profiles for electricity, heating and cooling for a whole year. The performance of the energy systems are modelled through a systemic approach. The optimal sizing of the different technologies composing the multi-source energy plant is investigated by using a genetic algorithm, with the goal of minimizing the primary energy consumption only, since the cost of technologies and, in particular, the actual tariff and incentive scenarios depend on the specific country. Moreover economic considerations may lead to inadequate solutions in terms of primary energy consumption. As a case study, the Sino-Italian Green Energy Laboratory of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University has been hypothetically located in five cities in different climatic zones. The load profiles are calculated by means of a TRNSYS ® model. Results show that the optimal load allocation and component sizing are strictly related to climatic data (e.g. external air temperature and solar radiation)

  8. Search for neutrinos from flaring blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreter, Michael [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Eberl, Thomas; James, Clancy [ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are among the best candidates for the recently detected extraterrestrial neutrino flux. Hadronic AGN jet-emission models predict a tight correlation between the neutrino flux and the time-variable gamma-ray emission. At the same time, the atmospheric-background (noise) signal, which often dominates in neutrino-astronomical observations, can be substantially reduced by rejecting long-lasting periods of low flux. For these reasons, short high-amplitude gamma-ray flares, as often observed in blazars, can be used to substantially increase the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes in point-source searches. We develop a strategy to search for TeV neutrinos from flaring blazar jets from the TANAMI sample using the ANTARES telescope and Fermi gamma-ray light curves. An unbinned maximum-likelihood method is applied to optimize the probability of a neutrino detection from TANAMI sources.

  9. Coherent-phase or random-phase acceleration of electron beams in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.; Montello, Maria L.

    1994-01-01

    Time structures of electron beam signatures at radio wavelengths are investigated to probe correlated versus random behavior in solar flares. In particular we address the issue whether acceleration and injection of electron beams is coherently modulated by a single source, or whether the injection is driven by a stochastic (possibly spatially fragmented) process. We analyze a total of approximately = 6000 type III bursts observed by Ikarus (Zurich) in the frequency range of 100-500 MHz, during 359 solar flares with simultaneous greater than or = 25 keV hard X-ray emission, in the years 1890-1983. In 155 flares we find a total of 260 continuous type III groups, with an average number of 13 +/- 9 bursts per group, a mean duration of D = 12 +/- 14 s, a mean period of P = 2.0 +/- 1.2 s, with the highest burst rate at a frequency of nu = 310 +/- 120 MHz. Pulse periods have been measured between 0.5 and 10 s, and can be described by an exponential distribution, i.e., N(P) varies as e (exp -P/1.0s). The period shows a frequency dependence of P(nu)=46(exp-0.6)(sub MHz)s for different flares, but is invariant during a particular flare. We measure the mean period P and its standard deviation sigma (sub p) in each type III group, and quantify the degree of periodicity (or phase-coherence) by the dimensionless parameter sigma (sub p)P. The representative sample of 260 type III burst groups shows a mean periodicity of sigma (sub p/P) = 0.37 +/- 0.12, while Monte Carlo simulations of an equivalent set of truly random time series show a distinctly different value of sigma (sub p)P = 0.93 +/- 0.26. This result indicates that the injection of electron beams is coherently modulated by a particle acceleration source which is either compact or has a global organization on a timescale of seconds, in contrast to an incoherent acceleration source, which is stochastic either in time or space. We discuss the constraints on the size of the acceleration region resulting from electron beam

  10. A New 3D Maser Code Applied to Flaring Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, M. D.; Mason, L.; Etoka, S.

    2018-03-01

    We set out the theory and discretization scheme for a new finite-element computer code, written specifically for the simulation of maser sources. The code was used to compute fractional inversions at each node of a 3-D domain for a range of optical thicknesses. Saturation behaviour of the nodes with regard to location and optical depth were broadly as expected. We have demonstrated via formal solutions of the radiative transfer equation that the apparent size of the model maser cloud decreases as expected with optical depth as viewed by a distant observer. Simulations of rotation of the cloud allowed the construction of light-curves for a number of observable quantities. Rotation of the model cloud may be a reasonable model for quasi-periodic variability, but cannot explain periodic flaring.

  11. X-ray intensity and source size characterizations for the 25 kV upgraded Manson source at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, G; Lake, P; Gard, P; Dunham, G; Nielsen-Weber, L; Wu, M; Norris, E

    2016-11-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories, the x-ray generator Manson source model 5 was upgraded from 10 to 25 kV. The purpose of the upgrade is to drive higher characteristics photon energies with higher throughput. In this work we present characterization studies for the source size and the x-ray intensity when varying the source voltage for a series of K-, L-, and M-shell lines emitted from Al, Y, and Au elements composing the anode. We used a 2-pinhole camera to measure the source size and an energy dispersive detector to monitor the spectral content and intensity of the x-ray source. As the voltage increases, the source size is significantly reduced and line intensity is increased for the three materials. We can take advantage of the smaller source size and higher source throughput to effectively calibrate the suite of Z Pulsed Power Facility crystal spectrometers.

  12. Extremely Rapid X-Ray Flares of TeV Blazars in the RXTE Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S. F.; Xue, Y. Q.; Brandt, W. N.; Cui, W.; Wang, Y. J.

    2018-01-01

    Rapid flares from blazars in very high-energy (VHE) γ-rays challenge the common understanding of jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The same population of ultra-relativistic electrons is often thought to be responsible for both X-ray and VHE emission. We thus systematically searched for X-ray flares at sub-hour timescales of TeV blazars in the entire Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer archival database. We found rapid flares from PKS 2005‑489 and S5 0716+714, and a candidate rapid flare from 1ES 1101‑232. In particular, the characteristic rise timescale of PKS 2005‑489 is less than half a minute, which, to our knowledge, is the shortest among known AGN flares at any wavelengths. The timescales of these rapid flares indicate that the size of the central supermassive black hole is not a hard lower limit on the physical size of the emission region of the flare. PKS 2005‑489 shows possible hard lags in its flare, which could be attributed to particle acceleration (injection); its flaring component has the hardest spectrum when it first appears. For all flares, the flaring components show similar hard spectra with {{Γ }}=1.7{--}1.9, and we estimate the magnetic field strength B ∼ 0.1–1.0 G by assuming synchrotron cooling. These flares could be caused by inhomogeneity of the jets. Models that can only produce rapid γ-ray flares but little synchrotron activity are less favorable.

  13. Development of compact size penning ion source for compact neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Basanta Kumar; Shyam, Anurag

    2008-12-01

    For long-life operation, easy to mount and compact in size penning type ion sources are widely used in different fields of research such as neutron generators, material research, and surface etching. One penning type ion source has been developed in our laboratory. Applying high voltage of 2 kV between two oppositely biased electrodes and using permanent magnet of 500 gauss magnetic field along the axis, we had produced the glow discharge in the plasma region. The performance of this source was investigated using nitrogen gas. Deuterium ions were produced and extracted on the basis of chosen electrodes and the angle of extraction. Using a single aperture plasma electrode, the beam was extracted along the axial direction. The geometry of plasma electrode is an important factor for the efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma ion source. The extracted ion current depends upon the shape of the plasma meniscus. A concave shaped plasma meniscus produces converged ion beam. The convergence of extracted ions is related to the extraction electrode angle. The greater the angle, the more the beam converges. We had studied experimentally this effect with a compact size penning ion source. The detailed comparison among the different extraction geometry and different electrode angle are discussed in this paper.

  14. Target dependence of proton source sizes at 14.6 A · GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephans, G.S.F.

    1994-01-01

    Relative-momentum correlations have been measured for pairs of protons from central collisions of 14.6 A-GeV/c 28 Si with 27 Al, 107 Ag, and 197 Au nuclei. The protons were detected in a region centered near a laboratory rapidity of 1.2. Theoretical correlation functions are convoluted with the spectrometer response function and fitted to the data to derive the source volume. The fitted radii are corrected for small relativistic effects. The extracted volumes are consistent with a crude geometrical overlap model and depart from π - π and K-K data trends which suggest a source size closer to that of the projectile

  15. Solar Flare Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-20

    were written continuously on magnetic tape, but were saved only if a flare occurred. The data may, of course, be displayed either as spectroheliograms...I1" f443.78 F Y Fe I1 16 SY* 3460.250 S Y Mn II 3 3413.99 F Y P Fe I6 3460.41 S Y 3444.220 S Y 5 II 6 SV Gd 11 731 3444.41 S Y 3460.75’ BIIA F N PGd

  16. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mathioudakis, Mihalis [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Wisniewski, John P. [HL Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Dhillon, Vik S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Marsh, Tom R. [Department of Physics, Gibbet Hill Road, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Brown, Benjamin P., E-mail: adam.f.kowalski@nasa.gov [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10{sup 4} K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100.

  17. Source contributions to the size and composition distribution of urban particulate air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, Michael J.; Cass, Glen R.

    A mechanistic air quality model has been constructed which is capable of predicting the contribution of individual emissions source types to the size- and chemical-composition distribution of airborne particles. This model incorporates all of the major aerosol processes relevant to regional air pollution studies including emissions, transport, deposition, gas-to-particle conversion and fog chemistry. In addition, the aerosol is represented as a source-oriented external mixture which is allowed to age in a more realistic fashion than can be accomplished when fresh particle-phase emissions are averaged into the pre-existing atmospheric aerosol size and composition distribution. A source-oriented external mixture is created by differentiating the primary particles emitted from the following source types: catalyst-equipped gasoline engines, non-catalyst-equipped gasoline engines, diesel engines, meat cooking, paved road dust, crustal material from sources other than paved road dust, and sulfur-bearing particles from fuel burning and industrial processes. Discrete primary seed particles from each of these source types are emitted into a simulation of atmospheric transport and chemical reaction. The individual particles evolve over time in the presence of gas-to-particle conversion processes while retaining information on the initial source from which they were emitted. The source- and age-resolved particle mechanics model is applied to the 1987 August SCAQS episode and comparisons are made between model predictions and observations at Claremont, CA. The model explains the origin of the bimodal character of the sub-micron aerosol size distribution. The mode located between 0.2 and 0.3 μm particle diameter is shaped by transformed emissions from diesel engines and meat cooking operations with lesser contributions from gasolinepowered vehicles and other fuel burning. The larger mode located at 0.7-0.8 μm particle diameter is due to fine particle background aerosol that

  18. An analysis of interplanetary scintillation as a method of measuring the angular sizes of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajivassiliou, C.A.; Duffett-Smith, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation has been widely used at metre wavelengths for estimating the angular sizes of radio sources in the range 0.1-2.0 arcsec. The estimates are based on observations of either the width of the temporal power spectrum or the shape of the scintillation index-elongation curve. We present a mathematical model of the latter procedure which reveals the biases introduced into an IPS survey as a result of the estimation process. (author)

  19. How flares can be understood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severny, A.B.

    1977-01-01

    Specific features of the flare phenomenon which are important for understanding of flares are the following: (1) Fine structure of visible emission of flares, especially at the very beginning and in the pre-flare active region. This structure can be seen also in later stages of development as bright points, some of which exist from the flare beginning (Babin's observations at Crimea, 1972-1976). (2) Turbulent motion with velocities up to 250-300 km s -1 as can be estimated from broadening of emission lines. (3) Predominantly red asymmetry of emission lines in the explosive phase and during further development of flares. (4) 'Supersonic' velocities and supergravitational accelerations of separate moving masses of the flare plasma. (5) The appearance of flares in areas with high grad H, exceeding 0.1 G km -1 which is equivalent to regions of electric currents > approximately 10 11 A. (6) Strong variations of net magnetic flux through the active region, as it follows from Meudon, Crimean, and Sacramento Peak (Rust's) observations. (Auth.)

  20. Source identification and metallic profiles of size-segregated particulate matters at various sites in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Naba; Jain, V K; Srivastava, Arun

    2015-09-01

    A study of elemental composition in the ambient air of Delhi was carried out in the monsoon, winter and summer seasons at four different sites from August 2012 to April 2013 in the size ranges 10 μm using "Dekati PM10" impactor. At each site, three samples were collected and were analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The presence of elements was found to be very common and highly concentrated in aerosol particles at all the sites, which are Na, Al, Si, K, Ca, Zn and Ba. Total suspended particulate matters (TSPMs) of fine particles were found high in comparison to coarse particles at all seasons. The TSPM of fine particles was found to be varied in the range from 303.6 to 416.2 μg/m(3). Similarly, the range of coarse TSPM was observed from 162.9 to 262.8 μg/m(3). Correlation matrices were observed between fine (size ranges 10 μm) size particles for all elements with seasons. Source apportionments of elements were carried out using MS Excel 2010 through XLSTAT software. The source apportionments between fine and coarse particles were carried out through factor analysis and dominated sources found to be crustal re-suspension and industrial activities.

  1. Size, Composition, and Sources of Health Relevant Particulate Matter in the San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Walter Allan

    Particulate Matter (PM) is an environment contaminant that has been associated with adverse health effects in epidemiological and toxicological studies. Atmospheric PM is made up of a diverse array of chemical species that are emitted from multiple sources across a range of aerodynamic diameters spanning several orders of magnitude. The focus of the present work was the characterization of ambient PM with aerodynamic diameters below 1.8 mum (PM1.8) in 6 size sub-fractions including PM0.1. Chemical species measured included organic carbon, elemental carbon, water soluble ions, trace metals, and organic molecular markers in urban and rural environments in the San Joaquin Valley. These measurements were used to determine differences in relative diurnal size distributions during a severe winter stagnation event, seasonal changes in PM size and composition, and the source origin of carbonaceous PM. This size-resolved information was used to calculate lung deposition patterns of health relevant PM species to evaluate seasonal differences in PM dose. By accurately calculating PM dose, researchers are able to more directly link ambient PM characterization data with biological endpoints. All of these results are used to support ongoing toxicological health effects studies. These types of analyses are important as this type of information may assist regulators with developing control strategies to reduce health effects caused by particulate air pollution.

  2. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP)

  3. Analysis of fifty year Gas Flaring Emissions from oil/gas companies in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumbia, E. H. T.; Liousse, C.; Granier, L.; Granier, C.; Rosset, R.; Oda, T.; Hsu, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    Flaring is a process during which waste gases are burned in an open atmosphere. The quantification of gas flaring emissions represents a major scientific concern due to its magnitude and related uncertainties. In global/regional emission inventories, this source, though releasing large amounts of pollutants in the atmosphere, is still poorly quantified if not missing. It can represent the main emission source of gaseous compounds and particles in some areas, as observed during the AMMA project in the Gulf of Guinea. Our study focuses on Africa, and includes Nigeria, which is one of the largest natural oil and gas reserve in the world. Africa is an important gas flaring area, since technologies for the exploitation of this energy source and the reduction of flaring activities have been only recently implemented. We have developed an emission inventory for gases and particles from flaring in Africa. We have first compiled the few published available dataset of fuel consumption from flaring. The spatial distribution of CO2 and black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in 2011 is estimated using a methodology based on field reports and remote sensing (DMSP satellite data). Our results point out to the importance of flaring activities into the regional anthropogenic emissions in Africa over the period 1960-2011. Finally, the contribution of flaring to total anthropogenic emission can be large and needs to be accurately quantified.

  4. Size distribution and source of black carbon aerosol in urban Beijing during winter haze episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfei; Wang, Xiaojia; Tao, Jun; Huang, Rujin; Tian, Ping; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Leiming; Ho, Kin-Fai; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Renjian

    2017-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) has important impact on climate and environment due to its light absorption ability, which greatly depends on its physicochemical properties including morphology, size and mixing state. The size distribution of the refractory BC (rBC) was investigated in urban Beijing in the late winter of 2014, during which there were frequent haze events, through analysis of measurements obtained using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2). By assuming void-free rBC with a density of 1.8 g cm-3, the mass of the rBC showed an approximately lognormal distribution as a function of the volume-equivalent diameter (VED), with a peak diameter of 213 nm. Larger VED values of the rBC were observed during polluted periods than on clean days, implying an alteration in the rBC sources, as the size distribution of the rBC from a certain source was relative stable, and VED of an individual rBC varied little once it was emitted into the atmosphere. The potential source contribution function analysis showed that air masses from the south to east of the observation site brought higher rBC loadings with more thick coatings and larger core sizes. The mean VED of the rBC presented a significant linear correlation with the number fraction of thickly coated rBC, extrapolating to be ˜ 150 nm for the completely non-coated or thinly coated rBC. It was considered as the typical mean VED of the rBC from local traffic sources in this study. Local traffic was estimated to contribute 35 to 100 % of the hourly rBC mass concentration with a mean of 59 % during the campaign. Lower local traffic contributions were observed during polluted periods, suggesting increasing contributions from other sources (e.g., coal combustion and biomass burning) to the rBC. Thus, the heavy pollution in Beijing was greatly influenced by other sources in addition to the local traffic.

  5. Size, Composition, and Source Profiles of Inhalable Bioaerosols from Colorado Dairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, Joshua W; Reynolds, Stephen; Magzamen, Sheryl; VanDyke, Amanda; Gottel, Neil R.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Owens, Sarah M.; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Volckens, John

    2017-06-06

    Particulate matter emissions from agricultural livestock operations contain both chemical and biological constituents that represent a potential human health hazard. The size and composition of these dusts, however, have not been well described. We evaluated the full size distribution (from 0 to 100 μm in aerodynamic diameter) and chemical/biological composition of inhalable dusts inside several Colorado dairy parlors. Four aerodynamic size fractions (<3, 3-10, 10-30, and >30 μm) were collected and analyzed using a combination of physiochemical techniques to understand the structure of bacterial communities and chemical constituents. Airborne particulate mass followed a bimodal size distribution (one mode at 3 μm and a second above 30 μm), which also correlated with the relative concentrations of the following microbiological markers: bacterial endotoxin, 3-hydroxy fatty acids, and muramic acid. Sequencing of the 16S- rRNA components of this aerosol revealed a microbiome derived predominantly from animal sources. Bacterial genera included Staphlyococcus, Pseudomonas, and Streptococcus, all of which have proinflammatory and pathogenic capacity. Our results suggest that the size distribution of bioaerosols emitted by dairy operations extends well above 10 μm in diameter and contains a diverse mixture of potentially hazardous constituents and opportunistic pathogens. These findings should inform the development of more effective emissions control strategies.

  6. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS FROM RECENT BLAZAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halzen, Francis; Kheirandish, Ali [Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The energy density of cosmic neutrinos measured by IceCube matches the one observed by Fermi in extragalactic photons that predominantly originate in blazars. This has inspired attempts to match Fermi sources with IceCube neutrinos. A spatial association combined with a coincidence in time with a flaring source may represent a smoking gun for the origin of the IceCube flux. In 2015 June, the Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an intense flare from blazar 3C 279 that exceeded the steady flux of the source by a factor of 40 for the duration of a day. We show that IceCube is likely to observe neutrinos, if indeed hadronic in origin, in data that are still blinded at this time. We also discuss other opportunities for coincident observations that include a recent flare from blazar 1ES 1959+650 that previously produced an intriguing coincidence with AMANDA observations.

  7. The recent NIR Flare of the Blazar 3C279

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Escobedo, G.; Chavushyan, V.

    2018-02-01

    In our monitoring campaign of AGNs we found the Blazar 3C279 flaring in the NIR on January 27th,2018. this source is cross identified with the quasar HB891253-055 and the Gamma-ray source 3FGLJ1256.1-054.

  8. Health and exposure assessment of flare gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindzierski, W.B.; Byrne-Lewis, C.; Probert, S.

    2000-01-01

    The incomplete combustion of flare gases produces pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are cause for concern for public health. Some of the concerns relate to potential long-term cumulative health effects from exposure to hazardous air pollutants including benzene, styrene, naphthalene, and benzopyrene. This study demonstrated that several factors should be taken into account when considering the importance of flaring and human exposure to flare gas emissions. Most flare stacks are located in rural areas, but most time-availability studies have been done on urban populations where the majority of people spend their time indoors. It was recommended that more time-activity studies are needed to emphasize the behaviour of rural populations which are most susceptible to exposure from pollutants from flaring. It was concluded that higher indoor air concentrations exist for many VOCs and PAHs compared to outdoors, but in these instances, indoor sources are the major contributors to indoor air concentrations. It was recommended that health assessments of hazardous air pollutants emitted from gas flaring has to take into account the indoor setting and other background exposures in order to provide useful information for decision makers. 49 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Theoretical and observational assessments of flare efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahey, D.M.; Preston, K.; Strosher, M.

    2000-01-01

    During the processing of hydrocarbon materials, gaseous wastes are flared in an effort to completely burn the waste material and therefore leave behind very little by-products. Complete combustion, however is rarely successful because entrainment of air into the region of combusting gases restricts flame sizes to less than optimum values. The resulting flames are often too small to dissipate the amount of heat associated with complete (100 per cent) combustion efficiency. Flaring, therefore, often results in emissions of gases with more complex molecular structures than just carbon dioxide and water. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds which are indicative of incomplete combustion are often associated with flaring. This theoretical study of flame efficiencies was based on the knowledge of the full range of chemical reactions and associated kinetics. In this study, equations developed by Leahey and Schroeder were used to estimate flame lengths, areas and volumes as functions of flare stack exit velocity, stoichiometric mixing ratio and wind speed. This was followed by an estimate of heats released as part of the combustion process. This was derived from the knowledge of the flame dimensions together with an assumed flame temperature of 1200 K. Combustion efficiencies were then obtained by taking the ratio of estimated actual heat release values to those associated with complete combustion. It was concluded that combustion efficiency decreases significantly with wind speed increases from 1 to 6 m/s. After that initial increase, combustion efficiencies level off at values between 10 to 15 per cent. Propane and ethane were found to burn more efficiently than methane or hydrogen sulfide. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig., 1 append

  10. Detection of X-ray flares from AX J1714.1-3912, the unidentified source near RX J1713.7-3946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Marco; Bamba, Aya

    2018-04-01

    Context. Molecular clouds are predicted to emit nonthermal X-rays when they are close to particle-accelerating supernova remnants (SNRs), and the hard X-ray source AX J1714.1-3912, near the SNR RX J1713.7-3946, has long been considered a candidate for diffuse nonthermal emission associated with cosmic rays diffusing from the remnant to a closeby molecular cloud. Aim. We aim at ascertaining the nature of this source by analyzing two dedicated X-ray observations performed with Suzaku and Chandra. Methods: We extracted images from the data in various energy bands, spectra, and light curves and studied the long-term evolution of the X-ray emission on the basis of the 4.5 yr time separation between the two observations. Results: We found that there is no diffuse emission associated with AX J1714.1-3912, which is instead the point-like source CXOU J171343.9-391205. We discovered rapid time variability (timescale 103 s), together with a high intrinsic absorption and a hard nonthermal spectrum (power law with photon index Γ 1.4). We also found that the X-ray flux of the source drops down by 1-2 orders of magnitude on a timescale of a few years. Conclusions: Our results suggest a possible association between AX J1714.1-3912 and a previously unknown supergiant fast X-ray transient, although further follow-up observations are necessary to prove this association definitively.

  11. The sun and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased 14 C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind. (U.K.)

  12. Probing the formation of planetesimals in the Galactic Centre using Sgr A* flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, A.S.; Portegies, Zwart S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Flares in X-ray and near-infrared are observed above the quiescent emission of the supermassive black hole (SBH) in the Galactic Centre (GC) at a rate of approximately once per day. One proposed energy source for these flares is the tidal disruption of planetesimals with radius ≳10 km passing within

  13. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  14. Use of simulation in flare countermeasure development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Delport, JP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ● Assume enough flare energy ● Questions addressed ● Timing ● Geometry ● Dispense logic ● Obscuration ● Physics based, spectrally correct ● Question addressed ● Flare spectrum ● Environmental influences © CSIR 2008 AOC Conference – 12 November... November 2008 Slide 12 Engagement Scenarios & Simulations ● Aircraft with flares versus missile ● Flight conditions ● Flare dispense logic ● Flare pod placement, angles ● Multitude of simulated launches ● Visualisation...

  15. Cybele: a large size ion source of module construction for Tore-Supra injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonin, A.; Garibaldi, P.

    2005-01-01

    A 70 keV 40 A hydrogen beam injector has been developed at Cadarache for plasma diagnostic purpose (MSE diagnostic and Charge exchange) on the Tore-Supra Tokamak. This injector daily operates with a large size ions source (called Pagoda) which does not completely fulfill all the requirements necessary for the present experiment. As a consequence, the development of a new ion source (called Cybele) has been underway whose objective is to meet high proton rate (>80%), current density of 160 mA/cm 2 within 5% of uniformity on the whole extraction surface for long shot operation (from 1 to 100 s). Moreover, the main particularity of Cybele is the module construction concept: it is composed of five source modules vertically juxtaposed, with a special orientation which fits the curved extraction surface of the injector; this curvature ensures a geometrical focalization of the neutral beam 7 m downstream in the Tore-Supra chamber. Cybele will be tested first in positive ion production for the Tore-Supra injector, and afterward in negative ion production mode; its modular concept could be advantageous to ensure plasma uniformity on the large extraction surface (about 1 m 2 ) of the ITER neutral beam injector. A module prototype (called the Drift Source) has already been developed in the past and optimized in the laboratory both for positive and negative ion production, where it has met the ITER ion source requirements in terms of D-current density (200 A/m 2 ), source pressure (0.3 Pa), uniformity and arc efficiency (0.015 A D-/kW). (authors)

  16. Solar flares at submillimeter wavelengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krucker, S.; Gimenez de Castro, C.G.; Hudson, H. S.; Trottet, G.; Bastian, T.S.; Hales, A.S.; Kašparová, Jana; Klein, K. L.; Kretzschmar, M.; Luethi, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Pohjolainen, S.; White, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2013), 58/1-58/45 ISSN 0935-4956 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * flares * radio observations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 13.312, year: 2013

  17. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  18. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionments of black carbon aerosols in London during winter time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-06-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterized in both winter and summer time 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However the size distribution of Dc (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different Dc distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), or easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm, and 169 ± 29 nm respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size / BC core - Dp / Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  20. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionment of black carbon aerosol in London during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterised in both winter- and summertime 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However, the size distribution of sf (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different sf distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), and easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm and 169 ± 29 nm, respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size/BC core - Dp/Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  1. [Inaccurate information about the size of the penis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: about 21 information sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Philippe Cilundika; Kazadi, Alex Bukasa

    2016-01-01

    Penis size is a huge topic of anxiety for a lot of men. Some of them are unhappy with their penis size as shown in the study conducted by Tiggemann in 2008. There are relatively few studies on erect penis size. This may reflect cultural taboos of researchers or doctors interacting with men who are in a state of sexual arousal. On the other hand, it is important for people who announce details on penis size to give the average penis size first and then sizes suggested by the researchers. We performed a cross-sectional survey in the two major urban centres of the Democratic Republic of Congo namely Kinshasa and Lubumbashi over a period of two years from May 2014 to May 2016. A total of 21 information sources constituted our sample, 8 in Kinshasa and 13 in Lubumbashi. We found it sufficient because in our culture discussing about sexual matter is rare. The parameters studied were: the nature of the source, the accuracy of the measurement method, the presence of bibliographical reference, the announced penis size. The majority of information sources used were radio or television broadcastings (23,8%); this can be explained by the fact that there are an increasing number of radio and television stations in our country and especially in large cities. With regard to accuracy of information about penis measurement method when sharing the message about penis size, our study showed that the majority of information sources did not indicate it when they announced penis size to the public (85,7%). Several sources did not report bibliographical references (57,1%). Announced data analysis on penis size showed that the average penis size was: 14 cm (28,6%), 15 cm (23,8%) and 15-20 cm (19%). All these results are intended to offer a warning to all players responsible for diffusing information on sexual health (penis size): scientific rigor consists in seeking information from reliable sources.

  2. Critical Height of the Torus Instability in Two-ribbon Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jiajia; Zhou, Zhenjun [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Min, E-mail: rliu@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230601 (China)

    2017-07-01

    We studied the background field for 60 two-ribbon flares of M-and-above classes during 2011–2015. These flares are categorized into two groups, i.e., eruptive and confined flares, based on whether a flare is associated with a coronal mass ejection or not. The background field of source active regions is approximated by a potential field extrapolated from the B {sub z} component of vector magnetograms provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculated the decay index n of the background field above the flaring polarity inversion line, and defined a critical height h {sub crit} corresponding to the theoretical threshold ( n {sub crit} = 1.5) of the torus instability. We found that h {sub crit} is approximately half of the distance between the centroids of opposite polarities in active regions and that the distribution of h {sub crit} is bimodal: it is significantly higher for confined flares than for eruptive ones. The decay index increases monotonously with increasing height for 86% (84%) of the eruptive (confined) flares but displays a saddle-like profile for the rest, 14% (16%), which are found exclusively in active regions of multipolar field configuration. Moreover, n at the saddle bottom is significantly smaller in confined flares than that in eruptive ones. These results highlight the critical role of background field in regulating the eruptive behavior of two-ribbon flares.

  3. ON THE NON-KOLMOGOROV NATURE OF FLARE-PRODUCTIVE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandage, Revati S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, TX 77005-1827 (United States); McAteer, R. T. James, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88001 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    A magnetic power spectral analysis is performed on 53 solar active regions, observed from 2011 August to 2012 July. Magnetic field data obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, inverted as Active Region Patches, are used to study the evolution of the magnetic power index as each region rotates across the solar disk. Active regions are classified based on the numbers and sizes of solar flares they produce in order to study the relationship between flare productivity and the magnetic power index. The choice of window size and inertial range plays a key role in determining the correct magnetic power index. The overall distribution of magnetic power indices has a range of 1.0–2.5. Flare-quiet regions peak at a value of 1.6. However, flare-productive regions peak at a value of 2.2. Overall, the histogram of the distribution of power indices of flare-productive active regions is well separated from flare-quiet active regions. Only 12% of flare-quiet regions exhibit an index greater than 2, whereas 90% of flare-productive regions exhibit an index greater than 2. Flare-quiet regions exhibit a high temporal variance (i.e., the index fluctuates between high and low values), whereas flare-productive regions maintain an index greater than 2 for several days. This shows the importance of including the temporal evolution of active regions in flare prediction studies, and highlights the potential of a 2–3 day prediction window for space weather applications.

  4. Modeling the Soft X-Ray During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Radiation can effect our communication and navigation systems here on Earth. In particular, solar X-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is responsible for ionizing (charging) earth's upper atmosphere, and sudden changes in the ionosphere can disrupt high frequency communication systems (e.g. airplane-to-ground) and degrade the location accuracy for GPS navigation. New soft X-ray flare data are needed to study the sources for the SXR radiation and variability of the solar flares and thus help to answer questions if all flares follow the same trend or have different plasma characteristics? In December 2015, the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) launched from Cape Canaveral Florida to answer those questions. The MinXSS CubeSat is a miniature satellite that was designed to measure the soft X-ray spectra and study flares in the 1-15 Å wavelength range. So far, the CubeSat has observed more than ten flares. The MinXSS flare data are plotted in energy vs irradiance to display the soft X-ray spectra, and these spectra are compared with different types of CHIANTI models of the soft X-ray radiation. One comparison is for non-flaring spectra using AIA EUV images to identify solar features called active regions, coronal holes, and quiet sun, and then using the fractional area of each feature to calculate a CHIANTI-based spectrum. This comparison reveals how important the active region radiation is for the SXR spectra. A second comparison is for flare spectra to several isothermal models that were created using CHIANTI. The isothermal model comparisons were done with both the raw count spectra from MinXSS and the derived irradiance spectra. This dual comparison helps to validate the irradiance conversion algorithm for MinXSS. Comparisons of the MinXSS data to the models show that flares tend to follow a temperature pattern. Analysis of the MinXSS data can help us understand our sun better, could lead to better forecasts of solar flares, and thus

  5. Flare parameters inferred from a 3D loop model database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuambe, Valente A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Simões, P. J. A.

    2018-04-01

    We developed a database of pre-calculated flare images and spectra exploring a set of parameters which describe the physical characteristics of coronal loops and accelerated electron distribution. Due to the large number of parameters involved in describing the geometry and the flaring atmosphere in the model used (Costa et al. 2013), we built a large database of models (˜250 000) to facilitate the flare analysis. The geometry and characteristics of non-thermal electrons are defined on a discrete grid with spatial resolution greater than 4 arcsec. The database was constructed based on general properties of known solar flares and convolved with instrumental resolution to replicate the observations from the Nobeyama radio polarimeter (NoRP) spectra and Nobeyama radio-heliograph (NoRH) brightness maps. Observed spectra and brightness distribution maps are easily compared with the modelled spectra and images in the database, indicating a possible range of solutions. The parameter search efficiency in this finite database is discussed. Eight out of ten parameters analysed for one thousand simulated flare searches were recovered with a relative error of less than 20 per cent on average. In addition, from the analysis of the observed correlation between NoRH flare sizes and intensities at 17 GHz, some statistical properties were derived. From these statistics the energy spectral index was found to be δ ˜ 3, with non-thermal electron densities showing a peak distribution ⪅107 cm-3, and Bphotosphere ⪆2000 G. Some bias for larger loops with heights as great as ˜2.6 × 109 cm, and looptop events were noted. An excellent match of the spectrum and the brightness distribution at 17 and 34 GHz of the 2002 May 31 flare, is presented as well.

  6. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  7. Characterization and source estimation of size-segregated aerosols during 2008-2012 in an urban environment in Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lingda [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materiais Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Wang, Guangfu, E-mail: guangfuw@bnu.edu.cn [Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing (China); Zhang, Renjiang [Key Laboratory of Regional Climate-Environment Research for Temperate Eas tAsia (RCE-TEA), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: During 2008-2012, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using an eight-stage cascade impactor at Beijing Normal University (BNU) Site, China. These samples were analyzed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis for concentrations of 21 elements consisting of Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Ba and Pb. The size-resolved data sets were then analyzed using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) technique in order to identify possible sources and estimate their contribution to particulate matter mass. Nine sources were resolved in eight size ranges (025 ∼ 16μm) and included secondary sulphur, motor vehicles, coal combustion; oil combustion, road dust, biomass burning, soil dust, diesel vehicles and metal processing. PMF analysis of size-resolved source contributions showed that natural sources represented by soil dust and road dust contributed about 57% to the predicted primary particulate matter (PM) mass in the coarse size range(>2μm). On the other hand, anthropogenic sources such as secondary sulphur, coal and oil combustion, biomass burning and motor vehicle contributed about 73% in the fine size range <2μm). The diesel vehicles and secondary sulphur source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size range (<0.25μm) and was responsible for about 52% of the primary PM mass. (author)

  8. Characterization and source estimation of size-segregated aerosols during 2008-2012 in an urban environment in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lingda; Wang, Guangfu; Zhang, Renjiang

    2013-01-01

    Full text: During 2008-2012, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using an eight-stage cascade impactor at Beijing Normal University (BNU) Site, China. These samples were analyzed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis for concentrations of 21 elements consisting of Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Ba and Pb. The size-resolved data sets were then analyzed using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) technique in order to identify possible sources and estimate their contribution to particulate matter mass. Nine sources were resolved in eight size ranges (025 ∼ 16μm) and included secondary sulphur, motor vehicles, coal combustion; oil combustion, road dust, biomass burning, soil dust, diesel vehicles and metal processing. PMF analysis of size-resolved source contributions showed that natural sources represented by soil dust and road dust contributed about 57% to the predicted primary particulate matter (PM) mass in the coarse size range(>2μm). On the other hand, anthropogenic sources such as secondary sulphur, coal and oil combustion, biomass burning and motor vehicle contributed about 73% in the fine size range <2μm). The diesel vehicles and secondary sulphur source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size range (<0.25μm) and was responsible for about 52% of the primary PM mass. (author)

  9. Optimizing the calculation of point source count-centroid in pixel size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Luyi; Kuang Anren; Su Xianyu

    2004-01-01

    Pixel size is an important parameter of gamma camera and SPECT. A number of methods are used for its accurate measurement. In the original count-centroid method, where the image of a point source (PS) is acquired and its count-centroid calculated to represent PS position in the image, background counts are inevitable. Thus the measured count-centroid (X m ) is an approximation of the true count-centroid (X p ) of the PS, i.e. X m =X p + (X b -X p )/(1+R p /R b ), where Rp is the net counting rate of the PS, X b the background count-centroid and Rb the background counting. To get accurate measurement, R p must be very big, which is unpractical, resulting in the variation of measured pixel size. R p -independent calculation of PS count-centroid is desired. Methods: The proposed method attempted to eliminate the effect of the term (X b -X p )/(1 + R p /R b ) by bringing X b closer to X p and by reducing R b . In the acquired PS image, a circular ROI was generated to enclose the PS, the pixel with the maximum count being the center of the ROI. To choose the diameter (D) of the ROI, a Gaussian count distribution was assumed for the PS, accordingly, K=1-(0.5) D/R percent of the total PS counts was in the ROI, R being the full width at half maximum of the PS count distribution. D was set to be 6*R to enclose most (K=98.4%) of the PS counts. The count-centroid of the ROI was calculated to represent X p . The proposed method was tested in measuring the pixel size of a well-tuned SPECT, whose pixel size was estimated to be 3.02 mm according to its mechanical and electronic setting (128 x 128 matrix, 387 mm UFOV, ZOOM=1). For comparison, the original method, which was use in the former versions of some commercial SPECT software, was also tested. 12 PSs were prepared and their image acquired and stored. The net counting rate of the PSs increased from 10 cps to 1183 cps. Results: Using the proposed method, the measured pixel size (in mm) varied only between 3.00 and 3.01 (mean

  10. Optimizing the calculation of point source count-centroid in pixel size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Luyi; Kuang Anren; Su Xianyu

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Pixel size is an important parameter of gamma camera and SPECT. A number of Methods are used for its accurate measurement. In the original count-centroid method, where the image of a point source(PS) is acquired and its count-centroid calculated to represent PS position in the image, background counts are inevitable. Thus the measured count-centroid (Xm) is an approximation of the true count-centroid (Xp) of the PS, i.e. Xm=Xp+(Xb-Xp)/(1+Rp/Rb), where Rp is the net counting rate of the PS, Xb the background count-centroid and Rb the background counting rate. To get accurate measurement, Rp must be very big, which is unpractical, resulting in the variation of measured pixel size. Rp-independent calculation of PS count-centroid is desired. Methods: The proposed method attempted to eliminate the effect of the term (Xb-Xp)/(1+Rp/Rb) by bringing Xb closer to Xp and by reducing Rb. In the acquired PS image, a circular ROI was generated to enclose the PS, the pixel with the maximum count being the center of the ROI. To choose the diameter (D) of the ROI, a Gaussian count distribution was assumed for the PS, accordingly, K=I-(0.5)D/R percent of the total PS counts was in the ROI, R being the full width at half maximum of the PS count distribution. D was set to be 6*R to enclose most (K=98.4%) of the PS counts. The count-centroid of the ROI was calculated to represent Xp. The proposed method was tested in measuring the pixel size of a well-tuned SPECT, whose pixel size was estimated to be 3.02 mm according to its mechanical and electronic setting (128*128 matrix, 387 mm UFOV, ZOOM=1). For comparison, the original method, which was use in the former versions of some commercial SPECT software, was also tested. 12 PSs were prepared and their image acquired and stored. The net counting rate of the PSs increased from 10cps to 1183cps. Results: Using the proposed method, the measured pixel size (in mm) varied only between 3.00 and 3.01( mean= 3.01±0.00) as Rp increased

  11. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  12. H2O maser flare in Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, L.I.; Moran, J.M.; Genzel, R.

    1982-01-01

    The flare of H 2 O maser emission in Orion A was observed with the Crimea--Effelsberg and Haystack--Green Bank interferometers in November 1979. Its position is α = 5/sup h/32/sup m/46/sup s/.6 +- 0/sup s/.06, delta = -5 0 24'.28''.7 +- 1'' (1950.0); its radial velocity, 8 km/sec. The asymmetric line profile has a 28-kHz halfwidth. The flare source comprises a 0''.0005 core (T/sub b/ = 5 x 10 16 0 K) embedded in a 0''.005 halo (T/sub b/ = 3 x 10 14 0 K)

  13. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 Å filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. The time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribbons has a peak near the HXR peak time. The presence of hot plasma in the lower atmosphere is further confirmed by a RHESSI imaging spectroscopy analysis, which shows resolved sources at 11 - 13 MK that are associated with at least one ribbon. We found that collisional beam-heating can only marginally explain the power necessary to heat the 10 MK plasma at the ribbons.

  14. Anti-neutrino imprint in solar neutrino flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, D.

    2006-10-01

    A future neutrino detector at megaton mass might enlarge the neutrino telescope thresholds revealing cosmic supernova background and largest solar flares (SFs) neutrinos. Indeed the solar energetic (Ep>100 MeV) flare particles (protons, α), while scattering among themselves on solar corona atmosphere must produce prompt charged pions, whose chain decays are source of a solar (electron muon) neutrino 'flare' (at tens or hundreds MeV energy). These brief (minutes) neutrino 'bursts' at largest flare peak may overcome by three to five orders of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, possibly leading to their detection above detection thresholds (in a full mixed three flavour state). Moreover the birth of anti-neutrinos at a few tens of MeV very clearly flares above a null thermal 'hep' anti-neutrino solar background and also above a tiny supernova relic and atmospheric noise. The largest prompt solar anti-neutrino 'burst' may be well detected in future Super Kamikande (gadolinium implemented) anti-neutrino \\bar\

  15. Upstream petroleum industry flaring guide : review draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Alberta requirements and expectations for upstream petroleum flaring are presented. Flaring is associated with a wide range of energy activities including oil and gas well drilling and well completion operations. The guide incorporates the recommendations made to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) in June 1998 by the multi-stakeholder Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) on associated or solution gas flaring. Additional requirements which address flaring issues not covered in the CASA report are also included in this guide. The Guide requires a 15 per cent reduction in solution gas flare volume by the end of year 2000 from the 1996 baseline, and a 25 per cent reduction by the end of 2001. The Guide prescribes new flare performance requirements for all flares, within three years for existing solution gas flares, five years for flares at other existing permanent facilities. It sets personal consultation and public notification requirements for new and existing solution gas batteries, and new sulphur recovery requirements for facilities not covered by existing EUB regulations. The Guide also addresses the question of conflict resolution to deal with flaring concerns, the release of flaring and venting data, the proposed reduction of flare limits, progress towards minimizing requirements for electricity generators using otherwise flared gas, annual reporting to the EUB, and management framework review in 2001

  16. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  17. Size-resolved source apportionment of ambient particles by positive matrix factorization at Gosan background site in East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Han

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Size- and time-resolved aerosol samples were collected using an eight-stage Davis rotating unit for monitoring (DRUM sampler from 29 March to 29 May in 2002 at Gosan, Jeju Island, Korea, which is one of the representative background sites in East Asia. These samples were analyzed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence for 3-h average concentrations of 19 elements consisting of S, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Cl, Cu, Zn, Ti, K, Mn, Pb, Ni, V, Se, As, Rb, Cr, Br. The size-resolved data sets were then analyzed using the positive matrix factorization (PMF technique in order to identify possible sources and estimate their contribution to particulate matter mass. PMF analysis uses the uncertainty of the measured data to provide an optimal weighting. Fifteen sources were resolved in eight size ranges (0.07~12 μm and included continental soil, local soil, sea salt, biomass/biofuel burning, coal combustion, oil heating furnace, residual oil fired boiler, municipal incineration, nonferrous metal source, ferrous metal source, gasoline vehicle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter and volcanic emission. PMF analysis of size-resolved source contributions showed that natural sources represented by local soil, sea salt and continental soil contributed about 79% to the predicted primary particulate matter (PM mass in the coarse size range (1.15~12 μm. On the other hand, anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning contributed about 60% in the fine size range (0.56~2.5 μm. The diesel vehicle source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size range (0.07~0.56 μm and was responsible for about 52% of the primary PM mass.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    横山, 央明; Takaaki, YOKOYAMA; 国立天文台; National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

    2002-01-01

    A solar flare is an explosive release of the magnetic energy in the solar upper atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic reconnection model of a solar flare and the results of magnetohydrohynamic simulations are shown.

  19. Solar Flares and Precise Satellite Timekeeping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camparo, J. C; Moss, S. C

    2002-01-01

    On 14 July 2000 and 9 November 2000 two large solar flares occurred. As measured by the GOES-8 and GOES-10 satellites, these flares were accompanied by an increase in the flux of energetic particles at geosynchronous altitudes...

  20. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  1. Design of the 'half-size' ITER neutral beam source for the test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.heinemann@ipp.mpg.de; Falter, H.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Gutser, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Agostinetti, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Jiang, T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, ChengDu (China)

    2009-06-15

    In 2007 the radio frequency driven negative hydrogen ion source developed at IPP in Garching was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design and the commissioning and operating phases of the ITER test facilities ISTF and NBTF in Padua, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment). ELISE will be operated with the so-called 'half-size ITER source' which is an intermediate step between the present small IPP RF sources (1/8 ITER size) and the full size ITER source. The source will have approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular concept with 4 drivers will allow an easy extrapolation to the full ITER size with 8 drivers. Pulsed beam extraction and acceleration up to 60 kV (corresponding to pre-acceleration voltage of SINGAP) is foreseen. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. Therefore one major difference compared to the source of ITER, NBTF or ISTF is the possible operation in air. Specific requirements for RF sources as found on IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU are implemented [A. Staebler, et al., Development of a RF-driven ion source for the ITER NBI system, SOFT Conference 2008, Fusion Engineering and Design, 84 (2009) 265-268].

  2. EVIDENCE OF BULK ACCELERATION OF THE GRB X-RAY FLARE EMISSION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  3. Trace elements in particulate matter from metropolitan regions of Northern China: Sources, concentrations and size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Tian, Shili; Li, Xingru; Sun, Ying; Li, Yi; Wentworth, Gregory R; Wang, Yuesi

    2015-12-15

    Public concerns over airborne trace elements (TEs) in metropolitan areas are increasing, but long-term and multi-site observations of size-resolved aerosol TEs in China are still lacking. Here, we identify highly elevated levels of atmospheric TEs in megacities and industrial sites in a Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban agglomeration relative to background areas, with the annual mean values of As, Pb, Ni, Cd and Mn exceeding the acceptable limits of the World Health Organization. Despite the spatial variability in concentrations, the size distribution pattern of each trace element was quite similar across the region. Crustal elements of Al and Fe were mainly found in coarse particles (2.1-9 μm), whereas the main fraction of toxic metals, such as Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb, was found in submicron particles (dust, fossil fuel combustion and industrial emissions, at different sites. In addition, higher elemental concentrations coincided with westerly flow, indicating that polluted soil and fugitive dust were major sources of TEs on the regional scale. However, the contribution of coal burning, iron industry/oil combustion and non-ferrous smelters to atmospheric metal pollution in Northern China should be given more attention. Considering that the concentrations of heavy metals associated with fine particles in the target region were significantly higher than those in other Asian sites, the implementations of strict environmental standards in China are required to reduce the amounts of these hazardous pollutants released into the atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Instant CloudFlare starter

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Written as a practical guide, CloudFlare Starter will show you all you need to know in order to effectively improve your online presence in a multitude of different ways. ""Instant CloudFlare Starter"" is a practical yet accessible guide for website owners looking to optimize their site for optimum security and maximum performance.

  5. Gas flare characterisation with Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ruecker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2017-04-01

    Gas Flaring (GF) is the process of burning waste gases at the tip of a stack. It is widely used in the upstream oil and gas industry. It is a contributor to the imbalance of the greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration in the earth's atmosphere, which prompts global warming. Besides GHG, GF also emits black carbon (BC), a known carcinogen and climate active species. At higher latitudes, GF has been estimated as the main input of atmospheric BC, alongside vegetation fires. The consideration of GF as a source to global budgets has been hindered by technical difficulties of in-situ measurements and the inexistence of a systematic reporting system. Remote sensing offers the possibility of a continuous, global and systematic monitoring of GF over extended periods. Being a high temperature process, GF can be detected from space using measurements at appropriate wavelengths. Considering 1800K as a typical GF temperature and Wien's displacement law, the peak emission will be in the short-wave infrared region. This spectral region is observed by two channels (S5 and S6) of the SLSTR instrument aboard ESA's newly launched Sentinel-3 satellite. Because of solar contamination, only night-time observations are used. In order to characterise the identified gas flares in terms of temperature and area, two Planck curves are fitted to SLSTR radiance observations in five spectral channels (S5 through S9, with F1 and F2). In this work, we present the methodology in detail as well as results for known flaring regions around the world. A comparison with VIIRS on Suomi-NPP and with HSRS on TET-1 over known GF locations is also considered.

  6. Handling an Asthma Flare-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Handling an Asthma Flare-Up KidsHealth / For Kids / Handling an Asthma Flare-Up ... controlar las crisis asmáticas What's an Asthma Flare-Up? If you have asthma , you probably know about ...

  7. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Sun; flares; X-rays; spectroscopic plasma diagnostic. Abstract. We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F ...

  8. The Giant Flares of the Microquasar Cygnus X-3: X-Rays States and Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Trushkin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on two giant radio flares of the X-ray binary microquasar Cyg X-3, consisting of a Wolf–Rayet star and probably a black hole. The first flare occurred on 13 September 2016, 2000 days after a previous giant flare in February 2011, as the RATAN-600 radio telescope daily monitoring showed. After 200 days on 1 April 2017, we detected a second giant flare. Both flares are characterized by the increase of the fluxes by almost 2000-times (from 5–10 to 17,000 mJy at 4–11 GHz during 2–7 days, indicating relativistic bulk motions from the central region of the accretion disk around a black hole. The flaring light curves and spectral evolution of the synchrotron radiation indicate the formation of two relativistic collimated jets from the binaries. Both flares occurred when the source went from hypersoft X-ray states to soft ones, i.e. hard fluxes (Swift/BAT 15–50 keV data dropped to zero, the soft X-ray fluxes (MAXI 2–10 keV data staying high, and then later, the binary came back to a hard state. Both similar giant flares indicated the unchanged mechanism of the jets’ formation in Cyg X-3, probably in conditions of strong stellar wind and powerful accretion onto a black hole.

  9. A global gas flaring black carbon emission rate dataset from 1994 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    Global flaring of associated petroleum gas is a potential emission source of particulate matters (PM) and could be notable in some specific regions that are in urgent need of mitigation. PM emitted from gas flaring is mainly in the form of black carbon (BC), which is a strong short-lived climate forcer. However, BC from gas flaring has been neglected in most global/regional emission inventories and is rarely considered in climate modeling. Here we present a global gas flaring BC emission rate dataset for the period 1994–2012 in a machine-readable format. We develop a region-dependent gas flaring BC emission factor database based on the chemical compositions of associated petroleum gas at various oil fields. Gas flaring BC emission rates are estimated using this emission factor database and flaring volumes retrieved from satellite imagery. Evaluation using a chemical transport model suggests that consideration of gas flaring emissions can improve model performance. This dataset will benefit and inform a broad range of research topics, e.g., carbon budget, air quality/climate modeling, and environmental/human exposure. PMID:27874852

  10. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO /HMI Vector Magnetic Data Products and the Random Forest Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Wang, Jason T. L., E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu, E-mail: haimin.wang@njit.edu, E-mail: jason.t.wang@njit.edu [Department of Computer Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Adverse space-weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, the prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares that occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP-related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hr, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross-validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF has been used to make multiclass predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near the polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  11. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Products and the Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason T. L.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Adverse space-weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, the prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares that occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP-related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hr, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross-validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF has been used to make multiclass predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near the polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  12. Real-time mapping of an industrial flare using lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Renata F.; Steffens, Juliana; Landulfo, E.; Guardani, Roberto; Nakaema, W. M.; Moreira, Paulo F., Jr.; da Silva Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Ferrini, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Characterization of atmospheric emissions from industrial flare stacks represents a challenge in measurement techniques because it is extremely difficult to determine the real-time concentrations of combustion products by in situ sampling, due to stack height, sensor calibration difficulties, and the dynamics of oscillations in the emission patterns. A ground based laser remote sensing (LIDAR) system has been developed for continuous and real-time monitoring of atmospheric emissions from an oil refinery located approximately 400 m from the instrument. The system is able to perform 3D scanning and profiling around the emission point. Tests were carried out using a scanning system pointed to the refinery flare. The mapping was obtained from a sequence of measurements at different zenithal and azimuthal angles resulting in a 3D image of the flare shape plus the flame itself. The measurements can be used to estimate the aerosol size distribution based on the ratios of the backscattering signal at three distinct wavelengths: 1064/532 nm, 1064/355 nm, and 532/355 nm. The method can be used in real time monitoring of industrial aerosol emissions and in the control of industrial processes. Preliminary results indicate a calibration procedure to assess the refining process efficiency based on the particle size distribution within and around the flare.

  13. Sizing up the individual market for health insurance: a comparison of survey and administrative data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean M; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Boudreaux, Michel

    2013-08-01

    Provisions within the Affordable Care Act, including the introduction of subsidized, Exchange-based coverage for lower income Americans lacking access to employer coverage, are expected to greatly expand the size and importance of the individual market. Using multiple federal surveys and administrative data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, we generate national-, regional-, and state-level estimates of the individual market. In 2009, the number of nonelderly persons with individual coverage ranged from 9.55 million in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to 25.3 million in the American Community Survey. Notable differences also exist between survey estimates and National Association of Insurance Commissioners administrative counts, an outcome likely driven by variation in the type and measurement of individual coverage considered by surveys relative to administrative data. Future research evaluating the impact of the Affordable Care Act coverage provisions must be mindful of differences across surveys and administrative sources as it relates to the measurement of individual market coverage.

  14. M Dwarf Flare Continuum Variations on One-second Timescales: Calibrating and Modeling of ULTRACAM Flare Color Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Hilton, Eric J.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color-color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 104 K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium, based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, and observations, and based on observations made with the ESO Telescopes

  15. Analysis of point source size on measurement accuracy of lateral point-spread function of confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shihang; Zhang, Li; Hu, Yao; Ding, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) has matured to become one of the most powerful instruments in analytical science because of its molecular sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional Raman Microscopy, CRM can perform three dimensions mapping of tiny samples and has the advantage of high spatial resolution thanking to the unique pinhole. With the wide application of the instrument, there is a growing requirement for the evaluation of the imaging performance of the system. Point-spread function (PSF) is an important approach to the evaluation of imaging capability of an optical instrument. Among a variety of measurement methods of PSF, the point source method has been widely used because it is easy to operate and the measurement results are approximate to the true PSF. In the point source method, the point source size has a significant impact on the final measurement accuracy. In this paper, the influence of the point source sizes on the measurement accuracy of PSF is analyzed and verified experimentally. A theoretical model of the lateral PSF for CRM is established and the effect of point source size on full-width at half maximum of lateral PSF is simulated. For long-term preservation and measurement convenience, PSF measurement phantom using polydimethylsiloxane resin, doped with different sizes of polystyrene microspheres is designed. The PSF of CRM with different sizes of microspheres are measured and the results are compared with the simulation results. The results provide a guide for measuring the PSF of the CRM.

  16. Night temperature and source-sink effects on overall growth, cell number and cell size in bell pepper ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Rebecca L; Cruz-Huerta, Nicacio; Williamson, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-01

    Ovary swelling, and resultant fruit malformation, in bell pepper flowers is favoured by low night temperature or a high source-sink ratio. However, the interaction between night temperature and source-sink ratio on ovary swelling and the contribution of cell size and cell number to ovary swelling are unknown. The present research examined the interactive effects of night temperature and source-sink ratio on ovary size, cell number and cell size at anthesis in bell pepper flowers. Bell pepper plants were grown in growth chambers at night temperatures of either 20 °C (HNT) or 12 °C (LNT). Within each temperature treatment, plants bore either 0 (non-fruiting) or two developing fruits per plant. Ovary fresh weight, cell size and cell number were measured. Ovary fresh weights in non-fruiting plants grown at LNT were the largest, while fresh weights were smallest in plants grown at HNT with fruits. In general, mesocarp cell size in ovaries was largest in non-fruiting plants grown at either LNT or HNT and smallest in fruiting plants at HNT. Mesocarp cell number was greater in non-fruiting plants under LNT than in the rest of the night temperature/fruiting treatments. These responses were more marked in ovaries sampled after 18 d of treatment compared with those sampled after 40 d of treatment. Ovary fresh weight of flowers at anthesis increased 65 % in non-fruiting plants grown under LNT compared with fruiting plants grown under HNT. This increase was due primarily to increases in mesocarp cell number and size. These results indicate that the combined effects of LNT and high source-sink ratio on ovary swelling are additive. Furthermore, the combined effects of LNT and low source-sink ratio or HNT and high source-sink ratio can partially overcome the detrimental effects of LNT and high source-sink ratio.

  17. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2016-05-01

    Reconnection has at least three possible roles in solar flares: First, it may contribute to the build-up of magnetic energy in the solar corona prior to flare onset; second, it may directly trigger the onset of the flare; and third, it may allow the release of magnetic energy by relaxing the magnetic field configuration to a lower energy state. Although observational support for the first two roles is somewhat limited, there is now ample support for the third. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of reconnection. Continued improvements in instrumentation will greatly help to determine the detailed physics of the reconnection process in the solar atmosphere. Careful measurement of the reconnection outflows will be especially helpful in this regard. Current observations suggest that in some flares the jet outflows are accelerated within a short diffusion region that is more characteristic of Petschek-type reconnection than Sweet-Parker reconnection. Recent resistive MHD theoretical and numerical analyses predict that the length of the diffusion region should be just within the resolution range of current X-ray and EUV telescopes if the resistivity is uniform. On the other hand, if the resistivity is not uniform, the length of the diffusion region could be too short for the outflow acceleration region to be observable.

  19. Return current instability in flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, D.; McQuillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    The authors consider the problem of ion-acoustic wave generation, and resultant anomalous Joule heating, by a return current driven unstable by a small-area thick-target electron beam in solar flares. They find that, contrary to the usual assumption, the hard X-ray bremsstrahlung emission may actually be enhanced in comparison to conventional thick-target models.

  20. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 814, č. 2 (2015), 153/1-153/7 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : plasmas * Sun flares * radio radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.909, year: 2015

  1. Heavy system multifragmentation: the independence of fragment size distribution of the source size; Multifragmentation des systemes lourds: la distribution de taille des fragments est independante de la taille de la source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivet, M.F.; Bacri, C.O.; Borderie, B.; Dore, D.; Frankland, J.D.; Plagnol, E.; Squalli, M.; Tassan-Got, L. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); INDRA collaboration

    1999-11-01

    Charged product multiplicities and Z distributions were measured for single multi-fragmenting sources (A = 200 - 400) produced in collisions between heavy nuclei at the same available energy per nucleon. Z distributions are found independent of the source size while fragment multiplicities scale as the charge of the total systems. A complete dynamical simulation, in which multifragmentation originates in the spinodal decomposition of a finite piece of nuclear matter, well accounts for this experimental observation. (authors) 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Open-Source Conceptual Sizing Models for the Hyperloop Passenger Pod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jeffrey C.; Gray, Justin S.; Jones, Scott M.; Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperloop is a new mode of transportation proposed as an alternative to California's high speed rail project, with the intended benefits of higher performance at lower overall costs. It consists of a passenger pod traveling through a tube under a light vacuum and suspended on air bearings. The pod travels up to transonic speeds resulting in a 35 minute travel time between the intended route from Los Angeles and San Francisco. Of the two variants outlined, the smaller system includes a 1.1 meter tall passenger capsule traveling through a 2.2 meter tube at 700 miles per hour. The passenger pod features water-based heat exchangers as well as an on-board compression system that reduces the aerodynamic drag as it moves through the tube. Although the original proposal looks very promising, it assumes that tube and pod dimensions are independently sizable without fully acknowledging the constraints of the compressor system on the pod geometry. This work focuses on the aerodynamic and thermodynamic interactions between the two largest systems; the tube and the pod. Using open-source toolsets, a new sizing method is developed based on one-dimensional thermodynamic relationships that accounts for the strong interactions between these sub-systems. These additional considerations require a tube nearly twice the size originally considered and limit the maximum pod travel speed to about 620 miles per hour. Although the results indicate that Hyperloop will need to be larger and slightly slower than originally intended, the estimated travel time only increases by approximately five minutes, so the overall performance is not dramatically affected. In addition, the proposed on-board heat exchanger is not an ideal solution to achieve reasonable equilibrium air temperatures within the tube. Removal of this subsystem represents a potential reduction in weight, energy requirements and complexity of the pod. In light of these finding, the core concept still remains a compelling

  3. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  4. Mean colors of stellar flare continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Shmeleva and Syrovatskii have shown that under certain circumstances the temperature structure in the hotter regions (T>2 x 10 4 K) of a solar flare is characterized by two universal functions: one for constant density conditions, the second for constant pressure conditions. Here we show that the U--B, B--V colors of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung emitted by both of these temperature structures are consistent with the mean colors of stellar flares near maximum light and also with the observed evolution of flare light in the two-color diagram during flare cooling. We suggest that the transition which occurs in the character of stellar flare light from mostly continuum emission near flare maximum to mostly line emission later in the flare is related to the transition which must occur from the constant density regime to the constant pressure regime on a time scale of order 1--2 minutes. The two types of flares (spike flares and slow flares) identified by Moffett are ascribed to these two different regimes. The flare light-curve model described here resembles in some respects a model previously proposed by Andrews, but there are differences in detail

  5. Source apportionment of size and time resolved trace elements and organic aerosols from an urban courtyard site in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, A.; Gianini, M. F. D.; Mohr, C.; Furger, M.; Bukowiecki, N.; Minguillón, M. C.; Lienemann, P.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2011-09-01

    Time and size resolved data of trace elements were obtained from measurements with a rotating drum impactor (RDI) and subsequent X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Trace elements can act as indicators for the identification of sources of particulate matter Switzerland. Eight different sources were identified for the three examined size ranges (PM1-0.1, PM2.5-1 and PM10-2.5): secondary sulfate, wood combustion, fire works, road traffic, mineral dust, de-icing salt, industrial and local anthropogenic activities. The major component was secondary sulfate for the smallest size range; the road traffic factor was found in all three size ranges. This trace element analysis is complemented with data from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), assessing the PM1 fraction of organic aerosols. A separate PMF analysis revealed three factors related to three of the sources found with the RDI: oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, related to inorganic secondary sulfate), hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, related to road traffic) and biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), explaining 60 %, 22 % and 17 % of total measured organics, respectively. Since different compounds are used for the source classification, a higher percentage of the ambient PM10 mass concentration can be apportioned to sources by the combination of both methods.

  6. Flare Prediction Using Photospheric and Coronal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Eric; Bobra, Monica; Shankar, Vaishaal; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Recht, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    The precise physical process that triggers solar flares is not currently understood. Here we attempt to capture the signature of this mechanism in solar-image data of various wavelengths and use these signatures to predict flaring activity. We do this by developing an algorithm that i) automatically generates features in 5.5 TB of image data taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory of the solar photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona during the time period between May 2010 and May 2014, ii) combines these features with other features based on flaring history and a physical understanding of putative flaring processes, and iii) classifies these features to predict whether a solar active region will flare within a time period of T hours, where T = 2 and 24. Such an approach may be useful since, at the present time, there are no physical models of flares available for real-time prediction. We find that when optimizing for the True Skill Score (TSS), photospheric vector-magnetic-field data combined with flaring history yields the best performance, and when optimizing for the area under the precision-recall curve, all of the data are helpful. Our model performance yields a TSS of 0.84 ±0.03 and 0.81 ±0.03 in the T = 2- and 24-hour cases, respectively, and a value of 0.13 ±0.07 and 0.43 ±0.08 for the area under the precision-recall curve in the T=2- and 24-hour cases, respectively. These relatively high scores are competitive with previous attempts at solar prediction, but our different methodology and extreme care in task design and experimental setup provide an independent confirmation of these results. Given the similar values of algorithm performance across various types of models reported in the literature, we conclude that we can expect a certain baseline predictive capacity using these data. We believe that this is the first attempt to predict solar flares using photospheric vector-magnetic field data as well as multiple wavelengths of image

  7. Source apportionment of synchronously size segregated fine and coarse particulate matter, using an improved three-way factor analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guo-Liang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Ye, Si; Peng, Xing; Xu, Jiao; Wang, Wei; Han, Bo; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2015-02-01

    Samples of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ were synchronously collected from a megacity in China (Chengdu) during the 2011 sampling campaign and then analyzed by an improved three-way factor analysis method based on ME2 (multilinear engine 2), to investigate the contributions and size distributions of the source categories for size segregated particulate matter (PM). Firstly, the synthetic test was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the improved three-way model. The same five source categories with slightly different source profiles were caught. The low AAE (average absolute error) values between the estimated and the synthetic source contributions (dust & coal combustion presented the highest percentage contributions, accounting for 58.20% (PM₁₀) and 53.73% (PM2.5); followed by vehicle exhaust & secondary organic carbon (18.45% for PM₁₀ and 21.63% for PM₂.₅), secondary sulfate and nitrate (17.06% for PM₁₀ and 20.91% for PM₂.₅) and cement dust (6.30% for PM₁₀ and 3.73% for PM₂.₅). The source profiles and contributions presented slightly different distributions for PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅, which could better reflect the actual situation. The findings based on the improved three-way factor analysis method may provide clear and deep insights into the sources of synchronously size-resolved PM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Can we observe neutrino flares in coincidence with explosive transients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guépin, C.; Kotera, K.

    2017-12-01

    The new generation of powerful instruments is reaching sensitivities and temporal resolutions that will allow multi-messenger astronomy of explosive transient phenomena, with high-energy neutrinos as a central figure. We derive general criteria for the detectability of neutrinos from powerful transient sources for given instrument sensitivities. In practice, we provide the minimum photon flux necessary for neutrino detection based on two main observables: the bolometric luminosity and the time variability of the emission. This limit can be compared to the observations in specified wavelengths in order to target the most promising sources for follow-ups. Our criteria can also help distinguishing false associations of neutrino events with a flaring source. We find that relativistic transient sources such as high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), blazar flares, tidal disruption events, and magnetar flares could be observed with IceCube, as they have a good chance to occur within a detectable distance. Of the nonrelativistic transient sources, only luminous supernovae appear as promising candidates. We caution that our criterion should not be directly applied to low-luminosity GRBs and type Ibc supernovae, as these objects could have hosted a choked GRB, leading to neutrino emission without a relevant counterpart radiation. We treat the concrete example of PKS 1424-418 major outburst and the possible association with an IceCube event IC 35.

  9. Manufacturing of the full size prototype of the ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector – The SPIDER beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavei, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.pavei@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Boilson, Deirdre [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bonicelli, Tullio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Boury, Jacques [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Bush, Michael [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Ceracchi, Andrea; Faso, Diego [CECOM S.r.l., Via Tiburtina – Guidonia Montecelio, Roma (Italy); Graceffa, Joseph [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Heinemann, Bernd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Hemsworth, Ronald [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lievin, Christophe [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Marcuzzi, Diego [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Masiello, Antonio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Sczepaniak, Bernd [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Singh, Mahendrajit [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Toigo, Vanni; Zaccaria, Pierluigi [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Negative ion sources are key components of neutral beam injectors for nuclear fusion. • The SPIDER experiment aims to optimize the negative ion source of MITICA and HNB. • The SPIDER Beam Source manufacturing is currently on-going. • Manufacturing and assembling technological issues encountered are presented. - Abstract: In ITER, each heating neutral beam injector (HNB) will deliver about 16.5 MW heating power by accelerating a 40 A deuterium negative ion beam up to the energy of 1 MeV. The ions are generated inside a caesiated negative ion source, where the injected H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} is ionized by a radio frequency electromagnetic field. The SPIDER test bed, currently being manufactured, is going to be the ion source test facility for the full size ion source of the HNBs and of the diagnostic neutral beam injector of ITER. The SPIDER beam source comprises an ion source with 8 radio-frequency drivers and a three-grid system, providing an overall acceleration up to energies of about 100 keV [1]. SPIDER represents a substantial step forward between the half ITER size ion source, which is currently being tested at the ELISE test bed in IPP-Garching, and the negative ion sources to be used on ITER, in terms of layout, dimensions and operating parameters. The SPIDER beam source will be housed inside a vacuum vessel which will be equipped with a beam dump and a graphite diagnostic calorimeter. The manufacturing design of the main parts of the SPIDER beam source has been completed and many of the tests on the prototypes have been successfully passed. The most complex parts, from the manufacturing point of view, of the ion source and the accelerator, developed by galvanic deposition of copper are being manufactured. The manufacturing phase will be completed within 2015, when the assembly of the device will start at the PRIMA site, in Padova (I). The paper describes the status of the procurement, the adaptations operated on the design of the beam

  10. Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation approach to the emission of radiation by sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, T.; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    A full-vectorial integral equation method is presented for calculating near fields and far fields generated by a given distribution of sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures. Special attention is given to the treatment of the singularity of the dipole source field. A method...... uses for analyzing the emission of light by sources in some antennas and optical components such as vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, microdisk lasers, and light emitting diodes. The methods also have prospective uses in quantum electrodynamics for studies of spontaneous emission from, e...

  11. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Product and Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Adverse space weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. Many previous forecasting studies used physical parameters derived from photospheric line-of-sight field or ground-based vector field observations. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high-cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December, and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hours, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performace metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  12. grain size and heat source effect on the drying profile of cocoa bean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    L x W x H and one electric bulb with 100,200,300 and 400watts rating hoisted in each box interchangeably. Cocoa bean cleaned and sorted into four different grain sizes samples four different grain sizes samples (A, B, C, D) was subjected to drying till 13 subjected to drying till 13 subjected to drying till 13-14% moisture co.

  13. Effects of nitrogen source and rate and method of fertilizer application on yield and fruit size in 'Bluecrop' highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was done to determine the effects of N source and rate and two common methods of fertilizer application on yield and fruit size in a maturing field of highbush blueberry. Plants were fertilized by drip fertigation or with granular fertilizer using urea or ammonium sulfate applied at a rate o...

  14. Size distributions and sources of elements in particulate matter at curbside, urban and rural sites in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jingchun; Tan, Jihua; Wang, Shulan; Hao, Jimin; Chai, Fahe

    2012-01-01

    Size distributions of 29 elements in aerosols collected at urban, rural and curbside sites in Beijing were studied. High levels of Mn, Ni, As, Cd and Pb indicate the pollution of toxic heavy metals cannot be neglected in Beijing. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicates 4 sources of combustion emission, crust related sources, traffic related sources and volatile species from coal combustion. The elements can be roughly divided into 3 groups by size distribution and enrichment factors method (EFs). Group 1 elements are crust related and mainly found within coarse mode including Al, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Fe, Sr, Zr and Ba; Group 2 elements are fossil fuel related and mostly concentrated in accumulation mode including S, As, Se, Ag, Cd, Tl and Pb; Group 3 elements are multi-source related and show multi-mode distribution including Be, Na, K, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Mo, Sn and Sb. The EFs of Be, S, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Tl and Pb show higher values in winter than in summer indicating sources of coal combustion for heating in winter. The abundance of Cu and Sb in coarse mode is about 2-6 times higher at curbside site than at urban site indicating their traffic sources. Coal burning may be the major source of Pb in Beijing since the phase out of leaded gasoline, as the EFs of Pb are comparable at both urban and curbside sites, and about two times higher in winter than that in summer.

  15. Source apportionment of size-segregated atmospheric particles based on the major water-soluble components in Lecce (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contini, D.; Cesari, D.; Genga, A.; Siciliano, M.; Ielpo, P.; Guascito, M.R.; Conte, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have potential effects on human health, on the radiation balance, on climate, and on visibility. The understanding of these effects requires detailed knowledge of aerosol composition and size distributions and of how the different sources contribute to particles of different sizes. In this work, aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Measurements were taken between February and October 2011 in an urban background site near Lecce (Apulia region, southeast of Italy). Samples were analysed to evaluate the concentrations of water-soluble ions (SO 4 2− , NO 3 − , NH 4 + , Cl − , Na + , K + , Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) and of water-soluble organic and inorganic carbon. The aerosols were characterised by two modes, an accumulation mode having a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.35 ± 0.02 μm, representing 51 ± 4% of the aerosols and a coarse mode (MMD = 4.5 ± 0.4 μm), representing 49 ± 4% of the aerosols. The data were used to estimate the losses in the impactor by comparison with a low-volume sampler. The average loss in the MOUDI-collected aerosol was 19 ± 2%, and the largest loss was observed for NO 3 − (35 ± 10%). Significant losses were observed for Ca 2+ (16 ± 5%), SO 4 2− (19 ± 5%) and K + (10 ± 4%), whereas the losses for Na + and Mg 2+ were negligible. Size-segregated source apportionment was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which was applied separately to the coarse (size interval 1–18 μm) and accumulation (size interval 0.056–1 μm) modes. The PMF model was able to reasonably reconstruct the concentration in each size-range. The uncertainties in the source apportionment due to impactor losses were evaluated. In the accumulation mode, it was not possible to distinguish the traffic contribution from other combustion sources. In the coarse mode, it was not possible to efficiently separate nitrate from the contribution of crustal/resuspension origin

  16. Source apportionment of size-segregated atmospheric particles based on the major water-soluble components in Lecce (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contini, D., E-mail: d.contini@isac.cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Cesari, D. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Genga, A.; Siciliano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Ielpo, P. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Istituto di Ricerca Sulle Acque, IRSA-CNR, Bari (Italy); Guascito, M.R. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, M. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have potential effects on human health, on the radiation balance, on climate, and on visibility. The understanding of these effects requires detailed knowledge of aerosol composition and size distributions and of how the different sources contribute to particles of different sizes. In this work, aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Measurements were taken between February and October 2011 in an urban background site near Lecce (Apulia region, southeast of Italy). Samples were analysed to evaluate the concentrations of water-soluble ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup −}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) and of water-soluble organic and inorganic carbon. The aerosols were characterised by two modes, an accumulation mode having a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.35 ± 0.02 μm, representing 51 ± 4% of the aerosols and a coarse mode (MMD = 4.5 ± 0.4 μm), representing 49 ± 4% of the aerosols. The data were used to estimate the losses in the impactor by comparison with a low-volume sampler. The average loss in the MOUDI-collected aerosol was 19 ± 2%, and the largest loss was observed for NO{sub 3}{sup −} (35 ± 10%). Significant losses were observed for Ca{sup 2+} (16 ± 5%), SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} (19 ± 5%) and K{sup +} (10 ± 4%), whereas the losses for Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} were negligible. Size-segregated source apportionment was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which was applied separately to the coarse (size interval 1–18 μm) and accumulation (size interval 0.056–1 μm) modes. The PMF model was able to reasonably reconstruct the concentration in each size-range. The uncertainties in the source apportionment due to impactor losses were evaluated. In the accumulation mode, it was not possible to distinguish the traffic contribution from other combustion sources. In the coarse mode, it was not possible to

  17. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  18. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  19. Extremely Energetic 4B/X17.2 Flare and Associated Phenomena ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The volume of the source is calculated using the RHESSI 10–20 keV images taking the 45% of contour level. The calculated value of the thermal energy content in the flare is 1.9 × 1031 ergs. Magnetic reconnection is the main possible cause for the energy release process in solar flares. The reconnection rate is one of the ...

  20. Optimization of Moderator Size of Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Source Based on a Compact Accelerator for Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasemi, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Takashi; Sato, Hirotaka; Kino, Koichi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Ken

    A compact accelerator-driven neutron source has some advantages over a large accelerator facility in terms of accessibility and usability. Recently, the project to develop a non-destructive testing system for nuclear fuels by neutron imaging using a compact accelerator-driven neutron source has launched in Japan. In this project, the traditional neutron radiography and temperature imaging by neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy (N-RAS) have been studied. From the viewpoint of L/D, a high-brightness moderator is desirable for the neutron imaging. In this study, we investigated the dependence of moderator size on the source brightness and the pulse characteristics of the neutron by simulation calculations to design the moderator for imaging using thermal and epithermal neutrons. As a result, the optimal size of the moderator for the neutron imaging was 6∼7 cm in the energy region from 5 meV to 100 eV.

  1. Chemical Composition and Source Apportionment of Size Fractionated Particulate Matter in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cleveland airshed comprises a complex mixture of industrial source emissions that contribute to periods of non-attainment for fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and are associated with increased adverse health outcomes in the exposed population. Specific PM sources responsible...

  2. Multicolor photometry of a meteor with flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyukh, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    In various spectral regions the intensity variations are studied along the track of a base meteor with three flares having the character of spherical explosion. The concentration of radiating atoms in the flare is estimated. In the moment of the first flare there was a sharp intensity increase in the red region of spectrum. In two other flares the radiation in the interval 4400-4700 A is predominated. During all the three flares which continued 0.04 s, the meteoric body lost 40% of its initial mass. The concentration of Mg 2 atoms (4481 A) which gave the main contribution into the intensity of the third, brightest flare in blue spectral region, is found to be 1x10 11 cm -3

  3. The effects of food sources on Japanese monkey home range size and location, and population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koganezawa, M; Imaki, H

    1999-01-01

    The effects of supplemental feeding by tourists on wild Japanese monkey's home range size and location, and troop size and composition were studied for two monkey troops, Troop A and Troop B, living along the Irohazaka loop road, Nikko National Park, central Japan. Changes were documented based on data gathered from 1982 to 1996 by the use of radio telemetry. Troop A's home range size shrank and changed from separate winter and summer ranges to a single, year-round home range, with its core located in a high elevation area where supplemental feeding by tourists was heavy. Troop B's home range also shrank and shifted to a lower elevation where supplemental feeding by tourists was heavy. Troop A's population size increased between the winters of 1983-1984 and 1990-1991 in conjunction with an increase in human encounter rates, and then decreased. Troop B's size increased until the winter of 1993-1994, and then decreased. The instability of troop size between 1993 and 1996 may be explained by documented factors such as a decrease in the adult sex ratio, an increase in the infant-female ratio, and an increase in juvenile mortality and/or emigration, all of which may have been influenced by supplemental feeding by tourists.

  4. Dwarf Star Erupts in Giant Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This movie taken by NASA'S Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows one of the largest flares, or star eruptions, ever recorded at ultraviolet wavelengths. The star, called GJ 3685A, just happened to be in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's field of view while the telescope was busy observing galaxies. As the movie demonstrates, the seemingly serene star suddenly exploded once, then even more intensely a second time, pouring out in total about one million times more energy than a typical flare from our Sun. The second blast of light constituted an increase in brightness by a factor of at least 10,000. Flares are huge explosions of energy stemming from a single location on a star's surface. They are caused by the brief destruction of a star's magnetic fields. Many types of stars experience them, though old, small, rapidly rotating 'red dwarfs' like GJ 3685A tend to flare more frequently and dramatically. These stars, called flare stars, can experience powerful eruptions as often as every few hours. Younger stars, in general, also erupt more often. One of the reasons astronomers study flare stars is to gain a better picture and history of flare events taking place on the Sun. A preliminary analysis of the GJ 3685A flare shows that the mechanisms underlying stellar eruptions may be more complex than previously believed. Evidence for the two most popular flare theories was found. Though this movie has been sped up (the actual flare lasted about 20 minutes), time-resolved data exist for each one-hundredth of a second. These observations were taken at 2 p.m. Pacific time, April 24, 2004. In the still image, the time sequence starts in the upper left panel, continues in the upper right, then moves to the lower left and ends in the lower right. The circular and linear features that appear below and to the right of GJ 3685A during the flare event are detector artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the flare.

  5. Statistical studies of low-power solar flares. Distribution of flares by area, brightness, and classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borovik A.V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic database has been created for 123801 solar flares that occurred on the Sun over the period from 1972 to 2010. It is based on catalogs of the Solar Geophysical Data (SGD and Quarterly Bulletin on Solar Activity. A software package has been used for statistical data preprocessing. The first results revealed a number of new fea-tures in the distribution of parameters of solar flares, which differ from those obtained previously. We have found that more than 90 % of all solar flares are low-power. The most numerous class comprises SF flares (64 %. Flare activity shows a pronounced cyclicity and high correlation with Wolf numbers. The highest correlation coefficients indicate S and 1 solar flares. There is also a high correlation between individual flare classes: S and 1, 1 and (2–4. The results obtained in [Mitra et al., 1972], which provide evidence of the prevalence of SN solar flares (47 % and the existence of significant peaks for SN and 1N flares, have not been confirmed. The distribution of the number of solar flares with increasing optical importance smoothly decreases without significant deviations. With increasing optical importance, solar flares are gradually redistributed toward an increase in brightness class. The excess of the number of SN and 1N solar flares present in the distributions obtained in [Mitra et al., 1972] are most likely associated with poor statistics.

  6. Flare Energy Release: Internal Conflict, Contradiction with High Resolution Observations, Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, L.

    2017-06-01

    All accepted paradigm of solar and stellar flares energy release based on 2 whales: 1. Source of energy is free energy of non-potential force free magnetic field in atmosphere above active region; 2. Process of ultrafast dissipation of magnetic fields is Reconnection in Thin Turbulent Current Sheet (RTTCS). Progress in observational techniques in last years provided ultra-high spatial resolution and in physics of turbulent plasma showed that real situation is much more complicated and standard approach is in contradiction both with observations and with problem of RTTCS stability. We present critical analysis of classic models of pre-flare energy accumulation and its dissipation during flare energy release from pioneer works Giovanelli (1939, 1947) up to topological reconnection. We show that all accepted description of global force-free fields as source of future flare cannot be agreed with discovered in last years fine and ultra-fine current-magnetic structure included numerouse arcs-threads with diameters up to 100 km with constant sequence from photosphere to corona. This magnetic skeleton of thin current magnetic threads with strong interaction between them is main source of reserved magnetic energy insolar atmosphere. Its dynamics will be controlled by percolation of magnetic stresses through network of current-magnetic threads with transition to flare state caused by critical value of global current. We show that thin turbulent current sheet is absolutely unstable configuration both caused by splitting to numerous linear currents by dissipative modes like to tearing, and as sequence of suppress of plasma turbulence caused by anomalous heating of turbulent plasma. In result of these factors primary RTTCS will be disrupted in numerous turbulent and normal plasma domains like to resistors network. Current propagation through this network will have percolation character with all accompanied properties of percolated systems: self-organization with formation power

  7. Source apportionment of size and time resolved trace elements and organic aerosols from an urban courtyard site in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Time and size resolved data of trace elements were obtained from measurements with a rotating drum impactor (RDI and subsequent X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Trace elements can act as indicators for the identification of sources of particulate matter <10 μm (PM10 in ambient air. Receptor modeling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF for trace element data from an urban background site in Zürich, Switzerland. Eight different sources were identified for the three examined size ranges (PM1−0.1, PM2.5−1 and PM10−2.5: secondary sulfate, wood combustion, fire works, road traffic, mineral dust, de-icing salt, industrial and local anthropogenic activities. The major component was secondary sulfate for the smallest size range; the road traffic factor was found in all three size ranges. This trace element analysis is complemented with data from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, assessing the PM1 fraction of organic aerosols. A separate PMF analysis revealed three factors related to three of the sources found with the RDI: oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, related to inorganic secondary sulfate, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, related to road traffic and biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, explaining 60 %, 22 % and 17 % of total measured organics, respectively. Since different compounds are used for the source classification, a higher percentage of the ambient PM10 mass concentration can be apportioned to sources by the combination of both methods.

  8. Mechanisms for Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a plasma process in which magnetic energy is rapidly converted to kinetic energy via a change in the magnetic topology. Observations of reconnection in solar flares show it to be an very efficient accelerator of particles, e.g. nonthermal electrons. The traditional picture of acceleration via parallel electric fields near the magnetic X-line does not scale well to large systems such as the solar corona. Recent work has shown that particles may be accelerated by a Fermi mechanism inside contracting magnetic islands. This mechanism was previously explored in terms of particles trapped in contracting islands, gaining energy due to the conservation of the parallel adiabatic invariant. However, this treatment is not strictly applicable in complicated island geometries where particles are poorly trapped. To generalize this theory, we examine this mechanism by means of its local expression: the scalar product of the electric force with the curvature drift. This proves equivalent to conservation of the parallel adiabatic invariant for the case of a trapped particle. We present two-dimensional kinetic simulations which explore the relative importance of this term compared to parallel electric fields. The curvature-drift term dominates in antiparallel reconnection, with a negligible contribution from parallel electric fields. In the guide field simulations, relevant for solar flares, the contribution from parallel electric fields is significant. We explore several simulations with varying system sizes and mass ratios in order to examine how the parallel electric fields and the curvature-drift term would scale to large systems relevant for physical applications. We then compare the 2D results with 3D simulations.

  9. Size distribution, directional source contributions and pollution status of PM from Chengdu, China during a long-term sampling campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guo-Liang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Ma, Tong; Song, Dan-Lin; Zhou, Lai-Dong; Han, Bo; Feng, Yin-Chang; Russell, Armistead G

    2017-06-01

    Long-term and synchronous monitoring of PM 10 and PM 2.5 was conducted in Chengdu in China from 2007 to 2013. The levels, variations, compositions and size distributions were investigated. The sources were quantified by two-way and three-way receptor models (PMF2, ME2-2way and ME2-3way). Consistent results were found: the primary source categories contributed 63.4% (PMF2), 64.8% (ME2-2way) and 66.8% (ME2-3way) to PM 10 , and contributed 60.9% (PMF2), 65.5% (ME2-2way) and 61.0% (ME2-3way) to PM 2.5 . Secondary sources contributed 31.8% (PMF2), 32.9% (ME2-2way) and 31.7% (ME2-3way) to PM 10 , and 35.0% (PMF2), 33.8% (ME2-2way) and 36.0% (ME2-3way) to PM 2.5 . The size distribution of source categories was estimated better by the ME2-3way method. The three-way model can simultaneously consider chemical species, temporal variability and PM sizes, while a two-way model independently computes datasets of different sizes. A method called source directional apportionment (SDA) was employed to quantify the contributions from various directions for each source category. Crustal dust from east-north-east (ENE) contributed the highest to both PM 10 (12.7%) and PM 2.5 (9.7%) in Chengdu, followed by the crustal dust from south-east (SE) for PM 10 (9.8%) and secondary nitrate & secondary organic carbon from ENE for PM 2.5 (9.6%). Source contributions from different directions are associated with meteorological conditions, source locations and emission patterns during the sampling period. These findings and methods provide useful tools to better understand PM pollution status and to develop effective pollution control strategies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Optical dating of single sand-sized grains of quartz: Sources of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements have been made of over 3000 sand-sized grains of quartz. Analysis at this scale highlights the variability in the luminescence sensitivity and the dose saturation characteristics of individual quartz grains. Using a new instrument capable of me...... intensity, dose saturation characteristics and instrument uncertainty in equivalent dose calculation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Carbon mineralization in two ultisols: effects of sources and particle sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g. particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal information on the potential...

  12. Carbon Mineralization in Two Ultisols Amended with Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g., particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal informa...

  13. Unveiling the Sources of Chromium in Pictorialist Photographs: Gum-Dichromate Process or Paper Sizing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Centeno, Silvia A; Kennedy, Nora W

    2015-01-01

    For this issue of Hand Papermaking devoted to paper sizing, we offer a review and extension of pertinent results obtained in our investigations of the gum-dichromate photographic process, commonly known as the gum-bichromate process.1 We have published three articles to date on our findings; this...

  14. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  15. Characterisation of the traffic sources of PM through size-segregated sampling, sequential leaching and ICP analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, Silvia; Perrino, Cinzia; Olivieri, Fabio; Astolfi, Maria Luisa

    A study of the elemental composition and size distribution of atmospheric particulate matter and of its spatial and temporal variability has been conducted at two traffic sites and one urban background site in the area of Rome, Italy. Chemical analysis included the fractionation of 22 elements (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Si, Sn, Sr, Ti, Tl, V) into a water-extractable and a residual fraction. Size distribution analysis included measurements of aerosols in twelve size classes in the range 0.03-10 μm. The simultaneous determination of PM 10 and PM 2.5 at three sites during a 2-week study allowed the necessary evaluation of space and time concentration variations. The application of a chemical fractionation procedure to size-segregated samples proved to be a valuable approach for the characterisation of PM and for discriminating different emission sources. Extractable and residual fractions of the elements showed in fact different size distributions: for almost all elements the extractable fraction was mainly distributed in the fine particle size, while the residual fraction was in general predominant in the coarse size range. For some elements (As, Cd, Sb, Sn, V) the dimensional separation between the extractable fraction, almost quantitatively present in the fine mode particles, and the residual fraction, mainly distributed in the coarse mode particles, was almost quantitative. Under these conditions, the application of the chemical fractionation procedure to PM 10 samples allows a clear distinction between contributes originating from fine and coarse particle emission sources. The results related to PM (10-2.5) and PM 2.5 daily samples confirmed that chemical fractionation analysis increases the selectivity of most elements as source tracers. Extractable and residual fractions of As, Mg, Ni, Pb, S, Sn, Tl, Sb, Cd and V showed different time patterns and different spatial and size distributions, clearly indicating that the two

  16. Size-resolved source apportionment of particulate matter in urban Beijing during haze and non-haze episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Additional size-resolved chemical information is needed before the physicochemical characteristics and sources of airborne particles can be understood; however, this information remains unavailable in most regions of China due to lacking measurement data. In this study, we report observations of various chemical species in size-segregated particle samples that were collected over 1 year in the urban area of Beijing, a megacity that experiences severe haze episodes. In addition to fine particles, high concentrations of coarse particles were measured during the periods of haze. The abundance and chemical compositions of the particles in this study were temporally and spatially variable, with major contributions from organic matter and secondary inorganic aerosols. The contributions of organic matter to the particle mass decreased from 37.9 to 31.2 %, and the total contribution of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium increased from 19.1 to 33.9 % between non-haze and haze days, respectively. Due to heterogeneous reactions and hygroscopic growth, the peak concentrations of the organic carbon, cadmium and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and potassium shifted from 0.43 to 0.65 µm on non-haze days to 0.65–1.1 µm on haze days. Although the size distributions of lead and thallium were similar during the observation period, their concentrations increased by a factor of more than 1.5 on haze days compared with non-haze days. We observed that sulfate and ammonium, which have a size range of 0.43–0.65 µm, sulfate and nitrate, which have a size range of 0.65–1.1 µm, calcium, which has a size range of 5.8–9 µm, and the meteorological factors of relative humidity and wind speed were responsible for haze pollution when the visibility was less than 10 km. Source apportionment using Positive Matrix Factorization showed six PM2.1 sources and seven PM2.1–9 common sources: secondary inorganic aerosol (25.1 % for fine particles vs. 9.8

  17. Size-resolved source apportionment of particulate matter in urban Beijing during haze and non-haze episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S. L.; Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Additional size-resolved chemical information is needed before the physicochemical characteristics and sources of airborne particles can be understood; however, this information remains unavailable in most regions of China due to lacking measurement data. In this study, we report observations of various chemical species in size-segregated particle samples that were collected over 1 year in the urban area of Beijing, a megacity that experiences severe haze episodes. In addition to fine particles, high concentrations of coarse particles were measured during the periods of haze. The abundance and chemical compositions of the particles in this study were temporally and spatially variable, with major contributions from organic matter and secondary inorganic aerosols. The contributions of organic matter to the particle mass decreased from 37.9 to 31.2 %, and the total contribution of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium increased from 19.1 to 33.9 % between non-haze and haze days, respectively. Due to heterogeneous reactions and hygroscopic growth, the peak concentrations of the organic carbon, cadmium and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and potassium shifted from 0.43 to 0.65 µm on non-haze days to 0.65-1.1 µm on haze days. Although the size distributions of lead and thallium were similar during the observation period, their concentrations increased by a factor of more than 1.5 on haze days compared with non-haze days. We observed that sulfate and ammonium, which have a size range of 0.43-0.65 µm, sulfate and nitrate, which have a size range of 0.65-1.1 µm, calcium, which has a size range of 5.8-9 µm, and the meteorological factors of relative humidity and wind speed were responsible for haze pollution when the visibility was less than 10 km. Source apportionment using Positive Matrix Factorization showed six PM2.1 sources and seven PM2.1-9 common sources: secondary inorganic aerosol (25.1 % for fine particles vs. 9.8 % for coarse particles), coal combustion (17

  18. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to ∼30 m s -1 within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  19. Manufacturing of large size RF based -ve ion source with 8 drivers-challenges and learnings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Jaydeep; Patel, Hitesh; Singh, Mahendrajit; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) Ion Source for ITER Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) system, is an 8 driver based ion source, where the desired plasma density is produced by inductive coupling of RF power. The present paper describes the experience of developing a manufacturing design to meet the above mentioned requirements, feasibility assessment, prototyping carried out, parallel experiments in support of manufacturing and realization of sub-components along with their quality inspections activities performed. Additionally, paper also presents to the observations in terms of deviations and non-conformities encountered, as a part of learning for the future components

  20. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Säm [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Liu, Wei [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Glesener, Lindsay, E-mail: feffen@stanford.edu, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES ) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  1. The optimal on-source region size for detections with counting-type telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepser, S.

    2017-03-01

    Source detection in counting type experiments such as Cherenkov telescopes often involves the application of the classical Eq. (17) from the paper of Li & Ma (1983) to discrete on- and off-source regions. The on-source region is typically a circular area with radius θ in which the signal is expected to appear with the shape of the instrument point spread function (PSF). This paper addresses the question of what is the θ that maximises the probability of detection for a given PSF width and background event density. In the high count number limit and assuming a Gaussian PSF profile, the optimum is found to be at ζ∞2 ≈ 2.51 times the squared PSF width σPSF392. While this number is shown to be a good choice in many cases, a dynamic formula for cases of lower count numbers, which favour larger on-source regions, is given. The recipe to get to this parametrisation can also be applied to cases with a non-Gaussian PSF. This result can standardise and simplify analysis procedures, reduce trials and eliminate the need for experience-based ad hoc cut definitions or expensive case-by-case Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. An unprecedented UV/optical flare in TV Columbae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkody, P.; Mateo, M.

    1984-01-01

    A surprising, 2 mag, short time scale (hr) outburst of TV Col (2A 0526-328) was observed simultaneously at IUE and optical wavelengths in 1982 November. During this 'flare', the IUE emission lines of N v 1240, C IV 1550, and He II 1640, intensified by more than an order of magnitude and developed P Cygni profiles, indicating mass loss. Continuum fits with a power-law plus a blackbody from the UV through the optical showed a steepening of the UV power-law component and an increase in the temperature and size of the blackbody component during the flare activity. This unusual behavior is discussed in terms of an accretion disk instability.

  3. Optimal placement and sizing of wind / solar based DG sources in distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wanlin; Guo, Niao; Yu, Chunlai; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yu, Haiyang; Liu, Zhipeng; Cui, Jiapeng

    2017-06-01

    Proper placement and sizing of Distributed Generation (DG) in distribution system can obtain maximum potential benefits. This paper proposes quantum particle swarm algorithm (QPSO) based wind turbine generation unit (WTGU) and photovoltaic (PV) array placement and sizing approach for real power loss reduction and voltage stability improvement of distribution system. Performance modeling of wind and solar generation system are described and classified into PQ\\PQ (V)\\PI type models in power flow. Considering the WTGU and PV based DGs in distribution system is geographical restrictive, the optimal area and DG capacity limits of each bus in the setting area need to be set before optimization, the area optimization method is proposed . The method has been tested on IEEE 33-bus radial distribution systems to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Dynamics of suspended sediment concentration, flow discharge and sediment particle size interdependency to identify sediment source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-11-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of sediment yield is a key for proper watershed management. This study analyzed statistical characteristics and trends of suspended sediment concentration (SCS), flow discharge (FD) and sediment particle sizes using data from 24 gage stations scattered throughout the United States. Analysis showed significant time- and location-specific differences of these variables. The median values of SSC, FD and percentage of particle sizes smaller than 63 μm (P63) for all 24 gage stations were found to be 510.236 mg l-1 (right skewed), 45.406 m3 s-1 (left skewed) and 78.648% (right skewed), respectively. Most of the stations exhibited significant trends (P type and erosivity, watershed area, and soil erodibility) and human-affected (i.e., land use and hydraulic structures and water resources management) factors governing the study variables.

  5. Size, source and chemical composition as determinants of toxicity attributable to ambient particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Frank J.; Fussell, Julia C.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture that changes in time and space. It encompasses many different chemical components and physical characteristics, many of which have been cited as potential contributors to toxicity. Each component has multiple sources, and each source generates multiple components. Identifying and quantifying the influences of specific components or source-related mixtures on measures of health-related impacts, especially when particles interact with other co-pollutants, therefore represents one of the most challenging areas of environmental health research. Current knowledge does not allow precise quantification or definitive ranking of the health effects of PM emissions from different sources or of individual PM components and indeed, associations may be the result of multiple components acting on different physiological mechanisms. Some results do suggest a degree of differential toxicity, namely more consistent associations with traffic-related PM emissions, fine and ultrafine particles, specific metals and elemental carbon and a range of serious health effects, including increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory conditions. A carefully targeted programme of contemporary toxicological and epidemiological research, incorporating more refined approaches (e.g. greater speciation data, more refined modelling techniques, accurate exposure assessment and better definition of individual susceptibility) and optimal collaboration amongst multidisciplinary teams, is now needed to advance our understanding of the relative toxicity of particles from various sources, especially the components and reactions products of traffic. This will facilitate targeted abatement policies, more effective pollution control measures and ultimately, a reduction in the burden of disease attributable to ambient PM pollution.

  6. Grain Size and Heat Source Effect on the Drying Profile of Cocoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four sweat boxes were constructed with wooden material (0.95 x 0.25 x 0.25m) L x W x H and one electric bulb with 100,200,300 and 400watts rating hoisted in each box interchangeably. Cocoa bean cleaned and sorted into four different grain sizes samples (A, B, C, D) was subjected to drying till 13-14% moisture content ...

  7. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar flares; X-ray detectors; X-ray line emission and continuum; break energy; microflares. Abstract. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in ...

  8. Cyclical Variability of Prominences, CMEs and Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 21; Issue 3-4. Cyclical Variability of Prominences, CMEs and Flares. J. L. Ballester. Session V – Vector Magnetic Fields, Prominences, CMEs & Flares Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp ...

  9. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  10. Estimation of scattering contribution in the calibration of neutron devices with radionuclide sources in rooms of different sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khabaz Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calibrations of neutron devices used in area monitoring are often performed by radionuclide neutron sources. Device readings increase due to neutrons scattered by the surroundings and the air. The influence of said scattering effects have been investigated in this paper by performing Monte Carlo simulations for ten different radionuclide neutron sources inside several sizes of concrete wall spherical rooms (Rsp = 200 to 1500 cm. In order to obtain the parameters that relate the additional contribution from scattered neutrons, calculations using a polynomial fit model were evaluated. Obtained results show that the contribution of scattering is roughly independent of the geometric shape of the calibration room. The parameter that relates the room-return scattering has been fitted in terms of the spherical room radius, so as to reasonably accurately estimate the scattering value for each radionuclide neutron source in any geometry of the calibration room.

  11. Dietary Protein Source Influence on Body Size and Composition in Growing Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Daniel L.; Barry, R. Jeff; Powell, Mickie L.; Nagy, Tim R.; D'Abramo, L.R.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of nutritional components on growth and body composition outcomes has been demonstrated in multiple model organisms. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) have an established role in research laboratories for its utility in understanding developmental biology and genetics, the influence of diet composition on basic growth outcomes is less well demonstrated. In the current study, four protein sources were tested in isolation using isonitrogenous diets or combined using a defined lab ...

  12. Estimating the size of a methane emission point source at different scales: from local to landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Stuart N.; Connors, Sarah; Robinson, Andrew D.; Manning, Alistair J.; Jones, Pippa S. D.; Lowry, David; Nisbet, Euan; Skelton, Robert L.; Allen, Grant; Pitt, Joseph; Harris, Neil R. P.

    2017-06-01

    High methane (CH4) mixing ratios (up to 4 ppm) have occurred sporadically at our measurement site in Haddenham, Cambridgeshire, since July 2012. Isotopic measurements and back trajectories show that the source is the Waterbeach Waste Management Park 7 km SE of Haddenham. To investigate this further, measurements were made on 30 June and 1 July 2015 at other locations nearer to the source. Landfill emissions have been estimated using three different approaches at different scales; near source using the WindTrax inversion dispersion model, middle distance using a Gaussian plume (GP) model and at the landscape scale using the Numerical Atmospheric Modelling Environment (NAME) Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling (InTEM) inversion. The emission estimates derived using the WindTrax and Gaussian plume (GP) approaches agree well for the period of intense observations. Applying the Gaussian plume approach to all periods of elevated measurements seen at Haddenham produces year-round and monthly landfill emission estimates with an estimated annual emission of 11.6 Gg CH4 yr-1. The monthly emission estimates are highest in winter (2160 kg h-1 in February) and lowest in summer (620 kg h-1 in July). These data identify the effects of environmental conditions on landfill CH4 production and highlight the importance of year-round measurements to capture seasonal variability in CH4 emission.

  13. Size Matters: What Are the Characteristic Source Areas for Urban Planning Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hua; Fan, Chao; Myint, Soe W; Wang, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    Urban environmental measurements and observational statistics should reflect the properties generated over an adjacent area of adequate length where homogeneity is usually assumed. The determination of this characteristic source area that gives sufficient representation of the horizontal coverage of a sensing instrument or the fetch of transported quantities is of critical importance to guide the design and implementation of urban landscape planning strategies. In this study, we aim to unify two different methods for estimating source areas, viz. the statistical correlation method commonly used by geographers for landscape fragmentation and the mechanistic footprint model by meteorologists for atmospheric measurements. Good agreement was found in the intercomparison of the estimate of source areas by the two methods, based on 2-m air temperature measurement collected using a network of weather stations. The results can be extended to shed new lights on urban planning strategies, such as the use of urban vegetation for heat mitigation. In general, a sizable patch of landscape is required in order to play an effective role in regulating the local environment, proportional to the height at which stakeholders' interest is mainly concerned.

  14. Pulsations of microwave flaring emission at low and high frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Melnikov, V. F.; Su, Y.; Huang, G.

    2007-07-01

    A wavelet analysis of the flare-intensity variations has been carried out for a solar flare observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 and 34 GHz and the spectrometer of Purple Mountain Observatory at 4.5-7.5 GHz. The signals contain a well-pronounced periodicity with a period of P = 14-17 s and stable, coherent behavior at frequencies higher and lower than the peak frequency. We simulated the modulation of the gyrosynchrotron emission by fast sausage magnetoacoustic oscillations for the cases of low and high plasma density in the radio source. The synchronism of the pulsations at high and low frequencies can be realized only in the case of high plasma density, when the low-frequency turnover of the microwave spectrum is due to the Razin effect, not self-absorption.

  15. Electron Acceleration In Impulsive Solar Flares : extract of a thesis

    CERN Document Server

    Lenters, G T

    1999-01-01

    Impulsive solar flares generate a wide range of photon and particle emissions and hence provide an excellent backyard laboratory for studying particle acceleration processes in astrophysical plasmas. The source of the acceleration remains unidentified, but the basic observations are clear: (1) Hard X-ray and gamma-ray line emission occur simultaneously, indicating that electron and ion acceleration must occur simultaneously; (2) the electron and ion precipitation rates at the foot-points of the flare must be extremely large to account for the photon emission (∼1037 electrons s −1 and ∼1035 protons s−1, respectively), which means that replenishment of the acceleration region (which contains ≈1037 fully ionized hydrogen atoms) is a crucial issue; and (3) there are enhancements of the heavy ion abundances relative to normal coronal values. The basic model proposed assumes the generation of extremely low levels of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turb...

  16. Geochemical, Sulfur Isotopic Characteristics and Source Contributions of Size-Aggregated Aerosols Collected in Baring Head, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Michalski, G. M.; Davy, P.; Harvey, M.; Wilkins, B. P.; Katzman, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols are critical to the climate, human health, and the hydrological cycle in the atmosphere, yet the sources of sulfate in aerosols are not completely understood. In this work, we evaluated the sources of sulfate in size-aggregated aerosols from the Southern Pacific Ocean and the land of New Zealand using geochemical and isotopic analyses. Aerosols were collected at Baring Head, New Zealand between 6/30/15 to 8/4/16 using two collectors, one only collects Southern Pacific Ocean derived aerosols (open-ocean collector), the other collects aerosols from both the ocean and the land (all-direction collector). Each collector is equipped with two filters to sample size-aggregated aerosols (fine aerosols: DMS flux. The sources of sulfur in NSS-SO42- could be further determined by their d34S values. DMS emission is likely the sole sulfur source in the open-ocean collector as it shows constant DMS-like d34S signatures (15-18‰) throughout the year. Meanwhile, the d34S of NSS-SO42- in the all-direction collector display a seasonal trend: summer time d34S values are higher and DMS-like (15-18‰), indicating DMS emission is the dominant sulfur source; winter time d34S values are lower ( 6-12‰), therefore the sulfur is likely sourced from both DMS emission and terrestrial S input with low d34S values, such as volcanic activities, fossil fuel and wood burning.

  17. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  18. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  19. Neural network AE source location apart from structure size and material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Blaháček, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2010), s. 99-107 ISSN 0730-0050. [European Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing 2010 /29./. Vídeň, 08.09.2010-10.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/10/1430; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : AE source location * artificial neural network * arrival time profiles Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/search/abstract.php3?AbsID=10828

  20. The optimal on-source region size for detections with counting-type telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The on-source region is typically a circular area with radius θ in which the signal is expected to appear with the shape of the instrument point spread function (PSF). This paper addresses the question of what is the θ that maximises the probability of detection for a given PSF width and background event density. In the high count number limit and assuming a Gaussian PSF profile, the optimum is found to be at ζ 2 ∞ ∼2.51 times the squared PSF width σ 2 PSF39 . While this number is shown to be a good choice in many cases, a dynamic formula for cases of lower count numbers, which favour larger on-source regions, is given. The recipe to get to this parametrisation can also be applied to cases with a non-Gaussian PSF. This result can standardise and simplify analysis procedures, reduce trials and eliminate the need for experience-based ad hoc cut definitions or expensive case-by-case Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Considerations for Sample Preparation Using Size-Exclusion Chromatography for Home and Synchrotron Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    The success of a SAXS experiment for structural investigations depends on two precise measurements, the sample and the buffer background. Buffer matching between the sample and background can be achieved using dialysis methods but in biological SAXS of monodisperse systems, sample preparation is routinely being performed with size exclusion chromatography (SEC). SEC is the most reliable method for SAXS sample preparation as the method not only purifies the sample for SAXS but also almost guarantees ideal buffer matching. Here, I will highlight the use of SEC for SAXS sample preparation and demonstrate using example proteins that SEC purification does not always provide for ideal samples. Scrutiny of the SEC elution peak using quasi-elastic and multi-angle light scattering techniques can reveal hidden features (heterogeneity) of the sample that should be considered during SAXS data analysis. In some cases, sample heterogeneity can be controlled using a small molecule additive and I outline a simple additive screening method for sample preparation.

  2. Localization of the solar flare SF900610 in X-rays with the WATCH instrument of the GRANAT observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Kuzmin, A.G.; Shevchenko, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    -ray source do not coincide with the coordinates of the Ha-line flare. The X-ray source moved over the solar disk during the flare. This probably implies that, as the X-ray emission was generated, different parts of one loop or a system of magnetic loops dominated at different flare times.......During the solar flare of June 10, 1990, the WATCH instrument of the GRANAT space observatory obtained 110 localizations of the X-ray source in the X-ray range 8-20 keV. Its coordinates were measured with an accuracy of similar to2 arcmin at a 3sigma confidence level. The coordinates of the X...

  3. Assessment of respiratory disorders in relation to solution gas flaring activities in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    A study was conducted by Alberta Health to address the issue of whether or not flaring of solution gas has a negative impact on human health. The Flaring Working Group of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance initiated this study which focused on the assessment of the relationship between human health disorders (such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and upper respiratory infections) and solution gas flaring activities in rural, urban and aboriginal populations. The personal exposure to flaring emissions was estimated by physical proximity to the source of emissions. A small area was studied in which geographical variations in human health disorders were compared to geographical variations of socioeconomic and environmental factors. Data was gathered from 1989 to 1996 to evaluate long term average conditions and changes over the time period investigated. Notwithstanding physicians' claims for increased rates of respiratory infections and hospitalization attributed to solution gas flaring, the study found no evidence linking respiratory infections and solution gas flaring. This was the conclusion regardless of the measure of health outcomes, the rural-urban status, ethnicity, or age. Nevertheless, the study recommended identification of bio-markers of exposure and effect reflective of the compounds of interest, and the development of a responsive and comprehensive geographic information database that would allow data linkage at all geographic levels for different periods of time. refs., 10 tabs., 15 figs., 1 appendix

  4. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  5. Allothermal gasification of biomass using micron size biomass as external heat source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Li, Qian; Qi, Fangjie; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; He, Piwen

    2012-03-01

    An allothermal biomass gasification system using biomass micron fuel (BMF) as external heat source was developed. In this system, heat supplied to gasifier was generated from combustion of BMF. Biomass feedstock was gasified with steam and then tar in the produced gas was decomposed in a catalytic bed with NiO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst. Finally the production gas was employed as a substitute for civil fuel gas. An overall energy analysis of the system was also investigated. The results showed that the lower heating value of the product gas reached more than 12 MJ/Nm(3). The combusted BMF accounted for 26.8% of the total energy input. Allothermal gasification based on the substituted BMF for conventional energy was an efficient and economical technology to obtain bioenergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Size-resolved source apportionment of carbonaceous particulate matter in urban and rural sites in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Walter A.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    Very little is currently known about the relationship between exposure to different sources of ambient ultrafine particles (PM 0.1) and human health effects. If human health effects are enhanced by PM 0.1's ability to cross cell membranes, then more information is needed describing the sources of ultrafine particles that are deposited in the human respiratory system. The current study presents results for the source apportionment of airborne particulate matter in six size fractions smaller than 1.8 μm particle diameter including ultrafine particles (PM 0.1) in one of the most polluted air basins in the United States. Size-resolved source apportionment results are presented at an urban site and rural site in central California's heavily polluted San Joaquin Valley during the winter and summer months using a molecular marker chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) method. Respiratory deposition calculations for the size-resolved source apportionment results are carried out with the Multiple Path Particle Dosimetry Model ( MPPD v 2.0), including calculations for ultrafine (PM 0.1) source deposition. Diesel engines accounted for the majority of PM 0.1 and PM 1.8 EC at both the urban and rural sampling locations during both summer and winter seasons. Meat cooking accounted for 33-67% and diesel engines accounted for 15-21% of the PM 0.1 OC at Fresno. Meat cooking accounted for 22-26% of the PM 0.1 OC at the rural Westside location, while diesel engines accounted for 8-9%. Wood burning contributions to PM 0.1 OC increased to as much as 12% of PM 0.1 OC during the wintertime. The modest contribution of wood smoke reflects the success of emissions control programs over the past decade. In contrast to PM 0.1, PM 1.8 OC had a higher fraction of unidentified source contributions (68-85%) suggesting that this material is composed of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) or primary organic aerosol (POA) that has been processed by atmospheric chemical reactions. Meat cooking was the largest

  7. Source term estimation for small sized HTRs: status and further needs - a german approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.; Schenk, W.; Verfondern, K.

    2000-01-01

    The main results of German studies on source term estimation for small pebble-bed HTRs with their strict safety demands are outlined. Core heat-up events are no longer dominant for modern high quality fuel, but fission product transport during water ingress accidents (steam cycle plants) and depressurization is relevant, mainly due to remobilization of fission products which were plated-out in the course of normal operation or became dust borne. An important lack of knowledge was identified as concerns data on plate-out under normal operation, as well as on the behaviour of dust borne activity as a whole. Improved knowledge in this field is also important for maintenance/repair and design/shielding. For core heat-up events the influence of burn-up on temperature induced fission product release has to be measured for future high burn-up fuel. Also, transport mechanisms out of the He circuit into the environment require further examination. For water/steam ingress events mobilization of plated-out fission products by steam or water has to be considered in detail, along with steam interaction with kernels of particles with defective coatings. For source terms of depressurization, a more detailed knowledge of the flow pattern and shear forces on the various surfaces is necessary. In order to improve the knowledge on plate-out and dust in normal operation and to generate specimens for experimental remobilization studies, planning/design of plate-out/dust examination facilities which could be added to the next generation of HTRs (HTR10,HTTR) is proposed. For severe air ingress and reactivity accidents, behaviour of future advanced fuel elements has to be experimentally tested. (authors)

  8. Fermi -LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Allafort, A.; Bottacini, E.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E.; Caragiulo, M.; Costanza, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bonino, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Caraveo, P. A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cecchi, C., E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu, E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi -LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi -LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO . All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi -LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  9. Exploring the blazar zone in high-energy flares of FSRQs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziale, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Tavecchio, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Stamerra, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Mexico, Luis E, Erro 1, Sta. Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla, CP 72840 (Mexico); Uemura, M., E-mail: luigi.pacciani@iaps.inaf.it [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2014-07-20

    The gamma-ray emission offers a powerful diagnostic tool to probe jets and their surroundings in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). In particular, sources emitting at high energies (>10 GeV) give us the strongest constraints. This motivates us to start a systematic study of flares with bright emission above 10 GeV, examining archival data of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. At the same time, we began to trigger Target of Opportunity observations to the Swift observatory at the occurrence of high-energy flares, obtaining a wide coverage of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for several FSRQs during flares. Among others, we investigate the SED of a peculiar flare of 3C 454.3, showing a remarkably hard gamma-ray spectrum, quite different from the brightest flares of this source, and a bright flare of CTA 102. We modeled the SED in the framework of the one-zone leptonic model, using also archival optical spectroscopic data to derive the luminosity of the broad lines and thus estimate the disk luminosity, from which the structural parameters of the FSRQ nucleus can be inferred. The model allowed us to evaluate the magnetic field intensity in the blazar zone and to locate the emitting region of gamma-rays in the particular case in which gamma-ray spectra show neither absorption from the broad-line region (BLR) nor the Klein-Nishina curvature expected in leptonic models assuming the BLR as the source of seed photons for the External Compton scenario. For FSRQs bright above 10 GeV, we were able to identify short periods lasting less than one day characterized by a high rate of high-energy gamma-rays and hard gamma-ray spectra. We discussed the observed spectra and variability timescales in terms of injection and cooling of energetic particles, arguing that these flares could be triggered by magnetic reconnection events or turbulence in the flow.

  10. Non-Local Diffusion of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, N. H.; Emslie, G.; Kontar, E.

    2017-12-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  11. Reconnection Mediated by Magnetic Fractures and the Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2018-03-01

    Reconnection of sheared magnetic fields is commonly treated by regarding the component perpendicular to the antiparallel components as a largely inert guide field. In this paper an alternative is proposed in which the free energy residing in the shear field is being converted prior to reconnection. This happens in high-density, dissipative current sheets bordering the reconnection site. A global scenario is presented in which low-intensity currents out of the photosphere are converging into the narrow, high-intensity currents at high altitude. This is enabled by the obliqueness of the latter. The very short timescale of the energy conversion causes a lateral propagation of the current sheets. In a quasi-stationary situation, it balances the reconnection rate, which turns out to be much lower than in guide-field approaches. Another important consequence of the obliqueness is the field-parallel emission of runaway electrons. Accelerated up to tens of keV, they are possibly important contributors to the production of hard X-rays during the impulsive phase of a flare, but only in areas of upward-directed currents. Quantitative evaluation of the model predicts various potentially observable properties, such as width and propagation speed of the generated flare ribbons, spatial dependences of the electron spectrum, size of the area of energy deposition, and successive decrease of the shear angle between conjugate footpoints. The presented theoretical model can account for the observed brightness asymmetry of flare ribbons with respect to the direction of the vertical currents.

  12. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  13. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  14. Identifying core domains to assess flare in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Hewlett, Sarah; Bingham, Clifton O

    2012-01-01

    For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is no consensus on how to define and assess flare. Variability in flare definitions impairs understanding of findings across studies and limits ability to pool results. The OMERACT RA Flare Group sought to identify domains to define RA flares from patient...

  15. Source apportionment of aerosol particles at a European air pollution hot spot using particle number size distributions and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Cecilia; Pokorná, Petra; Hovorka, Jan; Masiol, Mauro; Topinka, Jan; Zhao, Yongjing; Křůmal, Kamil; Cliff, Steven; Mikuška, Pavel; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-03-01

    Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region (Czech Republic) is a European air pollution hot spot for airborne particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ultrafine particles (UFPs). Air pollution source apportionment is essential for implementation of successful abatement strategies. UFPs or nanoparticles of diameter pollutants, organic markers, and associations between the NSD factors and chemical composition factors were used to identify the pollution sources. The PMF on the NSD reveals two factors in the ultrafine size range: industrial UFPs (28%, number mode diameter - NMD 45 nm), industrial/fresh road traffic nanoparticles (26%, NMD 26 nm); three factors in the accumulation size range: urban background (24%, NMD 93 nm), coal burning (14%, volume mode diameter - VMD 0.5 μm), regional pollution (3%, VMD 0.8 μm) and one factor in the coarse size range: industrial coarse particles/road dust (2%, VMD 5 μm). The PMF analysis of PM 0.09-1.15 revealed four factors: SIA/CC/BB (52%), road dust (18%), sinter/steel (16%), iron production (16%). The factors in the ultrafine size range resolved with NSD have a positive correlation with sinter/steel production and iron production factors resolved with chemical composition. Coal combustion factor resolved with NSD has moderate correlation with SIA/CC/BB factor. The organic markers homohopanes correlate with coal combustion and the levoglucosan correlates with urban background. The PMF applications to NSD and chemical composition datasets are complementary. PAHs in PM 1 were found to be associated with coal combustion factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of Sub-Millimeter-Size Powerful X-Ray Sources in Low-Impedance Rod-Pinch Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the paper, experiments on the formation of a low-impedance diode and a focused electron beam as a result of detachment of radial wires, accelerated by the current of a high-current generator, from the rod anode have been described. In the experiments, along with studies of conditions for compact focusing of the electron beam and effective generation of hard x-rays, the shape of the tip of the anode rod is determined at which the x-ray source is point-sized when viewed in the radial direction.

  17. A new method to prepare colloids of size-controlled clusters from a matrix assembly cluster source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rongsheng; Jian, Nan; Murphy, Shane; Bauer, Karl; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-05-01

    A new method for the production of colloidal suspensions of physically deposited clusters is demonstrated. A cluster source has been used to deposit size-controlled clusters onto water-soluble polymer films, which are then dissolved to produce colloidal suspensions of clusters encapsulated with polymer molecules. This process has been demonstrated using different cluster materials (Au and Ag) and polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, and polyethylene glycol). Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the clusters before and after colloidal dispersion confirms that the polymers act as stabilizing agents. We propose that this method is suitable for the production of biocompatible colloids of ultraprecise clusters.

  18. Meiofauna as food source for small-sized demersal fish in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schückel, Sabine; Sell, Anne F.; Kihara, Terue C.; Koeppen, Annemarie; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reiss, Henning

    2013-06-01

    Meiofauna play an essential role in the diet of small and juvenile fish. However, it is less well documented which meiofaunal prey groups in the sediment are eaten by fish. Trophic relationships between five demersal fish species (solenette, goby, scaldfish, dab <20 cm and plaice <20 cm) and meiofaunal prey were investigated by means of comparing sediment samples and fish stomach contents collected seasonally between January 2009 and January 2010 in the German Bight. In all seasons, meiofauna in the sediment was numerically dominated by nematodes, whereas harpacticoids dominated in terms of occurrence and biomass. Between autumn and spring, the harpacticoid community was characterized by Pseudobradya minor and Halectinosoma canaliculatum, and in summer by Longipedia coronata. Meiofaunal prey dominated the diets of solenette and gobies in all seasons, occurred only seasonally in the diet of scaldfish and dab, and was completely absent in the diet of plaice. For all fish species (excluding plaice) and in each season, harpacticoids were the most important meiofauna prey group in terms of occurrence, abundance and biomass. High values of Ivlev's index of selectivity for Pseudobradya spp. in winter and Longipedia spp. in summer provided evidence that predation on harpacticoids was species-selective, even though both harpacticoids co-occurred in high densities in the sediments. Most surficial feeding strategies of the studied fish species and emergent behaviours of Pseudobradya spp. and Longipedia spp. might have caused this prey selection. With increasing fish sizes, harpacticoid prey densities decreased in the fish stomachs, indicating a diet change towards larger benthic prey during the ontogeny of all fish species investigated.

  19. Effect of protein source on resistive-training-induced changes in body composition and muscle size in older men123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haub, Mark D; Wells, Amanda M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Campbell, Wayne W

    2008-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with reductions in muscle mass and strength, but nutrition and exercise interventions can delay this progression and enhance the quality of life. Objective We examined whether the predominant source of protein consumed by older men influenced measures of muscle size and strength, body composition, resting energy expenditure, and skeletal muscle creatine concentrations in response to 12 wk of resistive training. Design After consuming a lactoovovegetarian (LOV) diet for 2 wk, 21 men aged 65 ± 5 y were randomly assigned to either consume a beef-containing (BC) diet (n = 10) or to continue the LOV diet (n = 11) throughout resistive training. The BC diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from beef and the LOV diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from textured vegetable protein (soy) sources. The remaining protein in the diets came from self-selected LOV sources. Results The mean total protein intake for both groups ranged from 1.03 to 1.17 g · kg−1 · d−1 during the intervention. Men in both groups had improvements (14–38%) in maximal dynamic strength of all the muscle groups trained with no significant difference between groups. With resistive training, cross-sectional muscle area of the vastus lateralis increased in both groups (4.2 ± 3.0% and 6.0 ± 2.6% for the LOV and BC groups, respectively) with no significant difference between groups. Body composition, resting energy expenditure, and concentrations of muscle creatine, phosphocreatine, and total creatine did not differ significantly between groups or change over time. Conclusions These data suggest that increases in muscle strength and size were not influenced by the predominant source of protein consumed by older men with adequate total protein intake. PMID:12197993

  20. Statistics of Flares Sweeping across Sunspots

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Leping; Zhang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Flare ribbons are always dynamic, and sometimes sweep across sunspots. Examining 588 (513 M-class and 75 X-class) flare events observed by Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) satellite and Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) from 1998 May to 2009 May, we choose the event displaying that one of the flare ribbons completely sweeps across the umbra of a main sunspot of the corresponding active region, and finally obtain 20 (7 X-class and 13 M-class) events as our sample. In each even...

  1. What is the Relationship Between the Properties of Photospheric Flows and Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian; Li, Y.; Schuck, P. W.; Fisher, G. H.

    2009-05-01

    We estimated photospheric velocities by separately applying the Fourier Local Correlation Tracking (FLCT) and Differential Affine Velocity Estimator (DAVE) methods to 2708 co-registered pairs of SOHO/MDI magnetograms, with nominal 96-minute cadence, from 46 active regions (ARs) from 1996-1998 over the time interval κ45 when each AR was within 45° of disk center. For each magnetogram pair, we computed the average estimated radial magnetic field, BR and each tracking method produced an independently estimated flow field, u. We then quantitatively characterized these magnetic and flow fields by computing several extrinsic and intrinsic properties of each; extrinsic properties scale with AR size, while intrinsic properties do not depend directly on AR size. Intrinsic flow properties included moments of speeds, horizontal divergences, and radial curls; extrinsic flow properties included included sums of these properties, and a crude proxy for the ideal Poynting flux, ∑ |u| BR2. Several quantities derived from BR were also computed, including: total unsigned flux, Φ a measure of the amount of unsigned flux near strong-field polarity inversion lines (SPILs), R and ∑ BR2. Next, using correlation and discriminant analysis, we investigated the associations between derived properties and average flare flux determined from the GOES flare catalog, when averaged over both κ45 and shorter time windows, of 6 and 24 hours. Our AR sample included both flaring and flare-quiet ARs; the latter did not flare above GOES C1.0 level during κ45. Among magnetic properties, we found R to be most strongly associated with flare flux. Among extrinsic flow properties, the proxy Poynting flux, ∑ |u| BR2, was most strongly associated with flux, at a level comparable to that of R. All intrinsic flow properties studied were more poorly associated with flare flux than these magnetic properties.

  2. A comparative sizing analysis of a renewable energy supplied stand-alone house considering both demand side and source side dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elma, Onur; Selamogullari, Ugur Savas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Backup sizing analyses for PV–Wind energy supplied stand-alone house are completed. ► Source and demand side dynamics are considered for the first time in backup sizing. ► Backup size is reduced by 10% compared to backup size found with hourly values. ► The importance of data resolution on sizing study in such systems is shown. -- Abstract: Solar and wind energy use to supply the electrical demand of a stand-alone residential house is investigated. Combining solar and wind energy sources provide more reliable power source for stand-alone applications since they complement each other. Backup units (battery/supercapacitor) are also needed for uninterrupted energy. For a proper backup sizing in such systems, high resolution load data, wind speed and solar radiation data must be used as compared to the use of hourly averaged data found in literature. In this study, high resolution data on both load side and source side are collected experimentally. Then, collected data used as input to system simulations in Matlab/Simulink for sizing the backup in the considered hybrid power system. Backup state of the charge (SOC) is used as decision criteria. It is shown that, when load and source dynamics are considered, approximately 10% less backup size is required compared to backup size found with hourly averaged values. The study shows the importance of data resolution on backup sizing in such systems and could be a guide for renewable energy system designers.

  3. [Size distribution of particle and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particle emissions from simulated emission sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai-Huan; Tian, Na; Shang, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Su-Fen; Chen, Xiao-Qiu; Wu, Shui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Particles from cooking lampblack, biomass and plastics burning smoke, gasoline vehicular exhausts and gasoline generator exhausts were prepared in a resuspension test chamber and collected using a cascade MOUDI impactor. A total of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with particles were analyzed by GC-MS. The results showed that there were two peaks in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm and 2.5-10 microm for cooking lampblack, and only one peak in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm for straw and wood burning smoke. But there were no clear peak for plastics burning smoke. The peak for gasoline vehicular exhausts was found in the range of 2.5-10 microm due to the influence of water vapor associated with particles, while the particles from gasoline generator exhausts were mainly in the range of < or = 2.5 microm (accounting for 93% of the total mass). The peak in 2.5-10 microm was clear for cooking lampblack and gasoline vehicular exhausts. The peak in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm became more and more apparent with the increase of PAHs molecular weight. The fraction of PAH on particles less than 1.0 microm to that on the total particles increased along with PAH's molecular weight. Phenanthrene was the dominant compound for cooking lampblack and combustion smoke, while gasoline vehicular exhausts and generator exhausts were characterized with significantly high levels of naphthalene and benzo[g, h, i] perylene, respectively. The distribution of source characteristic ratios indicated that PAHs from cooking lampblack and biomass burning were close and they were different from those of vehicular exhausts and generator exhausts.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar X-ray flares from the 2XMM catalog (Pye+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, J. P.; Rosen, S.; Fyfe, D.; Schroeder, A. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present a uniform, large-scale survey of X-ray flare emission, based on the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue and its associated data products. Our survey comprises both XMM-targeted active stars and those observed serendipitously in the field-of-view of each observation. The 2XMM Catalogue and the associated time-series ('light-curve') data products have been used as the basis for the survey of X-ray flares from cool stars in the Hipparcos Tycho-2 catalogue. Our sample contains ~130 flares with well-observed profiles; they originate from ~70 stars. (5 data files).

  5. Electron acceleration in solar-flare magnetic traps: Model properties and their observational confirmations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2017-09-01

    Using an analytical solution of the kinetic equation, we have investigated the model properties of the coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in the limb flare of July 19, 2012. We calculated the emission spectrum at the flare loop footpoints in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and showed it to be consistent with the observed one. The spectrum of the coronal source located above the flare loop was calculated in the thin-target approximation. In this case, the slope of the hard X-ray spectrum is reproduced very accurately, but the intensity of the coronal emission is lower than the observed one by several times. Previously, we showed that this contradiction is completely removed if the additional (relative to the primary acceleration in the reconnecting current layer) electron acceleration in the coronal magnetic trap that contracts in the transverse direction and decreases in length during the impulsive flare phase is taken into account. In this paper we study in detail this effect in the context of a more realistic flare scenario, where a whole ensemble of traps existed in the hard X-ray burst time, each of which was at different stages of its evolution: formation, collapse, destruction. Our results point not only to the existence of first-order Fermi acceleration and betatron electron heating in solar flares but also to their high efficiency. Highly accurate observations of a specific flare are used as an example to show that the previously predicted theoretical features of the model find convincing confirmations.

  6. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; et al.

    2015-01-23

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10(50) erg s(–)(1), makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  7. Thermal and Nonthermal Emissions of a Composite Flare Derived from NoRH and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; White, Stephen M.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Masuda, Satoshi; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-12-01

    Differential emission measure (DEM) derived from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory is used in the analysis of a solar flare observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). The target was a composite event consisting of an impulsive flare, SOL2015-06-21T01:42 (GOES class M2.0), and a gradual flare, SOL2015-06-21T02:36 (M2.6), for which separation of thermal plasma heating from nonthermal particle acceleration was of major interest. We have calculated the thermal free-free intensity maps with the AIA-derived DEM and compared them against the observed NoRH maps to attribute the difference to the nonthermal component. In this way, we were able to locate three distinct sources: the major source with thermal and nonthermal components mixed, a nonthermal source devoid of thermal particles, and a thermal source lacking microwave emission. Both the first and the second nonthermal sources produced impulsively rising 17 GHz intensities and moved away from the local magnetic polarization inversion lines in correlation with the flare radiation. In contrast, the thermal sources stay in fixed locations and show temporal variations of the temperature and emission measure uncorrelated with the flare radiation. We interpret these distinct properties as indicating that nonthermal sources are powered by magnetic reconnection and thermal sources passively receive energy from the nonthermal donor. The finding of these distinct properties between thermal and nonthermal sources demonstrates the microwave and EUV emission measure combined diagnostics.

  8. 40 CFR 63.987 - Flare requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... at least one of the following addresses: 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959; or... millimeters of mercury (30 inches of mercury). (iii) The actual exit velocity of a flare shall be determined...

  9. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  10. Contribution of Tula Refinery flaring emissions to the Mexico megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Victor; Molina, Luisa; Sosa, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    Flaring is an important source of greenhouse gases, particulate matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in both upstream and downstream operations in the oil and gas industry. In 2010 Mexico was the eleventh emitting country with 2.5 billion cubic meters of gas flared (World Bank, 2012). Black carbon (a component of soot) emissions from flaring facilities are of particular interest because soot is considered a short-lived climate forcer (SLCF) (UNEP, 2011). In 2011 there were 23 megacities of at least 10 million inhabitants. It is expected that this number increase to 37 by 2025, which will include one more in Northern America (NA) and two more in Latin America (UN, 2012). International collaborative projects like MILAGRO in NA and MEGAPOLI/CityZen in Europe, have been conducted to assess the impact of megacities air pollution at several scales. The former focused on the air pollution plume of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA), the largest megacity in NA. This work studies the contribution of flaring emissions from Tula Refinery to regional air quality. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order to estimate emission rates of combustion by-products of interest for air quality. Mass flow rates of acetylene, ethylene, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, soot and sulfur dioxide are obtained. The emission rates of NO2 and SO2 are compared with measurements obtained at Tula as part of MILAGRO field campaign. The rates of soot, VOCs and CO emissions are compared with estimates obtained by Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (IMP). The second stage takes the flaring emission rates of the aforementioned species as inputs to WRF-Chem in order to simulate the chemical transport of the plume from 22 March to 27 March of 2006. The air quality model presented reliable performance of the resolved meteorology, with respect to the Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE

  11. FR-type radio sources in COSMOS: relation of radio structure to size, accretion modes and large-scale environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulaki, Eleni; Faustino Jimenez Andrade, Eric; Delvecchio, Ivan; Karim, Alexander; Smolčić, Vernesa; Magnelli, Benjamin; Bertoldi, Frank; Schinnener, Eva; Sargent, Mark; Finoguenov, Alexis; VLA COSMOS Team

    2018-01-01

    The radio sources associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) can exhibit a variety of radio structures, from simple to more complex, giving rise to a variety of classification schemes. The question which still remains open, given deeper surveys revealing new populations of radio sources, is whether this plethora of radio structures can be attributed to the physical properties of the host or to the environment. Here we present an analysis on the radio structure of radio-selected AGN from the VLA-COSMOS Large Project at 3 GHz (JVLA-COSMOS; Smolčić et al.) in relation to: 1) their linear projected size, 2) the Eddington ratio, and 3) the environment their hosts lie within. We classify these as FRI (jet-like) and FRII (lobe-like) based on the FR-type classification scheme, and compare them to a sample of jet-less radio AGN in JVLA-COSMOS. We measure their linear projected sizes using a semi-automatic machine learning technique. Their Eddington ratios are calculated from X-ray data available for COSMOS. As environmental probes we take the X-ray groups (hundreds kpc) and the density fields (~Mpc-scale) in COSMOS. We find that FRII radio sources are on average larger than FRIs, which agrees with literature. But contrary to past studies, we find no dichotomy in FR objects in JVLA-COSMOS given their Eddington ratios, as on average they exhibit similar values. Furthermore our results show that the large-scale environment does not explain the observed dichotomy in lobe- and jet-like FR-type objects as both types are found on similar environments, but it does affect the shape of the radio structure introducing bents for objects closer to the centre of an X-ray group.

  12. Physics of Coupled CME and Flare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-21

    eruption of combined flare-CME systems, as opposed to flares or CME in isolation. This work uses solar synoptic imaging and irradiance data from both...numbers provides a better picture of solar activity. One can characterize what was seen on the projection board. To understand and develop an...over time, a more accurate picture of solar activity can be obtained from a telescope with multiple images than a single observation once a day. These

  13. Distribution and sources of organic matter in size-fractionated nearshore sediments off the Barcelona city (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Collazos, Lucía; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Guillén, Jorge; Duran, Ruth; Cabelloa, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    Continental shelves are recognized to play a key role in the biogeochemical cycle of carbon, linking terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs. In this study we investigate the physical and biogeochemical processes that control the source, transport and fate of organic carbon (OC) in the continental shelf off Barcelona city, in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Surface sediment samples were collected from depths of 10-40 m during late summer and autumn 2012. Grain size and biogeochemical parameters such as OC, its stable isotope δ13C, total nitrogen (TN) and OC/TN ratios were analysed in size-fractionated sediments. The influence of environmental factors over the study area was determined using hydrological and oceanographic time series, together with video images of the Barcelona coast line and nearshore region. We have found a wide range of OC contents, from 0.13 to 8.68%, depending on water depth and sediment particle size. The highest OC concentration was always found in the clay fraction (63 μm) that contained terrestrial plant debris. Wave activity, discharge of the Besòs River and the "Espigó" de Ginebra; outfall were the main mechanisms controlling the sorting of sediments by their grain size and thus the distribution of OC in the inner shelf off Barcelona. In addition, we observed that the organic matter in clay particles was progressively degraded seawards, probably because these particles remain suspended in the water column much more time compared to those that are heavier and, therefore, they are exposed for longer time periods to oxygenated conditions. Both OC/TN ratios and δ13C values found suggest that the organic matter preserved was predominantly land supplied.

  14. Modelling blazar flaring using a time-dependent fluid jet emission model - an explanation for orphan flares and radio lags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, William J.

    2018-01-01

    Blazar jets are renowned for their rapid violent variability and multiwavelength flares, however, the physical processes responsible for these flares are not well understood. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent inhomogeneous fluid jet emission model for blazars. We model optically thick radio flares for the first time and show that they are delayed with respect to the prompt optically thin emission by ∼months to decades, with a lag that increases with the jet power and observed wavelength. This lag is caused by a combination of the travel time of the flaring plasma to the optically thin radio emitting sections of the jet and the slow rise time of the radio flare. We predict two types of flares: symmetric flares - with the same rise and decay time, which occur for flares whose duration is shorter than both the radiative lifetime and the geometric path-length delay time-scale; extended flares - whose luminosity tracks the power of particle acceleration in the flare, which occur for flares with a duration longer than both the radiative lifetime and geometric delay. Our model naturally produces orphan X-ray and γ-ray flares. These are caused by flares that are only observable above the quiescent jet emission in a narrow band of frequencies. Our model is able to successfully fit to the observed multiwavelength flaring spectra and light curves of PKS1502+106 across all wavelengths, using a transient flaring front located within the broad-line region.

  15. High-cadence and High-resolution Hα Imaging Spectroscopy of a Circular Flare's Remote Ribbon with IBIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Na; Tritschler, Alexandra; Jing, Ju; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Reardon, Kevin; Denker, Carsten; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2013-06-01

    We present an unprecedented high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopic observation of a C4.1 flare taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) in conjunction with the adaptive optics system at the 76 cm Dunn Solar Telescope on 2011 October 22 in the active region NOAA 11324. Such a two-dimensional spectroscopic observation covering the entire evolution of a flare ribbon with high spatial (0.''1 pixel-1 image scale), cadence (4.8 s), and spectral (0.1 Å step size) resolution is rarely reported. The flare consists of a main circular ribbon that occurred in a parasitic magnetic configuration and a remote ribbon that was observed by the IBIS. Such a circular-ribbon flare with a remote brightening is predicted in three-dimensional fan-spine reconnection but so far has been rarely studied. During the flare impulsive phase, we define "core" and "halo" structures in the observed ribbon based on IBIS narrowband images in the Hα line wing and line center. Examining the Hα emission spectra averaged in the flare core and halo areas, we find that only those from the flare cores show typical nonthermal electron beam heating characteristics that have been revealed by previous theoretical simulations and observations of flaring Hα line profiles. These characteristics include broad and centrally reversed emission spectra, excess emission in the red wing with regard to the blue wing (i.e., red asymmetry), and redshifted bisectors of the emission spectra. We also observe rather quick timescales for the heating (~30 s) and cooling (~14-33 s) in the flare core locations. Therefore, we suggest that the flare cores revealed by IBIS track the sites of electron beam precipitation with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. The flare cores show two-stage motion (a parallel motion along the ribbon followed by an expansion motion perpendicular to the ribbon) during the two impulsive phases of the flare. Some cores jump quickly (30 km s-1) between discrete

  16. Solar Flare Termination Shock and Synthetic Emission Line Profiles of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lijia [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Reeves, Kathy; Raymond, John, E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena that occur in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the TS has been recently related to spectral hardening of a flare’s hard X-ray spectra at energies >300 keV. Observations of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) spacecraft have found significant redshifts with >100 km s{sup −1}, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to detect such a redshift with IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare TSs. Using a magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe xxi 1354.08 line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself in the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line.

  17. Effect of flow parameters on flare stack generator noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinn, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    The SoundPLAN Computer Noise Model was used to determine the general effect of flare noise in a community adjacent to a petrochemical plant. Tests were conducted to determine the effect of process flow conditions and the pulsating flame on the flare stack generator noise from both a refinery flare and process flare. Flaring under normal plant operations, the flaring of fuel gas and the flaring of hydrogen were the three conditions that were tested. It was shown that the steam flow rate was the determining factor in the flare stack generated noise. Variations in the water seal level in the flare line surge tank increased or decreased the gas flowrate, which resulted in a pulsating flame. The period and amplitude of the pulsating noise from the flare stacks was determined by measuring several parameters. Flare stack noise oscillations were found to be greater for the process flare than for the refinery flare stack. It was suggested that minimizing the amount of steam fed to the flare and improving the burner design would minimize noise. 2 tabs., 6 figs

  18. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ronald J. [Code 7650, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ko, Yuan-Kuen, E-mail: ronald.murphy@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: yuan-kuen.ko@nrl.navy.mil [Code 7680, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s{sup −1} shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30–100 keV; i.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30–100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30–100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  19. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Proof-of-Concept Units for the Advanced Medium-Sized Mobile Power Sources (AMMPS) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriulli, JB

    2002-04-03

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of the proof-of-concept units within the Advanced Medium-sized Mobile Power Sources (AMMPS) program. The design used a small, lightweight diesel engine, a permanent magnet alternator, power electronics and digital controls as outlined in the philosophy detailed previously. One small proof-of-concept unit was completed and delivered to the military. The unit functioned well but was not optimized at the time of delivery to the military. A tremendous amount of experience was gained during this phase that can be used in the development of any follow-on AMMPS production systems. Lessons learned and recommendations for follow-on specifications are provided. The unit demonstrated that significant benefits are possible with the new design philosophy. Trade-offs will have to be made but many of the advantages appear to be within the technical grasp of the market.

  1. Observation of quasi-periodic pulsations in the solar flare SF 900610

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Kuz'min, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    A quasi-periodic component was found at the maximum of the X-ray light curve for the June 10, 1990 solar flare detected by the Granat observatory. The pulsation period was 143.2 +/- 0.8 s. The intensity of the pulsing component is not constant; the maximum amplitude of the pulsations is similar to5......% of the total flare intensity. An analysis of the data showed the characteristic size of the magnetic loop responsible for these pulsations to be similar to(1-3) x 10(10) cm....

  2. Detection of pair plasma in recent V404 Cygni flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland; Siegert, Thomas; Greiner, Jochen; Krause, Martin; Beloborodov, Andrei; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Guglielmetti, Fabrizia; Rodriguez, Jerome; Strong, Andrew; Zhangh, Xiaoling

    2016-03-01

    The release of gravitational energy from the accretion of matter onto a black hole still is a mystery. Observationally, the thermal radiadion from an inner accretion disk and its high energy tail are manifestations of processes in the inner region, while the ejection of radio jets demonstrates the energy and plasma outflow on larger scales. Models include materialisation of energy from the central source in the form of pair creation within a region of high density that is opaque to all kinds of radiation. At some point leptons may escape the dense inner regions, and annihilation of positrons in nearby components such as the corona and accretion disk could be expected. Transient line features have been reported from two sources before, and tentatively associated with positron annihilation. Flaring of the microquasar V404 Cygni in June-July 2015 allowed to test this model again. With SPI on INTEGRAL, which has demonstrated excellent measurement capability for positron annihilation in the Galaxy, we now find characteristic signatures of the annihilation of positrons across the 200-1000 keV energy range during this flaring phase. We discuss details of the positron annihilation spectra, and what they might tell us about pair plasma in the central energy source of microquasars.

  3. Monitoring the size and protagonists of the drug market: combining supply and demand data sources and estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The size of the illicit drug market is an important indicator to assess the impact on society of an important part of the illegal economy and to evaluate drug policy and law enforcement interventions. The extent of illicit drug use and of the drug market can essentially only be estimated by indirect methods based on indirect measures and on data from various sources, as administrative data sets and surveys. The combined use of several methodologies and data sets allows to reduce biases and inaccuracies of estimates obtained on the basis of each of them separately. This approach has been applied to Italian data. The estimation methods applied are capture-recapture methods with latent heterogeneity and multiplier methods. Several data sets have been used, both administrative and survey data sets. First, the retail dealer prevalence has been estimated on the basis of administrative data, then the user prevalence by multiplier methods. Using information about behaviour of dealers and consumers from survey data, the average amount of a substance used or sold and the average unit cost have been estimated and allow estimating the size of the drug market. The estimates have been obtained using a supply-side approach and a demand-side approach and have been compared. These results are in turn used for estimating the interception rate for the different substances in term of the value of the substance seized with respect to the total value of the substance to be sold at retail prices.

  4. Application of digital imaging techniques to flare monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Shaun J; Yan, Yong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for detecting and monitoring flares in harsh industrial environments with the use of an imaging sensor combined with digital image processing. Flare images are captured via an imaging fibre and analysed to detect the flare's presence and region of interest. The flare characteristics are then determined using various image processing algorithms. A prototype system is designed, constructed and evaluated on a purpose built laboratory scale flare test rig. Results indicate that the imaging based technique has potential for the detection, monitoring and analysis of flares amidst various background conditions in the chemical and oil industries for plant safety, pollution prevention and control.

  5. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF C-CLASS FLARE FOOTPOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, L., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the decay phase of a C-class flare in full-Stokes imaging spectropolarimetry with quasi-simultaneous measurements in the photosphere (6302.5 A line) and in the chromosphere (8542 A line) with the IBIS instrument. We analyze data from two fields of view, each spanning about 40'' Multiplication-Sign 80'' and targeting the two footpoints of the flare. A region of interest is identified from V/I images: a patch of opposite polarity in the smaller sunspot's penumbra. We find unusual flows in this patch at photospheric levels: a Doppler shift of -4 km s{sup -1}, but also a possible radial inflow into the sunspot of 4 km s{sup -1}. Such patches seem to be common during flares, but only high-resolution observations allowed us to see the inflow, which may be related to future flares observed in this region. Chromospheric images show variable overlying emission and flows and unusual Stokes profiles. We also investigate the irregular penumbra, whose formation may be blocked by the opposite polarity patch and flux emergence. The 40 minute temporal evolution depicts the larger of the flare ribbons becoming fainter and changing its shape. Measurable photospheric magnetic fields remain constant and we do not detect flare energy transport down from the chromosphere. We find no clear indications of impact polarization in the 8542 A line. We cannot exclude the possibility of impact polarization, because weaker signals may be buried in the prominent Zeeman signatures or it may have been present earlier during the flare.

  7. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Observation of a Sub-A Class Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States); Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley (United States); Hannah, Iain G. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Grefenstette, Brian W. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (United States); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque (United States); Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We report a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array ( NuSTAR ) observation of a solar microflare, SOL2015-09-01T04. Although it was too faint to be observed by the GOES X-ray Sensor, we estimate the event to be an A0.1 class flare in brightness. This microflare, with only ∼5 counts s{sup −1} detector{sup −1} observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ( RHESSI ), is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flare in the existing literature. The microflare occurred during a solar pointing by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical observatory, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed HXR microflare spectra and images. The microflare exhibits HXR properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, earlier peak time with higher energy, spatial dimensions similar to the RHESSI microflares, and a high-energy excess beyond an isothermal spectral component during the impulsive phase. The microflare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical size; observations are consistent with an origin via the interaction of at least two magnetic loops. We estimate the increase in thermal energy at the time of the microflare to be 2.4 × 10{sup 27} erg. The observation suggests that flares do indeed scale down to extremely small energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flare-like” properties.

  8. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutova, M. P.; Frank, Z.; Hagenaar, H.; Berger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  9. Flares Producing Well-organized Post-flare Arcades (Slinkies) Have Early Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryutova, M. P.; Frank, Z.; Hagenaar, H.; Berger, T.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not "produce" such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the "non-slinky" flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  10. Source quantification of size and season resolved aerosols in a semi-urban area of Indo-Gangetic plain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, R. K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Sharma, V.; Vestenius, M.; Kerminen, V.; Vignati, E.; Kulmala, M. T.; Lihavainen, H.

    2012-12-01

    This study describes a one year measurements of size-segregated aerosols at a semi-urban site in Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP), India, South Asia with focus on source quantification applied to organic and inorganic chemical species data using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), trajectory analysis and conditional probability function (CPF) methods. The campaign was planned in the framework of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) project. In light of the above, Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and Joint Research Centre (JRC) conducted aerosol mass measurements in Gual Pahari, India from April 2008 to March 2009. The average mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) aerosols are higher during the postmonsoon (October-November) and winter (December- February) compared to that during the summer season (March-May). Fine and coarse fraction concentrations observed are higher during the post-monsoon & winter months due to low and stable boundary layer. Concentrations decrease in March-June due to increasing temperatures and a higher boundary layer. The lowest concentrations are during the rainy months (June to August/Sept) due to wet removal. OC and EC fraction is higher in PM2.5. EC in in PM2.5 is 9%, and in PM2.5-10 size EC is 2%. OC contribution is about 36% of fine aerosol mass. High OC could be attributed to enhanced combustion sources and the meteorological conditions during winter period. High OC to EC ratio during postmonsoon and winter also supports higher secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in these seasons. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) calculated is 42% of the annual average of total OC in coarse fraction. SOC to total OC is highest in postmonsoon (53%), winter (34%) and followed by 29% in summer and monsoon seasons. 24-hr speciated fine and coarse aerosols annual data was used for source identification and quantification studies with

  11. Solar flare forecasting from 1 to 7 days in the Kiev State University astronomic observatory during 1976-1980 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanchuk, P.R.; Izotova, I.Yu.; Krivodubskij, V.N.; Adamenko, A.S.; Babij, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been made of the relashionship between the daily solar flares of Importance <= 1 in sunspot groups and the average number of centers in a group during the group passage on the solar disk, and of the values for the total area of sunspots in the sunspot group evolution maximum. Presented is the information on the reliability of the predictions of the flare activity in the sunspot groups basing on this relationship as well as on two others (the dependence of the flare activity on the sunspot Zurich classes and on the sizes of convective elements). For the period since January 1, 1977 till June 3, 1979, that coincides with most complete data observed, the 60% and 80% confidence is shown for the prediction of subflares (525 predictions) and Importance 1 flares (388 predictions), respectively, with the systematic error taken into account.

  12. Toxicological characterization of size-segregated urban air particulate matter in macrophage cell line - effects of chemical composition and sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalava, P.

    2008-07-01

    Urban air particulate pollution is currently regarded as the most harmful environmental exposure causing premature mortality in Europe. Thoracic particles (PM{sub 10}; diameter <10 mum) and fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}; diameter <2.5 mum) have been consistently associated with excess mortality and morbidity among susceptible population groups e.g. individuals with chronic respiratory or cardiovascular disease. In addition to size and lung dose, the chemical composition of inhaled particles has been hypothesized as being an important determinant of the adverse health outcomes. Inflammation has been regarded as the most important biological mechanism mediating the health effects of urban air particles in subjects with cardio-respiratory diseases. The main objective of the present thesis was to improve understanding of the immunotoxic properties of urban air particles and their association with potentially harmful sources and chemical compositions. A series of sampling campaigns were conducted in six European cities during contrasting air pollution situations in different seasons. Particulate samples for toxicological studies were collected in 7-week sampling campaigns using a high volume cascade impactor (HVCI) that consisted of four consecutive stages for coarse (PM{sub 10-2.5}), intermediate (PM{sub 2.5-1}), accumulation (PM{sub 1-0.2}) and ultrafine (PM{sub 0.2}) size-range particles. The size-segregated particulate mass, collected on polyurethane foam strips and backup filter, was extracted with methanol and pooled together according to size range and respective sampling location. In most studies, the mass in two of the size ranges, PM{sub 2.5-1} and PM{sub 1-0.2} was pooled together to form one fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5-0.2}) sample per campaign. Extensive inorganic and organic chemical analyses were made from the pooled HVCI samples. These were complemented with analysis results from samples collected with parallel low-volume samplers. This permitted the use

  13. Source attribution of aerosol size distributions and model evaluation using Whistler Mountain measurements and GEOS-Chem-TOMAS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Ng, J. Y.; Kodros, J. K.; Atwood, S. A.; Wheeler, M. J.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Pierce, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Remote and free-tropospheric aerosols represent a large fraction of the climatic influence of aerosols; however, aerosol in these regions is less characterized than those polluted boundary layers. We evaluate aerosol size distributions predicted by the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global chemical transport model with online aerosol microphysics using measurements from the peak of Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada (2182 m a.s.l., hereafter referred to as Whistler Peak). We evaluate the model for predictions of aerosol number, size, and composition during periods of free-tropospheric (FT) and boundary-layer (BL) influence at "coarse" 4° × 5° and "nested" 0.5° × 0.667° resolutions by developing simple FT/BL filtering techniques. We find that using temperature as a proxy for upslope flow (BL influence) improved the model-measurement comparisons. The best threshold temperature was around 2 °C for the coarse simulations and around 6 °C for the nested simulations, with temperatures warmer than the threshold indicating boundary-layer air. Additionally, the site was increasingly likely to be in cloud when the measured relative humidity (RH) was above 90 %, so we do not compare the modeled and measured size distributions during these periods. With the inclusion of these temperature and RH filtering techniques, the model-measurement comparisons improved significantly. The slope of the regression for N80 (the total number of particles with particle diameter, Dp, > 80 nm) in the nested simulations increased from 0.09 to 0.65, R2 increased from 0.04 to 0.46, and log-mean bias improved from 0.95 to 0.07. We also perform simulations at the nested resolution without Asian anthropogenic emissions and without biomass-burning emissions to quantify the contribution of these sources to aerosols at Whistler Peak (through comparison with simulations with these emissions on). The long-range transport of Asian anthropogenic aerosol was found to be significant throughout all particle

  14. A Radio Jet Regulated by an Accretion Disk Following a Stellar Tidal Disruption Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, D.; van Velzen, S.

    2017-10-01

    A tidal disruption flare occurs when a star comes too close to a massive black hole and gets shredded by its tidal forces. A recent flare, ASASSN-14li, has been dubbed the Rosetta stone for thermal tidal disruption flares. One of the remarkable aspects of this source is the detection of a radio flare coincident with its X-ray flare. While the X-rays likely originate from an inner accretion flow, the origin of the radio emission is still actively debated. Previous studies have ascribed the radio emission to synchrotron radiation from the interaction of the freely expanding ejecta with the ambient medium. However, we find that (1) the 16 GHz radio brightness fluctuations are correlated with the X-ray flux changes, and (2) these radio fluctuations lag the X-ray changes by about 13 days. This accretion-jet coupling is inconsistent with all previous models that involve freely expanding shocks. In this talk, I will discuss the implications of this coupling for the origin of its radio emission and the importance of similar observations in the future to understand how jets evolve in their earliest stages.

  15. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h−1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena. PMID:27721463

  16. An Investigation into the Elementary Temporal Structure of Solar Flare Hard X-Ray Bursts Using BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    The research performed under this contract is part of an on-going investigation to explore the finest time-resolution hard X-ray data available on solar flares. Since 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has provided almost continual monitoring of the Sun in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray region of the spectrum. BATSE provides for the first time a temporal resolution in the data comparable to the timescales on which flare particle energization occurs. Under this contract, we have employed an important but under-utilized BATSE data type, the Time-To-Spill (TTS) data, to address the question of how fine a temporal structure exists in flare hard X-ray emission. By establishing the extent to which 'energy release fragments,' or characteristic (recurrent) time structures, are building blocks of flare emission, it is possible to place constraints on particle acceleration theories.

  17. Plasma upflows and microwave emission in hot supra-arcade structure associated with AN M1.6 limb flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Bain, H.-M.; Cho, K.-S.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated a supra-arcade structure associated with an M1.6 flare, which occurred on the south-east limb on 2010 November 4. It is observed in EUV with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, microwaves at 17 and 34 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), and soft X-rays of 8-20 keV with RHESSI. Interestingly, we found exceptional properties of the supra-arcade thermal plasma from the AIA 131 Å and the NoRH: (1) plasma upflows along large coronal loops and (2) enhancing microwave emission. RHESSI detected two soft X-ray sources, a broad one in the middle of the supra-arcade structure and a bright one just above the flare-arcade. We estimated the number density and thermal energy for these two source regions during the decay phase of the flare. In the supra-arcade source, we found that there were increases of the thermal energy and the density at the early and last stages, respectively. On the contrary, the density and thermal energy of the source on the top of the flare-arcade decreases throughout. The observed upflows imply that there is continuous energy supply into the supra-arcade structure from below during the decay phase of the flare. It is hard to explain by the standard flare model in which the energy release site is located high in the corona. Thus, we suggest that a potential candidate of the energy source for the hot supra-arcade structure is the flare-arcade, which has exhibited a predominant emission throughout.

  18. Extreme Radio Flares and Associated X-Ray Variability from Young Stellar Objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbrich, Jan [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Reid, Mark J.; Wolk, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Rivilla, Victor M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Rau, Urvashi; Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Young stellar objects are known to exhibit strong radio variability on timescales of weeks to months, and a few reports have documented extreme radio flares with at least an order of magnitude change in flux density on timescales of hours to days. However, there have been few constraints on the occurrence rate of such radio flares or on the correlation with pre-main sequence X-ray flares, although such correlations are known for the Sun and nearby active stars. Here we report simultaneous deep VLA radio and Chandra X-ray observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster, targeting hundreds of sources to look for the occurrence rate of extreme radio variability and potential correlation with the most extreme X-ray variability. We identify 13 radio sources with extreme radio variability, with some showing an order of magnitude change in flux density in less than 30 minutes. All of these sources show X-ray emission and variability, but we find clear correlations with extreme radio flaring only on timescales <1 hr. Strong X-ray variability does not predict the extreme radio sources and vice versa. Radio flares thus provide us with a new perspective on high-energy processes in YSOs and the irradiation of their protoplanetary disks. Finally, our results highlight implications for interferometric imaging of sources violating the constant-sky assumption.

  19. Frequency distribution function of stellar flares in the Orion association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsamian, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    The temporal distributions of flare stars in the Orion association and the numbers of stars with different flare frequencies are determined by means of Ambartsumian's (1978) method, which uses the chronology of discovery of 'first' flares and the chronology of confirmations, i.e., the temporal distributions of 'repeated' flares. It is shown that flare stars with high flare frequency (not greater than 1000 hours) in the Pleiades are basically stars of low luminosity with M(U) not less than 13m. Two independent methods of determining the number of flare stars in the aggregates confirm that there are about 1.5 times more flare stars in the Orion association than in the Pleiades

  20. A study of flare stars in the taurus region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhaev, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The results are given of a search for flare stars in the region of the dark clouds in Taurus together with the results of photometric, H /sub alpha/ -spectroscopic, and statistical investigations of them. Photographic observations during 1980-1984 revealed 92 new flare stars, 13 of which were found to be known Orion variables with 16 repeated flares of 13 previously known flare stars. Their apparent distribution is considered. The question of whether the flare stars belong to a dark cloud is discussed. A comparative analysis of the flare stars in the Taurus region and other aggregates is made. The Hertzsprung-Russell (V, B - V) and two-color (U - B, B - V) diagrams for the flare stars are similar to the corresponding diagrams constructed for star clusters and associations (Pleiades, Orion, etc.). The total number of flare stars in the region of the dark clouds in Taurus is estimated at ≥ 500

  1. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LDEs); but the relationship of CMEs with impulsive flares is still unknown. Gosling (1993) showed that solar flares play no fundamental role in causing geomagnetic disturbances. He cited studies which indicate that CMEs are the primary cause ...

  2. Flaring red dwarf stars: news from Crimea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershberg, Roald E

    1998-01-01

    Important phenomena are briefly described which have recently been discovered in the Crimean studies of flaring red dwarf stars believed to be the most common type of variable stars in the Galaxy. These phenomena include (i) long-lived radiation from a blueshifted component in the ionized-helium λ 4686 A emission line in the active state of one such star, (ii) a long-lived absorption component in the stellar flare light curves with a lifetime exceeding that of the conventional flare emission, and (iii) solarcycle-like activity periodicity of the star EV Lac, whose mass is only 0.3 solar masses. In theoretical terms, a red dwarf star spot model is constructed which, in contrast to the commonly accepted model, agrees well with the solar spot picture. (physics of our days)

  3. Solar flare loops observations and interpretations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Guangli; Ji, Haisheng; Ning, Zongjun

    2018-01-01

    This book provides results of analysis of typical solar events, statistical analysis, the diagnostics of energetic electrons and magnetic field, as well as the global behavior of solar flaring loops such as their contraction and expansion. It pays particular attention to analyzing solar flare loops with microwave, hard X-ray, optical and EUV emissions, as well as the theories of their radiation, and electron acceleration/transport. The results concerning influence of the pitch-angle anisotropy of non-thermal electrons on their microwave and hard X-ray emissions, new spectral behaviors in X-ray and microwave bands, and results related to the contraction of flaring loops, are widely discussed in the literature of solar physics. The book is useful for graduate students and researchers in solar and space physics.

  4. Influence of body size on Cu bioaccumulation in zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha exposed to different sources of particle-associated Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Huan, E-mail: huanzhong1982@hotmail.com [Environmental and Resource Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada); Nanjing University, School of Environment, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Kraemer, Lisa; Evans, Douglas [Environmental and Resource Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Mussels exposed to algal/sediment-Cu have different size-related Cu accumulation. • Size-related Cu accumulation in mussels could be more dependant on algal-Cu uptake. • Importance of algal/sediment-Cu to Cu bioaccumulation varies with mussel body size. • Cu sources (algae and sediments) should be considered in “mussel watch” programs. • Cu stable isotope offers many advantages in Cu bioaccumulation studies. -- Abstract: Size of organisms is critical in controlling metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation, while mechanisms of size-related metal bioaccumulation are not fully understood. To investigate the influences of different sources of particle-associated Cu on body size-related Cu bioavailability and bioaccumulation, zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) of different sizes were exposed to stable Cu isotope ({sup 65}Cu) spiked algae (Chlorella vulgaris) or sediments in the laboratory and the Cu tissue concentration-size relationships were compared with that in unexposed mussels. Copper tissue concentrations decreased with mussel size (tissue or shell dry weight) in both unexposed and algal-exposed mussels with similar decreasing patterns, but were independent of size in sediment-exposed mussels. Furthermore, the relative contribution of Cu uptake from algae (65–91%) to Cu bioaccumulation is always higher than that from sediments (9–35%), possibly due to the higher bioavailability of algal-Cu. Therefore, the size-related ingestion of algae could be more important in influencing the size-related variations in Cu bioaccumulation. However, the relative contribution of sediment-Cu to Cu bioaccumulation increased with body size and thus sediment ingestion may also affect the size-related Cu variations in larger mussels (tissue weight >7.5 mg). This study highlights the importance of considering exposure pathways in normalization of metal concentration variation when using bivalves as biomonitors.

  5. THE FLARE-ONA OF EK DRACONIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal “hot-line” emission of Si iv 1400 Å (T ∼ 8 × 10 4 K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30–40 km s −1 , even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ∼10 km s −1 hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by “Doppler imaging” (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O iv] 1400 Å multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest n e ∼ 10 11 cm −3 , an order of magnitude larger than in low-activity solar twin α Centauri A, but typical of densities inferred in large stellar soft X-ray events. The self-similar FUV hot-line profiles between the flare decay and the subsequent more quiet periods, and the unchanging but high densities, reinforce a long-standing idea that the coronae of hyperactive dwarfs are flaring all the time, in a scale-free way; a flare-ona if you will. In this picture, the subsonic hot-line downflows probably are a byproduct of the post-flare cooling process, something like “coronal rain” on the Sun. All in all, the new STIS/COS program documents a complex, energetic, dynamic outer atmosphere of the young sunlike star

  6. Statistical properties of solar Hα flare activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Linhua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field structures on the solar atmosphere are not symmetric distribution in the northern and southern hemispheres, which is an important aspect of quasi-cyclical evolution of magnetic activity indicators that are related to solar dynamo theories. Three standard analysis techniques are applied to analyze the hemispheric coupling (north-south asymmetry and phase asynchrony of monthly averaged values of solar Hα flare activity over the past 49 years (from 1966 January to 2014 December. The prominent results are as follows: (1 from a global point of view, solar Hα flare activity on both hemispheres are strongly correlated with each other, but the northern hemisphere precedes the southern one with a phase shift of 7 months; (2 the long-range persistence indeed exists in solar Hα flare activity, but the dynamical complexities in the two hemispheres are not identical; (3 the prominent periodicities of Hα flare activity are 17 years full-disk activity cycle and 11 years Schwabe solar cycle, but the short- and mid-term periodicities cannot determined by monthly time series; (4 by comparing the non-parametric rescaling behavior on a point-by-point basis, the hemispheric asynchrony of solar Hα flare activity are estimated to be ranging from several months to tens of months with an average value of 8.7 months. The analysis results could promote our knowledge on the long-range persistence, the quasi-periodic variation, and the hemispheric asynchrony of solar Hα flare activity on both hemispheres, and possibly provide valuable information for the hemispheric interrelation of solar magnetic activity.

  7. Two-phase Heating in Flaring Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunming; Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.

    2018-03-01

    We analyze and model a C5.7 two-ribbon solar flare observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Hinode, and GOES on 2011 December 26. The flare is made of many loops formed and heated successively over one and half hours, and their footpoints are brightened in the UV 1600 Å before enhanced soft X-ray and EUV missions are observed in flare loops. Assuming that anchored at each brightened UV pixel is a half flaring loop, we identify more than 6700 half flaring loops, and infer the heating rate of each loop from the UV light curve at the footpoint. In each half loop, the heating rate consists of two phases: intense impulsive heating followed by a low-rate heating that is persistent for more than 20 minutes. Using these heating rates, we simulate the evolution of their coronal temperatures and densities with the model of the “enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops.” In the model, suppression of thermal conduction is also considered. This model successfully reproduces total soft X-ray and EUV light curves observed in 15 passbands by four instruments GOES, AIA, XRT, and EVE. In this flare, a total energy of 4.9 × 1030 erg is required to heat the corona, around 40% of this energy is in the slow-heating phase. About two-fifths of the total energy used to heat the corona is radiated by the coronal plasmas, and the other three fifth transported to the lower atmosphere by thermal conduction.

  8. LAT Monitored Source List Light Curves

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LAT team monitors flux values for a number of bright sources and transient sources that have shown flares during the mission. (See up-to-date weekly reports on...

  9. Impulsive phase of solar flares: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews the theoretical interpretation of impulsive phase phenomena in solar flares. The impulsive phase is defined to be that period of approx. 10 - 100s duration, during which the flare radiative output undergoes its most rapid, dramatic increase and decrease. The interpretation of the various impulsive phase radiation signatures are examined, including the i) hard x-ray emission, ii) radio emission, iii) UV, Hα and white light emissions and iv) gamma-ray emission. The acceleration mechanisms are discussed with respect to candidate acceleration mechanisms, and the synthesis of the theory and observations. (UK)

  10. Solar flares as harbinger of new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, K; Semertzidis, Y.; Papaevangelou, T.; Georgiopoulou, E.; Gardikiotis, A.; Dafni, T.; Tsagri, M.; Semertzidis, Y.; Papaevangelou, T.; Dafni, T.

    2011-01-01

    This work provides additional evidence on the involvement of exotic particles like axions and/or other WISPs, following recent measurements during the quietest Sun and flaring Sun. Thus, SPHINX mission observed a minimum basal soft X-rays emission in the extreme solar minimum in 2009. The same scenario (with ~17 meV axions) fits also the dynamical behaviour of white-light solar flares, like the measured spectral components in the visible and in soft X-rays, and, the timing between them. Solar chameleons remain a viable candidate, since they may preferentially convert to photons in outer space.

  11. Statistical Distributions of Optical Flares from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi [College of Physics and Engineering, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Zi-Gao, E-mail: fayinwang@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-07-20

    We statistically study gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical flares from the Swift /UVOT catalog. We compile 119 optical flares, including 77 flares with redshift measurements. Some tight correlations among the timescales of optical flares are found. For example, the rise time is correlated with the decay time, and the duration time is correlated with the peak time of optical flares. These two tight correlations indicate that longer rise times are associated with longer decay times of optical flares and also suggest that broader optical flares peak at later times, which are consistent with the corresponding correlations of X-ray flares. We also study the frequency distributions of optical flare parameters, including the duration time, rise time, decay time, peak time, and waiting time. Similar power-law distributions for optical and X-ray flares are found. Our statistic results imply that GRB optical flares and X-ray flares may share the similar physical origin, and both of them are possibly related to central engine activities.

  12. Relationship of Non-potentiality and Flaring: Intercomparison for an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1992-10-26

    We have made an attempt to obtain relationship of magnetic shear and vertical currents in NOAA AR7321. Intercomparison of changes observed at several flaring and non-flaring sites associated with an M4/2B flare observed on October 26, 1992 is reported.

  13. The Effect of Synthetic Vision Enhancements on Landing Flare Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Ngoc, L.; Borst, C.; Mulder, M.; Van Paassen, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    The usage of heads-down, non-conformal synthetic vision displays for landings below minimums has inherent problems during the flare due to minification effects. Literature showed that pilots can use four visual cues to perform a manual flare maneuver. Amongst their strategies, the Jacobson flare

  14. Statistical Distributions of Optical Flares from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-01-01

    We statistically study gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical flares from the Swift /UVOT catalog. We compile 119 optical flares, including 77 flares with redshift measurements. Some tight correlations among the timescales of optical flares are found. For example, the rise time is correlated with the decay time, and the duration time is correlated with the peak time of optical flares. These two tight correlations indicate that longer rise times are associated with longer decay times of optical flares and also suggest that broader optical flares peak at later times, which are consistent with the corresponding correlations of X-ray flares. We also study the frequency distributions of optical flare parameters, including the duration time, rise time, decay time, peak time, and waiting time. Similar power-law distributions for optical and X-ray flares are found. Our statistic results imply that GRB optical flares and X-ray flares may share the similar physical origin, and both of them are possibly related to central engine activities.

  15. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinardell, M. P., E-mail: mpvinardellmh@ub.edu; Sordé, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain); Díaz, J. [Universitat de Barcelona CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Baccarin, T.; Mitjans, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC{sub 50}) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The drop in HC{sub 50} correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide.

  16. Evaluation of ground level concentration of pollutant due to gas flaring by computer simulation: A case study of Niger - Delta area of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. ABDULKAREEM

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of associated gases through flaring has been a major problem for the Nigerian oil and gas industries and most of theses gases are flared due to the lack of commercial out lets. The resultant effects of gas flaring are the damaging effect of the environment due to acid rain formation, green house effect, global warming and ozone depletion.This writes up is aimed at evaluating ground level concentration of CO2, SO2, NO2 and total hydrocarbon (THC, which are product of gas flared in oil producing areas. Volumes of gas flared at different flow station were collected as well as geometrical parameters. The results of simulation of model developed based on the principles of gaseous dispersion by Gaussian showed a good agreement with dispersion pattern.The results showed that the dispersion pattern of pollutants at ground level depends on the volume of gas flared, wind speed, velocity of discharge and nearness to the source of flaring. The results shows that continuous gas flaring irrespective of the quantity deposited in the immediate environment will in long run lead to change in the physicochemical properties of soil.

  17. Transport and mixing of eolian sand from local sources resulting in variations in grain size in a gypsum dune field, White Sands, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Richard P.; Gill, Thomas E.; Jones, Slade B.

    2016-03-01

    The White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico (USA), provides a unique opportunity to study sources and eolian transport of sand. End member mixing analysis provides unbiased correlation of the grain size distributions of populations that mix sands from four different local source surface types. Textural differences between sources allow local transport paths to be deduced. In total, 1214 surface samples from 10 dunes and 2 downwind-oriented transects were collected. Neither elevation on the dune, lee or stoss location nor distance downwind correlated with mean grain size, coarsest 10% (D90), or sorting. Instead, grain size distributions are controlled by mixing of locally sourced sand populations. Adjacent dunes can have different mean grain sizes, resulting from different local source populations. Local within-dune and between-dune variability resulting from different sand sources dominates any larger-scale trends across and within dunes. Four sand populations are identified, based on microscopically observable differences in grain size, shape and angularity. Each correlates with high loading of a different statistical factor, derived from End Member Mixing Analysis. End Member 1 (EM1) correlates with well-sorted populations of finer-grained, equant, rounded sands. EM2 correlates with samples that contain moderately sorted populations containing angular blades and crystal aggregates associated with erosional interdunes. EM3 is associated with samples of moderately to poorly sorted fine-grained sand containing fine sand-sized gypsum needles collected from areas of vegetated interdunes, and EM4 is associated with moderately well sorted coarse- and very coarse-grained sands collected from granule ripples. These results suggest that downwind mixing of different populations and segregation by different depositional processes influence grain size distributions in the dune field, rather than by dune-scale or erg-scale transport and sorting.

  18. Influence of body size on Cu bioaccumulation in zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha exposed to different sources of particle-associated Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huan; Kraemer, Lisa; Evans, Douglas

    2013-10-15

    Size of organisms is critical in controlling metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation, while mechanisms of size-related metal bioaccumulation are not fully understood. To investigate the influences of different sources of particle-associated Cu on body size-related Cu bioavailability and bioaccumulation, zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) of different sizes were exposed to stable Cu isotope ((65)Cu) spiked algae (Chlorella vulgaris) or sediments in the laboratory and the Cu tissue concentration-size relationships were compared with that in unexposed mussels. Copper tissue concentrations decreased with mussel size (tissue or shell dry weight) in both unexposed and algal-exposed mussels with similar decreasing patterns, but were independent of size in sediment-exposed mussels. Furthermore, the relative contribution of Cu uptake from algae (65-91%) to Cu bioaccumulation is always higher than that from sediments (9-35%), possibly due to the higher bioavailability of algal-Cu. Therefore, the size-related ingestion of algae could be more important in influencing the size-related variations in Cu bioaccumulation. However, the relative contribution of sediment-Cu to Cu bioaccumulation increased with body size and thus sediment ingestion may also affect the size-related Cu variations in larger mussels (tissue weight >7.5mg). This study highlights the importance of considering exposure pathways in normalization of metal concentration variation when using bivalves as biomonitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fermi LAT View of a Sample of Flaring γ-Ray AGNs S. Buson1,∗ , D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    results of a quick-look science analysis pipeline, FA–GSW service delivers a daily bulletin of the activity of the gamma-ray sky which can be of interest to Fermi sci- ence groups and communities. Relevant information like detection of new sources, transients, brightness trends, flaring and variable sources are released to the ...

  20. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  1. Second-stage acceleration in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A model proposed by Chevalier and Scott to account for cosmic ray acceleration in an expanding supernova remnant is applied to the case of a shock wave injected into the solar corona by a flare. Certain features of solar cosmic rays can be explained by this model. (orig.) [de

  2. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  3. ON THE 2012 OCTOBER 23 CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARE: EMISSION FEATURES AND MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Yang; Ding, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Circular ribbon flares are usually related to spine-fan type magnetic topology containing null points. In this paper, we investigate an X-class circular ribbon flare on 2012 October 23, using the multiwavelength data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Hinode, and RHESSI. In Ca ii H emission, the flare showed three ribbons with two highly elongated ones inside and outside a quasi-circular one, respectively. A hot channel was displayed in the extreme-ultraviolet emissions that infers the existence of a magnetic flux rope. Two hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the 12–25 keV energy band were located at the footpoints of this hot channel. Using a nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation, we identify three topological structures: (1) a three-dimensional null point, (2) a flux rope below the fan of the null point, and (3) a large-scale quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) induced by the quadrupolar-like magnetic field of the active region. We find that the null point is embedded within the large-scale QSL. In our case, all three identified topological structures must be considered to explain all the emission features associated with the observed flare. Besides, the HXR sources are regarded as the consequence of the reconnection within or near the border of the flux rope

  4. SUNSPOT ROTATION, FLARE ENERGETICS, AND FLUX ROPE HELICITY: THE HALLOWEEN FLARE ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Longcope, Dana W.; Qiu Jiong

    2010-01-01

    We study the X17 eruptive flare on 2003 October 28 using Michelson Doppler Imager observations of photospheric magnetic and velocity fields and TRACE 1600 A images of the flare in a three-dimensional model of energy buildup and release in NOAA 10486. The most dramatic feature of this active region is the 123 0 rotation of a large positive sunspot over 46 hr prior to the event. We apply a method for including such rotation in the framework of the minimum current corona model of the buildup of energy and helicity due to the observed motions. We distinguish between helicity and energy stored in the whole active region and that released in the flare itself. We find that while the rotation of a sunspot contributes significantly to the energy and helicity budgets of the whole active region, it makes only a minor contribution to that part of the region that flares. We conclude that in spite of the fast rotation, shearing motions alone store sufficient energy and helicity to account for the flare energetics and interplanetary coronal mass ejection helicity content within their observational uncertainties. Our analysis demonstrates that the relative importance of shearing and rotation in this flare depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology.

  5. Influence of the Source of Social Support and Size of Social Network on All-Cause Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becofsky, Katie M; Shook, Robin P; Sui, Xuemei; Wilcox, Sara; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2015-07-01

    To examine associations between relative, friend, and partner support, as well as size and source of weekly social network, and mortality risk in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. In a mail-back survey completed between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 1990, adult participants in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (N=12,709) answered questions on whether they received social support from relatives, friends, and spouse/partner (yes or no for each) and on the number of friends and relatives they had contact with at least once per week. Participants were followed until December 31, 2003, or until the date of death. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the strength of the associations, controlling for covariates. Participants (3220 [25%] women) averaged 53.0 ± 11.3 years of age at baseline. During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 1139 deaths occurred. Receiving social support from relatives reduced mortality risk by 19% (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.95). Receiving spousal/partner support also reduced mortality risk by 19% (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.99). Receiving social support from friends was not associated with mortality risk (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75-1.09); however, participants reporting social contact with 6 or 7 friends on a weekly basis had a 24% lower mortality risk than did those in contact with 0 or 1 friend (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58-0.98). Contact with 2 to 5 or 8 or more friends was not associated with mortality risk, nor was the number of weekly contacts with relatives. Receiving social support from one's spouse/partner and relatives and maintaining weekly social interaction with 6 to 7 friends reduced mortality risk. Such data may inform interventions to improve long-term survival. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Black carbon in the Arctic: the underestimated role of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2013-09-01

    annual mean Arctic BC surface concentrations due to residential combustion by 68% when using daily emissions. A large part (93% of this systematic increase can be captured also when using monthly emissions; the increase is compensated by a decreased BC burden at lower latitudes. In a comparison with BC measurements at six Arctic stations, we find that using daily-varying residential combustion emissions and introducing gas flaring emissions leads to large improvements of the simulated Arctic BC, both in terms of mean concentration levels and simulated seasonality. Case studies based on BC and carbon monoxide (CO measurements from the Zeppelin observatory appear to confirm flaring as an important BC source that can produce pollution plumes in the Arctic with a high BC / CO enhancement ratio, as expected for this source type. BC measurements taken during a research ship cruise in the White, Barents and Kara seas north of the region with strong flaring emissions reveal very high concentrations of the order of 200–400 ng m−3. The model underestimates these concentrations substantially, which indicates that the flaring emissions (and probably also other emissions in northern Siberia are rather under- than overestimated in our emission data set. Our results suggest that it may not be "vertical transport that is too strong or scavenging rates that are too low" and "opposite biases in these processes" in the Arctic and elsewhere in current aerosol models, as suggested in a recent review article (Bond et al., Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: a scientific assessment, J. Geophys. Res., 2013, but missing emission sources and lacking time resolution of the emission data that are causing opposite model biases in simulated BC concentrations in the Arctic and in the mid-latitudes.

  7. Study on the flare stars in the Taurus region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhaev, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the search of flare stars and their photometric, Hsub(α)-spectroscopic and statistical study in the Taurus are presented. By means of photographic observations carried out during 1980-1984, 92 new flare stars were discovered, 13 of which are known Orion Population variables, and 16 repeated flare-ups among 13 known flare stars. Spatial distribution of these stars was considered and the problem of their membership was discussed. Comparative analysis of the data of flare stars in the Taurus with that of other systems has been carried out. The Herzsprung-Russel and two-colour (U-B, B-V) diagrams for the Taurus flare stars are similar to the diagrams of stellar clusters and associations (Pleiades, Orion etc.). The estimated total number of flare stars in this region is larger than 500

  8. Management of routine solution gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Alberta's Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) shares decision-making responsibilities with the Government of Alberta for strategic aspects of air quality. In 1997, the Alliance established the Flaring Project Team to develop recommendations that address potential and observed impacts associated with flaring, with particular focus on 'upstream solution gas' flaring. The upstream industry explores for, acquires, develops, produces and markets crude oil and natural gas. Essentially, solution gas at upstream sites is 'co-produced' during crude oil production. The project team was established to collect and summarize information on flaring and its impacts and to develop recommendations for short-term actions to minimize the practice of routine flaring of solution gas. Another goal of the team is to develop a research strategy to better understand flaring emissions and their effects on human, animal and environmental health. The team is working on developing long-term strategies for actions to address the gas flaring issue. 5 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  9. Identifying Preliminary Domains to Detect and Measure Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares: Report of the OMERACT 10 RA Flare Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Clifton O; Alten, Rieke; Bartlett, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    critical insights into the multidimensional nature of flare. The perspectives of patients and healthcare and research professionals are being integrated to ensure that any outcome measurement to detect flares fulfills the first OMERACT criteria of Truth. Through an iterative data-driven Delphi process......, a preliminary list of key domains has been identified to evaluate flare. RESULTS: At OMERACT 10, consensus was achieved identifying features of flare in addition to the existing core set for RA, including fatigue, stiffness, symptom persistence, systemic features, and participation. Patient self-report of flare...

  10. Microwave imaging of a solar limb flare - Comparison of spectra and spatial geometry with hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solar limb flare was mapped using the Very Large Array (VLA) together with hard X-ray (HXR) spectral and spatial observations of the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Microwave flux records from 2.8 to 19.6 GHz were instrumental in determining the burst spectrum, which has a maximum at 10 GHz. The flux spectrum and area of the burst sources were used to determine the number of electrons producing gyrosynchrotron emission, magnetic field strength, and the energy distribution of gyrosynchrotron-emitting electrons. Applying the thick target model to the HXR spectrum, the number of high energy electrons responsible for the X-ray bursts was found to be 10 to the 36th, and the electron energy distribution was approximately E exp -5, significantly different from the parameters derived from the microwave observations. The HXR imaging observations exhibit some similiarities in size and structure o the first two burst sources mapped with the VLA. However, during the initial burst, the HXR source was single and lower in the corona than the double 6 cm source. The observations are explained in terms of a single loop with an isotropic high-energy electron distribution which produced the microwaves, and a larger beamed component which produced the HXR at the feet of the loop.

  11. Progress report on recommendations of the Flaring Project Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macken, C.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the mandate of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) is to share decision-making responsibility for air quality management with the government of Alberta, through the ministries of Environmental Protection, Energy, and Health, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). CASA's vision for air quality in Alberta is that 'the air will be odourless, tasteless, look clear, and have no measurable short- or long-term adverse effects on people, animals, or the environment'. In 1997, CASA approved the establishment of the Flaring Project Team in response to public concern about potential and observed impacts associated with flaring of solution gas. Members of that team established a framework for the management of solution gas flaring. Their long-term goal is to eliminate routine flaring of solution gas. The Project Team assessed existing information on solution gas flaring, including technologies, efficiencies, emissions and impacts. Alternative technologies were also reviewed along with biological and health effects of solution gas flaring. A list of data gaps and research needs was compiled in order to help with the development of the Team's recommendations. The Team's final report was delivered in June 1998. It was recommended that the following policy objective hierarchy be used to guide decisions related to routine solution gas flaring: (1) eliminate routine solution gas flaring, (2) reduce volumes of gas flared, and (3) improve the efficiency of flares. By way of progress the Project Team was able to report that in March, 1999, the EUB issued a draft interim directive to address upstream petroleum industry flaring. The draft Directive incorporates the recommendations from the CASA Flaring Project Team with respect to management of solution gas flaring. In December 1998, changes to the royalty structure to encourage the productive use of flare gas have been announced by the Alberta Department of Energy and Alberta Environmental protection, thus

  12. The effect of journal impact factor, reporting conflicts, and reporting funding sources, on standardized effect sizes in back pain trials: a systematic review and meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froud, Robert; Bjørkli, Tom; Bright, Philip; Rajendran, Dévan; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Underwood, Martin; Evans, David; Eldridge, Sandra

    2015-11-30

    Low back pain is a common and costly health complaint for which there are several moderately effective treatments. In some fields there is evidence that funder and financial conflicts are associated with trial outcomes. It is not clear whether effect sizes in back pain trials relate to journal impact factor, reporting conflicts of interest, or reporting funding. We performed a systematic review of English-language papers reporting randomised controlled trials of treatments for non-specific low back pain, published between 2006-2012. We modelled the relationship using 5-year journal impact factor, and categories of reported of conflicts of interest, and categories of reported funding (reported none and reported some, compared to not reporting these) using meta-regression, adjusting for sample size, and publication year. We also considered whether impact factor could be predicted by the direction of outcome, or trial sample size. We could abstract data to calculate effect size in 99 of 146 trials that met our inclusion criteria. Effect size is not associated with impact factor, reporting of funding source, or reporting of conflicts of interest. However, explicitly reporting 'no trial funding' is strongly associated with larger absolute values of effect size (adjusted β=1.02 (95 % CI 0.44 to 1.59), P=0.001). Impact factor increases by 0.008 (0.004 to 0.012) per unit increase in trial sample size (P<0.001), but does not differ by reported direction of the LBP trial outcome (P=0.270). The absence of associations between effect size and impact factor, reporting sources of funding, and conflicts of interest reflects positively on research and publisher conduct in the field. Strong evidence of a large association between absolute magnitude of effect size and explicit reporting of 'no funding' suggests authors of unfunded trials are likely to report larger effect sizes, notwithstanding direction. This could relate in part to quality, resources, and/or how pragmatic a trial

  13. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  14. MASTER: QSO flare and CV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumkov, V.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Kornilov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Chazov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Gress, O.; Gorbunov, I.; Krylov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Saffe, C.; Buckley, D.; Gabovich, A.

    2018-03-01

    MASTER-OAFA auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net",Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) detected OT source at (RA, Dec) = 03h 48m 38.11s -27d 49m 13.4s on 2018-03-11.05672 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is (mlim=18.7m).

  15. Application of particle size distributions to total particulate stack samples to estimate PM2.5 and PM10 emission factors for agricultural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particle size distributions (PSD) have long been used to more accurately estimate the PM10 fraction of total particulate matter (PM) stack samples taken from agricultural sources. These PSD analyses were typically conducted using a Coulter Counter with 50 micrometer aperture tube. With recent increa...

  16. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND DIURNAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PARTICLE-BOUND METALS IN SOURCE AND RECEPTOR SITES OF THE LOS ANGELES BASIN. (R827352C006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurement of daily size-fractionated ambient PM10 mass, metals, inorganic ions (nitrate and sulfate) and elemental and organic carbon were conducted at source (Downey) and receptor (Riverside) sites within the Los Angeles Basin. In addition to 24-h concentration m...

  17. Speciation of heavy metals in different grain sizes of Jiaozhou Bay sediments: Bioavailability, ecological risk assessment and source analysis on a centennial timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xuming; Song, Jinming; Yuan, Huamao; Duan, Liqin; Li, Xuegang; Li, Ning; Liang, Xianmeng; Qu, Baoxiao

    2017-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination is an essential indicator of environmental health. In this work, one sediment core was used for the analysis of the speciation of heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) in Jiaozhou Bay sediments with different grain sizes. The bioavailability, sources and ecological risk of heavy metals were also assessed on a centennial timescale. Heavy metals were enriched in grain sizes of Pb > Cd > Zn > Cu >Ni > Cr > As. Enrichment factors (EF) indicated that heavy metals in Jiaozhou Bay presented from no enrichment to minor enrichment. The potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated that Jiaozhou Bay had been suffering from a low ecological risk and presented an increasing trend since 1940s owing to the increase of anthropogenic activities. The source analysis indicated that natural sources were primary sources of heavy metals in Jiaozhou Bay and anthropogenic sources of heavy metals presented an increasing trend since 1940s. The principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu and Pb were primarily derived from natural sources and that Zn and Cd were influenced by shipbuilding industry. Mn, Cu, Zn and Pb may originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. As may be influenced by agricultural activities. Moreover, heavy metals in sediments of Jiaozhou Bay were clearly influenced by atmospheric deposition and river input. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Characteristics of the Polarity Inversion Line and Solar Flare Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Studying connection between solar flares and properties of magnetic field in active regions is very important for understanding the flare physics and developing space weather forecasts. In this work, we analyze relationship between the flare X-ray peak flux from the GOES satellite, and characteristics of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained by the SDO/HMI instrument during the period of April, 2010 - June, 2016. We try to answer two questions: 1) What characteristics of the LOS magnetic field are most important for the flare initiation and magnitude? 2) Is it possible to construct a reliable forecast of ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 class flares based only on the LOS magnetic field characteristics? To answer these questions, we apply a Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) detection algorithm, and derive various properties of the PIL and the corresponding Active Regions (AR). The importance of these properties for flare forecasting is determined by their ability to separate flaring cases from non-flaring, and their Fisher ranking score. It is found that the PIL characteristics are of special importance for the forecasts of both ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 flares, while the global AR characteristics become comparably discriminative only for ≥ X1.0 flares. We use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and train it on the six characteristics of the most importance for each case. The obtained True Skill Statistics (TSS) values of 0.70 for ≥ M1.0 flares and 0.64 for ≥ X1.0 flares are better than the currently-known expert-based predictions. Therefore, the results confirm the importance of the LOS magnetic field data and, in particular, the PIL region characteristics for flare forecasts.

  19. Completeness and Bias Tests of Small Flares in gPhoton M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Million, Chase; Brasseur, Clara; Osten, Rachel A.; Shiao, Bernie; Bianchi, Luciana

    2018-01-01

    gPhoton is a time-tagged database of more than one trillion calibrated ultraviolet photon events from the ten-year GALEX mission. With the open-source gPhoton software, users can construct images and light curves at user-defined temporal and spatial scales. We have been working on a project to detect stellar flares on M dwarfs observed in GALEX data, with particular focus on smaller flares that have durations between 30 seconds and 30 minutes, and energies between 10^27 and 10^29 ergs. This parameter space is still largely unconstrained in the UV/optical, even with Kepler/K2 data, due to their short durations. We present completeness and reliability tests we are conducting to be able to account for selection and detection bias in our sample, including stellar type, instrument artifacts, sampling bias, and signal-to-noise. The bias-corrected occurrence rate of such flares, which are exponentially more frequent than larger flares already characterized by Kepler and ground-based studies, can be included in future calculations of exoplanet habitability.

  20. Environmental pollution due to gas flaring at Oyigbo area of Rivers State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avwiri, G. O.; Ebeniro, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental degradation due to oil activities in the oil rich Niger Delta of Nigeria is daily approaching a non-tolerance level. Pollutants come from various aspects of operation ranging from seismic operations through drilling to the refinery stage. Gas flared daily by Oil Companies constitute a major health hazard in this country. Environmental pollution due to gas flaring at Oyigbo area of Rivers State is hereby reported. Surface temperature-distance variations were investigated for both dry (March) and rainy (June) seasons. Physical and chemical properties of the rainwater from the areas were also measured and analysed. The results show a surface temperature elevation of about 4.1 Celsius above the mean normal diurnal temperature within a 3.00 km. radius. An average pH 4.25 was recorded thus showing the acidic nature of the environmental rainwater from the area. All other measured parameters showed serious deviations from standards. This temperature elevation and increased acidity of the rainwater have enormous influence on socio-economic lives and the activities of the populace especially on their source of income which is mainly small scale farming. It is therefore necessary that Government agencies empowered to monitor environment especially FEPA should implement all the existing legislation on gas flaring and be more involved in the design and location of gas flaring stacks. These stacks should be located at least 2 km. from towns and villages

  1. SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTIONS WITH MULTIPLE FLARE RIBBONS DURING AN X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and three FRs appeared. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edges, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in three-dimensional standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that the complex structures of the flare are likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.

  2. Plasma Astrophysics, Part II Reconnection and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Somov, Boris V

    2013-01-01

    This two-part book is devoted to classic fundamentals and current practices and perspectives of modern plasma astrophysics. This second part discusses the physics of magnetic reconnection and flares of electromagnetic origin in space plasmas in the solar system, single and double stars, relativistic objects, accretion disks and their coronae. More than 25% of the text is updated from the first edition, including the additions of new figures, equations and entire sections on topics such as topological triggers for solar flares and the magnetospheric physics problem. This book is aimed at professional researchers in astrophysics, but it will also be useful to graduate students in space sciences, geophysics, applied physics and mathematics, especially those seeking a unified view of plasma physics and fluid mechanics.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of Kepler flare stars (Van Doorsselaere+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorsselaere, T.; Shariati, H.; Debosscher, J.

    2017-11-01

    With an automated detection method, we have identified stellar flares in the long cadence observations of Kepler during quarter 15. We list each flare time for the respective Kepler objects. Furthermore, we list the flare amplitude and decay time after fitting the flare light curve with an exponential decay. Flare start times in long cadence data of Kepler during quarter 15. (1 data file).

  4. High-cadence and high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopy of a circular flare's remote ribbon with IBIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Na; Jing, Ju; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States); Denker, Carsten, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    We present an unprecedented high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopic observation of a C4.1 flare taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) in conjunction with the adaptive optics system at the 76 cm Dunn Solar Telescope on 2011 October 22 in the active region NOAA 11324. Such a two-dimensional spectroscopic observation covering the entire evolution of a flare ribbon with high spatial (0.''1 pixel{sup –1} image scale), cadence (4.8 s), and spectral (0.1 Å step size) resolution is rarely reported. The flare consists of a main circular ribbon that occurred in a parasitic magnetic configuration and a remote ribbon that was observed by the IBIS. Such a circular-ribbon flare with a remote brightening is predicted in three-dimensional fan-spine reconnection but so far has been rarely studied. During the flare impulsive phase, we define 'core' and 'halo' structures in the observed ribbon based on IBIS narrowband images in the Hα line wing and line center. Examining the Hα emission spectra averaged in the flare core and halo areas, we find that only those from the flare cores show typical nonthermal electron beam heating characteristics that have been revealed by previous theoretical simulations and observations of flaring Hα line profiles. These characteristics include broad and centrally reversed emission spectra, excess emission in the red wing with regard to the blue wing (i.e., red asymmetry), and redshifted bisectors of the emission spectra. We also observe rather quick timescales for the heating (∼30 s) and cooling (∼14-33 s) in the flare core locations. Therefore, we suggest that the flare cores revealed by IBIS track the sites of electron beam precipitation with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. The flare cores show two-stage motion (a parallel motion along the ribbon followed by an expansion motion perpendicular to the ribbon) during the two impulsive phases of the flare. Some cores jump

  5. Sunspot waves and flare energy release

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sych, R.A.; Karlický, Marian; Altyntsev, A.; Dudík, Jaroslav; Kashapova, L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 577, May (2015), A43/1-A43/8 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103; GA ČR GAP209/12/1652 Grant - others:EC(XE) 606862 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun flares * Sun oscillations * Sun X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  6. An Exceptional Radio Flare in Markarian 421

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Joseph L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In September 2012, the high-synchrotron-peaked (HSP blazar Markarian 421 underwent a rapid wideband radio flare, reaching nearly twice the brightest level observed in the centimeter band in over three decades of monitoring. In response to this event we carried out a five epoch centimeter- to millimeter-band multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA campaign to investigate the aftermath of this emission event. Rapid radio variations are unprecedented in this object and are surprising in an HSP BL Lac object. In this flare, the 15 GHz flux density increased with an exponential doubling time of about 9 days, then faded to its prior level at a similar rate. This is comparable with the fastest large-amplitude centimeter-band radio variability observed in any blazar. Similar flux density increases were detected up to millimeter bands. This radio flare followed about two months after a similarly unprecedented GeV gamma-ray flare (reaching a daily E > 100 MeV flux of (1.2 ± 0.7 × 10−6 ph cm−2 s−1 reported by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT collaboration, with a simultaneous tentative TeV detection by ARGO-YBJ. A cross-correlation analysis of long-term 15 GHz and LAT gamma-ray light curves finds a statistically significant correlation with the radio lagging ~40 days behind, suggesting that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Preliminary results from our VLBA observations show brightening in the unresolved core region and no evidence for apparent superluminal motions or substantial flux variations downstream.

  7. Solar and stellar flare observations using WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experiment WATCH (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is to be flown on board the Soviet satellite GRANAT in middle of 1989. The performance characteristics of the WATCH instrument is described. It is estimated that WATCH can detect about 100 solar hard X-ray bursts per day....... WATCH can also detect about 40 energetic stellar soft X-ray flares, similar to the fast transient X-ray emissions detected by the Ariel V satellite....

  8. Technical and economic analysis use of flare gas into alternative energy as a breakthrough in achieving zero routine flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Y.; Juliza, H.; Humala, N.

    2018-03-01

    The activity of exploring natural oil and gas will produce gas flare 0.584 MMSCFD. A gas flare is the combustion of gas remaining to avoid poisonous gas like H2S and CO which is very dangerous for human and environmental health. The combustion can bring about environmental pollution and losses because it still contains valuable energy. It needs the policy to encourage the use of flare gas with Zero Routine Flaring and green productivity to reduce waste and pollution. The objective of the research was to determine the use of gas flare so that it will have economic value and can achieve Zero Routine Flaring. It was started by analysing based on volume or rate and composition gas flare was used to determine technical feasibility, and the estimation of the gas reserves as the determination of the economy of a gas well. The results showed that the use of flare gas as fuel for power generation feasible to be implemented technically and economically with Internal Rate of Return (IRR) 19.32% and the Payback Period (PP) 5 year. Thus, it can increase gas flare value economically and can achieve a breakthrough in Zero Routine Flaring.

  9. Disentangling the major source areas for an intense aerosol advection in the Central Mediterranean on the basis of Potential Source Contribution Function modeling of chemical and size distribution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroselli, Chiara; Crocchianti, Stefano; Moroni, Beatrice; Castellini, Silvia; Selvaggi, Roberta; Nava, Silvia; Calzolai, Giulia; Lucarelli, Franco; Cappelletti, David

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we combined a Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis of daily chemical aerosol composition data with hourly aerosol size distributions with the aim to disentangle the major source areas during a complex and fast modulating advection event impacting on Central Italy in 2013. Chemical data include an ample set of metals obtained by Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), main soluble ions from ionic chromatography and elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC) obtained by thermo-optical measurements. Size distributions have been recorded with an optical particle counter for eight calibrated size classes in the 0.27-10 μm range. We demonstrated the usefulness of the approach by the positive identification of two very different source areas impacting during the transport event. In particular, biomass burning from Eastern Europe and desert dust from Sahara sources have been discriminated based on both chemistry and size distribution time evolution. Hourly BT provided the best results in comparison to 6 h or 24 h based calculations.

  10. Automated Flare Prediction Using Extreme Learning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme learning machine (ELM is a fast learning algorithm of single-hidden layer feedforward neural networks (SLFNs. Compared with the traditional neural networks, the ELM algorithm has the advantages of fast learning speed and good generalization. At the same time, an ordinal logistic regression (LR is a statistical method which is conceptually simple and algorithmically fast. In this paper, in order to improve the real-time performance, a flare forecasting method is introduced which is the combination of the LR model and the ELM algorithm. The predictive variables are three photospheric magnetic parameters, that is, the total unsigned magnetic flux, length of the strong-gradient magnetic polarity inversion line, and total magnetic energy dissipation. The LR model is used to map these three magnetic parameters of each active region into four probabilities. Consequently, the ELM is used to map the four probabilities into a binary label which is the final output. The proposed model is used to predict the occurrence of flares with a certain level over 24 hours following the time when the magnetogram is recorded. The experimental results show that the cascade algorithm not only improves learning speed to realize timely prediction but also has higher accuracy of X-class flare prediction in comparison with other methods.

  11. Modeling Meteor Flares for Spacecraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is tasked with assisting spacecraft operators and engineers in quantifying the threat the meteoroid environment poses to their individual missions. A more complete understanding of the meteoroid environment for this application requires extensive observations. One manner by which the MEO observes meteors is with dedicated video camera systems that operate nightly. Connecting the observational data from these video cameras to the relevant physical properties of the ablating meteoroids, however, is subject to sizable observational and theoretical uncertainties. Arguably the most troublesome theoretical uncertainty in ablation is a model for the structure of meteoroids, as observations clearly show behaviors wholly inconsistent with meteoroids being homogeneous spheres. Further complicating the interpretation of the observations in the context of spacecraft risk is the ubiquitous process of fragmentation and the flares it can produce, which greatly muddles any attempts to estimating initial meteoroid masses. In this talk a method of estimating the mass distribution of fragments in flaring meteors using high resolution video observations will be dis- cussed. Such measurements provide an important step in better understanding of the structure and fragmentation process of the parent meteoroids producing these flares, which in turn may lead to better constraints on meteoroid masses and reduced uncertainties in spacecraft risk.

  12. Post-Flare Giant Arches - Unanswered Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Dennis, B. R.; Palmerio, E.; Savage, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations from the SWAP EUV imager on-board PROBA2 and SXI X-ray observations from the GOES satellite have shown that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are one and the same thing. However, it is still not clear how certain loop systems are able to sustain prolonged growth to heights greater than half a solar-radii. In this presentation we further explore the energy deposition rate above post-flare loop systems through high-energy RHESSI observations. We also explore the difference between the growth of different loop systems through an epoch analysis. The epoch analysis is initially performed over the period when the STEREO satellites were in quadrature with PROBA2 allowing us to assess the difference between their on-disk and on-limb signatures. Giant arches are generally characterised by their height of growth when observed close to the solar limb, but due to the optically thin nature of the EUV solar atmosphere, projection effects and the scarcity of events occurring within 5 degrees of the limb it is not understood how common these events are. Using the analysis during the quadrature period we gain a better understanding of how rare these events are, and by determining characteristic on disk signatures we can combine our data set with magnetogram observations to better understand their magnetic evolution.

  13. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Building/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hara, Hirohisa, E-mail: l.harra@ucl.ac.uk [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-09-10

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.

  14. A Compressed Sensing-based Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Solar Flare X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Simon; Bolzern, Roman; Battaglia, Marina

    2017-11-01

    One way of imaging X-ray emission from solar flares is to measure Fourier components of the spatial X-ray source distribution. We present a new compressed sensing-based algorithm named VIS_CS, which reconstructs the spatial distribution from such Fourier components. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm on synthetic and observed solar flare X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite and compare its performance with existing algorithms. VIS_CS produces competitive results with accurate photometry and morphology, without requiring any algorithm- and X-ray-source-specific parameter tuning. Its robustness and performance make this algorithm ideally suited for the generation of quicklook images or large image cubes without user intervention, such as for imaging spectroscopy analysis.

  15. Flare activity on UV CETI: visible and IUE observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, K.J.H.; Bromage, G.E.; Dufton, P.L.; Keenan, F.P.; Kingston, A.E.

    1988-06-01

    Simultaneous far-ultraviolet (IUE) spectroscopy and optical photometry and spectrophotometry of a flare on UV Ceti are reported. The flare reached ΔU = 2sup(m) but showed only modest enhancements in the IUE spectra. The optical spectrophotometry indicated broadened Balmer line profiles during the flare, with Hβ and Hγ clearly showing red wings. The results are compared with other IUE and optical observations of UV Ceti, and their solar analogues. (author)

  16. Experimental Comprehensive Solar Flare Indices for Major and Certain Lesser Flares 1975-1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    0354-0418 N18W05 20 (0540) 22 0235 -0301 25 (0114) 26 (2117) 29 0501-0512 July 1 (1341) 7 |1205-1230 imi-iny...34I.Eli.il-.K EVENTS" FOR 197 5- 1979 (cor tlnued) TIME (UT) HcMATH Ha FLARE CO HP . OK FUKt HT PLAGE PROFILE FLARE DATK OR EVENT (1755) POSITION IMP...TOr ognHoSTy 0558-önÖ 0028-0111 0118-0214 15579) 1125 2017-2111 (1449) (0221) 0200-0234 "Ö27T-řUI Ö5Ö7-Öfi6 1010-1053 0232- 0235 0306

  17. Imaging Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Sun, X.; Qiu, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar atmosphere. It is widely accepted that flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the corona. An eruptive flare is usually accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, both of which are probably driven by the eruption of a magnetic flux rope (MFR). Here we report an eruptive flare on 2016 March 23 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . The extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations exhibit the clear rise and eruption of an MFR. In particular, the observations reveal solid evidence of magnetic reconnection from both the corona and chromosphere during the flare. Moreover, weak reconnection is observed before the start of the flare. We find that the preflare weak reconnection is of tether-cutting type and helps the MFR to rise slowly. Induced by a further rise of the MFR, strong reconnection occurs in the rise phases of the flare, which is temporally related to the MFR eruption. We also find that the magnetic reconnection is more of 3D-type in the early phase, as manifested in a strong-to-weak shear transition in flare loops, and becomes more 2D-like in the later phase, as shown by the apparent rising motion of an arcade of flare loops.

  18. Imaging Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Sun, X. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Priest, E. R., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar atmosphere. It is widely accepted that flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the corona. An eruptive flare is usually accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, both of which are probably driven by the eruption of a magnetic flux rope (MFR). Here we report an eruptive flare on 2016 March 23 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . The extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations exhibit the clear rise and eruption of an MFR. In particular, the observations reveal solid evidence of magnetic reconnection from both the corona and chromosphere during the flare. Moreover, weak reconnection is observed before the start of the flare. We find that the preflare weak reconnection is of tether-cutting type and helps the MFR to rise slowly. Induced by a further rise of the MFR, strong reconnection occurs in the rise phases of the flare, which is temporally related to the MFR eruption. We also find that the magnetic reconnection is more of 3D-type in the early phase, as manifested in a strong-to-weak shear transition in flare loops, and becomes more 2D-like in the later phase, as shown by the apparent rising motion of an arcade of flare loops.

  19. Developing a Construct to Evaluate Flares in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Conceptual Report of the OMERACT RA Flare Definition Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alten, Rieke; Choy, Ernest H; Christensen, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthcare professionals (HCP) recognize that episodic worsening disease activity, often described as a "flare," is a common feature of RA that can contribute to impaired function and disability. However, there is no standard definition to enable measurement...... of its intensity and impact. The conceptual framework of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Definition Working Group includes an anchoring statement, developed at OMERACT 9 in 2008: "flare in RA" is defined as worsening of signs and symptoms of sufficient intensity...... of minimally clinically detectable and important differences (MCDD, MCID). The measurement of RA flare is composed of data collection assessing a range of unique domains describing key features of RA worsening at the time of patient self-report of flare, and then periodically for the duration of the flare...

  20. On the origin of a sunquake during the 2014 March 29 X1 flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Kleint, Lucia [Institute of 4D Technologies, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Donea, Alina [Center for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Dalda, Alberto Sainz [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fletcher, Lyndsay, E-mail: judge@ucar.edu, E-mail: lucia.kleint@fhnw.ch, E-mail: alina.donea@monash.edu, E-mail: asdalda@stanford.edu, E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    Helioseismic data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument have revealed a sunquake associated with the X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48 in active region NOAA 12017. We try to discover if acoustic-like impulses or actions of the Lorentz force caused the sunquake. We analyze spectropolarimetric data obtained with the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Fortunately, the FIRS slit crossed the flare kernel close to the acoustic source during the impulsive phase. The infrared FIRS data remain unsaturated throughout the flare. Stokes profiles of lines of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm are analyzed. At the flare footpoint, the Si I 1082.7 nm core intensity increases by a factor of several, and the IR continuum increases by 4% ± 1%. Remarkably, the Si I core resembles the classical Ca II K line's self-reversed profile. With nLTE radiative models of H, C, Si, and Fe, these properties set the penetration depth of flare heating to 100 ± 100 km (i.e., photospheric layers). Estimates of the non-magnetic energy flux are at least a factor of two less than the sunquake energy flux. Milne-Eddington inversions of the Si I line show that the local magnetic energy changes are also too small to drive the acoustic pulse. Our work raises several questions. Have we missed the signature of downward energy propagation? Is it intermittent in time and/or non-local? Does the 1-2 s photospheric radiative damping time discount compressive modes?.

  1. A CIRCULAR-RIBBON SOLAR FLARE FOLLOWING AN ASYMMETRIC FILAMENT ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Pariat, Étienne [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universits, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-92190 Meudon (France); Wiegelmann, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Liu, Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

    2015-10-20

    The dynamic properties of flare ribbons and the often associated filament eruptions can provide crucial information on the flaring coronal magnetic field. This Letter analyzes the GOES-class X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48), in which we found an asymmetric eruption of a sigmoidal filament and an ensuing circular flare ribbon. Initially both EUV images and a preflare nonlinear force-free field model show that the filament is embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine-like structure. In the first phase, which is defined by a weak but still increasing X-ray emission, the western portion of the sigmoidal filament arches upward and then remains quasi-static for about five minutes. The western fan-like and the outer spine-like fields display an ascending motion, and several associated ribbons begin to brighten. Also found is a bright EUV flow that streams down along the eastern fan-like field. In the second phase that includes the main peak of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, the filament erupts, leaving behind two major HXR sources formed around its central dip portion and a circular ribbon brightened sequentially. The expanding western fan-like field interacts intensively with the outer spine-like field, as clearly seen in running difference EUV images. We discuss these observations in favor of a scenario where the asymmetric eruption of the sigmoidal filament is initiated due to an MHD instability and further facilitated by reconnection at a quasi-null in corona; the latter is in turn enhanced by the filament eruption and subsequently produces the circular flare ribbon.

  2. Radio flares from AE Aquarii - A low-power analog to Cygnus X-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Chanmugam, G.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii has been observed at 1.5, 4.9, 15, and 22.5 GHz. The source shows temporal variations in the flux density, often with a flarelike morphology. The flux variations are at times extreme, with values ranging from 1-12 mJy at 15 GHz; the degree of variability increases with frequency. The spectrum shows a variety of short-term behavior, at times increasing as nu, at other times decreasing with nu, and at still others flat. The long-term average of the spectrum increases as nu exp 0.3-0.4. No significant degree of circular polarization was observed. The source properties can be explained as a superposition of flare events in which electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies which then emit synchrotron radiation in discrete, expanding sources. The origin of the flare events may be connected to the disruption of the accretion disk some ditance from the white dwarf primary. The radio emission of AE Aqr shows similarities to the low-level flares from Cygnus X-3.

  3. Radio flares from AE Aquarii - a low-power analog to Cygnus X-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T.S.; Dulk, G.A.; Chanmugam, G.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii has been observed at 1.5, 4.9, 15, and 22.5 GHz. The source shows temporal variations in the flux density, often with a flarelike morphology. The flux variations are at times extreme, with values ranging from 1-12 mJy at 15 GHz; the degree of variability increases with frequency. The spectrum shows a variety of short-term behavior, at times increasing as nu, at other times decreasing with nu, and at still others flat. The long-term average of the spectrum increases as nu exp 0.3-0.4. No significant degree of circular polarization was observed. The source properties can be explained as a superposition of flare events in which electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies which then emit synchrotron radiation in discrete, expanding sources. The origin of the flare events may be connected to the disruption of the accretion disk some ditance from the white dwarf primary. The radio emission of AE Aqr shows similarities to the low-level flares from Cygnus X-3. 50 references.

  4. A Model for the Infrared Radiance of Optically Thin, Particulate Exhaust Plumes Generated by Pyrotechnic Flares Burning in a Vacuum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    .... The model is used to predict how a magnesium-Teflon exhaust plume would look when viewed as an approximate point source by a distant infrared sensor and also to analyze the data acquired from three separate magnesium-Teflon flares burned in a large vacuum chamber.

  5. Computations of Photon Orbits Emitted by Flares at the ISCO of Accretion Disks Around Rotating Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed computations of photon orbits emitted by flares at the ISCO of accretion disks around rotating black holes. We show that for sufficiently large spin parameter, i.e. $a > 0.94 M$, following a flare at ISCO, a sufficient number of photons arrive at an observer after multiple orbits around the black hole, to produce an "photon echo" of constant lag, i.e. independent of the relative phase between the black hole and the observer, of $\\Delta T \\simeq 14 M$. This constant time delay, then, leads to the presence of a QPO in the source power spectrum at a frequency $\

  6. The frequency of stellar X-ray flares from a large-scale XMM-Newton sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, J.; Rosen, S.

    2014-07-01

    The XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue has been used as the basis for a survey of X-ray flares from late-type (i.e. spectral type F-M) stars in the Hipparcos Tycho catalogue. The XMM catalogue and its associated data products provide an excellent basis for a comprehensive and sensitive survey of stellar flares - both from targeted active stars and from those observed serendipitously in the ~half-degree diameter field-of-view of each observation. Our sample contains ˜ 130 flares with well-observed profiles; they range in duration from ˜ 1000 s to ˜ 10,000 s, have peak X-ray luminosities log(L_x, erg/s) from ˜ 29 to ˜ 32, and X-ray energy output log(E_x, erg) from ˜ 32 to ˜ 35. We present flare frequency distributions from both target and serendipitous observations. The latter provide an unbiased (with respect to stellar activity) estimate and allow us to predict numbers of stellar flares that may be detected in future X-ray wide-field surveys such as those based on "Lobster-eye" optics. We also compare the XMM-derived estimates with values derived from earlier X-ray transient surveys. Predictions for future wide-angle surveys are of value both for the study of the stellar energetics and for determining likely "contaminant" levels in programmes aimed at other types of transient event such as gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Emission sources estimation of size-segregated suburban aerosols measured in continental part of Balkan region using PMF5.0 multivariate receptor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Srdjan; Đuričić-Milanković, Jelena; Anđelković, Ivan; Pantelić, Ana; Gambaro, Andrea; Đorđević, Dragana

    2017-04-01

    Using Low-Pressure Cascade Impactors by Dr Berner size segregated particulate matter in the size ranges: 0.27 ≤ Dp ≤ 0.53 μm, 0.53 ≤ Dp ≤ 1.06 μm, 1.06 ≤ Dp ≤ 2.09 μm, 2.09 ≤ Dp ≤ 4.11 μm, 4.11 ≤ Dp ≤ 8.11 μm and 8.11 ≤ Dp ≤ 16 μm were collected. Forty-eight-hour size segregated particulate matter samples from atmospheric aerosols in the sub-urban site of Belgrade were measured during two years (in 2012th to 2013in). ICP-MS was used to quantify next elements: Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Hg, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Se, Sb, Ti, Tl, V and Zn. In order to examine the number of sources and their fingerprints, EPA PMF 5.0 multivariate receptor tool was used. Error estimation methods (bootstrap, displacement, and bootstrap enhanced by displacement) in the analysis of the obtained solutions have enabled proper detection of the number and types of sources. This analysis of the results indicated the existence of four main sources that contribute to air pollution in the suburban area of Belgrade.

  8. Identification of possible sources of atmospheric PM10 using particle size, SEM-EDS and XRD analysis, Jharia Coalfield Dhanbad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debananda; Singh, Gurdeep; Gosai, Nitin

    2015-11-01

    Identification of responsible sources of pollution using physical parameter particulate matter (PM)10 in a critically polluted area is discussed in this paper. Database was generated by Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (AAQM) with respect to PM10 and PM2.5 in 18 monitoring stations at Jharia coalfield as per the siting criteria (IS: 5182, Part XIV) during 2011 to 2012. Identification of the probable sources of PM10 was carried out through particle size, shape, morphology analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), suitable compounds (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) and elements (energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)). Monitoring stations nearby opencast mine were affected by the big-sized and irregular-shaped particles; on the other hand, monitoring stations nearby city were affected by the small-sized and regular-shaped particles. In a city area, additional sources like diesel generator (DG) set, construction activities, coal burning, etc., were identified. Blistering effects were also observed in the particles from mine fire-affected areas. Using the X-ray diffraction technique, presence of FeS2, CuO, FeSO4 and CuSO4 compounds was observed, which indicates the effects of mine fire on particulate emission due to presence of SO4(2-) and S2- ions.

  9. Influence of the datasets size on the stability of the LR in the lower region of the within source distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haraksim, Rudolf; Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the statistical evaluation of the fingermark evidence using the likelihood ratio (LR) approach. It studies the influence of the quantity of data used to model the within (WS) and between (BS) source variability. The LR system built for the experiment uses an Automated

  10. On the spectrum and polarization of magnetar flare emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, R.; Turolla, R.

    2017-08-01

    Bursts and flares are among the distinctive observational manifestations of magnetars, isolated neutron stars endowed with an ultrastrong magnetic field (B ≈ 1014-1015 G). It is believed that these events arise in a hot electron-positron plasma that remains trapped within the closed magnetic field lines. We developed a simple radiative transfer model to simulate magnetar flare emission in the case of a steady trapped fireball. After dividing the fireball surface in a number of plane-parallel slabs, the local spectral and polarization properties are obtained integrating the radiative transfer equations for the two normal modes. We assume that magnetic Thomson scattering is the dominant source of opacity, and neglect contributions from second-order radiative processes, although double-Compton scattering is accounted for in establishing local thermal equilibrium in the fireball atmospheric layers. The observed spectral and polarization properties as measured by a distant observer are obtained by summing the contributions from the patches that are visible for a given viewing geometry by means of a ray-tracing code. The spectra we obtained in the 1-100 keV energy range are thermal and can be described in terms of the superposition of two blackbodies. The blackbody temperature and the emitting area ratio are in broad agreement with the available observations. The predicted linear polarization degree is, in general, greater than 80 per cent over the entire energy range and should be easily detectable by new-generation X-ray polarimeters, such as IXPE, XIPE and eXTP.

  11. Flares of the H2O Maser Emission in the Young Stellar Object GH2O 092.67+03.07 (IRAS 21078+5211)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, V. V.; Lekht, E. E.; Minnebaev, V. M.; Pashchenko, M. I.; Rudnitskii, G. M.; Tolmachev, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The results of monitoring the H2O maser observed toward the region GH2O 092.67+03.07 (IRAS 21078+5211) located in the Giant Molecular Cloud Cygnus OB7 are presented. The observations were carried out with the 22-m radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory in 2006-2017. Strong flares of the H2O maser emission with flux densities up to 19 800 Jy were detected. The flares exhibited both global (over the source) and local characters. All the flares were accompanied by strong variations in the H2O spectra within the corresponding radial-velocity ranges. Individual H2O components form both compact clusters and chains 1-2-AU long. Analysis of the variations of the fluxes, radial velocities, and line shapes of features during the flares showed that the medium may be strongly fragmented, with small-scale turbulent motions taking place in the H2Omaser region.

  12. Simulation of Supply-Chain Networks: A Source of Innovation and Competitive Advantage for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Liotta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available On a daily basis, enterprises of all sizes cope with the turbulence and volatility of market demands, cost variability, and severe pressure from globally distributed competitors. Managing uncertainty about future demand requirements and volumes in supply-chain networks has become a priority. One of the ways to deal with uncertainty is the utilization of simulation techniques and tools, which provide greater predictability of decision-making outcomes. For example, simulation has been widely applied in decision-making processes related to global logistics and production networks at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels, where it is used to predict the impact of decisions before their implementation in complex and uncertain environments. Large enterprises are inclined to use simulation tools whereas small and medium-sized enterprises seem to underestimate its advantages. The objective of this article is to emphasize the relevance of simulation for the design and management of supply-chain networks from the perspective of small and medium-sized firms.

  13. Early X-Ray Flares in GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Aimuratov, Y.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Chen, Y. C.; Karlica, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Li, L.; Melon Fuksman, J. D.; Moradi, R.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Primorac, D.; Rueda, J. A.; Shakeri, S.; Vereshchagin, G. V.; Xue, S.-S.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the early X-ray flares in the GRB “flare–plateau–afterglow” (FPA) phase observed by Swift-XRT. The FPA occurs only in one of the seven GRB subclasses: the binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). This subclass consists of long GRBs with a carbon–oxygen core and a neutron star (NS) binary companion as progenitors. The hypercritical accretion of the supernova (SN) ejecta onto the NS can lead to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole. Consequently, one can observe a GRB emission with isotropic energy {E}{iso}≳ {10}52 erg, as well as the associated GeV emission and the FPA phase. Previous work had shown that gamma-ray spikes in the prompt emission occur at ∼ {10}15{--}{10}17 cm with Lorentz Gamma factors {{Γ }}∼ {10}2{--}{10}3. Using a novel data analysis, we show that the time of occurrence, duration, luminosity, and total energy of the X-ray flares correlate with E iso. A crucial feature is the observation of thermal emission in the X-ray flares that we show occurs at radii ∼1012 cm with {{Γ }}≲ 4. These model-independent observations cannot be explained by the “fireball” model, which postulates synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation from a single ultrarelativistic jetted emission extending from the prompt to the late afterglow and GeV emission phases. We show that in BdHNe a collision between the GRB and the SN ejecta occurs at ≃1010 cm, reaching transparency at ∼1012 cm with {{Γ }}≲ 4. The agreement between the thermal emission observations and these theoretically derived values validates our model and opens the possibility of testing each BdHN episode with the corresponding Lorentz Gamma factor.

  14. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M; Kosovichev, Alexander G; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M [Center for Computational Heliophysics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ -rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites , RHESSI , and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs ( Hinode , Fermi GBM, Konus- W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs ( IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  15. Exergy analysis of waste emissions from gas flaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Saheed ISMAIL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas flaring produces a stream of waste gases at high temperature and pressure which contains carbon monoxide, Hydrogen Sulphide etc. The resultant effect of which is detrimental to our planet and, consequently, to the life of both the living and the non-living things. It’s well known that gas flaring contributes in no small measure to the global warming. Exergy analysis is applied in this work to analyze waste emissions from gas flaring so as to have a model through which impact of gas flaring can be measured. The study considers both the thermo-mechanical exergy and the chemical exergy of these gases. Relevant data on gas flaring activities in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria between the periods of fifteen (15 years was obtained from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC. A computer program (Exergy Calculator was developed based on the equations generated in the Model. Exergy associated with gas flaring activities in Nigeria between the periods of 1998 through 2012 was calculated. The results show that 1 mscf (in thousand cubic feet of flared gases generate 0.000041 MWh of energy leading to a value of 440158.607 MWh of energy for the period under review.The analysis provides important conclusions and recommendations for improving oil platforms operationsin in order to safeguard the environment, health of the populace, and maximize recovered exergy from gas flaring.

  16. Effect of Particle Acceleration Process on the Flare Characteristics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2002) 23, 95–99. Effect of Particle Acceleration Process on the Flare Characteristics of. Blazars. S. Bhattacharyya, S. Sahayanathan & C. L. Kaul Nuclear Research Laboratory,. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. Abstract. Following the kinetic equation approach, we study the flare.

  17. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  18. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-WIND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  19. Frequencies of Flare Occurrence: Interaction between Convection and Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, D. J.; Paudel, R. R.

    2018-02-01

    Observations of solar and stellar flares have revealed the presence of power-law dependences between the flare energy and the time interval between flares. Various models have been proposed to explain these dependences and the numerical value of the power-law indices. Here, we propose a model in which convective flows in granules force the footpoints of coronal magnetic loops, which are frozen-in to photospheric gas, to undergo a random walk. In certain conditions, this can lead to a twist in the loop, which drives the loop unstable if the twist exceeds a critical value. The possibility that a solar flare is caused by such a twist-induced instability in a loop has been in the literature for decades. Here, we quantify the process in an approximate way with a view to replicating the power-law index. We find that, for relatively small flares, the random walk twisting model leads to a rather steep power-law slope that agrees very well with the index derived from a sample of 56,000+ solar X-ray flares reported by the GOES satellites. For relatively large flares, we find that the slope of the power law is shallower. The empirical power-law slopes reported for flare stars also have a range that overlaps with the slopes obtained here. We suggest that in the coolest stars, a significant change in slope should occur when the frozen-flux assumption breaks down due to low electrical conductivity.

  20. Hα Intensity Oscillations in Large Flares Ram Ajor Maurya & Ashok ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reinvestigate the problem of oscillations in the quiet, active and flaring locations in the chromosphere. 2. The observational data. The Hα data of solar flares used for this study were obtained by the 6-inch aperture Spar telescope of Udaipur Solar Observatory in the observational period 04:00–12:00 UT of USO time window.

  1. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by “Solar. X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December. 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by. LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteris- tics of solar flares and their ...

  2. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Graham, D. [INAF-Ossevatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  3. Sgr A* flares: tidal disruption of asteroids and planets?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubovas, K.; Nayakshin, S.; Markoff, S.

    2012-01-01

    It is theoretically expected that a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the centre of a typical nearby galaxy disrupts a solar-type star every ∼105 yr, resulting in a bright flare lasting for months. Sgr A*, the resident SMBH of the Milky Way, produces (by comparison) tiny flares that last only hours

  4. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee, A.; Martin, S.F.; Bentley, R.D.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezs, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K.L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S.H.B.; Wang, J.

    1984-01-01

    Some sites for solar flares are known to develop where new magnetic flux emerges and becomes abutted against opposite polarity pre-existing magnetic flux (review by Galzauskas/1/). We have identified and analyzed the evolution of such flare sites at the boundaries of a major new and growing magnetic

  5. Flare Ribbon Expansion and Energy Release Ayumi Asai , Takaaki ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-04-10

    1Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, Minamisaku, Nagano, 384-1305, Japan. ... X2.3 solar flare which occurred on April 10, 2001. .... In the right panel of. Fig. 3, we show the temporal variation of the physical parameters, such as Bp, vf , ˙ , and S along a slit line. Here, we defined vf as the speed of the flare-ribbon ...

  6. A Systematic Review of Surgical Randomized Controlled Trials: Part 2. Funding Source, Conflict of Interest, and Sample Size in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Coroneos, Christopher J; Ziolkowski, Natalia I; Kaur, Manraj N; Banfield, Laura; Meade, Maureen O; Chung, Kevin C; Thoma, Achilleas; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-02-01

    The authors examined industry support, conflict of interest, and sample size in plastic surgery randomized controlled trials that compared surgical interventions. They hypothesized that industry-funded trials demonstrate statistically significant outcomes more often, and randomized controlled trials with small sample sizes report statistically significant results more frequently. An electronic search identified randomized controlled trials published between 2000 and 2013. Independent reviewers assessed manuscripts and performed data extraction. Funding source, conflict of interest, primary outcome direction, and sample size were examined. Chi-squared and independent-samples t tests were used in the analysis. The search identified 173 randomized controlled trials, of which 100 (58 percent) did not acknowledge funding status. A relationship between funding source and trial outcome direction was not observed. Both funding status and conflict of interest reporting improved over time. Only 24 percent (six of 25) of industry-funded randomized controlled trials reported authors to have independent control of data and manuscript contents. The mean number of patients randomized was 73 per trial (median, 43, minimum, 3, maximum, 936). Small trials were not found to be positive more often than large trials (p = 0.87). Randomized controlled trials with small sample size were common; however, this provides great opportunity for the field to engage in further collaboration and produce larger, more definitive trials. Reporting of trial funding and conflict of interest is historically poor, but it greatly improved over the study period. Underreporting at author and journal levels remains a limitation when assessing the relationship between funding source and trial outcomes. Improved reporting and manuscript control should be goals that both authors and journals can actively achieve.

  7. Lower atmosphere of solar flares; Proceedings of the Solar Maximum Mission Symposium, Sunspot, NM, Aug. 20-24, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neidig, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    The topics discussed by the present conference encompass the chromospheric flare phenomenon, white light flares, UV emission and the flare transition region, the flare corona and high energy emissions, stellar flares, and flare energy release and transport. Attention is given to radiative shocks and condensation in flares, impulsive brightening of H-alpha flare points, the structure and response of the chromosphere to radiation backwarming during solar flares, the interpretation of continuum emissions in white light flares, and the radiation properties of solar plasmas. Also discussed are EUV images of a solar flare and C III intensity, an active region survey in H-alpha and X-rays, dynamic thermal plasma conditions in large flares, the evolution of the flare mechanism in dwarf stars, the evidence concerning electron beams in solar flares, the energetics of the nonlinear tearing mode, macroscopic electric fields during two-ribbon flares, and the low temperature signatures of energetic particles

  8. Quantification of uncertainty in photon source spot size inference during laser-driven radiography experiments at TRIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Benjamin John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaniyappan, Sasikumar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautier, Donald Cort [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mendez, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Burris-Mog, Trevor John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Huang, Chengkun K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunter, James F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Espy, Michelle E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmidt, Derek William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sefkow, Adam [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Randall Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Images of the R2DTO resolution target were obtained during laser-driven-radiography experiments performed at the TRIDENT laser facility, and analysis of these images using the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE) determines a most probable full-width half maximum (FWHM) spot size of 78 μm. However, significant uncertainty prevails due to variation in the measured detector blur. Propagating this uncertainty in detector blur through the forward model results in an interval of probabilistic ambiguity spanning approximately 35-195 μm when the laser energy impinges on a thick (1 mm) tantalum target. In other phases of the experiment, laser energy is deposited on a thin (~100 nm) aluminum target placed 250 μm ahead of the tantalum converter. When the energetic electron beam is generated in this manner, upstream from the bremsstrahlung converter, the inferred spot size shifts to a range of much larger values, approximately 270-600 μm FWHM. This report discusses methods applied to obtain these intervals as well as concepts necessary for interpreting the result within a context of probabilistic quantitative inference.

  9. RECONNECTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS: THE ROLE OF SPINES IN THREE ERUPTIVE FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardins, Angela Des; Canfield, Richard; Longcope, Dana; Fordyce, Crystal; Waitukaitis, Scott

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in solar flares, we compare the RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) footpoint motions of three flares with a detailed study of the corresponding topology given by a Magnetic Charge Topology model. We analyze the relationship between the footpoint motions and topological spine lines and find that the examined footpoint sources move along spine lines. We present a three-dimensional topological model in which this movement can be understood. As reconnection proceeds, flux is transferred between the reconnecting domains, causing the separator to move. The movement of the separator's chromospheric ends, identified with the HXR footpoints, is along those spine lines on which the separator ends.

  10. Influence of Whistler Turbulence on Fast Electron Distribution and Their Microwave Emissions in a Flare Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, L. V.; Melnikov, V. F.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of whistlers on the distribution and gyrosynchrotron radiation of fast electrons injected into a coronal magnetic trap is considered. The kinetic equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation with consideration of fast electron scattering, both on background plasma particles and on whistlers, is solved for an inhomogeneous trap. It is supposed that the source of whistlers is a nonstationary process of flare energy release. Having found the fast electron distribution, we can calculate their gyrosynchrotron microwave emission. The influence of nonthermal electron scattering on whistlers are compared with the effects of scattering on Coulomb collisions. It is shown that whistlers considerably modify the emission characteristics of a loop at a certain energy density; in particular, they steepen the frequency spectrum. This is useful for microwave diagnostics of plasma turbulence in the flare loop.

  11. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  12. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65 0 of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of ∼10 G to as high as ∼450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65 0 of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

  13. The flare model for X-ray variability of NGC 4258

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trześniewski, T.; Czerny, B.; Karas, V.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; Goosmann, R.; Nikołajuk, M.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: We study the variability mechanism of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within the framework of the flare model. We examine the case of Seyfert/LINER galaxy NGC 4258, which is observed at high inclination angle and exhibits rapid fluctuations in its X-ray light curve. Methods: We construct a model light curve based on the assumption of magnetic flares localized in the equatorial plane and orbiting with Keplerian speed at each given radius. We calculate the level of variability as a function of the inclination of an observer, taking into account all effects of general relativity near a rotating supermassive black hole. Results: The variability level is a monotonic function of the source inclination. It rises more rapidly for larger values of the black hole spin (Kerr parameter a) and for steeper emissivity (index β of the radial profile). We compare the expected level of variability for the viewing angle 81.6 deg, as inferred for NGC 4258, with the case of moderate viewing angles of about 30 deg, which are typical of Seyfert type-1 galaxies. Conclusions: Highly inclined sources such as this one are particularly suitable to test the flare model because the orbital motion, Doppler boosting, and light bending are all expected to have maximum effect when the accretion disk is seen almost edge-on. The model is consistent with the NGC 4258 variability, where the obscuring material is thought to be localized mainly toward the equatorial plane rather than forming a geometrically thick torus. Once the intrinsic timescales of the flare duration are determined with higher precision, this kind of highly inclined objects with a precisely known mass of the black hole can be used to set independent constraints on the spin parameter.

  14. Long-term variation of the levels, compositions and sources of size-resolved particulate matter in a megacity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying-Ze; Wu, Jian-Hui; Shi, Guo-Liang; Wu, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Fen; Zhou, Lai-Dong; Zhang, Pu; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the long-term trends and variations of the levels, compositions, size distribution and sources of particulate matter (PM), long-term monitoring campaigns of PM10 and PM2.5 were performed in a megacity in China (Chengdu) during the period from 2009 to 2011. The average concentration of PM10 was 172.01±89.80 μg/m(3) and that of PM2.5 was 103.15±59.83 μg/m(3), with an average PM2.5/PM10 of 0.60. Enrichments of the important species indicated that the fractions of crustal elements were higher in PM10 than those in PM2.5, while the abundance of organic carbon (OC) and secondary ions was enriched in the fine PM. Quantitative source apportionments of both PM10 and PM2.5 were performed by PMF. PM10 and PM2.5 in Chengdu were influenced by similar source categories, and their percentage contributions were in the same order: crustal dust was the highest contributor, followed by vehicular exhaust, secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate and cement dust. Crustal dust and cement dust contributed a higher percentage to PM10 than to PM2.5, while vehicular exhaust and secondary particles provided higher percentage contributions to PM2.5. In addition, PMF-HCA was performed to investigate the characteristics of the sources of the clustered samples, identifying three periods: crustal dust dominant-period, secondary sulfate dominant-period and comprehensive source influenced-period. Planting, reduction of precursors, and banning high-emission vehicles should be implemented to control crustal dust, secondary particles and vehicular exhaust in Chengdu. Furthermore, the size-resolved and the period-resolved control would be more effective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Urban air quality in a mid-size city - PM2.5 composition, sources and identification of impact areas: From local to long range contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Stefania; Cazzaro, Marta; Innocente, Elena; Visin, Flavia; Hopke, Philip K.; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    Urban air quality represents a major public health burden and is a long-standing concern to European citizens. Combustion processes and traffic-related emissions represent the main primary particulate matter (PM) sources in urban areas. Other sources can also affect air quality (e.g., secondary aerosol, industrial) depending on the characteristics of the study area. Thus, the identification and the apportionment of all sources is of crucial importance to make effective corrective decisions within environmental policies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impacts of different emissions sources on PM2.5 concentrations and compositions in a mid-size city in the Po Valley (Treviso, Italy). Data have been analyzed to highlight compositional differences (elements and major inorganic ions), to determine PM2.5 sources and their contributions, and to evaluate the influence of air mass movements. Non-parametric tests, positive matrix factorization (PMF), conditional bivariate probability function (CBPF), and concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) have been used in a multi-chemometrics approach to understand the areal-scale (proximate, local, long-range) where different sources act on PM2.5 levels and composition. Results identified three levels of scale from which the pollution arose: (i) a proximate local scale (close to the sampling site) for traffic non-exhaust and resuspended dust sources; (ii) a local urban scale (including both sampling site and areas close to them) for combustion and industrial; and (iii) a regional scale characterized by ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. This approach and results can help to develop and adopt better air quality policy action.

  16. Beam size reduction of a several hundred-keV compact ion microbeam system by improving the extraction condition in an ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Yasuyuki; Ohkubo, Takeru; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Saitoh, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    A several hundred-keV compact ion microbeam system with a three-stage acceleration lens has been developed to form an ion beam of several micrometers in diameter. In a previous study of the Ohkubo et al. (2013) and Ishii et al. (2014), a hydrogen beam of 143 keV having 17 μm diameter was experimentally formed using such a microbeam system. It was demonstrated that a three-stage acceleration lens functioned as a focusing lens and indicated that the beam diameter (hereinafter referred to as the “beam size”) depended on the extraction voltage to generate the ion beam and the vacuum pressure in the extraction space in a plasma-type ion source. In this study, the hydrogen beam sizes were experimentally measured at 130 keV as functions of the extraction voltage and vacuum pressure to form the beam size with several micrometers in diameter. These two relationships showed that beam sizes were reduced in the extraction voltage range of 400–500 V and when the vacuum pressure was lowered to a minimum value of 5.33 × 10{sup −5} Pa. In addition, the result showed that the beam size was dominantly influenced by the vacuum pressure. Consequently, a hydrogen beam 5.8 μm in diameter was formed experimentally—the smallest beam yet obtained.

  17. The Source Size Dependence on the $M_{hadron}$ Applying Fermi and Bose Statistics and I-Spin Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Gideon; Cohen, Iuliana

    2000-01-01

    The emission volume sizes of pions and Kaons, r_{\\pi^\\pm \\pi^\\pm} and r_{K^\\pm K^\\pm}, measured in the hadronic Z^0 decays via the Bose-Einstein Correlations (BEC), and the recent measurements of r_{\\Lambda\\Lambda} obtained by through the Pauli exclusion principle are used to study the r dependence on the hadron mass. A clear r_{\\pi^\\pm \\pi^\\pm} > r_{K^\\pm K^\\pm} > r_{\\Lambda (LUND) model expectation. An adequate description of r(m) is obtained via the Heisenberg uncertainty relations and also by Local Parton Hadron Duality approach using a general QCD potential. These lead to a relation of the type r(m) ~ Constant/sqrt{m}. The present lack of knowledge on the f_o(980) decay rate to the K^0\\bar{K}^0 channel prohibits the use of the r_{K^0_SK^0_S} in the r(m) analysis. The use of a generalised BEC and I-spin invariance, which predicts an BEC enhancement also in the K^{\\pm}K^0 and \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^0 systems, should in the future help to include the r_{K^0_SK^0_S} in the r(m) analysis.

  18. Relative impact of on-road vehicular and point-source industrial emissions of air pollutants in a medium-sized Andean city

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. M.; Gómez, C. D.; Rojas, N. Y.; Acevedo, H.; Aristizábal, B. H.

    2017-03-01

    Cities in emerging countries are facing a fast growth and urbanization; however, the study of air pollutant emissions and its dynamics is scarce, making their populations vulnerable to potential effects of air pollution. This situation is critical in medium-sized urban areas built along the tropical Andean mountains. This work assesses the contribution of on-road vehicular and point-source industrial activities in the medium-sized Andean city of Manizales, Colombia. Annual fluxes of criteria pollutants, NMVOC, and greenhouse gases were estimated. Emissions were dominated by vehicular activity, with more than 90% of total estimated releases for the majority of air pollutants. On-road vehicular emissions for CO (43.4 Gg/yr) and NMVOC (9.6 Gg/yr) were mainly associated with the use of motorcycles (50% and 81% of total CO and NMVOC emissions respectively). Public transit buses were the main source of PM10 (47%) and NOx (48%). The per-capita emission index was significantly higher in Manizales than in other medium-sized cities, especially for NMVOC, CO, NOx and CO2. The unique mountainous terrain of Andean cities suggest that a methodology based on VSP model could give more realistic emission estimates, with additional model components that include slope and acceleration. Food and beverage facilities were the main contributors of point-source industrial emissions for PM10 (63%), SOx (55%) and NOx (45%), whereas scrap metal recycling had high emissions of CO (73%) and NMVOC (47%). Results provide the baseline for ongoing research in atmospheric modeling and urban air quality, in order to improve the understanding of air pollutant fluxes, transport and transformation in the atmosphere. In addition, this emission inventory could be used as a tool to identify areas of public health exposure and provide information for future decision makers.

  19. An Experiment to Locate the Site of TeV Flaring in M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Massaro, F.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Horns, D.; Raue, M.; /Hamburg U.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Wagner, S.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Colin, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Mazin, D.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Wagner, R.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Beilicke, M.; /McDonnell Ctr. Space Sci.; LeBohec, S.; Hui, M.; /Utah U.; Mukherjee, R.; /Barnard Coll.

    2012-05-18

    We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days x the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

  20. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  1. TIME-DEPENDENT MODELS OF FLARES FROM SAGITTARIUS A*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds-Eden, Katie; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Frank; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot; Porquet, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    The emission from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center, shows order of magnitude variability ('flares') a few times a day that is particularly prominent in the near-infrared (NIR) and X-rays. We present a time-dependent model for these flares motivated by the hypothesis that dissipation of magnetic energy powers the flares. We show that episodic magnetic reconnection can occur near the last stable circular orbit in time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black hole accretion-the timescales and energetics of these events are broadly consistent with the flares from Sgr A*. Motivated by these results, we present a spatially one-zone time-dependent model for the electron distribution function in flares, including energy loss due to synchrotron cooling and adiabatic expansion. Synchrotron emission from transiently accelerated particles can explain the NIR/X-ray light curves and spectra of a luminous flare observed on 2007 April 4. A significant decrease in the magnetic field strength during the flare (coincident with the electron acceleration) is required to explain the simultaneity and symmetry of the simultaneous light curves. Our models predict that the NIR and X-ray spectral indices are related by Δα ≅ 0.5 (where νF ν ∝ ν α ) and that there is only modest variation in the spectral index during flares. We also explore implications of this model for longer wavelength (radio-submillimeter) emission seemingly associated with X-ray and NIR flares; we argue that a few hour decrease in the submillimeter emission is a more generic consequence of large-scale magnetic reconnection than delayed radio emission from adiabatic expansion.

  2. The Duration of Energy Deposition on Unresolved Flaring Loops in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, Jeffrey W.; Polito, Vanessa; Warren, Harry P.; Crump, Nicholas A.

    2018-04-01

    Solar flares form and release energy across a large number of magnetic loops. The global parameters of flares, such as the total energy released, duration, physical size, etc., are routinely measured, and the hydrodynamics of a coronal loop subjected to intense heating have been extensively studied. It is not clear, however, how many loops comprise a flare, nor how the total energy is partitioned between them. In this work, we employ a hydrodynamic model to better understand the energy partition by synthesizing Si IV and Fe XXI line emission and comparing to observations of these lines with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We find that the observed temporal evolution of the Doppler shifts holds important information on the heating duration. To demonstrate this, we first examine a single loop model, and find that the properties of chromospheric evaporation seen in Fe XXI can be reproduced by loops heated for long durations, while persistent redshifts seen in Si IV cannot be reproduced by any single loop model. We then examine a multithreaded model, assuming both a fixed heating duration on all loops and a distribution of heating durations. For a fixed heating duration, we find that durations of 100–200 s do a fair job of reproducing both the red- and blueshifts, while a distribution of durations, with a median of about 50–100 s, does a better job. Finally, we compare our simulations directly to observations of an M-class flare seen by IRIS, and find good agreement between the modeled and observed values given these constraints.

  3. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Sauer, Herbert H.

    1991-01-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronaus in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface.

  4. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H.

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs

  5. Distribution function of frequency of stellar flares in the Orion association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsamyan, Eh.S.

    1980-01-01

    Using the chronology of discoveries of new flares and the chronology of confirmation i.e. the time distribution of second flares (Ambartsumian's method), the distribution function of frequency of flares on stars in the Orion association is obtained. A number of stars having different frequencies is also found. It is shown that flare stars with high flare frequency (ν -1 13sup(m). The quantities of flare stars in aggregates determined by two independent methods show that the number of flare stars in Orion association is about 1.5 times greater than in the Pleiades cluster [ru

  6. Concentration and size distribution of water-extracted dimethylaminium and trimethylaminium in atmospheric particles during nine campaigns - Implications for sources, phase states and formation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huan; Feng, Limin; Hu, Qingjing; Zhu, Yujiao; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Yang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2018-03-07

    In this study, we determined the concentrations of water-extracted dimethylaminium (DMA + ) and trimethylaminium (TMA + ) in size-segregated atmospheric particles collected during three inland campaigns and one sea-beach campaign in Qingdao and five marine campaigns in marginal seas of China and the northwest Pacific Ocean. The averages of DMA + and TMA + in PM 0.056 - 10 (the sum of concentrations from 0.056 to 10μm) during each campaign ranged from 0.045 to 1.1nmolm -3 and from 0.029 to 0.53nmolm -3 , respectively. The increased concentrations of DMA + and TMA + in PM 0.056 - 10 , particularly the 1-2 orders of magnitude increased ratios of DMA + /NH 4 + and TMA + /NH 4 + , in the marine and sea-beach atmospheres indicated that the overwhelming majority was derived from marine sources. Size distributions of TMA + and DMA + were also investigated in terms of phase states and formation pathways, e.g., the dominant modes of particulate DMA + and TMA + in some samples were characterized by the mass median aerodynamic diameter at 0.1-0.2μm against the dominant mode of NH 4 + and SO 4 2- at 0.7-0.9μm, while the ratios of DMA + /NH 4 + and/or TMA + /NH 4 + in 0.2μm particles. This strongly implied that the particulate DMA + and TMA + at 0.2μm size range mainly existed in the aqueous (or solid) phase where the dominance of gas-aerosol equilibria would cause the ratios to be almost size-independent. The size-dependent phase states corresponded to their various formation pathways. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biotic extinctions by solar flares; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beland, P.; Russell, D.A.; Crutzen, P.J.; Reid, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    Some comments are offered on the paper by Reid and others (nature 259:177 (1976)) in which a mechanism was suggested by which solar protons might catastrophically deplete atmospheric D 3 during a reversal of the Earth's geomagnetic field. Organisms would thereby be exposed to a more intense UV environment, leading to species extinctions. These authors assumed that during a reversal the geomagnetic field effectively disappears for about 1000 years, and also that solar flares sufficiently intense to cause extinctions occur at intervals of 1000 years or more. The validity of these assumptions is here examined using data on geomagnetic reversals identified over the past 75 M years, together with extinction data, and some anomalies are pointed out. A reply by Reid and others is appended. (U.K.)

  8. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  9. Recurrent pulse trains in the solar hard X-ray flare of 1980 June 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiplinger, A.L.; Dennis, B.R.; Frost, K.J.; Orwig, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    This study presents a detailed examination of the solar hard X-ray and γ-ray flare of 1980 June 7 as seen by the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on SMM. The hard X-ray profile is most unusual in that it is characterized by an initial pulse train of seven intense hard X-ray spikes. However, the event is unique among the 6300 events observed by HXRBS in that the temporal signature of this pulse train recurs twice during the flare. Such signatures of temporal stability in impulsive solar flares have not been observed before. Examinations of the hard X-ray data in conjunction with radio and γ-ray observations show that the 28--480 keV X-ray emission is simultaneous with the 17 GHz microwave fluxes within 128 ms and that the 3.5--6.5 MeV prompt γ-ray line emission is coincident with secondary maxima of the microwave and X-ray fluxes. Studies of the temporal and spectral properties of the pulses indicate that the pulses are not produced by purely reversible processes, and that if the source is oscillatory, it is not a high quality oscillator. Although the absence of spatially resolved hard X-ray observations leaves other possibilities open, a parameterization of the event as a set of seven sequentially firing loops is presented that offers many satisfying explanations of the observations

  10. An Expanding Radio Nebula Produced by a Giant Flare from the Magnetar SGR 1806-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, B.

    2005-03-04

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are ''magnetars'', a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, B {approx} 10{sup 15} gauss. On 2004 December 27, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20, the third such event ever recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a fading radio afterglow produced by this outburst, with a luminosity 500 times larger than the only other detection of a similar source. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare from SGR 1806-20, a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula was seen, expanding at approximately a quarter the speed of light. To create this nebula, at least 4 x 10{sup 43} ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The combination of spatially resolved structure and rapid time evolution allows a study in unprecedented detail of a nearby analog to supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Millimeter and X-Ray Emission from the 5 July 2012 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Y. T.; Smirnova, V. V.; Motorina, G. G.; Morgachev, A. S.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Nagnibeda, V. G.; Ryzhov, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    The 5 July 2012 solar flare SOL2012-07-05T11:44 (11:39 - 11:49 UT) with an increasing millimeter spectrum between 93 and 140 GHz is considered. We use space and ground-based observations in X-ray, extreme ultraviolet, microwave, and millimeter wave ranges obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Radio Solar Telescope Network, and Bauman Moscow State Technical University millimeter radio telescope RT-7.5. The main parameters of thermal and accelerated electrons were determined through X-ray spectral fitting assuming the homogeneous thermal source and thick-target model. From the data of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/SDO and differential-emission-measure calculations it is shown that the thermal coronal plasma gives a negligible contribution to the millimeter flare emission. Model calculations suggest that the observed increase of millimeter spectral flux with frequency is determined by gyrosynchrotron emission of high-energy (≳ 300 keV) electrons in the chromosphere. The consequences of the results are discussed in the light of the flare-energy-release mechanisms.

  12. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibacher, John W.; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares,, Maria Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by:-applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare-analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation-looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  13. Establishing a core domain set to measure rheumatoid arthritis flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Lie, Elisabeth; Bartlett, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    to measure RA flare. METHODS: Patient and healthcare professional (HCP) qualitative studies, focus groups, and literature review, followed by patient and HCP Delphi exercises including combined Delphi consensus at Outcome Measures in Rheumatology 10 (OMERACT 10), identified potential domains to measure flare...... Filter 2.0 methodology. RESULTS: A pre-meeting combined Delphi exercise for defining flare identified 9 domains as important (>70% consensus from patients or HCP). Four new patient-reported domains beyond those included in the RA disease activity core set were proposed for inclusion (fatigue...

  14. Reconstruction of a Large-scale Pre-flare Coronal Current Sheet Associated with a Homologous X-shaped Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Yan, Xiaoli; Feng, Xueshang; Duan, Aiying; Hu, Qiang; Zuo, Pingbing; Wang, Yi

    2017-11-01

    As a fundamental magnetic structure in the solar corona, electric current sheets (CSs) can form either prior to or during a solar flare, and they are essential for magnetic energy dissipation in the solar corona because they enable magnetic reconnection. However, the static reconstruction of a CS is rare, possibly due to limitations that are inherent in the available coronal field extrapolation codes. Here we present the reconstruction of a large-scale pre-flare CS in solar active region 11967 using an MHD-relaxation model constrained by the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram. The CS is associated with a set of peculiar homologous flares that exhibit unique X-shaped ribbons and loops occurring in a quadrupolar magnetic configuration.This is evidenced by an ’X’ shape, formed from the field lines traced from the CS to the photosphere. This nearly reproduces the shape of the observed flare ribbons, suggesting that the flare is a product of the dissipation of the CS via reconnection. The CS forms in a hyperbolic flux tube, which is an intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers. The recurrence of the X-shaped flares might be attributed to the repetitive formation and dissipation of the CS, as driven by the photospheric footpoint motions. These results demonstrate the power of a data-constrained MHD model in reproducing a CS in the corona as well as providing insight into the magnetic mechanism of solar flares.

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY LUMINOSITY AND MAJOR FLARE LAUNCHING IN GRS 1915+105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    We perform the most detailed analysis to date of the X-ray state of the Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1915+105 just prior to (0-4 hr) and during the brief (1-7 hr) ejection of major (superluminal) radio flares. A very strong model independent correlation is found between the 1.2 keV-12 keV X-ray flux 0-4 hr before flare ejections with the peak optically thin 2.3 GHz emission of the flares. This suggests a direct physical connection between the energy in the ejection and the luminosity of the accretion flow preceding the ejection. In order to quantify this concept, we develop techniques to estimate the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosity, L intrinsic , from RXTE All Sky Monitor data and to implement known methods to estimate the time-averaged power required to launch the radio emitting plasmoids, Q (sometimes called jet power). We find that the distribution of intrinsic luminosity from 1.2 keV-50 keV, L intrinsic (1.2-50), is systematically elevated just before ejections compared to arbitrary times when there are no major ejections. The estimated Q is strongly correlated with L intrinsic (1.2-50) 0-4 hr before the ejection, the increase in L intrinsic (1.2-50) in the hours preceding the ejection and the time-averaged L intrinsic (1.2-50) during the flare rise. Furthermore, the total time-averaged power during the ejection (Q + the time average of L intrinsic (1.2-50) during ejection) is strongly correlated with L intrinsic (1.2-50) just before launch with near equality if the distance to the source is ≈10.5 kpc.

  16. A near real time MSG-SEVIRI based algorithm for gas flaring monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruolo, Mariapia; Coviello, Irina; Filizzola, Carolina; Lacava, Teodosio; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades oil and gas industry has become responsible for important environmental issues. The gas flaring, one of the processes used to dispose of the natural gas associated with extracted crude oil, has been recognized as being potentially harmful to human health and the atmosphere. Efforts to empirically assess the environmental impacts of such phenomenon are frequently hampered by limited access to official information on flare locations and volumes, the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal sampling strategies and methods used to collect data. Consequently, there is a need to develop new methods of acquiring such information and remote sensing techniques seem the most viable option. In this paper, with reference to this problem, the potential of a satellite based technique for a near real time detection and characterization of hot spot sources was assessed. In detail, Medium Infrared (MIR) radiances acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) scanner carried aboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite were processed following the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) prescriptions. Such an algorithm, based on the processing of multi-year satellite images, co-located in the space-time domain, allows to timely identify statistically significant variations of the MIR signal, related to changes and/or malfunctions in the industrial process and responsible for the gas flaring blazes. Results achieved, referring to the flaring activity of the Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA), an oil/gas plant located in the South of Italy, will be described in detail and discussed in this paper.

  17. New Probe of Early Phases of Jet Formation and Evolution using Stellar Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga Reddy Pasham, Dheeraj; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2018-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole can result in transient radio emission. The electrons producing these synchrotron radio flares could either be accelerated inside a relativistic jet or externally by shocks resulting from an outflow interacting with the circumnuclear medium. Until now, evidence for the internal emission mechanism has been lacking; nearly all tidal disruption flare studies have adopted the external shock model to explain the observed properties of radio flares. I will talk about a result that presents a challenge to external emission models: we discovered a cross-correlation between the soft X-ray (0.3-1 keV) and 16 GHz radio flux of Rosetta Stone tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li. Variability features in the X-ray light curve appear again in the radio light curve, but after a time lag of about 13 days. This demonstrates that soft X-ray emitting accretion disk regulates the radio emission. This coupling appears to be inconsistent with all previous external emission models for this source but is naturally explained if the radio emission originates from a freely expanding jet. I will show that emission internal to an adiabatically expanding jet can also reproduce the observed evolution of the radio spectral energy distribution. Furthermore, both the correlation between X-ray and radio luminosity as well as our radio spectral modeling imply an approximately linear coupling between the accretion rate and jet power. I will also discuss how future tidal disruption events can help us understand how jets form and evolve in general.

  18. A Large-scale Plume in an X-class Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E. [Physics Department, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ, 07102-1982 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    Ever-increasing multi-frequency imaging of solar observations suggests that solar flares often involve more than one magnetic fluxtube. Some of the fluxtubes are closed, while others can contain open fields. The relative proportion of nonthermal electrons among those distinct loops is highly important for understanding energy release, particle acceleration, and transport. The access of nonthermal electrons to the open field is also important because the open field facilitates the solar energetic particle (SEP) escape from the flaring site, and thus controls the SEP fluxes in the solar system, both directly and as seed particles for further acceleration. The large-scale fluxtubes are often filled with a tenuous plasma, which is difficult to detect in either EUV or X-ray wavelengths; however, they can dominate at low radio frequencies, where a modest component of nonthermal electrons can render the source optically thick and, thus, bright enough to be observed. Here we report the detection of a large-scale “plume” at the impulsive phase of an X-class solar flare, SOL2001-08-25T16:23, using multi-frequency radio data from Owens Valley Solar Array. To quantify the flare’s spatial structure, we employ 3D modeling utilizing force-free-field extrapolations from the line of sight SOHO /MDI magnetograms with our modeling tool GX-Simulator. We found that a significant fraction of the nonthermal electrons that accelerated at the flare site low in the corona escapes to the plume, which contains both closed and open fields. We propose that the proportion between the closed and open fields at the plume is what determines the SEP population escaping into interplanetary space.

  19. Investigating effects of sample pretreatment on protein stability using size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Tobias; El Deeb, Sami; Hahne, Thomas; El-Hady, Deia Abd; AlBishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution atomic absorption spectrometry methods have been developed and evaluated to test the stability of proteins during sample pretreatment. This especially includes different storage conditions but also adsorption before or even during the chromatographic process. For the development of the size exclusion method, a Biosep S3000 5 μm column was used for investigating a series of representative model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibody, and myoglobin. Ambient temperature storage was found to be harmful to all model proteins, whereas short-term storage up to 14 days could be done in an ordinary refrigerator. Freezing the protein solutions was always complicated and had to be evaluated for each protein in the corresponding solvent. To keep the proteins in their native state a gentle freezing temperature should be chosen, hence liquid nitrogen should be avoided. Furthermore, a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to observe the adsorption of proteins on container material and chromatographic columns. Adsorption to any container led to a sample loss and lowered the recovery rates. During the pretreatment and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, adsorption caused sample losses of up to 33%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF A FLUX ROPE FROM THE SIGMOID ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 AND ASSOCIATED M6.5 FLARE: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Dhara, Sajal Kumar [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Udaipur 313001 (India); Veronig, Astrid M. [Kanzelhöhe Observatory/Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Shanmugaraju, A. [Department of Physics, Arul Anandhar College, Karumathur, Tamilnadu 625514 (India); Moon, Yong-Jae, E-mail: bhuwan@prl.res.in [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the formation, activation, and eruption of a flux rope (FR) from the sigmoid active region NOAA 11719 by analyzing E(UV), X-ray, and radio measurements. During the pre-eruption period of ∼7 hr, the AIA 94 Å images reveal the emergence of a coronal sigmoid through the interaction between two J-shaped bundles of loops, which proceeds with multiple episodes of coronal loop brightenings and significant variations in the magnetic flux through the photosphere. These observations imply that repetitive magnetic reconnections likely play a key role in the formation of the sigmoidal FR in the corona and also contribute toward sustaining the temperature of the FR higher than that of the ambient coronal structures. Notably, the formation of the sigmoid is associated with the fast morphological evolution of an S-shaped filament channel in the chromosphere. The sigmoid activates toward eruption with the ascent of a large FR in the corona, which is preceded by the decrease in photospheric magnetic flux through the core flaring region, suggesting tether-cutting reconnection as a possible triggering mechanism. The FR eruption results in a two-ribbon M6.5 flare with a prolonged rise phase of ∼21 minutes. The flare exhibits significant deviation from the standard flare model in the early rise phase, during which a pair of J-shaped flare ribbons form and apparently exhibit converging motions parallel to the polarity inversion line, which is further confirmed by the motions of hard X-ray footpoint sources. In the later stages, the flare follows the standard flare model and the source region undergoes a complete sigmoid-to-arcade transformation.

  1. An energy storage process and energy budget of solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Dryer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The flare energy is generally considered to be stored in stressed (twisted or sheared) magnetic fields. Chatacteristic magnetic configurations in the great activities (inverted, twisted delta-configuration) suggest an inherent shape of fluxtube for these regions: a twisted magnetic knot. Further, evolutionary characteristics such as rapid growths of spots and growth of twist in parallel with apparent shear motion of spot, together with the fact that the shear motion is associated with upward velocity, suggest a continuous emergence of such a twisted knot from below throughout the activity. In this model the flare energy may be supplied directly into the corona as the twisted portion of the fluxtube emerges out. The authors evaluate the energy supply for a very flare-rich and fast-evolved active region McMath 13043 (1974 July), and compare it with released flare energies (thermal and kinetic). (Auth.)

  2. Intralesional triamcinolone for flares of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Peter Theut; Boer, Jurr; Prens, Errol P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. Standard practice of managing acute flares with corticosteroid injection lacks scientific evidence. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the outcomes of routine treatment using intralesional triamcinolone ...

  3. A static model of chromospheric heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiazzi, P. J.; Canfield, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the solar chromosphere to flare processes, namely nonthermal electrons, thermal conduction, and coronal pressure, is modeled. Finite difference methods employing linearization and iteration are used in obtaining simultaneous solutions to the equations of steady-state energy balance, hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, and atomic statistical equilibrium. The atmospheric response is assumed to be confined to one dimension by a strong vertical magnetic field. A solution is obtained to the radiative transfer equation for the most important optically thick transitions of hydrogen, magnesium, and calcium. The theoretical atmospheres discussed here are seen as elucidating the role of various physical processes in establishing the structure of flare chromospheres. At low coronal pressures, conduction is found to be more important than nonthermal electrons in establishing the position of the transition region. Only thermal conduction can adequately account for the chromospheric evaporation in compact flares. Of the mechanisms considered, only nonthermal electrons bring about significant heating below the flare transition region.

  4. Forecasting Flare Activity Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, T.

    2017-12-01

    Current operational flare forecasting relies on human morphological analysis of active regions and the persistence of solar flare activity through time (i.e. that the Sun will continue to do what it is doing right now: flaring or remaining calm). In this talk we present the results of applying deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) to the problem of solar flare forecasting. CNNs operate by training a set of tunable spatial filters that, in combination with neural layer interconnectivity, allow CNNs to automatically identify significant spatial structures predictive for classification and regression problems. We will start by discussing the applicability and success rate of the approach, the advantages it has over non-automated forecasts, and how mining our trained neural network provides a fresh look into the mechanisms behind magnetic energy storage and release.

  5. Relativistic electron transport and bremsstrahlung production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of ultrarelativistic electron transport in solar flare magnetic loops has been developed. It includes Coulomb, synchrotron, and bremsstrahlung energy losses; pitch-angle scattering by Alfven and whistler turbulence in the coronal region of the loop; and magnetic mirroring in the converging magnetic flux tubes beneath the transition region. Depth distributions, time profiles, energy spectra, and angular distributions of the resulting bremsstrahlung emission are calculated. It is found that both the preferential detection of solar flares with greater than 10 MeV emission near the limb of the sun and the observation of ultrarelativistic electron bremsstrahlung from flares on the disk are consequences of the loop transport model. The declining portions of the observed time profiles of greater than 10 MeV emission from solar flares can also be accounted for, and it is proposed that these portions are determined by transport and not acceleration.

  6. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  7. Optical source profiles of brown carbon in size-resolved particulate matter from typical domestic biofuel burning over Guanzhong Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yali; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Qiyuan; Sun, Jian; Gong, Xuesong; Cao, Junji; Xu, Hongmei; Liu, Suixin; Yang, Liu

    2018-05-01

    In this study, both PM 2.5 and size-resolved source samples were collected from a "heated kang" and an advanced stove to investigate the optical properties of brown carbon (BrC). The light-absorption coefficient (b abs ), the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE), and the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of both water and methanol-extracted BrC were investigated. The methanol-extracted BrC (BrC methanol ) had higher light absorption than water-extracted BrC (BrC water ). The value of PM 2.5 b abs of BrC methanol at 365nm (b abs365,methanol ) dramatically decreased from 64,669.8Mm -1 for straw burning in the "heated kang" to 1169.2Mm -1 for maize straw briquettes burning in the advanced stove at the same burning rate. The value of PM 2.5 MAC for BrC methanol at 365nm (MAC 365,methanol ) decreased from 1.8m 2 g -1 in the "heated kang" to 1.3m 2 g -1 in the advanced stove. For smoldering burning in the "heated kang", b abs365,methanol , MAC 365,methanol , and K + showed a unimodal distribution that peaked at sizes methanol and MAC 365,methanol size distributions of the briquette burning in the advanced stove showed a bimodal pattern, with a large peak at sizes methanol value for sizes <0.4μm (277.4Mm -1 ) was only 12.3% compared to those obtained from the "heated kang". The burning rate did not influence the size distribution pattern of either the "heated kang" or the advanced stove. Results from a radiative model show that biomass burning is an important factor for light absorptivity, and the use of an advanced stove can reduce the simple forcing efficiency value by nearly 20% in UV bands compared to the "heated kang". Our results indicate that changing the combustion style from maize straw smoldering to briquette burning in an advanced stove can effectively reduce BrC emissions during heating seasons in rural areas of Guanzhong Plain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  9. Numerical simulations of loops heated to solar flare temperatures. I - Gasdynamics. II - X-ray and UV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Oran, E. S.; Doschek, G. A.; Boris, J. P.; Mariska, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL's Dynamic Flux Tube Model is used to numerically simulate the dynamic response of a coronal magnetic loop to an energy input of the order encountered in solar flares. The coronal plasma is heated by the deposition of flare energy at the top of the loop to more than 10 million K, yielding a conduction front that moves toward the chromosphere, where the plasma is heated by the large downward conductive flux and ablates upward to the coronal part of the loop at velocities of a few hundred km/sec. The conduction front simultaneously produces chromospheric ablation and compresses the material ahead of it. With the aid of compressional instabilities, the compressed plasma grows throughout the flare heating phase, presenting a possible source of the flare optical continuum emission which is correlated with soft X-ray radiation. The observational consequences of rapidly heated loop gas dynamic processes are discussed. In the second part of this presentation, the dynamical calculation results previously obtained are used to predict the spectral line intensities, profiles and wavelengths of several X-ray lines and the UV line of Fe XXI at 1354.1 A. Three different viewing orientations of the loop are considered.

  10. Source apportionment of size-fractionated particles during the 2013 Asian Youth Games and the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pulong; Wang, Tijian; Lu, Xiaobo; Yu, Yiyong; Kasoar, Matthew; Xie, Min; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2017-02-01

    In this study, samples of size-fractionated particulate matter were collected continuously using a 9-size interval cascade impactor at an urban site in Nanjing, before, during and after the Asian Youth Games (AYG), from July to September of 2013, and the Youth Olympic Games (YOG), from July to September of 2014. First, elemental concentrations, water-soluble ions including Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , NH 4 + , K + , Na + and Ca 2+ , organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were analysed. Then, the source apportionment of the fine and coarse particulate matter was carried out using the chemical mass balance (CMB) model. The average PM 10 concentrations were 90.4±20.0μg/m 3 during the 2013 AYG and 70.6±25.3μg/m 3 during the 2014 YOG. For PM 2.1, the average concentrations were 50.0±12.8μg/m 3 in 2013 and 34.6±17.0μg/m 3 in 2014. Investigations showed that the average concentrations of particles declined significantly from 2013 to 2014, and concentrations were at the lowest levels during the events. Results indicated that OC, EC, sulfate and crustal elements have significant monthly and size-based variations. The major components, including crustal elements, water-soluble ions and carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 75.3-91.9% of the total particulate mass concentrations during the sampling periods. Fugitive dust, coal combustion dust, iron dust, construction dust, soil dust, vehicle exhaust, secondary aerosols and sea salt have been classified as the main emissions in Nanjing. The source apportionment results indicate that the emissions from fugitive dust, which was the most abundance emission source during the 2013 AYG, contributed to 23.0% of the total particle mass. However, fugitive dust decreased to 6.2% of the total particle mass during the 2014 YOG. Construction dust (14.7% versus 7.8% for the AYG and the YOG, respectively) and secondary sulfate aerosol (9.3% versus 8.0% for the AYG and the YOG, respectively) showed the same trend as fugitive dust

  11. Observation of solar flare by Hinotori SXT/HXM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohki, Ken-ichiro; Takakura, Tatsuo; Tsuneta, Sukehisa; Nitta, Nariaki; Makishima, Kazuo.

    1982-01-01

    Solar flares were observed by SXT (hard X-ray two-dimensional observation system) and HXM (hard X-ray spectrometer) on Hinotori. The results of two-dimensional analysis of 20 flares are reported in this paper. Various images of hard X-ray were observed. Hard X-ray bursts with relatively long duration may be generated in corona. The hard X-ray flare generated on the solar disc gives information on the relative position to the H flare. The examples of this hard X-ray images are presented. The HXM can observe the hard X-ray spectra up to 350 keV. The flares with duration less than 5 min have the spectra coninciding with the thermal radiation from a single temperature before the peak, and power law type non-thermal radiation spectra after the peak. The hard X-ray flares with duration longer than 10 min have power law type spectra. (Kato, T.)

  12. Solar flare nuclear gamma-rays and interplanetary proton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E.W.; Forrest, D.J.; Cane, H.V.; Reames, D.V.; Mcguire, R.E.; Von Rosenvinge, T.T.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray line (GRL) and solar energetic proton (SEP) events observed from February 1980 through January 1985 are compared in order to substantiate and better characterize the lack of correlation between GRL fluences and SEP event peak fluxes. The scatter plot of SEP event peak flux vs. GRL fluence is presented, and the ratio of 'solar' to 'interplanetary', about 10 MeV protons, is presented. It is shown that, while even large SEP events can originate in flares lacking detectable GRL emission, the converse case of flares with a significant GRL line fluence by lacking protons in space is rare. The ratio R of the number of about 10 MeV protons that produce GRL emission at the flare site to the number of about 10 MeV protons detected in space can vary from event to event by four orders of magnitude. There is a clear tendency for impulsive flares to have larger values of R than long-duration flares, where the flare time scale is given by the e-folding decay time of the associated soft X-ray emission. 103 refs

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations for Studying Solar Flare Trigger Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhamad, J.; Kusano, K.; Inoue, S.; Shiota, D. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-06-20

    In order to understand the flare trigger mechanism, we conduct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations using a coronal magnetic field model derived from data observed by the Hinode satellite. Several types of magnetic bipoles are imposed into the photospheric boundary of the Nonlinear Force-free Field model of Active Region (AR) NOAA 10930 on 2006 December 13, to investigate what kind of magnetic disturbance may trigger the flare. As a result, we confirm that certain small bipole fields, which emerge into the highly sheared global magnetic field of an AR, can effectively trigger a flare. These bipole fields can be classified into two groups based on their orientation relative to the polarity inversion line: the so-called opposite polarity, and reversed shear structures, as suggested by Kusano et al. We also investigate the structure of the footpoints of reconnected field lines. By comparing the distribution of reconstructed field lines and observed flare ribbons, the trigger structure of the flare can be inferred. Our simulation suggests that the data-constrained simulation, taking into account both the large-scale magnetic structure and small-scale magnetic disturbance (such as emerging fluxes), is a good way to discover a flare-producing AR, which can be applied to space weather prediction.

  14. Size-distributions of n-alkanes, PAHs and hopanes and their sources in the urban, mountain and marine atmospheres over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated (9 stages n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and hopanes in the urban (Baoji city in inland China, mountain (Mt. Tai in east coastal China and marine (Okinawa Island, Japan atmospheres over East Asia were studied using a GC/MS technique. Ambient concentrations of n-alkanes (1698±568 ng m−3 in winter and 487±145 ng m−3 in spring, PAHs (536±80 and 161±39 ng m−3, and hopanes (65±24 and 20±2.4 ng m−3 in the urban air are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than those in the mountain aerosols and 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than those in the marine samples. Mass ratios of n-alkanes, PAHs and hopanes clearly demonstrate coal-burning emissions as their major source. Size distributions of fossil fuel derived n-alkane, PAHs and hopanes were found to be unimodal in most cases, peaking at 0.7–1.1 μm size. In contrast, plant wax derived n-alkanes presented a bimodal distribution with two peaks at the sizes of 0.7–1.1 μm and >4.7 μm in the summer mountain and spring marine samples. Among the three types of samples, geometric mean diameter (GMD of the organics in fine mode (<2.1 μm was found to be smallest (av. 0.63 μm in spring for the urban samples and largest (1.01 μm for the marine samples, whereas the GMD in coarse mode (≥2.1 μm was found to be smallest (3.48 μm for the marine aerosols and largest (4.04 μm for the urban aerosols. The fine mode GMDs of the urban and mountain samples were larger in winter than in spring and summer. Moreover, GMDs of 3- and 4-ring PAHs were larger than those of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in the three types of atmospheres. Such differences in GMDs can be interpreted by the repartitioning of organic compounds and the coagulation and hygroscopic growth of particles during a long-range transport from the inland continent to the marine area, as well as the difference in their sources among the three regions.

  15. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas

  16. Mass and chemical composition of size-segregated aerosols (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) over Athens, Greece: local versus regional sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosi, C.; Grivas, G.; Zarmpas, P.; Chaloulakou, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2011-11-01

    To identify the relative contribution of local versus regional sources of particulate matter (PM) in the Greater Athens Area (GAA), simultaneous 24-h mass and chemical composition measurements of size segregated particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) were carried out from September 2005 to August 2006 at three locations: one urban (Goudi, Central Athens, "GOU"), one suburban (Lykovrissi, Athens, "LYK") in the GAA and one at a regional background site (Finokalia, Crete, "FKL"). The two stations in the GAA exceeded the EU-legislated PM10 limit values, both in terms of annual average (59.0 and 53.6 μg m-3 for Lykovrissi and Goudi, respectively) and of 24-h value. High levels of PM2.5 and PM1 were also found at both locations (23.5 and 18.6 for Lykovrissi, while 29.4 and 20.2 μg m-3 for Goudi, respectively). Significant correlations were observed between the same PM fractions at both GAA sites indicating important spatial homogeneity within GAA. During the warm season (April to September), the PM1 ratio between GAA and FKL ranged from 1.1 to 1.3. On the other hand this ratio was significantly higher (1.6-1.7) during the cold season (October to March) highlighting the role of long-range transport and local sources during the warm and cold seasons respectively. Regarding the coarse fraction no seasonal trend was observed for both GAA sites with their ratio (GAA site/FKL) being higher than 2 indicating significant contribution from local sources such as soil and/or road dust. Chemical speciation data showed that on a yearly basis, ionic and crustal mass represent up to 67-70% of the gravimetrically determined mass for PM10 samples in the GAA and 67% for PM1 samples in LYK. The unidentified mass might be attributed to organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), in agreement with the results reported by earlier studies in central Athens. At all sites, similar seasonal patterns were observed for nss-SO42-, a secondary compound, indicating significant contribution from

  17. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  18. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in street dust of Rio de Janeiro and Niterói, Brazil: Particle size distribution, sources and cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Caroline Fernandes Jaegger; de Resende, Michele Fabri; de Almeida Furtado, Leonardo; Brasil, Taila Figueredo; Eberlin, Marcos N; Netto, Annibal Duarte Pereira

    2017-12-01

    Fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in two fractions (<63μm and 63-850μm) of street dust samples collected in different urban areas of Rio de Janeiro and Niterói cities, Brazil. Individual PAH concentrations and total PAH concentrations (∑PAH) were evaluated considering geographic and particle size distributions, PAH source and cancer risk. In 53% of the samples, ∑PAH values were higher in the smallest particles than in the largest ones, whereas the inverse was true for 23.5% of the samples. In 23.5% of the samples, both classes of particles showed comparable ∑PAH. The highest ∑PAH concentrations were found in areas of limited air dispersion, resulting in PAH accumulation in street dust. The diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated a strong influence of pyrogenic sources on PAH concentration, mainly of vehicular emissions. The cancer risk levels for children and adults, for both particulate size fractions (<63μm and 63μm-850μm), were comparable for dermal contact and by ingestion, and ranged from 10 -8 to 10 -6 , whereas in certain cases the cancer risk level for adults by dermal contact was 2 to 3 times larger than for children. The cancer risk levels via inhalation always ranged from 10 -13 to 10 -10 , so this exposure pathway was almost 10 4 less severe than through ingestion and dermal contact, and thus negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Robin S; Strasburg, Gale M; Romsos, Dale R; Wilson, Lori A; Lai, Grace H; Huang, Hsimin

    2016-03-01

    Ferric orthophosphate (FePO₄) has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO₄ has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO₄ have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO₄ bioavailability. Five commercial FePO₄ sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV) of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R² = 0.93, p = 0.008). Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R² = 0.91; p = 0.0002) than surface area (R² = 0.83; p = 0.002) and median particle size (R² = 0.59; p = 0.12). The results indicate that while solubility of FePO₄ is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO₄ with the desired RBV.

  1. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin S. Dickmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferric orthophosphate (FePO4 has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO4 has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO4 have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO4 bioavailability. Five commercial FePO4 sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p < 0.05, which is higher than typically reported. Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.008. Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R2 = 0.91; p = 0.0002 than surface area (R2 = 0.83; p = 0.002 and median particle size (R2 = 0.59; p = 0.12. The results indicate that while solubility of FePO4 is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO4 with the desired RBV.

  2. Dependence of large SEP events with different energies on the associated flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Gui-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Feng

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the dependence of large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events on the associated flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the correlation coefficients (CCs) between peak intensities of E> 10 {MeV} (I 10), E> 30 {MeV} (I 30) and E> 50 {MeV} (I 50) protons and soft X-ray (SXR) emission of associated flares and the speeds of associated CMEs in the three longitudinal areas W0-W39, W40-W70 (hereafter the well connected region) and W71-W90 have been calculated. Classical correlation analysis shows that CCs between SXR emission and peak intensities of SEP events always reach their largest value in the well connected region and then decline dramatically in the longitudinal area outside the well connected region, suggesting that they may contribute to the production of SEPs in large SEP events. Both classical and partial correlation analyses show that SXR fluence is a better parameter describing the relationship between flares and SEP events. For large SEP events with source location in the well connected region, the CCs between SXR fluence and I 10, I 30 and I 50 are 0.58±0.12, 0.80±0.06 and 0.83±0.06 respectively, while the CCs between CME speed and I 10, I 30 and I 50 are 0.56±0.12, 0.52±0.13 and 0.48±0.13 respectively. The partial correlation analyses show that in the well connected region, both CME shock and SXR fluence can significantly affect I 10, but SXR peak flux makes no additional contribution. For E> 30 {MeV} protons with source location in the well connected region, only SXR fluence can significantly affect I 30, and the CME shock makes a small contribution to I 30, but SXR peak flux makes no additional contribution. For E> 50 {MeV} protons with source location in the well connected region, only SXR fluence can significantly affect I 50, but both CME shock and SXR peak flux make no additional contribution. We conclude that these findings provide statistical evidence that for SEP events with source locations in the well connected

  3. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. I - Thermal versus nonthermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube is studied in an attempt to determine how the energy of the electrons is deposited in the flux tube. One-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are used in the present investigation. As the energetic electrons propagate into the system, a return current of ambient plasma electrons and some of the energetic electrons is drawn into the energetic electron source. It is found that, as the ambient temperature relative to the ion temperature increases above about 3, the heated return-current electrons can excite ion-sound waves.

  4. Prediction and comparison of noise levels from ground and elevated flare systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obasi, E.

    2009-01-01

    Flaring is a process to dispose of hydrocarbons during clean-up, emergency shut downs or dispose a small volume waste streams of mixed gasses that cannot easily or safely be separated. This presentation discussed flaring as a noise issue. It focused on flaring noise characterization; flare noise modeling; flare sound power levels; and flare sound pressure level comparison at a distance of 1.5 km. The presentation included a photograph of flaring at a gas plant in Nigeria. The presentation listed some of the potential health effects associated with long term exposure to excessive noise, such as hearing loss; headaches; stress; fatigue; sleep disturbance; and high blood pressure. Companies flare gas to dispose waste gases in a safe and reliable manner through combustion and to depressurize gas lines during maintenance and emergencies. This presentation also discussed ground and elevated flares; components of flare noise characterization; and key factors affecting flare noise. A model to predict flaring noise was also presented. It demonstrated that at the same gas mass flow rate, the noise level from elevated flare stacks are significantly higher than ground flares. tabs., figs.

  5. Prediction and comparison of noise levels from ground and elevated flare systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obasi, E. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Flaring is a process to dispose of hydrocarbons during clean-up, emergency shut downs or dispose a small volume waste streams of mixed gasses that cannot easily or safely be separated. This presentation discussed flaring as a noise issue. It focused on flaring noise characterization; flare noise modeling; flare sound power levels; and flare sound pressure level comparison at a distance of 1.5 km. The presentation included a photograph of flaring at a gas plant in Nigeria. The presentation listed some of the potential health effects associated with long term exposure to excessive noise, such as hearing loss; headaches; stress; fatigue; sleep disturbance; and high blood pressure. Companies flare gas to dispose waste gases in a safe and reliable manner through combustion and to depressurize gas lines during maintenance and emergencies. This presentation also discussed ground and elevated flares; components of flare noise characterization; and key factors affecting flare noise. A model to predict flaring noise was also presented. It demonstrated that at the same gas mass flow rate, the noise level from elevated flare stacks are significantly higher than ground flares. tabs., figs.

  6. Time delay of the PeV gamma ray burst after the October 1985 radio flare of Cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezinsky, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    Cygnus X-3 remains a puzzling and controversial source of ultra-high-energy radiation, E ≥ 0.1 PeV. In existing data, TeV and sometimes PeV radiation has been seen episodically; such an episode is connected with the radio flare of Cyg X-3 in October 1985, when PeV radiation with no phase structure was seen. The PeV pulse was detected 3-5 days after the radio flare. The author proposes a natural explanation for the delay, in which gamma-photons of PeV energy are absorbed by radio radiation inside the source. After a delay, the gamma radiation emerges as the radio flux diminishes and absorption decreases. (author)

  7. INTEGRAL/IBIS observations of the Galactic center region at the epoch of the short Fermi/LAT flare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocchi, M.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Natalucci, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic Center was in the IBIS/ISGRI field-of-view during the epoch of the gamma-ray flare observed recently by Fermi/LAT (ATEL#3162). During the 20s interval of the flare IBIS/ISGRI did not detect any emission from SAX J1747.0-2853, located at ~10degrees off-axis, with a 3sigma upper limit......, the second one was selected because the source position was most optimal, i.e., about 6-8 degrees off-axis, the closest to the Galactic center region. The second slot is only a few hours apart from the Swift/XRT observation of SAX J1747.0-2853 (ATEL #3163), during which very bright emission from this source...

  8. Probing quantum gravity using photons from a flare of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 observed by the MAGIC telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea del Pozo, E; Delgado Mendez, C; de los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; García-López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Göbel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, N E; Nanopoulos, D V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2008-01-01

    We use the timing of photons observed by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope during a flare of the active galaxy Markarian 501 to probe a vacuum refractive index ~ 1-(E/M_QGn)^n, n = 1,2, that might be induced by quantum gravity. The peaking of the flare is found to maximize for quantum-gravity mass scales M_QG1 ~ 0.4x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 ~ 0.6x10^11 GeV, and we establish lower limits M_QG1 > 0.26x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 > 0.39x10^11 GeV at the 95% C.L. Monte Carlo studies confirm the MAGIC sensitivity to propagation effects at these levels. Thermal plasma effects in the source are negligible, but we cannot exclude the importance of some other source effect.

  9. Flare Prediction Using Photospheric and Coronal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, E.; Shankar, V.; Bobra, M.; Recht, B.

    2016-12-01

    We attempt to forecast M-and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm and five years of image data from both the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. HMI is the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space (Schou et al., 2012). The AIA instrument maps the transition region and corona using various ultraviolet wavelengths (Lemen et al., 2012). HMI and AIA data are taken nearly simultaneously, providing an opportunity to study the entire solar atmosphere at a rapid cadence. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use some parameterization of solar data - typically of the photospheric magnetic field within active regions. These numbers are considered to capture the information in any given image relevant to predicting solar flares. In our approach, we use HMI and AIA images of solar active regions and a deep convolutional kernel network to predict solar flares. This is effectively a series of shallow-but-wide random convolutional neural networks stacked and then trained with a large-scale block-weighted least squares solver. This algorithm automatically determines which patterns in the image data are most correlated with flaring activity and then uses these patterns to predict solar flares. Using the recently-developed KeystoneML machine learning framework, we construct a pipeline to process millions of images in a few hours on commodity cloud computing infrastructure. This is the first time vector magnetic field images have been combined with coronal imagery to forecast solar flares. This is also the first time such a large dataset of solar images, some 8.5 terabytes of images that together capture over 3000 active regions, has been used to forecast solar flares. We evaluate our method using various flare prediction windows defined in the literature (e.g. Ahmed et al., 2013) and a novel per

  10. Mass size distribution and source identification of particulate matter metal components at four urban sites and a background site of Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Ülkü Alver; Polat, Gülfem; Onat, Burcu

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the size distribution characteristics and metal contents of particulate matter (PM) have been determined. In this scope, PM sampling has been done at five stations in Istanbul. PM filter samples were collected for eight different sizes using the Anderson cascade impactor. PM filters were decomposed and analyzed for 20 metals. The highest median concentration for Fe, Ca, K, and Mg, known as soil metals, were observed as follows: Fe and Ca were observed at Goztepe station (1.20 and 8.28 μg/m(3)), K was observed at Kilyos station (0.33 μg/m(3)), and Mg was observed at Avcilar station (0.37 μg/m(3)). The highest median concentrations for Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, V, As, Se, Co, and Cd, known as anthropogenic metals, were observed at Avcilar, Goztepe, and Besiktas stations. Although the lowest metal concentrations was determined at Kilyos stations that was selected as the urban background. The enrichment factors (EFs) of most metals in the fine PM is higher than those in the coarse mode. According to the factor analyses, the most important emission source was observed to be industrial facilities at Avcilar; traffic at Besiktas; traffic and domestic heating at Goztepe; and domestic heating, sea salt aerosols, and ship traffic (in the Bosphorus Channel of Istanbul) at Rasathane.

  11. FLARE VERSUS SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliver, E. W. [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 10{sup 5}) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ∼2 × 10{sup 3}, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20–W90) SEP events.

  12. FLARE VERSUS SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 10 5 ) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ∼2 × 10 3 , similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20–W90) SEP events.

  13. Third generation dual-source CT enables accurate diagnosis of coronary restenosis in all size stents with low radiation dose and preserved image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuehua; Yu, Mengmeng; Li, Wenbin; Lu, Zhigang; Wei, Meng; Zhang, Jiayin

    2018-01-18

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of low dose stent imaging in patients with large (≥ 3 mm) and small (source CT. Symptomatic patients suspected of having in-stent restenosis (ISR) were prospectively enrolled. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) were performed within 1 month for correlation. Binary ISR was defined as an in-stent neointimal proliferation with diameter stenosis ≥ 50%. The radiation dose and image quality of CCTA were also assessed. Sixty-nine patients with 140 stents were ultimately included for analysis. The mean total radiation dose of CCTA was 1.3 ± 0.72 mSv in all patients and 0.95 ± 0.17 mSv in patients with high pitch acquisition. The overall diagnostic accuracy of CCTA stent imaging of patient-based, lesion-based and stent-based analysis was 95.7%, 94.1% and 94.3%, respectively. Further, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA in the small calibre stent group (diameter source CT enables accurate diagnosis of coronary ISR of both large and small calibre stents. Low radiation dose could be achieved with preserved image quality. • Third-generation DSCT enables accurate diagnosis of coronary ISR of all size stents. • Low radiation dose could be achieved with preserved image quality. • The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA of small calibre stents was 88.5%.

  14. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions at Puijo measurement station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2014-06-01

    Interactions between aerosols and liquid water clouds were studied during autumns 2010-2011 at a semiurban measurement station on Puijo tower in Kuopio, Finland. Cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopicity and cloud droplet size distribution were measured, with a focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. On average, the polluted air contained more particles than the clean air masses, and generally the concentrations decreased during cloud events. Cloud processing was found to take place, especially in the clean air masses, and to a lesser extent in the polluted air. Some, mostly minor, differences in the average particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail, with a special focus on the emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. This revealed larger variations in particle and cloud properties than the analysis of the whole data set. Clear differences in the total (between 214 and 2200 cm-3) and accumulation mode particle concentrations (between 62 and 169 cm-3) were observed. Particle chemical composition, especially the concentrations of organics (between 0.42 and 1.28 μg m-3) and sulfate (between 0.16 and 4.43 μg m-3), varied considerably. This affected the hygroscopic growth factor: for example, for 100 nm particles the range was from 1.21 to 1.45 at 90% relative humidity. Particularly, large particles, high hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganics were linked with the pollutant plumes. Moreover, the particle hygroscopicity distributions in the polluted air were clearly bimodal, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions also had an impact on cloud droplet

  15. Multiple-wavelength analysis of energy release during a solar flare - Thermal and nonthermal electron populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kerdraon, Alain; Trottet, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    Collaborative solar investigations by Tufts University and the Observatoire de Paris have resulted in simultaneous radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NR), comparisons of this radio data with X-ray observations, and theoretical interpretations of the dominant radiation mechanisms during a weak impulsive solar flare observed on May 28, 1988. The VLA has mapped the flaring structures at time intervals of 3.3 s, showing that the preflash and flash-phase components of the impulsive emission originate in spatially separated sources. The 20.7 cm preflash source is ascribed to thermal gyroresonance emission from coronal loops with typical magnetic field strengths of up to 270 G; this emission is associated with heating and exhibits no detectable hard X-ray radiation above 30 keV. The flash-phase 20.7 cm source and the hard X-ray emission are attributed to nonthermal electrons in the coronal and chromospheric portions of a magnetic loop. The combination of imaging observations at 20.7 and 91.6 cm excludes emission from a confined hot plasma during the flash phase.

  16. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-01-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  17. Flare evaluation for 32-nm half pitch using SFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Kamo, Takashi; Iriki, Nobuyuki; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Tanaka, Toshihiko

    2008-03-01

    Flare degrades critical-dimension (CD) control in EUVL, a promising technology for the 32-nm half-pitch node. To deal with flare, high-quality projection optics in the exposure tool and flare variation compensation (FVC) technology with proper mask resizing are needed. Selete has installed a small-field exposure tool (SFET) with the goal of assessing resist performance. Due to the high-quality optics, the SFET allowed us to determine the required flare specification to be 6.1% or 6.6%, as calculated from the residual part of the low- or middle-frequency region, respectively. The flare level was confirmed through experimental results and from calculations using the power spectral density (PSD) obtained from the mirror roughness by the disappearing-resist method. The lithographic performance was evaluated using 32-nm-halfpitch patterns in a new resist. The resist characteristics can be explained by modeling blur as a Gaussian function with a σ of 8.8 nm and using a very accurate CD variation (area or not, there was no difference in CD as a function of distance up to a distance of 20 µm. In addition, CD degradation was observed at distances not far (area. In a 60-nm neighborhood of the open area, an 8-nm variation in CD appeared up to the distance at which the CD leveled off. When the influences of resist blur and flare on patterns was taken into account in the calculation, it was found that aerial simulations based on a rigorous 3D model of a mask structure matched the experimental results. These results yield the appropriate mask resizing and the range in which flare has an influence, which is needed for FVC. This research was supported in part by NEDO.

  18. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a flare that occurred on 9 March 2012 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit reached almost the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, fortunately EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km/s upflows was observed in several locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20 - 60 km/s upflows in a host of million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XI - Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex. At a point close to strong energy input, the flare ions reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK. At this point there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. The results to be presented are refined from the preliminary data given above and combined with context AIA observations for a comparison with predictions of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

  19. Improving Flare Irradiance Models with the Low Pass Filter Relation Between EUV Flare Emissions with Differing Formation Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward M. B.; Eparvier, Francis G.

    2016-10-01

    Solar flares are the result of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona which converts magnetic energy into kinetic energy resulting in the rapid heating of solar plasma. As this plasma cools, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) line emission intensities evolve as the plasma temperature passes through line formation temperatures, resulting in emission lines with cooler formation temperatures peaking after those with hotter formation temperatures. At the 2016 American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting in Boulder (SPD2016), we showed that Fe XVIII solar flare light curves are highly correlated with Fe XXIII light curves that have been subjected to the single-pole Low Pass Filter Equation (LPFE) with a time constant equal to the time difference between the peak emissions. The single-pole (or equivalently, RC) LPFE appears frequently in analyses of systems which both store and dissipate heat, and the flare LPFE effect is believed to be related to the underlying cooling processes. Because the LPFE is constrained by a single parameter, this effect has implications for both operational EUV flare irradiance models and understanding thermal processes that occur in post-flare loops. At the time of SPD2016, it was ambiguous as to whether the LPFE effect relates hot thermal bremsstrahlung soft x-ray (SXR) or EUV line emissions with cooler EUV line emissions since Fe XXIII flare light curves are highly correlated with SXR flare light curves. In this study, we present new results characterizing the LPFE relation between multiple emission lines with differing formation temperatures ranging from 107.2 to 105.7 K observed by SDO/EVE and SXR thermal bremsstrahlung emissions observed by GOES/XRS. We show that the LPFE equation relates Fe XVIII with cooler EUV line emissions, providing unambiguous evidence that the LPFE effect exists between EUV line emissions rather than thermal bremsstrahlung and line emissions exclusively. The exact nature of this effect remains an open

  20. Analysis of Giga-size Earth Observation Data in Open Source GRASS GIS 7 - from Desktop to On-line Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Mitasova, H.; Jasiewicz, J.; Neteler, M.; Gebbert, S.

    2014-12-01

    GRASS GIS is a leading open source GIS for geospatial analysis and modeling. In addition to being utilized as a desktop GIS it also serves as a processing engine for high performance geospatial computing for applications in diverse disciplines. The newly released GRASS GIS 7 supports big data analysis including temporal framework, image segmentation, watershed analysis, synchronized 2D/3D animations and many others. This presentation will focus on new GRASS GIS 7-powered tools for geoprocessing giga-size earth observation (EO) data using spatial pattern analysis. Pattern-based analysis connects to human visual perception of space as well as makes geoprocessing of giga-size EO data possible in an efficient and robust manner. GeoPAT is a collection of GRASS GIS 7 modules that fully integrates procedures for pattern representation of EO data and patterns similarity calculations with standard GIS tasks of mapping, maps overlay, segmentation, classification(Fig 1a), change detections etc. GeoPAT works very well on a desktop but it also underpins several GeoWeb applications (http://sil.uc.edu/ ) which allow users to do analysis on selected EO datasets without the need to download them. The GRASS GIS 7 temporal framework and high resolution visualizations will be illustrated using time series of giga-size, lidar-based digital elevation models representing the dynamics of North Carolina barrier islands over the past 15 years. The temporal framework supports efficient raster and vector data series analysis and simplifies data input for visual analysis of dynamic landscapes (Fig. 1b) allowing users to rapidly identify vulnerable locations, changes in built environment and eroding coastlines. Numerous improvements in GRASS GIS 7 were implemented to support terabyte size data processing for reconstruction of MODIS land surface temperature (LST) at 250m resolution using multiple regressions and PCA (Fig. 1c) . The new MODIS LST series (http://gis.cri.fmach.it/eurolst/) includes

  1. Meeting the Challenge from Bright and Fast Gamma-Ray Flares of 3C 279

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Cavaliere, A.

    2017-07-01

    Bright and fast gamma-ray flares with hard spectra have been recently detected from the blazar 3C 279, with apparent GeV luminosities up to 1049 erg s-1. The source is observed to flicker on timescales of minutes with no comparable optical-UV counterparts. Such observations challenge current models of high-energy emissions from 3C 279 and similar blazar sources that are dominated by relativistic jets along our line of sight with bulk Lorentz factors up to Γ ˜ 20 launched by supermassive black holes. We compute and discuss a model based on a clumpy jet comprising strings of compact plasmoids as indicated by radio observations. We follow the path of the synchrotron radiations emitted in the optical-UV bands by relativistic electrons accelerated around the plasmoids to isotropic Lorentz factors γ ˜ {10}3. These primary emissions are partly reflected back by a leading member in the string that acts as a moving mirror for the approaching companions. Around the plasmoids, shrinking gap transient overdensities of seed photons build up. These are upscattered into the GeV range by inverse Compton interactions with the relativistic electrons accelerated in situ. We show that such a combined process produces bright gamma-ray flares with minor optical to X-ray enhancements. Main features of our model include: bright gamma-ray flares with risetimes as short as a few minutes, occurring at distances of order 1018 cm from the central black hole; Compton dominance at GeV energies by factors up to some 102; minimal reabsorption from local photon-photon interactions.

  2. Statistical Properties of Ribbon Evolution and Reconnection Electric Fields in Eruptive and Confined Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterreiter, J.; Veronig, A. M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Tschernitz, J.; Pötzi, W.

    2018-03-01

    A statistical study of the chromospheric ribbon evolution in Hα two-ribbon flares was performed. The data set consists of 50 confined (62%) and eruptive (38%) flares that occurred from June 2000 to June 2015. The flares were selected homogeneously over the Hα and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) classes, with an emphasis on including powerful confined flares and weak eruptive flares. Hα filtergrams from the Kanzelhöhe Observatory in combination with Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms were used to derive the ribbon separation, the ribbon-separation velocity, the magnetic-field strength, and the reconnection electric field. We find that eruptive flares reveal statistically larger ribbon separation and higher ribbon-separation velocities than confined flares. In addition, the ribbon separation of eruptive flares correlates with the GOES SXR flux, whereas no clear dependence was found for confined flares. The maximum ribbon-separation velocity is not correlated with the GOES flux, but eruptive flares reveal on average a higher ribbon-separation velocity (by ≈ 10 km s-1). The local reconnection electric field of confined (cc=0.50 ±0.02) and eruptive (cc=0.77 ±0.03) flares correlates with the GOES flux, indicating that more powerful flares involve stronger reconnection electric fields. In addition, eruptive flares with higher electric-field strengths tend to be accompanied by faster coronal mass ejections.

  3. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  4. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shubha S.; Spaulding, Ryan; Deardorff, Donald G.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental motivation of the project is that the scientific output of solar research can be greatly enhanced by better exploitation of the existing solar/heliosphere space-data products jointly with ground-based observations. Our primary focus is on developing a specific innovative methodology based on recent advances in "big data" intelligent databases applied to the growing amount of high-spatial and multi-wavelength resolution, high-cadence data from NASA's missions and supporting ground-based observatories. Our flare database is not simply a manually searchable time-based catalog of events or list of web links pointing to data. It is a preprocessed metadata repository enabling fast search and automatic identification of all recorded flares sharing a specifiable set of characteristics, features, and parameters. The result is a new and unique database of solar flares and data search and classification tools for the Heliophysics community, enabling multi-instrument/multi-wavelength investigations of flare physics and supporting further development of flare-prediction methodologies.

  5. ELECTRON ACCELERATION IN CONTRACTING MAGNETIC ISLANDS DURING SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I. [University of Michigan, Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2143 (United States); Guidoni, S. E. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  6. Modelling Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Dominique, M.; Jelínek, P.; Takasao, S.

    2018-02-01

    Solar flare emission is detected in all EM bands and variations in flux density of solar energetic particles. Often the EM radiation generated in solar and stellar flares shows a pronounced oscillatory pattern, with characteristic periods ranging from a fraction of a second to several minutes. These oscillations are referred to as quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs), to emphasise that they often contain apparent amplitude and period modulation. We review the current understanding of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares. In particular, we focus on the possible physical mechanisms, with an emphasis on the underlying physics that generates the resultant range of periodicities. These physical mechanisms include MHD oscillations, self-oscillatory mechanisms, oscillatory reconnection/reconnection reversal, wave-driven reconnection, two loop coalescence, MHD flow over-stability, the equivalent LCR-contour mechanism, and thermal-dynamical cycles. We also provide a histogram of all QPP events published in the literature at this time. The occurrence of QPPs puts additional constraints on the interpretation and understanding of the fundamental processes operating in flares, e.g. magnetic energy liberation and particle acceleration. Therefore, a full understanding of QPPs is essential in order to work towards an integrated model of solar and stellar flares.

  7. Can Sgr A* flares reveal the molecular gas density PDF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churazov, E.; Khabibullin, I.; Sunyaev, R.; Ponti, G.

    2017-11-01

    Illumination of dense gas in the Central Molecular Zone by powerful X-ray flares from Sgr A* leads to prominent structures in the reflected emission that can be observed long after the end of the flare. By studying this emission, we learn about past activity of the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center and, at the same time, we obtain unique information on the structure of molecular clouds that is essentially impossible to get by other means. Here we discuss how X-ray data can improve our knowledge of both sides of the problem. Existing data already provide (I) an estimate of the flare age, (II) a model-independent lower limit on the luminosity of Sgr A* during the flare and (III) an estimate of the total emitted energy during Sgr A* flare. On the molecular clouds side, the data clearly show a voids-and-walls structure of the clouds and can provide an almost unbiased probe of the mass/density distribution of the molecular gas with the hydrogen column densities lower than few 1023 cm-2. For instance, the probability distribution function of the gas density PDF(ρ) can be measured this way. Future high energy resolution X-ray missions will provide the information on the gas velocities, allowing, for example, a reconstruction of the velocity field structure functions and cross-matching the X-ray and molecular data based on positions and velocities.

  8. Characteristics of pebble and cobble-sized clasts along the Curiosity rover traverse from sol 100 to 750: Terrain types, potential sources, and transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Cropper, K.; Gupta, S.; Kah, L. C.; Williams, R. M. E.; Blank, J.; Calef, F.; Hamilton, V. E.; Lewis, K.; Shechet, J.; McBride, M.; Bridges, N.; Frias, J. Martinez; Newsom, H.

    2016-12-01

    We combine the results of orbitally-derived morphologic and thermal inertia data with in situ observations of abundance, size, morphologic characteristics, and distribution of pebble- to cobble-sized clasts along the Curiosity rover traverse. Our goals are to characterize rock sources and transport history, and improve our ability to predict upcoming terrain. There are ten clast types, with nine types interpreted as sedimentary rocks. Only Type 3 clasts had morphologies indicative of significant wear through transport; thus, most clast types are indicative of nearby outcrops or prior presence of laterally extensive sedimentary rock layers, consistent with the erosional landscape. A minor component may reflect impact delivery of more distant material. Types 1 and 4 are heavily-cemented sandstones, likely associated with a ;caprock; layer. Types 5 and 6 (and possibly 7) are pebble-rich sandstones, with varying amounts of cement leading to varying susceptibility to erosion/wear. Type 3 clasts are rounded pebbles likely transported and deposited alluvially, then worn out of pebbly sandstone/conglomerate. Types 9 and 10 are poorly-sorted sandstones, with Type 9 representing fragments of Square Top-type layers, and Type 10 deriving from basal or other Mt. Sharp layers. Types 2, 8 and 9 are considered exotics. There are few clear links between clast type and terrain surface roughness (particularly in identifying terrain that is challenging for the rover to navigate). Orbital data may provide a reasonable prediction of certain end-member terrains but the complex interplay between variables that contribute to surface characteristics makes discriminating between terrain types from orbital data problematic. Prediction would likely be improved through higher-resolution thermal inertia data.

  9. Detection and characterization of small hot fires: Comparing FireBird, BIRD, S-NPP VIIRS and MODIS capacities over gas flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, Gernot; Schroeder, Wilfrid; Lorenz, Eckehard; Kaiser, Johannes; Caseiro, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    According to recent research, black carbon has the second strongest effect on the earth climate system after carbon dioxide. In high Northern latitudes, industrial gas flares are an important source of black carbon, especially in winter. This fact is particularly relevant for the relatively fast observed climate change in the Arctic since deposition of black carbon changes the albedo of snow and ice, thus leading to a positive feedback cycle. Here we explore gas flare detection and Fire Radiative Power (FRP) retrievals of the German FireBird TET-1 and BIRD Hotspot Recognition Systems (HSRS), the VIIRS sensor on board of the S-NPP satellite, and the MODIS sensor using temporally close to near coincident data acquisitions. Comparison is based on level 2 products developed for fire detection for the different sensors; in the case of S-NPP VIIRS we use two products: the new VIIRS 750m algorithm based on MODIS collection 6, and the 350 m algorithm based on the VIIRS mid-infrared I (Imaging) band, which offers high resolution, but no FRP retrievals. Results indicate that the highest resolution FireBird sensors offer the best detection capacities, though the level two product shows false alarms, followed by the VIIRS 350 m and 750 m algorithms. MODIS has the lowest detection rate. Preliminary results of FRP retrievals show that FireBird and VIIRS algorithms have a good agreement. Given the fact that most gas flaring is at the detection limit for medium to coarse resolution space borne sensors - and hence measurement errors may be high - our results indicates that a quantitative evaluation of gas flaring using these sensors is feasible. Results shall be used to develop a gas flare detection algorithm for Sentinel-3, and a similar methodology will be employed to validate the capacity of Sentinel 3 to detect and characterize small high temperature sources such as gas flares.

  10. Crustal extension and magmatism during the mid-Cenozoic ignimbrite flare-up in the Guazapares Mining District and Cerocahui basin regions, northern Sierra Madre Occidental, western Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bryan Patrick

    Silicic large igneous provinces are significant in the geologic record, due to their unusually extensive areal coverage (>100,000 km2) and large volumes (>250,000 km3), and may be characteristic of continental regions undergoing broad lithospheric extension. The Sierra Madre Occidental of northwestern Mexico is the biggest and best-preserved silicic large igneous province of the Cenozoic and is considered part of the extensive mid-Cenozoic ignimbrite flare-up that affected much of the southwestern North American Cordillera. Despite its size and preservation, very little is known about the geology of the Sierra Madre Occidental, and the timing and spatial extent of ignimbrite flare-up volcanism in relation to crustal extension is relatively unknown. This study presents new geologic mapping, stratigraphy, zircon U-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS dating, modal analysis, and geochemical data from the Guazapares Mining District and Cerocahui basin regions, two adjacent areas of the northern Sierra Madre Occidental in western Chihuahua. The rock exposure and topographic relief in this previously unmapped ~450 km2 area make it ideal for studying the relationships between silicic large igneous province volcanism and crustal extension. Three informal formations are identified in the study area: (1) the ca. 27.5 Ma Parajes formation, a ~1-km-thick succession of primarily welded silicic outflow ignimbrite sheets erupted from sources within ~50--100 km of the study area that were active during the Early Oligocene pulse of the mid-Cenozoic ignimbrite flare-up; (2) the ca. 27--24.5 Ma Temoris formation, composed primarily of locally erupted mafic-intermediate lavas and associated intrusions with interbedded alluvial deposits, likely related to rocks of the Southern Cordillera basaltic andesite province that were intermittently erupted across all of the northern Sierra Madre Occidental following the Early Oligocene ignimbrite pulse; and (3) the ca. 24.5--23 Ma Sierra Guazapares

  11. Search for neutrino emission in gamma-ray flaring blazars with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Losa, Agustín, E-mail: agustin.sanchez@ific.uv.es [IFIC, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2013-10-11

    The ANTARES telescope observes a full hemisphere of the sky all the time with a duty cycle close to 100%. This makes it well suited for an extensive observation of neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources. In the surrounding medium of blazars, i.e. active galactic nuclei with their jets pointing almost directly toward the observer, neutrinos may be produced together with gamma-rays by hadronic interactions, so a strong correlation between neutrinos and gamma-rays emissions is expected. The time variability information of the studied source can be obtained by the gamma-ray light curves measured by the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi satellite. If the expected neutrino flux observation is reduced to a narrow window around the assumed neutrino production period, the point-source sensitivity can be drastically improved. The ANTARES data collected in 2008 has been analyzed looking for neutrinos detected in the high state period of 10 bright and variable Fermi sources assuming that the neutrino emission follows the gamma-ray light curves. First results show a sensitivity improvement by a factor 2–3 with respect to a standard time-integrated point source search. The analysis has been done with an unbinned method based on the minimization of a likelihood ratio applied to data corresponding to a live time of 60 days. The width of the flaring periods ranges from 1 to 20 days. Despite the fact that the most significant studied source is compatible with background fluctuations, recently detected flares promise interesting future analyze.

  12. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-09-28

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled.

  13. The Jets of Microquasars during Giant Flares and Quiet State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Trushkin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the radio properties of jets of the following microquasars, as determined from daily multi-frequency monitoring observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope during 2010–2017: V404 Cyg, SS433, Cyg X-1, GRS1915+105 and LSI+61 ∘ 303. We have detected many giant flares from SS433, a powerful flare from V404 Cyg in June 2015, an active state of Cyg X-1 in 2017 and fifty periodic flares from LSI+61 ∘ 303. We describe the properties of massive ejections based on multi-band (radio, X-ray and γ -ray studies. The general properties of the light curves are closely connected with the processes of jet formation in microquasars.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Soliton and strong Langmuir turbulence in solar flare processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of modulational instability in the current sheet of a solar flare is investigated. Special attention is given to the plasma microinstability in this sheet and its relation to the flare process. It is found that solitons or strong Langmuir turbulence are likely to occur in the diffusion region under solar flare conditions in which the electric resistivity could be enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the region, resulting in significant heating and stochastic acceleration of particles. A numerical example is used to demonstrate the transition of the magnetic field velocity and plasma density from the outer MHD region into the diffusive region and then back out again with the completion of the energy conversion process. This is all made possible by an increase in resistivity of four to five orders of magnitude over the classical value.

  16. High-energy particles associated with solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, K.; Klimas, A.J.

    1974-05-01

    High energy particles, the so-called solar cosmic rays, are often generated in association with solar flares, and then emitted into interplanetary space. These particles, consisting of electrons, protons, and other heavier nuclei, including the iron-group, are accelerated in the vicinity of the flare. By studying the temporal and spatial variation of these particles near the earth's orbit, their storage and release mechanisms in the solar corona and their propagation mechanism can be understood. The details of the nuclear composition and the rigidity spectrum for each nuclear component of the solar cosmic rays are important for investigating the acceleration mechanism in solar flares. The timing and efficiency of the acceleration process can also be investigated by using this information. These problems are described in some detail by using observational results on solar cosmic rays and associated phenomena. (U.S.)

  17. Are All Flare Ribbons Simply Connected to the Corona?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Paraschiv, Alin; Lacatus, Daniela; Donea, Alina [Monash Center for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lindsey, Charlie, E-mail: judge@ucar.edu, E-mail: alina.donea@monash.edu, E-mail: alin.paraschiv@monash.edu, E-mail: daniela.lacatus@monash.edu, E-mail: indsey@cora.nwra.com [Northwest Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    We consider the observational basis for the belief that flare ribbons in the chromosphere result from energy transport from the overlying corona. We study ribbons of small flares using magnetic and intensity data from the Hinode , Solar Dynamics Observatory , and IRIS missions. While most ribbons appear connected to the corona and overlie regions of significant vertical magnetic field, we examine one ribbon with no clear evidence for such connections. Evolving horizontal magnetic fields seen with Hinode suggest that reconnection with preexisting fields below the corona can explain the data. The identification of just one, albeit small, ribbon, with no apparent connection to the corona, leads us to conclude that at least two mechanisms are responsible for the heating that leads to flare ribbon emission.

  18. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: nicolas.bian@glasgow.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  19. Effect of a dam on the optical properties of different-sized fractions of dissolved organic matter in a mid-subtropical drinking water source reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiyuan; Jiang, Juan; Zheng, Yuyi; Wang, Feifeng; Wu, Chunshan; Xie, Rong-Rong

    2017-11-15

    The presence of a dam on a river is believed to have a key role in affecting changes in the components of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in reservoirs. However, questions remain about the mechanisms that control these changes. In this study, we used tangential ultrafiltration, fluorescence spectrum and phytoplankton cell density detection to explore the impacts of a dam on the CDOM components in the Shanzai Reservoir, a source of drinking water. The results demonstrated each CDOM size fraction comprised two main components, namely C1 (protein-like substance) and C2 (humic-like substance). The C1 content had a higher value in areas with slow flow than in the normal river channel, while the C2 contents were generally stable in the flow direction. The topography of the reservoir site affected the structure of the CDOM components based on changes in the hydraulic conditions caused by the dam. The variations in the CDOM components, hydraulic parameters and fluorescence indices in the river flow direction indicated that the contribution of the phytoplankton to the CDOM content increased as the distance to the dam decreased, phytoplankton metabolism enhanced C1 content of the 1-10kDa molecular weights range fraction. Further, the contributions of different phytoplankton biomass to C1 proved that the dam changed the hydraulic conditions, had secondary effects on the metabolism of the phytoplankton, and resulted in changes in the structure of the CDOM components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photographic colorimetry of stellar flares in the Pleiades and Orion. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoian, L.V.; Chavushian, O.S.; Melikian, N.D.; Natsvlishvili, R.Sh.; Ambarian, V.V.; Brutian, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    Synchronous three-telescope UBV photographic colorimetry of Pleiades and Orion stellar flares obtained at Biurakan Astrophysical Observatory and Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory during 86 observing hours in 1980 and 1981 is presented. The data are compiled in tables and discussed in terms of color differences appearing at different stages of a flare. A total of 32 flares are observed (25 in the Pleiades and 7 in Orion), and four new flare stars are identified in each region. 12 references

  1. Money Talks: Why Nigeria’s Petroleum Industry Bill will Fail to End Gas Flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    Industry Bill ( PIB ) that if enacted would ban gas flaring. However, as currently written the PIB will not end flaring for the same reasons that...previous legislation failed. Loopholes in the PIB combined with corruption, lack of effective enforcement mechanisms and lack of incentives to develop...Bill ( PIB ) that if enacted would ban gas flaring. However, as currently written, the PIB will not end flaring for the same reasons that previous

  2. Max 1991: Flare Research at the Next Solar Maximum. Workshop 1: Scientific Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the Max 1991 program is to gather coordinated sets of solar flare and active region data and to perform interpretive and theoretical research aimed at understanding flare energy storage and release, particle acceleration, flare energy transport, and the propagation of flare effects to Earth. The workshop was divided into four areas of concern: energy storage, energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport.

  3. HOOKED FLARE RIBBONS AND FLUX-ROPE-RELATED QSL FOOTPRINTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Hui; Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad–Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad–Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  4. Flare Activity of Wide Binary Stars with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Riley W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity in wide binary stars using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. The target list contains a set of previously discovered wide binary star systems identified by proper motions in the Kepler field. We cross-matched these systems with estimates of flare activity for ∼200,000 stars in the Kepler field, allowing us to compare relative flare luminosity between stars in coeval binaries. From a sample of 184 previously known wide binaries in the Kepler field, we find 58 with detectable flare activity in at least 1 component, 33 of which are similar in mass (q > 0.8). Of these 33 equal-mass binaries, the majority display similar (±1 dex) flare luminosity between both stars, as expected for stars of equal mass and age. However, we find two equal-mass pairs where the secondary (lower mass) star is more active than its counterpart, and two equal-mass pairs where the primary star is more active. The stellar rotation periods are also anomalously fast for stars with elevated flare activity. Pairs with discrepant rotation and activity qualitatively seem to have lower mass ratios. These outliers may be due to tidal spin-up, indicating these wide binaries could be hierarchical triple systems. We additionally present high-resolution adaptive optics images for two wide binary systems to test this hypothesis. The demographics of stellar rotation and magnetic activity between stars in wide binaries may be useful indicators for discerning the formation scenarios of these systems.

  5. Thermodynamics of supra-arcade downflows in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin

    2017-10-01

    Context. Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) have been frequently observed during the gradual phase of solar flares near the limb. In coronal emission lines sensitive to flaring plasmas, they appear as tadpole-like dark voids against the diffuse fan-shaped "haze" above, flowing toward the well-defined flare arcade. Aims: We aim to investigate the evolution of SADs' thermal properties, and to shed light on the formation mechanism and physical processes of SADs. Methods: We carefully studied several selected SADs from two flare events and calculated their differential emission measures (DEMs) as well as DEM-weighted temperatures using data obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Results: Our analysis shows that SADs are associated with a substantial decrease in DEM above 4 MK, which is 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the surrounding haze as well as the region before or after the passage of SADs, but comparable to the quiet corona. There is no evidence for the presence of the SAD-associated hot plasma (>20 MK) in the AIA data, and this decrease in DEM does not cause any significant change in the DEM distribution as well as the DEM-weighted temperature, which supports this idea that SADs are density depletion. This depression in DEM rapidly recovers in the wake of the SADs studied, generally within a few minutes, suggesting that they are discrete features. In addition, we found that SADs in one event are spatio-temporally associated with the successive formation of post-flare loops along the flare arcade. Movies associated to Figs. A.1 and A.2 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Homologous Circular-ribbon Flares Driven by Twisted Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Yang, K.; Guo, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Z. J.; Kashapova, L.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we report two homologous circular-ribbon flares associated with two filament eruptions. They were well observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope and the Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2014 March 5. Prior to the flare, two small-scale filaments enclosed by a circular pre-flare brightening lie along the circular polarity inversion line around the parasitic polarity, which has shown a continuous rotation since its first appearance. Two filaments eventually erupt in sequence associated with two homologous circular-ribbon flares and display an apparent writhing signature. Supplemented by the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation and the magnetic field squashing factor investigation, the following are revealed. (1) This event involves the emergence of magnetic flux ropes into a pre-existing polarity area, which yields the formation of a 3D null-point topology in the corona. (2) Continuous input of the free energy in the form of a flux rope from beneath the photosphere may drive a breakout-type reconnection occurring high in the corona, supported by the pre-flare brightening. (3) This initiation reconnection could release the constraint on the flux rope and trigger the MHD instability to first make filament F1 lose equilibrium. The subsequent more violent magnetic reconnection with the overlying flux is driven during the filament rising. In return, the eruption of filament F2 is further facilitated by the reduction of the magnetic tension force above. These two processes form a positive feedback to each other to cause the energetic mass eruption and flare.

  7. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Size Fractionated Atmospheric Aerosols, and, Evaluating Student Attitudes and Learning in Large Lecture General Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory Harold

    Chemical speciation and source apportionment of size fractionated atmospheric aerosols were investigated using laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD TOF-MS) and source apportionment was carried out using carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry (14C AMS). Sample collection was carried out using the Davis Rotating-drum Unit for Monitoring impact analyzer in Davis, Colfax, and Yosemite, CA. Ambient atmospheric aerosols collected during the winter of 2010/11 and 2011/12 showed a significant difference in the types of compounds found in the small and large sized particles. The difference was due to the increase number of oxidized carbon species that were found in the small particles size ranges, but not in the large particles size ranges. Overall, the ambient atmospheric aerosols collected during the winter in Davis, CA had and average fraction modern of F14C = 0.753 +/- 0.006, indicating that the majority of the size fractionated particles originated from biogenic sources. Samples collected during the King Fire in Colfax, CA were used to determine the contribution of biomass burning (wildfire) aerosols. Factor analysis was used to reduce the ions found in the LD TOF-MS analysis of the King Fire samples. The final factor analysis generated a total of four factors that explained an overall 83% of the variance in the data set. Two of the factors correlated heavily with increased smoke events during the sample period. The increased smoke events produced a large number of highly oxidized organic aerosols (OOA2) and aromatic compounds that are indicative of biomass burning organic aerosols (WBOA). The signal intensities of the factors generated in the King Fire data were investigated in samples collected in Yosemite and Davis, CA to look at the impact of biomass burning on ambient atmospheric aerosols. In both comparison sample collections the OOA2 and WBOA factors both increased during biomass burning events located near the sampling sites. The correlation

  8. Effects of forage source and forage particle size as a free-choice provision on growth performance, rumen fermentation, and behavior of dairy calves fed texturized starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi-Mirzaei, H; Azarfar, A; Mirzaei, M; Kiani, A; Ghaffari, M H

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the interactive effects of forage source and forage particle size (PS) as a free-choice provision on growth performance, rumen fermentation, and behavior of dairy calves fed texturized starters. Forty-eight Holstein calves (42 ± 3 kg of body weight) were randomly assigned (n = 12 calves per treatment) in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with the factors of forage source [alfalfa hay (AH) and wheat straw (WS)] and forage PS [(AH: medium = 1.96 mm or long = 3.93 mm) and (WS: medium = 2.03 mm or long = 4.10 mm), as geometric mean diameters]. The treatments were (1) AH with medium PS (AH-MPS), (2) AH with long PS (AH-LPS), (3) WS with medium PS (WS-MPS), and (4) WS with long PS (WS-LPS). Regardless of forage PS, the preweaning starter intake, dry matter intake, metabolizable energy intake, weaning body weight, and forage intake were greater for AH calves than WS calves. Average daily gain, average daily gain/metabolizable energy intake, feed efficiency, and final body weight of the calves did not differ among groups. An interaction of forage source and forage PS influenced acetate, propionate, and acetate-to-propionate ratio in the rumen on d 35, with the greatest acetate proportion and acetate-to-propionate ratio, but the least propionate proportion for AH-MPS calves than the other calves. The total volatile fatty acid concentration and the rumen proportions of propionate (d 70), butyrate (d 35), and valerate (d 35) were greater in AH-MPS calves than in AH-LPS calves. Calves fed AH had greater total volatile fatty acid concentration (d 35 and 70) and propionate proportion (d 70), but lesser ruminal proportions of butyrate (d 35 and 70), valerate (d 35 and 70), and acetate-to-propionate ratio (d 70) compared with calves fed WS. The ruminal valerate proportion (d 70) was greatest in WS-MPS calves than the other calves. An interaction of forage source and forage PS influenced preweaning standing time and starter eating time, with the least

  9. UBV-photometry of flare stars in pleiades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavushyan, O.S.; Garibdzhanyan, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of UBV-photometry of 283 flare stars at the minimum of brightness in the Pleiad region. A new method has been developed and used of taking into account the background in photographic UBV-photometry with an iris microphotometer. The data obtained indicate that the flare Pleiad stars are located on both sides of the main sequence in the light-luminosity (V,B-V) diagram, while in the (U-B,B-V) diagram they are largely located above the main sequence

  10. The excitation of the iron Kα feature in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emslie, A.G.; Phillips, K.J.H.; Dennis, B.R.

    1985-09-01

    The paper concerns two solar flare events observed with the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer and the Kα channel of the X-ray Polychromator Bent Crystal Sepctrometer on the solar Maximum Mission Satellite. The observed magnitude of the Kα enhancement above the fluorescent background at the time of the large X-ray bursts is compared with the predicted Kα flux. The results support a thick-target non-thermal interpretation of impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares. (U.K.)

  11. Beam heating in solar flares - Electrons or protons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.C.; Karlicky, M.; Mackinnon, A.L.; Van Den Oord, G.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of electron and proton beam models as candidates for the impulsive phase heating of solar flares is discussed in relation to observational constants and theoretical difficulties. It is concluded that, while the electron beam model for flare heating still faces theoretical and observational problems, the problems faced by low and high energy proton beam models are no less serious, and there are facets of proton models which have not yet been studied. At the present, the electron beam model remains the most viable and best developed of heating model candidates. 58 refs

  12. DETECTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of the bright GRB 100728A and its afterglow. The early X-ray emission is dominated by a vigorous flaring activity continuing until 1 ks after the burst. In the same time interval, high-energy emission is significantly detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Marginal evidence of GeV emission is observed up to later times. We discuss the broadband properties of this burst within both the internal and external shock scenarios, with a particular emphasis on the relation between X-ray flares, the GeV emission, and a continued long-duration central engine activity as their power source.

  13. A radio jet from the optical and x-ray bright stellar tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, S; Anderson, G E; Stone, N C; Fraser, M; Wevers, T; Metzger, B D; Jonker, P G; van der Horst, A J; Staley, T D; Mendez, A J; Miller-Jones, J C A; Hodgkin, S T; Campbell, H C; Fender, R P

    2016-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly launched jet. The multiwavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion-state changes of stellar mass black holes, which suggests that all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Quantitative analysis of hard X-ray 'footpoint' flares observed by the solar maximum mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, A. L.; Brown, J. C.; Hayward, J.

    1985-01-01

    Amplifier gain and collimator hole size variations across the field of view, amplifier/filter efficiency, variations in effective collimator hole size and angular response with photon energy, dead-time, and hard X-ray plate transmission, are among the factors for which instrumental corrections have to be incorporated to effect reliable correction and deconvolution of images from the SMM satellite's Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS). Attention is given to the substantial Poisson noise in these energy bands. The maximum entropy deconvolution/correction routine developed for establishing the spatial structure reliably inferrable from HXIS data is presented, together with the results of the application of this routine to the three impulsive flares reported by Duijemian et al. (1982) from April 10, May 21, and November 5, 1980.

  15. Two-stage Energy Release Process of a Confined Flare with Double HXR Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hao; Chen, Yao; Wu, Zhao; Su, Yang; Tian, Hui; Li, Gang; Du, Guohui; Song, Hongqiang

    2018-02-01

    A complete understanding of the onset and subsequent evolution of confined flares has not been achieved. Earlier studies mainly analyzed disk events so as to reveal their magnetic topology and the cause of confinement. In this study, taking advantage of a tandem of instruments working at different wavelengths of X-rays, EUVs, and microwaves, we present dynamic details about a confined flare observed on the northwestern limb of the solar disk on 2016 July 24. The entire dynamic evolutionary process starting from its onset is consistent with a loop–loop interaction scenario. The X-ray profiles manifest an intriguing double-peak feature. From the spectral fitting, it has been found that the first peak is nonthermally dominated, while the second peak is mostly multithermal with a hot (∼10 MK) and a super-hot (∼30 MK) component. This double-peak feature is unique in that the two peaks are clearly separated by 4 minutes, and the second peak reaches up to 25–50 keV in addition, at energy bands above 3 keV, the X-ray fluxes decline significantly between the two peaks. This, together with other available imaging and spectral data, manifest a two-stage energy release process. A comprehensive analysis is carried out to investigate the nature of this two-stage process. We conclude that the second stage with the hot and super-hot sources mainly involves direct heating through a loop–loop reconnection at a relatively high altitude in the corona. The uniqueness of the event characteristics and the complete dataset make the study a nice addition to present literature on solar flares.

  16. M DWARF FLARES FROM TIME-RESOLVED SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, Eric J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Kowalski, Adam F.; West, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    We have identified 63 flares on M dwarfs from the individual component spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using a novel measurement of emission-line strength called the Flare Line Index. Each of the ∼38,000 M dwarfs in the SDSS low-mass star spectroscopic sample of West et al. was observed several times (usually 3-5) in exposures that were typically 9-25 minutes in duration. Our criteria allowed us to identify flares that exhibit very strong Hα and Hβ emission-line strength and/or significant variability in those lines throughout the course of the exposures. The flares we identified have characteristics consistent with flares observed by classical spectroscopic monitoring. The flare duty cycle for the objects in our sample is found to increase from 0.02% for early M dwarfs to 3% for late M dwarfs. We find that the flare duty cycle is larger in the population near the Galactic plane and that the flare stars are more spatially restricted than the magnetically active but non-flaring stars. This suggests that flare frequency may be related to stellar age (younger stars are more likely to flare) and that the flare stars are younger than the mean active population.

  17. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  18. Quasi-periodic Pulsations in the Most Powerful Solar Flare of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y.; Pugh, Chloe E.; Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2018-05-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are common in solar flares and are now regularly observed in stellar flares. We present the detection of two different types of QPP signals in the thermal emission light curves of the X9.3-class solar flare SOL2017-09-06T12:02, which is the most powerful flare of Cycle 24. The period of the shorter-period QPP drifts from about 12 to 25 s during the flare. The observed properties of this QPP are consistent with a sausage oscillation of a plasma loop in the flaring active region. The period of the longer-period QPP is about 4 to 5 minutes. Its properties are compatible with standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations, which are often detected in coronal loops. For both QPP signals, other mechanisms such as repetitive reconnection cannot be ruled out, however. The studied solar flare has an energy in the realm of observed stellar flares, and the fact that there is evidence of a short-period QPP signal typical of solar flares along with a long-period QPP signal more typical of stellar flares suggests that the different ranges of QPP periods typically observed in solar and stellar flares is likely due to observational constraints, and that similar physical processes may be occurring in solar and stellar flares.

  19. Statistical investigation of flare stars. I. UV Ceti stars in the neighborhood of the sun and flare stars in clusters and associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.; Ambaryan, V.V.

    1988-09-01

    An analysis of modern observational data shows that UV Ceti stars in the neighborhood of the sun and flare stars in clusters and associations have many observational characteristics in common. This conclusion is based on the flare light curves, the spectra in the quiescent state, the luminosities, the flare durations, the mean flare frequencies, the energy spectra, the colors of the flare radiation, the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and the flares in the radio and x-ray regions. The differences between these stars (luminosities, energy spectra, Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, connection with diffuse nebulas, etc.) are largely quantitative and can be satisfactorily explained by differences in their ages - UV Ceti stars are on the average older formations.

  20. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : interim report November 1996-Jun 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.; Johnson, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report focused on the emissions and efficiency of flares under operating conditions typical of solution gas flares. While most solution gas produced in Alberta is conserved, it is estimated that 6 per cent of these gases are flared with significant changes in the volumes flared from site to site. The median volume of flared or vented gas was approximately 60,300 m 3 /year and 95 per cent of battery sites flare and vent less than 1,000,000 m 3 /year. The goal of this project is to experimentally study the scaled-down generic pipe flares under well-controlled conditions to better understand the performance of flares. Research was conducted in a closed-loop wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on flaring. Other objectives of the research are to develop methods for measuring the overall combustion efficiency of flares with either gaseous flare streams or those containing liquid droplets. Models for the scaling of plumes that disperse the products of combustion from flares as a function of wind speed, exit velocity and flare stack diameter were also examined. And finally, this research project measured the emissions of selected toxic compounds in both their vapor and soot phases. 38 refs., 10 tabs., 56 figs

  1. Constraining the location of gamma-ray flares in luminous blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Sikora, Marek, E-mail: knalew@jila.colorado.edu [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-07-10

    Locating the gamma-ray emission sites in blazar jets is a long standing and highly controversial issue. We jointly investigate several constraints on the distance scale r and Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray emitting regions in luminous blazars (primarily flat spectrum radio quasars). Working in the framework of one-zone external radiation Comptonization models, we perform a parameter space study for several representative cases of actual gamma-ray flares in their multiwavelength context. We find a particularly useful combination of three constraints: from an upper limit on the collimation parameter Γθ ≲ 1, from an upper limit on the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) luminosity L{sub SSC} ≲ L{sub X}, and from an upper limit on the efficient cooling photon energy E{sub cool,obs} ≲ 100 MeV. These three constraints are particularly strong for sources with low accretion disk luminosity L{sub d}. The commonly used intrinsic pair-production opacity constraint on Γ is usually much weaker than the SSC constraint. The SSC and cooling constraints provide a robust lower limit on the collimation parameter Γθ ≳ 0.1-0.7. Typical values of r corresponding to moderate values of Γ ∼ 20 are in the range 0.1-1 pc, and are determined primarily by the observed variability timescale t{sub var,obs}. Alternative scenarios motivated by the observed gamma-ray/millimeter connection, in which gamma-ray flares of t{sub var,obs} ∼ a few days are located at r ∼ 10 pc, are in conflict with both the SSC and cooling constraints. Moreover, we use a simple light travel time argument to point out that the gamma-ray/millimeter connection does not provide a significant constraint on the location of gamma-ray flares. We argue that spine-sheath models of the jet structure do not offer a plausible alternative to external radiation fields at large distances; however, an extended broad-line region is an idea worth exploring. We propose that the most definite additional constraint could be

  2. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s –1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s –1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s –1 . We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview o