WorldWideScience

Sample records for flammable gas upgrades

  1. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only

  2. Methodology for flammable gas evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    There are 177 radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste generates flammable gases. The waste releases gas continuously, but in some tanks the waste has shown a tendency to trap these flammable gases. When enough gas is trapped in a tank`s waste matrix, it may be released in a way that renders part or all of the tank atmosphere flammable for a period of time. Tanks must be evaluated against previously defined criteria to determine whether they can present a flammable gas hazard. This document presents the methodology for evaluating tanks in two areas of concern in the tank headspace:steady-state flammable-gas concentration resulting from continuous release, and concentration resulting from an episodic gas release.

  3. Flammable gas project topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  4. Flammable gas safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic constituents in Hanford waste tanks, with particular emphasis on those tanks that have been assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY, obtained during the window E core sampling, have been analyzed for organic constituents. Four of the samples were from the upper region, or convective layer, of the tank and two were from the lower, nonconvective layer. The samples were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitroso-iminodiacetic acid (NIDA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid (CA), succinic acid (SA), and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (ED3A). The chelator of highest concentration was EDTA in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography (LC) was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids (LMWA) including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids. Oxalate constituted approximately 40% of the TOC in the nonconvective layer samples. Oxalate was found to be approximately 3 to 4 times higher in concentration in the nonconvective layer than in the convective layer. During FY 1993, LC methods for analyzing LWMA, and two chelators N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and EDTA, were transferred to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and the 222-S laboratory

  5. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-02-18

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for double shell tank (DST) and single shell tank (SST) representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant SSCs and/or TSRS were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  6. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-03-03

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for DST and SST representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant structures, systems and components (SSCs) and/or technical safety requirements (TSRs) were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support WP-13033, Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  7. Flammable gas program topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1996-10-30

    The major emphasis of this report is to describe what has been learned about the generation, retention, and release of flammable gas mixtures in high-level waste tanks. A brief overview of efforts to characterize the gas composition will be provided. The report also discusses what needs to be learned about the phenomena, how the Unreviewed Safety Question will be closed, and the approach for removing tanks from the Watch List.

  8. Flammable gas program topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The major emphasis of this report is to describe what has been learned about the generation, retention, and release of flammable gas mixtures in high-level waste tanks. A brief overview of efforts to characterize the gas composition will be provided. The report also discusses what needs to be learned about the phenomena, how the Unreviewed Safety Question will be closed, and the approach for removing tanks from the Watch List

  9. Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study 52827

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-03-17

    This course, Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study (COURSE 52827), presents an overview of the hazards and controls associated with commonly used, compressed flammable gases at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  10. Remote flammable gas detection/measuring device.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kononov, VA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available This research report presents the results of an evaluation of the existing open path remote flammable gas detection/monitoring technology and provides recommendations on possible limited implementation of this technology and future development...

  11. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-10-30

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

  12. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data

  13. Flammable gas data evaluation. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, P.D.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Numerous safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate, retain, and periodically release flammable gases. This report documents some of the activities of the Flammable Gas Project Data Evaluation Task conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal year 1996. Described in this report are: (1) the results of examining the in-tank temperature measurements for insights into gas release behavior; (2) the preliminary results of examining the tank waste level measurements for insights into gas release behavior; and (3) an explanation for the observed hysteresis in the level/pressure measurements, a phenomenon observed earlier this year when high-frequency tank waste level measurements came on-line.

  14. Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-11

    The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the

  15. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  16. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Dahl, M.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1999-01-01

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples

  17. Flammability of Gas-Filled Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushkov Valentin Anatol'evich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The regularities of flame propagation on the horizontal surface of gas-filled polymers are considered depending on the concentration of oxygen in the oxidizer flow. The values of the coefficients in the expression describing relationship between the rate of flame propagation on the surface of foams and oxygen concentration are obtained. It was shown that with the mass content of reactive organophosphorus compounds reaching 4.0...5.9%, non-smoldering resole foam plastics with high performance characteristics are obtained. It was found that in order to obtain moderately combustible polyurethane foams based on oxyethylated phosphorus-containing polyols, the phosphorus concentration should not exceed 3 % of mass. To obtain flame-retardant urea-formaldehyde foam cellular plastics, the concentration of phosphorus should not exceed 0.3 % of mass. Physical-mechanical properties and flammability indices of developed gas-filled polymers based on reactive oligomers are presented.

  18. Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-05-23

    This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List.

  19. Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List

  20. 77 FR 62224 - Hanford Tank Farms Flammable Gas Safety Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... Safety Strategy AGENCY: Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. ACTION: Notice, recommendation. SUMMARY... the Secretary of Energy concerning the Hanford Tank Farms flammable gas safety strategy. [[Page 62225... Hanford Tank Farms Flammable Gas Safety Strategy Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2286a(a)(5) Atomic Energy Act...

  1. Safety basis for selected activities in single-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for single-shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade

  2. Assessment of gas flammability in transuranic waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Loehr, C.A.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package [Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) SARP] set limits for gas generation rates, wattage limits, and flammable volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in transuranic (TRU) waste containers that would be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Based on existing headspace gas data for drums stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), over 30 percent of the contact-handled TRU waste drums contain flammable VOC concentrations greater than the limit. Additional requirements may be imposed for emplacement of waste in the WIPP facility. The conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the facility required that flame tests be performed if significant levels of flammable VOCs were present in TRU waste containers. This paper describes an approach for investigating the potential flammability of TRU waste drums, which would increase the allowable concentrations of flammable VOCS. A flammability assessment methodology is presented that will allow more drums to be shipped to WIPP without treatment or repackaging and reduce the need for flame testing on drums. The approach includes experimental work to determine mixture lower explosive limits (MLEL) for the types of gas mixtures observed in TRU waste, a model for predicting the MLEL for mixtures of VOCS, hydrogen, and methane, and revised screening limits for total flammable VOCs concentrations and concentrations of hydrogen and methane using existing drum headspace gas data and the model predictions

  3. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... between the doors of an air lock under § 154.345. (b) The sampling points under paragraph (a) of this... automatic valve that prevents cross-communication between sampling points. (p) Each flammable gas detection...

  4. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  5. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  6. STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU TA

    2007-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  7. Offsite Radiological Consequence Analysis for the Bounding Flammable Gas Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Carro, C A

    2003-01-01

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank The calculation applies reasonably conservation input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. Revision 1 incorporates comments received from Office of River Protection.

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  9. Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.

    1997-01-01

    One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures

  10. Flammable gas cloud build up in a ventilated enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivings, M.J.; Gant, S.E.; Saunders, C.J.; Pocock, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation is frequently used as a means for preventing the build up of flammable or toxic gases in enclosed spaces. The effectiveness of the ventilation often has to be considered as part of a safety case or risk assessment. In this paper methods for assessing ventilation effectiveness for hazardous area classification are examined. The analysis uses data produced from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of low-pressure jet releases of flammable gas in a ventilated enclosure. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements of gas releases in a ventilation-controlled test chamber. Good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental data. Analysis of the CFD results shows that the flammable gas cloud volume resulting from a leak is largely dependent on the mass release rate of flammable gas and the ventilation rate of the enclosure. The effectiveness of the ventilation for preventing the build up of flammable gas can therefore be assessed by considering the average gas concentration at the enclosure outlet(s). It is found that the ventilation rate of the enclosure provides a more useful measure of ventilation effectiveness than considering the enclosure air change rate.

  11. Flammable gas cloud build up in a ventilated enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivings, M J; Gant, S E; Saunders, C J; Pocock, D J

    2010-12-15

    Ventilation is frequently used as a means for preventing the build up of flammable or toxic gases in enclosed spaces. The effectiveness of the ventilation often has to be considered as part of a safety case or risk assessment. In this paper methods for assessing ventilation effectiveness for hazardous area classification are examined. The analysis uses data produced from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of low-pressure jet releases of flammable gas in a ventilated enclosure. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements of gas releases in a ventilation-controlled test chamber. Good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental data. Analysis of the CFD results shows that the flammable gas cloud volume resulting from a leak is largely dependent on the mass release rate of flammable gas and the ventilation rate of the enclosure. The effectiveness of the ventilation for preventing the build up of flammable gas can therefore be assessed by considering the average gas concentration at the enclosure outlet(s). It is found that the ventilation rate of the enclosure provides a more useful measure of ventilation effectiveness than considering the enclosure air change rate. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks

  13. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-09-28

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures.

  14. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures

  15. Project W-030 flammable gas verification monitoring test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARKER, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the verification monitoring campaign used to document the ability of the new ventilation system to mitigate flammable gas accumulation under steady state tank conditions. This document reports the results of the monitoring campaign. The ventilation system configuration, process data, and data analysis are presented

  16. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report

  17. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  18. Characterization strategy for the flammable gas safety issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Roberts, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    The characterization strategy for resolving the flammable gas safety issue for Hanford waste tanks is based on a structured logic diagram (SLD) that displays the outcomes necessary to reach the desired goal of making flammable gas risk acceptable. The diagram provides a structured path that can identify all information inputs, data as well as models, needed to achieve the goal. Tracing the path from need to outcome provides an immediate and clear justification and defense of a specific need. The diagram itself is a open-quote picture of a risk calculation close-quote and forms the basis for a quantitative model of risk. The SLID, with the risk calculation, identifies options for characterization, mitigation, and controls that have the maximum effect in reducing risk. It provides quantitative input to risk-based decision making so that options are chosen for maximum impact at least cost

  19. A risk-based approach to flammable gas detector spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defriend, Stephen; Dejmek, Mark; Porter, Leisa; Deshotels, Bob; Natvig, Bernt

    2008-11-15

    Flammable gas detectors allow an operating company to address leaks before they become serious, by automatically alarming and by initiating isolation and safe venting. Without effective gas detection, there is very limited defense against a flammable gas leak developing into a fire or explosion that could cause loss of life or escalate to cascading failures of nearby vessels, piping, and equipment. While it is commonly recognized that some gas detectors are needed in a process plant containing flammable gas or volatile liquids, there is usually a question of how many are needed. The areas that need protection can be determined by dispersion modeling from potential leak sites. Within the areas that must be protected, the spacing of detectors (or alternatively, number of detectors) should be based on risk. Detector design can be characterized by spacing criteria, which is convenient for design - or alternatively by number of detectors, which is convenient for cost reporting. The factors that influence the risk are site-specific, including process conditions, chemical composition, number of potential leak sites, piping design standards, arrangement of plant equipment and structures, design of isolation and depressurization systems, and frequency of detector testing. Site-specific factors such as those just mentioned affect the size of flammable gas cloud that must be detected (within a specified probability) by the gas detection system. A probability of detection must be specified that gives a design with a tolerable risk of fires and explosions. To determine the optimum spacing of detectors, it is important to consider the probability that a detector will fail at some time and be inoperative until replaced or repaired. A cost-effective approach is based on the combined risk from a representative selection of leakage scenarios, rather than a worst-case evaluation. This means that probability and severity of leak consequences must be evaluated together. In marine and

  20. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  1. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU, T.A.

    2005-10-27

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  2. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU TA

    2009-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  3. Strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the general strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue; it is not a detailed description of program activities. budgets and schedules. Details of the program activities have been issued (Johnson and Sherwood, 1994) and the information pertaining to budgets is provided in the FY 1995-1997 Multi-Year Work Plan for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) (Program Element 1.1.1.2.02.). The key element in this strategy is to provide an understanding of the behavior of each of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks. While a review of historical information does provide some insight, it is necessary to gather current information about the gases, behavior and nature of the waste,. and about the control systems that maintain and monitor the waste. Analysis of this information will enable TWRS to determine the best approach to place any tank in a safe condition, if it is found to be in an unsafe state

  4. Flammable gas project expert elicitation results for Hanford Site double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the second phase of parameter quantification by the flammable gas expert panel. This second phase is focused on the analysis of flammable gas accidents in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks. The first phase of parameter quantification, performed in 1997 was focused on the analysis of Hanford single-shell tanks

  5. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for all 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 11 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-10l) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 10 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-101) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  6. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for al1 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 13 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 12 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  7. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE [SEC 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU, T.A.

    2003-09-30

    Flammable gases such as hydrogen, ammonia, and methane are observed in the tank dome space of the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. This report assesses the steady-state flammability level under normal and off-normal ventilation conditions in the tank dome space for 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The steady-state flammability level was estimated from the gas concentration of the mixture in the dome space using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. A time-dependent equation of gas concentration, which is a function of the gas release and ventilation rates in the dome space, has been developed for both soluble and insoluble gases. With this dynamic model, the time required to reach the specified flammability level at a given ventilation condition can be calculated. In the evaluation, hydrogen generation rates can be calculated for a given tank waste composition and its physical condition (e.g., waste density, waste volume, temperature, etc.) using the empirical rate equation model provided in Empirical Rate Equation Model and Rate Calculations of Hydrogen Generation for Hanford Tank Waste, HNF-3851. The release rate of other insoluble gases and the mass transport properties of the soluble gas can be derived from the observed steady-state gas concentration under normal ventilation conditions. The off-normal ventilation rate is assumed to be natural barometric breathing only. A large body of data is required to do both the hydrogen generation rate calculation and the flammability level evaluation. For tank waste that does not have sample-based data, a statistical-based value from probability distribution regression was used based on data from tanks belonging to a similar waste group. This report (Revision 3) updates the input data of hydrogen generation rates calculation for 177 tanks using the waste composition information in the Best-Basis Inventory Detail

  8. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document

  9. ISOLDE Off-line Gas Leak Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Kristoffer Bested

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates gas injection system of the ISOLDE Off-line separator. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to analysis the composition of the gas. Based on these measurements a contamination of the injected gas is found and a system upgrade is purposed. Furthermore a calibration of the leak rate of the leak valve is made.

  10. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  11. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a reference document describing the current knowledge of flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases. The report incorporates these analyses into two models for calculating headspace flammability, one based on instantaneous equilibrium between dissolved gases and the headspace and one incorporating limited release rates based on mass-transfer considerations. Finally, it demonstrates the use of both models to estimate headspace flammable gas concentrations and minimum ventilation rates required to maintain concentrations below 25% of the LFL.

  12. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a reference document describing the current knowledge of flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases. The report incorporates these analyses into two models for calculating headspace flammability, one based on instantaneous equilibrium between dissolved gases and the headspace and one incorporating limited release rates based on mass-transfer considerations. Finally, it demonstrates the use of both models to estimate headspace flammable gas concentrations and minimum ventilation rates required to maintain concentrations below 25% of the LFL

  13. Electrical safety in flammable gas/vapor laden atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Korver, WOE

    1992-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of electrical system installation within areas where flammable gases and liquids are handled and processed. The accurate hazard evaluation of flammability risks associated with chemical and petrochemical locations is critical in determining the point at which the costs of electrical equipment and installation are balanced with explosion safety requirements. The book offers the most current code requirements along with tables and illustrations as analytic tools. Environmental characteristics are covered in Section 1 along with recommended electrical ins

  14. Economics of natural gas upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels

  15. The effect of hydrogen enrichment towards the flammability limits of natural gas in conventional combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izirwan Izhab; Nur Syuhada Mohd Shokri; Nurul Saadah Sulaiman; Mohd Zulkifli Mohamad Noor; Siti Zubaidah Sulaiman; Rosmawati Naim; Norida Ridzuan, Mohd Masri Razak; Abdul Halim Abdul Razik; Zulkafli Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogenated fuels shows a considerable promise for the applications in gas turbines and internal combustion engines. The aims of this study are to determine the flammability limits of natural gas/ air mixtures and to investigate the effect of hydrogen enrichment on the flammability limits of natural gas/ air mixtures up to 60 vol % of hydrogen/fuel volume ratio at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The experiments were performed in a 20 L closed explosion vessel where the mixtures were ignited by using a spark permanent wire that was placed at the centre of the vessel. The pressure-time variations during explosions of natural gas/ air mixtures in an explosion vessel were recorded. Moreover, the explosion pressure data is used to determine the flammability limits that flame propagation is considered to occur if explosion pressure is greater than 0.1 bar. Therefore, in this study, the results show that the range of flammability limits are from 6 vol % to 15 vol % and by the addition of hydrogen in natural gas proved to extend the initial lower flammability limit of 6 vol % to 2 vol % of methane. (author)

  16. Engineering task plan for flammable gas atmosphere mobile color video camera systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlman, E.H.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of the mobile video camera systems. The color video camera systems will be used to observe and record the activities within the vapor space of a tank on a limited exposure basis. The units will be fully mobile and designed for operation in the single-shell flammable gas producing tanks. The objective of this tank is to provide two mobile camera systems for use in flammable gas producing single-shell tanks (SSTs) for the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program. The camera systems will provide observation, video recording, and monitoring of the activities that occur in the vapor space of applied tanks. The camera systems will be designed to be totally mobile, capable of deployment up to 6.1 meters into a 4 inch (minimum) riser

  17. Modelling of hot surface ignition within gas turbines subject to flammable gas in the intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea Duedahl; Nielsen, Kenny Krogh; Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    successfully developed and implemented in the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS CFX. This model is based on a combination of standard models, User Defined Functions (UDFs) and the CFX Expression Language (CEL). Prediction of ignition is based on a set of criteria to be fulfilled while......Controlling risks associated with fires and explosions from leaks of flammable fluids at oil and gas facilities is paramount to ensuring safe operations. The gas turbine is a significant potential source of ignition; however, the residual risk is still not adequately understood. A model has been...... but decreases with increase in initial mixture temperature and pressure. The model shows a great potential in reliable prediction of the risk of hot surface ignition within gas turbines in the oil and gas industry. In the future, a dedicated experimental study will be performed not only to improve...

  18. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-06-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a technical basis or reference document for flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases

  19. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust.

  20. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  1. Flammable gas safety program. Analytical methods development: FY 1994 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Wahl, K.; Steele, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with particular focus on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods that have been developed are illustrated by their application to samples obtained from Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY)

  2. System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks

  3. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening flammable gas tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    High-level waste (HLW) produces flammable gases as a result of radiolysis and thermal decomposition of organics. Under certain conditions, these gases can accumulate within the waste for extended periods and then be released quickly into the dome space of the storage tank. As part of the effort to reduce the safety concerns associated with flammable gas in HLW tanks at Hanford, a flammable gas watch list (FGWL) has been established. Inclusion on the FGWL is based on criteria intended to measure the risk associated with the presence of flammable gas. It is important that all high-risk tanks be identified with high confidence so that they may be controlled. Conversely, to minimize operational complexity, the number of tanks on the watchlist should be reduced as near to the true number of flammable risk tanks as the current state of knowledge will support. This report presents an alternative to existing approaches for FGWL screening based on the theory of approximate reasoning (AR) (Zadeh 1976). The AR-based model emulates the inference process used by an expert when asked to make an evaluation. The FGWL model described here was exercised by performing two evaluations. (1) A complete tank evaluation where the entire algorithm is used. This was done for two tanks, U-106 and AW-104. U-106 is a single shell tank with large sludge and saltcake layers. AW-104 is a double shell tank with over one million gallons of supernate. Both of these tanks had failed the screening performed by Hodgson et al. (2) Partial evaluations using a submodule for the predictor likelihood for all of the tanks on the FGWL that had been flagged previously by Whitney (1995).

  4. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    High-level waste (HLW) produces flammable gases as a result of radiolysis and thermal decomposition of organics. Under certain conditions, these gases can accumulate within the waste for extended periods and then be released quickly into the dome space of the storage tank. As part of the effort to reduce the safety concerns associated with flammable gas in HLW tanks at Hanford, a flammable gas watch list (FGWL) has been established. Inclusion on the FGWL is based on criteria intended to measure the risk associated with the presence of flammable gas. It is important that all high-risk tanks be identified with high confidence so that they may be controlled. Conversely, to minimize operational complexity, the number of tanks on the watchlist should be reduced as near to the true number of flammable risk tanks as the current state of knowledge will support. This report presents an alternative to existing approaches for FGWL screening based on the theory of approximate reasoning (AR) (Zadeh 1976). The AR-based model emulates the inference process used by an expert when asked to make an evaluation. The FGWL model described here was exercised by performing two evaluations. (1) A complete tank evaluation where the entire algorithm is used. This was done for two tanks, U-106 and AW-104. U-106 is a single shell tank with large sludge and saltcake layers. AW-104 is a double shell tank with over one million gallons of supernate. Both of these tanks had failed the screening performed by Hodgson et al. (2) Partial evaluations using a submodule for the predictor likelihood for all of the tanks on the FGWL that had been flagged previously by Whitney (1995)

  5. DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability Assessment for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-07-11

    The slurry feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter contains several organic carbon species that decompose in the cold cap and produce flammable gases that could accumulate in the off-gas system and create potential flammability hazard. To mitigate such a hazard, DWPF has implemented a strategy to impose the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) limits on all key operating variables affecting off-gas flammability and operate the melter within those limits using both hardwired/software interlocks and administrative controls. The operating variables that are currently being controlled include; (1) total organic carbon (TOC), (2) air purges for combustion and dilution, (3) melter vapor space temperature, and (4) feed rate. The safety basis limits for these operating variables are determined using two computer models, 4-stage cold cap and Melter Off-Gas (MOG) dynamics models, under the baseline upset scenario - a surge in off-gas flow due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melter.

  6. Flammable Gas Refined Safety Analysis Tool Software Verification and Validation Report for Resolve Version 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to document all software verification and validation activities, results, and findings related to the development of Resolve Version 2.5 for the analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford Site waste tanks.

  7. Flammable Gas Refined Safety Analysis Tool Software Verification and Validation Report for Resolve Version 2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document all software verification and validation activities, results, and findings related to the development of Resolve Version 2.5 for the analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford Site waste tanks

  8. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop number-sign 2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages

  9. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-04-17

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop {number_sign}2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages.

  10. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed

  11. Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    2000-09-27

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  12. A refined safety analysis approach for closure of the Hanford Site flammable gas unreviewed safety question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Following a 1990 investigation into flammable gas generation, retention, and release mechanisms within the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks, personnel concluded that the existing Authorization Basis documentation did not adequately evaluate flammable gas hazards. This declaration was based primarily on the fact that personnel did not adequately consider hydrogen and nitrous oxide evolution within the material in certain waste tanks and subsequent hypothetical ignition in the development of safety documentation for the waste tanks. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters subsequently declared an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). Although work scope has been focused on closure of the USQ since 1990, the DOE has yet to close the USQ because of considerable uncertainty regarding essential technical parameters and associated risk. The DOE recently approved a Basis for Interim Operation to revise the Authorization Basis for managing the tank farms, however, the USQ remains open. The two fundamental requirements for closure of the flammable gas USQ are as follows: development of a defensible technical basis for existing controls; development of a process to assess the adequacy of controls as the waste tank mission progresses

  13. Equipment design guidance document for flammable gas waste storage tank new equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    This document is intended to be used as guidance for design engineers who are involved in design of new equipment slated for use in Flammable Gas Waste Storage Tanks. The purpose of this document is to provide design guidance for all new equipment intended for application into those Hanford storage tanks in which flammable gas controls are required to be addressed as part of the equipment design. These design criteria are to be used as guidance. The design of each specific piece of new equipment shall be required, as a minimum to be reviewed by qualified Unreviewed Safety Question evaluators as an integral part of the final design approval. Further Safety Assessment may be also needed. This guidance is intended to be used in conjunction with the Operating Specifications Documents (OSDs) established for defining work controls in the waste storage tanks. The criteria set forth should be reviewed for applicability if the equipment will be required to operate in locations containing unacceptable concentrations of flammable gas

  14. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V and P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V and P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V and P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V and P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V and P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V and P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V and P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V and P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex

  15. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  16. Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations

  17. Resolve. Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    RESOLVE. Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations

  18. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening high-level waste tanks for flammable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at Hanford have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. AR models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. The authors performed a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening. They found that the effort to implement such a model was acceptable and that computational requirements were reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts

  19. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening high-level waste tanks for flammable gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-07-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at Hanford have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. AR models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. The authors performed a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening. They found that the effort to implement such a model was acceptable and that computational requirements were reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts.

  20. Design review report for rotary mode core sample truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks, preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the completion of a preliminary design review for the Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks. The RMCST modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to validate basic design assumptions and concepts to support a path forward leading to a final design. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that the design was acceptable and efforts should continue toward a final design review

  1. Gas turbine cleaning upgrade (compressor wash)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, P. [Gas Turbine Efficiency, Jarfalla (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The influence of gas turbine degradation on operating costs is high. Gas turbine cleaning is one of many actions taken for power recovery and is to consider as preventive maintenance. It is generally performed within the industrial field and occasionally within the aero sector. In order to meet the gas turbine development win high blade loads and ever-increasing temperatures, together with emission Aces and environmental regulations, more efficient and careful cleaning methods are needed. Following a survey about potentials for cost reduction in gas turbine operation a new man-hour and water saving cleaning method has been evaluated for a standard process. Compared with traditional cleaning methods, the new method is water,- cost,- weight and space saving due to a new washing technique. Traditional methods are based on using different nozzles for ON and OFF-line cleaning, which rise the demand for complicated systems. In the new method the same nozzle installation, same liquid flow and pressure is used for both ON and OFF-line cleaning. This gives a cost reduction of appr. 20.000 - 30.000 USD per gas turbine depending on installation and size. Evaluation of the new method shows significantly improved ON -line cleaning performance and thus OFF -line cleaning is required only during scheduled stops. (orig.) 10 refs.

  2. Development of a cost efficient methodology to perform allocation of flammable and toxic gas detectors applying CFD tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Rafael Brod; Rocha, Gean Felipe Almeida [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nalvarte, Gladys Augusta Zevallos [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Novik (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    This paper is aimed to present a computational procedure for flammable and toxic gas detector allocation and quantification developed by DNV. The proposed methodology applies Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as operational and safety characteristics of the analyzed region to assess the optimal number of toxic and flammable gas detectors and their optimal location. A probabilistic approach is also used when applying the DNV software ThorEXPRESSLite, following NORSOK Z013 Annex G and presented in HUSER et al. 2000 and HUSER et al. 2001, when the flammable gas detectors are assessed. A DNV developed program, DetLoc, is used to run in an iterative way the procedure described above leading to an automatic calculation of the gas detectors location and number. The main advantage of the methodology presented above is the independence of human interaction in the gas detector allocation leading to a more precise and free of human judgment allocation. Thus, a reproducible allocation is generated when comparing several different analyses and a global criteria appliance is guaranteed through different regions in the same project. A case study is presented applying the proposed methodology. (author)

  3. Independent design review report for truck number 1 modifications for flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    The East and West Tank Farm Standing Order 97-01 requires that the PMST be modified to include purging of the enclosed space underneath the shielded receiver weather cover per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 496, Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment. The Standing Order also requires that the PMST be modified by replacing the existing electrical remote latch (RLU) unit with a mechanical remote latch unit. As the mechanical remote latch unit was exactly like the RLU installed on the Rotary Mode Core Sampler Trucks (RMCST) and the design for the RMCST went through formal design review, replacing the RLU was done utilizing informal design verification and was completed per work package ES-97-0028. As the weather cover purge was similar to the design for the RMCSTS, this design was reviewed using the independent review method with multiple independent reviewers. A function design criteria (WHC-SD-WM-FDC-048, Functional Design Criteria for Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks) provided the criteria for the modifications. The review consisted of distributing the design review package to the reviewers and collecting and dispositioning the RCR comments. The review package included the ECNs for review, the Design Compliance Matrix, copies of all drawings affected, and copies of outstanding ECNs against these drawings. A final meeting was held to ensure that all reviewers were aware of the changes to ECNs from incorporation of RCR comments

  4. Gas Permeation Processes in Biogas Upgrading: A Short Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Izák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 10 (2015), s. 1277-1283 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14094; GA MŠk LH14006; GA ČR GA14-12695S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : biogas upgrading * memranes * gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2015

  5. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Spalding and D. Contardo

    2012-01-01

      The CMS Upgrade Programme consists of four classes of projects: (a) Detector and Systems upgrades which are ongoing and largely (though not entirely) target LS1. (b) Full system upgrades for three projects that are preparing TDRs: Pixels, HCAL and L1 Trigger. The projects target completion by LS2. (c) Infrastructure consolidation and upgrades to improve operational robustness and to support the above projects. (d) Phase 2 replacement of the Tracker and major upgrades of the Trigger and Forward Detectors. For (a) and (c), detailed costing exists and is being integrated into a common reporting system. The schedule milestones for each project will be linked into the overall schedule planning for LS1. For the three TDR projects, the designs have progressed significantly since the Technical Proposal in 2010. Updated detailed cost estimates and schedules will be prepared with the TDRs to form the basis for tracking the projects through completion. To plan the upgrades and the supporting simulati...

  6. Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Flametube Facility Upgraded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, James E.; Nemets, Steve A.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy D.; Frankenfeld, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    In fiscal year 2003, test cell 23 of the Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL 23) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was upgraded with the addition of gaseous hydrogen as a working propellant and the addition of a 450-psig air-supply system. Test flexibility was further enhanced by upgrades to the facility control systems. RCL 23 can now test with gaseous hydrogen flow rates up to 0.05 lbm/sec and jet fuel flow rates up to 0.62 lbm/sec. Research airflow rates up to 3 lbm/sec are possible with the 450-psig supply system over a range of inlet temperatures. Nonvitiated, heated air is supplied from a shell and tube heat exchanger. The maximum nonvitiated facility air temperature is 1100 F at 1.5 lbm/sec. Research-section exhaust temperatures are limited to 3200 F because of material and cooling capacity limits. A variety of support systems are available depending on the research hardware configuration. Test section ignition can be provided via either a hydrogen air torch system or an electronic spark system. Emissions measurements are obtained with either pneumatically or electromechanically actuated gas sample probes, and the electromechanical system allows for radial measurements at a user-specified axial location for measurement of emissions profiles. Gas analysis data can be obtained for a variety of species, including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NO and NOx), oxygen (O2), unburnt hydrocarbons, and unburnt hydrogen. Facility control is accomplished with a programmable logic control system. Facility operations have been upgraded to a system based on graphical user interface control screens. A data system is available for real-time acquisition and monitoring of both measurements in engineering units and performance calculations. The upgrades have made RCL 23 a highly flexible facility for research into low emissions gas turbine combustor concepts, and the flame tube configuration inherently allows for a variety of fuel nozzle

  7. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  8. Flammability limits of lithium-ion battery thermal runaway vent gas in air and the inerting effects of halon 1301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Matthew Eugene

    Lithium-ion (rechargeable) and lithium-metal (non-rechargeable) battery cells put aircraft at risk of igniting and fueling fires. Lithium batteries can be packed in bulk and shipped in the cargo holds of freighter aircraft; currently lithium batteries are banned from bulk shipment on passenger aircraft [1]. The federally regulated Class C cargo compartment extinguishing system's utilization of a 5 %vol Halon 1301 knockdown concentration and a sustained 3 %vol Halon 1301 may not be sufficient at inerting lithium-ion battery vent gas and air mixtures [2]. At 5 %vol Halon 1301 the flammability limits of lithium-ion premixed battery vent gas (Li-Ion pBVG) in air range from 13.80 %vol to 26.07 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Testing suggests that 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 is required to render all ratios of the Li-Ion pBVG in air inert. The lower flammability limit (LFL) and upper flammability limit (UFL) of hydrogen and air mixtures are 4.95 %vol and 76.52 %vol hydrogen, respectively. With the addition of 10 %vol and 20 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 9.02 %vol and 11.55 %vol hydrogen, respectively, and the UFL is 45.70 %vol and 28.39 %vol hydrogen, respectively. The minimum inerting concentration (MIC) of Halon 1301 in hydrogen and air mixtures is 26.72 %vol Halon 1301 at 16.2 %vol hydrogen. The LFL and UFL of Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures are 7.88 %vol and 37.14 %vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively. With the addition of 5 %vol, 7 %vol, and 8 %vol Halon 1301 the LFL is 13.80 %vol, 16.15 %vol, and 17.62 % vol Li-Ion pBVG, respectively, and the UFL is 26.07 %vol, 23.31 %vol, and 21.84 %vol Li- Ion pBVG, respectively. The MIC of Halon 1301 in Li-Ion pBVG and air mixtures is 8.59 %vol Halon 1301 at 19.52 %vol Li-Ion pBVG. Le Chatelier's mixing rule has been shown to be an effective measure for estimating the flammability limits of Li-Ion pBVGes. The LFL has a 1.79 % difference while the UFL has a 4.53 % difference. The state of charge (SOC) affects the flammability limits in an apparent parabolic

  9. Piezoelectric valve for massive gas injection in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibon, Mathias; Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technical University Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herrmann, Albrecht; Mank, Klaus; Mertens, Vitus; Pautasso, Gabriella; Ploeckl, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A sudden loss of plasma temperature can cause a disruption, which poses a significant problem for current Tokamaks and future fusion devices. Hence, mitigating forces and thermal loads during disruptions is important for the integrity of the vessel and first wall components. Therefore, high speed gas valves are used to deliver a pulse of noble gas onto the plasma, which irradiates the thermal energy quickly, avoiding localized heat loads and mechanical stress due to induced currents. A new design for such a valve is currently under development. The valve plate is driven by two piezoelectric stack actuators. The stroke of the actuators (0.07 mm) is amplified by a monolithic titanium frame and reaches 2 mm. The frame also serves as spring to pre-load the actuators. In the idle state, it also presses the conical valve plate into the seal, closing the gas chamber (42 cm{sup 3}). The actuators accelerate the stem and the valve plate until it is fully opened after 2 ms. The orifice of the valve has a diameter of 14 mm. This allows a peak mass flow rate of the gas up to 8 . 10{sup 4} (Pa.m)/(s) after 1.8 ms and an average mass flow rate of 2 . 10{sup 4} (Pa.m)/(s) over the evacuation time of 10 ms. Therefore, one valve would be sufficient to deliver the required amount of gas to mitigate disruptions at ASDEX Upgrade.

  10. Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

    1998-09-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations

  11. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  12. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Butler and J. Nash

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress on the CMS upgrades was summarised, in a workshop held at Fermilab between 7th and 10th November, attended by more than 150 people, many of whom came from Europe and Asia. Important goals of the workshop were to begin to formulate a schedule for the upgrades and to determine project interdependencies. Input was received from all the upgrade working groups and will be combined into a first-pass schedule over the next several weeks. In addition, technical progress on each of the major subtasks was presented and plans for the near-term future were established. Slides from the more than 100 talks are located at: https://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=153564 In the opening plenary session, Frank Zimmermann, of the CERN Beams Department, gave his view of the LHC luminosity evolution. The luminosity will increase faster than we assumed in designing the upgrades. CMS will need to re-evaluate the current upgrade plans and revise them if necessary. CMS Upgrade Physics coordinator...

  13. Flammable refrigerants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerwen, R.J.M. van; Verwoerd, M.; Oostendorp, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are promising alternatives for CFC, HCFC and HFC refrigerants. Due to their flammable nature, safety aspects have to be considered carefully. The world-wide situation concerning acceptability and practical application of flammable refrigerants is becoming more and more complex and

  14. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor's controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first

  15. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Contardo and J. Spalding

    2013-01-01

    There is very good progress in the execution of the LS1 projects and in launching construction of the Phase 1 upgrades. We focus here on two main achievements since the last CMS Week. The approval of the third Phase 1 TDR The preparation of the L1 Trigger Upgrade Technical Design Report has been a major effort of the collaboration at the beginning of this year, especially to develop supporting Trigger menu and physics performance studies. These studies have demonstrated the efficiency of the upgraded system to ensure low lepton and jet trigger thresholds, leading to a significant increase of the acceptance for the Higgs measurements, in the associated production mode and in the ττ decays, as well as for the stop searches involving multiple jets in the final state. The TDR was submitted to the LHCC in May and approved at the June committee meeting. It is now a public document, completing the series of the three TDRs describing the Phase 1 upgrades, with the new Pixel system and the HCAL rea...

  16. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  17. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ''beyond extremely unlikely'' frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  18. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    Didier Contardo

    2012-01-01

      The CMS Upgrade Programme is making good progress on the LS1 and Phase 1 projects, in the planning for Phase 2. The construction of the ME4/2 muon chambers to be installed during LS1 has started and the two first CSC production chambers have been fully qualified. The three muon groups have recently established a set of milestones towards the completion of their project, that will be integrated in the detailed planning and scheduling for the shutdown work established by Technical Coordination. The project to replace the photo-detectors in the HF and HO calorimeters is also well advanced and at the validation stage. The operation of an HF slice with new multi-anode PMTs and back-end electronics has already been demonstrated in 2012. For the Phase 1 data-taking, as discussed in the Chamonix workshop, it is likely that the LHC performance will exceed the nominal luminosity and pile-up before the second shutdown, still scheduled in 2018. The collaboration is therefore pursuing a strategy to upgrade ...

  19. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Contardo and J. Spalding

    2013-01-01

    The three post-LS1 Phase 1 Upgrade projects (the L1-Trigger, Pixel Tracker, and HCAL) are all making excellent progress and are transitioning from the prototype to the execution phase. Meanwhile plans are developing for Phase 2, a major Upgrade programme targeting the third long shutdown, LS3. News on Phase 1 is included under the respective projects; we only provide a brief summary here. Phase 1 The plan for the L1 Trigger relies on the installation during the present shutdown of optical splitting for the Trigger input signals. This will allow the new Trigger system to be brought online and fully commissioned during beam operation in 2015, while CMS relies on the existing legacy Trigger for physics. Once fully commissioned the experiment can switch over to the new Trigger, which will provide greatly improved performance at high event pile-up, by 2016. System tests of the splitter system, and of the new architecture of the calorimeter trigger were very successful, and the work in LS1 is on-track. Prototype ...

  20. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Contardo and J. Spalding

    2012-01-01

      Good progress is being made on the projects that will be installed during LS1. CSC chamber production for ME4/2 is progressing at a rate of four chambers per month, with 25 built so far, and the new electronics for ME1/1 is undergoing a pre-production integration testing. For the RPC chambers, gap production is underway with first deliveries to the chamber assembly sites at CERN and Ghent. The third site at Mumbai will begin production next month. For the PMT replacement in the forward hadron calorimeters (HF), the 1728 PMTs are all characterised and ready to be installed. Testing of the electronics boards is going well. Preparations to replace the HPDs in the outer calorimeter (HO) with SiPMs are also on-track. All components are at CERN and burn-in of the new front-end electronics is proceeding. There are three major upgrade projects targeting the period from LS1 through LS2: a new pixel detector, upgraded photo-detectors and electronics for HCAL, and development of a new L1 Trigger. The new ...

  1. UPGRADES

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Contardo and J. Spalding

    2013-01-01

      LS1 and Phase 1 The detector projects targeting LS1 are progressing well, and a fully integrated schedule developed by Technical Coordination includes installation milestones and a detailed work-plan. The first chambers of the RPC system were produced and are being qualified. Production will ramp up this year to a rate of 20 chambers per month. 32 chambers of the CSC system have been fabricated for the ME4/2 CSC stations, and production proceeds at a rate of 4 per month. The new ME1/1 Front-End Board is in production and the off-detector electronics integration tests are ongoing. The new Theta Trigger Boards for the DT readout production is started and the relocation of the Sector Collector boards with new Optical Links as been successfully tested. All the components for the upgrade of the Forward Hadron Calorimeter PMTs have been received at CERN and assemblies are being qualified. The situation is similar for the Hadron Outer Calorimeter new SiPMs and readout modules. Three projects are plan...

  2. Flammable Gas Safety Program: Mechanisms of gas generation from simulated SY Tank Farm wastes. Progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barefield, E.K.; Boadtright, D.; Deshpande, A.; Doctorovich, F.; Liotta, C.L.; Neumann, H.M.; Seymore, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1995-09-01

    This is the final report for work done at Georgia Tech during Fiscal Year 1994. The objectives of this work were to develop a better understanding of the mechanism of formation of flammable gases in the thermal decomposition of metal complexants, such as HEDTA and sodium glycolate, in simulated SY waste mixtures. This project is a continuation of work begun under earlier contracts with Westinghouse Hanford Co. Three major areas are discussed: development of a reliable analysis for dissolved ammonia, the initiation of long term studies of HEDTA decomposition in stainless steel vessels and product analyses through 3800 h, and further consideration of product analyses and kinetic data reported in FY 1993 for decomposition of HEDTA and sodium glycolate in Teflon-lined glass vessels. A brief exploration was also made of the speciation of aluminum(l1l) in the presence of HEDTA as a function of pH using {sup 27}Al NMR.

  3. Flammable gas production in Land 2 and Land 3/4 radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    Geological, radiolytic and microbiological sources of gas are considered in relation to Land 2 and Land 3/4 type radioactive waste repositories. Geological sources are potentially the most troublesome and it is concluded that site investigation work should be designed to detect gas trap structures, reservoir lithologies or source rocks. Known source and reservoir lithologies should not be considered as suitable for the siting of waste repositories. Radiolytic and microbiological sources will depend on waste characteristics. A detailed review of the literature on radiolytic gas generation is presented and conclusions from this work indicate that water in waste and matrix should be kept to a minimum. Similarly, the level of radioactivity stored in each waste container should be kept to the minimum compatible with the storage design. Microbiological gas sources will be reduced by maintaining the cellulose content of the waste at a minimum. It is suggested that the removal of organics from the waste stream would be beneficial in terms of potential gas production. (author)

  4. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade process control system structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; describes the main control computer hardware and system software features in more detail; and, then, describes the real-time control tasks, and how they interact with each other, and how they interact with the operator interface task

  5. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  6. Improved methane removal in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process using immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Yang, Zhi-Man; Fu, Shan-Fei; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2018-05-01

    Methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process, which is a greenhouse gas, could cause global warming. The biofilter with immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is a promising approach for methane removal, and the selections of inoculated MOB culture and support material are vital for the biofilter. In this work, five MOB consortia were enriched at different methane concentrations. The MOB-20 consortium enriched at the methane concentration of 20.0% (v/v) was then immobilized on sponge and two particle sizes of volcanic rock in biofilters to remove methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed that the immobilized MOB performed more admirable methane removal capacity than suspended cells. The immobilized MOB on sponge reached the highest methane removal efficiency (RE) of 35%. The rough surface, preferable hydroscopicity, appropriate pore size and particle size of support material might favor the MOB immobilization and accordingly methane removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANTIFOAM TRACKING SYSTEM AS AN OPTION TO SUPPORT THE MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY CONTROL STRATEGY AT THE DWPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Lambert, D.

    2014-08-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of an additional strategy for confidently satisfying the flammability controls for DWPF’s melter operation. An initial strategy for implementing the operational constraints associated with flammability control in DWPF was based upon an analytically determined carbon concentration from antifoam. Due to the conservative error structure associated with the analytical approach, its implementation has significantly reduced the operating window for processing and has led to recurrent Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) remediation. To address the adverse operating impact of the current implementation strategy, SRR issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to SRNL requesting the development and documentation of an alternate strategy for evaluating the carbon contribution from antifoam. The proposed strategy presented in this report was developed under the guidance of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and involves calculating the carbon concentration from antifoam based upon the actual mass of antifoam added to the process assuming 100% retention. The mass of antifoam in the Additive Mix Feed Tank (AMFT), in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), and in the SME is tracked by mass balance as part of this strategy. As these quantities are monitored, the random and bias uncertainties affecting their values are also maintained and accounted for. This report documents: 1) the development of an alternate implementation strategy and associated equations describing the carbon concentration from antifoam in each SME batch derived from the actual amount of antifoam introduced into the AMFT, SRAT, and SME during the processing of the batch. 2) the equations and error structure for incorporating the proposed strategy into melter off-gas flammability assessments

  8. Upgrading Algeria-Italy trans-Mediterranean natural gas pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stella, G.

    1992-01-01

    The first trans-Mediterranean pipeline system, which went into service in 1983, had to be doubled in capacity in order to meet increased European demand for Algerian natural gas. After a brief review of the contractual, planning and construction history of the first pipeline, this paper discusses the strategies taken which led to the decision to double the line's capacity. Descriptions are then given of the different construction phases realized in Tunisia, the Sicilian Channel and Italian mainland. Focus is on construction schedules, problems and solutions. The report comes complete with details of project financing, organizing, materials supply programs, innovative technology applications, design philosophy and construction techniques

  9. Biological upgrading of coal-derived synthesis gas: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S.; Johnson, E.R.; Ko, C.W.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1986-10-01

    The technical feasibility of the biological conversion of coal synthesis gas to methane has been demonstrated in the University of Arkansas laboratories. Cultures of microorganisms have been developed which achieve total conversion in the water gas shift and methanation reactions in either mixed or pure cultures. These cultures carry out these conversions at ordinary temperatures and pressures, without sulfur toxicity. Several microorganisms have been identified as having commercial potential for producing methane. These include a mixed culture of unidentified bacteria; P. productus which produces acetate, a methane precursor; and Methanothrix sp., which produces methane from acetate. These cultures have been used in mixed reactors and immobilized cell reactors to achieve total CO and H/sub 2/ conversion in a retention time of less than two hours, quite good for a biological reactor. Preliminary economic projections indicate that a biological methanation plant with a size of 5 x 10/sup 10/ Btu/day can be economically attractive. 42 refs., 26 figs., 86 tabs.

  10. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) upgrade graphical interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffon, J.D.; Peters, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high performance digital computers and color graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) at EBR-II is the first system to be upgraded with high performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software

  11. Upgrading producer gas quality from rubber wood gasification in a radio frequency tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on improving the producer gas quality using radio frequency (RF) tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor. The producer gas containing tar, particles and water was directly passed at a particular flow rate into the RF reactor at various temperatures for catalytic and thermal treatments. Thermal treatment generates higher heating value of 5.76 MJ Nm(-3) at 1200°C. Catalytic treatments using both dolomite and Y-zeolite provide high tar and particles conversion efficiencies of about 97% on average. The result also showed that light poly-aromatic hydrocarbons especially naphthalene and aromatic compounds particularly benzene and toluene were still found even at higher reaction temperatures. Low energy intensive RF tar thermocatalytic treatment was found to be effective for upgrading the producer gas quality to meet the end user requirements and increasing its energy content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. When does decentralized production of biogas and centralized upgrading and injection into the natural gas grid make sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, E. J.; van Gernert, W. J. T.; Bekkering, J.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    The production of biogas through anaerobic digestion is one of the technological solutions to convert biomass into a readily usable fuel. Biogas can replace natural gas, if the biogas is upgraded to green gas. To contribute to the EU-target to reduce Green House Gases emissions, the installed biogas

  13. Oxygen speciation in upgraded fast pyrolysis bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omais, Badaoui; Crepier, Julien; Charon, Nadège; Courtiade, Marion; Quignard, Alain; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-04-21

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is considered as a promising route to produce liquid for the transportation field from a renewable resource. However, the derived bio-oils are mainly oxygenated (45-50%w/w O on a wet basis) and contain almost no hydrocarbons. Therefore, upgrading is necessary to obtain a liquid with lower oxygen content and characterization of oxygenated compounds in these products is essential to assist conversion reactions. For this purpose, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) can be investigated. Oxygen speciation in such matrices is hampered by the large diversity of oxygenated families and the complexity of the hydrocarbon matrix. Moreover, response factors must be taken into account for oxygenate quantification as the Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) response varies when a molecule contains heteroatoms. To conclude, no distillation cuts were accessible and the analysis had to cover a large range of boiling points (30-630 °C). To take up this analytical challenge, a thorough optimization approach was developed. In fact, four GC × GC column sets were investigated to separate oxygenated compounds from the hydrocarbon matrix. Both model mixtures and the upgraded biomass flash pyrolysis oil were injected using GC × GC-FID to reach a suitable chromatographic separation. The advantages and drawbacks of each column combination for oxygen speciation in upgraded bio-oils are highlighted in this study. Among the four sets, an original polar × semi-polar column combination was selected and enabled the identification by GC × GC-ToF/MS of more than 40 compounds belonging to eight chemical families: ketones, furans, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, guaiacols, anisols, and esters. For quantification purpose, the GC × GC-FID chromatogram was divided into more than 60 blobs corresponding to the previously identified analyte and hydrocarbon zones. A database associating each blob to a molecule and its specific response factor (determined

  14. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass Pyrolysis Oxygenates with Vacuum Gas Oil Using a Davison Circulating Riser Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Mark W. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Olstad, Jessica [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Parent, Yves [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Deutch, Steve [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Iisa, Kristiina [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Christensen, Earl [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Ben, Haoxi [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Black, Stuart [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Nimlos, Mark [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Magrini, Kim [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2018-01-22

    We investigate and quantitate the changes in hydrocarbon product composition while evaluating the performance and operability of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Davison Circulating Riser (DCR) reactor system when biomass model compounds are cofed with traditional fluid catalyst cracking (FCC) feeds and catalyst: vacuum gas oil (VGO) and equilibrium zeolite catalyst (E-Cat). Three compounds (acetic acid, guaiacol, and sorbitan monooleate) were selected to represent the major classes of oxygenates present in biomass pyrolysis vapors. These vapors can contain 30-50% oxygen as oxygenates, which create conversion complications (increased reactivity and coking) when integrating biomass vapors and liquids into fuel and chemical processes long dominated by petroleum feedstocks. We used these model compounds to determine the appropriate conditions for coprocessing with petroleum and ultimately pure pyrolysis vapors only as compared with standard baseline conditions obtained with VGO and E-Cat only in the DCR. Model compound addition decreased the DCR catalyst circulation rate, which controls reactor temperature and measures reaction heat demand, while increasing catalyst coking rates. Liquid product analyses included 2-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (2D GCxGC TOFS), simulated distillation (SIM DIST), 13C NMR, and carbonyl content. Aggregated results indicated that the model compounds were converted during reaction, and despite functional group differences, product distributions for each model compound were very similar. In addition, we determined that adding model compounds to the VGO feed did not significantly affect the DCR's operability or performance. Future work will assess catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor to fungible hydrocarbon products using upgrading catalysts currently being developed at NREL and at Johnson Matthey.

  15. A Highly Stable Microporous Covalent Imine Network Adsorbent for Natural Gas Upgrading and Flue Gas CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2016-06-06

    The feasible capture and separation of CO2 and N2 from CH4 is an important task for natural gas upgrading and the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we studied the microporous covalent imine networks (CIN) material prepared through Schiff base condensation and exhibited superior chemical robustness under both acidic and basic conditions and high thermal stability. The material possesses a relatively uniform nanoparticle size of approximately 70 to 100 nm. This network featured permanent porosity with a high surface area (722 m2g-1) and micropores. A single-component gas adsorption study showed enhanced CO2 and CH4 uptakes of 3.32 mmol/g and 1.14 mmol/g, respectively, at 273 K and 1 bar, coupled with high separation selectivities for CO2/CH4, CH4/N2, and CO2/N2 of 23, 11.8 and 211, respectively. The enriched Lewis basicity in the porous skeletons favours the interaction of quadrupolar CO2 and polarizable CH4, resulting in enhanced CH4 and CO2 uptake and high CH4/N2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 selectivities. Breakthrough experiments showed high CO2/CH4, CH4/N2 and CO2/N2 selectivities of 7.29, 40 and 125, respectively, at 298 K and 1 bar. High heats of adsorption for CH4 and CO2 (QstCH4; 32.61 kJ mol-1 and QstCO2; 42.42 kJ mol-1) provide the ultimate validation for the high selectivity. To the best of our knowledge, such a versatile adsorbent material that displays both enhanced uptake and selectivity for a variety of binary gas mixtures, including CO2/ CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2, has not been extensively explored.

  16. Environmental benefits of utilizing biogas and upgrading it to natural gas quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, K.; Jensby, T.; Norddahl, B.

    1997-01-01

    In case of successful development of the upgrading technology, the utilization of biomass for biogas production may be increased tenfold in Funen. The pilot plant using low-pressure membranes for the upgrading of biogas is expected to be able to undertake a cost-neutral upgrading of biogas due to earnings which arise from the sale of CO 2 . It appears that the utilization of the upgrading technology for the production of 10 7 Nm 3 within region Funen alone will result in a reduction of the greenhouse effect corresponding to 74 * 10 3 t CO 2 . (au)

  17. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  18. AN OVERVIEW OF GAS-UPGRADING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOHYDROGEN PRODUCED FROM TREATMENT OF PALM OIL MILL EFFLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IZZATI NADIA MOHAMAD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To date, a high energy demand has led to massive research efforts towards improved gas-separation techniques for more energy-efficient and environmenttally friendly methods. One of the potential alternative energies is biogas produced from the fermentation of liquid waste generated from the oil-extraction process, which is known as palm oil mill effluent (POME. Basically, the gas produced from the POME fermentation process consists mainly of a CO2 and H2 gas mixture. CO2 is known as an anthropogenic greenhouse gas, which contributes towards the climate change phenomenon. Hence, it is crucial to determine a suitable technique for H2 separation and purification with good capability for CO2 capture, as this will reduce CO2 emission to the environment as well. This paper reviewed the current gas-separation techniques that consist of absorption, adsorption and a membrane in order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques towards the efficiency of the separation system. Crucial aspects for gas-separation techniques such as energy, economic, and environmental considerations are discussed, and a potential biohydrogen and biogas-upgrading technique for industrial POME application is presented and concluded in this paper. Based on the comparison on these aspects, water scrubbing is found to be the best technique to be used in the biogas-upgrading industry, followed by membrane and chemical scrubbing as well as PSA. Hence, these guidelines are justified for selecting the best gas-upgrading technique to be used in palm oil mill industry applications.

  19. Simultaneous valorization and biocatalytic upgrading of heavy vacuum gas oil by the biosurfactant‐producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Wael Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdy El‐Said; Awadh, Maysoon N.; Obuekwe, Christian; El Nayal, Ashraf M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) is a complex and viscous hydrocarbon stream that is produced as the bottom side product from the vacuum distillation units in petroleum refineries. HVGO is conventionally treated with thermochemical process, which is costly and environmentally polluting. Here, we investigate two petroleum biotechnology applications, namely valorization and bioupgrading, as green approaches for valorization and upgrading of HVGO. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U strain grew o...

  20. Biomass gasification with air in fluidized bed: hot gas cleanup and upgrading with steam-reforming catalysts of big size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Caballero, M.A. [University Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Aznar, M.P.; Gil, J. [University of Saragossa (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Several commercial steam reforming (nickel-based) catalysts were tested for tar elimination and gas upgrading in biomass gasification with air in fluidized bed. The characteristic or novelty of this work is that the catalysts are not crushed or ground but are used in their commercial size and shape. Catalysts were tested at pilot scale in two fixed beds located in a slip flow downstream from the gasifier. The equivalence ratio used in the upstream gasifier and steam content in the flue gas have an important effect on the kinetics of the tar removal reaction. (author)

  1. Overview of the Flammability of Gases Generated in Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Huckaby, J.L.; Bryan, S.A.; Johnson, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents an overview of what is known about the flammability of the gases generated and retained in Hanford waste tanks in terms of the gas composition, the flammability and detonability limits of the gas constituents, and the availability of ignition sources. The intrinsic flammability (or nonflammability) of waste gas mixtures is one major determinant of whether a flammable region develops in the tank headspace; other factors are the rate, surface area, volume of the release, and the tank ventilation rate, which are not covered in this report

  2. The Impact of Energy Efficient Vehicles on Gas Tax (Highway Trust Fund) and Alternative Funding for Infrastructure Construction, Upgrade, and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Road construction, upgrades, and maintenance have largely been financed by a gas tax since the first tax on fuel was instituted by the federal government in 1932. Monies from the gas tax and other sources are deposited in the Highway Trust Fund to ha...

  3. Upgradation in N2 gas station for TLD personnel monitoring using gas based semi-automatic badge readers- installation and integration of N2 gas generator plant to the system and its performance appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently Personnel Monitoring against external radiation is being carried out using CaSO 4 :Dy phosphor based TLD badge and hot N 2 gas based semiautomatic TLD Badge Reader (TLDBR-7B). This system requires the supply of high purity N 2 gas for the operation of the reader. This gas is normally obtained from N 2 gas cylinders use of which is a cumbersome, tedious, cost intensive and involves safety hazards. To minimize the dependence on conventional gas cylinders, a medium sized plant for generation of N 2 gas directly from air has been installed and coupled to gas station and distribution system. The paper describes the comparative study of performance of TLD reading system using gas from the generator with that using gas cylinders, which has been found to be quite comparable. This upgradation has helped in drastic reduction in cost, labour and improved safety in TLD Laboratory working. (author)

  4. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang

    2013-01-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane...... (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema...... in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis + aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Thermodynamic modelling of an onsite methanation reactor for upgrading producer gas from commercial small scale biomass gasifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakalis, S; Malamis, D; Moustakas, K

    2017-06-26

    Small scale biomass gasifiers have the advantage of having higher electrical efficiency in comparison to other conventional small scale energy systems. Nonetheless, a major drawback of small scale biomass gasifiers is the relatively poor quality of the producer gas. In addition, several EU Member States are seeking ways to store the excess energy that is produced from renewables like wind power and hydropower. A recent development is the storage of energy by electrolysis of water and the production of hydrogen in a process that is commonly known as "power-to-gas". The present manuscript proposes an onsite secondary reactor for upgrading producer gas by mixing it with hydrogen in order to initiate methanation reactions. A thermodynamic model has been developed for assessing the potential of the proposed methanation process. The model utilized input parameters from a representative small scale biomass gasifier and molar ratios of hydrogen from 1:0 to 1:4.1. The Villar-Cruise-Smith algorithm was used for minimizing the Gibbs free energy. The model returned the molar fractions of the permanent gases, the heating values and the Wobbe Index. For mixtures of hydrogen and producer gas on a 1:0.9 ratio the increase of the heating value is maximized with an increase of 78%. For ratios higher than 1:3, the Wobbe index increases significantly and surpasses the value of 30 MJ/Nm 3 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous valorization and biocatalytic upgrading of heavy vacuum gas oil by the biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Awadh, Maysoon N; Obuekwe, Christian; El Nayal, Ashraf M

    2017-11-01

    Heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) is a complex and viscous hydrocarbon stream that is produced as the bottom side product from the vacuum distillation units in petroleum refineries. HVGO is conventionally treated with thermochemical process, which is costly and environmentally polluting. Here, we investigate two petroleum biotechnology applications, namely valorization and bioupgrading, as green approaches for valorization and upgrading of HVGO. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U strain grew on 20% v/v of HVGO as a sole carbon and sulfur source. It produced rhamnolipid biosurfactants in a growth-associated mode with a maximum crude biosurfactants yield of 10.1 g l -1 , which reduced the surface tension of the cell-free culture supernatant to 30.6 mN m -1 within 1 week of incubation. The rarely occurring dirhamnolipid Rha-Rha-C 12 -C 12 dominated the congeners' profile of the biosurfactants produced from HVGO. Heavy vacuum gas oil was recovered from the cultures and abiotic controls and the maltene fraction was extracted for further analysis. Fractional distillation (SimDist) of the biotreated maltene fraction showed a relative decrease in the high-boiling heavy fuel fraction (BP 426-565 °C) concomitant with increase in the lighter distillate diesel fraction (BP 315-426 °C). Analysis of the maltene fraction revealed compositional changes. The number-average (Mn) and weight-average (Mw) molecular weights, as well as the absolute number of hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles were higher in the biotreated maltene fraction of HVGO. These findings suggest that HVGO can be potentially exploited as a carbon-rich substrate for production of the high-value biosurfactants by P. aeruginosa AK6U and to concomitantly improve/upgrade its chemical composition. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Hydroquinone and Quinone-Grafted Porous Carbons for Highly Selective CO2 Capture from Flue Gases and Natural Gas Upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Krishna, Rajamani; Yang, Jiangfeng; Deng, Shuguang

    2015-08-04

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption isotherms were measured and correlated with the Langmuir model. An ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) selectivity for the CO2/N2 separation of 26.5 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the hydroquinone-grafted carbon, which is 58.7% higher than that of the pristine porous carbon, and a CO2/CH4 selectivity value of 4.6 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the quinone-grafted carbon (OAC-2), which represents a 28.4% improvement over the pristine porous carbon. The highest CO2 adsorption capacity on the oxygen-doped carbon adsorbents is 3.46 mmol g(-1) at 298 K and 1 atm. In addition, transient breakthrough simulations for CO2/CH4/N2 mixture separation were conducted to demonstrate the good separation performance of the oxygen-doped carbons in fixed bed adsorbers. Combining excellent adsorption separation properties and low heats of adsorption, the oxygen-doped carbons developed in this work appear to be very promising for flue gas treatment and natural gas upgrading.

  8. Techno-economic and Life Cycle Assessment of methane production via biogas upgrading and power to gas technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collet, Pierre; Flottes, Eglantine; Favre, Alain; Raynal, Ludovic; Pierre, Hélène; Capela, Sandra; Peregrina, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CH 4 production from Power to Gas and upgrading technologies have been assessed. • Both environmental and economic assessments of have been done. • We perform sensitivity analyses to identify key parameters. - Abstract: To decrease the use of fossil fuels and face the energetic demand, the integration of renewable energy is a necessary step. Part of this renewable energy can be supplied by the production of electricity from photovoltaic panels and windfarms. The massive use of these intermittent energies will lead to overproduction periods, and there is consequently a need to convert this surplus of electricity into a storable form of energy. Power-to-gas (PtG) technology consists in using electricity to convert water into hydrogen by electrolysis, and then to synthetize methane from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Techno-economic and Life Cycle Assessment of methane production via the combination of anaerobic digestion and PtG technology have been applied to sewage sludge valorization. Process studies and equipment design have been addressed considering already available technologies. Sensitivity analyses have been done on biogas upgrading technologies, electricity prices, annual operation time and composition of the electricity mix with also a comparison between PtG and direct injection. It appears that the more the electricity is expensive, the longer the operation time of the methanation process must be to be competitive with injection of methane from biogas. Reduction of electricity consumption of the electrolysis step decreases production costs. Even if the current context does not feature adapted conditions to ensure an economically viable chain, the evolution of the energetic context in the next few years as well as the expected technological improvements will contribute to overall cost reduction. From an environmental point of view, continuous PtG generates more greenhouse gases than direct injection, but intermittent operation with use of

  9. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G [Menlo Park, CA; Merkel, Timothy C [Menlo Park, CA; Lin, Haiqing [Mountain View, CA; Thompson, Scott [Brecksville, OH; Daniels, Ramin [San Jose, CA

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  10. Upgraded biogas from municipal solid waste for natural gas substitution and CO{sub 2} reduction – A case study of Austria, Italy, and Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, Katherine [Sostenipra, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Villalba, Gara, E-mail: gara.villalba@uab.es [Sostenipra, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Sostenipra, Institute de Ciencia i Technologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gabarrell, Xavier [Sostenipra, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Sostenipra, Institute de Ciencia i Technologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Biogas can be upgraded to create biomethane, a substitute to natural gas. • Biogas upgrading was applied to landfills and anaerobic digestors in 3 countries. • Up to 0.6% of a country’s consumption of natural gas could be replaced by biomethane. • Italy could save 46% of the national CO{sub 2} emissions attributed to the waste sector. • Scenarios were created to increase biomethane production. - Abstract: Biogas is rich in methane and can be further purified through biogas upgrading technologies, presenting a viable alternative to natural gas. Landfills and anaerobic digestors treating municipal solid waste are a large source of such biogas. They therefore offer an attractive opportunity to tap into this potential source of natural gas while at the same time minimizing the global warming impact resulting from methane emissions in waste management schemes (WMS) and fossil fuel consumption reduction. This study looks at the current municipal solid waste flows of Spain, Italy, and Austria over one year (2009), in order to determine how much biogas is generated. Then it examines how much natural gas could be substituted by using four different biogas upgrading technologies. Based on current waste generation rates, exploratory but realistic WMS were created for each country in order to maximize biogas production and potential for natural gas substitution. It was found that the potential substitution of natural gas by biogas resulting from the current WMS seems rather insignificant: 0.2% for Austria, 0.6% for Italy and 0.3% for Spain. However, if the WMS is redesigned to maximize biogas production, these figures can increase to 0.7% for Austria, 1% for Italy and 2% for Spain. Furthermore, the potential CO{sub 2} reduction as a consequence of capturing the biogas and replacing fossil fuel can result in up to a 93% reduction of the annual national waste greenhouse gas emissions of Spain and Italy.

  11. Upgraded biogas from municipal solid waste for natural gas substitution and CO2 reduction – A case study of Austria, Italy, and Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, Katherine; Villalba, Gara; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Biogas can be upgraded to create biomethane, a substitute to natural gas. • Biogas upgrading was applied to landfills and anaerobic digestors in 3 countries. • Up to 0.6% of a country’s consumption of natural gas could be replaced by biomethane. • Italy could save 46% of the national CO 2 emissions attributed to the waste sector. • Scenarios were created to increase biomethane production. - Abstract: Biogas is rich in methane and can be further purified through biogas upgrading technologies, presenting a viable alternative to natural gas. Landfills and anaerobic digestors treating municipal solid waste are a large source of such biogas. They therefore offer an attractive opportunity to tap into this potential source of natural gas while at the same time minimizing the global warming impact resulting from methane emissions in waste management schemes (WMS) and fossil fuel consumption reduction. This study looks at the current municipal solid waste flows of Spain, Italy, and Austria over one year (2009), in order to determine how much biogas is generated. Then it examines how much natural gas could be substituted by using four different biogas upgrading technologies. Based on current waste generation rates, exploratory but realistic WMS were created for each country in order to maximize biogas production and potential for natural gas substitution. It was found that the potential substitution of natural gas by biogas resulting from the current WMS seems rather insignificant: 0.2% for Austria, 0.6% for Italy and 0.3% for Spain. However, if the WMS is redesigned to maximize biogas production, these figures can increase to 0.7% for Austria, 1% for Italy and 2% for Spain. Furthermore, the potential CO 2 reduction as a consequence of capturing the biogas and replacing fossil fuel can result in up to a 93% reduction of the annual national waste greenhouse gas emissions of Spain and Italy

  12. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Biomass gasification: Produced gas upgrading by in-bed use of dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares, A.; Aznar, M.P.; Caballero, M.A.; Gil, J.; Frances, E. [Univ. of Saragossa (Spain). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Corella, J. [Univ. Complutense of Madrid (Spain). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01

    When some calcined dolomite (OCa{center_dot}OMg) is used in the bed of a biomass gasifier of fluidized bed type the raw gas produced is cleaner than when only silica sand is used in it as fluidizing medium. In-bed dolomite changes the product distribution at the gasifier exit because of in-situ catalytic reactions promoted by the calcined dolomite. Gasifying with steam-O{sub 2} mixtures causes the tar content in the exit gas to decrease from 12 to 2--3 g tar/m{sup 3}{sub n}, the H{sub 2} content to increase from 25--28 to 43 vol%, and the CO content to decrease from 45 to 27 vol% when the gas and char yields, heating value of the gas, and other main variables also undergo important changes because of the in-bed dolomite. The experimental work here reported is carried out at small pilot plant scale in a 15 cm i.d. atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed gasifier fed by 10 kg biomass/h. Dolomite is continuously fed to the gasifier, mixed with the biomass in percentages of 2--3 wt% of the total mass flow fed. A 10 wt% of calcined dolomite in the gasifier bed is enough to significantly improve the product distribution and gas quality.

  15. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Some methods of upgrading of technologies of construction of wells for shale gas

    OpenAIRE

    Mysluk, М. А.; Homynets, Z. D.; Salyzhyn, Yu. M.; Bogoslavets, V. V.; Voloshyn, Yu. D.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the analysis of international practices the directions for improvement of the construction technologies for shale gas wells are worded. Particular attention is paid to the quality of the well construction, technologies of drilling-in and development of a payout beds.

  17. Upgrading of reformate gas for different applications with focus on small-scale hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannasch, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen gas or hydrogen rich gas is today used in many different applications, i.e. as fuel in fuel cells or additive in vehicle fuel (i.e. hythane) and as reagent or reducing agent in different industrial product lines. The majority of the hydrogen is produced either via electrolysis or reformation, where this work has entirely been focused on the latter alternative. The overarching aims of this project have been to demonstrate the need for reformate purification for different applications, and then, to investigate different available methods that can be used in order to enable the requested gas clean-up. The different purification methods have been examined with respect to parameters such as operating conditions (temperature, pressure), impurity tolerance, size, weight and cost. Another goal of the project has been to investigate how the reformer fuel type used influences the reformate gas quality and hence, the need for gas purification before the reformate can be fed to e.g. a low temperature polymer membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). For this reason, some experimental work has been performed. First, analysis of the reformate gas composition when natural gas, LPG, gasoline, diesel, kerosene (low and high S-concentration (i.e. JP8)) and ethanol have been processed. The reformation tests were carried out in a small scale reformer unit ({approx} 1 kW H{sub 2}) including Catator's catalyst formulations developed for the steam reforming, the water gas shift and the preferential oxidation reaction, respectively. Verification tests, with synthetic gas blends, including different potential reformate impurities, and with real reformate gas were thereafter performed with a commercial 4-cell PEMFC stack (3-5 W). Finally, some examination and also to some extent further development of Catator's existing gas purification units were made, i.e. chemical (WGS, PROX) and physical (regenerative adsorption). The Pd-alloy membrane seems to be the obvious choice of purification

  18. Catalytic upgrading of gas from biofuels and implementation of electricity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P.; Hepola, J.; Heiskanen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Kinetic modelling of tar model compound (benzene) reaction with CO{sub 2} over dolomite (Kalkkimaa dolomite) catalyst has been carried out. This modelling has been based mainly on results obtained in earlier project. However, some additional tests have been made to complete the data. The data obtained was fitted to four different Langmuir-Hinshelwood type of kinetic rate equations in order to find the best suited model for the reaction. The model that best described the data assumed single site benzene adsorption and non-dissociative CO{sub 2} adsorption. Kinetical modelling work was continued by studies considering steam reforming of tar. Reaction rates were measured with large excess of water to benzene then with stoichiometric ratio of water to benzene and in simulated gasification gas. Conditions free of external (film) and internal (pore) diffusion effects were used. Reactor was operated both in differential and integral modes. Preliminary modelling was carried out and kinetical parameters for simple first order reaction model were calculated. During the first half of the year complementary experiments concerning earlier studies on sulfur poisoning of nickel catalysts were carried out. The experiments were performed in fixed bed tube reactors and in a TPH-reactor of VTT. In addition, several analytical methods for determining the nature of adsorbed sulfur on the catalyst surface was used. During the other part of the year two complementary report drafts concerning sulfur poisoning of nickel catalysts at hot gas cleaning conditions of gasification gas were prepared. (orig.)

  19. Antimisting kerosene atomization and flammability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleeter, R.; Petersen, R. A.; Toaz, R. D.; Jakub, A.; Sarohia, V.

    1982-01-01

    Various parameters found to affect the flammability of antimisting kerosene (Jet A + polymer additive) are investigated. Digital image processing was integrated into a technique for measurement of fuel spray characteristics. This technique was developed to avoid many of the error sources inherent to other spray assessment techniques and was applied to the study of engine fuel nozzle atomization performance with Jet A and antimisting fuel. Aircraft accident fuel spill and ignition dynamics were modeled in a steady state simulator allowing flammability to be measured as a function of airspeed, fuel flow rate, fuel jet Reynolds number and polymer concentration. The digital imaging technique was employed to measure spray characteristics in this simulation and these results were related to flammability test results. Scaling relationships were investigated through correlation of experimental results with characteristic dimensions spanning more than two orders of magnitude.

  20. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  1. Catalytic upgrading of gas from biofuels and implementation of electricity production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espenaes, Bengt-Goeran; Frostaeng, Sten [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    The project aimed at research and development concerning processes for production of fuel gas and systems for production of electricity in the small to intermediate size range (100 kW{sub e} to 5 MW{sub e}. The project included building and testing of a complete 'biomass-to-electricity' chain at scale of 100 kW{sub th}. Research work was focused on improvements in reduction of contents of tar and ammonia, and on the influences from sulphur on nickel catalysts, and from chlorine on dolomite catalysts. The project was divided into four main tasks, comprising 19 work packages which included basic and applied research and process development. The work was to some extent a further development of results obtained in a previous EC project (AIR2-CT93-1436). A pilot plant at scale 100 kW{sub th} was designed and erected by BTG. This system consists of a fluidized bed gasifier, a reversal flow tar converter (RFTC), a gas cooler, dust filter and a gas engine. A main effort was put into the optimisation of the RFTC. Tar contents obtained varied between 50 and 150 mg/Nm{sup 3} . Finally, a short test programme was executed, where the technical feasibility of the RFTC was demonstrated successfully at real conditions in the complete biomass-to-electricity system. Specific investment costs were estimated for scales of 0.4, 1 and 2 MW{sub el}. For the largest scale the specific investment costs were estimated to about 165 ECU/kW{sub el}. The fundamental work consisted of basic investigations of catalysts, catalysed reactions, catalyst poisoning by sulphur and tar characterisation. Issues addressed were such as factors that influence activity of different catalysts for elimination of tars, search for new catalysts and optimal use of known and new catalysts. Detailed kinetics of catalysed reactions that convert tar into desired permanent fuel gas components was determined for the most stable tar components, which play major roles in the overall conversion of tar. The

  2. Effects of upgrading systems on energy conversion efficiency of a gasifier - fuel cell - gas turbine power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrazzi, Simone; Allesina, Giulio; Tartarini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An advanced gasifier-SOFC-MGT system is modeled. • An overall electrical efficiency of 32.81% is reached. • Influence of all the sub-system modeled on the power plant efficiency is discussed. • Compression storage of syngas is taken into account. - Abstract: This work focuses on a DG-SOFC-MGT (downdraft gasifier - solid oxide fuel cell - micro gas turbine) power plant for electrical energy production and investigates two possible performance-upgrading systems: polyphenylene oxide (PPO) membrane and zeolite filters. The first is used to produce oxygen-enriched air used in the reactor, while the latter separates the CO 2 content from the syngas. In order to prevent power plant shutdowns during the gasifier reactor scheduled maintenance, the system is equipped with a gas storage tank. The generation unit consists of a SOFC-MGT system characterized by higher electrical efficiency when compared to conventional power production technology (IC engines, ORC and EFGT). Poplar wood chips with 10% of total moisture are used as feedstock. Four different combinations with and without PPO and zeolite filtrations are simulated and discussed. One-year energy and power simulation were used as basis for comparison between all the cases analyzed. The modeling of the gasification reactions gives results consistent with literature about oxygen-enriched processes. Results showed that the highest electrical efficiency obtained is 32.81%. This value is reached by the power plant equipped only with PPO membrane filtration. Contrary to the PPO filtering, zeolite filtration does not increase the SOFC-MGT unit performance while it affects the energy balance with high auxiliary electrical consumption. This solution can be considered valuable only for future work coupling a CO 2 sequestration system to the power plant.

  3. Self-Flammability of Gases Generated by Hanford Tank Waste and the Potential of Nitrogen Inerting to Eliminate Flammability Safety Concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Through radiolytic and thermolytic reactions, Hanford tank wastes generate and retain a variety of gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, methane (and other hydrocarbons), ammonia, and nitrogen. This gas generation can be expected to continue during processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The generation rates in the WTP will change from those for the in-situ tank waste because of different process temperatures, different dose rates produced by in-process changes in the proportions of solid and liquid, and dilution of the waste liquid. The flammability of the generated gas that is continuously released, and of any retained gas that might be released into a vessel headspace in quantity due to a spontaneous release, depends on the concentrations not only of the fuel gases—primarily hydrogen (H2), methane, other hydrocarbons, and ammonia—but of the oxidizer nitrous oxide (N2O). As a result of high concentrations of N2O, some gas mixtures are “self-flammable” (i.e., ignition can occur when no air is present because N2O provides the only oxidizer needed). Self-flammability could potentially reduce the effectiveness of using a nitrogen (N2) purge in the headspace as a flammability control, if its effects are not accounted for. A given amount of inertant gas (N2) can accommodate only a certain amount of a generated self-flammable gas before the mixture with inertant gas becomes flammable.

  4. 14 CFR 27.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 27.1185 Section 27.1185... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 27.1185 Flammable fluids. (a..., other than a fuel tank, that is part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases must be isolated...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 29.1185 Section 29.1185... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 29.1185 Flammable fluids. (a) No tank or reservoir that is part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be in a...

  6. 14 CFR 121.255 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 121.255 Section 121.255..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.255 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 25.1185 Section 25.1185... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1185 Flammable fluids. (a... system containing flammable fluids or gases may be in a designated fire zone unless the fluid contained...

  8. 14 CFR 125.153 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 125.153 Section 125.153....153 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in designated fire zones, except where the fluid contained, the design of...

  9. A review of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass into biofuels-focusing on gas cleaning and up-grading process steps

    OpenAIRE

    Brandin, Jan; Hulteberg, Christian; Kusar, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    It is not easy to replace fossil-based fuels in the transport sector, however, an appealing solution is to use biomass and waste for the production of renewable alternatives. Thermochemical conversion of biomass for production of synthetic transport fuels by the use of gasification is a promising way to meet these goals. One of the key challenges in using gasification systems with biomass and waste as feedstock is the upgrading of the raw gas produced in the gasifier. These materials replacin...

  10. Upgraded biogas from municipal solid waste for natural gas substitution and CO2 reduction--a case study of Austria, Italy, and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Katherine; Villalba, Gara; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Biogas is rich in methane and can be further purified through biogas upgrading technologies, presenting a viable alternative to natural gas. Landfills and anaerobic digestors treating municipal solid waste are a large source of such biogas. They therefore offer an attractive opportunity to tap into this potential source of natural gas while at the same time minimizing the global warming impact resulting from methane emissions in waste management schemes (WMS) and fossil fuel consumption reduction. This study looks at the current municipal solid waste flows of Spain, Italy, and Austria over one year (2009), in order to determine how much biogas is generated. Then it examines how much natural gas could be substituted by using four different biogas upgrading technologies. Based on current waste generation rates, exploratory but realistic WMS were created for each country in order to maximize biogas production and potential for natural gas substitution. It was found that the potential substitution of natural gas by biogas resulting from the current WMS seems rather insignificant: 0.2% for Austria, 0.6% for Italy and 0.3% for Spain. However, if the WMS is redesigned to maximize biogas production, these figures can increase to 0.7% for Austria, 1% for Italy and 2% for Spain. Furthermore, the potential CO2 reduction as a consequence of capturing the biogas and replacing fossil fuel can result in up to a 93% reduction of the annual national waste greenhouse gas emissions of Spain and Italy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hot gas cleaning and upgrading with a calcined dolomite located downstream a biomass fluidized bed gasifier operating with steam-oxygen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, P.; Aznar, M.P.; Caballero, M.A.; Gil, J.; Martin, J.A.; Corella, J. [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1997-11-01

    Cleaning and upgrading of the hot raw gas from a biomass gasifier, bubbling fluidized bed type, is studied at small pilot plant scale (10 kg biomass fed/h) using a calcined dolomite located downstream from the gasifier. Gasification is made with steam-oxygen mixtures at 800-850{degree}C and atmospheric pressure. Main variables studied are the gas residence time in the bed of dolomite and the gas atmosphere composition, which depends on the gasifying agent (H{sub 2}O + O{sub 2})-to-biomass and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} ratios. H{sub 2} and CO content in the flue gas increases by 16-23 vol% and decrease by 15-22 vol % (dry basis), respectively. Although CH{sub 4} conversion (elimination) higher than 30 vol % has never been reached, tar conversion (elimination) of 90-95 vol% are obtained with space times of 0.06 - 0.15 kg calcined dolomite h{sup -1} m{sup -3}. A detailed study is here presented on how the calcined dolomite significantly cleans and upgrades the flue gas, increasing also the gas yield by 0.15-0.40 m{sup 3} (STP)/kg daf biomass fed. 14 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Commercial steam reforming catalysts to improve biomass gasification with steam-oxygen mixtures. 1: Hot gas upgrading by the catalytic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, M.A.; Aznar, M.P.; Gil, J.; Martin, J.A.; Frances, E. [Univ. of Saragossa (Spain). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Corella, J. [Univ. of Complutense of Madrid (Spain). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01

    Commercial steam reforming (nickel-based) catalysts are used for hot gas cleaning and upgrading in biomass gasification with steam-oxygen mixtures. The gasifier used was an atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed with an internal diameter of 15 cm and a total height of 3.2 m and was continuously fed with 5--20 kg of biomass/h. Eight different catalysts from four different manufacturers (BASF AG, TOPSOE A/S, ICI, and UCI) have been tested. They were located in a downflow fixed-bed reactor of 4 cm i.d. placed in a slip flow after the gasifier. A guard bed with a calcined dolomite was also used before the catalytic bed to decrease the tar content in the raw gas below the limit of 2 g of tar/m{sup 3}{sub n}, thus avoiding the catalyst deactivation by coke formation. The main variables studied were the temperature of the catalytic bed and the gas composition in the bed. Effects concerning tar elimination will be reported in part 2 of this work. This paper is mainly devoted to characterization of catalysts and to upgrading of the flue gas. H{sub 2} and CO contents increased by 4--14 and 1--8 vol%, dry basis, respectively. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and steam contents decreased by 0--14, 87--99, and 2--6 vol %, dry basis, respectively. Other parameters varied in the following ways: the lower heating value decreased by 0.3--1.7 MJ/m{sup 3}{sub n}, gas yield increased by 0.1--0.4 m{sup 3}{sub n}/kg of biomass daf, and apparent thermal efficiency increased by 1--20%. The results presented allow screening of the best catalysts to get an upgraded and useful gas in biomass gasification with steam-oxygen mixtures.

  13. Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks for Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading: Techno-economic Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Life Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Rappé, Kenneth G.; Jones, Susanne B.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cafferty, Kara G.

    2016-11-17

    This work shows preliminary results from techno-economic analysis and life cycle greenhouse gas analysis of the conversion of seven (7) biomass feedstocks to produce liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis and upgrading via hydrodeoxygenation. The biomass consists of five (5) pure feeds (pine, tulip poplar, hybrid poplar, switchgrass, corn stover) and two blends. Blend 1 consists of equal weights of pine, tulip poplar and switchgrass, and blend 2 is 67% pine and 33% hybrid poplar. Upgraded oil product yield is one of the most significant parameters affecting the process economics, and is a function of both fast pyrolysis oil yield and hydrotreating oil yield. Pure pine produced the highest overall yield, while switchgrass produced the lowest. Interestingly, herbaceous materials blended with woody biomass performed nearly as well as pure woody feedstock, suggesting a non-trivial relationship between feedstock attributes and production yield. Production costs are also highly dependent upon hydrotreating catalyst-related costs. The catalysts contribute an average of ~15% to the total fuel cost, which can be reduced through research and development focused on achieving performance at increased space velocity (e.g., reduced catalyst loading) and prolonging catalyst lifetime. Green-house-gas reduction does not necessarily align with favorable economics. From the greenhouse gas analysis, processing tulip poplar achieves the largest GHG emission reduction relative to petroleum (~70%) because of its lower hydrogen consumption in the upgrading stage that results in a lower natural gas requirement for hydrogen production. Conversely, processing blend 1 results in the smallest GHG emission reduction from petroleum (~58%) because of high natural gas demand for hydrogen production.

  14. Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for the Upgrade of the Muon System of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, Othmane

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the long awaited Higgs boson in 2012, the Large hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its two general purpose experiments (ATLAS and CMS) are preparing to break new grounds in High Energy Physics (HEP). The international HEP collaboration has established a rigorous research program of exploring new physics at the high energy frontiers. The program includes substantial increase in the luminosity of the LHC putting detectors into a completely new and unprecedented harsh environment. In order to maintain their excellent performance, an upgrade of the existing detectors is mandatory. In this work we will describe ongoing efforts for the upgrade of the CMS muon detection system, in particular the addition of detection layers based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. We will summarize the past 5-year R\\ and D program and the future installation and operation plans.

  15. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B; Hladik, Michelle L; Vajda, Alan M; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Douville, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m(3) d(-1) design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration=2.7 μg L(-1); n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration=4.5 μg L(-1)), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration=1.4 μg L(-1)) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative proportions of

  16. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m3 d−1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L−1; n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L−1), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L−1) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  17. Biomass gasification with steam and oxygen mixtures at pilot scale and with catalytic gas upgrading. Pt. 1: performance of the gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, M.P.; Gil, J.; Martin, M.A.; Caballero, M.A.; Olivares, A.; Perez, P.; Frances, E. [University of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Corella, J. [University `Complutense` of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Biomass gasification with steam + O{sub 2} mixtures is studied at small pilot plant (10-20 kg/h) scale. The gasifier used is a turbulent fluidised bed of 15 cm. i.d. and 3.3 m high. The pilot plant has a downstream slip flow to study the catalytic upgrading of the raw gas. A guard bed with dolomite and a catalytic bed with a steam reforming catalyst are used and eight different commercial catalysts have been tested to date. Product distribution from the gasifier, including gas proposition and tar content in the gas, are here shown in detail at different (steam + oxygen)/biomass and (H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}) ratios and gasification temperatures (800-880{sup o}C). (author)

  18. A membrane based process for the upgrading of biogas to substituted natural gas (SNG) and recovery of carbondioxide for industrial use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norddahl, Birgir; dePreez, Jan

    2007-01-01

    A low pressure carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane based process to upgrade biogas from anaerobic digestion of agricultural waste to a substitute natural gas (SNG) has been tested on a pilot scale. The data extracted from the pilot plant was used to estimate membrane permeance and ideal...... natural gas can be mixed with NG in the national grid and the latter by-product is intended for the production of liquified CO2, suitable for use in greenhouses. At a pressure level of 8-16 barg, this process could offer simplicity and less investment and maintenance than other technologies....... selectivity of the CO2/CH4 gas pair. Four semi-commercial modules were tested. The results show that by using a membrane cascade and by carefully choosing the CMS modules, it is possible to produce a stream containing at least 90 vol-% CH4 and a by-product containing at least 60 vol-% CO2. The substituted...

  19. 46 CFR 105.10-15 - Flammable liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable liquid. 105.10-15 Section 105.10-15 Shipping... liquid. (a) The term flammable liquid means any liquid which gives off flammable vapors (as determined by.... Flammable liquids are referred to by grades as follows: (1) Grade A. Any flammable liquid having a Reid 1...

  20. Influence of the gas-liquid flow configuration in the absorption column on photosynthetic biogas upgrading in algal-bacterial photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Cervantes, Alma; Madrid-Chirinos, Cindy; Cantera, Sara; Lebrero, Raquel; Muñoz, Raúl

    2017-02-01

    The potential of an algal-bacterial system consisting of a high rate algal pond (HRAP) interconnected to an absorption column (AC) via recirculation of the cultivation broth for the upgrading of biogas and digestate was investigated. The influence of the gas-liquid flow configuration in the AC on the photosynthetic biogas upgrading process was assessed. AC operation in a co-current configuration enabled to maintain a biomass productivity of 15gm -2 d -1 , while during counter-current operation biomass productivity decreased to 8.7±0.5gm -2 d -1 as a result of trace metal limitation. A bio-methane composition complying with most international regulatory limits for injection into natural gas grids was obtained regardless of the gas-liquid flow configuration. Furthermore, the influence of the recycling liquid to biogas flowrate (L/G) ratio on bio-methane quality was assessed under both operational configurations obtaining the best composition at an L/G ratio of 0.5 and co-current flow operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantifying the loss of methane through secondary gas mass transport (or 'slip') from a micro-porous membrane contactor applied to biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2013-07-01

    Secondary gas transport during the separation of a binary gas with a micro-porous hollow fibre membrane contactor (HMFC) has been studied for biogas upgrading. In this application, the loss or 'slip' of the secondary gas (methane) during separation is a known concern, specifically since methane possesses the intrinsic calorific value. Deionised (DI) water was initially used as the physical solvent. Under these conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) absorption were dependent upon liquid velocity (V(L)). Whilst the highest CO2 flux was recorded at high V(L), selectivity towards CO2 declined due to low residence times and a diminished gas-side partial pressure, and resulted in slip of approximately 5.2% of the inlet methane. Sodium hydroxide was subsequently used as a comparative chemical absorption solvent. Under these conditions, CO2 mass transfer increased by increasing gas velocity (VG) which is attributed to the excess of reactive hydroxide ions present in the solvent, and the fast conversion of dissolved CO2 to carbonate species reinitiating the concentration gradient at the gas-liquid interface. At high gas velocities, CH4 slip was reduced to 0.1% under chemical conditions. Methane slip is therefore dependent upon whether the process is gas phase or liquid phase controlled, since methane mass transport can be adequately described by Henry's law within both physical and chemical solvents. The addition of an electrolyte was found to further retard CH4 absorption via the salting out effect. However, their applicability to physical solvents is limited since electrolytic concentration similarly impinges upon the solvents' capacity for CO2. This study illustrates the significance of secondary gas mass transport, and furthermore demonstrates that gas-phase controlled systems are recommended where greater selectivity is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  3. Vacuum stability and residual gas density estimation for the vacuum chamber upgrade of the ATLAS interaction region of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bregliozzi, G; Baglin, V; Jimenez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has 54 km of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) beam chambers out of which about 90% are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K) and the rest at room temperature. During operation, the residual gas density in the beam pipes is dominated by beam induced effect such ion, electron and photon-stimulated gas desorption. Therefore, the computation of gas density profile is of great importance to confirm the vacuum stability, and to estimate the beam lifetime. Moreover, the gas density profiles are essential to determine the machine induced background in the experimental areas, and to define the pressure profile in the cryogenic sectors where there is no vacuum instrumentation available. In this paper, the vacuum stability is studied for a newly proposed upgrade of the vacuum chamber at the ATLAS interaction point, using the vacuum stability code called VASCO. The residual gas density profile along the ATLAS vacuum chambers and the effects of photon and electron flux hitting the vacuum chamber wal...

  4. Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Study of a Midwestern Residential Energy Upgrade Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Ian M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borgeson, Merrian Goggio [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zimring, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-04-12

    With the proliferation of statewide energy savings targets and other policies favorable to energy efficiency, savings from utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs could rise to offset much of annual load growth by 2025 (Barbose et al 2013). For these increased savings to occur, however, nearly all of these programs must pass screening for cost effectiveness. Some program administrators and state regulators are finding that conventional analyses, which only consider a narrow set of energy-savings related efficiency program benefits, are now resulting in some natural gas efficiency programs failing their cost-effectiveness criteria in the new low natural gas price environment. Regulators are considering whether to scale back or terminate gas portfolios in at least four states (WA, OR, ID, NM) because of cost-effectiveness concerns. Stakeholders in several regions of the country have asked LBNL to help assess alternatives to reducing the pursuit of energy savings in their regions. We address these requests by producing two working papers: one exploring cost-effectiveness screening policy implications of low to moderate natural gas prices, and a second assessing some of the values that policymakers may take into account in weighing the pros and cons of ending natural gas efficiency programs. In this policy brief, we lay out the challenges that low gas prices pose for cost effectiveness of an electric-gas efficiency program and portfolio. We then quantify options available to regulators and administrators who want to evaluate the tradeoffs among multiple policy objectives. A multi-measure, residential energy upgrade program in the Midwest is used as a lens to explore the implications of common and emerging cost-effectiveness policies in the context of low prices for natural gas. We illustrate the results across a range of cost-effectiveness screening options, including different discount rates, levels of test application, various benefit-cost tests, and the

  5. Selected Parametric Effects on Materials Flammability Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.; Juarez, Alfredo; Peyton, Gary J.; Harper, Susana A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA-STD-(I)-6001B Test 1 is currently used to evaluate the flammability of materials intended for use in habitable environments of U.S. spacecraft. The method is a pass/fail upward flame propagation test conducted in the worst case configuration, which is defined as a combination of a material s thickness, test pressure, oxygen concentration, and temperature that make the material most flammable. Although simple parametric effects may be intuitive (such as increasing oxygen concentrations resulting in increased flammability), combinations of multi-parameter effects could be more complex. In addition, there are a variety of material configurations used in spacecraft. Such configurations could include, for example, exposed free edges where fire propagation may be different when compared to configurations commonly employed in standard testing. Studies involving combined oxygen concentration, pressure, and temperature on flammability limits have been conducted and are summarized in this paper. Additional effects on flammability limits of a material s thickness, mode of ignition, burn-length criteria, and exposed edges are presented. The information obtained will allow proper selection of ground flammability test conditions, support further studies comparing flammability in 1-g with microgravity and reduced gravity environments, and contribute to persuasive scientific cases for rigorous space system fire risk assessments.

  6. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report

  7. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  8. Determinants of flammability in savanna grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kimberley J; Ripley, Brad S; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Belcher, Claire M; Lehmann, Caroline E R; Thomas, Gavin H; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-01-01

    Tropical grasses fuel the majority of fires on Earth. In fire-prone landscapes, enhanced flammability may be adaptive for grasses via the maintenance of an open canopy and an increase in spatiotemporal opportunities for recruitment and regeneration. In addition, by burning intensely but briefly, high flammability may protect resprouting buds from lethal temperatures. Despite these potential benefits of high flammability to fire-prone grasses, variation in flammability among grass species, and how trait differences underpin this variation, remains unknown.By burning leaves and plant parts, we experimentally determined how five plant traits (biomass quantity, biomass density, biomass moisture content, leaf surface-area-to-volume ratio and leaf effective heat of combustion) combined to determine the three components of flammability (ignitability, sustainability and combustibility) at the leaf and plant scales in 25 grass species of fire-prone South African grasslands at a time of peak fire occurrence. The influence of evolutionary history on flammability was assessed based on a phylogeny built here for the study species.Grass species differed significantly in all components of flammability. Accounting for evolutionary history helped to explain patterns in leaf-scale combustibility and sustainability. The five measured plant traits predicted components of flammability, particularly leaf ignitability and plant combustibility in which 70% and 58% of variation, respectively, could be explained by a combination of the traits. Total above-ground biomass was a key driver of combustibility and sustainability with high biomass species burning more intensely and for longer, and producing the highest predicted fire spread rates. Moisture content was the main influence on ignitability, where species with higher moisture contents took longer to ignite and once alight burnt at a slower rate. Biomass density, leaf surface-area-to-volume ratio and leaf effective heat of combustion

  9. 46 CFR 153.465 - Flammable vapor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable vapor detector. 153.465 Section 153.465... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.465 Flammable vapor detector. (a) A tankship that carries a flammable cargo must have two vapor detectors that meet § 35.30-15(b) of this chapter. (b) At...

  10. Testing Vegetation Flammability: The Problem of Extremely Low Ignition Frequency and Overall Flammability Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Kauf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades changes in fire regimes led to higher vulnerability of fire prone ecosystems, with vegetation being the only component influencing fire regime which can be managed in order to reduce probability of extreme fire events. For these management practices to be effective reliable information on the vegetation flammability is being crucial. Epiradiator based testing methods are one of the methods commonly used to investigate vegetation flammability and decrease in ignition frequency is always interpreted as a decrease in flammability. Furthermore, gathered information is often combined into a single flammability score. Here we present results of leaf litter testing which, together with previously conducted research on similar materials, show that material with very low ignition frequency under certain testing conditions can be extremely flammable if testing conditions are slightly changed. Additionally, our results indicate that combining measured information into one single flammability score, even though sometimes useful, is not always meaningful and should be performed with caution.

  11. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  12. Triptycene dimethyl-bridgehead dianhydride-based intrinsically microporous hydroxyl-functionalized polyimide for natural gas upgrading

    KAUST Repository

    Alghunaimi, Fahd

    2016-07-28

    The synthesis and gas permeation properties of a high-performance hydroxyl-functionalized PIM-polyimide (TDA1-APAF) prepared from a novel 9,10-dimethyl-2,3,6,7-triptycene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (TDA1) and a commercially available 2,2-bis(3-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane (APAF) diamine monomer are reported. The microporous polymer had a BET surface area based on nitrogen adsorption of 260 m2 g−1. A freshly prepared sample exhibited excellent gas permeation properties: (i) CO2 permeability of 40 Barrer coupled with a CO2/CH4 selectivity of 55 and (ii) H2 permeability of 94 Barrer with a H2/CH4 selectivity of 129. Physical aging over 250 days resulted in significantly enhanced CO2/CH4 and H2/CH4 selectivities of 75 and 183, respectively with only ~ 25% loss in CO2 and H2 permeability. Aged TDA1-APAF exhibited 5-fold higher pure-gas CO2 permeability (30 Barrer) and two-fold higher CO2/CH4 permselectivity over conventional dense cellulose triacetate membranes at 2 bar. In addition, TDA1-APAF polyimide had a N2/CH4 selectivity of 2.3, thereby making it potentially possible to bring natural gas with low, but unacceptable nitrogen content to pipeline specification. Gas mixture permeation experiments with a 1:1 CO2/CH4 feed mixture demonstrated higher mixed- than pure-gas selectivity and plasticization resistance up to 30 bar. These results suggest that intrinsically microporous hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimides are promising candidate membrane materials for removal of CO2 from natural gas and hydrogen purification in petrochemical refinery applications.

  13. Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks

  14. Charged particle detection performance of gas electron multiplier detector for the upgrade of CMS endcap muon system at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is one of two general-purpose detectors at the CERN LHC. LHC will provide exceptional high instantaneous and integrated luminosities after second long shutdown. The forward region $\\mid \\eta \\mid \\geq 1.5$ of the CMS detector will face extremely high particle rates in 10s of kHz/cm2 and hence it will affect the momentum resolution and longevity of the muon detectors. To overcome these issues, the CMS-GEM collaboration has proposed to install new large size high rate capable triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors in the forward region of CMS muon system. The proposal has been approved recently. The first set of Triple GEM detectors will be installed in the GE1/1 region ($1.6 < \\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.2$) of muon endcap during phase-II upgrade of the LHC. Towards this goal, full size CMS Triple GEM prototype chambers have been fabricated and put under the test beam at the CERN SPS test beam facility. The GEM detectors were operated with two gas mixtures: Ar:CO2 (70:30) and Ar:CO2:CF4 (...

  15. Hydroquinone and quinone-grafted porous carbons for highly selective CO2 capture from flue gases and natural gas upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krishna, R.; Yang, J.; Deng, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were

  16. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth E. Baldrey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO(sub 3) and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was underway at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. This represents the first long-term full-scale testing of this class of products. Modifications to the flue gas conditioning system at Jim Bridger, including development of alternate injection lances, was also undertaken to improve chemical spray distribution and to avoid spray deposition to duct interior surfaces. Also in this quarter, a firm commitment was received for another long-term test of the cohesivity additives. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative

  17. NOCA upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    The network operations control area (NOCA) of the space flight operations facility (SFOF) is being upgraded in both hardware and software capabilities to provide the visibility and operability necessary for the operations control function to be performed within the present technological environment of the tracking network. The hardware implementation currently in progress is addressed. It provides a standard operating console with increased display capacity and improved ergonomics as a replacement for the existing, outmoded, circular consoles original to the SFOF.

  18. Application of the Combined Cycle LWR-Gas Turbine to PWR for NPP Life Extension Safety Upgrade and Improving Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. N.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, some of the most important problem for the nuclear industry are life extension, advance competitiveness and safety of aging LWR NPPs. Based on results of studies performed in the USA (Battelle Memorial Institute) and in Russia (NIKIET), a new power technology, using a combined cycle gas-turbine facility CCGT - LWR, so called TD-Cycle, can significantly help in resolution of some problems of nuclear power industry. The nuclear steam and gas topping cycle is used for re-powering a light water pressurized reactor of PWR or VVER type. An existing NPP is topped with a gas turbine facility with a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) generating steam from waste heat. The superheated steam of high pressure (P=90-165 bar, T=500-550 C) generated in the HRSG, is expanded in a high pressure (HP) turbine for producing electricity. The HP turbine can work on one shaft with the the gas turbine or at one shaft with intermediate (IP) or low (LP) pressure parts of the main nuclear steam turbine, or with a separate electric generator. The exhausted steam from the HP turbine is injected into the steam mixer where it is mixed with the saturated steam from the NPP steam generator (SG). The mixer is intended to superheat the main nuclear steam and should be characterized by minimum losses during mixing superheated and saturated steam. Steam from the mixer superheated by 20-60 C directs to the existing IP turbine, and then, through a separator-reheater flows into the LP turbine. Feed water re-heaters of LP and HP are actually unchanged in this case. Feed water extraction to the HRSG is supplied after one of LP water heaters. This proposal is intended to re-power existing LWR NPPs. To minimize cost, the IP and LP turbines and electric generator would remain the same. The reactor thermal power and fast neutron flux to the reactor vessel would decrease by 30-50 percent of nominal values. The external peripheral row of fuel elements can be replaced with metal absorber rods to

  19. Pressure Drop Versus Flow Rate Analysis of the Limited Streamer Tube Gas System of the BaBar Muon Detector Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that Limited Streamer Tubes (LST) be used in the current upgrade of the muon detector in the BaBar detector. An LST consists of a thin silver plated wire centered in a graphite-coated cell. One standard LST tube consists of eight such cells, and two or three such tubes form an LST module. Under operation, the cells are filled with a gas mixture of CO 2 , argon and isobutane. During normal operation of the detector, the gas will be flushed out of the system at a constant low rate of one volume change per day. During times such as installation, however, it is often desired to flush and change the LST gas volumes very rapidly, leading to higher than normal pressure which may damage the modules. This project studied this pressure as a function of flow rate and the number of modules that are put in series in search of the maximal safe flow rate at which to flush the modules. Measurements of pressure drop versus flow rate were taken using a flow meter and a pressure transducer on configurations of one to five modules put in series. Minimal Poly-Flo tubing was used for all connections between test equipment and modules. They contributed less than 25% to all measurements. A ratio of 0.00022 ± 0.00001 mmHg per Standard Cubic Centimeter per Minute (SCCM) per module was found, which was a slight overestimate since it included the contributions from the tubing connections. However, for the purpose of finding a flow rate at which the modules can be safely flushed, this overestimate acts as a safety cushion. For a standard module with a volume of 16 liters and a known safe overpressure of 2 inches of water, the ratio translates into a flow rate of 17000 ± 1000SCCM and a time requirement of 56 ± 5 seconds to flush an entire module

  20. Conceptual design and techno-economic evaluation of efficient oil shale refinery processes ingratiated with oil and gas products upgradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Qingchun; Qian, Yu; Zhou, Huairong; Yang, Siyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three integrated oil shale refinery processes are proposed. • Techno-economic performance of three proposed processes is conducted and compared. • Competitiveness of the three proposed processes is investigated at different scenarios. • A development direction for oil shale refinery industry is suggested. - Abstract: Compared with the petrochemical industry, oil shale refinery industry is still relatively backward and has many shortcomings, such as poor quality of shale oil, inefficient utilization of retorting gas, and the unsatisfactory economic performance. In the situation of the low oil price, many oil shale refinery plants are forced to stop or cut production. Thus, oil shale industry is facing a severe problem. How to relieve monetary loss or turn it into profits? This paper proposes three integrated oil shale refinery processes: an integrated with hydrogen production from retorting gas, an integrated with hydrogenation of shale oil, and an integrated with hydrogen production and oil hydrogenation. The techno-economic performance of the three different processes is conducted and compared with that of a conventional oil shale process. Results show the exergy destruction ratio of the oil shale process integrated with hydrogen production from retorting gas is the least, 41.6%, followed by the oil shale process integrated with hydrogen production and oil hydrogenation, 45.9%. Furthermore, these two proposed processes have the best economic performance. Especially they can turn losses of the conventional oil shale process into profits at the situation of low oil price. The oil shale process integrated with hydrogen production from retorting gas is recommended to the oil shale plants which use the oil shale with oil content lower than 12.9%, while the plants using oil shale with oil content higher than 12.9% are better to select the oil shale process integrated with hydrogen production and oil hydrogenation.

  1. Metal–organic frameworks to satisfy gas upgrading demands: fine-tuning the soc-MOF platform for the operative removal of H2S

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2017-01-06

    -MOF platform with the requisite hydrolytic stability, H2S stability, and exceptional gas selectivity for ROG and NG upgrading. Finally, the soc-MOF was deployed as a continuous film on a porous support, and its gas permeation properties as a membrane were evaluated.

  2. Bark traits, decomposition and flammability of Australian forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootemaat, Saskia; Wright, Ian J.; Van Bodegom, Peter M.; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.; Shaw, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Bark shedding is a remarkable feature of Australian trees, yet relatively little is known about interspecific differences in bark decomposability and flammability, or what chemical or physical traits drive variation in these properties. We measured the decomposition rate and flammability

  3. Muon Chamber Endcap Upgrade of the CMS Experiment with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors and their Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gola, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    As the CERN LHC is heading towards a high luminosity phase a very high flux is expected in the endcaps of the CMS Detector. The presence of muons in collision events can be due to rare or new physics so it is important to maintain the high trigger efficiency of the CMS muon system. The CMS Collaboration has proposed to instrument the high-eta region (1.6 lt IetaI lt 2.2) of the muon endcaps with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, referred to as GE1/1 chambers, during the LS2. This technology will help in maintaining optimum trigger performance with maximum selection efficiency of muons even in a high flux environment. We describe plans for a Slice Test to installa few GE1/1 chambers covering 50 degrees in azimuthal angle within the CMS detector in 2017, with subsequent operation during the current Run 2 of the LHC. We show the performance of the GE1/1 chambers to be installed during the slice test, specifically GEM foil leakage currents, chamber gas volume integrity, high voltage circuit performanc...

  4. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2003-12-01

    ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

  5. An Approach to the Flammability Testing of Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation reviews: (1) Current approach to evaluation of spacecraft materials flammability (2) The need for and the approach to alternative routes (3) Examples of applications of the approach recommended a) Crew Module splash down b) Crew Module depressurization c) Applicability of NASA's flammability test data to other sample configurations d) Applicability of NASA's ground flammability test data to spacecraft environments

  6. NIMROD Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; Kohley, Z.; May, L.; Natowitz, J. B.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    The 4 pi detection array NIMROD has been recently upgraded. The upgrade increased granularity in the backward direction and improved Si coverage. NIMROD is now composed of 10 forward annular rings (˜3-90 degrees) and a hemisphere of the ISiS array (90-176 degrees). There is complete Si coverage in the regions of 3-45 and 90-176 degrees. The forward region is composed of ten telescopes of 300 micron Si and CsI as well as two super telescopes of 150 and 500 micron Si with CsI per ring. The ISiS portion has complete Si coverage in the form of 500 micron Si with the CsI. Additionally, modular treatment of signals has been implemented. Handling signals in this way retains the telescope grouping of detectors in the electronics as long as possible. Towards this end, motherboards holding Zepto System preamplifiers were installed on the reaction chamber for preamplification of the Si signals at the earliest opportunity. The improved detector system has been used in a first experiment with 86,78Kr+64,58Ni systems. Performance of the detector system during the experiment will be presented.

  7. Hydrogen assisted biological biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria

    Wind and biomass are promoted worldwide as sustainable forms of energy. Anaerobic digestion of biomass produces biogas with ∼50−70% CH4 and 30−50% CO2. However, biogas with >90% CH4 content has higher heating value, can be injected into the natural gas grid or used as alternative to natural gas...... as vehicle fuel. Methods currently available for biogas upgrading mainly consists of physicochemical CO2 removal, requiring the use of chemical substances and energy input and, thus, increasing process costs. This PhD project proposes an alternative to existing biogas upgrading technologies, where H2......, produced by water electrolysis, using excess of electricity from wind mills, is coupled with the CO2 contained in the biogas to convert them to CH4. This process is defined as biological biogas upgrading and is carried out by hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea that couples CO2 with H2 to produce...

  8. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, J.C. de la, E-mail: juan-carlos.de-la-rosa-blul@ec.europa.eu [European Commission Joint Research Centre (Netherlands); Fornós, Joan, E-mail: jfornosh@anacnv.com [Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellós (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H{sub 2} and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  9. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, J.C. de la; Fornós, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H 2 and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  10. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...

  11. Biogas utilization as flammable for internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, H.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the energetic potential stored in form of generated biogas of organic industrial wastes treatment is analyzed. Biogas utilization as flammable at internal combustion engine coupled to electrical energy generating is studied in the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Bucaramanga city (Colombia). This Plant was designed for 160.000 habitants treatment capacity, 1300 m3/h wealth, 170 BDO/m3 residues concentration and 87% process efficiency. The plant generate 2.000 m3/d of biogas. In laboratory trials was worked with biogas originating from Treatment Plant, both without purifying and purified, and the obtained results were compared with both yields determined with 86-octanes gasoline and natural gas. The analysis of pollutant by-products generated in combustion process as leak gases, present corrosive compounds and not desirable. elements in biogas composition are included

  12. Flammability test for sunglasses: developing a system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Renan; Ventura, Liliane

    2014-02-01

    Recent investigations show the need for certificating sunglasses to ensure the safety and health to population. The Brazilian Standard ABNT NBR 15111 regulates features to sunglasses, however, there is not a sunglasses certification office in Brazil, therefore, our lab has been developing several equipment for sunglasses testing. This work refers to one of them: the flammability test system for sunglasses in compliance with the NBR 15111. The standard provides requirements for the flammability test procedure which requires that the equipment must operate at a temperature of 650 °C +/- 20 °C the end of a steel rod of 300 mm length and 6 mm diameter should be heated and pressed over the surface of the lenses for five seconds; the flammability is checked by visual inspection. The furnace is made of ceramic. We used a power electronic circuit to control the power in the furnace using ON/OFF mode and for measuring the temperature, we used a K-type thermocouple. A stepper motor with pulley lifts the steel rod. The system reaches the working temperature in 15 minutes for a step input of 61 V in open loop system. The electronics control are under development in order to shorten the time necessary to reach the working temperature and maintain the temperature variation in the furnace within the limits imposed by the standard as next steps.

  13. BFR Electrolyte Additive Safety and Flammability Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcorn, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-13

    Lithium-ion battery safety is a critical issue in the adoption of the chemistry to larger scale applications such as transportation and stationary storage. One of the critical components impacting the safety of lithium-ion batteries is their use of highly flammable organic electrolytes. In this work, brominated flame retardants (BFR’s) – an existing class of flame retardant materials – are incorporated as additives to lithium-ion battery electrolytes with the intention to reduce the electrolyte flammability and thereby improve safety. There are a few critical needs for a successful electrolyte additive: solubility in the electrolyte, electrochemical stability over the range of battery operation, and minimal detrimental effects on battery performance. Those detrimental effects can take the form of electrolyte specific impacts, such as a reduction in conductivity, or electrode impacts, such as SEI-layer modification or chemical instability to the active material. In addition to these needs, the electrolyte additive also needs to achieve its intended purpose, which in this case is to reduce the flammability of the electrolyte. For the work conducted as part of this SPP agreement three separate BFR materials were provided by Albemarle to be tested by Sandia as additives in a traditional lithium-ion battery electrolyte. The provided BFR materials were tribromo-neopentyl alcohol, tetrabromo bisphenol A, and tribromoethylene. These materials were incorporated as separate 4 wt.% additives into a traditional lithium-ion battery electrolyte and compared to said traditional electrolyte, designated Gen2.

  14. Tank 24-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented and interpreted to help resolve the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. Concern that the headspace of tank 241-C-103 may contain a flammable mixture of organic vapors and an aerosol of combustible organic liquid droplets arises from the presence of a layer of organic liquid in the tank. This organic liquid is believed to have originated in the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process, having been stored initially in tank 241-C-102 and apparently transferred to tank 241-C-103 in 1975 (Carothers 1988). Analyses of samples of the organic liquid collected in 1991 and 1993 indicate that the primary constituents are tributyl phosphate (TBP) and several semivolatile hydrocarbons (Prentice 1991, Pool and Bean 1994). This is consistent with the premise that the organic waste came from the PUREX process, because the PUREX process used a solution of TBP in a diluent composed of the n-C 11 H 24 to n-C 15 H 32 normal paraffinic hydrocarbons (NPH)

  15. Processing options for bitumen upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harji, A.N.; Koppel, P.E.; Mazurek, W.L.; Meysami, P.

    2003-01-01

    It is estimated that 178 billion barrels of oil can be recovered from Alberta's vast heavy oil reserves. The challenge lies in the logistics of recovering, upgrading and transporting the oil to market. The Canadian Energy Research Institute conducted a recent study to determine market potential by 2007 for diluted bitumen and synthetic crude oil produced from upgraded bitumen. The viability for a wide range of bitumen feedstocks was assessed along with the sensitivity of refinery demand to their prices. The 3 major markets for western Canadian bitumen include PADD 2 in the United States, western Canada, and Ontario. Bitumen is too viscous to transport by pipeline and cannot be processed by most of the existing refineries. Therefore, in order to develop a mass market for the product, bitumen must undergo the energy intensive upgrading process at existing refineries. The factors impacting which method of upgrading is most suitable were discussed with particular attention to the impact that Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol may have on Alberta's bitumen resource in terms of costs of complying with greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. The authors emphasized that it is crucial to customize an upgrading project to meet site and market specific factors. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Flammability limits of silane/perfluorocarbon/nitrogen mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Perfluorocarbons are known to react with silane because silane is a very strong reducing agent. However, quantitative information on their explosion limits are not known. So, in this study, flammability of silane/perfluorocarbon/nitrogen was examined experimentally. Their flammability areas were revealed quantitatively as triangular flammability diagrams, and the fact that perfluorocarbon reacts with silane was ascertained. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed

  18. Identification of components in fast pyrolysis oil and upgraded products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and flame ionisation detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, J.H.; Wildschut, J.; Mahfud, F.; Heeres, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil and upgraded products are promising energy carriers. Characterisation of the oils is hampered due to the presence of a large number of components (>400) belonging to a broad variety of chemical compound classes (i.e., acids, aldehydes, ketones). In this study, a comparison of the

  19. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  20. Flammability properties of typical aviation functional oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianlong; Zhou, Tiannian; Wang, Jian

    2017-10-01

    A sequence of experiments were conducted in a cone calorimeter to measure the flammability properties of 4050# lubricating oil and 15# hydraulic oil. Meanwhile, the heat release rate, mass loss rate and ignition time were used to investigate the combustion characteristics of the two kinds of oil with varying external radiant heat fluxes. The results show that the 15# oil is easier to be ignited than the 4050# oil and -0.55 power of the ignition time is linear with the external radiant heat flux, which agrees with the previous studies.

  1. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  2. Flammable Gas Safety Program: analysis of gas sampling probe locations in the SX-farm flammable gas watchlist tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, J.M.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1995-09-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the optimum ventilation line up for the AN Tank Farm. The analysis used the postulated maximum historical GRE in tanks AN-103, -104, and -105. Tank AN-104 was found to be limiting. The results of the analysis show that an airflow of 250 cfm through tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and -105 with an airflow of 100 cfm through tanks 241-AN-101, -102, -106, and -107 would be the optimum ventilation lineup

  3. 46 CFR 188.10-27 - Flammable liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable liquid. 188.10-27 Section 188.10-27 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-27 Flammable liquid. This term includes any liquid whose flashpoint, as determined by an open cup tester, is 80 °F. or below. ...

  4. 43 CFR 423.31 - Fires and flammable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fires and flammable material. 423.31... of Conduct § 423.31 Fires and flammable material. (a) You must not leave a fire unattended, and it... smoking materials, including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, matches, or other burning material. (c) You must...

  5. Flammability tests for regulation of building and construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Sumathipala

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of building materials and products for flammability is critical to ensure the safety of occupants in buildings and other structures. The involvement of exposed building materials and products in fires resulting in the loss of human life often spurs an increase in regulation and new test methods to address the problem. Flammability tests range from those...

  6. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...... validation experiment are crucial to the ultimate goal of the project, which is the development of predictive tools that should be capable of selecting an adaptive response to fire spread in any manned spacecraft.......As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...... spread, and thus also the modeling thereof, in realistic conditions is described. Some of the parameters governing the flame spread are also identified and their scaling against the dimensions of the test specimen is briefly questioned. Then several of the current and scheduled efforts are presented...

  7. Health risk assessment based on injection of upgraded biogas in natural gas grid; Evaluation des risques sanitaires et accidentels lies a l'injection de biogaz epure dans un reseau de gaz naturel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, C.; Modelon, H.; Rousselle, C. [AFSSET, 94 - Maisons Alfort (France); Zdanevitch, I.; Evanno, S. [INERIS, 60 - Verneuil en Halatte (France)

    2010-07-01

    This document presents the opinion of the French Agency for Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (AFSSET). Results are based on a collective expertise conducted to assess health risks associated with the injection of biogas in the natural gas grid. The complete assessment is published and available on the web site of the Agency; only the major results are presented in this document. Following recommendations issued by AFSSET in 2008, a new study has been initiated to collect and analyze data on the composition of biogas from sewage sludge. The French National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks (INERIS) is in charge of this project. The data will be used to assess the accidental risks (resulting from the upgrading of biogas, transport by pipeline and utilization for energy purposes) and health risks for users (resulting from the injection in the natural gas grid). (authors)

  8. 75 FR 49379 - Correction to Internal Citation of “Extremely Flammable Solid” and “Flammable Solid”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1500 Correction to Internal Citation of ``Extremely... to correct internal citations to the definitions of ``extremely flammable solid'' and ``flammable... citation for part 1500 continues to read as follows: Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1261-1277. 0 2. In Sec. 1500.83...

  9. One-pot, bioinspired coatings to reduce the flammability of flexible polyurethane foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rick; Li, Yu-Chin; Gervasio, Michelle; Luu, Jason; Kim, Yeon Seok

    2015-03-25

    In this manuscript, natural materials were combined into a single "pot" to produce flexible, highly fire resistant, and bioinspired coatings on flexible polyurethane foam (PUF). In one step, PUF was coated with a fire protective layer constructed of a polysaccharide binder (starch or agar), a boron fire retardant (boric acid or derivative), and a dirt char former (montmorillonite clay). Nearly all coatings produced a 63% reduction in a critical flammability value, the peak heat release rate (PHRR). One formulation produced a 75% reduction in PHRR. This technology was validated in full-scale furniture fire tests, where a 75% reduction in PHRR was measured. At these PHRR values, this technology could reduce the fire threat of furniture from significant fire damage in and beyond the room of fire origin to being contained to the burning furniture. This flammability reduction was caused by three mechanisms-the gas-phase and condensed-phase processes of the boron fire retardant and the condensed-phase process of the clay. We describe the one-pot coating process and the impact of the coating composition on flammability.

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-22 - Flammable liquid-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable liquid-TB/ALL. 30.10-22 Section 30.10-22 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-22 Flammable liquid—TB/ALL. The term flammable liquid means any liquid which gives off flammable...

  11. Upgrading Uncompetitive Products Economically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Hua; Jensen, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    the k products in T that can be upgraded to not be dominated by any products in P at the lowest cost. This problem is non-trivial due to not only the large data set sizes, but also to the many possibilities for upgrading a product. We identify and provide solutions for the different options...... for upgrading an uncompetitive product, and combine the solutions into a single solution. We also propose a spatial join-based solution that assumes P and T are indexed by an R-tree. Given a set of products in the same R-tree node, we derive three lower bounds on their upgrading costs. These bounds are employed...... by the join approach to prune upgrade candidates with uncompetitive upgrade costs. Empirical studies with synthetic and real data show that the join approach is efficient and scalable....

  12. DOE/DOE Tight Oil Flammability & Transportation Spill Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, David L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This presentation describes crude oils, their phase behavior, the SPR vapor pressure program, and presents data comparisons from various analytical techniques. The overall objective is to describe physical properties of crude oil relevant to flammability and transport safety

  13. Chemical Safety Alert: Lightning Hazard to Facilities Handling Flammable Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raises awareness about lightning strikes, which cause more death/injury and damage than all other environmental elements combined, so industry can take proper precautions to protect equipment and storage or process vessels containing flammable materials.

  14. Magnetic switching, final chapter, Book I: the ATA upgrade prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Efforts directed at finding a 10 kHz switch to replace the current 1 kHz gas blown spark gap have culminated in a prototype for an upgrade of ATA. The design and performance of this prototype as well as possible options and recommendations concerning an eventual upgrade are described. 4 references, 9 figures

  15. Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good

  16. Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good.

  17. Effect of a zero g environment on flammability limits as determined using a standard flammability tube apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlow, R. A.; Reuss, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Flammability limits in a zero gravity environment were defined. Key aspects of a possible spacelab experiment were investigated analytically, experimentally on the bench, and in drop tower facilities. A conceptual design for a spacelab experiment was developed.

  18. NSLS control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Yong N.

    1995-01-01

    The NSLS consists of two storage rings, a booster and a linac. A major upgrade of the control system (installed in 1978) was undertaken and has been completed. The computer architecture is being changed from a three level star-network to a two level distributed system. The microprocessor subsystem, host computer and workstations, communication link and the main software components are being upgraded or replaced. Since the NSLS rings operate twenty four hours a day a year with minimum maintenance time, the key requirement during the upgrade phase is a non-disruptive transition with minimum downtime. Concurrent with the upgrade, some immediate improvements were required. This paper describes the various components of the upgraded system and outlines the future plans

  19. NSLS control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, Susila; Tang, Y.N.

    1994-01-01

    The NSLS consists of two storage rings, a booster and a linac. A major upgrade of the control system (installed in 1978) was undertaken and has been completed. The computer architecture is being changed from a three level star-network to a two level distributed system. The microprocessor subsystem, host computer and workstations, communication link and the main software components are being upgraded or replaced. Since the NSLS rings operate twenty four hours a day a year with minimum maintenance time, the key requirement during the upgrade phase is a non-disruptive transition with minimum downtime. Concurrent with the upgrade, some immediate improvements were required. This paper describes the various components of the upgraded system and outlines the future plans. ((orig.))

  20. NSLS control system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Yong N.

    1995-12-31

    The NSLS consists of two storage rings, a booster and a linac. A major upgrade of the control system (installed in 1978) was undertaken and has been completed. The computer architecture is being changed from a three level star-network to a two level distributed system. The microprocessor subsystem, host computer and workstations, communication link and the main software components are being upgraded or replaced. Since the NSLS rings operate twenty four hours a day a year with minimum maintenance time, the key requirement during the upgrade phase is a non-disruptive transition with minimum downtime. Concurrent with the upgrade, some immediate improvements were required. This paper describes the various components of the upgraded system and outlines the future plans.

  1. Towards novel biogas upgrading processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privalova, E.

    2013-06-01

    Biogas production has considerable development possibilities not only in Finland but all over the world since it it the easiest way of creating value out of various waste fractions and represents an alternative source of renewable energy. Development of efficient biogas upgrading technology has become an important issue since it improves the quality of biogas and for example facilitating its injection into the natural gas pipelines. Moreover, such upgrading contributes to resolving the issue of increasing CO{sub 2} emissions and addresses the increasing climate change concerns. Together with traditional CO{sub 2} capturing technologies a new class of recently emerged sorbents such as ionic liquids is claimed as promising media for gas separations. In this thesis, an extensive comparison of the performance of different solvents in terms of CO{sub 2} capture has been performed. The focus of the present study was on aqueous amine solutions and their mixtures, traditional ionic liquids, 'switchable' ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s in order to reveal the best option for biogas upgrading. The CO{sub 2} capturing efficiency for the most promising solvents achieved values around 50-60 L CO{sub 2}/L absorbent. These values are superior to currently widely applied water wash biogas upgrading system. Regeneration of the solvent mixtures appeared to be challenging since the loss of initial efficiency upon CO{sub 2} release was in excess of 20-40 vol %, especially in the case of aqueous amine solutions. In contrast, some of the ionic liquids displayed reversible behavior. Thus, for selected 'switchable' ionic and poly(ionic liquid)s the CO{sub 2} absorption/regeneration cycles were performed 3-4 times without any notable efficiency decrease. The viscosity issue, typical for ionic liquids upon CO{sub 2} saturation, was addressed and the information obtained was evaluated and related to the ionic interactions. The occurrence of volatile organic compounds

  2. Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process--upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostbauer, P; Lombardi, L; Olivieri, T; Lenz, S

    2014-01-01

    Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 65-90 kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 500-1000 kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2 Nm(3)/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7 Nm(3)/(htBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.5-99%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Upgrade of the Gas Flow Control System of the Resistive Current Leads of the LHC Inner Triplet Magnets: Simulation and Experimental Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Casas-Cubillos, J; Pezzetti, M

    2014-01-01

    The 600 A and 120 A circuits of the inner triplet magnets of the Large Hadron Collider are powered by resistive gas cooled current leads. The current solution for controlling the gas flow of these leads has shown severe operability limitations. In order to allow a more precise and more reliable control of the cooling gas flow, new flowmeters will be installed during the first long shutdown of the LHC. Because of the high level of radiation in the area next to the current leads, the flowmeters will be installed in shielded areas located up to 50 m away from the current leads. The control valves being located next to the current leads, this configuration leads to long piping between the valves and the flowmeters. In order to determine its dynamic behaviour, the proposed system was simulated with a numerical model and validated with experimental measurements performed on a dedicated test bench.

  4. Biogas upgrading to biomethane. Proceedings; Biogasaufbereitung zu Biomethan. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-05

    Within the 6th Hanauer Dialogue 'Biogas upgrading to biomethane' at 21st February, 2008, the following lectures were held: (a) Processing of biogas - an introduction (Michael Beil); (b) The climate protecting targets of the Federal Republic of Germany: Which role will play the upgrading of biogas, and which legal boundary conditions are created by the Federal Government? (Uwe Holzhammer); (c) Future strategy: CH{sub 4} grids (Juergen Schmid); (d) Biogas upgrading and biomethane utilization in Sweden (Anneli Petersson); (e) Biogas upgrading and utilization of bio methane in Switzerland (Arthur Wellinger); (f) Biogas upgrading by means of pressure swing adsorption (Alfons Schulte-Schulze Berndt); (g) Biogas upgrading by means of pressurized water washing (Ulf Richter); (h) Biogas upgrading for feeding in public grids. The case of biogas plant Bruck a.d. Leitha (Michael Harasek); (i) Biogas upgrading by means of chemical absorption according to the LP Cooab process (Jerome van Beek); (j) Practical experiences in unpressurized amine washing MT bio methane (Karsten Wuensche); (k) Biogas upgrading by means of organic physical washing with HAASE biogas amplifiers (Roland Kahn); (l) Upgrading using cryogenic technology; the GPP registered -system (Jeroen de Pater); (m) Micro Gas Distribution Systems: Alternatives to biogas upgrading and grid injection (Michael Beil, Bernd Krautkremer); (n) Feeding of exchange gas. The case of project Straelen and Kerpen (Frank Schaefer); (o) Feeding of biogas from the view of grid operators (Norbert Nordmeyer); BIOGASMAX: Biogas as Vehicle Fuel - Market Expansion to 2020 Air Quality (Michael Beil, Uwe Hoffstede); (p) Study: Feeding of biogas into the natural gas distribution system (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe).

  5. The LHCb Muon Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardini, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration is currently working on the upgrade of the experiment to allow, after 2018, an efficient data collection while running at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10$^{33}$/cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The upgrade will allow 40 MHz detector readout, and events will be selected by means of a very flexible software-based trigger. The muon system will be upgraded in two phases. In the first phase, the off-detector readout electronics will be redesigned to allow complete event readout at 40 MHz. Also, part of the channel logical-ORs, used to reduce the total readout channel count, will be removed to reduce dead-time in critical regions. In a second phase, higher-granularity detectors will replace the ones installed in highly irradiated regions, to guarantee efficient muon system performances in the upgrade data taking conditions.

  6. Optics upgrade for switchyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobilarcik, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    An upgrade of the Switchyard optics is proposed. This upgrade extends the P3 (old Main Ring) lattice through enclosure C. The septa for the 3-way Meson Area split is moved from enclosure F1 to enclosure M01. The functionality of the Meson Target Train is preserved. Finally, for the purpose of demonstrating that the resulting split can be transported, a straw-man lattice is proposed for enclosure M02 and beyond.

  7. Flammability on textile of flight crew professional clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, M. C.; Oliveira, M. S.; Giacomin, A. M.; Laktim, M. C.; Baruque-Ramos, J.

    2017-10-01

    The issue about flammability of textile materials employed in passenger cabins of commercial aircrafts is an important part of safety routines planning. Once an in-flight emergency initiated with fire or smoke aboard, time becomes critical and the entire crew must be involved in the solution. It is part of the crew functions, notably the attendants, the in-flight firefighting. This study compares the values of textile material of flight attendant working cloths and galley curtain fabric with regard to flammability and Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI). Values to the professional clothing material indicate that they are flammable and the curtains, self-extinguishing. Thus, despite of the occurrences of fire outbreaks in aircrafts are unexceptional, the use of other materials and technologies for uniforms, such as alternative textile fibers and flame retardant finishes should be considered as well as the establishment of performance limits regarding flame and fire exposing.

  8. Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

    2013-07-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

  9. Applicability of Aerospace Materials Ground Flammability Test Data to Spacecraft Environments Theory and Applied Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Beeson, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ground test data in reference to flammability to spacecraft environments. It reviews the current approach to spacecraft fire safety, the challenges to fire safety that the Constellation program poses, the current trends in the evaluation of the Constellation materials flammability, and the correlation of test data from ground flammability tests with the spacecraft environment. Included is a proposal for testing and the design of experiments to test the flammability of materials under similar spacecraft conditions.

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-21 - Flammable or inflammable-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable or inflammable-TB/ALL. 30.10-21 Section 30.10-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-21 Flammable or inflammable—TB/ALL. The words flammable and inflammable are interchangeable or...

  11. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  12. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the entire...

  13. The LHCb Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piucci, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    During the LHC Run 1 the LHCb experiment has successfully performed a large number of high precision measurements in heavy flavour physics using 3 fb-1 of data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. In LHC Run 2 the LHCb is expected to integrate an additional 5 fb-1 data, however many of the measurements will remain limited by statistics. For this reason LHCb will undergo in 2020 a major upgrade during the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC, with the aim to collect 50 fb-1 of data by 2028. To achieve this goal the LHCb detector readout rate will be upgraded from the current 1 MHz to the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The luminosity delivered to the experiment will increase by a factor five, up to 2 ṡ 1033 cm-2 s-1. The online selection of events will be uniquely performed by a pure software trigger, improving the trigger efficiencies. In order to sustain the increased luminosity and readout rate, all the sub-detectors will be upgraded. The architecture of the upgraded DAQ system and trigger strategy will be presented, as well an overview of the sub-detector upgrades.

  14. Controlling the ignition and flammability of magnesium for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The perceived easy ignition and flammability of magnesium alloys create a detrimental safety feature that overshadows their high strength-to-weight ratio and hinders the aerospace application opportunities. To overcome the existing barriers a progress in understanding and controlling the reactivity of magnesium at high temperatures is required. This report describes fundamentals of magnesium ignition and flammability along with laboratory testing procedures and correlations with full scale fire scenarios, related in particular to the aircraft cabin. The influence of alloying elements on high temperature reactivity of magnesium and global efforts to develop ignition resistant and non-flammable magnesium alloys are reviewed. Although ignition and flammability represent quite different quantities, both are controlled by an oxidation resistance of the alloy and its capability to form a dense and protective surface oxide after exposures to an open flame or other heat source. Since surface oxide, composed of pure MgO, does not offer a sufficient protection, the research strategy is focused on modification of its chemistry and microstructure by micro-alloying the substrate with rare earths and other elements having high affinity to oxygen

  15. 16 CFR 1500.133 - Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling. 1500.133 Section 1500.133 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... of the container in capital letters of the type size specified in § 1500.121(c). The balance of the...

  16. Developing a flammability test system for sunglasses: results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Renan; Ventura, Liliane

    2015-03-01

    Sunglasses popularity has increased tremendously. This fact has further led to the need of certificating sunglasses accordingly to the standard NBR 15111 to protect consumers from damages and secondary hazards caused by sunglasses use. The ongoing need comes at the expense that none certification institution in Brazil performs all tests procedures required by the NBR 15111. This manuscript presents the development of a flammability test system for sunglasses and the assessments results. The equipment for testing flammability developed is made of an electrical furnace with a thermocouple and electronic system that maintains the temperature in 650 ºC. This furnace heats a steel rod used for testing flammability. A steel cable connected to a linear actuator drives the rod. The main control system is based on an ARM Cortex M0 microcontroller and we developed a PC interface in LabView to acquire data and store it. The equipment built also has a control panel with a push button, status LEDs and temperature indicator. We performed flammability tests in 45 sunglasses: 45 lenses and 45 frames using the equipment described. None of the samples ignited or continued to glow when the test has finished, however, all polycarbonate samples were melted in the contact region with the steel rod. All samples complied with the NBR 15111. The proof argues that the polycarbonate is extremely resistant to ignition.

  17. 30 CFR 77.1103 - Flammable liquids; storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flammable liquids; storage. 77.1103 Section 77.1103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... shall be kept free from grass (dry), weeds, underbrush, and other combustible materials such as trash...

  18. Estimation of the lower flammability limit of organic compounds as a function of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J R; Rowley, R L; Wilding, W V

    2011-02-15

    A new method of estimating the lower flammability limit (LFL) of general organic compounds is presented. The LFL is predicted at 298 K for gases and the lower temperature limit for solids and liquids from structural contributions and the ideal gas heat of formation of the fuel. The average absolute deviation from more than 500 experimental data points is 10.7%. In a previous study, the widely used modified Burgess-Wheeler law was shown to underestimate the effect of temperature on the lower flammability limit when determined in a large-diameter vessel. An improved version of the modified Burgess-Wheeler law is presented that represents the temperature dependence of LFL data determined in large-diameter vessels more accurately. When the LFL is estimated at increased temperatures using a combination of this model and the proposed structural-contribution method, an average absolute deviation of 3.3% is returned when compared with 65 data points for 17 organic compounds determined in an ASHRAE-style apparatus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. OMEGA upgrade staging options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Shoup, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how they are designing an upgrade to its 24-beam OMEGA laser system, OMEGA is a frequency tripled, all-rod system capable of producing 2 kJ at 0.8 ns on target. Important direct-drive-target-ignition physics could be investigated with an upgraded system capable of producing a shaped pulse consisting of a long (5ns) low-intensity, foot, smoothly transitioning into a short (0.5 ns), intense, compression pulse. The total pulse energy is 30 kJ, which, from target-irradiation uniformity considerations, must be distributed over 60 beams

  20. The UKIRT Upgrades Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Andy; Davies, John; Robson, Ian

    Tim Hawarden presented this paper to the 30th anniversary workshop, just a month before his untimely death. The editors have done their best to convert his talk into this paper, and gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Nick Rees (a member of the Upgrades team, now at Diamond Light Source). Tim's discussion concerned the UKIRT Upgrades Project, which ran through the 1990s and transformed the telescope and made it truly competitive on the world stage for operation into the twenty-first century. The reference list at the end of the paper is comprehensive; some of these are referred to in the paper itself and some are included for completeness only.

  1. Gas Detection for Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, D

    2001-01-01

    Flammable gases are often used in detectors for physics experiments. The storage, distribution and manipulation of such flammable gases present several safety hazards. As most flammable gases cannot be detected by human senses, specific well-placed gas detection systems must be installed. Following a request from the user group and in collaboration with CERN safety officers, risk analyses are performed. An external contractor, who needs to receive detailed user requirements from CERN, performs the installations. The contract is passed on a guaranteed results basis. Co-ordination between all the CERN groups and verification of the technical installation is done by ST/AA/AS. This paper describes and focuses on the structured methodology applied to implement such installations based on goal directed project management techniques (GDPM). This useful supervision tool suited to small to medium sized projects facilitates the task of co-ordinating numerous activities to achieve a completely functional system.

  2. OMEGA Upgrade preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1989-10-01

    The OMEGA laser system at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester is the only major facility in the United States capable of conducting fully diagnosed, direct-drive, spherical implosion experiments. As such, it serves as the national Laser Users Facility, benefiting scientists throughout the country. The University's participation in the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program underwent review by a group of experts under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences (the Happer Committee) in 1985. The Happer Committee recommended that the OMEGA laser be upgraded in energy to 30 kJ. To this end, Congress appropriated $4,000,000 for the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade, spread across FY88 and FY89. This document describes the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade. The proposed enhancements to the existing OMEGA facility will result in a 30-kHJ, 351-nm, 60-beam direct-drive system, with a versatile pulse-shaping facility and a 1%--2% uniformity of target drive. The Upgrade will allow scientists to explore the ignition-scaling regime, and to study target behavior that is hydrodynamically equivalent to that of targets appropriate for a laboratory microfusion facility (LMF). In addition, it will be possible to perform critical interaction experiments with large-scale-length uniformly irradiated plasmas

  3. LHCb VELO upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Karol; LHCb VELO Upgrade Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  4. Upgrade of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, work will be carried out on the CERN switching centre between Monday 23 October 8.00 p.m. and Tuesday 24 October 2.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  5. Small-scale upgrading and refinement of biogas; Smaaskalig uppgradering och foeraedling av biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Helena; Mccann, Michael; Westman, Johan (Poeyry SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Small-scale upgrading and refinement of biogas is a report which aims to compile the state of knowledge in small-scale biogas upgrading. The project have been a collaboration with Agrovaest and Energy Farm and was funded by the Foundation for Agricultural Research, Western Goetaland and the Agriculture Department. The technology available for small scale upgrade has been examined from the technical and economic standpoint. An economic comparison has been made and the production of upgraded biogas has been estimated for different raw gas flows. The work also contains information related to biogas production, upgrading and a comparison of liquid biogas, DME and Ecopar-diesel

  6. Brown coal - on the way to industrial-scale upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speich, P.

    1981-01-01

    The main fields of development of Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG (Rheinbraun) in the field of brown coal upgrading are reported, i.e. production of synthesis gas, SNG, and liquid products. The Rheinbraun research programme involves the processes of high-temperature-Winkler gasification, hydrogasification, hydroliquefaction, tube stills, and methanation plants. In the long run, nuclear power will be indispensable for base load power supply so that brown coal can be upgraded instead of being used directly for electric power generation. (HS) [de

  7. Upgrade of the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) to its Full Science Capability of Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry in Airborne Science Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P.; Dunagan, S.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this task in the AITT (Airborne Instrument Technology Transition) Program are to (1) upgrade the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument to its full science capability of measuring (a) direct-beam sun transmission to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (b) sky radiance vs scattering angle to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index spectra, shape, and mode-resolved size distribution), (c) zenith radiance for cloud properties, and (d) hyperspectral signals for trace gas retrievals, and (2) demonstrate its suitability for deployment in challenging NASA airborne multiinstrument campaigns. 4STAR combines airborne sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith pointing with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air pollution, radiant energy budgets (hence climate), and remote measurements of Earth's surfaces. Direct beam hyperspectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements are intended to tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. 4STAR test flights, as well as science flights in the 2012-13 TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) and 2013 SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) have demonstrated that the following are essential for 4STAR to achieve its full science potential: (1) Calibration stability for both direct-beam irradiance and sky radiance, (2) Improved light collection and usage, and (3) Improved flight operability and reliability. A particular challenge

  8. A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  9. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Kaestli, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7~TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  10. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00575876

    2011-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  11. Optimizing pyrolysis gasoline upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coupard, V.; Cosyns, J.; Debuisschert, Q.; Travers, Ph. [Axens (France). Kinetics and Catalysis Div.

    2002-06-01

    Stringent environmental regulations for European Gasoline will mean decrease in Pygas in Gasoline pool. Pygas upgrading routes have been developed to produce added value products such as dicyclopentadiene, cyclopentane, improved olefin cracking stocks and desulfurized aromatic streams. Examples will be presented with Economics. New generation Nickel/Palladium catalysts in the 1{sup st} stage Pygas hydrogenation units will be discussed related to increasing capacity and service life. (orig.)

  12. LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, Karol

    2017-02-11

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×10{sup 33} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm{sup 2} pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO{sub 2} coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  13. LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of $2\\times10^{33} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have $55\\times55 \\mu m^{2}$ pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separate...

  14. The LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    de Capua, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-3, will transform the experiment to a triggerless system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm−2 s −1 . The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current strip detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will allow for fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction in the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 µm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC. The VeloPix builds on the currently available Timepix3, modified to deliver a radiation hard design capable of an order of magnitude increase in output rate. The hottest regions will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s, yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO...

  15. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro; LHCb VELO Upgrade Group

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  16. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro, E-mail: alvaro.dosil@usc.es

    2016-07-11

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×10{sup 33} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm{sup 2} pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO{sub 2} coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  17. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  18. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  19. The ATLAS Upgrade programme

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    After the ¯rst successful years of LHC running, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ¯ve times the design-luminosity some 10-years from now. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and improve the physics capabilities of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  20. Upgrading Enterprise Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDunn, R

    2005-04-28

    This presentation will describe the process we went through this past year to upgrade our enterprise search tool from a very old version of Inktomi to the latest version of Verity Ultraseek. We started with requirements gathering and then compared requirements against several available products to determine which product to choose. After purchasing the product, we worked through several defined phases of implementation and customization, with initial rollout late January 2004. Finally, we will show you where we are today and describe future search plans.

  1. The Bevalac Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Feinberg, B.; Frias, R.; Gough, R.A.; Howard, D.R.; Hunt, D.B.; Krebs, G.F.; Krupnick, J.T.; Lewis, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes a proposed upgrade of the Bevalac accelerator complex in which the present Bevatron is replaced with a modern, strong-focusing 17 T-m synchrotron. This new ring is designed to accelerate all ions throughout the periodic table with intensities 100 to 1000 times higher than the present Bevatron. It will also provide a substantially improved beam spill structure and will reduce operating costs. A fast extraction capability can be used to inject a future heavy ion storage ring. Pulse-to-pulse switching of energy and ion species is an important goal. The existing injectors, shielding, experimental facilities and utilities of the present Bevalac will remain substantially intact.

  2. Bark flammability as a fire-response trait for subalpine trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejaville, Thibaut; Curt, Thomas; Carcaillet, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between the flammability properties of a given plant and its chances of survival after a fire still remain unknown. We hypothesize that the bark flammability of a tree reduces the potential for tree survival following surface fires, and that if tree resistance to fire is provided by a thick insulating bark, the latter must be few flammable. We test, on subalpine tree species, the relationship between the flammability of bark and its insulating ability, identifies the biological traits that determine bark flammability, and assesses their relative susceptibility to surface fires from their bark properties. The experimental set of burning properties was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis to assess the bark flammability. Bark insulating ability was expressed by the critical time to cambium kill computed from bark thickness. Log-linear regressions indicated that bark flammability varies with the bark thickness and the density of wood under bark and that the most flammable barks have poor insulating ability. Susceptibility to surface fires increases from gymnosperm to angiosperm subalpine trees. The co-dominant subalpine species Larix decidua (Mill.) and Pinus cembra (L.) exhibit large differences in both flammability and insulating ability of the bark that should partly explain their contrasted responses to fires in the past.

  3. Bark flammability as a fire-response trait for subalpine trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut eFrejaville

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between the flammability properties of a given plant and its chances of survival after a fire still remain unknown. We hypothesize that the bark flammability of a tree reduces the potential for tree survival following surface fires, and that if tree resistance to fire is provided by a thick insulating bark, the latter must be few flammable. We tests, on subalpine tree species, the relationship between the flammability of bark and its insulating ability, identifies the biological traits that determine bark flammability, and assesses their relative susceptibility to surface fires from their bark properties. The experimental set of burning properties was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis to assess the bark flammability. Bark insulating ability was expressed by the critical time to cambium kill computed from bark thickness. Log-linear regressions indicated that bark flammability varies with the bark thickness and the density of wood under bark and that the most flammable barks have poor insulating ability. Susceptibility to surface fires increases from gymnosperm to angiosperm subalpine trees. The co-dominant subalpine species Larix decidua (Mill. and Pinus cembra (L. exhibit large differences in both flammability and insulating ability of the bark that should partly explain their contrasted responses to fires in the past.

  4. Simulation of gas explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas explosion hazard assessments in flammable gas handling operations both offshore and onshore are crucial in order to obtain an acceptable level of safety. In order to perform such assessments good predictive tools are needed, which take account of the relevant parameters, such as geometrical design variables and gas cloud type and distribution. A theoretical simulation model must therefore be tested against sufficient experimental evidence prior to becoming a useful tool. The experimental data should include both variations in geometry and gas cloud composition and the model should give reasonable predictions without use of geometry or case dependent constants.

  5. Electrocatalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis oils to chemical and fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Ho

    The present project's aim is to liquefy biomass through fast pyrolysis and then upgrade the resulting "bio-oil" to renewable fuels and chemicals by intensifying its energy content using electricity. This choice reflects three points: (a) Liquid hydrocarbons are and will long be the most practical fuels and chemical feedstocks because of their energy density (both mass and volume basis), their stability and relative ease of handling, and the well-established infrastructure for their processing, distribution and use; (b) In the U.S., the total carbon content of annually harvestable, non-food biomass is significantly less than that in a year's petroleum usage, so retention of plant-captured carbon is a priority; and (c) Modern technologies for conversion of sunlight into usable energy forms---specifically, electrical power---are already an order of magnitude more efficient than plants are at storing solar energy in chemical form. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) generates flammable gases, char, and "bio-oil", a viscous, corrosive, and highly oxygenated liquid consisting of large amounts of acetic acid and water together with hundreds of other organic compounds. With essentially the same energy density as biomass and a tendency to polymerize, this material cannot practically be stored or transported long distances. It must be upgraded by dehydration, deoxygenation, and hydrogenation to make it both chemically and energetically compatible with modern vehicles and fuels. Thus, this project seeks to develop low cost, general, scalable, robust electrocatalytic methods for reduction of bio-oil into fuels and chemicals.

  6. LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    van Beuzekom, Martin; Ketel, Tjeerd; Gershon, Timothy; Parkes, Christopher; Reid, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a vital piece of apparatus for allowing precision measurements in hadronic physics. It provides not only superb impact parameter resolutions but also excellent momentum resolution, both important discriminating tools for precision high energy physics. This poster focuses on the R&D going into the future LHCb VELO detector. At present there are two proposed options for the upgrade; pixel chips or strip detectors. The LHCb upgrade is designed with higher luminosities and increased yields in mind. In order to get more out of the LHCb detector changes to the front end electronics will have to be made. At present, the first level hardware trigger is sets a limiting factor on the maximum efficiency for hadronic channels. As the VELO is positioned so close the proton-proton interaction region, whatever the choice of sensor, we will require efficient cooling and some proposed solutions are outlined. The LHCb TimePix telescope has had a very successful years running, with various devic...

  7. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobre, M

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb −1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb −1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. (paper)

  8. ATLAS Strip Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    A phased upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is planned. The last upgrade phase (HL-LHC) is currently foreseen in 2022-2023. It aims to increase the integrated luminosity to about ten times the original LHC design luminosity. To cope with the harsh conditions in terms of particle rates and radiation dose expected during HL-LHC operation, the ATLAS collaboration is developing technologies for a complete tracker replacement. This new detector will need to provide extreme radiation hardness and a high granularity, within the tight constraints imposed by the existing detectors and their services. An all-silicon high-granularity tracking detector is proposed. An international R&D collaboration is working on the strip layers for this new tracker. A number of large area prototype planar detectors produced on p-type wafers have been designed and fabricated for use at HL-LHC. These prototype detectors and miniature test detectors have been irradiated to a set of fluences matched to HL-LHC expectatio...

  9. The LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Panman, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of LHCb is to measure the effects of new particles or forces beyond the Standard Model. Results obtained from data collected in 2010 and 2011 show that the detector is robust and functioning well. While LHCb will be able to measure a host of interesting channels in heavy flavour decays in the upcoming few years, a limit of about 1 fb$^{-1}$ of data per year cannot be overcome without upgrading the detector. The LHC machine does not face such a limitation. With the upgraded detector, read out at 40 MHz, a much more flexible software-based triggering strategy will allow a large increase not only in data rate, as the detector would collect 5 fb$^{-1}$ per year, but also the ability to increase trigger efficiencies especially in decays to hadronic final states. In addition, it will be possible to change triggers to explore different physics as LHC discoveries point us to the most interesting channels. Our physics scope extends beyond that of flavour. Possibilities for interesting discoveries exis...

  10. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  11. ATLAS detector upgrade prospects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00184940; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb$^{-1}$ expected for LHC running to 3000 fb $^{-1}$ by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of ...

  12. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, M.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb -1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb -1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV.

  13. HP upgrade operational streamlining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, David R.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mccollums, D.; Seery, Paul J.; Ricklefs, Randall L.

    1993-01-01

    New computer technology and resources must be successfully integrated into CDSLR station operations to manage new complex operational tracking requirements, support the on site production of new data products, support ongoing station performance improvements, and to support new station communication requirements. The NASA CDSLR Network is in the process of upgrading station computer resources with HP UNIX workstations, designed to automate a wide range of operational station requirements. The primary HP upgrade objective was to relocate computer intensive data system tasks from the controller computer to a new advanced computer environment designed to meet the new data system requirements. The HP UNIX environment supports fully automated real time data communications, data management, data processing, and data quality control. Automated data compression procedures are used to improve the efficiency of station data communications. In addition, the UNIX environment supports a number of semi-automated technical and administrative operational station tasks. The x window user interface generates multiple simultaneous color graphics displays, providing direct operator visibility and control over a wide range of operational station functions.

  14. Disruption studies on ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.; Egorov, S.; Finken, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Disruptions generate large thermal and mechanical stresses on the tokamak components and are occasionally responsible for damages to the machine. For a future reactor disruptions have a significant impact on the design since all loading conditions must be analyzed in accordance with stricter design criteria (due to safety or difficult maintenance). Therefore the uncertainties affecting the predicted stresses must be reduced as much as possible with a more comprehensive set of measurements and analyses in this generation of experimental machines, and avoidance/predictive methods must be developed further. Disruption studies on ASDEX Upgrade are focused on these subjects, namely on: (1) understanding the physical mechanisms leading to this phenomenon in order to learn to avoid it or to predict its occurrence and to mitigate its effects; (2) analyzing the effects of disruptions on the machine to determine the functional dependence of the thermal and mechanical loads upon the discharge parameters. This allows, firstly, to dimension or reinforce the machine components to withstand these loads and, secondly, to extrapolate them to tokamaks still in the design phase; (3) learning to mitigate the consequence of disruptions, i.e. thermal loads, mechanical forces and runaways with injection of impurity pellets or gas. This paper is focused on most recent results concerning points, i.e. on the analysis of the degree of asymmetry of the forces and on the use of impurity puff for mitigation

  15. Low-Flammability PTFE for High-Oxygen Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walle, E.; Fallon, B.; Sheppard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified forming process removes volatile combustible materials. Flammability of cable-wrapping tape reduced by altering tape-manufacturing process. In new manufacturing process, tape formed by proprietary process of screw extrusion, followed by washing in solvent and drying. Tape then wrapped as before. Spectrogram taken after extrusion, washing, and drying shows lower hydrocarbon content. PTFE formed by new process suited to oxygen-rich environments. Safe in liquid oxygen of Space Shuttle tank and in medical uses; thin-wall shrinkable tubing in hospital test equipment, surgical instruments, and implants.

  16. The Efficiency of Non-Flammable Functional Underwear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glombikova Viera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the efficiency of non-flammable functional underwear used as a secondary heat barrier in extreme conditions. Five groups of knitted fabrics were analysed for flame resistance and selected physiological properties (water vapour permeability, air permeability, thermal resistance and liquid moisture transport by moisture management transport. The results indicated similar levels of flame resistance for the materials tested but show important differences in terms of physiological characteristics, namely liquid moisture transport, which influences the safety and comfort of protective clothing.

  17. Slum Upgrading and Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corburn, Jason; Sverdlik, Alice

    2017-03-24

    Informal settlement upgrading is widely recognized for enhancing shelter and promoting economic development, yet its potential to improve health equity is usually overlooked. Almost one in seven people on the planet are expected to reside in urban informal settlements, or slums, by 2030. Slum upgrading is the process of delivering place-based environmental and social improvements to the urban poor, including land tenure, housing, infrastructure, employment, health services and political and social inclusion. The processes and products of slum upgrading can address multiple environmental determinants of health. This paper reviewed urban slum upgrading evaluations from cities across Asia, Africa and Latin America and found that few captured the multiple health benefits of upgrading. With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focused on improving well-being for billions of city-dwellers, slum upgrading should be viewed as a key strategy to promote health, equitable development and reduce climate change vulnerabilities. We conclude with suggestions for how slum upgrading might more explicitly capture its health benefits, such as through the use of health impact assessment (HIA) and adopting an urban health in all policies (HiAP) framework. Urban slum upgrading must be more explicitly designed, implemented and evaluated to capture its multiple global environmental health benefits.

  18. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  19. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  20. LHC luminosity upgrade detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; de Roeck, Albert; Bortoletto, Daniela; Wigmans, Richard; Riegler, Werner; Smith, Wesley H

    2006-01-01

    LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm -2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: • Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) • Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector developments (lectures 2-4) • Electronics, trigger and data acquisition challenges (lecture 5) Note: the much more ambitious LHC energy upgrade will not be covered

  1. Upgrading the ATLAS control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, F.H.; Ferraretto, M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators are tools used in the research of nuclear and atomic physics. The ATLAS facility at the Argonne National Laboratory is one such tool. The ATLAS control system serves as the primary operator interface to the accelerator. A project to upgrade the control system is presently in progress. Since this is an upgrade project and not a new installation, it was imperative that the development work proceed without interference to normal operations. An additional criteria for the development work was that the writing of additional ''in-house'' software should be kept to a minimum. This paper briefly describes the control system being upgraded, and explains some of the reasons for the decision to upgrade the control system. Design considerations and goals for the new system are described, and the present status of the upgrade is discussed

  2. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C

    2014-01-01

    After the first successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about above times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  3. LHCb: The LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Borghi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the LHC. The operation and the results obtained from the data collected in 2010 and 2011 demonstrate that the detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of ~1 fb$^{–1}$ of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. We therefore plan for an upgraded spectrometer by 2018 with a 40 MHz readout and a much more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency, especially in the hadronic channels

  4. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the rst successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ve times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  5. The Fermilab ACNET upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briegel, C.; Johnson, G.; Winterowd, L.

    1990-01-01

    The Fermilab Accelerator Controls Network (ACNET) upgrade consists of a new physical medium (IEEE 802.5 token ring), additions to the calling sequence and added processor support. ACNET is the accelerator control backbone network for all data communication. A proprietary network was replaced by an IEEE standard enabling an open network with excellent characteristics for the control system. The calling sequence was enhanced for the added capabilities of the token-ring interface such as 'gather-read' and 'scatter-write'. In addition to prior support of DEC PDP11s under RS11M and VAXs under VMS, the ACNET calling sequence was implemented in the language C for the IBM PC with MS-DOS and Motorola 680x0 with MTOS using VME bus. Additional support is in progress for Intel 80x86 with MTOS using Multibus II. (orig.)

  6. The Fermilab ACNET upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, Charlie; Johnson, Glenn; Winterowd, Lin

    1990-08-01

    The Fermilab Accelerator Controls Network (ACNET) upgrade consists of a new physical medium (IEEE 802.5 token ring), additions to the calling sequence and added processor support. ACNET is the accelerator control backbone network for all data communication. A proprietary network was replaced by an IEEE standard enabling an open network with excellent characteristics for the control system. The calling sequence was enhanced for the added capabilities of the token-ring interface such as "gather-read" and "scatter-write". In addition to prior support of DEC PDP11s under RS11M and VAXs under VMS, the ACNET calling sequence was implemented in the language C for the IBM PC with MS-DOS and Motorola 680 x0 with MTOS using VME bus. Additional support is in progress for Intel 80 x86 with MTOS using Multibus II.

  7. SNS proton power upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M.; DeGraff, B.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S.-H.

    2017-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is preparing for the Proton Power Upgrade (PPU) project to increase the output energy of the accelerator from 1.0 GeV to 1.3 GeV. As part of this project with the combination of increasing the output energy and beam current, the beam power capability will be doubled from 1.4MW to 2.8MW. In this project, seven new high beta cryomodules housing 28 superconducting niobium cavities will be added to the LINAC tunnel. Lessons learned from over ten years of operation will be incorporated into the new cryomodule and cavity design. The design and the fabrication of these cryomodules and how these will be integrated into the existing accelerator will be detailed in this paper.

  8. ISTTOK control system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Ivo S., E-mail: ivoc@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Duarte, Paulo; Fernandes, Horácio; Valcárcel, Daniel F.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Silva, Carlos; Duarte, André S.; Neto, André; Sousa, Jorge; Batista, António J.N.; Carvalho, Bernardo B.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •ISTTOK fast controller. •All real-time diagnostic and actuators were integrated in the control platform. •100 μs control cycle under the MARTe framework. •The ISTTOK control system upgrade provides reliable operation with an improved operational space. -- Abstract: The ISTTOK tokamak (Ip = 4 kA, BT = 0.5 T, R = 0.46 m, a = 0.085 m) is one of the few tokamaks with regular alternate plasma current (AC) discharges scientific programme. In order to improve the discharge stability and to increase the number of AC discharge cycles a novel control system was developed. The controller acquires data from 50 analog-to-digital converter (ADC) channels of real-time diagnostics and measurements: tomography, Mirnov coils, interferometer, electric probes, sine and cosine probes, bolometer, current delivered by the power supplies, loop voltage and plasma current. The system has a control cycle of 100 μs during which it reads all the diagnostics connected to the advanced telecommunications computing architecture (ATCA) digitizers and sends the control reference to ISTTOK actuators. The controller algorithms are executed on an Intel{sup ®} Q8200 chip with 4 cores running at 2.33 GHz and connected to the I/O interfaces through an ATCA based environment. The real-time control system was programmed in C++ on top of the Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor (MARTe). To extend the duration of the AC discharges and the plasma stability a new magnetising field power supply was commissioned and the horizontal and vertical field power supplies were also upgraded. The new system also features a user-friendly interface based on HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Javascript to configure the controller parameters. This paper presents the ISTTOK control system and the consequent update of real-time diagnostics and actuators.

  9. The ring of fire: the relative importance of fuel packing versus intrinsic leaf flammability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootemaat, S.; Wright, I.J.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Viegas, D.X.

    2014-01-01

    Two different experimental set-ups were used to disentangle the relative importance of intrinsic leaf traits versus fuel packing for the flammability in fuel beds. Dried leaves from 25 Australian perennial species were burnt in fuel bed rings under controlled conditions. The flammability parameters

  10. Thermal Stability and Flammability of Polypropylene/Montmorillonite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Shu; Qin, Huai-Li; Zhang, Shi-Min; Han, Charles C.

    2004-03-01

    Smectite clays, such as montmorillonite, are a valuable class of mineral for industrial applications because of their high aspect ratio, plate morphology, and intercalative capacity. After preparation, smectite clays may be used as a nano-scalled inorganic fillers to prepare polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites, which has unique properties such as improved strength, modulus, heat resistance, surface scratch resistance and good barrier properties, at very low filler. In the present work, polypropylene/montmorillonite (PP/MMT) composites were prepared and their thermal stability and flammability were investigated. Regardless of the micro-dispersed or submicro-dispersed structure, the composites exhibit higher thermal stability and considerably reduced peak heat release rate (PHRR). It is likely caused by the physical-chemical adsorption of the volatile degradation products on the silicates. On the other hand, the addition of MMT can catalyze the initial decomposition of PP matrix and accelerate the ignition of PP matrix in combustion. It has been observed that a ceramic-like char formed on the surface of the composites during burning test. The characterization of the char surface before ignition indicates that it is an inorganic-rich surface, which provided a better barrier property, leading to the improvement of the thermal stability and reduction of flammability of the composites.

  11. Method and apparatus for enrichment or upgrading heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for upgrading and final enrichment of heavy water are described, comprising means for contacting partially enriched heavy water feed in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas (essentially D 2 ) originating in an electrolysis cell so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and means for passing the deuterium enriched water to the electrolysis cell. (author)

  12. Methods development for measuring and classifying flammability/combustibility of refrigerants. Interim report, task 2 - test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Regulations on alternative refrigerants and concerns for the environment are forcing the refrigeration industry to consider the use of potentially flammable fluids to replace CFC fluids currently in use. The objectives of this program are to establish the conditions under which refrigerants and refrigerant blends exhibit flammability and to develop appropriate methods to measure flammability.

  13. Innovation in biological production and upgrading of methane and hydrogen for use as gaseous transport biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Biofuels derived from biomass will play a major role in future renewable energy supplies in transport. Gaseous biofuels have superior energy balances, offer greater greenhouse gas emission reductions and produce lower pollutant emissions than liquid biofuels. Biogas derived through fermentation of wet organic substrates will play a major role in future transport systems. Biogas (which is composed of approximately 60% methane/hydrogen and 40% carbon dioxide) requires an upgrading process to reduce the carbon dioxide content to less than 3% before it is used as compressed gas in transport. This paper reviews recent developments in fermentative biogas production and upgrading as a transport fuel. Third generation gaseous biofuels may be generated using marine-based algae via two-stage fermentation, cogenerating hydrogen and methane. Alternative biological upgrading techniques, such as biological methanation and microalgal biogas upgrading, have the potential to simultaneously upgrade biogas, increase gaseous biofuel yield and reduce carbon dioxide emission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  15. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns

  16. Biogas upgrading and utilization: Current status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Treu, Laura; Tsapekos, Panagiotis

    2018-01-01

    Biogas production is an established sustainable process for simultaneous generation of renewable energy and treatment of organic wastes. The increasing interest of utilizing biogas as substitute to natural gas or its exploitation as transport fuel opened new avenues in the development of biogas...... upgrading techniques. The present work is a critical review that summarizes state-of-the-art technologies for biogas upgrading and enhancement with particular attention to the emerging biological methanation processes. The review includes comprehensive description of the main principles of various biogas...

  17. Superhilac upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.

    1985-05-01

    This project will increase the uranium output of the Bevalac heavy-ion facility from the currently available 10 7 to 5 x 10 7 ions/pulse, allowing accurate Lamb shift measurements to be made in U 90+ and U 91+ with important applications to the testing of quantum electrodynamics and the development of an x-ray laser. The injected beam intensity will be increased to make better use of the 10emA output space-charge limit of the Wideroe linac. Components will include a new high current MEtal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source along with an improved high current, high voltage Cockcroft-Walton power supply to handle the increased beam current. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line will be upgraded with additional focusing to manage the increased space-charge forces and with an improved vacuum to reduce charge exchange losses. Finally, the phase matching between the 23MHz Wideroe linac and the 70MHz Alvarez linac will be improved by the addition of the appropriate buncher cavities. Physics design is underway and detailed engineering is scheduled to begin in October 1985, with installation slated for the 1986 summer shutdown

  18. ATLAS Future Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00225024; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Along with maintenance and consolidation of the detector in the past few years, ATLAS has added inner b-layer to its tracking system. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requir...

  19. The Atlas upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    ATLAS is a heavy-ion accelerator system consisting of a 9-MV tandem electrostatic injector coupled to a superconducting linac. A project now well advanced will upgrade the capabilities of ATLAS immensely by replacing the tandem and its negative-ion source with a positive-ion injector that consists of an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source and a 12-MV superconducting injector linac of novel design. This project will increase the beam intensity 100 fold and will extend the projectile-mass range up to uranium. Phase 1 of the work, which is nearing completion in late 1988, will provide an injector comprising the ECR source and its 350-kV voltage platform, beam analysis and bunching systems, beam lines, and a prototype 3-MV linac. The ECR source and its voltage platform are operational, development of the new class of low-frequency interdigital superconducting resonators required for the injector linac has been completed, and assembly of the whole system is in progress. Test runs and then routine use of the Phase 1 injector systems are planned for early 1989, and the final 12-MV injector linac will be commissioned in 1990. 12 refs., 6 figs

  20. Altair performance and upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; White, John; Ball, Jesse; Trujillo, Chad

    2014-07-01

    Altair is the facility single conjugate AO system for Gemini North. Although it has been in operation for more than 10 years (and upgraded to LGS in 2007), Altair's performance is degraded by three main issues: vibrations of the telescope and instrument support structure, spatial aliasing on centroid offsets from the M2 support structure print-through on the optical surface and static non-common path aberrations. Monte-Carlo simulations can reproduce the behavior of Altair when including these three effects and they are roughly of the same order of magnitude. Solutions or mitigations are being investigated to overcome these nefarious effects and restore Altair's performance to its nominal level. A simplex algorithm as well as a phase diversity approach are being investigated to measure and correct for static aberrations. A high accuracy phase map of the M2 print-through has been obtained and is being used to calibrate and/or filter centroids affected by aliasing. A new real time computer is under consideration, to be able to handle more advanced controllers, especially notch filters to combat vibrations. In this paper we will report on the various simulations and on-sky results of this rejuvenation of one of Gemini's workhorse instruments.

  1. Alberta propylene upgrading prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    A very significant byproduct recovery and purification scheme is at present being prepared by TransCanada Midstream (TCMS). Alberta Economic Development commissioned an independent study to identify propylene supply options while proceeding with the evaluation of various propylene derivatives with regard to their fit with the Alberta context. Identification of chemical companies with derivative interests was also accomplished. By 2005, it is estimated that 280 kilo-tonnes of propylene will be available on an annual basis from byproduct sources. Those sources are oil sands upgraders, ethylene plants and refineries. The ranges of impurities and supply costs vary between the different sources. An option being considered involves pipeline and rail receipt with a major central treating and distillation facility for the production of polymer grade (PG) propylene with propane and other smaller byproducts. Special consideration was given to three chemicals in this study, namely: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and acrylic acid (AA). Above average growth rates were identified for these chemicals: demand is growing at 6 to 7 per cent a year for both PP and ACN, while demand for AA grows at 8 per cent annually. Two other possibilities were identified, propylene oxide (PO) and phenol. The study led to the conclusion that low capital and operating costs and shipping costs to the Pacific Rim represent advantages to the development of propylene derivatives in the future in Alberta. 4 refs., 87 tabs., 7 figs

  2. Mongolia - Vocational Education - Equipment Upgrades

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Evaluation design The impact evaluation sought to identify the causal impact of exposure to equipment upgrades on subsequent outcomes. Insofar as we were not able to...

  3. Mining Upgrades to Reduce Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settlement with Southern Coal Corporation and 26 affiliates requires the companies to comprehensively upgrade their coal mining and processing operations to prevent polluted wastewater from threatening rivers and streams and communities across Appalachia.

  4. Gas purification using membrane gas absorption processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dindore, V.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the increasing energy demand and the abundance of low quality natural gas reservoirs containing high percentages of CO2, considerable attention is given to the bulk removal of CO2 and upgrading of low quality natural gas. The main goal in doing so is to increase the heating value of natural

  5. Rheological characterization of polyolefin composites with reduced flammability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habrova, Veronika; Kalendova, Alena; Paravanova, Gordana

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the low-flammability halogen-free polyolefin composites were characterized with three rheological methods. In the extrusion process of the studied materials the end-products with a dissimilar surface quality were produced. Therefore, the diverse melt flow behaviours evaluated with common rheological techniques were also expected. Nevertheless, the conventional rotational and capillary rheometries were not able to describe the differences between investigated flame retarded composites in optimal way. Thus, the non-conventional rheological die Shark skin, originally designed to detect flow instabilities, was tested as a third possibility in order to better understand rheology of the filled polymer melts. It was found that the Shark skin technique is able to characterize the studied two kind flame retardants composites and can also be helpful to qualify the production bathes with identical additives/polymer formulation.

  6. Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomer Nanocomposites: Morphology, Thermophysical, and Flammability Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai K. Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel materials based on nanotechnology creating nontraditional ablators are rapidly changing the technology base for thermal protection systems. Formulations with the addition of nanoclays and carbon nanofibers in a neat thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU were melt-compounded using twin-screw extrusion. The TPU nanocomposites (TPUNs are proposed to replace Kevlar-filled ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer rubber, the current state-of-the-art solid rocket motor internal insulation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was conducted to study the char characteristics of the TPUNs at elevated temperatures. Specimens were examined to analyze the morphological microstructure during the pyrolysis reaction and in fully charred states. Thermophysical properties of density, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity of the different TPUN compositions were determined. To identify dual usage of these novel materials, cone calorimetry was employed to study the flammability properties of these TPUNs.

  7. Flammability and Photo-Stability of Selected Polymer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jeelin

    1981-01-01

    A systematic approach to the improvement of the flammability of epoxy resins, bisphenol-A polycarbonate poly(butylene terephthalate), and Nylon 6.6 by introducing halogens and loop functionality into the flame retardants is described. The phthalides (the loop functionality containing molecules) include 3,3-bis(4-bromophenyl)-phthalide, 3,3-bis(4-chlorophenyl)phthalide, and phenolphthalein. The phthalide containing epoxy resins are synthesized and characterized in comparison with the bisphenol-A epoxy resins in terms of flammability in the copolymer systems. The resins include diglycidyl ethers of phenolphthalein, bisphenol-A. tetrabromobisphenol-A, and tetraoromophenolphthalein. The vaporization of the phthalide additive in the polymers is observed in Thermal Gravimetric Analysis. The flame retardancy is primarily due to the presence of halogens. In the poly(butylene terephthalate) system, the cleavage of the C(sub aromatic) -B bond of the flame retardant additive enhances the crosslinking react ions between the aromatic rings resulting in an increase of char formation. In the epoxy resin systems, loop functionality contributes to char formation to a larger extent. The interaction between the epoxy resin and poly-(butylene terephthalate) follows the mechanism of insertion of the oxirane ring into the ester bond. This mechanism is studied by FT-IR. The investigation of the thermal properties of the char-forming phenol-formaldehyde resins is conducted to provide information for the systematic design of high temperature flame-resistant phenolics. NMR and FT-IR are used to characterize the oligomeric resins and the cured resins. The curing agents used in the study include formaldehyde, s-trioxane and terephthaloyl chloride. The brominated phenolic resins are found to have higher oxygen indices with lower char yields.

  8. Upgrading inflatable door seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, T.M.; Metcalfe, R.; Welch, L.A.; Josefowich, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Inflatable door seals are used for airlocks in CANDU stations. They have been a significant source of unreliability and maintenance cost. A program is underway to improve their performance and reliability, backed by environmental qualification testing. Only commercial products and suppliers existed in 1993. For historical reasons, these 'existing products' did not use the most durable material then available. In hindsight, neither had they been adapted nor optimized to combat conditions often experienced in the plants-sagging doors, damaged sealing surfaces, and many thousands of openings and closings per year. Initial attempts to involve the two existing suppliers in efforts to upgrade these seals were unsuccessful. Another suitable supplier had therefore to be found, and a 'new,' COG-owned seal developed; this was completed in 1997. This paper summarizes its testing, along with that of the two existing products. Resistance to aging has been improved significantly. Testing has shown that an accident can be safely withstood after 10 years of service or 40,000 openings-closings, whichever comes first. AECL's Fluid Sealing Technology Unit (FSTU) has invested in the special moulds, test fixtures and other necessary tooling and documentation required to begin commercial manufacture of this new quality product. Accordingly, as with FSTU's other nuclear products such as pump seals, the long-term supply of door seals to CANDU plants is now protected from many external uncertainties-e.g., commercial products being discontinued, materials being changed, companies going out of business. Manufacturing to AECL's detailed specifications is being subcontracted to the new supplier. FSTU is performing the quality surveillance, inspection, testing, and customer service activities concomitant with direct responsibility for supply to the plants. (author)

  9. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  10. Project scenarios for bitumen upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, P.E.; Mazurek, W.L.; Harji, A.

    2002-01-01

    The established reserves of Alberta's heavy oil resources are 178 billion barrels, and potential recoverable reserves are 315 billion barrels. The challenge of production includes the logistics of recovery, upgrading and transportation to market. Utilization of the bitumen is not simple because bitumen is too viscous to transport by pipeline. In addition, it is not processable by most existing refineries unless it can be upgraded through dilution. This paper examined different factors regarding the economic viability of various upgrading methods of a wide range of bitumen feedstocks. The study also examined the sensitivity of refinery demand to the prices of these feedstocks, along with the competitiveness among bitumen-based feedstock and conventional crudes. Western Canada, Ontario and the PADD II district in the United States are the 3 major markets for western Canadian bitumen based feedstock, the demand for which depends on refinery configurations and asphalt demand. This paper described the following 4 generic scenarios that describe Alberta bitumen upgrading projects: (1) adjacent to open pit mines, (2) adjacent to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) facilities, (3) remotely located from resource production at an existing refinery, and (4) pipeline bitumen. It was noted that producers should determine the best way to upgrade the bitumen to ensure there is an economic market for the product, but they should also be aware not to over process the bitumen so as not to leave existing refinery facilities under-utilized. 2 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  11. Investigation of the Extinguishing Features for Liquid Fuels and Organic Flammable Liquids Atomized by a Water Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytkov, Ivan V.; Zabelin, Maksim V.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of heat and mass transfer were investigated experimentally while moving and evaporating the atomized water flow in high-temperature combustion products of typical liquid fuels and organic flammable liquids: gasoline, kerosene, acetone, crude oil, industrial alcohol. We determined typical periods of liquid extinguishing by an atomized water flow of various dispersability. Data of the discharge of extinguishing medium corresponding to various parameters of atomization and duration of using the atomization devices was presented. It is shown that Um≈3.5 m/s is a minimal outflow velocity of droplets during moving while passing the distance of 1m in the high-temperature gas medium to stop the combustion of organic liquids.

  12. Investigation of the Extinguishing Features for Liquid Fuels and Organic Flammable Liquids Atomized by a Water Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytkov Ivan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and mass transfer were investigated experimentally while moving and evaporating the atomized water flow in high-temperature combustion products of typical liquid fuels and organic flammable liquids: gasoline, kerosene, acetone, crude oil, industrial alcohol. We determined typical periods of liquid extinguishing by an atomized water flow of various dispersability. Data of the discharge of extinguishing medium corresponding to various parameters of atomization and duration of using the atomization devices was presented. It is shown that Um≈3.5 m/s is a minimal outflow velocity of droplets during moving while passing the distance of 1m in the high-temperature gas medium to stop the combustion of organic liquids.

  13. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and open-quotes boundclose quotes gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete

  14. LBA-ECO LC-02 Forest Flammability Data, Catuaba Experimental Farm, Acre, Brazil: 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the results of controlled burns conducted to assess the flammability of mature forests on the Catuaba Experimental Farm of the Federal...

  15. LBA-ECO LC-02 Forest Flammability Data, Catuaba Experimental Farm, Acre, Brazil: 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides the results of controlled burns conducted to assess the flammability of mature forests on the Catuaba Experimental Farm of the...

  16. Non-Flammable Crew Clothing Utilizing Phosphorus-Based Fire Retardant Polymers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For maintaining U.S. leadership role in space exploration, there is an urgent need to develop non-flammable shirts, shorts, sweaters, and jackets without...

  17. Non-Flammable Crew Clothing Utilizing Phosphorus-Based Fire Retardant Polymers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For maintaining U.S. leadership role in space exploration, there is an urgent need to develop non-flammable shirts, shorts, sweaters, and jackets without...

  18. [Research on shortwave NIR spectroscopy and its application to in situ flammable liquid detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Du, Zhen-hui; Liu, Jin; Xu, Ke-zin

    2008-09-01

    Fast, accurate and highly effective detection in situ was important to the control of illegal transportation and the use of liquid state dangerous goods. The present article used the strong penetrability of the shortwave near-infrared ray to the packing material and liquid and measured the absorption spectra of some flammable liquids such as the absolute ethyl alcohol, absolute methanol, ammonia, turpentine, gasoline, diesel oil, petroleum etc and the partial liquors in the short wavelength region of NIR (667-1000 nm). The primitive spectral data were standardized and compressed, and then, the characteristic wavelength of the absorption spectra was analyzed using the SPSS statistics software. A math model for flammable liquid distinction was established based on the designated characteristic wavelength and can correctly detect flammable liquid using the absorbency of 3 wavelengths (881, 935 and 981 nm). According to the above the authors may construct the inexpensive spectrum instrument to check the flammable liquid non-destructively in situ.

  19. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Kallenbachthe ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) programme is directed towards physics input to critical elements of the ITER design and the preparation of ITER operation, as well as addressing physics issues for a future DEMO design. Since 2015, AUG is equipped with a new pair of 3-strap ICRF antennas, which were designed for a reduction of tungsten release during ICRF operation. As predicted, a factor two reduction on the ICRF-induced W plasma content could be achieved by the reduction of the sheath voltage at the antenna limiters via the compensation of the image currents of the central and side straps in the antenna frame. There are two main operational scenario lines in AUG. Experiments with low collisionality, which comprise current drive, ELM mitigation/suppression and fast ion physics, are mainly done with freshly boronized walls to reduce the tungsten influx at these high edge temperature conditions. Full ELM suppression and non-inductive operation up to a plasma current of {{I}\\text{p}}=0.8 MA could be obtained at low plasma density. Plasma exhaust is studied under conditions of high neutral divertor pressure and separatrix electron density, where a fresh boronization is not required. Substantial progress could be achieved for the understanding of the confinement degradation by strong D puffing and the improvement with nitrogen or carbon seeding. Inward/outward shifts of the electron density profile relative to the temperature profile effect the edge stability via the pressure profile changes and lead to improved/decreased pedestal performance. Seeding and D gas puffing are found to effect the core fueling via changes in a region of high density on the high field side (HFSHD). The integration of all above mentioned operational scenarios will be feasible and naturally obtained in a large device where the edge is more opaque for neutrals and higher plasma temperatures provide a lower collisionality. The combination of exhaust control with pellet fueling has been successfully

  20. Environmental upgrading of a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostinetto, V.; Vendrame, G.

    1999-01-01

    This article refers to an experimental study concerning the vegetative upgrading of a closed-down landfill (once used for industrial waste disposal). The aim was to check the possibility of reconstructing or aiding the natural growth of a vegetation in keeping with the surrounding area, in a tried environment such as that of landfills. The original idea contained in the approved project - which meant to generically upgrade the territory by planting species belonging to the grassy layer, shrubs and trees - has, with time, undergone some changes. On the basis of both the knowledge acquired during management and of a more accurate analysis of the territory, the experiment was preferred to aim at finding out which were the species, both continental and Mediterranean, able to gradually adjust to the surrounding landscape, leaving to natural selection the task to decide which species were more suitable to the upgrading of closed-down landfills, and which planting technique was more effective [it

  1. Status of TMX upgrade diagnostics construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornady, R.S.; Davis, J.C.; Simonen, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the status of the initial TMX Upgrade diagnostics and the state of development of additional diagnostics being prepared for later TMX Upgrade experiments. The initial diagnostic instrument set has been described in the TMX Upgrade Proposal. This set is required to get TMX Upgrade operational and to evaluate its initial performance. Additional diagnostic instruments are needed to then carry out the more detailed experiments outlined by the TMX Upgrade program milestones. The relation of these new measurements to the physics program is described in The TMX Upgrade Program Plan

  2. Clothing Flammability and Burn Injuries: Public Opinion Concerning an Overlooked, Preventable Public Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Spivak, Steven M; Pollack, Keshia M; Gielen, Andrea C; Salomon, Michele; Damant, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe knowledge of clothing flammability risk, public support for clothing flammability warning labels, and stronger regulation to reduce the risk. As part of a national survey of homeowners about residential sprinkler systems, the authors included questions about clothing flammability. The authors used an online web panel to sample homeowners and descriptive methods to analyze the resulting data. The sample included 2333 homeowners. Knowledge of clothing flammability and government oversight of clothing flammability risk was low. Homeowners were evenly split about the effectiveness of current standards; however, when presented with clothing-related burn injury and death data, a majority (53%) supported stricter standards. Most homeowners (64%) supported warning labels and indicated that such labels would either have no effect on their purchasing decisions (64%) or be an incentive (24%) to purchase an item. Owners of sprinkler-equipped homes were more likely to support these interventions than owners of homes without sprinkler systems. Public knowledge about clothing flammability risks is low. Most homeowners supported clothing labels to inform consumers of this risk and increased government intervention to reduce the risk.

  3. Reflections on a digital upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadjalli, M.

    2013-07-01

    Upon receiving US NRC's approval in 2010, the first RPS/ESPS digital upgrade using TELEPERM® XS technology was successfully installed in Spring of 2011 at the first Unit of a three-unit station, followed by the 2nd Unit installation in spring of 2012. Both Units' systems have been operating flawlessly since installation. After about two years of operation, a reflection on digital upgrades and lessons learned, from a vendor perspective, provides valuable insight for the commercial nuclear power industry.

  4. Upgrade trigger: Bandwidth strategy proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Conor; Meloni, Simone; Boettcher, Thomas Julian; Whitehead, Mark Peter; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Vesterinen, Mika Anton

    2017-01-01

    This document describes a selection strategy for the upgrade trigger using charm signals as a benchmark. The Upgrade trigger uses a 'Run 2-like' sequence consisting of a first and second stage, in between which the calibration and alignment is performed. The first stage, HLT1, uses an inclusive strategy to select beauty and charm decays, while the second stage uses offline-quality exclusive selections. A novel genetic algorithm-based bandwidth division is performed at the second stage to distribute the output bandwidth among different physics channels, maximising the efficiency for useful physics events. The performance is then studied as a function of the available output bandwidth.

  5. Argonne's atlas control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, F.; Quock, D.; Chapin, B.; Figueroa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) is located at the Argonne National Laboratory. The facility is a tool used in nuclear and atomic physics research, which focuses primarily on heavy-ion physics. The accelerator as well as its control system are evolutionary in nature, and consequently, continue to advance. In 1998 the most recent project to upgrade the ATLAS control system was completed. This paper briefly reviews the upgrade, and summarizes the configuration and features of the resulting control system

  6. A novel SnO(2)-based gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroký, K; Jiresová, J

    1994-10-01

    A novel 'two-terminal' semiconductor gas sensor was developed based on a heavily Sb-doped SnO(2) film prepared by cathodic sputtering. The sensor is heated at its operational temperature by the gas sensitive film itself. A device for detecting the leakage of flammable gases, some noxious or hazardous gases can be made in this way.

  7. Biophotonics for Biofuel Upgradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Gopinath; Mandal, Tanusri

    2017-12-01

    Experimental studies have been made to find out Cyanobacterias' biophotonical response in gaseous-fuelation and carbon dioxide fixation during photo-anaerobic digestion. A new horizontal type photo-bioreactor has been designed by using environment hazard plastic bottles and it works ideally for anoxygenic cyanobacterial growth. Through `V3-metagenomics' of 16S rRNA gene sequencing by paired-end Illumina MiSeq and downstream analysis by QIIME program, we have identified anaerobic cyanobacteria, represent the orders YS2 and Streptophyta. OTUs have been identified by aligning against Greengenes and Silva databases, separately. The flame temperature of the fuel gas is 860°C and the percent-content of carbon dioxide (CO2) is 17.6%.

  8. BIOPHOTONICS FOR BIOFUEL UPGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath RANA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have been made to find out Cyanobacterias’ biophotonical response in gaseous-fuelation and car-bon dioxide fixation during photo-anaerobic digestion. A new horizontal type photo-bioreactor has been designed by using environment hazard plastic bottles and it works ideally for anoxygenic cyanobacterial growth. Through ‘V3-metagenomics’ of 16S rRNA gene sequencing by paired-end Illumina MiSeq and downstream analysis by QIIME program, we have identified anaerobic cyanobacteria, represent the orders YS2 and Streptophyta. OTUs have been identified by aligning against Greengenes and Silva databases, separately. The flame temperature of the fuel gas is 860°C and the percent-content of carbon dioxide (CO2 is 17.6%.

  9. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  10. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  11. Upgrading of the West Area

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The rejigged main hall (EHW1) in the West Area: on background, below the crane, is the brown yoke of the Omega magnet which had been resited. The upgrading was completed by the time in July when 400 GeV protons arrived. See Annual Report 1983 p. 107.

  12. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenbach, A.; Adamek, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Akaslompolo, S.; Angioni, C.; Atanasiu, C. V.; Balden, M.; Behler, K.; Belonohy, E.; Bergmann, A.; Bernert, M.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Boom, J.; Bottino, A.; Braun, F.; Brudgam, M.; Buhler, A.; Burckhart, A.; Chankin, A.; Classen, I.G.J.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; de Marne, P.; D' Inca, R.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Endstrasser, N.; Engelhardt, K.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Fahrbach, H. U.; Fattorini, L.; Fischer, R.; Flaws, A.; Funfgelder, H.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gal, K.; Munoz, M. G.; Geiger, B.; Adamov, M. G.; Giannone, L.; Giroud, C.; Gorler, T.; da Graca, S.; Greuner, H.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Gunter, S.; Haas, G.; Hakola, A. H.; Hangan, D.; Happel, T.; Hauff, T.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hicks, N.; Hobirk, J.; Hohnle, H.; Holzl, M.; Hopf, C.; Horton, L.; Huart, M.; Igochine, V.; Ionita, C.; Janzer, A.; Jenko, F.; Kasemann, C. P.; Kalvin, S.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kirk, A.; Klingshirn, H. J.; Kocan, M.; Kocsis, G.; Kollotzek, H.; Konz, C.; Koslowski, R.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leipold, F.; Leuterer, F.; Lohs, A.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Lunt, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Maier, H.; Maggi, C.; Mank, K.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; McDermott, R.; Meister, H.; Menchero, L.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Merz, F.; Mlynek, A.; Monaco, F.; Muller, H. W.; Munich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Nold, B.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G.; Podoba, Y.; Pompon, F.; Poli, E.; Polochiy, K.; Potzel, S.; Prechtl, M.; Puschel, M. J.; Putterich, T.; Rathgeber, S. K.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Reiter, B.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Rott, M.; Ryter, F.; Sandmann, W.; Santos, J.; Sassenberg, K.; Sauter, P.; Scarabosio, A.; Schall, G.; Schmid, K.; Schneider, P. A.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B.; Sempf, M.; Serra, F.; Sertoli, M.; Siccinio, M.; Sigalov, A.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.C.C.; Sommer, F.; Stabler, A.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Sugiyama, K.; Suttrop, W.; Szepesi, T.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Told, D.; Treutterer, W.; Urso, L.; Varela, P.; Vincente, J.; Vianello, N.; Vierle, T.; Viezzer, E.; Vorpahl, C.; Wagner, D.; Weller, A.; Wenninger, R.; Wieland, B.; Wigger, C.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Wursching, E.; Yadikin, D.; Yu, Q.; Zammuto, I.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zilker, M.; Zohm, H.

    2011-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade programme is directed towards physics input to critical elements of the ITER design and the preparation of ITER operation, as well as addressing physics issues for a future DEMO design. After the finalization of the tungsten coating of the plasma facing components, the

  13. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenbach, A.; ASDEX Upgrade team,; EUROfusion MST1 Team,

    2017-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) programme is directed towards physics input to critical elements of the ITER design and the preparation of ITER operation, as well as addressing physics issues for a future DEMO design. Since 2015, AUG is equipped with a new pair of 3-strap ICRF antennas, which were designed

  14. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroth, U.; Adamek, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.

    2013-01-01

    The medium size divertor tokamak ASDEX Upgrade (major and minor radii 1.65 m and 0.5 m, respectively, magnetic-field strength 2.5 T) possesses flexible shaping and versatile heating and current drive systems. Recently the technical capabilities were extended by increasing the electron cyclotron r...

  15. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohm, H.; Adamek, J.; Angioni, C.

    2009-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade was operated with a fully W-covered wall in 2007 and 2008. Stationary H-modes at the ITER target values and improved H-modes with H up to 1.2 were run without any boronization. The boundary conditions set by the full W wall (high enough ELM frequency, high enough central heating and...

  16. Development of next generation biogas cleaning and upgrading technology: demonstration of terpene removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linders, M.J.G.; Ham, L.V. van der; Stille, L.C.; Trap, H.C.; Huigen, L.; Mooijer, J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2015-01-01

    Terpenes are a problem for biogas producers, as grid owners will refuse entry to the natural gas grid when more than a few ppm terpenes are detected in the renewable natural gas injected. The problems are related to the integrity of pipelines, safety at the upgrading plant and the fact that terpenes

  17. Biogas upgrading - Review of commercial technologies; Biogasuppgradering - Granskning av kommersiella tekniker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Fredric; Hulteberg, Christian; Persson, Tobias; Tamm, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Biogas production is growing and there is an increasing demand for upgraded biogas, to be used as vehicle fuel or injected to the natural gas grid. To enable the efficient use of biogas in these applications the gas must be upgraded, i.e. the carbon dioxide, which constitutes a large part of the raw biogas from the digester, must be separated from the methane. This report aims to evaluate the biogas upgrading technologies that are commercially available and in operation today: amine scrubbers, water scrubbers, PSA units, organic scrubbers and membrane units. The technologies are described in detail by presenting the theory behind the separation mechanism, the upgrading process as a complete system, operational issues and how these are solved, and finally the most important financial data. Furthermore, the best developed cryogenic technologies, which today are being used to purify landfill gas and biogas from some specific components and to liquefy biogas, are presented. Cryogenic upgrading is an interesting possibility, but as this report shows, the technology still has some important operational issues to resolve. Technologies which are especially focused on small-scale applications are finally presented, however not in as much detail as the other, more common technologies. The report shows that for mid-scale applications, the most common options are all viable. The scrubbing technologies all perform well and have similar costs of investment and operation. The simplicity and reliability of the water scrubber has made this the preferred choice in many applications, but the high purity and very low methane slip from amine scrubbers are important characteristics. Regarding PSA and membrane units, the investment cost for these are about the same as for scrubbers. Furthermore, recent developments of the membrane units have also made it possible to reach low methane slips with this technology. Biogas production is increasing, in Sweden and globally, and the interest for

  18. The Jarvis gas release incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manocha, J.

    1992-01-01

    On 26 September, 1991, large volumes of natural gas were observed to be leaking from two water wells in the Town of Jarvis. Gas and water were being ejected from a drilled water well, at which a subsequent gas explosion occurred. Measurements of gas concentrations indicated levels far in excess of the lower flammability limit at several locations. Electrical power and natural gas services were cut off, and residents were evacuated. A state of emergency was declared, and gas was found to be flowing from water wells, around building foundations, and through other fractures in the ground. By 27 September the volumes of gas had reduced substantially, and by 30 September all residents had returned to their homes and the state of emergency was cancelled. The emergency response, possible pathways of natural gas into the aquifer, and public relations are discussed. It is felt that the likelihood of a similar incident occurring in the future is high. 11 figs

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-29 - Gas free-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas free-TB/ALL. 30.10-29 Section 30.10-29 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-29 Gas free—TB/ALL. The term gas free means free from dangerous concentrations of flammable or toxic gases. ...

  20. Pricing and Market Segmentation with Software Upgrades.

    OpenAIRE

    Bala, R.; Carr, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    Upgrades are endemic in the software industry and create the possibility that customers might either postpone purchase or buy early on and never upgrade: When will a customer upgrade? Is it better to upgrade now or to wait for an improved version? When should we release an improved product? How much should we charge for each version? Should we give discounts on upgrades to existing customers? Will today’s sales be cannibalized by the anticipated improved version? We focus on pricing and how i...

  1. Take control of upgrading to Leopard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissell, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Start on the right foot with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard! Little is more exciting and unnerving than a major operating system upgrade for your Mac, but thousands of people have upgraded to Panther and Tiger calmly and successfully with the advice in Joe Kissell's previous hit Take Control of Upgrading... titles. Joe's expert guidance, developed over innumerable test installations, walks you through the six steps necessary before upgrading, which of Leopard's three installation options is right for you, how to perform the actual upgrade, and post-installation checking and cleanup.

  2. Operational Considerations for Oxygen Flammability Risks: Concentrated Oxygen Diffusion and Permeation Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Susana; Smith, Sarah; Juarez, Alfredo; Hirsch, David

    2010-01-01

    Increased human spaceflight operations utilize oxygen concentrations that are frequently varied with use of concentrations up to 100 percent oxygen. Even after exiting a higher percentage oxygen environment, high oxygen concentrations can still be maintained due to material saturation and oxygen entrapment between barrier materials. This paper examines the material flammability concerns that arise from changing oxygen environments during spaceflight operations. We examine the time required for common spacecraft and spacesuit materials exposed to oxygen to return to reduced ignitability and flammability once removed from the increased concentration. Various common spacecraft materials were considered: spacecraft cabin environment foams, Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit materials and foams, Advanced Crew Escape Suit materials, and other materials of interest such as Cotton, Nomex^ HT90-40, and Tiburon Surgical Drape. This paper presents calculated diffusion coefficients derived from experimentally obtained oxygen transmission rates for the tested materials and the analytically derived times necessary for reduced flammability to be achieved based on NASA flammability criteria. Oxygen material saturation and entrapment scenarios are examined. Experimental verification data on oxygen diffusion in saturation scenarios are also presented and discussed. We examine how to use obtained data to address flammability concerns during operational planning to reduce the likelihood of fires while improving efficiency for procedures.

  3. Flammability of tree species for use in fuelbreaks at forest fires prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Kovalsyki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among several silvicultural measures of forest fires prevention, fuelbreaks stands out. These structures are used to reduce and/or prevent fire spread. They consist of plantations with lower flammability species than the main species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the flammability of Psidium cattleianum Sabine., Ligustrum lucidum W. T. Aiton., Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi. and Bougainvillea glabra Choisy, for potential use in fuelbreaks. In this research Pinus taeda L. was used as control. Samples consisted of 1 g of fine material (< 0.7 cm of diameter newly collected. Samples burning were performed in epiradiator, under temperature between 250 °C and 350 °C. It was carried out 50 replications for each species. It was analyzed ignition frequency, time to ignition, combustion duration, combustion index, and it was also determined flammability value. P. taeda presents a very high combustion intensity and was classified as a flammable species. The other species were considered poorly flammable. S. terebinthifolius and B. glabra indicated low combustion intensity, L. lucidum medium and P. cattleianum high combustion intensity. In this context, it was concluded that these species have potential to be used in fuelbreaks to prevent forest fires.

  4. Position paper on flammability concerns associated with TRU waste destined for WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in southeastern New Mexico,is an underground repository, designed for the safe geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated from defense-related activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP storage rooms are mined in a bedded salt (halite) formation, and are located 2150 feet below the surface. After the disposal of waste in the storage rooms, closure of the repository is expected to occur by creep (plastic flow) of the salt formation, with the waste being permanently isolated from the surrounding environment. This paper has evaluated the issue of flammability concerns associated with TRU waste to be shipped to WIPP, including a review of possible scenarios that can potentially contribute to the flammability. The paper discusses existing regulations that address potential flammability concerns, presents an analysis of previous flammability-related incidents at DOE sites with respect to the current regulations, and finally, examines the degree of assurance these regulations provide in safeguarding against flammability concerns during transportation and waste handling. 50 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Rethinking the oilsands : new technologies target fuel use, upgrading efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonehouse, D.; Ball, C.; Proce, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Oil Sands Technology Roadmap has plans for the industry to produce 5 million barrels a day of bitumen production by 2030. The volume is in line with the size of the reserve of 175 billion barrels of recoverable oil using known technology. Currently the industry produces 1 million barrels per day and is prepared to raise production to 2 million barrels per day by 2012. However, while thermal recovery technologies open up more of the oil sands for production, they also come with the added cost of fuel for steam generation. Much of the research in the oilsands sector is focused on finding alternative fuels for power and steam and alternate sources of hydrogen for upgrading. A number of upgrading challenges were identified in the roadmap, such as reducing costs, improving the quality of synthetic crude and reducing the increasingly unsustainable use of natural gas consumption for both recovery and upgrading. Upgrading processes were reviewed in this article, with details of coking procedures, primary and secondary upgrading, as well as synthetic crude fractions and refining difficulties. Plans to use oil sands residues as an alternate energy source were discussed, in relation to the advantages of hydro-cracking and higher quality distillates. Details of a project using this procedure at the Nexen/OPTI Long Lake Project were presented. The project is designed to produce its own electricity and fuel, resulting in significant operating cost reductions. Suncor is also currently looking at gasification of by-products. Deer Creek's Joslyn oilsands project is currently testing Multi-Phase Superfine Atomized Residue (MSAR), which is a fuel designed to replace natural gas and is comprised of 70 per cent bitumen and 30 per cent water, with trace amounts of surfactants. Quadrise Canada Fuel Systems owns the rights to the new technology. MSAR is currently much cheaper than natural gas and there is an endless supply. It was suggested that delays in the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline

  6. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wolbers, Stephen; Barker, B; Bledsoe, S; Boes, T; Bowden, Mark; Cancelo, Gugstavo I; Dürling, G; Forster, B; Haynes, B; Hendricks, B; Kasza, T; Kutschke, Robert K; Mahlum, R; Martens, Michael A; Mengel, M; Olsen, M; Pavlicek, V; Pham, T; Piccoli, Luciano; Steimel, Jim; Treptow, K; Votava, Margaret; Webber, Robert C; West, B; Zhang, D

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980s, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  7. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, Boris; MIPP Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP)) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 μs, respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 s spill and read them out in ˜50 s between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front-End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  8. The TEXT upgrade vertical interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.; Gartman, M.L.; Li, W.; Chiang, K.; Shin, S.; Castles, R.L.; Chatterjee, R.; Rahman, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    A far-infrared interferometer has been installed on TEXT upgrade to obtain electron density profiles. The primary system views the plasma vertically through a set of large (60-cm radialx7.62-cm toroidal) diagnostic ports. A 1-cm channel spacing (59 channels total) and fast electronic time response is used, to provide high resolution for radial profiles and perturbation experiments. Initial operation of the vertical system was obtained late in 1991, with six operating channels

  9. MAST Upgrade – Construction Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milnes, Joe, E-mail: Joe.Milnes@ccfe.ac.uk; Ayed, Nizar Ben; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O’Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Outlines unique capability of MAST-U, including divertor and diagnostic capability. • Describes progress made in the manufacture and assembly of key MAST-U components. • Highlights the design challenges that have been overcome. • Lists the key lessons learned thus far in the project. - Abstract: The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: (1) testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); (2) adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and (3) exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progress in delivering the upgraded diagnostic capability, the modification and upgrading of the NBI heating systems and the complete overhaul of the machine control infrastructure, including a new control room with full remote participation facilities.

  10. The upgraded WIYN bench spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Willmarth, Daryl; Glaspey, John; Poczulp, Gary; Blanco, Dan; Britanik, Lana; McDougall, Eugene; Corson, Charles; Liang, Ming; Keyes, Joe; Jacoby, George

    2010-07-01

    We present the as-built design overview and post-installation performance of the upgraded WIYN Bench Spectrograph. This Bench is currently fed by either of the general-use multi-fiber instruments at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak, the Hydra multi-object positioner, and the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU). It is very versatile, and can be configured to accommodate low-order, echelle, and volume phase holographic gratings. The overarching goal of the upgrade was to increase the average spectrograph throughput by ~60% while minimizing resolution loss (three major thrusts: (1) a new CCD was provided with a nearly constant 30% increase is throughput over 320-1000 nm; (2) two Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings were delivered; and (3) installed a new all-refractive collimator that properly matches the output fiber irradiance (EE90) and optimizes pupil placement. Initial analysis of commissioning data indicates that the total throughput of the system has increased 50-70% using the 600 l/mm surface ruled grating, indicating that the upgrade has achieved its goal. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that overall image resolution meets the requirement of <20% loss.

  11. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO2, biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using...... the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO2 to CH4...... by PCR–DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree...

  12. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties of Chemicals using Group-Contribution Property Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    Process safety studies and assessments rely on accurate property data. Flammability data like the lower and upper flammability limit (LFL and UFL) play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosion. If experimental values are not available for the safety analysis due to cost...... or time constraints, property prediction models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate flammability data. The estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as less time consuming as possible. However, GC property prediction methods frequently lack rigorous uncertainty analysis. Hence...... the functional group. The contributions of all three factors are then summed up The method is simple and easy to apply. Taking into account higher order groups increases the accuracy. Furthermore, the application range is high due to the high number of considered functional and structural contributions...

  13. A preliminary study on the thermal conductivity and flammability of WPC based on some tropical woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, L. H. L.; Chua, P. H.; Lee, E. E. N.

    Selected local woods and their wood-polymer combinations or composites (WPC) were tested for their thermal conductivity and their fire resistance. WPC were prepared by polymerizing monomers " in situ" in oven dried woods by gamma radiation. The monomers included acrylonitrile (AN), 60% styrene-40% acrylonitrile (STAN), methyl methacrylate (MMA), 95% methyl methacrylate —5% dioxane (MD), and vinylidene chloride (VDC). A reduction in thermal conductivity was exhibited by all the composites prepared. W-PAN showed the greatest reduction in thermal conductivity and W-PSTAN in general showed the least. An explanation is suggested for this behaviour. The polymers PMMA and PMD were found to enhance flammability of the woods while PVDC, PAN, and PSTAN imparted fire resistance to the woods. Of the six local woods studied, Ramin-and-Keruing-polymer composites showed the highest flammable tendencies obtained. The correlation of thermal conductivity to flammability is discussed.

  14. UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

  15. Group-Contribution based Property Estimation and Uncertainty analysis for Flammability-related Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Marcarie, Camille; Abildskov, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This study presents new group contribution (GC) models for the prediction of Lower and Upper Flammability Limits (LFL and UFL), Flash Point (FP) and Auto Ignition Temperature (AIT) of organic chemicals applying the Marrero/Gani (MG) method. Advanced methods for parameter estimation using robust...... regression and outlier treatment have been applied to achieve high accuracy. Furthermore, linear error propagation based on covariance matrix of estimated parameters was performed. Therefore, every estimated property value of the flammability-related properties is reported together with its corresponding 95...

  16. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  17. Microbial electrochemical separation of CO2 for biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkoli, Argyro; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2018-01-01

    Biogas upgrading to natural gas quality has been under focus the recent years for increasing the utilization potential of biogas. Conventional methods for CO2 removal are expensive and have environmental challenges, such as increased emissions of methane in the atmosphere with serious greenhouse...... impact. In this study, an innovative microbial electrochemical separation cell (MESC) was developed to in-situ separate and regenerate CO2 via alkali and acid regeneration. The MESC was tested under different applied voltages, inlet biogas rates and electrolyte concentrations. Pure biomethane...... was obtained at 1.2 V, inlet biogas rate of 0.088 mL/h/mL reactor and NaCl concentration of 100 mM at a 5-day operation. Meanwhile, the organic matter of the domestic wastewater in the anode was almost completely removed at the end. The study demonstrated a new sustainable way to simultaneously upgrade biogas...

  18. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  19. Review of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Catalytically Upgrading Vegetable Oils into Hydrocarbon Biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhui Zhao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To address the issues of greenhouse gas emissions associated with fossil fuels, vegetable oilseeds, especially non-food oilseeds, are used as an alternative fuel resource. Vegetable oil derived from these oilseeds can be upgraded into hydrocarbon biofuel. Catalytic cracking and hydroprocessing are two of the most promising pathways for converting vegetable oil to hydrocarbon biofuel. Heterogeneous catalysts play a critical role in those processes. The present review summarizes current progresses and remaining challenges of vegetable oil upgrading to biofuel. The catalyst properties, applications, deactivation, and regeneration are reviewed. A comparison of catalysts used in vegetable oil and bio-oil upgrading is also carried out. Some suggestions for heterogeneous catalysts applied in vegetable oil upgrading to improve the yield and quality of hydrocarbon biofuel are provided for further research in the future.

  20. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohm, H.; Angioni, C.; Arslanbekov, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results from ASDEX Upgrade are presented. An improved understanding of energy and particle transport emerges in terms of a 'critical gradient' model for the temperature gradients. Coupling this to particle diffusion explains most of the observed behaviour of the density profiles, in particular the finding that strong central heating reduces the tendency for density profile peaking. Internal transport barriers with T e and T i in excess of 20 keV (but not simultaneously) have been achieved. By shaping the plasma, a regime with small type II ELMs has been established. Here, the maximum power deposited on the target plates was greatly reduced at constant average power. Also, an increase of the ELM frequency by injection of shallow pellets was demonstrated. ELM free operation is possible in the QH-mode regime previously found in DIII-D which has also been established on ASDEX Upgrade. Regarding stability, a regime with benign NTMs was found. During ECCD stabilisation of NTMs, β N could be increased well above the usual onset level without a reappearance of the NTM. ECRH and ECCD have also been used to control the sawtooth repetition frequency at a moderate fraction of the total heating power. The inner wall of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel has increasingly been covered with tungsten without detrimental effects on plasma performance. Regarding scenario integration, a scenario with a large fraction of non inductively driven current (≥ 50%), but without internal transport barrier has been established. It combines improved confinement (τ E =τ ITER98 ∼ 1:2) and stability (β N ≤ 3:5) at high Greenwald fraction (n e =n GW ∼ 0:85) in steady state and with type II ELMy edge. (author)

  1. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, A.; Aguiam, D.; Aho-Mantila, L.

    2017-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) programme is directed towards physics input to critical elements of the ITER design and the preparation of ITER operation, as well as addressing physics issues for a future DEMO design. Since 2015, AUG is equipped with a new pair of 3-strap ICRF antennas, which were designed...... and non-inductive operation up to a plasma current of  Ip = 0.8 MA could be obtained at low plasma density. Plasma exhaust is studied under conditions of high neutral divertor pressure and separatrix electron density, where a fresh boronization is not required. Substantial progress could be achieved...

  2. CMS upgrade and future plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoepfner Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CMS plans for operation at the LHC phase-II unprecedented in terms of luminosity thus resulting in serious consequences for detector performance. To achieve the goal to maintain the present excellent performance of the CMS detector, several upgrades are necessary. To handle the high phase-II data rates, the readout and trigger systems are redesigned using recent technology developments. The high particle rates will accelerate detector aging and require replacement of the tracker and forward calorimeters. In addition, the muon system will be extended.

  3. The Upgraded D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U.

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  4. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  5. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days

  6. Upgrade of the AGS H- linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, J.G.; Buxton, W.; Kponou, A.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Raparia, D.

    1994-01-01

    The AGS linac presently accelerates 25 mA of H - to 200 MeV at a 5 Hz rep-rate and 500 μs pulse width. The Booster takes 4 pulses every 3.8 seconds, and the remaining pulses are used for isotope production. The authors are in the process of upgrading the linac to increase the average current delivered for isotope production by more than a factor of two, while at the same time expecting to decrease linac downtime. Various aspects of this upgrade are discussed, including the upgrade of the control system, new high power transmission line, transport line vacuum, and rf power supply system upgrades

  7. Performance of HT-WGS Catalysts for Upgrading of Syngas Obtained from Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano Bujan, M.; Sanchez Hervas, J. M.

    2009-05-21

    Oxygen pressurized gasification of biomass out stands as a very promising approach to obtain energy or hydrogen from renewable sources. The technical feasibility of this technology is being investigated under the scope of the VI FP CHRISGAS project, which has started in September 2004 and has a duration of five years. The Division of Combustion and Gasification of CIEMAT participates in this project in Work Package 13: Ancillary and novel processes, studying innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems. Such systems include novel or available high temperature water gas shift catalysts and commercially available membranes not yet tried in this type of atmosphere. This report describes the activities carried out during the period 2005-2007 regarding the performance of high temperature water gas shift catalysts for upgrading of synthesis gas obtained from biomass gasification. (Author) 28 refs.

  8. 46 CFR 58.01-55 - Tanks for flammable and combustible oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... engine, including any oil-pressure pumps, filters, and heaters dealing with oil pressures above 26 psi... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tanks for flammable and combustible oil. 58.01-55... combustible oil. (a) For the purposes of this section, a machinery space of category A is a space that...

  9. MESERAN Test Results for Elimination of Flammable Solvents in Wipe Applications at Pantex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. G. Benkovich

    2005-03-30

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents for wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and longterm materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues and accelerated aging studies are among the tests that are being conducted and that are used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. The results are compared to the traditionally used isopropyl alcohol, which serves as the baseline cleaner. This report details the results of MESERAN (Measurement and Evaluation of Surfaces by Evaporative Rate ANalysis) testing performed at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) to quantify the cleaning efficacy on samples contaminated with the various contaminants and cleaned by wiping with the various solvents being evaluated.

  10. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Reliability Analysis N Appendix N TO Part 25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. N Appendix N TO Part 25—Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis N25.1General. (a) This...

  11. 75 FR 67047 - Standard for the Flammability of Mattresses and Mattress Pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... 1972 under the authority of the Flammable Fabrics Act (``FFA''), 15 U.S.C. 1191 et seq. When the... has considered, and a preliminary regulatory analysis. 15 U.S.C. 1193(i). Before issuing a final rule, the Commission must prepare a final regulatory analysis and make certain findings concerning any...

  12. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  13. Non-Toxic, Non-Flammable, -80 C Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a non-toxic, non-flammable, -80 C phase change material (PCM) to be used in NASA's ICEPAC capsules for biological sample preservation in flight to and from Earth orbit. A temperature of about -68 C or lower is a critical temperature for maintaining stable cell, tissue, and cell fragment storage.

  14. Explosion protection for vehicles intended for the transport of flammable gases and liquids--an investigation into technical and operational basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Hans; Günther, Werner

    2009-05-30

    In Europe, the transport of flammable gases and liquids in tanks has been impacted by new developments: for example, the introduction of the vapour-balancing technique on a broad scale and the steady increase in the application of electronic components with their own power sources; furthermore, new regulatory policies like the ATEX Directives are being enforced in the European Union. With this background in mind, the present investigation aims to provide a basis for future developments of the relevant explosion protection regulations in the safety codes for the transport of dangerous goods (RID/ADR). Specifically, the concentration of gas in the air was measured under various practical conditions while tank vehicles were being loaded with flammable gases or liquids. These spot-test data were supplemented by systematic investigations at a road tanker placed in our test field. With respect to non-electrical ignition sources, a closer investigation of the effect of hot surfaces was carried out. With regard to improving the current regulations, the results of our investigation show that it would be reasonable to implement a stronger differentiation of the characteristics of the dangerous goods (gaseous/liquid, flashpoint) on the one hand and of the techniques applied (loading with and without vapour-balancing system) on the other hand. Conclusions for the further development of the current international regulations are proposed.

  15. A quantitative risk-assessment system (QR-AS) evaluating operation safety of Organic Rankine Cycle using flammable mixture working fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wang, Xueying; Shu, Gequn; Wu, Mingqiang; Yan, Nanhua; Ma, Xiaonan

    2017-09-15

    Mixture of hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide shows excellent cycle performance in Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) used for engine waste heat recovery, but the unavoidable leakage in practical application is a threat for safety due to its flammability. In this work, a quantitative risk assessment system (QR-AS) is established aiming at providing a general method of risk assessment for flammable working fluid leakage. The QR-AS covers three main aspects: analysis of concentration distribution based on CFD simulations, explosive risk assessment based on the TNT equivalent method and risk mitigation based on evaluation results. A typical case of propane/carbon dioxide mixture leaking from ORC is investigated to illustrate the application of QR-AS. According to the assessment results, proper ventilation speed, safe mixture ratio and location of gas-detecting devices have been proposed to guarantee the security in case of leakage. The results revealed that this presented QR-AS was reliable for the practical application and the evaluation results could provide valuable guidance for the design of mitigation measures to improve the safe performance of ORC system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ALICE Upgrades: Plans and Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Tieulent, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration consolidated and completed the installation of current detectors during LS1 with the aim to accumulate 1 nb$^{-1}$ of Pb-Pb collisions during Run 2 corresponding to about 10 times the Run 1 integrated luminosity. In parallel, the ALICE experiment has a rich detector upgrade programme scheduled during the second LHC long shutdown (LS2, 2018-2019) in order to fully exploit the LHC Runs 3 and 4. The main objectives of this programme are: improving the tracking precision and enabling the read-out of all Pb-Pb interactions at a rate of up to 50 kHz, with the goal to record an integrated luminosity of 10 nb$^{-1}$ after LS2 in minimum-bias trigger mode. This sample would represent an increase by a factor of one hundred with respect to the minimum-bias sample expected during Run 2. The implementation of this upgrade programme, foreseen in LS2, includes: a new low-material Inner Tracking System at central rapidity with a forward rapidity extension to add vertexing capabilities to the current M...

  17. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Titus, P.; Rogoff, P.; Zolfaghari, A.; Mangra, D.; Smith, M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  18. BNFL Magnox - Upgrades and enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udbinac, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the past, generic models, restrictive budgets,and general shortages of resources have limited the scope of the UK's older Magnox simulators. Nevertheless, the simulators evolved slowly over time, becoming more like their reference plants, as resources became available. Three years ago, the Training and Development Branch of Magnox Electric plc took a giant leap, investing significant resources into the modernization of their training simulators. New hardware was built, including a new simulator room. The simulator software was ported from Unix running on outdated servers to new servers running Microsoft Windows NT. Perhaps most significantly, major model enhancements were made to key plant systems to significantly increase the likeness of each simulator to its reference plant. The upgrade to NT, the addition of state-of-the-art instructor stations, and some of the model enhancements were achieved with SimPort, an all-inclusive simulation package provided by DS and S. This paper will provide a more detailed view of the Magnox modular simulators, including how they are used and how they have benefited from the enhancements and upgrades implemented during the project. (author)

  19. Upgrade and modernization of NBSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    The NBSR, a 20-MW research reactor operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, has become the leading US laboratory in neutron research. About 1000 scientists from 200 industries, government and foreign laboratories, and universities conducted experiments at the NBSR in 19931. Since 1990, when the first instruments in the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) became available, the number of research participants has doubled. A major program of modernization and facility upgrade was initiated in order to meet this growing demand, and to assure safe and reliable reactor operations for 30 additional years. A scheduled shutdown, begun in late May 1994, is nearing completion at this writing (May 1995). To upgrade the CNRF, the D 2 0 cold neutron source has been replaced with a liquid hydrogen cold source, and the remaining four neutron guides are being installed. In addition, the primary and secondary cooling systems have been modernized with the installation of plate heat exchangers, and the refueling system has been completely refurbished. Periodic maintenance is also being done. The entire D20 primary coolant inventory is about to be replaced, and new shim arms have been installed

  20. MPTS Operation and Recent Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, B. P.; Diallo, A.; Labik, G.; Stevens, D. R.

    2011-10-01

    NSTX's Multi-Point Thomson Scattering (MPTS) diagnostic has supported plasma operation for over ten years, during which time a phased implementation has been pursued. The measurements span the horizontal midplane covering around 90 percent of the full-bore confined plasma and the scrape-off layer (SOL). While beginning with one 30-Hz Nd:YAG laser and 10 radial positions, MPTS has operated with a second laser - combined frequency of 60 Hz - and 30 radial positions during the past six years. A recent upgrade brings the total number of radial positions to 42. While most of the 12 new channels are set to improve spatial resolution in the pedestal and internal transport barrier (ITB) regions, a limited number of extra channels have been added to the inner edge and the SOL. Many of the new channels resulted from the splitting of existing fiber bundles, an option that had been left open in MPTS's original design. The 42-channel configuration is planned to begin operation during the 2011 NSTX experimental run. Experimental results will be presented. Future plans for the upcoming NSTX center-stack upgrade will be discussed. U.S. Dept. of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. ALICE upgrades its powerful eyes

    CERN Multimedia

    Yuri Kharlov, ALICE Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) is a high-resolution photon detector that measures the photons coming out of the extremely hot plasma created in the lead-lead collisions at the LHC. Taking advantage of the long accelerator shut-down, the ALICE teams are now repairing and upgrading the existing modules and getting ready to install the brand-new module in time for the next run. The upgraded PHOS detector will be faster and more stable with wider acceptance and improved photon identification.   PHOS crystal matrix during repair. The key feature and the main complexity of the ALICE PHOS detector is that it operates at a temperature of -25°C, which makes it the second-coldest equipment element at the LHC after the cryogenic superconducting magnets. Since 2009 when it was installed, the PHOS detector, with its cold and warm volumes, has been immersed in airtight boxes to avoid condensation in the cold volumes. The 10,752 lead tungstate crystals of the PHOS were completely insulated fr...

  2. Contribution to internal pressure and flammable gas concentration in RAM transport packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrant, M.M.; Brown, N.

    1989-01-01

    Various facilities in the US operated by the US Department of Energy generate wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) isotopes (such as plutonium and americium) that decay primarily by emission of alpha particles. The alpha particles lose energy in their passage through matter and change the material chemically in the process called radiolysis. The waste materials consist of a wide variety of commercially available plastics, paper, cloth, and rubber; concreted or sludge wastes containing water; and metals, glass, and other solid inorganic materials. TRU wastes that have surface dose rates of 200 mrem/hr or less are typically packaged in plastic bags placed inside metal drums or boxes that are vented through high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These wastes are to be transported from waste generation or storage sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the TRUPACT-II, a Type B package

  3. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  4. GTHTR300 cost reduction through design upgrade and cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xing L.; Sato, Hiroyuki; Kamiji, Yu; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency began design and development of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor of 300MWe nominal output (GTHTR300) in 2001. The reactor baseline design completed three years later was based on 850°C core outlet temperature and a direct cycle gas turbine balance of plant. It attained 45.6% net power generation efficiency and 3.5US¢/KWh cost of electricity. The cost was estimated 20% lower than LWR. The latest design upgrade has incorporated several major technological advances made in the past ten years to both reactor and balance of plant. As described in this paper, these advances have enabled raising the design basis reactor core outlet temperature to 950°C and increasing power generating efficiency by nearly 5% point. Further implementation of seawater desalination cogeneration is made through employing a newly-proposed multi-stage flash process. Through efficient waste heat recovery of the reactor gas turbine power conversion cycle, a large cost credit is obtained against the conventionally produced water prices. Together, the design upgrade and the cogeneration are shown to reduce the GTHTR300 cost of electricity to under 2.7 US¢/KWh. (author)

  5. First Results from the DUV-FEL Upgrade at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Pinayev, Igor; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2005-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL is the world’s only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. Tremendous progress was made in both HGHG FEL and its applications in the last couple years.*,** In response to the requests of many users to study chemical science at the facility, the DUV-FEL linac was upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 uJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for ultraviolet radiation and enable state-of-the-art gas phase photochemistry research. The upgraded facility will also make possible key R&D experiments such as higher harmonic HGHG (n>5) that would lay the groundwork for future X-ray FEL based on HGHG. The upgraded HGHG FEL will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at either 800 nm or 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New HGHG modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers w...

  6. Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This project will execute the design, procurement, construction, startup, and turnover activities for upgrades to the stack monitoring system on selected Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) ventilation systems. In this plan, the technical, schedule, and cost baselines are identified, and the roles and responsibilities of project participants are defined for managing the Stack Monitoring System Upgrades, Project W-420

  7. LHCb Upgraded RICH 2 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Garsed, Philip John; Cardinale, Roberta; Petrolini, Alessandro; Benettoni, Massimo; Simi, Gabriele; Zago, M; Easo, Sajan; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Frei, Christoph; He, Jibo; Piedigrossi, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb experiment and, specifically, its two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors will undergo a major upgrade. RICH 2 will be refurbished with new photon detectors and their associated electronics, with the capability of up to 40 MHz sustained acquisition rate. A new support and cooling system has been developed for the two photodetector arrays, retaining the vessel, gas and optical systems unchanged. This document describes their new mechanical arrangement, its engineering design, installation and alignment. A summary of the project schedule and Institute responsibilities is provided.

  8. Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment of Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (central off-gas scrubber facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in response to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lined concrete vault, replacing an existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. Ne scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation. A formal design certification statement is included herein on Page 53, a certification covering the installation shall be executed prior to placing the modified facility into service

  9. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation

  10. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  11. Possible scenarios for the LHC injector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2006-01-01

    The possible upgrade of the LHC injector chain is a crucial step towards the LHC luminosity upgrade beyond 1034 cm-2s-1. It is also a mandatory requirement for the LHC energy upgrade well beyond the ultimate value of 7.56 TeV per beam. By pushing the accelerator parameters to the ultimate performance we can increase to 1.7×1011 the bunch population and eventually reach a peak luminosity of 2.3×1034 cm-2s-1. To go beyond, a considerable improvement of the LHC parameters, such as ß*, beam intensity, bunch length, number of circulating bunches is required. Finally, the upgrade of the injector complex and of the injection energy is another important ingredient to upgrade both peak and integrated luminosity up to an order of magnitude above the nominal value.

  12. Upgrade Opportunities for Buildings in City Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This proposal focus on the potential of the existing buildings upgrade process in achieving the 20-20-20 goals, as these are the biggest energy consumers, the most significant built area and the better placed buildings within our cities. These buildings frequently lack basic maintenance and need intervention, but include within themselves a vast amount of incorporated energy and centuries of construction knowledge. Beyond the advantages that may result from re-attracting people back into the city centre, upgrading these existing buildings can also have positive bounce-back effect on the reduction of the energy needs related to transportation, as demonstrated in studies that alert to the impact of the building sprawl in the total energy use. As “buildings account for 40 % of total energy consumption in the Union”, the better performance of this sector has a significant role, remembering that “these requirements shall take account of general indoor climate conditions, in order to avoid possible negative effects such as inadequate ventilation, as well as local conditions and the designated function and the age of the building” [1]. The importance of “upgrading” the existing buildings resides on the fact that new buildings represent only approximately 1 or 2% of the total usable area, an estimate that is bound to decrease due to the current construction crisis. While the recent buildings tend to be more efficient, the numerous existing buildings are important stakeholders due to their massive consumptions and incorporated energy. The ongoing Annex 56 on “Energy & Greenhouse Gas Optimized Building Renovation” assumes that “Current standards do not respond effectively to the numerous constraints imposed by existing buildings and in many cases, the requirements result in very expensive measures and complex procedures, seldom accepted by occupants, owners or developers. It is then urgent for the new standards to respond to these

  13. The ASDEX Upgrade discharge schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, G.; Engelhardt, K.; Raupp, G.; Treutterer, W.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.

    2007-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade's recently commissioned discharge control system (DCS) marks the transition from a traditional programmed system to a highly flexible 'data driven' one. The allocation of application processes (APs) to controllers, the interconnection of APs through uniquely named signals, and AP control parameter values are all defined as data, and can easily be adapted to the requirements of a particular discharge. The data is laid down in a set of XML documents which APs request via HTTP from a configuration server before a discharge. The use of XML allows for easy parsing, and structural validation through (XSD) schemas. The central input to the configuration process is the discharge schedule (DS), which embodies the dynamic behaviour of a planned discharge as reference trajectories grouped in segments, concatenated through transition conditions. Editing, generation and validation tools, and version control through CVS allow for efficient management of DSs

  14. MHD phenomena at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenter, S.; Gude, A.; Maraschek, M.; Pinches, S.D.; Sesnic, S.; Wolf, R.C.; Yu, Q.; Zohm, M.

    2001-01-01

    The onset of neoclassical tearing modes leads to the most serious β limit at ASDEX Upgrade. The β p value for the onset of neoclassical tearing modes is found to be proportional to the ion gyro-radius for collisionless plasmas as proposed by the ion polarisation current model. Larger collisionalities have a stabilizing effect. Sawtooth crashes or fishbones can trigger the mode, and in a few cases it appears spontaneously. Fishbones are shown to be able to cause magnetic reconnection. The fractional energy loss due to a (3,2) mode saturates for large pressures at around 25 %. In discharges with large impurity accumulation unusual MHD phenomena such as cascades of high-n tearing modes and modes driven by positive pressure gradients have been found. (author)

  15. MHD phenomena at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenter, S.; Gude, A.; Maraschek, M.; Pinches, S.D.; Sesnic, S.; Wolf, R.C.; Yu, Q.; Zohm, H.

    1999-01-01

    The onset of neoclassical tearing modes leads to the most serious β limit at ASDEX Upgrade. The β p value for the onset of neoclassical tearing modes is found to be proportional to the ion gyro-radius for collisionless plasmas as proposed by the ion polarisation current model. Larger collisionalities have a stabilizing effect. Sawtooth crashes or fishbones can trigger the mode, and in a few cases it appears spontaneously. Fishbones are shown to be able to cause magnetic reconnection. The fractional energy loss due to a (3,2) mode saturates for large pressures at around 25%. In discharges with large impurity accumulation unusual MHD phenomena such as cascades of high-n tearing modes and modes driven by positive pressure gradients have been found. (author)

  16. ATR Technical Specification Upgrade Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, R.T.; Durney, J.L.; Freund, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a 250 MW, uranium-aluminum fueled test reactor which began full power operation in 1969. The initial operation was controlled by an Operating Limits document based on the original Safety Analysis Report. Additional safety bases were later developed to support Technical Specifications which were approved and implemented in 1977. The Technical Specifications which were initially developed with content and format specified in ANSI/ANS--15.1, ''The Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors.'' The safety basis documentation and the Technical Specifications have been updated as required to maintain them current with the ATR facility configuration. All revisions have been made with a content, format and style consistent with the original. A major, two-phase program to upgrade the content, format and style is in progress. This paper describes the first phase of this program

  17. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  18. ATR technical specification upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCraken, R.T.; Durney, J.L.; Freund, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a 250 MW, uranium-aluminum fueled test reactor which began full power operation in 1969. The initial operation was controlled by an Operating Limits document based on the original Safety Analysis Report. Additional safety bases were later developed to support Technical Specifications which were approved and implemented in 1977. The Technical Specifications were initially developed with the content and format specified in ANSI/ANS-15.1, The Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors. The safety basis documentation and the Technical Specifications have been updated as required to maintain them current with the ATR facility configuration. All revisions have been made with a content, format and style consistent with the original. A major, two-phase program to upgrade the content, format and style is in progress. This paper describes the first phase of this program

  19. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berst, Kara [Chickasaw Nation, Ada, OK (United States); Howeth, Maria [Chickasaw Nation, Ada, OK (United States)

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  20. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Liu, P.K.T. (Aluminum Co. of America, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Membrane reactors are today finding extensive applications for gas and vapor phase catalytic reactions (see discussion in the introduction and recent reviews by Armor [92], Hsieh [93] and Tsotsis et al. [941]). There have not been any published reports, however, of their use in high pressure and temperature liquid-phase applications. The idea to apply membrane reactor technology to coal liquid upgrading has resulted from a series of experimental investigations by our group of petroleum and coal asphaltene transport through model membranes. Coal liquids contain polycyclic aromatic compounds, which not only present potential difficulties in upgrading, storage and coprocessing, but are also bioactive. Direct coal liquefaction is perceived today as a two-stage process, which involves a first stage of thermal (or catalytic) dissolution of coal, followed by a second stage, in which the resulting products of the first stage are catalytically upgraded. Even in the presence of hydrogen, the oil products of the second stage are thought to equilibrate with the heavier (asphaltenic and preasphaltenic) components found in the feedstream. The possibility exists for this smaller molecular fraction to recondense with the unreacted heavy components and form even heavier undesirable components like char and coke. One way to diminish these regressive reactions is to selectively remove these smaller molecular weight fractions once they are formed and prior to recondensation. This can, at least in principle, be accomplished through the use of high temperature membrane reactors, using ceramic membranes which are permselective for the desired products of the coal liquid upgrading process. An additional incentive to do so is in order to eliminate the further hydrogenation and hydrocracking of liquid products to undesirable light gases.

  1. Autogenerative high pressure digestion: anaerobic digestion and biogas upgrading in a single step reactor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Fermoso, F.G.; Weijma, J.; Zagt, K.; Lier, van J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional anaerobic digestion is a widely applied technology to produce biogas from organic wastes and residues. The biogas calorific value depends on the CH4 content which generally ranges between 55 and 65%. Biogas upgrading to so-called ‘green gas’, with natural gas quality, generally proceeds

  2. Application of gamma-ray densitometry in developing primary upgrading processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.D.S.; Patmore, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray densitometry has been applied in developing processes for upgrading heavy oils, refinery residua, tar sand bitumen and coal into synthetic crudes. These processes normally operate at high temperatures and pressures, thus non-invasive monitors are highly desirable. Examples of applications at CANMET are given for the following three areas: gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid multiphase flow hydrodynamic studies, monitoring of ash concentration and measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of liquids. (author)

  3. Upgrading nuclear safeguards in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, Maribeth; Murakami, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    When the Soviet Union collapsed in December 1991, Kazakhstan inherited 1,410 nuclear warheads. Within three years, by 1994, Kazakhstan had formally acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and transferred its last nuclear warhead to Russia in April 1995. Its NPT safeguards agreement with the IAEA came into force in 1994 and all facilities are under safeguards. In February 2004 Kazakhstan signed the Additional Protocol to its IAEA safeguards agreement, though this not yet in force. Kazakhstan played a key role during the Soviet era as a supplier and processor of uranium. The BN-350 fast reactor at Aktau (formerly Shevchenko), on the shore of the Caspian Sea, successfully produced up to 135 MWe of electricity and 80,000 m3/day of potable water over some 27 years until it was closed down in mid-1999. The IAEA being involved in upgrading the nuclear material accountancy and control systems of all Member States requested, Japan and Sweden to conduct independent evaluations at the Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Committee (KAEC), and specifically at the Ulba Metallurgical Plant (UMP) and identified areas that could be improved with respect to nuclear material accountancy and control. In June 2003 the Agency, with four Member States and the European Union, undertook a programme to upgrade the nuclear accountancy and control systems within Kazakhstan with special emphasis on the UMP in Ust-Kamenogorsk in northeast Kazakhstan. The current IAEA programme is focused on upgrading hardware and software systems and the training of personnel in Kazakhstan. Due to the complexity of the facility, special emphasis is on training personnel and upgrading systems at the UMP. At the UMP the focus is on reducing the uncertainty in the hold-up (material which cannot be cleaned out) in the process lines, better determining the amount of nuclear material that is released from the facility as waste or retained at the facility as waste, increasing the ability of the facility to more

  4. Cycling performance of lithium polymer cells assembled by in situ polymerization of a non-flammable ionic liquid monomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon-Sung; Kim, Dong-Won

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by in situ polymerization of ionic liquid in the lithium polymer cells. • Flammability of the electrolyte was significantly reduced by polymerizing electrolyte containing a non-flammable ionic liquid monomer. • The cells assembled with polymeric ionic liquid-based electrolytes exhibited reversible cycling behavior with good capacity retention. -- Abstract: Lithium polymer cells composed of a lithium negative electrode and a LiCoO 2 positive electrode were assembled with a gel polymer electrolyte obtained by in situ polymerization of an electrolyte solution containing an ionic liquid monomer with vinyl groups. The polymerization of the electrolyte solution containing the non-flammable ionic liquid monomer resulted in a significant reduction of the flammability of the gel polymer electrolytes. The lithium polymer cell assembled with the stable gel polymer electrolyte delivered a discharge capacity of 134.3 mAh g −1 at ambient temperature and exhibited good capacity retention

  5. Upgrading of western shale oil by hydropyrolysis and hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunger, J.W.; Russell, C.P.; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Pu, J.

    1992-07-01

    A proof-of-concept study for a new shale oil upgrading and refining process was undertaken. This project is aimed at reducing upgrading costs, thereby malting shale oil development more feasible for commercialization. Raw shale oil was topped to remove the most volatile components. The topped shale oil was distilled into three narrow boiling cuts, representing of 175--275{degrees}C, 275--365{degrees}C, and 365--455{degrees}C, and a residue portion (>455{degrees}C). The distillate cuts were used to study molecular weight effects, and the residue was used to test the performance of hydropyrolysis. Hydropyrolysis converts the heavy residue into lower boiling point materials which can be more easily hydrotreated. In the experiment to test molecular weight effects, it was found that geometric hindrance accounts for the inhibition effect. Diffusion limitation and inhibition by competitive adsorption are not strong effects. These results imply that there is no process substitute for the requirement of molecular weight reduction. In the experiment to test the performance of hydropyrolysis, average molecular weight is reduced from 495 to 359 at moderate severities. In HDN of the hydropyrolized residue, however, high process severities are still required to remove nitrogen to the level of refinery-acceptable-feed (< 0.15 wt %). Based on experimental data, the product slate is 1.9 wt % gas, 13.1 wt % gasoline, 27.3 wt % kerosene, 55.6 wt % total gas oil, 1.3 wt % vacuum residue, and 0.8 wt % coke with 1376 scf/bbl total hydrogen consumption. The removal of sulfur is 96%, and that of nitrogen is 84%. The concentration of sulfur in the final product is 0.038 wt %, and that of nitrogen in final product is 0.26%. The conversion of heavy residue to atmospheric distillate is 47%. However, the remaining residue is partially upgraded as a refinery feed.

  6. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  7. Upgrade Planning for the ATLAS Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    “A series of upgrades leading to those required for the HL-LHC phase ff ATLAS is described with emphasis on those relating to the tracking part of the experiment. Aspects of the proposed ATLAS HL-LHC tracker layout and recent results on prototyping performance are presented. The wider context of ATLAS Upgrade planning is also briefly discussed along with current understanding of scheduling. The expected performance of the upgraded tracker in the presence of high pile-up is shown to motivate the baseline detector choices although possible alternative layouts are also mentioned.”

  8. Possible Scenarios for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2107593

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider possible scenarios to upgrade the LHC luminosity beyond 1034 cm−2s−1. By pushing the accelerator parameters to the ultimate performance we can increase to 1.7 1011 the bunch population and eventually reach a peak luminosity of 2.3×1034 cm−2s−1. To go beyond, a considerable improvement of the LHC parameters, such as ß*, beam intensity, bunch length, number of circulating bunches is required. Finally, the upgrade of the injector complex and of the injection energy is another important ingredient to upgrade both peak and integrated luminosity up to an order of magnitude above the nominal value.

  9. THE IMPACT OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherburne, Carol [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Remediation, LLC; Osterberg, Paul [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Johnson, Tom [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Frawely, Thomas [Fauske and Associates, LLC, Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    2013-01-23

    The Savannah River Site, in conjunction with AREVA Federal services, has designed a process to treat dissolved radioactive waste solids with ozone. It is known that in this radioactive waste process, radionuclides radiolytically break down water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which presents a well defined flammability hazard. Flammability limits have been established for both ozone and hydrogen separately; however, there is little information on mixtures of hydrogen and ozone. Therefore, testing was designed to provide critical flammability information necessary to support safety related considerations for the development of ozone treatment and potential scale-up to the commercial level. Since information was lacking on flammability issues at low levels of hydrogen and ozone, a testing program was developed to focus on filling this portion of the information gap. A 2-L vessel was used to conduct flammability tests at atmospheric pressure and temperature using a fuse wire ignition source at 1 percent ozone intervals spanning from no ozone to the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) of ozone in the vessel, determined as 8.4%(v/v) ozone. An ozone generator and ozone detector were used to generate and measure the ozone concentration within the vessel in situ, since ozone decomposes rapidly on standing. The lower flammability limit of hydrogen in an ozone-oxygen mixture was found to decrease from the LFL of hydrogen in air, determined as 4.2 % (v/v) in this vessel. From the results of this testing, Savannah River was able to develop safety procedures and operating parameters to effectively minimize the formation of a flammable atmosphere.

  10. Development of Large-Format Lithium-Ion Cells with Silicon Anode and Low Flammable Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Hernandez-Lugo, D. M.; Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Miller, T. B.; Lvovich, V. F.; Lytle, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing safe, high energy and high capacity lithium-ion cell designs and batteries for future missions under NASAs Advanced Space Power System (ASPS) project. Advanced cell components, such as high specific capacity silicon anodes and low-flammable electrolytes have been developed for improving the cell specific energy and enhancing safety. To advance the technology readiness level, we have developed large-format flight-type hermetically sealed battery cells by incorporating high capacity silicon anodes, commercially available lithium nickel, cobalt, aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes, and low-flammable electrolytes. In this report, we will present the performance results of these various battery cells. In addition, we will also discuss the post-test cell analysis results as well.

  11. A Review of the Flammability Factors of Kenaf and Allied Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibre is a well-known reinforcement fibre in polymer-matrix Composites (PMC lately. Natural fibre has fast growing and abundance properties which make it available at very low cost. For kenaf fibre there is long lists of research projects which have been done regarding its behaviour, and properties and modification made to it. In this paper, fire flammability is the main concern for natural fibre reinforced polymer (NFRP composites especially kenaf fibre. To estimate its flammability, a wide range of factors can be considered such as fibre content, type of matrices, pH conditions, treatment, and fire retardant (FR filler’s type. The most important criteria are the ignition time, rate of propagation, and fire behavior. thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, different scanning calorimetric (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA are the three most famous methods used to investigate the fire behaviour of composites.

  12. Influence of natural or organophilic bentonite for flammable of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyder, Eduardo T.; Kloss, Juliana R.; Morita, Reinaldo Y.; Barbosa, Ronilson V.

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture polymeric applied in electrical sector in general use additives which act as flame retardants, for example, some borates, phosphates, and halogenated hydroxides. An alternative material for this purpose frequently reported in the literature because the flame resistance or flame retardancy is organoclay. Thus, the objective of this study is to evaluate the flammability of mixtures of EVA/natural bentonite and EVA/organoclay containing modifier as a species free of quaternary ammonium ions. The natural bentonite and organoclay were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and materials were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the flammability test. Regarding the combustion rate values, there was a reduction of flame propagation in EVA/natural bentonite (3.0%), showing that in this case the clay without modifier acted as a physical barrier and promoted retardant action of flame. (author)

  13. Flammability and thermal properties studies of nonwoven flax reinforced acrylic based polyester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasyid, M. F. Ahmad; Salim, M. S.; Akil, H. M.; Ishak, Z. A. Mohd.

    2017-12-01

    In the pursuit of green and more sustainable product, natural fibre reinforced composites originating from renewable resources has gained interest in recent years. These natural fibres exhibit good mechanical properties, low production costs, and good environmental properties. However, one of the disadvantages of natural fibre reinforced composites is their high flammability that limits their application in many fields. Within this research, the effect of sodium silicate on the flammability and thermal properties of flax reinforced acrylic based polyester composites has been investigated. Sodium silicate is applied as binder and flame retardant system in impregnation process of the natural flax fiber mats. The addition of sodium silicate significantly improved the flame retardant efficiency but reduced the degree of crosslinking of the composites.

  14. Straightforward dimensionless experimental formulae for flash point of binary mixtures of two flammable components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristova Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensionless experimental formulae based on a rational reciprocal function for correlation of flashpoint data of binary mixtures of two flammable components have been developed. The formulae are based on data obtained from flash-point experiments. The proposed approach requires only two coefficients, molar fraction of components and flashpoint temperatures of the pure flammable components to be known in advance. Literature data were used for formulae verification and validation obtained results indicate that accuracy is comparable and to some extent better than that of conventional flash point prediction models. Dimensional analysis and scaling of data have been performed in order to define the correct construction of the equation fitting flash-point data in dimensionless form using the independent variables suggested by Catoire. Stefan number relevant flash-point of a single compound or a blend has been defined.

  15. Upgrading oil sands bitumen with FLUID COKING and FLEXICOKING technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamienski, P.; Phillips, G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Fairfax, VA (United States); McKnight, C.; Rumball, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described EMRE's Fluid Coking and Flexicoking technologies that are well suited for upgrading Alberta's heavy crudes and oil sands bitumen into pipelineable crudes or synthetic crudes, which can be further processed into transportation fuels. The Fluid Coking technology uses a fluidized bed reactor that thermally converts the heavy oils into light gases, liquids and coke. The metals and much of the sulphur are concentrated in the coke. Combustion of the coke provides process heat and the remaining coke is sold or stored on site for later recovery. Syncrude Canada currently operates 3 Fluid Coking units in northern Alberta. Flexicoking extends fluid coking by integrating air gasification to produce a carbon monoxide/hydrogen rich fuel gas that helps meet fuel and energy requirements of bitumen recovery and upgrading. The yields of light gas and liquids are similar to those of the Fluid Coking process. The partial combustion of coke provides the process heat for the thermal conversion and gasification steps. The remaining coke is gasified and desulphurized using Flexsorb technology. At present, there are 5 Flexicoking units in operation around the world. Interest in the technology is growing, particularly in locations with large demand for clean fuel or electricity. It is also suitable for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations in Alberta. This presentation outlined the operating principles of the Flexicoking integrated gasification system and compared it with more expensive oxygen gasification processes. tabs., figs.

  16. The deforestation story: testing for anthropogenic origins of Africa's flammable grassy biomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, William; Zaloumis, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Africa has the most extensive C4 grassy biomes of any continent. They are highly flammable accounting for greater than 70% of the world's burnt area. Much of Africa's savannas and grasslands occur in climates warm enough and wet enough to support closed forests. The combination of open grassy systems and the frequent fires they support have long been interpreted as anthropogenic artefacts caused by humans igniting frequent fires. True grasslands, it was believed, would be restricted to climat...

  17. Inhibited flammability and surface inactivation of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Mateum, Philip Edward R.; Orille, Ross William M.; Ramos, Rafael Julius U.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Ramos, Henry J.; Bo-ot, Luis Ma. T.

    2007-06-01

    Changes on the properties of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS) were examined. The experimental facility employed was an in-house constructed, compact gas discharge ion source with beam energies maintained approximately in the 1 keV range fixed at 1 mA discharge current, 3 mTorr gas filling pressure. Wood specimens used were of species endemic in the Philippines namely Shorea sp., Shorea polysperma and Cocos nucifera. Results showed the processed samples manifested characteristics of inhibited flammability, and became relatively hydrophobic after the treatment. In the fire resistance test, it was also observed during initial flaming that the processed surfaces accumulated less soot attesting to a much lower smoldering rate, i.e. lesser combustibility. To assess the increase in fire endurance time for the processed wood against the control substrates, a non-directional, two-tailed t-test was utilized. Significant at the 0.05 level, the t-statistic measured 9.164 as opposed to only 4.303 in its corresponding critical value at two degrees of freedom. Hence, the treatment appeared to show strong statistical evidence of being effective in enhancing fire resistance. The processed specimens also exhibited moisture absorptive inhibition time of more than 10 min versus an average absorption period of just 8 s for the unprocessed samples. Spectroscopy using a cast steel mass analyzer indicated a predominance of H+ with faint signals of H2+in the ion showers. It is hypothesized that the monatomic ion plays an essential participatory role in the surface modification process. Data from an earlier work using Narra wood (Pterocarpus indicus) [G.Q. Blantocas, H.J. Ramos, M. Wada, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 8498] was extended in the current study to substantiate this hypothesis. The data is now presented as current density ratio H+ /H2+versus the change rate constant K of the wetting model equation. It is shown that wood affinity to water decreased as the

  18. Inhibited flammability and surface inactivation of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Mateum, Philip Edward R.; Orille, Ross William M.; Ramos, Rafael Julius U.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Ramos, Henry J.; Bo-ot, Luis Ma.T.

    2007-01-01

    Changes on the properties of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS) were examined. The experimental facility employed was an in-house constructed, compact gas discharge ion source with beam energies maintained approximately in the 1keV range fixed at 1mA discharge current, 3mTorr gas filling pressure. Wood specimens used were of species endemic in the Philippines namely Shorea sp., Shorea polysperma and Cocos nucifera. Results showed the processed samples manifested characteristics of inhibited flammability, and became relatively hydrophobic after the treatment. In the fire resistance test, it was also observed during initial flaming that the processed surfaces accumulated less soot attesting to a much lower smoldering rate, i.e. lesser combustibility. To assess the increase in fire endurance time for the processed wood against the control substrates, a non-directional, two-tailed t-test was utilized. Significant at the 0.05 level, the t-statistic measured 9.164 as opposed to only 4.303 in its corresponding critical value at two degrees of freedom. Hence, the treatment appeared to show strong statistical evidence of being effective in enhancing fire resistance. The processed specimens also exhibited moisture absorptive inhibition time of more than 10min versus an average absorption period of just 8s for the unprocessed samples. Spectroscopy using a cast steel mass analyzer indicated a predominance of H + with faint signals of H 2 + in the ion showers. It is hypothesized that the monatomic ion plays an essential participatory role in the surface modification process. Data from an earlier work using Narra wood (Pterocarpus indicus) [G.Q. Blantocas, H.J. Ramos, M. Wada, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 8498] was extended in the current study to substantiate this hypothesis. The data is now presented as current density ratio H + /H 2 + versus the change rate constant K of the wetting model equation. It is shown that wood affinity to water decreased as

  19. Flammability limits: A review with emphasis on ethanol for aeronautical applications and description of the experimental procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, Christian J.R.; Carvalho, João A.; Andrade, José C.; Cortez, Ely V.; Carvalho, Felipe S.; Santos, José C.; Mendiburu, Andrés Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Develops a comprehensive literature review on ethanol flammability limits. ► Difference in standard procedures lead to different experimental values of the flammability limits. ► Methodology for experiments to find the FL's of ethanol for aeronautical applications. - Abstract: The lower and upper flammability limits of a fuel are key tools for predicting fire, assessing the possibility of explosion, and designing protection systems. Knowledge about the risks involved with the explosion of both gaseous and vaporized liquid fuel mixtures with air is very important to guarantee safety in industrial, domestic, and aeronautical applications. Currently, most countries use various standard experimental tests, which lead to different experimental values for these limits. A comprehensive literature review of the flammability limits of combustible mixtures is developed here in order to organize the theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject. The main focus of this paper is the review of the flammability data of ethanol–air mixtures available in the literature. In addition, the description of methodology for experiments to find the upper and lower limits of flammability of ethanol for aeronautical applications is discussed. A heated spherical 20 L vessel was used. The mixtures were ignited with electrode rods placed in the center of the vessel, and the spark gap was 6.4 mm. LFL and the UFL were determined for ethanol (hydrated ethanol 96% °INPM) as functions of temperature for atmospheric pressure to compare results with data published in the scientific literature.

  20. Condensation heat transfer coefficients of flammable refrigerants on various enhanced tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Jung; Jung, Dong Soo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, external condensation Heat Transfer Coefficients (HTCs) of six flammable refrigerants of propylene (R1270), propane (R290), isobutane (R600a), butane (R600), dimethylether (RE170), and HFC32 were measured at the vapor temperature of 39 .deg. C on a 1023 fpm low fin and turbo-C tubes. All data were taken under the heat flux of 32∼116 and 42∼142 kW/m 2 for the low fin and turbo-C tubes respectively. Flammable refrigerants' data obtained on enhanced tubes showed a typical trend that external condensation HTCs decrease with increasing wall subcooling. HFC32 and DME showed up to 30% higher HTCs than those of HCFC22 due to their excellent thermophysical properties. Propylene, propane, isobutane, and butane showed similar or lower HTCs than those of HCFC22. Beatty and Katz' correlation predicted the HTCs of the flammable refrigerants obtained on a low fin tube within a mean deviation of 7.3%. Turbo-C tube showed the best performance due to its 3 dimensional surface geometry for fast removal of condensate

  1. Flammability of self-extinguishing kenaf/ABS nanoclays composite for aircraft secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, S.; Majid, D. L.; Mohd Tawil, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the flammability properties of kenaf fiber reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) with nanoclays composites. Natural fiber is one of the potential materials to be used with thermoplastic as a composite due to its attractive properties such as lightweight and strong. In this paper, flammability properties of this material are evaluated through Underwriters Laboratory 94 Horizontal Burning (UL94 HB), which has been conducted for both controlled and uncontrolled conditions, smoke density and limiting oxygen index tests (LOI). These flammability tests are in compliance with the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) requirement. The results from UL94 HB and smoke density tests show that the presence of nanoclays with effective composition of kenaf fiber reinforced ABS has enhanced the burning characteristics of the material by hindering propagation of flame spread over the surface of the material through char formation. Consequently, this decreases the burning rate and produces low amount of smoke during burning. On contrary, through LOI test, this material requires less oxygen to burn when exposed to fire, which hinders the enhancement of burning characteristics. This is due to burning mechanism exhibited by nanoclays that catalyzes barrier formation and flame propagation rate over the surface of the biocomposite material. Overall, these experimental results suggest that this biocomposite material is capable of self-extinguishing and possesses effective fire extinction. The observed novel synergism from the result obtained is promising to be implemented in secondary structures of aircraft with significant benefits such as cost-effective, lightweight and biodegradable self-extinguishing biocomposite.

  2. Computer systems and software description for gas characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1997-01-01

    The Gas Characterization System Project was commissioned by TWRS management with funding from TWRS Safety, on December 1, 1994. The project objective is to establish an instrumentation system to measure flammable gas concentrations in the vapor space of selected watch list tanks, starting with tank AN-105 and AW-101. Data collected by this system is meant to support first tank characterization, then tank safety. System design is premised upon Characterization rather than mitigation, therefore redundancy is not required

  3. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-11-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO(2) , biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO(2) to CH(4) by addition of H(2) . Enrichment at thermophilic temperature (55°C) resulted in CO(2) and H(2) bioconversion rate of 320 mL CH(4) /(gVSS h), which was more than 60% higher than that under mesophilic temperature (37°C). Different dominant species were found at mesophilic- and thermophilic-enriched cultures, as revealed by PCR-DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree of biogas upgrading was achieved. The produced biogas had a CH(4) content, around 95% at steady-state, at gas (mixture of biogas and hydrogen) injection rate of 6 L/(L day). The increase of gas injection rate to 12 L/(L day) resulted in the decrease of CH(4) content to around 90%. Further study showed that by decreasing the gas-liquid mass transfer by increasing the stirring speed of the mixture the CH(4) content was increased to around 95%. Finally, the CH(4) content around 90% was achieved in this study with the gas injection rate as high as 24 L/(L day). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Upgrading of PWR plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Tomonori; Sasaki, Kazunori; Nakaishi, Hirokazu.

    1989-01-01

    For the education and training of operators in electric power plants, simulators have been employed, and it is well known that their effect is great. There are operation training simulators which simulate the dynamic characteristics of plants and all the machinery and equipment that operators handle, and train the procedure of restoration at the time of abnormality in plants, education simulators which can analyze the dynamic characteristics of plants efficiently in a short time, and offer information by visualizing phenomena with three-dimensional display and others so as to be easily understandable, and forecast simulators which do the analysis forecasting plant behavior at the time of abnormality in plants, and investigate the necessity of the guide for operation procedure and the countermeasures at the time of emergency. In this explanation, the upgrading of operation training simulators which have been put already in training is discussed. The constitution of simulator system and the instructor function, the outline of PWR plant simulation models comprising thermal flow model, pump model, leak model and so on, the techniques of increasing simulator speed, and the example of analysis using the NUPAC code are reported. (K.I.)

  5. The LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumlak, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider beauty LHCb detector is a dedicated flavour physics experiment, designed to efficiently detect decays of b- and c-hadrons to perform precise studies of CP violation and rare decays. At the end of Run 2, many of the LHCb measurements will remain statistically dominated. In order to increase the trigger yield for purely hadronic channels, the hardware trigger will be removed, and the full detector will be read out at 40 MHz. This, in combination with the five-fold increase in luminosity necessitates radical changes to LHCb's electronics with entire subdetector replacements required in some cases. The Vertex Locator (VELO) surrounding the interaction region is used to reconstruct the proton-proton collision points (primary vertices) and decay vertices of long-lived particles (secondary vertices). The upgraded VELO will be equipped with silicon hybrid pixel sensors, each read out by VeloPix ASICs. The highest occupancy ASICs will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhit/s and produce an output data rate of over 15 Gbit/s, with a total rate of 1.6 Tbit/s anticipated for the whole detector. Selected highlights of this challenging and ambitious project are described in this paper.

  6. ETA-II accelerator upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, D.G.; Deadrick, F.J.; Hibbs, S.M.; Sampayan, S.E.; Petersen, D.E.

    1991-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements to the ETA-II linear induction electron accelerator. The accelerator's cells have been carefully reconditioned to raise the maximum accelerating gap voltage from approximately 100 kV to 125 kV. Insulators of Rexolite plastic in a new ''zero-gap'' arrangement replaced the alumina originals after several alternative materials were investigated. A new multi-cable current feed system will be used to eliminate pulse reflection interactions encountered in earlier experiments. Improved alignment fixtures have been installed to help minimize beam perturbation due to poorly aligned intercell magnets between 10-cell groups. A stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) has been utilized to enhance overall magnetic alignment, and to characterize irreducible alignment errors. These changes are in conjunction with an expansion of the accelerator from a 20-cell to a 60-cell configuration. When completed, the upgraded accelerator is expected to deliver 2.5 kA of electron beam current at 7.5 MeV in bursts of up to fifty 70-ns pulses at a 5-kHz repetition rate. A 5.5-meter-long wiggler will convert the energy into 3-GW microwave pulses at 140 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

  7. The software upgrade of NICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Emanuel; Guido, Vincenzo; Oliva, Ernesto

    2008-08-01

    NICS (the Near Infrared Camera Spectrometer) is a cooled near-infrared camera-spectrometer that has been developed in the late 90's at the INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory for the Ø3.5 m "Telescopio Nazionale Galileo" (TNG) at the La Palma Observatory. The instrument has been operating for regular scientific observations since the beginning of 2001. During the 2001-2007 period it has been used in about 410 nights yielding data which contributed to the production of 60 refereed papers which collected a total of more than 800 citations. At the age of 8 years, NICS is still among the most efficient and versatile infrared instruments existing worldwide. To improve its observational efficiency, we have designed and we are currently developing new control software and GUI interfaces. The former has been devised to optimize the low level tasks (in particular the motors controls), the latter to simplify the communications between the observer and the instrument. We give here a short description of NICS software upgrade.

  8. Human-machine interface upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The article describes a new human-machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human-machine interface upgrade was completed in the summer 2001. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between the reactor operator and the nuclear reactor I and C. The second display is a graphical one. It presents the status of the reactor, principal parameters (as power, period), control rods positions, course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human-machine interface was produced with the InTouch developing tool of the Wonder-Ware Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors to the reactor. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the new human-machine interface with the present reactor I and C. The new human-machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the comfort and safety of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support for foreign visitors. (orig.)

  9. Anatomy of an upgrade event in the upgrade era, and implications for the LHCb trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, C

    2014-01-01

    This document studies the rates at which particles of interest are produced within the LHCb detector acceptance, in both Run 1 and Upgrade conditions. We present the event rates that could be selected by an idealised trigger system during the LHCb Upgrade, and compare these to the rates selected by the Run 1 trigger system. We discuss the implications of our findings for the proposed LHCb Upgrade trigger.

  10. Heavy crude oils - From Geology to Upgrading - An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huc, A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    and Production. 5. Reservoir Geology. 6. Oil Sands: Mining and Processing. 7. Cold Production. 8. Enhanced Recovery. 9. Heavy Oil Production: Pumping Systems. 10. Examples of Large Heavy Oil Projects. Part 3. Surface Transport. 11. Heavy Oil dilution. 12. Aqueous Emulsions. 13. Core Annular Flow. 14. Surface Pumps for Transport: Selection and Limitations. Part 4. Upgrading. 15. De-asphalting with Heavy Paraffinic Solvents. 16. Vis-breaking. 17. Coking. 18. Catalytic Hydrotreatment and Hydro-conversion: Fixed Bed, Moving Bed, Ebullated Bed and Entrained Bed. Part 5. Environmental Issues. 19. Reservoir and Production. 20. Upgrading. 21. Greenhouse Gas Emissions. 22. CO 2 Mass Balance: and Integrated Approach. Part 6. Ongoing Technological Challenges. 23. In Situ Upgrading of Heavy Oil and Bitumen. 24. Process Work-flows. Conclusion. Abbreviations. Glossary. Nomenclature

  11. CANDU Digital Control Computer upgrade options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, M.S.; De Grosbois, J.; Qian, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the evolution of Digital Control Computers (DCC) in CANDU power plants to the present day. Much of this evolution has been to meeting changing control or display requirements as well as the replacement of obsolete, or old and less reliable technology with better equipment that is now available. The current work at AECL and Canadian utilities to investigate DCC upgrade options, alternatives, and strategies are examined. The dependence of a particular upgrade strategy on the overall plant refurbishment plans are also discussed. Presently, the upgrade options range from replacement of individual obsolete system components, to replacement of the entire DCC hardware without changing the software, to complete replacement of the DCCs with a functionally equivalent system using new control computer equipment and software. Key issues, constraints and objectives associated with these DCC upgrade options are highlighted. (author)

  12. Completion of the ATLAS control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, F. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the fall of 1992 at the SNEAP(Symposium of North Eastern Accelerator Personnel) a project to up grade the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System) control system was first reported. Not unlike the accelerator it services the control system will continue to evolve. However, the first of this year has marked the completion of this most recent upgrade project. Since the control system upgrade took place during a period when ATLAS was operating at a record number of hours, special techniques were necessary to enable the development of the new control system ''on line'' while still saving the needs of normal operations. This paper reviews the techniques used for upgrading the ATLAS control system while the system was in use. In addition a summary of the upgrade project and final configuration, as well as some of the features of the new control system is provided

  13. Recovery Act. Tapoco project. Cheoah upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Paul [Alcoa Inc., Alcoa Center, PA (United States)

    2013-10-02

    Under Funding Opportunity Announcement Number: DE-FOA-0000120, Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Modernization, Alcoa Power Generating Inc. (APGI), a fully owned subsidiary of Alcoa Inc., implemented major upgrades at its Cheoah hydroelectric facility near Robbinsville, North Carolina.

  14. IOP Physics benchmarks of the VELO upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068636

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb Experiment at the LHC is successfully performing precision measurements primarily in the area of flavour physics. The collaboration is preparing an upgrade that will start taking data in 2021 with a trigger-less readout at five times the current luminosity. The vertex locator has been crucial in the success of the experiment and will continue to be so for the upgrade. It will be replaced by a hybrid pixel detector and this paper discusses the performance benchmarks of the upgraded detector. Despite the challenging experimental environment, the vertex locator will maintain or improve upon its benchmark figures compared to the current detector. Finally the long term plans for LHCb, beyond those of the upgrade currently in preparation, are discussed.

  15. Backbone upgrades and DEC equipment replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancamp, Warren

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) dual protocol backbone is outlined. It includes DECnet link upgrades to match TCP/IP link performance. It also includes the integration of backbone resources and central management. The phase 1 transition process is outlined.

  16. Initial performance of upgraded Tevatron cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab began operating a re-designed satellite refrigerator systems in November 1993. Upgrades were installed to operate the Tevatron at a magnet temperature of 3.5 K, approximately 1K lower than the original design. Refrigerator upgrades included new valve boxes, larger reciprocating expanders, the installation of cold vapor compressors, new sub-atmospheric instrumentation and an entirely new distributed controls system. Cryogenic system reliability data for Colliding Physics Run 1B is presented emphasizing a failure analysis for each aspect of the upgrade. Comparison to data for Colliding Physics Run 1A (previous to upgrade) is presented to show the impact of a major system overhaul. New operational problems and their solutions are presented in detail

  17. Upgrading of solid biofuels and feedstock quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burvall, Jan [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Research for Northern Sweden

    1998-06-01

    This paper treats upgrading of biomass to pellets, briquettes and powder and the quality needed of the initial feedstock. The main raw materials are wood and reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) 5 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Positive train control test bed interoperability upgrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. (TTCI) upgraded the Positive Train Control (PTC) Test Bed to support additional PTC testing configurations under Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Task Order 270. The scope of work provided additional PTC Co...

  19. Monitoring organic volatiles and flammable gases with a holographic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hurtado, J. L.; Davidson, C. A. B.; Lowe, C. R.

    2011-05-01

    There is an increasing preoccupation regarding the effects of organic volatiles or explosive gases in human welfare and society. A holographic sensor for gaseous and volatile compounds was produced by diffusion of silver salts in a silicon elastomer (PDMS). The salts were reduced to produce silver particles, which upon ablation with a pulsed laser form fringes of nano-sized silver grains. The fringes are separated by about half of the wavelength of the laser (266nm) producing a photonic effect that can be measured as a colorful reflection. A CCD spectrophotometer was used to detect the reflected wavelength of the hologram illuminated with a white light source. The molecular affinity of PDMS for organic molecules can be expressed as intermolecular forces in terms of the cohesive energy density. This parameter is used to predict with great accuracy the sensor performance. Hydrocarbon gases at different concentrations were tested for 3 sets of temperatures. Alkanes, alkenes and alkynes containing 2 to 4 carbon atoms were detected. The sensor responds in less than 5s to the hydrocarbon gas presence in a range of concentrations from 0% to 100% (v/v). Liquid organic compounds exhibit a slower response; however, the results agree with the prediction imposed by the cohesive energy densities. The capabilities of the sensor make it ideal for applications in indoor environment monitoring or dangerous environments enriched with such organic compounds.

  20. Upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221618; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In coming years the LHC is expected to undergo upgrades to increase both the energy of proton-proton collisions and the instantaneous luminosity. In order to cope with these more challenging LHC conditions, upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system will be required. This talk will focus on some of the key aspects of these upgrades. Firstly, the upgrade period between 2019-2021 will see an increase in instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. Upgrades to the Level 1 trigger system during this time will include improvements for both the muon and calorimeter triggers. These include the upgrade of the first-level Endcap Muon trigger, the calorimeter trigger electronics and the addition of new calorimeter feature extractor hardware, such as the Global Feature Extractor (gFEX). An overview will be given on the design and development status the aforementioned systems, along with the latest testing and validation results. \\\\ By 2026, the High Luminosity LHC will be able to deliver 14 TeV collisions ...

  1. Pulsed power supply for Nova Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, J.L.; Kajs, J.P.; Walls, A.; Weldon, W.F.; Zowarka, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT). A baseline design of the Nova Upgrade has been completed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Nova Upgrade is an 18 beamline Nd: glass laser design utilizing fully relayed 4x4 30 cm aperture segmented optical components. The laser thus consists of 288 independent beamlets nominally producing 1.5 to 2.0 MJ of 0.35 μm light in a 3 to 5 ns pulse. The laser design is extremely flexible and will allow a wide range of pulses to irradiate ICF targets. This facility will demonstrate ignition/gain and the scientific feasibility of ICF for energy and defense applications. The pulsed power requirements for the Nova Upgrade are given. CEM-UT was contracted to study and develop a design for a homopolar generator/inductor (HPG/inductor) opening switch system which would satisfy the pulsed power supply requirements of the Nova Upgrade. The Nd:glass laser amplifiers used in the Nova Upgrade will be powered by light from xenon flashlamps. The pulsed power supply for the Nova Upgrade powers the xenon flashlamps. This design and study was for a power supply to drive flashlamps

  2. The ALICE Inner Tracking System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Siddhanta, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    The long term plan of ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a detailed investigation and characterisation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). ALICE has devised a comprehensive upgrade strategy to enhance its physics capabilities and to exploit the LHC running conditions after the second long shutdown of the LHC scheduled in 2019-20. The upgraded ALICE will focus on high precision measurements of rare probes over a wide range of momenta, which will significantly improve the performance with respect to the present experimental set up. The upgrade strategy is based on the fact that after LS2 LHC will progressively increase its luminosity with Pb beams eventually reaching an interaction rate of about 50 kHz. To exploit the new LHC capabilities, several existing detectors will undergo a substantial upgrade and new detectors will be added. Within this upgrade strategy, the Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade forms an important cornerstone, providing precise measurements for...

  3. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) scientific staff members were very active in R ampersand D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R ampersand D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately

  4. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

  5. Design upgrading on Ignitor Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchiaro, A.; Coletti, A.; Bianchi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ignitor is a high field compact machine conceived to achieve ignition in D-T plasma. The upgraded design of the Plasma Chamber (PC) and of the First Wall (FW) system consider the updated scenarios for IGNITOR vertical plasma disruption (VDE). The electromagnetic (EM) loads arising from halo currents and net horizontal force with the proper toroidal distribution have been envisaged. The dynamic elastic-plastic structural analysis of the PC has brought to a tayloring of the wall thickness such to reduce the displacements within the clearance with toroidal coil. A detailed 3D finite elements model has been developed in order to evaluate the electromagnetic loads on FW. The thermal loads arisen from plasma heat loads (peak value 1.8 MW/m 2 ) have been also considered. In any case the maximum calculated stresses are within the allowable limits. The relevant 3D virtual mockup software simulates the inside of the PC including the entire boom with end-effector. This allowed for the analysis of the boom kinematics to cover all positions with the various end-effectors to assess the Remote Handling task operations. The structural analysis of the IGNITOR machine Load Assembly has been performed taking into account the friction coefficients between the significant components. The non linear analysis takes into account for both the in-plane and the out-of-plane loads. The vertical plasma disruption conditions (VDE) result in bigger out-of-plane loads than the normal operating conditions. Keys of proper dimensions between the 30 o extension C-Clamps modules was adopted to assure structural stability. As far as the interlaminar shear stresses on toroidal field coils are concerned, the related safety factors are decreased respect to the normal operating conditions, but remaining around 2. (author)

  6. Will implementation of green gas into the gas supply be feasible in the future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir. J. Bekkering; prof. dr. Wim van Gemert; A.A. Broekhuis; Drs. E.J. Hengeveld

    2015-01-01

    energy efficiency, greenhouse gas reduction and cost price of a green gas supply chain were evaluated. This supply chain is based on co-digestion of dairy cattle manure and maize, biogas upgrading and injection into a distribution gas grid. A defined reference scenario reflects the current state of

  7. Will implementation of green gas into the gas supply be feasible in the future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, J.; Hengeveld, E. J.; van Gemert, W. J. T.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The energy efficiency, greenhouse gas reduction and cost price of a green gas supply chain were evaluated. The considered supply chain is based on co-digestion of dairy cattle manure and maize, biogas upgrading and injection into a distribution gas grid. A reference scenario was defined which

  8. Operational present status and reliability analysis of the upgraded EAST cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z. W.; Y Zhang, Q.; Lu, X. F.; Hu, L. B.; Zhu, P.

    2017-12-01

    Since the first commissioning in 2005, the cryogenic system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) has been cooled down and warmed up for thirteen experimental campaigns. In order to promote the refrigeration efficiencies and reliability, the EAST cryogenic system was upgraded gradually with new helium screw compressors and new dynamic gas bearing helium turbine expanders with eddy current brake to improve the original poor mechanical and operational performance from 2012 to 2015. Then the totally upgraded cryogenic system was put into operation in the eleventh cool-down experiment, and has been operated for the latest several experimental campaigns. The upgraded system has successfully coped with various normal operational modes during cool-down and 4.5 K steady-state operation under pulsed heat load from the tokamak as well as the abnormal fault modes including turbines protection stop. In this paper, the upgraded EAST cryogenic system including its functional analysis and new cryogenic control networks will be presented in detail. Also, its operational present status in the latest cool-down experiments will be presented and the system reliability will be analyzed, which shows a high reliability and low fault rate after upgrade. In the end, some future necessary work to meet the higher reliability requirement for future uninterrupted long-term experimental operation will also be proposed.

  9. Combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) technology - an economical alternative for heavy water upgraders using water distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryland, D.K.; Sadhankar, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Heavy water upgrading is a unique and crucial part of a CANDU power station. Water distillation (DW) systems are used for heavy water upgrading in all CANDU stations. The DW upgrader is designed to take advantage of the difference in relative volatility (a measure of separation of isotopes) between H 2 O and D 2 O. However, the low relative volatility of the H 2 O/D 2 O system requires large number of stages (long columns) and large reflux ratios (large reboiler loads) - thus resulting in significant capital and operating costs. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) technology as an economical alternative to the DW system. CECE-based upgraders have been demonstrated in pilot scale facilities at AECL Chalk River Laboratories and in Hamilton, Ontario. This design is based on catalytic hydrogen isotope exchange between water and hydrogen gas. (author)

  10. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stroth, U.; Adámek, Jiří; Aho-Mantila, L.; Äkäslompolo, S.; Amdor, C.; Angioni, C.; Balden, M.; Bardin, S.; Barrera Orte, L.; Behler, K.; Belonohy, E.; Bergmann, A.; Bernert, M.; Bilato, R.; Birkenmeier, G.; Bobkov, V.; Boom, J.; Bottereau, C.; Bottino, A.; Braun, F.; Brezinsek, S.; Brochard, T.; Brüdgam, M.; Buhler, A.; Burckhart, A.; Casson, F.J.; Chankin, A.; Chapman, I.; Clairet, F.; Classen, I.G.J.; Coenen, J.W.; Conway, G.D.; Coster, D.P.; Curran, D.; da Silva, F.; de Marné, P.; D’Inca, R.; Douai, D.; Drube, R.; Dunne, M.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Eixenberger, H.; Endstrasser, N.; Engelhardt, K.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Fischer, R.; Fünfgelder, H.; Fuchs, J.C.; Gál, K.; García Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Giannone, L.; Görler, T.; da Graca, S.; Greuner, H.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Guimarais, L.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hakola, A.H.; Hangan, D.; Happel, T.; Härtl, T.; Hauff, T.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Höhnle, H.; Hölzl, M.; Hopf, C.; Igochine, V.; Ionita, C.; Janzer, A.; Jenko, F.; Käsemann, C.-P.; Kallenbach, A.; Kálvin, S.; Kantor, M.; Kappatou, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kasparek, W.; Kaufmann, M.; Kirk, A.; Klingshirn, H.-J.; Kocan, M.; Kocsis, G.; Konz, C.; Koslowski, R.; Krieger, K.; Kubic, M.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P.T.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Lazaros, A.; Leipold, F.; Leuterer, F.; Lindig, S.; Lisgo, S.; Lohs, A.; Lunt, T.; Maier, H.; Makkonen, T.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mayer, M.; McCarthy, P.J.; McDermott, R.; Mehlmann, F.; Meister, H.; Menchero, L.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Merz, F.; Mlynek, A.; Monaco, F.; Müller, S.; Müller, H.W.; Münich, M.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuwirth, D.; Nocente, M.; Nold, B.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G.; Plöckl, B.; Podoba, Y.; Pompon, F.; Poli, E.; Polozhiy, K.; Potzel, S.; Püschel, M.J.; Pütterich, T.; Rathgeber, S.K.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Reimold, M.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; v.Rooij, G.; Roth, J.; Rott, M.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Santos, J.; Sauter, P.; Scarabosio, A.; Schall, G.; Schmid, K.; Schneider, P.A.; Schneider, W.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schubert, M.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B.; Sempf, M.; Sertoli, M.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Sigalov, A.; Silva, A.; Sommer, F.; Stäbler, A.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Sugiyama, K.; Suttrop, W.; Tala, T.; Tardini, G.; Teschner, M.; Tichmann, C.; Told, D.; Treutterer, W.; Tsalas, M.; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Varela, P.; Véres, G.; Vicente, J.; Vianello, N.; Vierle, T.; Viezzer, E.; Viola, B.; Vorpahl, C.; Wachowski, M.; Wagner, D.; Wauters, T.; Weller, A.; Wenninger, R.; Wieland, B.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Würsching, E.; Yu, Q.; Zammuto, I.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zilker, M.; Zohm, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2013), s. 104003-104003 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/24./. San Diego, 08.10.2012-13.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * ASDEX * ITER * ICRH system Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.243, year: 2013 http://m.iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/10/104003/pdf/0029-5515_53_10_104003.pdf

  11. Balancing gas supply and demand with a sustainable gas supply chain : A study based on field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir. J. Bekkering; prof. dr. Wim van Gemert; Drs. E.J. Hengeveld; A.A. Broekhuis

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of balancing gas supply and demand with a green gas supply chain were analyzed. The considered supply chain is based on co-digestion of cow manure and maize, the produced biogas is upgraded to (Dutch) natural gas standards. The applicability of modeling yearly gas demand data in a

  12. Should upgrading and refining be enhanced in Alberta?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgarpour, S.

    2006-01-01

    Although world oil prices are rising, the price of bitumen remains stable. It was noted that surplus refinery capacity is disappearing and that skilled labour, infrastructure, transportation systems, environmental management and technology development are among some of the challenges facing heavy hydrocarbon development. Pie charts indicating global reserves of crude oil and heavy crude oil showed that although the Middle East leads in world proven oil reserves, nearly half of the heavy crude oil and natural bitumen deposits are in Canada. As a global energy leader, Alberta is using its' world class expertise to develop the vast energy resources of the province and to market these resources and abilities to the world. This presentation summarized processing activities in Alberta and outlined the markets for petrochemicals. A graph representing North American petroleum supply and demand from 2001 to 2019 was also presented along with a review of Alberta's upgrading and refining capacity and infrastructure opportunities for crude oil, natural gas, petrochemicals and electricity. Alberta's crude oil markets by 2020 are likely to be the Far East, California, Heredity's, Wyoming, Chicago, Cushing, United States Gulf Coast, and the East Coast. The benefits of upgrading in Alberta include inexpensive feedstock, existing upgrader and petrochemical sites and low transportation costs. In addition, more refining capacity in the province would provide market diversification for bitumen products; higher investment and value-added in Alberta; opportunity to provide feedstock to petrochemicals; production of synthetic diluent in the province; and, smaller environmental footprint and greater energy efficiency. The cumulative impact of oil sands development on government revenues was discussed along with the challenge of addressing the issue of a skilled labour shortage, infrastructure needs, and developing a business case for a carbon dioxide pipeline. tabs., figs

  13. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes

  14. Energy upgrading measures improve also indoor climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Peter; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose

    2014-01-01

    A new survey shows that the economy is what motivates Danish owners of single-family houses the most to start energy upgrading, and that improved indoor climate is also an important factor. After the upgrading, homeowners experience both improved economy and indoor climate. In a strategy to incre......A new survey shows that the economy is what motivates Danish owners of single-family houses the most to start energy upgrading, and that improved indoor climate is also an important factor. After the upgrading, homeowners experience both improved economy and indoor climate. In a strategy...... to increase the number of homeowners who venture into a major energy upgrading of their house, the demonstrated positive side effects, more than energy savings, should be included in the communication to motivate homeowners. The barriers should be reduced by “taking the homeowners by the hand” and helping...... them to choose relevant energy-saving solutions as well as clarifying the financial consequences and opportunities....

  15. Five TWh saved on profitable upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Stein Arne.

    1999-01-01

    Article. In Norway, a project is planned to evaluate the upgrading potential of the hydroelectric power sector. The article criticizes the authorities for not supporting the upgrading of hydroelectric power plants in their eager to promote the development of wind power. An important contribution of the planned project will be a book from which the utilities may get advice on measures of upgrading. Generators and control systems account for 80% of the faults and interruptions in the power utilities. The turbine technology has made important progress in the 1990s. By pure upgrading measures alone, the turbine efficiencies may be increased enough for an additional 3 TWh to be taken out from the Norwegian hydroelectric power system. Today, the price of imported carbon-based Danish power determines whether the utilities find it profitable to rehabilitate the hydroelectric plants. The energy potential of upgrading is estimated to be 5 TWh. This energy can be generated with known technology and with no serious consequences for the environment

  16. Safety upgrades to the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAbreu, B.; Mark, J.M.; Mutterback, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) Reactor is a 135 MW thermal research facility located at Chalk River Laboratories, and is owned and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. One of the largest and most versatile research reactors in the world, it serves as the R and D workhorse for Canada's CANDU business while at the same time filling the role as one of the world's major producers of medical radioisotopes. AECL plans to extend operation of the NRU reactor to approximately the year 2005 when a new replacement, the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) will be available. To achieve this, AECL has undertaken a program of safety reassessment and upgrades to enhance the level of safety consistent with modem requirements. An engineering assessment/inspection of critical systems, equipment and components was completed and seven major safety upgrades are being designed and installed. These upgrades will significantly reduce the reactor's vulnerability to common mode failures and external hazards, with particular emphasis on seismic protection. The scheduled completion date for the project is 1999 December at a cost approximately twice the annual operating cost. All work on the NRU upgrade project is planned and integrated into the regular operating cycles of the reactor; no major outages are anticipated. This paper describes the safety upgrades and discusses the technical and managerial challenges involved in extending the operating life of the NRU reactor. (author)

  17. Upgrading Probability via Fractions of Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frič Roman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of “Grundbegriffe” by A. N. Kolmogorov (published in 1933 on education in the area of probability and its impact on research in stochastics cannot be overestimated. We would like to point out three aspects of the classical probability theory “calling for” an upgrade: (i classical random events are black-and-white (Boolean; (ii classical random variables do not model quantum phenomena; (iii basic maps (probability measures and observables { dual maps to random variables have very different “mathematical nature”. Accordingly, we propose an upgraded probability theory based on Łukasiewicz operations (multivalued logic on events, elementary category theory, and covering the classical probability theory as a special case. The upgrade can be compared to replacing calculations with integers by calculations with rational (and real numbers. Namely, to avoid the three objections, we embed the classical (Boolean random events (represented by the f0; 1g-valued indicator functions of sets into upgraded random events (represented by measurable {0; 1}-valued functions, the minimal domain of probability containing “fractions” of classical random events, and we upgrade the notions of probability measure and random variable.

  18. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. Its main upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (phase 2) where the luminosity will have increased 5-fold compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm−2s−1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional luminosity increase by a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity leveling. This upgrade will probably happen around 2022. The upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals are directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. An ambitious upgrade development program is pursued studying different electronics options. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Which one to u...

  19. Developments towards the LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid Vidal, Xabier, E-mail: xabier.cid.vidal@cern.ch

    2016-09-21

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector surrounding the interaction region of the LHCb experiment. The upgrade of the VELO is planned to be installed in 2019–2020, and the current detector will be replaced by a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. The new detector is designed to withstand the radiation dose expected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb{sup −1}. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC that is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are being irradiated in five different facilities and the post-irradiation performance is being measured with testbeams, and in the lab. These proceedings present the VELO upgrade and briefly discuss the results of the sensor testing campaign. - Highlights: • The VELO is the detector surrounding the LHCb collision point. • After its upgrade, the VELO will be capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. • The detector will be composed of Si pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC. • The irradiated prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are currently being tested.

  20. A review on optimization production and upgrading biogas through CO2 removal using various techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Dian; Wresta, Arini; Atmaja, Tinton Dwi; Saepudin, Aep

    2014-02-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of organic materials is a renewable energy resource that consists mainly of CH4 and CO2. Trace components that are often present in biogas are water vapor, hydrogen sulfide, siloxanes, hydrocarbons, ammonia, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. Considering the biogas is a clean and renewable form of energy that could well substitute the conventional source of energy (fossil fuels), the optimization of this type of energy becomes substantial. Various optimization techniques in biogas production process had been developed, including pretreatment, biotechnological approaches, co-digestion as well as the use of serial digester. For some application, the certain purity degree of biogas is needed. The presence of CO2 and other trace components in biogas could affect engine performance adversely. Reducing CO2 content will significantly upgrade the quality of biogas and enhancing the calorific value. Upgrading is generally performed in order to meet the standards for use as vehicle fuel or for injection in the natural gas grid. Different methods for biogas upgrading are used. They differ in functioning, the necessary quality conditions of the incoming gas, and the efficiency. Biogas can be purified from CO2 using pressure swing adsorption, membrane separation, physical or chemical CO2 absorption. This paper reviews the various techniques, which could be used to optimize the biogas production as well as to upgrade the biogas quality.

  1. Comparison and evaluation of methods for the determination of flammability limits, applied to methane/hydrogen/air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoor, F. van den; Hermanns, R.T.E.; Oijen, J.A. van; Verplaetsen, F.; Goey, L.P.H. de

    2008-01-01

    Different methods, both experimental and numerical, to determine the flammability limits are compared and evaluated, exemplified by a determination of the flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures for hydrogen fuel molar fractions of 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6, at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. Two different experimental methods are used. The first method uses a glass tube with visual observation of the flame, whereas the second method uses a closed spherical vessel with a pressure rise criterion to determine whether flame propagation has occurred. In addition to these experiments, the flammability limits are determined numerically. Unsteady planar and spherically expanding flames are calculated with a one-dimensional flame code with the inclusion of radiation heat loss in the optically thin limit. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of the planar flame calculations shows large differences, especially for lean mixtures. These differences increase with increasing hydrogen content in the fuel. Better agreement with the experimental results is found for the spherically expanding flame calculations. A limiting burning velocity of 5 cm/s is found to predict the upper flammability limit determined with the tube method very well, whereas the limiting flame temperature approach was found to give poorer agreement. Further analysis indicates that the neglect of flame front instabilities is the probable cause of the large differences between experimental and numerical results at the lower flammability limit

  2. CMS Technical Design Report for the Muon Endcap GEM Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108476; Safonov, A; Sharma, A; Tytgat, M; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2015-01-01

    This report describes both the technical design and the expected performance of the Phase-II upgrade, using Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, of the first endcap station of the CMS muon system. The upgrade is targeted for the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC and is designed to improve the muon trigger and tracking performance at high luminosity. The GEM detectors will add redundancy to the muon system in the 1.6 < |η| < 2.2 pseudorapidity region, where the amount of detection layers is lowest while the background rates are highest and the bending of the muon trajectories due to the CMS magnetic field is small. GEM detectors have been identified as a suitable technology to operate in the high radiation environment present in that region. The first muon endcap station will be instrumented with a double layer of triple-GEM chambers in the 1.6 < |η| < 2.2 region. The detector front-end electronics uses the custom designed VFAT3 chip to provide both fast input for the level-1 muon trigger ...

  3. The CDF calorimeter upgrade for RunIIb

    CERN Document Server

    Huston, J; Kuhlmann, S; Lami, S; Miller, R; Paoletti, R; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F

    2004-01-01

    The physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider will continue to explore the high energy elementary particle physics until the LHC commissioning. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter opens a new window for improving the jet energy resolution, important in finding various signals such as Higgs by correcting the energy loss in the dead material and adding information in the jet algorithms using charged particles. It plays an important role in soft electron tagging of b- jets and photon identification in SUSY. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter includes: a) the replacement of slow gas detector on the front face of the Central Calorimeter with Preshower (CPR) based on 2cm thick scintillator tiles segmented in eta and Phi and read out by WLS fibers running into a groove on the surface of each tiles. The WLS fibers are placed to clear fibers after leaving the tiles; b) the replacement of the Central Crack Chamber (CCR) with 5mm thick scintillator tiles read with the same technique: To finalize the design parame...

  4. A global distribution of the ignitability component of flammability based on climatic drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karali, Anna; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Hatzaki, Maria; Giannakopoulos, Christos; Nastos, Panagiotis

    2017-04-01

    Fire regime is the result of complex interactions among ignition, topography, weather and vegetation. Even though the influence of vegetation varies regionally, it remains the only component that can be directly managed in order to reduce the negative impacts of wildland fires. Therefore, reliable information on vegetation flammability is required, making it one of the essential components of fire risk assessment and management. Specific Leaf Area (SLA [cm2 g-1], the ratio of leaf area to leaf dry mass) has received little attention regarding its relationship with ignitability and, thus, flammability. However, recent studies on a regional scale have shown that leaves of higher SLA are more ignitable. Thus, in the framework of the current study, the ignitability, as a function of SLA on global scale, is explored. In order to calculate SLA, a linear regression model combining SLA and climate data has been used (Maire et al., 2015). The climate data used for its calculation include the maximum monthly fractional sunshine duration, the maximum monthly temperature and the number of days with daily mean temperature above 0°C for each grid cell, obtained from the ERA-Interim gridded observations database. Subsequently, the ignitability component of flammability is calculated on a global scale using a bivariate regression relationship with SLA based on experimental burns of leaf materials (Grootemaat et al., 2015). The global distribution of ignitability can subsequently be combined with fire weather index (FWI) values for the development of an integrated index of forest fire vulnerability for the current and future climate, using CMIP5 climate model outputs. This will enable the integration of functional biogeographic data with widely applied fire risk assessment methodologies at regional to global spatial scales.

  5. Biogas Laminar Burning Velocity and Flammability Characteristics in Spark Ignited Premix Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Wardana, I. N. G.; Lawes, M.; Hughes, K. J.; Wahyudi, Slamet; Hamidi, Nurkholis; Hayakawa, Akihiro

    2013-04-01

    Spherically expanding flames propagating at constant pressure were employed to determine the laminar burning velocity and flammability characteristics of biogas-air mixtures in premixed combustion to uncover the fundamental flame propagation characteristics of a new alternative and renewable fuel. The results are compared with those from a methane-air flame. Biogas is a sustainable and renewable fuel that is produced in digestion facilities. The composition of biogas discussed in this paper consists of 66.4% methane, 30.6% carbon dioxide and 3% nitrogen. Burning velocity was measured at various equivalence ratios (phi) using a photographic technique in a high pressure fan-stirred bomb, the initial condition being at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The flame for methane-air mixtures propagates from phi=0.6 till phi=1.3. The flame at phi >= 1.4 does not propagate because the combustion reaction is quenched by the larger mass of fuel. At phiflame for biogas-air mixtures propagates in a narrower range, that is from phi=0.6 to phi=1.2. Different from the methane flame, the biogas flame does not propagate at phi>=1.3 because the heat absorbed by inhibitors strengthens the quenching effect by the larger mass of fuel. As in the methane flame, the biogas flame at phi<=0.5 does not propagate. This shows that the effect of inhibitors in extremely lean mixtures is small. Compared to a methane-air mixture, the flammability characteristic (flammable region) of biogas becomes narrower in the presence of inhibitors (carbon dioxide and nitrogen) and the presence of inhibitors causes a reduction in the laminar burning velocity. The inhibitor gases work more effectively at rich mixtures because the rich biogas-air mixtures have a higher fraction of carbon dioxide and nitrogen components compared to the lean biogas-air mixtures.

  6. Characterization of impurities in biogas before and after upgrading to vehicle fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Johansson, Ulrika [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Biogases produced by digesting organic wastes, residual sludge from waste water treatment, energy crops,byproducts from industry or in landfills contain impurities which can be harmful for components that will be in contact with the biogas during its utilization. In this project, the impurities present in biogases have been mapped out depending upon which feedstock is digested. P-cymene och D-limonene, two terpenes, have been found to be characteristics for biogases produced from the digestion of waste including household wastes while an 'oil' fraction containing alkanes with 9 to 13 carbon atoms is characteristic for biogases produced at waste water treatment plants. Ketones and sulfur compounds are found in biogases produced from the digestion of food industry wastes or energy crops. It was not possible to characterize impurities in biogases produced in farm plants digesting manure because not enough samples were analyzed from these plants. In order to understand the relation between the feedstock and the impurities present in the biogas, an extensive study on feedstock characterization must be conducted. One question to be answered is if these impurities only originate from the volatilization from the feedstock and in this case, why only these specific compounds are found at significant concentrations. In this study we have also studied how effective purification/upgrading techniques are to remove impurities that have been identified in biogases. En general comment is that the upgraded gas still contains a part of the characteristic impurities which have been identified for each feedstock at different levels of concentration depending on which technique has been used. The results show that activated carbon filters are more or less effective. Some of them can remove more than 90 % of the impurities while others remove less that 10 %. Results show also that the amine scrubber have very moderate effects on the impurities composition. In that case, the

  7. ASTM Committee G-4 metals flammability test program - Data and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Homa, John M.; Williams, Ralph E.; Benz, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of metals flammability tests performed on twenty-six metals in the NASA/White Sands Test Facility are discussed together with the test systems. The promoted combustion and ignition characteristics of these metals are described, and the metals are ranked according to their suitability for use in oxygen systems. In general, alloys with high copper and nickel contents and low iron content were found to rank higher than those that had high iron content, while alloys that had high aluminum content were ranked the lowest.

  8. Laminar burning velocities of near-flammability-limit H2-air-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesel Sitar, J.V.; Chan, C.K.; Torchia, F.; Guerrero, A.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar burning velocities of lean H 2 -air-steam mixtures near the flammability limit were measured by using the pressure-time history of an expanding flame kernel. Although flames in these mixtures are inherently unstable, this difficulty was avoided by using the early pressure rise of the burn. A comparison of results from that method with burning velocities determined from schlieren photographs of the expanding flame kernel gave good agreement. Despite the difficulties, it is believed that the pressure trace method gives results that are useful in modelling reactor accident scenarios. 8 refs., 4 figs

  9. Flammability properties of British heathland and moorland vegetation: models for predicting fire ignition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M; Marrs, Rob H

    2014-06-15

    Temperate ecosystems, for example British heathlands and moorlands, are predicted to experience an increase in severe summer drought and wildfire frequency over the next few decades. The development of fire ignition probability models is fundamental for developing fire-danger rating systems and predicting wildfire outbreaks. This work assessed the flammability properties of the fuel complex of British moorlands as a function of their moisture content under laboratory conditions. Specifically, we aimed to develop: (1) models of the probability of fire ignition in peat/litter fuel-beds (litter of four different plant species, Sphagnum moss and peat); (2) flammability properties in terms of ignitability, sustainability, consumability and combustibility of these peat/litter fuel-beds; (3) the probability of ignition in a canopy-layer of Calluna vulgaris (the most dominant heath/moor species in Britain) as a function of its dead-fuel proportion and moisture content; (4) the efficacy of standardized smouldering and flaming ignition sources in developing sustained ignitions. For this, a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fuel structure of moor vegetation were performed. The flammability properties in peat/litter fuel-beds were influenced strongly by the fuel moisture content. There were small differences in moisture thresholds for experiencing initial flaming ignitions (35-59%), however, the threshold for sustained ignitions (i.e. spreading a fixed distance from the ignition point) varied across a much wider range (19-55%). Litter/peat fuel-beds were classified into three groups: fuel-beds with high ignitability and combustibility, fuel-beds with high levels of sustainability, and fuel-beds with low levels in all flammability descriptors. The probability of ignition in the upper Calluna-vegetation layer was influenced by both the proportion of dead fuels and their moisture content, ranging from 19% to 35% of moisture as dead fuel proportion increased

  10. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Korolchenko Dmitriy; Voevoda Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL) surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam...

  11. SYMPTOMS OF UPGRADING CONSUMPTION IN RURAL HOUSEHOLDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Gutkowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse the structure of expenditure in rural households paying attention to the upgrading of consumption. The research material used in the present study was individual data from the household budget survey for 2004, 2006 and 2012 which is conducted annually by the Central Statistical Offi ce of Poland. In the conducted study a conventional statistical analysis and multivariate statistical method was used. The process of upgrading the structure of consumer spending is observed in all types of rural households. Disposable incomes are the main determinant affecting consumption models in rural households and their level of upgrading. Socio-demographic characteristics play an increasingly important role in shaping consumer expenditure in rural households. Decreasing spending on consumer staples, and increasing spending on goods of a higher order are observed in the structure of expenses.

  12. LHC Interaction Region Upgrade Phase I

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, R

    2009-01-01

    The LHC is starting operation with beam in 2008. The primary goal of CERN and the LHC community is to ensure that the collider is operated efficiently, maximizing its physics reach, and to achieve the nominal performance in the shortest term. Since several years the community has been discussing the directions for upgrading the experiments, in particular ATLAS and CMS, the LHC machine and the CERN proton injector complex. A well substantiated and coherent scenario for the first phase of the upgrade, which is foreseen in 2013, is now approved by CERN Council. In this paper, we present the goals and the proposed conceptual solution for the Phase-I upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology, with the target of increasing the luminosity by a factor of 2-3 with respect to the nominal luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1, while maximising the use of the existing infrastructure.

  13. Microbial biocatalyst developments to upgrade fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbane, John J

    2006-06-01

    Steady increases in the average sulfur content of petroleum and stricter environmental regulations concerning the sulfur content have promoted studies of bioprocessing to upgrade fossil fuels. Bioprocesses can potentially provide a solution to the need for improved and expanded fuel upgrading worldwide, because bioprocesses for fuel upgrading do not require hydrogen and produce far less carbon dioxide than thermochemical processes. Recent advances have demonstrated that biodesulfurization is capable of removing sulfur from hydrotreated diesel to yield a product with an ultra-low sulfur concentration that meets current environmental regulations. However, the technology has not yet progressed beyond laboratory-scale testing, as more efficient biocatalysts are needed. Genetic studies to obtain improved biocatalysts for the selective removal of sulfur and nitrogen from petroleum provide the focus of current research efforts.

  14. Instrumentation and control doctrine for VVER upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernette, R.; Cucciniello, J.; Trebot, R.

    1997-01-01

    The main results are reported of analyses carried out on the WWER-400 and WWER-1000 series, and the reasons are summed up underlying the decision to establish a policy of WWER instrumentation and control upgrading. It is shown that such a policy forms a key stage in any upgrading project and contributes to the improvement of reactor safety at several levels: it helps to optimize the integration of safety requirements; it makes it easier to achieve a high level of automation and a better man-machine interaction; it should raise the culture of reactor safety. Four annexes demonstrate the factual fundamentals and structure of such a policy. (A.K.)

  15. The LANSCE RICE control system upgrade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oothoudt, Michael; Schaller, S. (Stuart); Bjorklund, E. A. (Eric A.); Burns, M. J. (Mary J.); Carr, G. (Gary); Carr, G. (Gary); Faucett, John Allen,; Hayden, D. J. (David J.); Lusk, M. D. (Matthew D.); Merl, R. B. (Robert B.); Potter, J. M. (Jerry M.); Reynolds, J. A. (Jerome A.); Romero, D. B. (Dolores B.); Shelley, F. E. (Fred E.)

    2003-01-01

    The LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) control system upgrade program continues with the impending replacement of the RICE (Remote Instrumentation and Control Equipment) subsystem. The RICE subsystem upgrade is a challenge because of its technology (late 1960s), number of channels (>10,000), and unique characteristics (all-modules data takes, timed/flavored data takes). The plan is to replace at least the non-timed data and the command portions of the subsystem with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). We discuss motivations, technological challenges, proof-of-principle, and planning. The boundary condition, as usual, is that we must implement these major changes on a running accelerator.

  16. CMS DT Upgrade The Sector Collector Relocation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079704

    2016-01-01

    The Sector Collector relocation is the first stage of the upgrade program for the Drift Tubes subdetector of the CMS experiment. It was accomplished during Long Shutdown 2013-2014, and consisted in the relocation of the second-level trigger and readout electronics from the experimental to the service cavern, relieving the environmental constraints and improving accessibility for maintenance and upgrade. Extending the electrical links would degrade reliability, so the information is converted to optical with a custom system capable of dealing with the DC-unbalanced data. Initially, present electronics are used, so optical-to-copper conversion has also been installed.

  17. Take control of upgrading to Snow Leopard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissell, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Installing a major new version of Mac OS X should be exciting and fun, but without proper guidance you may find it nerve-wracking or even risk losing valuable files. Fortunately, many thousands of people have upgraded Mac OS X calmly and successfully with Joe Kissell's previous best-selling Take Control of Upgrading... titles. Joe's friendly, expert steps-developed over innumerable test installations-help you to avoid trouble, understand what's going on when you install Snow Leopard, and easily recover from problem

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  19. Development of a Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Komai, Hidetoshi; Edo, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed a sacandidate for the muon system of the ATLAS detector for upgrading in LHC experiments. The μ-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector that doesn’t have floating structure such as wires, mesh, or foil. This detector can be made by printed-circuit-board (PCB) technology, which is commercially available and suited for mass production. Operation tests have been performed under high flux neutrons under similar conditions to the ATLAS cavern. Spark rates are measured using several gas mixtures under 7 MeV neutron irradiation, and good properties were observed using neon, ethane, and CF4 mixture of gases.Using resistive materials as electrodes, we are also developing a new μ-PIC, which is not expected to damage the electrodes in the case of discharge sparks.

  20. Cells on fibers to degrade PAH and upgrade coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clyde, R.

    1997-01-01

    There are over 2000 sites contaminated with PAH's from coal burning plants. White rot fungus degrades phenanthrene and anthracene, but the fungus needs air to grow. When grown on old cardboard boxes and buried, air is entrapped in the corrugations for growth of the fungus. When holes are put in the valleys of the corrugations and rotated in a half full reactor, drops are formed. Mass transfer to drops is much faster than to a flat surface, as described in Patent 5,256,570, so the fungus grows faster. Low rank coal can be upgraded to more valuable products with the fungus, say some Australians, but the problem is supplying oxygen. Celite can be entrapped in the fibers to ferment coal derived synthesis gas. The paper describes these processes

  1. A kinetic model for the first stage of pygas upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. de Medeiros

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis gasoline - PYGAS - is an intermediate boiling product of naphtha steam cracking with a high octane number and high aromatic/unsaturated contents. Due to stabilization concerns, PYGAS must be hydrotreated in two stages. The first stage uses a mild trickle-bed conversion for removing extremely reactive species (styrene, dienes and olefins prior to the more severe second stage where sulfured and remaining olefins are hydrogenated in gas phase. This work addresses the reaction network and two-phase kinetic model for the first stage of PYGAS upgrading. Nonlinear estimation was used for model tuning with kinetic data obtained in bench-scale trickle-bed hydrogenation with a commercial Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. On-line sampling experiments were designed to study the influence of variables - temperature and spatial velocity - on the conversion of styrene, dienes and olefins.

  2. Flammability limits: A review with emphasis on ethanol for aeronautical applications and description of the experimental procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coronado, Christian J.R. [Federal University of Itajuba - UNIFEI, Mechanical Engineering Institute - IEM Av BPS 1303, Itajuba, MG CEP 37500903 (Brazil); Carvalho, Joao A., E-mail: joao@feg.unesp.br [Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Campus of Guaratingueta - FEG Av. Ariberto P. da Cunha 333, Guaratingueta, SP CEP 12510410 (Brazil); Andrade, Jose C.; Cortez, Ely V. [National Space Research Institute - INPE, Combustion and Propulsion Laboratory - LCP Rod. Pres. Dutra, km 39, Cachoeira Paulista, SP CEP 12630-000 (Brazil); Carvalho, Felipe S. [Federal University of Itajuba - UNIFEI, Mechanical Engineering Institute - IEM Av BPS 1303, Itajuba, MG CEP 37500903 (Brazil); Santos, Jose C. [National Space Research Institute - INPE, Combustion and Propulsion Laboratory - LCP Rod. Pres. Dutra, km 39, Cachoeira Paulista, SP CEP 12630-000 (Brazil); Mendiburu, Andres Z. [Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Campus of Guaratingueta - FEG Av. Ariberto P. da Cunha 333, Guaratingueta, SP CEP 12510410 (Brazil)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Develops a comprehensive literature review on ethanol flammability limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Difference in standard procedures lead to different experimental values of the flammability limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology for experiments to find the FL's of ethanol for aeronautical applications. - Abstract: The lower and upper flammability limits of a fuel are key tools for predicting fire, assessing the possibility of explosion, and designing protection systems. Knowledge about the risks involved with the explosion of both gaseous and vaporized liquid fuel mixtures with air is very important to guarantee safety in industrial, domestic, and aeronautical applications. Currently, most countries use various standard experimental tests, which lead to different experimental values for these limits. A comprehensive literature review of the flammability limits of combustible mixtures is developed here in order to organize the theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject. The main focus of this paper is the review of the flammability data of ethanol-air mixtures available in the literature. In addition, the description of methodology for experiments to find the upper and lower limits of flammability of ethanol for aeronautical applications is discussed. A heated spherical 20 L vessel was used. The mixtures were ignited with electrode rods placed in the center of the vessel, and the spark gap was 6.4 mm. LFL and the UFL were determined for ethanol (hydrated ethanol 96% Degree-Sign INPM) as functions of temperature for atmospheric pressure to compare results with data published in the scientific literature.

  3. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties for Computer-aided molecular design of working fluids for thermodynamic cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    Computer Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) is an important tool to generate, test and evaluate promising chemical products. CAMD can be used in thermodynamic cycle for the design of pure component or mixture working fluids in order to improve the heat transfer capacity of the system. The safety...... assessment of novel working fluids relies on accurate property data. Flammability data like the lower and upper flammability limit (LFL and UFL) play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosion. For novel working fluid candidates experimental values are not available for the safety...

  4. Development of organic non-flammable spacecraft potting, encapsulating and conformal coating compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    The overall program objective was to develop a flexible compound which not only functioned in a manned aerospace environment as an effective electrical insulation, but whose flammability characteristics in 16.5 psia, 60% oxygen/40% nitrogen were evidenced by rapid self-extinguishment and minimal thermal (pyrolysis) degradation. The following polymeric matrices were examined in depth: fluoroelastomers, modified fluoroelastomers, silicone RTV's, and modified silicone and fluorosilicone RTV's. Almost none of these systems burned in air, but all burned in 6.2 psia oxygen. Inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic additives were evaluated in conjunction with these polymers in order to achieve the required survival in the 16.5 psia 60/40 environment. Depending upon formulations, it was possible to achieve nonflammable products when tested in the 1/4 in. x 1/4 in. x 1 in. configuration, even up to and including 16.5 psia oxygen. However, in order to assure this level of flame resistance, it was found necessary to heavily load the matrix with the additives. This resulted in a significant reduction in mechanical properties and large increases in viscosities. Optimization of formulations to obtain a suitable balance between these properties and flammability resistance led to the final selection of Formulation 387 as the primary system.

  5. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  6. Observations on the W-transport in the core plasma of JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pütterich, T.; Dux, R.; Neu, R.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bobkov, V.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Coenen, J.W.; Coffey, I.; Czarnecka, A.; Giroud, C.; Jacquet, P.; Joffrin, E.; Kallenbach, A.; Lehnen, M.; Lerche, E.; De La Luna, E.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; McDermott, R.M.; Meigs, A.; Mlynář, Jan; Sertoli, M.; van Rooij, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2013), s. 124036-124036 ISSN 0741-3335. [European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics/40./. Espoo, 01.07.2013-05.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * impurity transport * core plasma * fusion * tungsten * ASDEX Upgrade Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/55/12/124036/pdf/0741-3335_55_12_124036.pdf

  7. Colorado River Sewer System Joint Venture to Upgrade Wastewater System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAN FRANCISCO -Today, the Colorado River Sewer System Joint Venture, located in Parker, Ariz. entered into an agreement with the EPA to upgrade their wastewater treatment system to meet stringent water quality standards. The cost of the upgrade is ap

  8. Guidelines for upgrading of low volume roads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Division of Roads and Transport Technology CSIR

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manual is to provide guidelines on the upgrading of gravel low volume roads to roads and maintenance personnel of road authorities of all sizes. Low volume is, for the purpose of this document, defined to be less than 500...

  9. Upgrading of TARN-II vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Arakaki, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Tomizawa, M.; Tanabe, T.; Katayama, I.

    1994-01-01

    Ion pumps and titanium getter pumps have been increased nearly twice in the TARN-II. The pumping speed per unit length is now improved up to 2/3 times that of TARN-I. An average vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr order has been achieved at beam time. Performance of the system after the upgrading is reported. (author)

  10. Filtration engineering study to upgrade the ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, F.N.N.

    1995-01-01

    Filtration technologies are evaluated which have potential to augment or upgrade the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The study was written in anticipation of treating future waste waters that have high fouling potentials. The Three ultrafilters judged to be capable of treating future waste waters are: hollow fiber, tubular, and centrifugal

  11. Overview of the Calorimeter Readout Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Straessner, Arno; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS calorimeter electronics will be upgraded for the HL-LHC data taking phase to cope with higher event pile-up and to allow improved trigger strategies. This presentations gives an overview of the ongoing developments for the CMS barrel calorimeters and the ATLAS LAr and Tile calorimeters.

  12. LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade Work Report

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Michael

    2017-01-01

    As the LHCb prepares for the planned upgrade of its vertex locator, there is a great need for supporting work such as the design and testing of apparatus that will ensure the smooth implementation of new hardware and infrastructure. My work this summer consisted largely of tasks to support this process.

  13. The Kyoto University tandem upgrading project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Shimoura, Susumu; Takimoto, Kiyohiko; Sakaguchi, Harutaka; Kobayashi, Shinsaku

    1988-01-01

    A brief description on the Kyoto University tandem upgrading project. The project consists of replacing the old 5 MV tandem Van de Graaff by an 8UDH pelletron. The old pressure vessel and beam lines are used again without significant modification. The project is planned to be completed at the end of 1989. (orig.)

  14. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  15. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  16. Design features impacting mobile phone upgrading frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saaksjarvi, M.C.; Hellen, K.; Tuunanen, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of design on customer upgrading frequency, and differentiates between functional and aesthetic aspects of design. For the empirical study, we conducted an intercept survey in Beijing and Shanghai with Chinese consumers (n=170) in a retail mall setting. The survey’s

  17. PC Made Easy: Upgrading Computer Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Matt

    1997-01-01

    Provides guidelines for ordering the best computer books, geared to the library's size. Covers series, articles, subjects, and publishers most useful to a broad audience, as well as the best places to seek information on new titles and where to find reviews. Offers time savers for upgrading a computer book collection and discusses weeding…

  18. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS experiment for the operation at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider requires a new and more performant inner tracker, the ITk. The innermost part of this tracker will be built using silicon pixel detectors. This paper describes the ITk pixel project, which, after few years of design and test e ort, is now defined in detail.

  19. Tackling Chinese Upgrading through Experimentalism and Pragmatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Julia Kirch

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the development of China’s wind turbine industry, shedding light on the Chinese mode of disruptive industrial upgrading through policy pragmatism and fragmented, experimental governance. Based on a historical analysis of China’s wind turbine industry, the paper highlights three...

  20. Upgrade of the CERN telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, maintenance work will be carried out on the CERN switching centre between 8.00 p.m. and 10.00 p.m. on Monday 9 October. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this time. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service