WorldWideScience

Sample records for first-order electroweak phase

  1. First order electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Fodor, Z.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, the authors have studied the phase transition in the SU(2)gauge theory at finite temperature. The authors' improved perturbative approach does not suffer from the infrared problems appearing in the ordinary loop expansion. The authors have calculated the effective potential up to cubic terms in the couplings. The higher order terms suggest that the method is reliable for Higgs masses smaller than 80 GeV. The authors have obtained a non-vanishing magnetic mass which further weakens the transitions. By use of Langer's theory of metastability, the authors have calculated the nucleation rate for critical bubbles and have discussed some cosmological consequences. For m H <80 GeV the phase transition is first order and proceeds via bubble nucleation and growth. The thin wall approximation is only marginally applicable. Since the phase transition is quite weak SM baryogenesis is unlikely. 8 refs., 5 figs

  2. QCD-Electroweak First-Order Phase Transition in a Supercooled Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso, Satoshi; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Shimada, Kengo

    2017-10-01

    If the electroweak sector of the standard model is described by classically conformal dynamics, the early Universe evolution can be substantially altered. It is already known that—contrarily to the standard model case—a first-order electroweak phase transition may occur. Here we show that, depending on the model parameters, a dramatically different scenario may happen: A first-order, six massless quark QCD phase transition occurs first, which then triggers the electroweak symmetry breaking. We derive the necessary conditions for this dynamics to occur, using the specific example of the classically conformal B -L model. In particular, relatively light weakly coupled particles are predicted, with implications for collider searches. This scenario is also potentially rich in cosmological consequences, such as renewed possibilities for electroweak baryogenesis, altered dark matter production, and gravitational wave production, as we briefly comment upon.

  3. QCD-Electroweak First-Order Phase Transition in a Supercooled Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso, Satoshi; Serpico, Pasquale D; Shimada, Kengo

    2017-10-06

    If the electroweak sector of the standard model is described by classically conformal dynamics, the early Universe evolution can be substantially altered. It is already known that-contrarily to the standard model case-a first-order electroweak phase transition may occur. Here we show that, depending on the model parameters, a dramatically different scenario may happen: A first-order, six massless quark QCD phase transition occurs first, which then triggers the electroweak symmetry breaking. We derive the necessary conditions for this dynamics to occur, using the specific example of the classically conformal B-L model. In particular, relatively light weakly coupled particles are predicted, with implications for collider searches. This scenario is also potentially rich in cosmological consequences, such as renewed possibilities for electroweak baryogenesis, altered dark matter production, and gravitational wave production, as we briefly comment upon.

  4. Gravitational waves from a first-order electroweak phase transition: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, David J

    2018-03-06

    We review the production of gravitational waves by an electroweak first-order phase transition. The resulting signal is a good candidate for detection at next-generation gravitational wave detectors, such as LISA. Detection of such a source of gravitational waves could yield information about physics beyond the Standard Model that is complementary to that accessible to current and near-future collider experiments. We summarize efforts to simulate and model the phase transition and the resulting production of gravitational waves.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs cosmology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  5. Strongly first-order electroweak phase transition and classical scale invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzinnia, Arsham; Ren, Jing

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility of realizing a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition within the minimal classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM), previously proposed and analyzed as a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. By introducing one complex gauge-singlet scalar and three (weak scale) right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the scenario was successfully rendered capable of achieving a radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry (by means of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism), inducing nonzero masses for the SM neutrinos (via the seesaw mechanism), presenting a pseudoscalar dark matter candidate (protected by the CP symmetry of the potential), and predicting the existence of a second CP-even boson (with suppressed couplings to the SM content) in addition to the 125 GeV scalar. In the present treatment, we construct the full finite-temperature one-loop effective potential of the model, including the resummed thermal daisy loops, and demonstrate that finite-temperature effects induce a first-order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the thermally driven first-order phase transition to be sufficiently strong at the onset of the bubble nucleation (corresponding to nucleation temperatures TN˜100-200 GeV) further constrains the model's parameter space; in particular, an O(0.01) fraction of the dark matter in the Universe may be simultaneously accommodated with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. Moreover, such a phase transition disfavors right-handed Majorana neutrino masses above several hundreds of GeV, confines the pseudoscalar dark matter masses to ˜1-2 TeV, predicts the mass of the second CP-even scalar to be ˜100-300 GeV, and requires the mixing angle between the CP-even components of the SM doublet and the complex singlet to lie within the range 0.2≲sinω ≲0.4. The obtained results are displayed in comprehensive exclusion plots, identifying the viable regions of the parameter space

  6. Magnetic Fields at First Order Phase Transition: A Threat to Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    De Simone, Andrea; Quiros, Mariano; Riotto, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The generation of the observed baryon asymmetry may have taken place during the electroweak phase transition, thus involving physics testable at LHC, a scenario dubbed electroweak baryogenesis. In this paper we point out that the magnetic field which is produced in the bubbles of a first order phase transition endangers the baryon asymmetry produced in the bubble walls. The reason being that the produced magnetic field couples to the sphaleron magnetic moment and lowers the sphaleron energy; this strengthens the sphaleron transitions inside the bubbles and triggers a more effective wash out of the baryon asymmetry. We apply this scenario to the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) where, in the absence of a magnetic field, successful electroweak baryogenesis requires the lightest CP-even Higgs and the right-handed stop masses to be lighter than about 127 GeV and 120 GeV, respectively. We show that even for moderate values of the magnetic field, the Higgs mass required to preserve the ...

  7. Strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basler, P.; Krause, M.; Mühlleitner, M.; Wittbrodt, J.; Wlotzka, A.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS has marked a milestone for particle physics. Yet, there are still many open questions that cannot be answered within the Standard Model (SM). For example, the generation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe through baryogenesis can only be explained qualitatively in the SM. A simple extension of the SM compatible with the current theoretical and experimental constraints is given by the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) where a second Higgs doublet is added to the Higgs sector. We investigate the possibility of a strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM type I and type II where either of the CP-even Higgs bosons is identified with the SM-like Higgs boson. The renormalisation that we apply on the loop-corrected Higgs potential allows us to efficiently scan the 2HDM parameter space and simultaneously take into account all relevant theoretical and up-to-date experimental constraints. The 2HDM parameter regions found to be compatible with the applied constraints and a strong electroweak phase transition are analysed systematically. Our results show that there is a strong interplay between the requirement of a strong phase transition and collider phenomenology with testable implications for searches at the LHC.

  8. Strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basler, P.; Krause, M.; Mühlleitner, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wittbrodt, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Wlotzka, A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-02-23

    The discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS has marked a milestone for particle physics. Yet, there are still many open questions that cannot be answered within the Standard Model (SM). For example, the generation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe through baryogenesis can only be explained qualitatively in the SM. A simple extension of the SM compatible with the current theoretical and experimental constraints is given by the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) where a second Higgs doublet is added to the Higgs sector. We investigate the possibility of a strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM type I and type II where either of the CP-even Higgs bosons is identified with the SM-like Higgs boson. The renormalisation that we apply on the loop-corrected Higgs potential allows us to efficiently scan the 2HDM parameter space and simultaneously take into account all relevant theoretical and up-to-date experimental constraints. The 2HDM parameter regions found to be compatible with the applied constraints and a strong electroweak phase transition are analysed systematically. Our results show that there is a strong interplay between the requirement of a strong phase transition and collider phenomenology with testable implications for searches at the LHC.

  9. First Order Electroweak Phase Transition from (Non)Conformal Extensions of the Standard Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Virkajärvi, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    We analyse and compare the finite-temperature electroweak phase transition properties of classically (non)conformal extensions of the Standard Model. In the classically conformal scenarios the breaking of the electroweak symmetry is generated radiatively. The models feature new scalars coupled co...... the associated models are testable at the upcoming Large Hadron Collider run two experiments....

  10. Gravitational waves from the first order electroweak phase transition in the Z3 symmetric singlet scalar model*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Toshinori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Among various scenarios of baryon asymmetry of the Universe, electroweak baryogenesis is directly connected with physics of the Higgs sector. We discuss spectra of gravitational waves which are originated by the strongly first order phase transition at the electroweak symmetry breaking, which is required for a successful scenario of electroweak baryogenesis. In the Z3 symmetric singlet scalar model, the significant gravitational waves are caused by the multi-step phase transition. We show that the model can be tested by measuring the characteristic spectra of the gravitational waves at future interferometers such as LISA and DECIGO.

  11. The CP-violating 2HDM in light of a strong first order electroweak phase transition and implications for Higgs pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, P.; Mühlleitner, M.; Wittbrodt, J.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the strength of the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) within the CP-violating 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (C2HDM). The 2HDM is a simple and well-studied model, which can feature CP violation at tree level in its extended scalar sector. This makes it, in contrast to the Standard Model (SM), a promising candidate for explaining the baryon asymmetry of the universe through electroweak baryogenesis. We apply a renormalisation scheme which allows efficient scans of the C2HDM parameter space by using the loop-corrected masses and mixing matrix as input parameters. This procedure enables us to investigate the possibility of a strong first order EWPT required for baryogenesis and study its phenomenological implications for the LHC. Like in the CP-conserving (real) 2HDM (R2HDM) we find that a strong EWPT favours mass gaps between the non-SM-like Higgs bosons. These lead to prominent final states comprised of gauge+Higgs bosons or pairs of Higgs bosons. In contrast to the R2HDM, the CP-mixing of the C2HDM also favours approximately mass degenerate spectra with dominant decays into SM particles. The requirement of a strong EWPT further allows us to distinguish the C2HDM from the R2HDM using the signal strengths of the SM-like Higgs boson. We additionally find that a strong EWPT requires an enhancement of the SM-like trilinear Higgs coupling at next-to-leading order (NLO) by up to a factor of 2.4 compared to the NLO SM coupling, establishing another link between cosmology and collider phenomenology. We provide several C2HDM benchmark scenarios compatible with a strong EWPT and all experimental and theoretical constraints. We include the dominant branching ratios of the non-SM-like Higgs bosons as well as the Higgs pair production cross section of the SM-like Higgs boson for every benchmark point. The pair production cross sections can be substantially enhanced compared to the SM and could be observable at the high-luminosity LHC, allowing access to the trilinear

  12. Electroweak monopoles and the electroweak phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, Suntharan; Kobakhidze, Archil [The University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2017-07-15

    We consider an isolated electroweak monopole solution within the Standard Model with a nonlinear Born-Infeld extension of the hypercharge gauge field. Monopole (and dyon) solutions in such an extension are regular and their masses are predicted to be proportional to the Born-Infeld mass parameter. We argue that cosmological production of electroweak monopoles may delay the electroweak phase transition and make it more strongly first order for monopole masses M >or similar 9.3 . 10{sup 3} TeV, while the nucleosynthesis constraints on the abundance of relic monopoles impose the bound M electroweak phase transition. (orig.)

  13. Electroweak radiative effects of the first order in the birth of the single W-bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermol'chik, V.L.; Suares, Kh.; Shumejko, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    The process of single W-boson production (charged current Drell - Yan process) is considered. Electroweak radiative corrections of first order are calculated. The Bardin - Shumeiko covariant approach is used to remove infrared divergences. Logarithmic onshell divergences cancellation is shown. Stable for numeric calculation expression for contribution of soft photons is obtained. Matrix element for bremsstrahlung radiation is calculated using helicity amplitudes method. Partial integration over 3-particle phase space volume is performed analytically. The result of numerical analyses shows that electroweak correction to the cross section is large (up to 150 % for electron in the final state) in the region of the lepton pair invariant mass M = 20… 80 GeV where final state radiation is dominated. In the region 1-5 TeV the correction is growth up by absolute value and achieved 40 %. This indicates high importance of radiative corrections at high energies in conditions of experiments at Large Hadron Collider. (authors)

  14. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier

  15. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr., E-mail: childh@kenyon.edu, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  16. Electroweak phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, left-angle φ right-angle T is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of left-angle φ right-angle T . In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase left-angle φ right-angle T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value left-angle φ right-angle = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state left-angle φ right-angle = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state left-angle φ right-angle = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field

  17. Energy Budget of Cosmological First-order Phase Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, Jose R; No, Jose M; Servant, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    The study of the hydrodynamics of bubble growth in first-order phase transitions is very relevant for electroweak baryogenesis, as the baryon asymmetry depends sensitively on the bubble wall velocity, and also for predicting the size of the gravity wave signal resulting from bubble collisions, which depends on both the bubble wall velocity and the plasma fluid velocity. We perform such study in different bubble expansion regimes, namely deflagrations, detonations, hybrids (steady states) and runaway solutions (accelerating wall), without relying on a specific particle physics model. We compute the efficiency of the transfer of vacuum energy to the bubble wall and the plasma in all regimes. We clarify the condition determining the runaway regime and stress that in most models of strong first-order phase transitions this will modify expectations for the gravity wave signal. Indeed, in this case, most of the kinetic energy is concentrated in the wall and almost no turbulent fluid motions are expected since the s...

  18. Magnetocaloric materials and first order phase transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Bez, Henrique

    and magnetocaloric regenerative tests. The magnetic, thermal and structural properties obtained from such measurements are then evaluated through different models, i.e. the Curie-Weiss law, the Bean-Rodbell model, the free electron model and the Debye model.The measured magnetocaloric properties of La0.67Ca0.33MnO3...... heat capacity, magnetization and entropy change measurements. By measuring bulky particles (with a particle size in the range of 5001000 μm) of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz with first order phase transition, it was possible to observe very sharp transitions. This is not the case for finer ground particles which......This thesis studies the first order phase transitions of the magnetocaloric materials La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 and La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz trying to overcome challenges that these materials face when applied in active magnetic regenerators. The study is done through experimental characterization and modelling...

  19. What's new with the electroweak phase transition?

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, M.

    1999-01-01

    We review the status of non-perturbative lattice studies of the electroweak phase transition. In the Standard Model, the complete phase diagram has been reliably determined, and the conclusion is that there is no phase transition at all for the experimentally allowed Higgs masses. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in contrast, there can be a strong first order transition allowing for baryogenesis. Finally, we point out possibilities for future simulations, such as the problem of CP-violation at the MSSM electroweak phase boundary.

  20. Comments on the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dine, M.; Leigh, R.G.; Huet, P.; Linde, A.; Linde, D.

    1992-01-01

    We report on an investigation of various problems related to the theory of the electroweak phase transition. This includes a determination of the nature of the phase transition, a discussion of the possible role of higher order radiative corrections and the theory of the formation and evolution of the bubbles of the new phase. We find in particular that no dangerous linear terms appear in the effective potential. However, the strength of the first-order phase transition is 2/3 times less than what follows from the one-loop approximation. This rules out baryogenesis in the minimal version of the electroweak theory with light Higgs bosons. (orig.)

  1. Acoustic waves and the detectability of first-order phase transitions by eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, David J.

    2017-05-01

    In various extensions of the Standard Model it is possible that the electroweak phase transition was first order. This would have been a violent process, involving the formation of bubbles and associated shock waves. Not only would the collision of these bubbles and shock waves be a detectable source of gravitational waves, but persistent acoustic waves could enhance the signal and improve prospects of detection by eLISA. I summarise the results of a recent campaign to model such a phase transition based on large-scale hydrodynamical simulations, and its implications for the eLISA mission.

  2. A Bayesian Interpretation of First-Order Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sergio; Peralta, Joaquín; Navarrete, Yasmín; González, Diego; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-03-01

    In this work we review the formalism used in describing the thermodynamics of first-order phase transitions from the point of view of maximum entropy inference. We present the concepts of transition temperature, latent heat and entropy difference between phases as emergent from the more fundamental concept of internal energy, after a statistical inference analysis. We explicitly demonstrate this point of view by making inferences on a simple game, resulting in the same formalism as in thermodynamical phase transitions. We show that analogous quantities will inevitably arise in any problem of inferring the result of a yes/no question, given two different states of knowledge and information in the form of expectation values. This exposition may help to clarify the role of these thermodynamical quantities in the context of different first-order phase transitions such as the case of magnetic Hamiltonians (e.g. the Potts model).

  3. Nucleation of relativistic first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Kapusta, J.I.

    1992-01-01

    The authors apply the general formalism of Langer to compute the nucleation rate for systems of relativistic particles with zero or small baryon number density and which undergo first-order phase transitions. In particular, the pre-exponential factor is computed and it is proportional to the viscosity. The initial growth rate of a critical size bubble or droplet is limited by the ability of dissipative processes to transport latent heat away from the surface. 30 refs., 4 figs

  4. First order phase transition of expanding matter and its fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazumi, Shinpei; Iwamoto, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Using an expanding matter model with a Lennard-Jones potential, the instability of the expanding system is investigated. The pressure, the temperature, and the density fluctuations are calculated as functions of density during the time evolution of the expanding matter, which are compared to the coexistence curve calculated by the Gibbs ensemble. The expanding matter undergoes the first order phase transition in the limit of the quasistatic expansion. The resultant fragment mass distributions are also investigated. (author)

  5. First order phase transition of a long polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristoff, David; Radin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model consisting of a self-avoiding polygon occupying a variable density of the sites of a square lattice. A fixed energy is associated with each 90 0 bend of the polygon. We use a grand canonical ensemble, introducing parameters μ and β to control average density and average (total) energy of the polygon, and show by Monte Carlo simulation that the model has a first order, nematic phase transition across a curve in the β-μ plane.

  6. Issues concerning gravity waves from first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosowsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The stochastic background of gravitational radiation is a unique and potentially valuable source of information about the early universe. Photons thermally decoupled when the universe was around 100,000 years old; electromagnetic radiation cannot directly provide information about the epoch earlier than this. In contrast, gravitons presumably decoupled around the Planck time, when the universe was only 10 -44 seconds old. Since gravity wave propagate virtually unimpeded, any energetic event in the evolution of the universe will leave an imprint on the gravity wave background. Turner and Wilczek first suggested that first-order phase transitions, and particularly transitions which occur via the nucleation, expansion, and percolation of vacuum bubbles, will be a particularly efficient source of gravitational radiation. Detailed calculations with scalar-field vacuum bubbles confirm this conjecture and show that strongly first-order phase transitions are probably the strongest stochastic gravity-wave source yet conjectured. In this work the author first reviews the vacuum bubble calculations, stressing their physical assumptions. The author then discusses realistic scenarios for first-order phase transitions and describes how the calculations must be modified and extended to produce reliable results. 11 refs

  7. Entanglement scaling at first order quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, A.; Cartwright, C.; De Chiara, G.; Sanpera, A.

    2018-04-01

    First order quantum phase transitions (1QPTs) are signalled, in the thermodynamic limit, by discontinuous changes in the ground state properties. These discontinuities affect expectation values of observables, including spatial correlations. When a 1QPT is crossed in the vicinity of a second order one, due to the correlation length divergence of the latter, the corresponding ground state is modified and it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the order of the transition when the size of the system is finite. Here we show that, in such situations, it is possible to apply finite size scaling (FSS) to entanglement measures, as it has recently been done for the order parameters and the energy gap, in order to recover the correct thermodynamic limit (Campostrini et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 070402). Such a FSS can unambiguously discriminate between first and second order phase transitions in the vicinity of multicritical points even when the singularities displayed by entanglement measures lead to controversial results.

  8. Thermal equilibrium during the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetradis, N.

    1991-12-01

    The effective potential for the standard model develops a barrier, at temperatures around the electroweak scale, which separates the minimum at zero field and a deeper non-zero minimum. This could create out of equilibrium conditions by inducing the localization of the Higgs field in a metastable state around zero. In this picture vacuum decay would occur through bubble nucleation. I show that there is an upper bound on the Higgs mass for the above scenario to be realized. The barrier must be high enough to prevent thermal fluctuations of the Higgs expectation value from establishing thermal equilibrium between the two minima. The upper bound is estimated to be lower than the experimental lower limit. This is also imposes constraints on extensions of the standard model constructed in order to generate a strongly first order phase transition. (orig.)

  9. Correlation functions in first-order phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, V.; Crespo, D.

    1997-09-01

    Most of the physical properties of systems underlying first-order phase transitions can be obtained from the spatial correlation functions. In this paper, we obtain expressions that allow us to calculate all the correlation functions from the droplet size distribution. Nucleation and growth kinetics is considered, and exact solutions are obtained for the case of isotropic growth by using self-similarity properties. The calculation is performed by using the particle size distribution obtained by a recently developed model (populational Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model). Since this model is less restrictive than that used in previously existing theories, the result is that the correlation functions can be obtained for any dependence of the kinetic parameters. The validity of the method is tested by comparison with the exact correlation functions, which had been obtained in the available cases by the time-cone method. Finally, the correlation functions corresponding to the microstructure developed in partitioning transformations are obtained.

  10. Singlet Higgs phenomenology and the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profumo, Stefano; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Shaughnessy, Gabe

    2007-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of gauge singlet extensions of the Standard Model scalar sector and their implications for the electroweak phase transition. We determine the conditions on the scalar potential parameters that lead to a strong first order phase transition as needed to produce the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. We analyze the constraints on the potential parameters derived from Higgs boson searches at LEP and electroweak precision observables. For models that satisfy these constraints and that produce a strong first order phase transition, we discuss the prospective signatures in future Higgs studies at the Large Hadron Collider and a Linear Collider. We argue that such studies will provide powerful probes of phase transition dynamics in models with an extended scalar sector

  11. Electroweak phase transition in an extension of the standard model with scalar color octet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. W.; Shim, Seong-A; Oh, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In an extension of the standard model with a scalar color octet, the possibility of the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is studied by examining the finite-temperature effective Higgs potential at the one-loop level. It is found that there are wide regions in the parameter space that allow the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition, where the Higgs boson mass is larger than the experimental lower bound of 115 GeV, and the masses of the scalar color octet is around 200 GeV. The parameter regions may be explored at the LHC with respect to the electroweak phase transition.

  12. A strong electroweak phase transition from the inflaton field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Vaskonen, Ville [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O.Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland)

    2016-09-22

    We study a singlet scalar extension of the Standard Model. The singlet scalar is coupled non-minimally to gravity and assumed to drive inflation, and also couple sufficiently strongly with the SM Higgs field in order to provide for a strong first order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the model to describe inflation successfully, be compatible with the LHC data, and yield a strong first order electroweak phase transition, we identify the regions of the parameter space where the model is viable. We also include a singlet fermion with scalar coupling to the singlet scalar to probe the sensitivity of the constraints on additional degrees of freedom and their couplings in the singlet sector. We also comment on the general feasibility of these fields to act as dark matter.

  13. Echoes of inflationary first-order phase transitions in the CMB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological phase transitions (CPTs, such as the Grand Unified Theory (GUT and the electroweak (EW ones, play a significant role in both particle physics and cosmology. In this letter, we propose to probe the first-order CPTs, by detecting gravitational waves (GWs which are generated during the phase transitions through the cosmic microwave background (CMB. If happened around the inflation era, the first-order CPTs may yield low-frequency GWs due to bubble dynamics, leaving imprints on the CMB. In contrast to the nearly scale-invariant primordial GWs caused by vacuum fluctuation, these bubble-generated GWs are scale dependent and have non-trivial B-mode spectra. If decoupled from inflaton, the EWPT during inflation may serve as a probe for the one after reheating where the baryon asymmetry could be generated via EW baryogenesis (EWBG. The CMB thus provides a potential way to test the feasibility of the EWBG, complementary to the collider measurements of Higgs potential and the direct detection of GWs generated during EWPT.

  14. Echoes of inflationary first-order phase transitions in the CMB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongliang, E-mail: hjiangag@connect.ust.hk [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Liu, Tao, E-mail: taoliu@ust.hk [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Sun, Sichun, E-mail: sichun@uw.edu [Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Wang, Yi, E-mail: phyw@ust.hk [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-10

    Cosmological phase transitions (CPTs), such as the Grand Unified Theory (GUT) and the electroweak (EW) ones, play a significant role in both particle physics and cosmology. In this letter, we propose to probe the first-order CPTs, by detecting gravitational waves (GWs) which are generated during the phase transitions through the cosmic microwave background (CMB). If happened around the inflation era, the first-order CPTs may yield low-frequency GWs due to bubble dynamics, leaving imprints on the CMB. In contrast to the nearly scale-invariant primordial GWs caused by vacuum fluctuation, these bubble-generated GWs are scale dependent and have non-trivial B-mode spectra. If decoupled from inflaton, the EWPT during inflation may serve as a probe for the one after reheating where the baryon asymmetry could be generated via EW baryogenesis (EWBG). The CMB thus provides a potential way to test the feasibility of the EWBG, complementary to the collider measurements of Higgs potential and the direct detection of GWs generated during EWPT.

  15. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashino, Katsuya, E-mail: hashino@jodo.sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kakizaki, Mitsuru, E-mail: kakizaki@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kanemura, Shinya, E-mail: kanemu@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Ko, Pyungwon, E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Matsui, Toshinori, E-mail: matsui@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-10

    We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  16. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Hashino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  17. Electroweak Phase Transition and Baryogenesis in the nMSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, S J; Prokopec, T; Schmidt, M G; Huber, Stephan J.; Konstandin, Thomas; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the nMSSM with CP violation in the singlet sector. We study the static and dynamical properties of the electroweak phase transition. We conclude that electroweak baryogenesis in this model is generic in the sense that if the present limits on the mass spectrum are applied, no severe additional tuning is required to obtain a strong first-order phase transition and to generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry. For this we determine the shape of the nucleating bubbles, including the profiles of CP-violating phases. The baryon asymmetry is calculated using the advanced transport theory to first and second order in gradient expansion presented recently. Still, first and second generation sfermions must be heavy to avoid large electric dipole moments.

  18. Experimental First Order Pairing Phase Transition in Atomic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L G; Larsen, A C; Giacoppo, F; Guttormsen, M; Siem, S

    2015-01-01

    The natural log of experimental nuclear level densities at low energy is linear with energy. This can be interpreted in terms of a nearly 1st order phase transition from a superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles. The transition temperature coincides with the BCS critical temperature and yields gap parameters in good agreement with the values extracted from even- odd mass differences from rotational states. This converging evidence supports the relevance of the BCS theory to atomic nuclei

  19. The Higgs vacuum uplifted. Revisiting the electroweak phase transition with a second Higgs doublet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsch, G.C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Huber, S.J. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mimasu, K. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Louvain Univ. Catholique, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology; No, J.M. [King' s College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-05-25

    The existence of a second Higgs doublet in Nature could lead to a cosmological first order electroweak phase transition and explain the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. We explore the parameter space of such a two-Higgs-doublet-model and show that a first order electroweak phase transition strongly correlates with a significant uplifting of the Higgs vacuum w.r.t. its Standard Model value. We then obtain the spectrum and properties of the new scalars H{sub 0}, A{sub 0} and H{sup ±} that signal such a phase transition, showing that the decay A{sub 0}→H{sub 0}Z at the LHC and a sizable deviation in the Higgs self-coupling λ{sub hhh} from its SM value are sensitive indicators of a strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the 2HDM.

  20. Towards the theory of the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dine, M.; Leigh, R.G.; Huet, P.; Linde, A.; Linde, D.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate various problems related to the theory of the electroweak phase transition. This includes determination of the nature of the phase transition, discussion of the possible role of the higher-order radiative corrections, and the theory of the formation and evolution of bubbles of the new phase. We show, in particular, that no dangerous linear terms in the scalar field φ appear in the expression for the effective potential. We have found that, for the Higgs-boson mass smaller than the masses of W and Z bosons, the phase transition is of the first order. However, its strength is approximately 2/3 times less than what follows from the one-loop approximation. The phase transition occurs due to production and expansion of critical bubbles. Subcritical bubbles may be important only if the phase transition is very weakly first order. A general analytic expression for the probability of the bubble formation is obtained, which may be used for study of tunneling in a wide class of theories. The bubble-wall velocity depends on many factors, including the ratio of the mean free path of the particles to the thickness of the wall. Thin walls in the electroweak theory have a nonrelativistic velocity, whereas thick walls may be relativistic. A decrease of the cubic term by the factor 2/3 rules our baryogenesis in the minimal version of the electroweak theory. Even though we concentrate in this paper on the phase transition in this theory, most of our results can be applied to more general models as well, where baryogenesis is possible

  1. On the nature of the electroweak phase sition and its cosmological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The Large Hadron Collider will take experiments into a new energy domain beyond the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions. As the LHC will unveil the mysteries of the electroweak symmetry breaking, this will also have far-reaching implications for cosmology. This concerns in particular the fundamental question of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. One of the best-motivated mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry of the universe relies on a first-order electroweak phase transition. I will present some well-motivated extensions of the standard model that naturally lead to a first-order phase transition. Interestingly, this has strong implications for gravity wave physics. I will discuss how a gravity wave detector and space interferometer such as Lisa, which would turn out to be a completely independent window on the electroweak scale, could complement the information provided by the LHC. (author)

  2. Dark matter and electroweak phase transition in the mixed scalar dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewen; Bian, Ligong

    2018-03-01

    We study the electroweak phase transition in the framework of the scalar singlet-doublet mixed dark matter model, in which the particle dark matter candidate is the lightest neutral Higgs that comprises the C P -even component of the inert doublet and a singlet scalar. The dark matter can be dominated by the inert doublet or singlet scalar depending on the mixing. We present several benchmark models to investigate the two situations after imposing several theoretical and experimental constraints. An additional singlet scalar and the inert doublet drive the electroweak phase transition to be strongly first order. A strong first-order electroweak phase transition and a viable dark matter candidate can be accomplished in two benchmark models simultaneously, for which a proper mass splitting among the neutral and charged Higgs masses is needed.

  3. First-order corrections to random-phase approximation GW calculations in silicon and diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ummels, R.T.M.; Bobbert, P.A.; van Haeringen, W.

    1998-01-01

    We report on ab initio calculations of the first-order corrections in the screened interaction W to the random-phase approximation polarizability and to the GW self-energy, using a noninteracting Green's function, for silicon and diamond. It is found that the first-order vertex and self-consistency

  4. The electroweak phase transition in models with gauge singlets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahriche, A.

    2007-01-01

    A strong first order phase transition is needed for generating the baryon asymmetry; and also to save it during the electroweak phase transition (EWPT). However this condition is not fulfilled within the Standard Model (SM), but in its extensions. It is widely believed that the existence of singlet scalars in some Standard Model extensions can easily make the EWPT strongly first order. In this work, we will examine the strength of the EWPT in the simplest extension of the SM with a real gauge singlet using the sphaleron energy at the critical temperature. We find that the phase transition is stronger by adding a singlet; and also that the criterion for a strong phase transition Ω(T c )/T c >or similar 1, where Ω = (v 2 + (x - x 0 ) 2 ) ( 1)/(2) and x(x 0 ) is the singlet vacuum expectation value in the broken (symmetric) phase, is not valid for models containing singlets, even though often used in the literature. The usual condition v c /T c >or similar 1 is more meaningful, and it is satisfied for the major part of the parameter space for physically allowed Higgs masses. Then it is convenient to study the EWPT in models with singlets that couple only to the Higgs doublets, by replacing the singlets by their vevs. (orig.)

  5. The electroweak phase transition in models with gauge singlets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahriche, A.

    2007-04-18

    A strong first order phase transition is needed for generating the baryon asymmetry; and also to save it during the electroweak phase transition (EWPT). However this condition is not fulfilled within the Standard Model (SM), but in its extensions. It is widely believed that the existence of singlet scalars in some Standard Model extensions can easily make the EWPT strongly first order. In this work, we will examine the strength of the EWPT in the simplest extension of the SM with a real gauge singlet using the sphaleron energy at the critical temperature. We find that the phase transition is stronger by adding a singlet; and also that the criterion for a strong phase transition {omega}(T{sub c})/T{sub c} >or similar 1, where {omega} = (v{sup 2} + (x - x{sub 0}){sup 2}){sup (}1)/(2) and x(x{sub 0}) is the singlet vacuum expectation value in the broken (symmetric) phase, is not valid for models containing singlets, even though often used in the literature. The usual condition v{sub c}/T{sub c} >or similar 1 is more meaningful, and it is satisfied for the major part of the parameter space for physically allowed Higgs masses. Then it is convenient to study the EWPT in models with singlets that couple only to the Higgs doublets, by replacing the singlets by their vevs. (orig.)

  6. Electroweak phase transition in two Higgs doublet models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.M.; Lemieux, P.

    1997-01-01

    We reexamine the strength of the first-order phase transition in the electroweak theory supplemented by an extra Higgs doublet. The finite-temperature effective potential V eff is computed to one-loop order, including the summation of ring diagrams, to study the ratio φ c /T c of the Higgs field VEV to the critical temperature. We make a number of improvements over previous treatments, including a consistent treatment of Goldstone bosons in V eff , an accurate analytic approximation to V eff valid for any mass-to-temperature ratios, and use of the experimentally measured top quark mass. For two-Higgs-doublet models, we identify a significant region of parameter space where φ c /T c is large enough for electroweak baryogenesis, and we argue that this identification should persist even at higher orders in perturbation theory. In the case of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, our results indicate that the extra Higgs bosons have little effect on the strength of the phase transition. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Scaling behavior in first-order quark-hadron phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that in the Ginzburg-Landau description of first-order quark-hadron phase transition the normalized factorial moments exhibit scaling behavior. The scaling exponent ν depends on only one effective parameter g, which characterizes the strength of the transition. For a strong first-order transition, we find ν=1.45. For weak transition it is 1.30 in agreement with the earlier result on second-order transition

  8. Probing Electroweak Phase Transition via Enhanced Di-Higgs Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, Marcela [Chicago U., KICP; Liu, Zhen [Fermilab; Riembau, Marc [DESY

    2018-01-02

    We consider a singlet extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a spontaneous $Z_2$ breaking and study the gluon-gluon fusion production of the heavy scalar, with subsequent decay into a pair of SM-like Higgs bosons. We find that an on-shell interference effect can notably enhance the resonant di-Higgs production rate up to 40\\%. In addition, consistently taking into account both the on-shell and off-shell interference effects between the heavy scalar and the SM di-Higgs diagrams significantly improves the HL-LHC and HE-LHC reach in this channel. As an example, within an effective field theory analysis in an explicitly $Z_2$ breaking scenario, we further discuss the potential to probe the parameter region compatible with a first order electroweak phase transition. Our analysis is applicable for general potentials of the singlet extension of the SM as well as for more general resonance searches.

  9. On entropy change measurements around first order phase transitions in caloric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Luana; Ba Doan, Nguyen; Ranno, Laurent

    2017-02-22

    In this work we discuss the measurement protocols for indirect determination of the isothermal entropy change associated with first order phase transitions in caloric materials. The magneto-structural phase transitions giving rise to giant magnetocaloric effects in Cu-doped MnAs and FeRh are used as case studies to exemplify how badly designed protocols may affect isothermal measurements and lead to incorrect entropy change estimations. Isothermal measurement protocols which allow correct assessment of the entropy change around first order phase transitions in both direct and inverse cases are presented.

  10. Phase domain structures in cylindrical magnets under conditions of a first-order magnetic phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhezherya, Yu.I.; Klymuk, O.S.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and resonance properties of cylindrical magnets at first-order phase transition from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic state were theoretically studied. It has been shown that in the external magnetic field directed perpendicularly to the rotation axis, formation of a specific domain structure of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic layers can be energetically favorable. The parameters of cylindrical phase domains as well as their dependences on temperature, magnetic field and material characteristics have been calculated. Peculiarities of the magnetic resonance spectra appearing as a result of the phase domain formation have been considered. Dependence of the resonance field of the system of ferromagnetic domains on magnetization and temperature has been obtained. - Highlights: → Parameters of the equilibrium system of cylindrical phase domains are calculated. → The range of fields for PM and FM phases coexistence is found. → FMR field of the disk domains is found to be lower than that of the PMR field.→ The resonance field increases with the decrease of temperature lower than T || .

  11. Rounding by disorder of first-order quantum phase transitions: emergence of quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Pallab; Schwab, David; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2008-01-11

    We give a heuristic argument for disorder rounding of a first-order quantum phase transition into a continuous phase transition. From both weak and strong disorder analysis of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model in one spatial dimension, we find that, for N > or =3, the first-order transition is rounded to a continuous transition and the physical picture is the same as the random transverse field Ising model for a limited parameter regime. The results are strikingly different from the corresponding classical problem in two dimensions where the fate of the renormalization group flows is a fixed point corresponding to N-decoupled pure Ising models.

  12. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-01-01

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  13. Gravitational wave generation from bubble collisions in first-order phase transitions: An analytic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprini, Chiara; Durrer, Ruth; Servant, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave production from bubble collisions was calculated in the early 1990s using numerical simulations. In this paper, we present an alternative analytic estimate, relying on a different treatment of stochasticity. In our approach, we provide a model for the bubble velocity power spectrum, suitable for both detonations and deflagrations. From this, we derive the anisotropic stress and analytically solve the gravitational wave equation. We provide analytical formulas for the peak frequency and the shape of the spectrum which we compare with numerical estimates. In contrast to the previous analysis, we do not work in the envelope approximation. This paper focuses on a particular source of gravitational waves from phase transitions. In a companion article, we will add together the different sources of gravitational wave signals from phase transitions: bubble collisions, turbulence and magnetic fields and discuss the prospects for probing the electroweak phase transition at LISA

  14. Bubble nucleation in first-order inflation and other cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.; Weinberg, E.J.; Widrow, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    We address in some detail the kinematics of bubble nucleation and percolation in first-order cosmological phase transitions, with the primary focus on first-order inflation. We study how a first-order phase transition completes, describe measures of its progress, and compute the distribution of bubble sizes. For example, we find that the typical bubble size in a successful transition is of order 1% to 100% of the Hubble radius, and depends very weakly on the energy scale of the transition. We derive very general conditions that must be satisfied by Γ/H 4 to complete the phase transition (Γ=bubble nucleation rate per unit volume; H=expansion rate; physically, Γ/H 4 corresponds to the volume fraction of space occupied by bubbles nucleated over a Hubble time). In particular, Γ/H 4 must exceed 9/4π to successfully end inflation. To avoid the deleterious effects of bubbles nucleated early during inflation on primordial nucleosynthesis and on the isotropy and spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, during most of inflation Γ/H 4 must be less than order 10 -4 --10 -3 . Our constraints imply that in a successful model of first-order inflation the phase transition must complete over a period of at most a few Hubble times and all but preclude individual bubbles from providing an interesting source of density perturbation. We note, though, that it is just possible for Poisson fluctuations in the number of moderately large-size bubbles to lead to interesting isocurvature perturbations, whose spectrum is not scale invariant. Finally, we analyze in detail several recently proposed models of first-order inflation

  15. Gravitational waves from the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2012-01-01

    We study the generation of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider a few extensions of the Standard Model, namely, the addition of scalar singlets, the minimal supersymmetric extension, and the addition of TeV fermions. For each model we consider the complete dynamics of the phase transition. In particular, we estimate the friction force acting on bubble walls, and we take into account the fact that they can propagate either as detonations or as deflagrations preceded by shock fronts, or they can run away. We compute the peak frequency and peak intensity of the gravitational radiation generated by bubble collisions and turbulence. We discuss the detectability by proposed spaceborne detectors. For the models we considered, runaway walls require significant fine tuning of the parameters, and the gravitational wave signal from bubble collisions is generally much weaker than that from turbulence. Although the predicted signal is in most cases rather low for the sensitivity of LISA, models with strongly coupled extra scalars reach this sensitivity for frequencies f ∼ 10 −4 Hz, and give intensities as high as h 2 Ω GW ∼ 10 −8

  16. First-order phase transition in the quantum spin glass at T=0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, J. Roberto; Nogueira, Yamilles; Sousa, J. Ricardo de

    2003-05-26

    The van Hemmen model with transverse and random longitudinal field is studied to analyze the tricritical behavior in the quantum Ising spin glass at T=0. The free energy and order parameter are calculated for two types of probability distributions: Gaussian and bimodal. We obtain the phase diagram in the {omega}-H plane, where {omega} and H are the transverse and random longitudinal fields, respectively. For the case of Gaussian distribution the phase transition is of second order, while the bimodal distribution we observe second-order transition for high-transverse field and first-order transition for small transverse field, with a tricritical point in the phase diagram.

  17. First-order phase transition in the quantum spin glass at T=0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, J. Roberto; Nogueira, Yamilles; Sousa, J. Ricardo de

    2003-01-01

    The van Hemmen model with transverse and random longitudinal field is studied to analyze the tricritical behavior in the quantum Ising spin glass at T=0. The free energy and order parameter are calculated for two types of probability distributions: Gaussian and bimodal. We obtain the phase diagram in the Ω-H plane, where Ω and H are the transverse and random longitudinal fields, respectively. For the case of Gaussian distribution the phase transition is of second order, while the bimodal distribution we observe second-order transition for high-transverse field and first-order transition for small transverse field, with a tricritical point in the phase diagram

  18. Gravitational waves from a very strong electroweak phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: lleitao@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (UNMdP-CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Deán Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider extensions of the Standard Model which can give very strongly first-order phase transitions, such that the transition fronts either propagate as detonations or run away. To compute the bubble wall velocity, we estimate the friction with the plasma and take into account the hydrodynamics. We track the development of the phase transition up to the percolation time, and we calculate the gravitational wave spectrum generated by bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves. For the kinds of models we consider, we find parameter regions for which the gravitational waves are potentially observable at the planned space-based interferometer eLISA. In such cases, the signal from sound waves is generally dominant, while that from bubble collisions is the least significant of them. Since the sound waves and turbulence mechanisms are diminished for runaway walls, the models with the best prospects of detection at eLISA are those which do not have such solutions. In particular, we find that heavy extra bosons provide stronger gravitational wave signals than tree-level terms.

  19. Quasi-liquid layer theory based on the bulk first-order phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhkin, I. A.; Petrenko, V. F.

    2009-01-01

    The theory of the superionic phase transition (bulk first-order transition) proposed in [1] is used to explain the existence of a quasi-liquid layer at an ice surface below its melting point. An analytical expression is derived for the quasi-liquid layer thickness. Numerical estimates are made and compared with experiment. Distinction is made between the present model and other quasi-liquid layer theories

  20. The gravitational waves from the first-order phase transition with a dimension-six operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang [CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.55 Zhong Guan Cun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Sasaki, Misao, E-mail: cairg@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: schwang@itp.ac.cn [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    We investigate in details the gravitational wave (GW) from the first-order phase transition (PT) in the extended standard model of particle physics with a dimension-six operator, which is capable of exhibiting the recently discovered slow first-order PT in addition to the usually studied fast first-order PT. To simplify the discussion, it is sufficient to work with an example of a toy model with the sextic term, and we propose an unified description for both slow and fast first-order PTs. We next study the full one-loop effective potential of the model with fixed/running renormalization-group (RG) scales. Compared to the prediction of GW energy density spectrum from the fixed RG scale, we find that the presence of running RG scale could amplify the peak amplitude by amount of one order of magnitude while shift the peak frequency to the lower frequency regime, and the promising regime of detection within the sensitivity ranges of various space-based GW detectors shrinks down to a lower cut-off value of the sextic term rather than the previous expectation.

  1. First-Order Transitions and the Magnetic Phase Diagram of CeSb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    might exist in the magnetic phase diagram of CeSb at 16K for a field of approximately 0.3 T. The present study concludes that the transitions from the paramagnetic to the magnetically ordered states are of first order for fields below 0.8 T. Within the experimental accuracy no change has been observed......The high-temperature (14-17K) low-magnetic field (0-0.8 T) region of the phase diagram of the anomalous antiferromagnet CeSb has been reinvestigated by neutron diffraction in an attempt to locate a possible tricritical point. Previous neutron diffraction studies indicated that a tricritical point...

  2. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiu-Qin; Liu Ni; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. (paper)

  3. Gravitational waves from the sound of a first order phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Huber, Stephan J; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J

    2014-01-31

    We report on the first three-dimensional numerical simulations of first-order phase transitions in the early Universe to include the cosmic fluid as well as the scalar field order parameter. We calculate the gravitational wave (GW) spectrum resulting from the nucleation, expansion, and collision of bubbles of the low-temperature phase, for phase transition strengths and bubble wall velocities covering many cases of interest. We find that the compression waves in the fluid continue to be a source of GWs long after the bubbles have merged, a new effect not taken properly into account in previous modeling of the GW source. For a wide range of models, the main source of the GWs produced by a phase transition is, therefore, the sound the bubbles make.

  4. Invasion-wave-induced first-order phase transition in systems of active particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    An instability near the transition to collective motion of self-propelled particles is studied numerically by Enskog-like kinetic theory. While hydrodynamics breaks down, the kinetic approach leads to steep solitonlike waves. These supersonic waves show hysteresis and lead to an abrupt jump of the global order parameter if the noise level is changed. Thus they provide a mean-field mechanism to change the second-order character of the phase transition to first order. The shape of the wave is shown to follow a scaling law and to quantitatively agree with agent-based simulations.

  5. A first order phase transition from inflationary to big bang universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, G.

    1986-01-01

    The microcanonical entropy is calculated for a system of massive, conformally coupled, scalar bosons using a conformal gravitational theory. The resulting entropy is seen to indicate a first order phase transition from an inflationary expansion stage (where the amplitude of the scalar boson follows that of the scale function of the universe and the mass of the solar boson is the source of the cosmological constant) to a big bang stage (where neither of these conditions hold). Such a first order phase transition involves an entropy increase of some thirty orders of magnitude. In the author's theory, the invariant temperature (proper temperature times scale function) is not zero, nor is it the Hawking temperature, but it is tens of magnitudes smaller than the corresponding temperature of the big bang stage. A specific model for these bosons that provides the phase transition and serves as the source of the cosmological constant is also examined briefly, where the bosons are identified as spontaneously generated primordial black holes as in the cosmological model of Brout, Englert and Casher. In that case, the decay of the black holes provides a decaying cosmological constant and an explicit mechanism for heating up the universe

  6. First-order system least squares and the energetic variational approach for two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, J. H.; Brannick, J.; Liu, C.; Manteuffel, T.; Zikatanov, L.

    2011-07-01

    This paper develops a first-order system least-squares (FOSLS) formulation for equations of two-phase flow. The main goal is to show that this discretization, along with numerical techniques such as nested iteration, algebraic multigrid, and adaptive local refinement, can be used to solve these types of complex fluid flow problems. In addition, from an energetic variational approach, it can be shown that an important quantity to preserve in a given simulation is the energy law. We discuss the energy law and inherent structure for two-phase flow using the Allen-Cahn interface model and indicate how it is related to other complex fluid models, such as magnetohydrodynamics. Finally, we show that, using the FOSLS framework, one can still satisfy the appropriate energy law globally while using well-known numerical techniques.

  7. Gravitational wave signals of electroweak phase transition triggered by dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Wei [Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875 (China); Guo, Huai-Ke; Shu, Jing, E-mail: chaowei@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ghk@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: jshu@itp.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-09-01

    We study in this work a scenario that the universe undergoes a two step phase transition with the first step happened to the dark matter sector and the second step being the transition between the dark matter and the electroweak vacuums, where the barrier between the two vacuums, that is necessary for a strongly first order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) as required by the electroweak baryogenesis mechanism, arises at the tree-level. We illustrate this idea by working with the standard model (SM) augmented by a scalar singlet dark matter and an extra scalar singlet which mixes with the SM Higgs boson. We study the conditions for such pattern of phase transition to occur and especially for the strongly first order EWPT to take place, as well as its compatibility with the basic requirements of a successful dark matter, such as observed relic density and constraints of direct detections. We further explore the discovery possibility of this pattern EWPT by searching for the gravitational waves generated during this process in spaced based interferometer, by showing a representative benchmark point of the parameter space that the generated gravitational waves fall within the sensitivity of eLISA, DECIGO and BBO.

  8. Gravitationally compact objects as nucleation sites for first-order vacuum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, D.A.; Hiscock, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    A characteristic of first-order phase transitions is their ability to be initiated by nucleation sites. In this paper we consider the role that gravitationally compact objects may play as nucleation sites for first-order phase transitions within quantum fields. As the presence of nucleation sites may prevent the onset of supercooling, the existence of nucleation sites for phase transitions within quantum fields may play an important role in some inflationary models of the Universe, in which the Universe is required to exist in a supercooled state for a period of time. In this paper we calculate the Euclidean action for an O(3) bubble nucleating about a gravitationally compact object, taken to be a boson star for simplicity. The gravitational field of the boson star is taken to be a small perturbation on flat space, and the O(3) action is calculated to linear order as a perturbation on the O(4) action. The Euclidean bubble profile is found by solving the (Higgs) scalar field equation numerically; the thin-wall approximation is not used. The gravitationally compact objects are found to have the effect of reducing the Euclidean action of the nucleating bubble, as compared to the Euclidean action for the bubble in flat spacetime. The effect is strongest when the size of the gravitationally compact object is comparable to the size of the nucleating bubble. Further, the size of the decrease in action increases as the nucleating ''star'' is made more gravitationally compact. Thus, gravitationally compact objects may play the role of nucleation sites. However, their importance to the process of false-vacuum decay is strongly dependent upon their number density within the Universe

  9. Energy barriers between metastable states in first-order quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Sascha; Timpanaro, André M.; Cormick, Cecilia; Landi, Gabriel T.

    2018-02-01

    A system of neutral atoms trapped in an optical lattice and dispersively coupled to the field of an optical cavity can realize a variation of the Bose-Hubbard model with infinite-range interactions. This model exhibits a first-order quantum phase transition between a Mott insulator and a charge density wave, with spontaneous symmetry breaking between even and odd sites, as was recently observed experimentally [Landig et al., Nature (London) 532, 476 (2016), 10.1038/nature17409]. In the present paper, we approach the analysis of this transition using a variational model which allows us to establish the notion of an energy barrier separating the two phases. Using a discrete WKB method, we then show that the local tunneling of atoms between adjacent sites lowers this energy barrier and hence facilitates the transition. Within our simplified description, we are thus able to augment the phase diagram of the model with information concerning the height of the barrier separating the metastable minima from the global minimum in each phase, which is an essential aspect for the understanding of the reconfiguration dynamics induced by a quench across a quantum critical point.

  10. The electroweak phase transition in minimal supergravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Nanopoulos, Dimitri V

    1994-01-01

    We have explored the electroweak phase transition in minimal supergravity models by extending previous analysis of the one-loop Higgs potential to include finite temperature effects. Minimal supergravity is characterized by two higgs doublets at the electroweak scale, gauge coupling unification, and universal soft-SUSY breaking at the unification scale. We have searched for the allowed parameter space that avoids washout of baryon number via unsuppressed anomalous Electroweak sphaleron processes after the phase transition. This requirement imposes strong constraints on the Higgs sector. With respect to weak scale baryogenesis, we find that the generic MSSM is {\\it not} phenomenologically acceptable, and show that the additional experimental and consistency constraints of minimal supergravity restricts the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs even further to $m_h\\lsim 32\\GeV$ (at one loop), also in conflict with experiment. Thus, if supergravity is to allow for baryogenesis via any other mechanism above the weak...

  11. Numerical tests of the electroweak phase transition and thermodynamics of the electroweak plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Csikor, Ferenc; Hein, J; Jaster, A; Montvay, István

    1996-01-01

    The finite temperature phase transition in the SU(2) Higgs model at a Higgs boson mass M_H \\simeq 34 GeV is studied in numerical simulations on four-dimensional lattices with time-like extensions up to L_t=5. The effects of the finite volume and finite lattice spacing on masses and couplings are studied in detail. The errors due to uncertainties in the critical hopping parameter are estimated. The thermodynamics of the electroweak plasma near the phase transition is investigated by determining the relation between energy density and pressure.

  12. W-phase estimation of first-order rupture distribution for megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Roberto; Cummins, Phil; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimating the rupture pattern for large earthquakes during the first hour after the origin time can be crucial for rapid impact assessment and tsunami warning. However, the estimation of coseismic slip distribution models generally involves complex methodologies that are difficult to implement rapidly. Further, while model parameter uncertainty can be crucial for meaningful estimation, they are often ignored. In this work we develop a finite fault inversion for megathrust earthquakes which rapidly generates good first order estimates and uncertainties of spatial slip distributions. The algorithm uses W-phase waveforms and a linear automated regularization approach to invert for rupture models of some recent megathrust earthquakes. The W phase is a long period (100-1000 s) wave which arrives together with the P wave. Because it is fast, has small amplitude and a long-period character, the W phase is regularly used to estimate point source moment tensors by the NEIC and PTWC, among others, within an hour of earthquake occurrence. We use W-phase waveforms processed in a manner similar to that used for such point-source solutions. The inversion makes use of 3 component W-phase records retrieved from the Global Seismic Network. The inverse problem is formulated by a multiple time window method, resulting in a linear over-parametrized problem. The over-parametrization is addressed by Tikhonov regularization and regularization parameters are chosen according to the discrepancy principle by grid search. Noise on the data is addressed by estimating the data covariance matrix from data residuals. The matrix is obtained by starting with an a priori covariance matrix and then iteratively updating the matrix based on the residual errors of consecutive inversions. Then, a covariance matrix for the parameters is computed using a Bayesian approach. The application of this approach to recent megathrust earthquakes produces models which capture the most significant features of

  13. First-order inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been reviewed. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result if inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. (orig.)

  14. First-order inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs

  15. Kinetics of first order phase transformation in metals and alloys. Isothermal evolution in martensite transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    The 11th lecture about microstructures and fluctuation in solids reports on the martensitic phase transformation of alkali metals and alloys. The martensitic transformation is a diffusionless first order phase transformation. Martensitic transformations are classified into two with respect to kinetics, one is isothermal transformation and the other is athermal transformation. The former transformation depends upon both temperature and time, but the latter solely depends on temperature. The former does not have a definite transformation start temperature but occurs after some finite incubation time during isothermal holding. The isothermal martensitic transformation is changed to the athermal one under high magnetic field, and also the reverse transformation occurs under the application of hydrostatic pressure. The former phenomena were observed in Fe-Ni-Mn alloys, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys and also the reverse transformation in Fe-3.1at%Ni-0.5at%Mn alloys. The athermal transformation was observed in Li and Na metals at 73 and 36 K, respectively. A neutron diffraction study has been performed on single crystals of metallic Na. On cooling the virgin sample, the incubation time to transform from the bcc structure to the low-temperature structure (9R structure) is formed to be more than 2h at 38 K, 2 K higher than the transformation temperature of 36 K. The full width of half maximum of the Bragg reflection suddenly increased, due to some deformation introduced by the nucleation of the low-temperature structure. In relation to the deformation, strong extra-diffuse scattering (Huang scattering) was observed around the Bragg reflection in addition to thermal diffuse scattering. The kinetics of the martensitic transformation in In-Tl alloys has been studied by x-ray and neutron diffraction methods. A characteristic incubation time appeared at fixed temperature above Ms, the normal martensitic transformation start temperature. (author)

  16. Fluctuation effects in first-order phase transitions: Theory and model for martensitic transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss central questions in weak, first-order structural transitions by means of a magnetic analog model. A theory including fluctuation effects is developed for the model, showing a dynamical response with softening, fading modes and a growing central peak. The model is also analyzed by a two......-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation, showing clear precursor phenomena near the first-order transition and spontaneous nucleation. The kinetics of the domain growth is studied and found to be exceedingly slow. The results are applicable for martensitic transformations and structural surface...

  17. Spatially resolved modelling of inhomogeneous materials with a first order magnetic phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian; Smith, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , respectively and first order reversal effect as a function of temperature. We conclude that even a very little variation in local stoichiometry of less than a percent, corresponding to a standard deviation in of for has a significant impact on the overall properties and history dependence of a sample....

  18. Status of electroweak phase transition and baryogenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is possible that the universe has undergone a number of phase transitions, as illustrated in table 1. .... А, and perturbation theory breaks down for heavy Higgs bosons, ..... This is good news, since the neutron and electric dipole moment.

  19. Miscellaneous results on the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Schiller, A.

    1994-12-01

    We present new 4-D Monte Carlo results characterizing the strength of the finite temperature phase transition for Higgs/W mass ratios 1.0 and 0.6, obtained on isotropic lattices mainly with N s = 16, N t = 2. We discuss the distribution of a gauge invariant block spin order parameter, estimating the Higgs condensate Φ c at T c . We use the Potvin/Rebbi method in order to find the interface tension α/T c 3 . We demonstrate how the multi-histogram method (giving free energy differences) can be used to avoid the limiting procedure δ K → 0. From pure-phase histograms at K c , extrapolated with the help of this method, we estimate the latent heat Δε/T c 4 . Actual time series at lower Higgs mass require blocking in order to determine the jump of the lattice observables. (orig.)

  20. Low temperature electroweak phase transition in the Standard Model with hidden scale invariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntharan Arunasalam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a cosmological phase transition within the Standard Model which incorporates spontaneously broken scale invariance as a low-energy theory. In addition to the Standard Model fields, the minimal model involves a light dilaton, which acquires a large vacuum expectation value (VEV through the mechanism of dimensional transmutation. Under the assumption of the cancellation of the vacuum energy, the dilaton develops a very small mass at 2-loop order. As a result, a flat direction is present in the classical dilaton-Higgs potential at zero temperature while the quantum potential admits two (almost degenerate local minima with unbroken and broken electroweak symmetry. We found that the cosmological electroweak phase transition in this model can only be triggered by a QCD chiral symmetry breaking phase transition at low temperatures, T≲132 MeV. Furthermore, unlike the standard case, the universe settles into the chiral symmetry breaking vacuum via a first-order phase transition which gives rise to a stochastic gravitational background with a peak frequency ∼10−8 Hz as well as triggers the production of approximately solar mass primordial black holes. The observation of these signatures of cosmological phase transitions together with the detection of a light dilaton would provide a strong hint of the fundamental role of scale invariance in particle physics.

  1. Holography and the Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Creminelli, Paolo; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Creminelli, Paolo; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    We study through holography the compact Randall-Sundrum (RS) model at finite temperature. In the presence of radius stabilization, the system is described at low enough temperature by the RS solution. At high temperature it is described by the AdS-Schwarzshild solution with an event horizon replacing the TeV brane. We calculate the transition temperature T_c between the two phases and we find it to be somewhat smaller than the TeV scale. Assuming that the Universe starts out at T >> T_c and cools down by expansion, we study the rate of the transition to the RS phase. We find that the transition is too slow and the Universe ends up in an old inflation scenario unless tight bounds are satisfied by the model parameters. In particular we find that the AdS curvature must be comparable to the 5D Planck mass and that the radius stabilization mechanism must lead to a sizeable distortion of the basic RS metric.

  2. A Preisach approach to modeling partial phase transitions in the first order magnetocaloric material MnFe(P,As)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Moos, Lars; Bahl, C.R.H.; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2014-01-01

    of MnFe(P,As) under partial phase transitions, which is similar to what materials experience in actual magnetic refrigeration devices. Partial phase transition curves, in the absence of a magnetic field, are measured using calorimetry and the experimental results are compared to simulations......Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that could provide energy efficient and environmentally friendly cooling. Magnetocaloric materials in which a structural phase transition is found concurrently with the magnetic phase transition are often termed first order magnetocaloric materials....... Such materials are potential candidates for application in magnetic refrigeration devices. However, the first order materials often have adverse properties such as hysteresis, making actual performance troublesome to quantify, a subject not thoroughly studied within this field.Here we investigate the behavior...

  3. A Preisach approach to modeling partial phase transitions in the first order magnetocaloric material MnFe(P,As)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, L. von, E-mail: lmoo@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bahl, C.R.H.; Nielsen, K.K.; Engelbrecht, K. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Küpferling, M.; Basso, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that could provide energy efficient and environmentally friendly cooling. Magnetocaloric materials in which a structural phase transition is found concurrently with the magnetic phase transition are often termed first order magnetocaloric materials. Such materials are potential candidates for application in magnetic refrigeration devices. However, the first order materials often have adverse properties such as hysteresis, making actual performance troublesome to quantify, a subject not thoroughly studied within this field. Here we investigate the behavior of MnFe(P,As) under partial phase transitions, which is similar to what materials experience in actual magnetic refrigeration devices. Partial phase transition curves, in the absence of a magnetic field, are measured using calorimetry and the experimental results are compared to simulations of a Preisach-type model. We show that this approach is applicable and discuss what experimental data is required to obtain a satisfactory material model.

  4. Gravity waves from the non-renormalizable electroweak vacua phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Eric [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Vaudrevange, Pascal M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    It is currently believed that the Standard Model is an effective low energy theory which in principle may contain higher dimensional non-renormalizable operators. These operators may modify the standard model Higgs potential in many ways, one of which being the appearance of a second vacuum. For a wide range of parameters, this new vacuum becomes the true vacuum. It is then assumed that our universe is currently sitting in the false vacuum. Thus the usual second-order electroweak phase transition at early times will be followed by a second, first-order phase transition. In cosmology, a first-order phase transition is associated with the production of gravity waves. In this paper we present an analysis of the production of gravitational waves during such a second electroweak phase transition. We find that, for one certain range of parameters, the stochastic background of gravitational waves generated by bubble nucleation and collision have an amplitude which is estimated to be of order {omega}{sub GW}h{sup 2}{proportional_to}10{sup -11} at f=3 x 10{sup -4} Hz, which is within reach of the planned sensitivity of LISA. For another range of parameters, we find that the amplitude is estimated to be of order {omega}{sub GW}h{sup 2}{proportional_to} 0{sup -25} around f=10{sup 3} Hz, which is within reach of LIGO. Hence, it is possible to detect gravity waves from such a phase transition at two different detectors, with completely different amplitude and frequency ranges. (orig.)

  5. On the existence of a first order phase transition at small vacuum angel θin the CP3 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejnik, S.; Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava; Schierholz, G.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    1993-12-01

    We examine the phase structure of the CP 3 model as a function of θ in the weak coupling regime. It is shown that the model has a first order phase transition at small θ. We pay special attention to the extrapolation of the data to the infinite volume. It is found that the critical value of θ decreases towards zero as β is taken to infinity. (orig.)

  6. Gravitational waves from first order phase transitions as a probe of an early matter domination era and its inverse problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela, E-mail: Gabriela.Barenboim@uv.es; Park, Wan-Il, E-mail: Wanil.Park@uv.es

    2016-08-10

    We investigate the gravitational wave background from a first order phase transition in a matter-dominated universe, and show that it has a unique feature from which important information about the properties of the phase transition and thermal history of the universe can be easily extracted. Also, we discuss the inverse problem of such a gravitational wave background in view of the degeneracy among macroscopic parameters governing the signal.

  7. Full correspondence between asymmetric filling of slits and first-order phase transition lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Szybisz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption on single planar walls and filling of slits with identical planar walls are investigated in the frame of the density functional theory. In this sort of slits the external potential is symmetric with respect to its central plane. Calculations were carried out by applying both the canonical and grand canonical ensembles (CE and GCE, respectively. The behavior is analyzed by varying the strength of the adsorbate-substrate attraction, the temperature T, and the coverage Γℓ. Results obtained for physisorption of Xe on alkaline surfaces are reported in the present work. Prewetting (PW lines and wetting temperatures, Tw, are determined from the analysis of adsorption on single walls. The filling of slits is analyzed for temperatures T > Tw. It is found that whenever for a given Xe-substrate combination the adsorption on a single wall exhibits a first-order wetting transition then asymmetric profiles that break the left-right symmetry of the external potential appear in the filling of an equivalent slit. These spontaneously symmetry breaking (SSB solutions occur in a restricted range of Γℓ with a T-dependent width. In the case of closed slits analyzed in the CE scheme, the obtained asymmetric profiles exhibit lower Helmholtz free energies than the symmetric species and, therefore, could be stabilized in this geometry. For open slits, the GCE scheme yields all the symmetric and SSB states in the corresponding convex regimes of the free energy. It is shown that both the CE and the GCE frames yield three coexistent states, two symmetric and one asymmetric twofold degenerate. Both a PW line and the related SSB effect terminate at the same temperature. For rather strongly attractive surfaces reentrant SSB states are found at a fixed value of T.

  8. First-order dynamical phase transition in models of glasses: an approach based on ensembles of histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrahan, Juan P; Jack, Robert L; Lecomte, Vivien; Duijvendijk, Kristina van; Wijland, Frederic van; Pitard, Estelle

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of kinetically constrained models of glass formers by analysing the statistics of trajectories of the dynamics, or histories, using large deviation function methods. We show that, in general, these models exhibit a first-order dynamical transition between active and inactive dynamical phases. We argue that the dynamical heterogeneities displayed by these systems are a manifestation of dynamical first-order phase coexistence. In particular, we calculate dynamical large deviation functions, both analytically and numerically, for the Fredrickson-Andersen model, the East model, and constrained lattice gas models. We also show how large deviation functions can be obtained from a Landau-like theory for dynamical fluctuations. We discuss possibilities for similar dynamical phase-coexistence behaviour in other systems with heterogeneous dynamics

  9. Ball solitons in kinetics of the first order magnetic phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nietz, V.V.; Osipov, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The theory of magnetic ball solitons (BS), arising as a result of the energy fluctuations at the spin-flop transition induced by a magnetic field in antiferromagnets with uniaxial anisotropy, is presented. Such solitons are possible in a wide range of amplitudes and energies, including the negative energy relative to an initial condition. When such an antiferromagnet is in a metastable condition, ball solitons are born with the greatest probability if the energy of solitons is close to zero. Evolution of these solitons, at which they develop into macroscopic domains of a new magnetic phase, is analyzed, thus carrying out full phase reorganization

  10. The Hagedorn spectrum, nuclear level densities and first order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, Luciano G.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2015-01-01

    An exponential mass spectrum, like the Hagedorn spectrum, with slope 1/T H was interpreted as fixing an upper limiting temperature T H that the system can achieve. However, thermodynamically, such spectrum indicates a 1 st order phase transition at a fixed temperature T H . A much lower energy example is the log linear level nuclear density below the neutron binding energy that prevails throughout the nuclear chart. We show that, for non-magic nuclei, such linearity implies a 1 st order phase transition from the pairing superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles

  11. The Hagedorn spectrum, nuclear level densities and first order phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, Luciano G., E-mail: lgmoretto@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-10-15

    An exponential mass spectrum, like the Hagedorn spectrum, with slope 1/T{sub H} was interpreted as fixing an upper limiting temperature T{sub H} that the system can achieve. However, thermodynamically, such spectrum indicates a 1{sup st} order phase transition at a fixed temperature T{sub H}. A much lower energy example is the log linear level nuclear density below the neutron binding energy that prevails throughout the nuclear chart. We show that, for non-magic nuclei, such linearity implies a 1{sup st} order phase transition from the pairing superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles.

  12. Rate-induced solubility and suppression of the first-order phase transition in olivine LiFePO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; van Hulzen, Martijn; Singh, Deepak P; Brownrigg, Alex; Wright, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Niels H; Wagemaker, Marnix

    2014-05-14

    The impact of ultrahigh (dis)charge rates on the phase transition mechanism in LiFePO4 Li-ion electrodes is revealed by in situ synchrotron diffraction. At high rates the solubility limits in both phases increase dramatically, causing a fraction of the electrode to bypass the first-order phase transition. The small transforming fraction demonstrates that nucleation rates are consequently not limiting the transformation rate. In combination with the small fraction of the electrode that transforms at high rates, this indicates that higher performances may be achieved by further optimizing the ionic/electronic transport in LiFePO4 electrodes.

  13. Gravitational waves from a supercooled electroweak phase transition and their detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Manning, Adrian [University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Yue, Jason [National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the properties of a stochastic gravitational wave background produced by a first-order electroweak phase transition in the regime of extreme supercooling. We study a scenario whereby the percolation temperature that signifies the completion of the transition, T{sub p}, is as low as a few MeV (nucleosynthesis temperature), while most of the true vacuum bubbles are formed much earlier at the nucleation temperature, T{sub n} ∝ 50 GeV. This implies that the gravitational wave spectrum is mainly produced by the collisions of large bubbles and characterised by a large amplitude and a peak frequency as low as f ∝ 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz. We show that such a scenario can occur in (but not limited to) a model based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge group, so that the Higgs vacuum configuration is altered by a cubic coupling. In order to carefully quantify the evolution of the phase transition of this model over such a wide temperature range we go beyond the usual fast transition approximation, taking into account the expansion of the Universe as well as the behaviour of the nucleation probability at low temperatures. Our computation shows that there exists a range of parameters for which the gravitational wave spectrum lies at the edge between the exclusion limits of current pulsar timing array experiments and the detection band of the future Square Kilometre Array observatory. (orig.)

  14. A first-order spectral phase transition in a class of periodically modulated Hermitian Jacobi matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pchelintseva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider self-adjoint unbounded Jacobi matrices with diagonal \\(q_n = b_{n}n\\ and off-diagonal entries \\(\\lambda_n = n\\, where \\(b_{n}\\ is a \\(2\\-periodical sequence of real numbers. The parameter space is decomposed into several separate regions, where the spectrum of the operator is either purely absolutely continuous or discrete. We study the situation where the spectral phase transition occurs, namely the case of \\(b_{1}b_{2} = 4\\. The main motive of the paper is the investigation of asymptotics of generalized eigenvectors of the Jacobi matrix. The pure point part of the spectrum is analyzed in detail.

  15. Bohr model description of the critical point for the first order shape phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaca, R.; Buganu, P.; Budaca, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    The critical point of the shape phase transition between spherical and axially deformed nuclei is described by a collective Bohr Hamiltonian with a sextic potential having simultaneous spherical and deformed minima of the same depth. The particular choice of the potential as well as the scaled and decoupled nature of the total Hamiltonian leads to a model with a single free parameter connected to the height of the barrier which separates the two minima. The solutions are found through the diagonalization in a basis of Bessel functions. The basis is optimized for each value of the free parameter by means of a boundary deformation which assures the convergence of the solutions for a fixed basis dimension. Analyzing the spectral properties of the model, as a function of the barrier height, revealed instances with shape coexisting features which are considered for detailed numerical applications.

  16. Bohr model description of the critical point for the first order shape phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Budaca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical point of the shape phase transition between spherical and axially deformed nuclei is described by a collective Bohr Hamiltonian with a sextic potential having simultaneous spherical and deformed minima of the same depth. The particular choice of the potential as well as the scaled and decoupled nature of the total Hamiltonian leads to a model with a single free parameter connected to the height of the barrier which separates the two minima. The solutions are found through the diagonalization in a basis of Bessel functions. The basis is optimized for each value of the free parameter by means of a boundary deformation which assures the convergence of the solutions for a fixed basis dimension. Analyzing the spectral properties of the model, as a function of the barrier height, revealed instances with shape coexisting features which are considered for detailed numerical applications.

  17. Probing the electroweak phase transition via enhanced di-Higgs boson production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Marcela; Liu, Zhen; Riembau, Marc

    2018-05-01

    We consider a singlet extension of the standard model (SM) with a spontaneous Z2 breaking and study the gluon-gluon fusion production of the heavy scalar, with subsequent decay into a pair of SM-like Higgs bosons. We find that an on-shell interference effect can notably enhance the resonant di-Higgs production rate up to 40%. In addition, consistently taking into account both the on-shell and off-shell interference effects between the heavy scalar and the SM di-Higgs diagrams significantly improves the HL-LHC and HE-LHC reach in this channel. As an example, within an effective field theory analysis in an explicitly Z2 breaking scenario, we further discuss the potential to probe the parameter region compatible with a first-order electroweak phase transition. Our analysis is applicable for general potentials of the singlet extension of the SM as well as for more general resonance searches.

  18. The MSSM Electroweak Phase Transition on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko

    1998-01-01

    We study the MSSM finite temperature electroweak phase transition with lattice Monte Carlo simulations, for a large Higgs mass (m_H ~ 95 GeV) and light stop masses (m_tR ~ 150...160 GeV). We employ a 3d effective field theory approach, where the degrees of freedom appearing in the action are the SU(2) and SU(3) gauge fields, the weakly interacting Higgs doublet, and the strongly interacting stop triplet. We determine the phase diagram, the critical temperatures, the scalar field expectation values, the latent heat, the interface tension and the correlation lengths at the phase transition points. Extrapolating the results to the infinite volume and continuum limits, we find that the transition is stronger than indicated by 2-loop perturbation theory, guaranteeing that the MSSM phase transition is strong enough for baryogenesis in this regime. We also study the possibility of a two-stage phase transition, in which the stop field gets an expectation value in an intermediate phase. We find that a two-stage transi...

  19. A model description of the first-order phase transition in MnFeP1-x As x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.; Lin, G.X.; Dagula, W.; Fuquan, B.; Zhang, L.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a description of the critical behavior at the first-order phase transition in MnFeP 1- x As x system in terms of the Bean-Rodbell model. Within the molecular-field approximation, the Gibbs free energy of the system is expressed in terms of the exchange interaction, the elastic energy, the entropy term, the pressure term and the Zeeman energy. A magnetic-state equation has been obtained by minimizing the Gibbs free energy with respect to the volume and the magnetization. The characteristic parameters for the phase transition observed in this system have been obtained by fitting our experimental data. The results show that the magnetoelastic coupling plays a very important role in the mechanism of the phase transition

  20. Phase Behavior of Diblock Copolymer–Homopolymer Ternary Blends: Congruent First-Order Lamellar–Disorder Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Irwin, Matthew T.; Morse, David C.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

    2016-10-13

    We have established the existence of a line of congruent first-order lamellar-to-disorder (LAM–DIS) transitions when appropriate amounts of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C) and poly(ethylene) (E) homopolymers are mixed with a corresponding compositionally symmetric CE diblock copolymer. The line of congruent transitions, or the congruent isopleth, terminates at the bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) channel, and its trajectory appears to be influenced by the critical composition of the C/E binary homopolymer blend. Blends satisfying congruency undergo a direct LAM–DIS transition without passing through a two-phase region. We present complementary optical transmission, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) results that establish the phase behavior at constant copolymer volume fraction and varying C/E homopolymer volume ratios. Adjacent to the congruent composition at constant copolymer volume fraction, the lamellar and disordered phases are separated by two-phase coexistence windows, which converge, along with the line of congruent transitions, at an overall composition in the phase prism coincident with the BμE channel. Hexagonal and cubic (double gyroid) phases occur at higher diblock copolymer concentrations for asymmetric amounts of C and E homopolymers. These results establish a quantitative method for identifying the detailed phase behavior of ternary diblock copolymer–homopolymer blends, especially in the vicinity of the BμE.

  1. The Widom-Rowlinson mixture on a sphere: elimination of exponential slowing down at first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, T; Vink, R L C

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations of first-order phase transitions using 'standard' toroidal boundary conditions are generally hampered by exponential slowing down. This is partly due to interface formation, and partly due to shape transitions. The latter occur when droplets become large such that they self-interact through the periodic boundaries. On a spherical simulation topology, however, shape transitions are absent. We expect that by using an appropriate bias function, exponential slowing down can be largely eliminated. In this work, these ideas are applied to the two-dimensional Widom-Rowlinson mixture confined to the surface of a sphere. Indeed, on the sphere, we find that the number of Monte Carlo steps needed to sample a first-order phase transition does not increase exponentially with system size, but rather as a power law τ∝V α , with α∼2.5, and V the system area. This is remarkably close to a random walk for which α RW = 2. The benefit of this improved scaling behavior for biased sampling methods, such as the Wang-Landau algorithm, is investigated in detail.

  2. Critical bubbles and fluctuations at the electroweak phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kripfganz, J; Schmidt, M G

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the critical bubbles of the electroweak phase transition using an effective high-temperature 3-dimensional action for the Higgs field \\varphi. The separate integration of gauge and Goldstone boson degrees of freedom is conveniently described in the 't Hooft-Feynman covariant background gauge. The effective dimensionless gauge coupling g_3(T)^2 in the broken phase is well behaved throughout the phase transition. However, the behavior of the one-loop Z(\\varphi) factors of the Higgs and gauge kinetic terms signalizes the breakdown of the derivative expansion and of the perturbative expansion for a range of small \\varphi values increasing with the Higgs mass m_H. Taking a functional S_z[\\varphi] with constant Z(\\varphi)=z instead of the full non-local effective action in some neighborhood of the saddlepoint we are calculating the critical bubbles for several temperatures. The fluctuation determinant is calculated to high accuracy using a variant of the heat kernel method. It gives a strong suppression ...

  3. First-Order 0-π Quantum Phase Transition in the Kondo Regime of a Superconducting Carbon-Nanotube Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Maurand

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a carbon-nanotube quantum dot embedded in a superconducting-quantum-interference-device loop in order to investigate the competition of strong electron correlations with a proximity effect. Depending on whether local pairing or local magnetism prevails, a superconducting quantum dot will exhibit a positive or a negative supercurrent, referred to as a 0 or π Josephson junction, respectively. In the regime of a strong Coulomb blockade, the 0-to-π transition is typically controlled by a change in the discrete charge state of the dot, from even to odd. In contrast, at a larger tunneling amplitude, the Kondo effect develops for an odd-charge (magnetic dot in the normal state, and quenches magnetism. In this situation, we find that a first-order 0-to-π quantum phase transition can be triggered at a fixed valence when superconductivity is brought in, due to the competition of the superconducting gap and the Kondo temperature. The superconducting-quantum-interference-device geometry together with the tunability of our device allows the exploration of the associated phase diagram predicted by recent theories. We also report on the observation of anharmonic behavior of the current-phase relation in the transition regime, which we associate with the two accessible superconducting states. Our results finally demonstrate that the spin-singlet nature of the Kondo state helps to enhance the stability of the 0 phase far from the mixed-valence regime in odd-charge superconducting quantum dots.

  4. First-order phase transitions in CaFe2As2 single crystal: a local probe study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzamora, M; Munevar, J; Baggio-Saitovitch, E; Bud'ko, S L; Ni Ni; Canfield, P C; Sanchez, D R

    2011-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structural and magnetic phase transitions of CaFe 2 As 2 (T N = 173 K) single crystals. For this compound we found that V ZZ is positive and parallel to the c-axis of the tetragonal structure. For CaFe 2 As 2 a magnetic hyperfine field B hf was observed at the 57 Fe nucleus below T N ∼ 173 K. Analysis of the temperature dependence of B hf data using the Bean-Rodbell model shows that the Fe spins undergo a first-order magnetic transition at ∼ 173 K. A collinear antiferromagnetic structure is established below this temperature with the Fe spin lying in the (a, b) plane. Below T N the paramagnetic fraction of Fe decreases down to 150 K and for lower temperatures all the Fe spins are magnetically ordered.

  5. Sound Shell Model for Acoustic Gravitational Wave Production at a First-Order Phase Transition in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    2018-02-01

    A model for the acoustic production of gravitational waves at a first-order phase transition is presented. The source of gravitational radiation is the sound waves generated by the explosive growth of bubbles of the stable phase. The model assumes that the sound waves are linear and that their power spectrum is determined by the characteristic form of the sound shell around the expanding bubble. The predicted power spectrum has two length scales, the average bubble separation and the sound shell width when the bubbles collide. The peak of the power spectrum is at wave numbers set by the sound shell width. For a higher wave number k , the power spectrum decreases to k-3. At wave numbers below the inverse bubble separation, the power spectrum goes to k5. For bubble wall speeds near the speed of sound where these two length scales are distinguished, there is an intermediate k1 power law. The detailed dependence of the power spectrum on the wall speed and the other parameters of the phase transition raises the possibility of their constraint or measurement at a future space-based gravitational wave observatory such as LISA.

  6. Sound Shell Model for Acoustic Gravitational Wave Production at a First-Order Phase Transition in the Early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    2018-02-16

    A model for the acoustic production of gravitational waves at a first-order phase transition is presented. The source of gravitational radiation is the sound waves generated by the explosive growth of bubbles of the stable phase. The model assumes that the sound waves are linear and that their power spectrum is determined by the characteristic form of the sound shell around the expanding bubble. The predicted power spectrum has two length scales, the average bubble separation and the sound shell width when the bubbles collide. The peak of the power spectrum is at wave numbers set by the sound shell width. For a higher wave number k, the power spectrum decreases to k^{-3}. At wave numbers below the inverse bubble separation, the power spectrum goes to k^{5}. For bubble wall speeds near the speed of sound where these two length scales are distinguished, there is an intermediate k^{1} power law. The detailed dependence of the power spectrum on the wall speed and the other parameters of the phase transition raises the possibility of their constraint or measurement at a future space-based gravitational wave observatory such as LISA.

  7. The phase transition of the first order in the critical region of the gas-liquid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Yukhnovskii

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a summarising investigation of the events of the phase transition of the first order that occur in the critical region below the liquid-gas critical point. The grand partition function has been completely integrated in the phase-space of the collective variables. The basic density measure is the quartic one. It has the form of the exponent function with the first, second, third and fourth degree of the collective variables. The problem has been reduced to the Ising model in an external field, the role of which is played by the generalised chemical potential μ*. The line μ*(η =0, where η is the density, is the line of the phase transition. We consider the isothermal compression of the gas till the point where the phase transition on the line μ*(η =0 is reached. When the path of the pressing reaches the line μ* =0 in the gas medium, a droplet of liquid springs up. The work for its formation is obtained, the surface-tension energy is calculated. On the line μ* =0 we have a two-phase system: the gas and the liquid (the droplet one. The equality of the gas and of the liquid chemical potentials is proved. The process of pressing is going on. But the pressure inside the system has stopped, two fixed densities have arisen: one for the gas-phase ηG=ηc(1-d/2 and the other for the liquid-phase ηL=ηc(1+d/2 (symmetrically to the rectlinear diameter, where ηc=0.13044 is the critical density. Starting from that moment the external pressure works as a latent work of pressure. Its value is obtained. As a result, the gas-phase disappears and the whole system turns into liquid. The jump of the density is equal to ηc d, where d=(D/2G1/2 ~ τν/2. D and G are coefficients of the Hamiltonian in the last cell connected with the renormalisation-group symmetry. The equation of state is written.

  8. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R.; Trodden, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The dark asymmetry can then be equal and opposite to the usual visible matter asymmetry, leading to a universe that is symmetric with respect to a generalised baryon number. We present both a general structure, and a precisely defined example of a viable model of this type. In that example, the dark matter is ''atomic'' as well as asymmetric, and various cosmological and astrophysical constraints are derived. Testable consequences for colliders include a Z' boson that couples through the B−L charge to the visible sector, but also decays invisibly to dark sector particles. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures

  9. Semi-analytic calculation of the gravitational wave signal from the electroweak phase transition for general quartic scalar effective potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehayias, John; Profumo, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Upcoming gravitational wave (GW) detectors might detect a stochastic background of GWs potentially arising from many possible sources, including bubble collisions from a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. We investigate whether it is possible to connect, via a semi-analytical approximation to the tunneling rate of scalar fields with quartic potentials, the GW signal through detonations with the parameters entering the potential that drives the electroweak phase transition. To this end, we consider a finite temperature effective potential similar in form to the Higgs potential in the Standard Model (SM). In the context of a semi-analytic approximation to the three dimensional Euclidean action, we derive a general approximate form for the tunneling temperature and the relevant GW parameters. We explore the GW signal across the parameter space describing the potential which drives the phase transition. We comment on the potential detectability of a GW signal with future experiments, and physical relevance of the associated potential parameters in the context of theories which have effective potentials similar in form to that of the SM. In particular we consider singlet, triplet, higher dimensional operators, and top-flavor extensions to the Higgs sector of the SM. We find that the addition of a temperature independent cubic term in the potential, arising from a gauge singlet for instance, can greatly enhance the GW power. The other parameters have milder, but potentially noticeable, effects

  10. Properties of high-density matter in the electroweak symmetric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, D.; Goyal, A.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the bulk properties of matter at high densities and finite temperatures in the phase where electroweak symmetry is exact and fermions are massless, by taking the strong interactions into account perturbatively to lowest order in the quark-gluon chromodynamic coupling constant α c . We also discuss the possibility of a phase transition of strange quark matter into this high-density matter in the electroweak symmetric phase at densities likely to be present in the core of dense neutron stars or collapsing stars. Finally, we study the properties of finite-size chunks of this matter by taking surface effects into account and give an estimate of the surface tension

  11. Direct visualization of phase separation between superconducting and nematic domains in Co-doped CaFe2As2 close to a first-order phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fente, Antón; Correa-Orellana, Alexandre; Böhmer, Anna E.; Kreyssig, Andreas; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Mompean, Federico J.; García-Hernández, Mar; Munuera, Carmen; Guillamón, Isabel; Suderow, Hermann

    2018-01-01

    We show that biaxial strain induces alternating tetragonal superconducting and orthorhombic nematic domains in Co-substituted CaFe2As2 . We use atomic force, magnetic force, and scanning tunneling microscopy to identify the domains and characterize their properties, finding in particular that tetragonal superconducting domains are very elongated, more than several tens of micrometers long and about 30 nm wide; have the same Tc as unstrained samples; and hold vortices in a magnetic field. Thus, biaxial strain produces a phase-separated state, where each phase is equivalent to what is found on either side of the first-order phase transition between antiferromagnetic orthorhombic and superconducting tetragonal phases found in unstrained samples when changing Co concentration. Having such alternating superconducting domains separated by normal conducting domains with sizes of the order of the coherence length opens opportunities to build Josephson junction networks or vortex pinning arrays and suggests that first-order quantum phase transitions lead to nanometric-size phase separation under the influence of strain.

  12. The end point of the first-order phase transition of the SU(2) gauge-Higgs model on a four-dimensional isotropic lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Y.; Csikor, F.; Fodor, Z.; Ukawa, A.

    1999-01-01

    We report results of a study of the end point of the electroweak phase transition of the SU(2) gauge-Higgs model defined on a four-dimensional isotropic lattice with N t = 2. Finite-size scaling study of Lee-Yang zeros yields λ c = 0.00116(16) for the end point. Combined with a zero-temperature measurement of Higgs and W boson masses, this leads to M H,c = 68.2 ± 6.6 GeV for the critical Higgs boson mass. An independent analysis of Binder cumulant gives a consistent value λ c = 0.00102(3) for the end point

  13. Electroweak baryogenesis and low energy supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Carena, M S; Riotto, Antonio; Vilja, I; Wagner, C E M

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is an interesting theoretical scenario, which demands physics beyond the Standard Model at energy scales of the order of the weak boson masses. It has been recently emphasized that, in the presence of light stops, the electroweak phase transition can be strongly first order, opening the window for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM. For the realization of this scenario, the Higgs boson must be light, at the reach of the LEP2 collider. In this article, we compute the baryon asymmetry assuming the presence of non-trivial CP violating phases in the parameters associated with the left-right stop mixing term and the Higgsino mass $\\mu$. We conclude that a phase $|\\sin \\phi_{\\mu}| > 0.01$ and Higgsino and gaugino mass parameters $|\\mu| \\simeq M_2$, and of the order of the electroweak scale, are necessary in order to generate the observed baryon asymmetry.

  14. Strongly coupled single-phase flow problems: Effects of density variation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and first order decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    We have developed TOUGH2 modules for strongly coupled flow and transport that include full hydrodynamic dispersion. T2DM models tow-dimensional flow and transport in systems with variable salinity, while T32DMR includes radionuclide transport with first-order decay of a parent-daughter chain of radionuclide components in variable salinity systems. T2DM has been applied to a variety of coupled flow problems including the pure solutal convection problem of Elder and the mixed free and forced convection salt-dome flow problem. In the Elder and salt-dome flow problems, density changes of up to 20% caused by brine concentration variations lead to strong coupling between the velocity and brine concentration fields. T2DM efficiently calculates flow and transport for these problems. We have applied T2DMR to the dispersive transport and decay of radionuclide tracers in flow fields with permeability heterogeneities and recirculating flows. Coupling in these problems occurs by velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion. Our results show that the maximum daughter species concentration may occur fully within a recirculating or low-velocity region. In all of the problems, we observe very efficient handling of the strongly coupled flow and transport processes.

  15. Molecular orientational re-ordering and the transformation of a Landau second order phase transition to first order in a nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, T.C.

    1988-08-01

    We consider the nature of the nematic to isotropic phase transition in terms of the molecular orientational re-ordering, expressed by the variation of the order parameter, s, in the light of Landau's theory of second order phase transition. Then, we show how the de Gennes modification to the Landau thermodynamic potential converts the transition to first order which is in better agreement with the experimental observations. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  16. Optimized broad-histogram simulations for strong first-order phase transitions: droplet transitions in the large-Q Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias; Gull, Emanuel; Trebst, Simon; Huse, David A

    2010-01-01

    The numerical simulation of strongly first-order phase transitions has remained a notoriously difficult problem even for classical systems due to the exponentially suppressed (thermal) equilibration in the vicinity of such a transition. In the absence of efficient update techniques, a common approach for improving equilibration in Monte Carlo simulations is broadening the sampled statistical ensemble beyond the bimodal distribution of the canonical ensemble. Here we show how a recently developed feedback algorithm can systematically optimize such broad-histogram ensembles and significantly speed up equilibration in comparison with other extended ensemble techniques such as flat-histogram, multicanonical and Wang–Landau sampling. We simulate, as a prototypical example of a strong first-order transition, the two-dimensional Potts model with up to Q = 250 different states in large systems. The optimized histogram develops a distinct multi-peak structure, thereby resolving entropic barriers and their associated phase transitions in the phase coexistence region—such as droplet nucleation and annihilation, and droplet–strip transitions for systems with periodic boundary conditions. We characterize the efficiency of the optimized histogram sampling by measuring round-trip times τ(N, Q) across the phase transition for samples comprised of N spins. While we find power-law scaling of τ versus N for small Q∼ 2 , we observe a crossover to exponential scaling for larger Q. These results demonstrate that despite the ensemble optimization, broad-histogram simulations cannot fully eliminate the supercritical slowing down at strongly first-order transitions

  17. Magnetic properties of Gd5(Si1.5Ge2.5) near the temperature and magnetic field induced first order phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, E.M.; Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature (from 5 to 300 K) and DC magnetic field (from 0 to 90 kOe) dependencies of the DC magnetization and magnetic susceptibility, and the temperature (from 5 to 350 K) dependency of the AC magnetic susceptibility of Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) have been studied. The temperature and/or magnetic field induced magnetic phase transition in Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) is a first order ferromagnet-paramagnet transition. The temperature of the magnetic transition in low AC magnetic field is 206 and 217 K for cooling and heating, respectively. The DC magnetic field increases the transition temperature by ∼0.36 K/kOe indicating that the paramagnetic phase can be reversibly transformed into the ferromagnetic phase. When the magnetic field is removed, the ferromagnetic phase transforms into the paramagnetic phase showing a large remanence-free hysteresis. The magnetic phase diagram based on the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the DC magnetization at various temperatures for Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) is proposed. The magnetic field dependence of the magnetization in the vicinity of the first order phase transition shows evidence for the formation of a magnetically heterogeneous system in the volume of Gd 5 (Si 1.5 Ge 2.5 ) specimen where the magnetically ordered (ferromagnetic) and disordered (paramagnetic) phases co-exist

  18. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D., E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: membiela@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: sanchez@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (CONICET-UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Deán Funes (7600) 3350 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-03-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  19. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-01-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis

  20. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D. [IFIMAR (CONICET-UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Deán Funes (7600) 3350 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  1. 3-dimensional lattice studies of the electroweak phase transition at MHiggs∼ 70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Kripfganz, J.

    1996-06-01

    We study the electroweak phase transition by lattice simulations of an effective 3-dimensional theory, for a Higgs mass of about 70 GeV. Exploiting, among others, a variant of the equal weight criterion of phase equilibrium, we obtain transition temperature, latent heat and surface tension, and compare with M H ∼35 GeV. In the broken phase masses and Higgs condensates are compared to perturbation theory. For the symmetric phase, bound state masses and the static force are determined. (orig.)

  2. Assessment of Ex-Vitro Anaerobic Digestion Kinetics of Crop Residues Through First Order Exponential Models: Effect of LAG Phase Period and Curve Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaque Sahito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies of AD (Anaerobic Digestion process are useful to predict the performance of digesters and design appropriate digesters and also helpful in understanding inhibitory mechanisms of biodegradation. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic kinetics of crop residues digestion with buffalo dung. Seven crop residues namely, bagasse, banana plant waste, canola straw, cotton stalks, rice straw, sugarcane trash and wheat straw were selected from the field and were analyzed on MC (Moisture Contents, TS (Total Solids and VS (Volatile Solids with standard methods. In present study, three first order exponential models namely exponential model, exponential lag phase model and exponential curve factor model were used to assess the kinetics of the AD process of crop residues and the effect of lag phase and curve factor was analyzed based on statistical hypothesis testing and on information theory. Assessment of kinetics of the AD of crop residues and buffalo dung follows the first order kinetics. Out of the three models, the simple exponential model was the poorest model, while the first order exponential curve factor model is the best fit model. In addition to statistical hypothesis testing, the exponential curve factor model has least value of AIC (Akaike's Information Criterion and can generate methane production data more accurately. Furthermore, there is an inverse linear relationship between the lag phase period and the curve factor.

  3. Assessment of ex-vitro anaerobic digestion kinetics of crop residues through first order exponential models: effect of lag phase period and curve factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, A.R.; Brohi, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic studies of AD (Anaerobic Digestion) process are useful to predict the performance of digesters and design appropriate digesters and also helpful in understanding inhibitory mechanisms of biodegradation. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic kinetics of crop residues digestion with buffalo dung. Seven crop residues namely, bagasse, banana plant waste, canola straw, cotton stalks, rice straw, sugarcane trash and wheat straw were selected from the field and were analyzed on MC (Moisture Contents), TS (Total Solids) and VS (Volatile Solids) with standard methods. In present study, three first order exponential models namely exponential model, exponential lag phase model and exponential curve factor model were used to assess the kinetics of the AD process of crop residues and the effect of lag phase and curve factor was analyzed based on statistical hypothesis testing and on information theory. Assessment of kinetics of the AD of crop residues and buffalo dung follows the first order kinetics. Out of the three models, the simple exponential model was the poorest model, while the first order exponential curve factor model is the best fit model. In addition to statistical hypothesis testing, the exponential curve factor model has least value of AIC (Akaike's Information Criterion) and can generate methane production data more accurately. Furthermore, there is an inverse linear relationship between the lag phase period and the curve factor. (author)

  4. Ashkin-Teller criticality and weak first-order behavior of the phase transition to a fourfold degenerate state in two-dimensional frustrated Ising antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R. M.; Zhuo, W. Z.; Chen, J.; Qin, M. H.; Zeng, M.; Lu, X. B.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, J.-M.

    2017-07-01

    We study the thermal phase transition of the fourfold degenerate phases (the plaquette and single-stripe states) in the two-dimensional frustrated Ising model on the Shastry-Sutherland lattice using Monte Carlo simulations. The critical Ashkin-Teller-like behavior is identified both in the plaquette phase region and the single-stripe phase region. The four-state Potts critical end points differentiating the continuous transitions from the first-order ones are estimated based on finite-size-scaling analyses. Furthermore, a similar behavior of the transition to the fourfold single-stripe phase is also observed in the anisotropic triangular Ising model. Thus, this work clearly demonstrates that the transitions to the fourfold degenerate states of two-dimensional Ising antiferromagnets exhibit similar transition behavior.

  5. Optimized broad-histogram simulations for strong first-order phase transitions: droplet transitions in the large-Q Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Bela; Gull, Emanuel; Trebst, Simon; Troyer, Matthias; Huse, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The numerical simulation of strongly first-order phase transitions has remained a notoriously difficult problem even for classical systems due to the exponentially suppressed (thermal) equilibration in the vicinity of such a transition. In the absence of efficient update techniques, a common approach for improving equilibration in Monte Carlo simulations is broadening the sampled statistical ensemble beyond the bimodal distribution of the canonical ensemble. Here we show how a recently developed feedback algorithm can systematically optimize such broad-histogram ensembles and significantly speed up equilibration in comparison with other extended ensemble techniques such as flat-histogram, multicanonical and Wang-Landau sampling. We simulate, as a prototypical example of a strong first-order transition, the two-dimensional Potts model with up to Q = 250 different states in large systems. The optimized histogram develops a distinct multi-peak structure, thereby resolving entropic barriers and their associated phase transitions in the phase coexistence region—such as droplet nucleation and annihilation, and droplet-strip transitions for systems with periodic boundary conditions. We characterize the efficiency of the optimized histogram sampling by measuring round-trip times τ(N, Q) across the phase transition for samples comprised of N spins. While we find power-law scaling of τ versus N for small Q \\lesssim 50 and N \\lesssim 40^2 , we observe a crossover to exponential scaling for larger Q. These results demonstrate that despite the ensemble optimization, broad-histogram simulations cannot fully eliminate the supercritical slowing down at strongly first-order transitions.

  6. "Big Bang" as a result result of the curvature-driven first-order phase transition in the early cold Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashitskii, E. A.; Pentegov, V. I.

    We suggest that the "Big Bang" may be a result of the first-order phase transition driven by changing scalar curvature of the 4D space-time in the expanding cold Universe, filled with nonlinear scalar field φ and neutral matter with equation of state p = vɛ (where p and ɛ are pressure and energy density of matter). We consider a Lagrangian for scalar field in curved space-time with nonlinearity φ, which along with the quadratic term -ΣR|φ|2 (where Σ is interaction constant and R is scalar curvature) contains a term ΣR(φ +φ+) linear in φ. Due to this term the condition for the extrema of the potential energy of the scalar field is given by a cubic equation. Provided v > 1/3 the scalar curvature R = [κ(3v-1)ɛ - 4Γ (where κ and Γ are Einstein's gravitational and cosmological constants) decreases along with decreasing " in the process of the Universe's expansion, and at some critical value Rc < 0 a first-order phase transition occurs, driven by an "external field" parameter proportional to R. Given certain conditions the critical radius of the early Universe at the point of the first-order phase transition may reach arbitrary large values, so this scenario of unrestricted "inflation" of the Universe may be called "hyperinflation". Beyond the point of phase transition the system is rolling down into the potential minimum releasing the potential energy of scalar field with subsequent powerful heating of the Universe playing the role of "Big Bang".

  7. Bino-driven electroweak baryogenesis with highly suppressed electric dipole moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingchuan [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: yli@physics.wisc.edu; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)], E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)], E-mail: mjrm@physics.wisc.edu

    2009-03-09

    It is conventional wisdom that successful electroweak baryogenesis in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) is in tension with the non-observation of electric dipole moments (EDMs), since the level of CP-violation responsible for electroweak baryogenesis is believed to generate unavoidably large EDMs. We show that CP-violation in the bino-Higgsino sector of the MSSM can account for successful electroweak baryogenesis without inducing large EDMs. This observation weakens the correlation between electroweak baryogenesis and EDMs, and makes the bino-driven electroweak baryogenesis scenario the least constrained by EDM limits. Taking this observation together with the requirement of a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition, we argue that a bino-driven scenario with a light stop is the most phenomenologically viable MSSM electroweak baryogenesis scenario.

  8. Bino-driven electroweak baryogenesis with highly suppressed electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingchuan; Profumo, Stefano; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2009-01-01

    It is conventional wisdom that successful electroweak baryogenesis in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) is in tension with the non-observation of electric dipole moments (EDMs), since the level of CP-violation responsible for electroweak baryogenesis is believed to generate unavoidably large EDMs. We show that CP-violation in the bino-Higgsino sector of the MSSM can account for successful electroweak baryogenesis without inducing large EDMs. This observation weakens the correlation between electroweak baryogenesis and EDMs, and makes the bino-driven electroweak baryogenesis scenario the least constrained by EDM limits. Taking this observation together with the requirement of a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition, we argue that a bino-driven scenario with a light stop is the most phenomenologically viable MSSM electroweak baryogenesis scenario

  9. Gauge invariant treatment of the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Fodor, Z.; Hebecker, A.

    1994-03-01

    We evaluate the gauge invariant effective potential for the composite field σ = 2Φ † Φin the SU(2)-Higgs model at finite temperature. Symmetric and broken phases correspond to the domains σ ≤ T 2 /3 and σ > T 2 /3, respectively. The effective potential increases very steeply at small values of σ. Predictions for several observables, derived from the ordinary and the gauge invariant effective potential, are compared. Good agreement is found for the critical temperature and the jump in the order parameter. The results for the latent heat differ significantly for large Higgs masses. (orig.)

  10. On the finite temperature λφ4 model. Is there a first order phase transition in (λφ4)3?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1995-11-01

    We investigate the behavior at finite temperature of the massive λ φ 4 model in a D-dimensional spacetime, performing a renormalization up to the order of one loop. In this approximation we show that the thermal mass increase with the temperature, while the thermal coupling constant decrease with the temperature. We establish that in the (λφ 4 ) 3 model there is a temperature β * -1 above which the coupling constant becomes negative. We argue that the system could develop a first order phase transition, where the origin corresponds to a metastable vacuum. (author). 29 refs

  11. Analysis of the first-order phase transition of (Mn,Fe)2(P,Si,Ge) using entropy change scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G F; Zhao, Z R; Zhang, X F; Song, L; Tegus, O

    2013-01-01

    For materials with small size of the discontinuities of the free energy derivatives at transition, it is not so easy to determine the order of the transition using the criterion of the Arrott plot. In our previous paper, we found that the Mn 2−x Fe x P 0.6 Si 0.25 Ge 0.15 compounds with x = 0.7 and 0.8 undergo first-order phase transitions but apparently shows some characteristics of a second-order phase transition. In this paper, we have employed the Arrott plot and entropy change scaling to analyse the nature of the transitions for those compounds. The results reveal that the use of entropy change scaling is more effective than the Arrott plot for determining the nature of the transition in such materials. (paper)

  12. Split NMSSM with electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidov, S.V.; Gorbunov, D.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Institutsky per. 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Kirpichnikov, D.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-24

    In light of the Higgs boson discovery and other results of the LHC we reconsider generation of the baryon asymmetry in the split Supersymmetry model with an additional singlet superfield in the Higgs sector (non-minimal split SUSY). We find that successful baryogenesis during the first order electroweak phase transition is possible within a phenomenologically viable part of the model parameter space. We discuss several phenomenological consequences of this scenario, namely, predictions for the electric dipole moments of electron and neutron and collider signatures of light charginos and neutralinos.

  13. Simulating the electroweak phase transition in the SU(2) Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hein, J.; Jansen, K.; Jaster, A.; Montvay, I.

    1994-09-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to study the finite temperature phase transition in the SU(2) Higgs model on the lattice. In the presently investigated range of the Higgs boson mass, below 50 GeV, the phase transition turns out to be of first order and its strength is rapidly decreasing with increasing Higgs boson mass. In order to control the systematic errors, we also perform studies of scaling violations and of finite volume effects. (orig.)

  14. Critical phenomena at a first-order phase transition in a lattice of glow lamps: Experimental findings and analogy to neural activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it, E-mail: ludovico.minati@ifj.edu [Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38123 Mattarello (Italy); Complex Systems Theory Department, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków (Poland); Candia, Antonio de [Department of Physics “E. Pancini,” University of Naples “Federico II,” Napoli (Italy); INFN Gr. Coll. Salerno, Unità di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Scarpetta, Silvia [INFN Gr. Coll. Salerno, Unità di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics “E.R.Caianiello,” University of Salerno, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Networks of non-linear electronic oscillators have shown potential as physical models of neural dynamics. However, two properties of brain activity, namely, criticality and metastability, remain under-investigated with this approach. Here, we present a simple circuit that exhibits both phenomena. The apparatus consists of a two-dimensional square lattice of capacitively coupled glow (neon) lamps. The dynamics of lamp breakdown (flash) events are controlled by a DC voltage globally connected to all nodes via fixed resistors. Depending on this parameter, two phases having distinct event rate and degree of spatiotemporal order are observed. The transition between them is hysteretic, thus a first-order one, and it is possible to enter a metastability region, wherein, approaching a spinodal point, critical phenomena emerge. Avalanches of events occur according to power-law distributions having exponents ≈3/2 for size and ≈2 for duration, and fractal structure is evident as power-law scaling of the Fano factor. These critical exponents overlap observations in biological neural networks; hence, this circuit may have value as building block to realize corresponding physical models.

  15. A self consistent study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.; Mack, G.; Palma, G.

    1994-12-01

    We propose the study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature by a two-step method. It combines i) dimensional reduction to a 3-dimensional lattice theory via perturbative blockspin transformation, and ii) either further real space renormalization group transformations, or solution of gap equations, for the 3d lattice theory. A gap equation can be obtained by using the Peierls inequality to find the best quadratic approximation to the 3d action. This method avoids the lack of self consistency of the usual treatments which do not separate infrared and UV-problems by introduction of a lattice cutoff. The effective 3d lattice action could also be used in computer simulations. (orig.)

  16. A self consistent study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.

    1995-01-01

    We propose the study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature by a two-step method. It combines i) dimensional reduction to a 3-dimensional lattice theory via perturbative blockspin transformation, and ii) either further real space renormalization group transformations, or solution of gap equations, for the 3d lattice theory. A gap equation can be obtained by using the Peierls inequality to find the best quadratic approximation to the 3d action. This method avoids the lack of self consistency of the usual treatments which do not separate infrared and UV-problems by introduction of a lattice cutoff. The effective 3d lattice action could also be used in computer simulations. ((orig.))

  17. EXAFS study of Mn1.28Fe0.67P0.46Si0.54 compound with first-order phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L, Yingjie; Huliyageqi, B; Haschaolu, W; Song, Zhiqiang; Tegus, O; Nakai, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have investigated the Fe and Mn K edge XAFS spectra of the Mn 1.28 Fe 0.67 P 0.46 Si 0.54 compound at 25 K and 295 K. • The site occupation of the Fe and Mn atoms and local structure of Mn 1.28 Fe 0.67 P 0.46 Si 0.54 are determined. • The atomic distances between Fe–Fe in c-plane for the ferromagnetic state are larger than those in the paramagnetic state. - Abstract: The Fe 2 P-type MnFe(P,Si) compounds are investigated by means of magnetic measurements and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements show that the Mn 1.28 Fe 0.67 P 0.46 Si 0.54 compound undergoes a first-order phase transition at the Curie temperature of 254 K. The Fe K-edge and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra show that Mn atom mainly located at the 3g sites, while the 3f sites are occupied by Fe atoms and Mn atom randomly. The distances between the Fe atom and its nearest neighbor atoms in a triangle Fe–Mn–Fe change from 2.80 Å at 25 K to 2.74 Å at 300 K. On the other hand, the distances between Fe atom and its second neighbor atoms change from 4.06 Å at 25 K to 4.02 Å at 300 K

  18. Electroweak baryogenesis with primordial hypermagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Pallares, Gabriel; Besprosvany, Jaime; Piccinelli, Gabriella

    2002-01-01

    Primordial magnetic fields, independently of their origin, could have had a significant influence over several physical processes that took place during the evolution of the early universe, in particular baryogenesis. Recall that for temperatures above the electroweak phase transition (T > 100 GeV), the symmetry of the standard model corresponded to the U(1)y hypercharge group, instead of the U(1)em electromagnetic group and are therefore properly called hypermagnetic fields. In this work, we show that during a first order electroweak phase transition, the presence of hypermagnetic fields produces an axial charge segregation in the reflection and transmission of fermions off the true vacuum bubbles. We also comment on the possible consequences that these processes have for the generation of baryon number during the phase transition

  19. Electroweak Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Erler, Jens; Langacker, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The results of high precision weak neutral current (WNC), Z-pole, and high energy collider electroweak experiments have been the primary prediction and test of electroweak unification. The electroweak program is briefly reviewed from a historical perspective. The current status and the implications for the standard model and beyond are discussed.

  20. Towards a nonequilibrium quantum field theory approach to electroweak baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riotto, A.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a general method to compute CP violating observables from extensions of the standard model in the context of electroweak baryogenesis. It is an alternative to the one recently developed by Huet and Nelson and relies on a nonequilibrium quantum field theory approach. The method is valid for all shapes and sizes of the bubble wall expanding in the thermal bath during a first-order electroweak phase transition. The quantum physics of CP violation and its suppression coming from the incoherent nature of thermal processes are also made explicit. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Towards Reviving Electroweak Baryogenesis with a Fourth Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    universe. However, it does not work within the standard model due to two reasons: (1 the strength of CP violation from the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism with three generations is too small; (2 the electroweak phase transition is not first order for the experimentally allowed Higgs boson mass. We discuss possibilities to solve these problems by introducing a fourth generation of fermions and how electroweak baryogenesis might be revived. We also discuss briefly the recent observation of a Higgs-like boson with mass around 125 GeV, which puts the fourth generation in a difficult situation, and the possible way out.

  2. First-Order Twistor Lifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simões BrunoAscenso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of twistor methods in the study of Jacobi fields has proved quite fruitful, leading to a series of results. L. Lemaire and J. C. Wood proved several properties of Jacobi fields along harmonic maps from the two-sphere to the complex projective plane and to the three- and four-dimensional spheres, by carefully relating the infinitesimal deformations of the harmonic maps to those of the holomorphic data describing them. In order to advance this programme, we prove a series of relations between infinitesimal properties of the map and those of its twistor lift. Namely, we prove that isotropy and harmonicity to first order of the map correspond to holomorphicity to first order of its lift into the twistor space, relatively to the standard almost complex structures and . This is done by obtaining first-order analogues of classical twistorial constructions.

  3. First-Order Twistor Lifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ascenso Simões

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of twistor methods in the study of Jacobi fields has proved quite fruitful, leading to a series of results. L. Lemaire and J. C. Wood proved several properties of Jacobi fields along harmonic maps from the two-sphere to the complex projective plane and to the three- and four-dimensional spheres, by carefully relating the infinitesimal deformations of the harmonic maps to those of the holomorphic data describing them. In order to advance this programme, we prove a series of relations between infinitesimal properties of the map and those of its twistor lift. Namely, we prove that isotropy and harmonicity to first order of the map correspond to holomorphicity to first order of its lift into the twistor space, relatively to the standard almost complex structures J1 and J2. This is done by obtaining first-order analogues of classical twistorial constructions.

  4. Simulation of high field induced first-order phase transition in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Leonardo P.; Raposo, E.P.; Coutinho-Filho, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and nature of first-order transitions (FOT) in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (BSCCO) are still open issues, although results from a number of experiments do support a FOT both at low and high fields. We present a FOT obtained via Monte Carlo simulations using the Lawrence-Doniach model for layered superconductors, focusing on a clean 3D sample of BSCCO, with dc field applied perpendicular to the CuO 2 planes. Our results confirm Nelson's predictions for the random-walk-like diffusion of melted lines, contrarily to some recent suggestions. Further results for the z-dependent density-density correlation function indicate that in the high field regime the CuO 2 planes decouple along with line melting, in agreement with experimental observations in BSCCO

  5. Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine, E-mail: tkonstan@cern.ch, E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch [CERN Physics Department, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only.

  6. Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only

  7. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  8. Disappearance of the force-free current configuration at the first order vortex lattice phase transition in YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Indenbom, M. V.; Berseth, V.; Benoit, W.; Erb, A.; Flükiger, R.

    1997-08-01

    The anisotropy in the transverse AC susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals, induced by the periodic appearance of a force-free current configuration upon rotation of a superimposed DC field in the crystal plane, disappears at the vortex phase transition, indicating the loss of the vortex lines' stability against mutual cutting.

  9. First-Order Hybrid Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braüner, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid logic is an extension of modal logic which allows us to refer explicitly to points of the model in the syntax of formulas. It is easy to justify interest in hybrid logic on applied grounds, with the usefulness of the additional expressive power. For example, when reasoning about time one...... often wants to build up a series of assertions about what happens at a particular instant, and standard modal formalisms do not allow this. What is less obvious is that the route hybrid logic takes to overcome this problem often actually improves the behaviour of the underlying modal formalism....... For example, it becomes far simpler to formulate proof-systems for hybrid logic, and completeness results can be proved of a generality that is simply not available in modal logic. That is, hybridization is a systematic way of remedying a number of known deficiencies of modal logic. First-order hybrid logic...

  10. Electroweak phase transition in the economical 3-3-1 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phong, Vo Quoc; Van, Vo Thanh; Minh, Le Hoang [Ho Chi Minh City University of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Long, Hoang Ngoc [Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-07-15

    We consider the EWPT in the economical 3-3-1 (E331) model. Our analysis shows that the EWPT in the model is a sequence of two first-order phase transitions, SU(3) → SU(2) at the TeV scale and SU(2) → U(1) at the 100 GeV scale. The EWPT SU(3) → SU(2) is triggered by the new bosons and the exotic quarks; its strength is about 1-13 if the mass ranges of these new particles are 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} GeV. The EWPT SU(2) → U(1) is strengthened by only the new bosons; its strength is about 1-1.15 if the mass parts of H{sub 1}{sup 0}, H{sub 2}{sup ±} and Y{sup ±} are in the ranges 10-10{sup 2} GeV. The contributions of H{sub 1}{sup 0} and H{sub 2}{sup ±} to the strengths of both EWPTs may make them sufficiently strong to provide large deviations from thermal equilibrium and B violation necessary for baryogenesis. (orig.)

  11. Electroweak Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hollik, W.

    2005-01-01

    The status of precision electroweak measurements as of summer 2002 is reviewed. The recent results on the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and on neutrino-nucleon scattering are discussed. Precision results on the electroweak interaction obtained by the experiments at the SLC, LEP and TEVATRON colliders are presented. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the minimal Standard Model and are used to constrain its parameters, including the mass of the Higgs boson. Th...

  12. Enabling electroweak baryogenesis through dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewicki, Marek; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Wells, James D.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact on electroweak baryogenesis from a swifter cosmological expansion induced by dark matter. We detail the experimental bounds that one can place on models that realize it, and we investigate the modifications of these bounds that result from a non-standard cosmological history. The modifications can be sizeable if the expansion rate of the Universe increases by several orders of magnitude. We illustrate the impact through the example of scalar field dark matter, which can alter the cosmological history enough to enable a strong-enough first-order phase transition in the Standard Model when it is supplemented by a dimension six operator directly modifying the Higgs boson potential. We show that due to the modified cosmological history, electroweak baryogenesis can be realized, while keeping deviations of the triple Higgs coupling below HL-LHC sensitivies. The required scale of new physics to effectuate a strong-enough first order phase transition can change by as much as twenty percent as the expansion rate increases by six orders of magnitude.

  13. The big bang as a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change of the scalar curvature in an expanding early Universe: The “hyperinflation” scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashitskii, E. A., E-mail: pashitsk@iop.kiev.ua; Pentegov, V. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-01-15

    We suggest that the Big Bang could be a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change in the scalar curvature of the 4D spacetime in an expanding cold Universe filled with a nonlinear scalar field φ and neutral matter with an equation of state p = νε (where p and ε are the pressure and energy density of the matter, respectively). We consider the Lagrangian of a scalar field with nonlinearity φ{sup 4} in a curved spacetime that, along with the term–ξR|φ|{sup 2} quadratic in φ (where ξ is the interaction constant between the scalar and gravitational fields and R is the scalar curvature), contains the term ξRφ{sub 0}(φ + φ{sup +}) linear in φ, where φ{sub 0} is the vacuum mean of the scalar field amplitude. As a consequence, the condition for the existence of extrema of the scalar-field potential energy is reduced to an equation cubic in φ. Provided that ν > 1/3, the scalar curvature R = [κ(3ν–1)ε–4Λ] (where κ and Λ are Einstein’s gravitational and cosmological constants, respectively) decreases with decreasing ε as the Universe expands, and a first-order phase transition in variable “external field” parameter proportional to R occurs at some critical value R{sub c} < 0. Under certain conditions, the critical radius of the early Universe at the point of the first-order phase transition can reach an arbitrary large value, so that this scenario of unrestricted “inflation” of the Universe may be called “hyperinflation.” After the passage through the phase-transition point, the scalar-field potential energy should be rapidly released, which must lead to strong heating of the Universe, playing the role of the Big Bang.

  14. Introduction to first order optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, W.G.

    1983-05-01

    The fundamentals of ion optics are presented, beginning with the basic non-relativistic equations of motion, and the conditions under which the paraxial equations hold. The relativistically correct equations are then presented. The basic focussing properties of dipoles and quadrupoles are described as well as the operation of the quadrupole doublet and triplet. The matrix formulation of optics is developed and used to derive a number of basic results such as imaging relations, principal planes, dispersion and achromatism. The concepts of emittance, acceptance, brightness and phase space are introduced and illustrated by examples. A waist in phase space is defined, and its relationship to a focus is discussed. Both the 'Sigma matrix and Twiss formulations' for phase-space transformations are presented and their inter-relationship shown. Liouville's Theorem is also discussed along with conditions for its validity. Examples of the action of a lens and a drift space on the beam phase space are given to illustrate the power of these concepts and develop some familiarity with them on the part of the reader

  15. Electroweak baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trodden, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to naive cosmological expectations, all evidence suggests that the universe contains an abundance of matter over antimatter. This article reviews the currently popular scenario in which testable physics, present in the standard model of electroweak interactions and its modest extensions, is responsible for this fundamental cosmological datum. A pedagogical explanation of the motivations and physics behind electroweak baryogenesis is provided, and analytical approaches, numerical studies, up to date developments, and open questions in the field are also discussed. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  16. Direct evidence for the first-order phase transition at the lower critical temperature in Er/sub 1-x/Ho/sub x/Rh4B4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachal, B.; Ishikawa, M.; Junod, A.; Muller, J.

    1982-01-01

    Using a heat-pulse and a relaxation technique, we have performed an extensive calorimetric investigation on the reetrant superconductors Er/sub 1-x/Ho/sub x/Rh 4 B 4 (x = 0.4 and 0.6) around their lower critical temperature. These experiments revealed a supercooling effect and thermal hystersis, thus establishing the first-order nature of the transition. Based on the measurement of the latent heat, our thermodynamic analysis suggests that the onset of ferromagnetism is lowered by only 55 mK due to the competing superconducting phase. Results of magnetization and ac susceptibility experiments on these compounds are also included

  17. Gravitational waves from phase transition in split NMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss gravitational wave signal from the strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the split NMSSM. We find that for sets of parameters predicting successful electroweak baryogenesis the gravitational wave signal can be within the reach of future experiments LISA, BBO and Ultimate DECIGO.

  18. Self-imaging in first-order optical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.; Nijhawan, O.P.; Guota, A.K.; Musla, A.K.; Singh, Kehar

    1998-01-01

    The structure and main properties of coherent and partially coherent optical fields that are self-reproducible under propagation through a first-order optical system are investigated. A phase space description of self-imaging in first-order optical systems is presented. The Wigner distribution

  19. Natural Cold Baryogenesis from Strongly Interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of "cold electroweak baryogenesis" has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on...

  20. Type-I pseudo-first-order phase transition induced electrocaloric effect in lead-free Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.06BaTiO3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Chen, Guorui; Liu, Xing; Zhai, Jiwei; Shen, Bo; Li, Shandong; Li, Peng; Yang, Ke; Zeng, Huarong; Yan, Haixue

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the electrocaloric effect (ECE) of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.06BaTiO3 (BNT-0.06BT) ceramic has been directly measured using a home-made adiabatic calorimeter. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) approaches 0.86 K under an electric field of 5 kV/mm at 110 °C, which provides experimental evidence for optimizing the ECE near the type-I pseudo-first-order phase transition (PFOPT). Most importantly, a considerable ΔT value can be maintained over a wide temperature range well above the temperature of the PFOPT under a high electric field. In addition, ΔT is closely related to the structural transition and electric field strength. This work provides a guideline to investigate the high ECE in BNT-based ferroelectric ceramics for applications in cooling technologies.

  1. Quadratic gravity in first order formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique; Anero, Jesus; Gonzalez-Martin, Sergio, E-mail: enrique.alvarez@uam.es, E-mail: jesusanero@gmail.com, E-mail: sergio.gonzalez.martin@uam.es [Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto de Física Teórica (IFT-UAM/CSIC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-10-01

    We consider the most general action for gravity which is quadratic in curvature. In this case first order and second order formalisms are not equivalent. This framework is a good candidate for a unitary and renormalizable theory of the gravitational field; in particular, there are no propagators falling down faster than 1/ p {sup 2}. The drawback is of course that the parameter space of the theory is too big, so that in many cases will be far away from a theory of gravity alone. In order to analyze this issue, the interaction between external sources was examined in some detail. We find that this interaction is conveyed mainly by propagation of the three-index connection field. At any rate the theory as it stands is in the conformal invariant phase; only when Weyl invariance is broken through the coupling to matter can an Einstein-Hilbert term (and its corresponding Planck mass scale) be generated by quantum corrections.

  2. Electroweak boson production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Sestini, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment offers a complementary phase space to ATLAS and CMS to study electroweak processes, thanks to the forward acceptance and the large bandwidth of the trigger allowing low energy thresholds. For this reason electroweak measurements at LHCb can provide unique constraints to the Parton Distribution Functions. Moreover these measurements can be used to validate reconstruction techniques. In these proceedings the latest measurements on W and Z bosons production performed during the LHC Run I and Run II data taking are presented.

  3. Electroweak corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, W.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The prospect of high accuracy measurements investigating the weak interactions, which are expected to take place at the electron-positron storage ring LEP at CERN and the linear collider SCL at SLAC, offers the possibility to study also the weak quantum effects. In order to distinguish if the measured weak quantum effects lie within the margins set by the standard model and those bearing traces of new physics one had to go beyond the lowest order and also include electroweak radiative corrections (EWRC) in theoretical calculations. These higher-order corrections also can offer the possibility of getting information about two particles present in the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model (GSW), but not discovered up till now, the top quark and the Higgs boson. In ch. 2 the GSW standard model of electroweak interactions is described. In ch. 3 some special techniques are described for determination of integrals which are responsible for numerical instabilities caused by large canceling terms encountered in the calculation of EWRC effects, and methods necessary to get hold of the extensive algebra typical for EWRC. In ch. 4 various aspects related to EWRC effects are discussed, in particular the dependence of the unknown model parameters which are the masses of the top quark and the Higgs boson. The processes which are discussed are production of heavy fermions from electron-positron annihilation and those of the fermionic decay of the Z gauge boson. (H.W.). 106 refs.; 30 figs.; 6 tabs.; schemes

  4. An Adequate First Order Logic of Intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaochen, Zhou; Hansen, Michael Reichhardt

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces left and right neighbourhoods as primitive interval modalities to define other unary and binary modalities of intervals in a first order logic with interval length. A complete first order logic for the neighbourhood modalities is presented. It is demonstrated how the logic can...... support formal specification and verification of liveness and fairness, and also of various notions of real analysis....

  5. Multivariate Discrete First Order Stochastic Dominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    This paper characterizes the principle of first order stochastic dominance in a multivariate discrete setting. We show that a distribution  f first order stochastic dominates distribution g if and only if  f can be obtained from g by iteratively shifting density from one outcome to another...

  6. Electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    A point of view of the electroweak interaction is presented. It begins phenomenologically and moves in stages toward the conventional gauge theory formalism containing elementary scalar Higgs-fields and then beyond. The purpose in so doing is that the success of the standard SU(2) x U(1) theory in accounting for low energy phenomena need not automatically imply success at high energies. It is deemed unlikely by most theorists that the predicted W +- or Z 0 does not exist or does not have the mass and/or couplings anticipated in the standard model. However, the odds that the standard predictions will work are not 100%. Therefore there is some reason to look at the subject as one would were he forced by a wrong experimental outcome - to go back to fundamentals and ascertain what is the minimal amount of theory necessary to account for the data

  7. EXAFS study of Mn{sub 1.28}Fe{sub 0.67}P{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54} compound with first-order phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L, Yingjie; Huliyageqi, B; Haschaolu, W; Song, Zhiqiang [Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory for Physics and Chemistry of Functional Materials, Physics and Electronic Information College, Inner Mongolia Normal University, Hohhot 010022 (China); Tegus, O, E-mail: tegusph@imnu.edu.cn [Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory for Physics and Chemistry of Functional Materials, Physics and Electronic Information College, Inner Mongolia Normal University, Hohhot 010022 (China); Nakai, Ikuo [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We have investigated the Fe and Mn K edge XAFS spectra of the Mn{sub 1.28}Fe{sub 0.67}P{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54} compound at 25 K and 295 K. • The site occupation of the Fe and Mn atoms and local structure of Mn{sub 1.28}Fe{sub 0.67}P{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54} are determined. • The atomic distances between Fe–Fe in c-plane for the ferromagnetic state are larger than those in the paramagnetic state. - Abstract: The Fe{sub 2}P-type MnFe(P,Si) compounds are investigated by means of magnetic measurements and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements show that the Mn{sub 1.28}Fe{sub 0.67}P{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54} compound undergoes a first-order phase transition at the Curie temperature of 254 K. The Fe K-edge and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra show that Mn atom mainly located at the 3g sites, while the 3f sites are occupied by Fe atoms and Mn atom randomly. The distances between the Fe atom and its nearest neighbor atoms in a triangle Fe–Mn–Fe change from 2.80 Å at 25 K to 2.74 Å at 300 K. On the other hand, the distances between Fe atom and its second neighbor atoms change from 4.06 Å at 25 K to 4.02 Å at 300 K.

  8. Semiclassical force for electroweak baryogenesis three-dimensional derivation

    CERN Document Server

    Kainulainen, K; Schmidt, M G; Weinstock, S; Kainulainen, Kimmo; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.; Weinstock, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    We derive a semiclassical transport equation for fermions propagating in the presence of a CP-violating planar bubble wall at a first order electroweak phase transition. Starting from the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) equation for the two-point (Wightman) function we perform an expansion in gradients, or equivalently in the Planck constant h-bar. We show that to first order in h-bar the KB equations have a spectral solution, which allows for an on-shell description of the plasma excitations. The CP-violating force acting on these excitations is found to be enhanced by a boost factor in comparison with the 1+1-dimensional case studied in a former paper. We find that an identical semiclassical force can be obtained by the WKB method. Applications to the MSSM are also mentioned.

  9. CP-violating profile of the electroweak bubble wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funakubo, Koichi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kakuto, Akira; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Takenaga, Kazunori; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    1995-11-01

    In any scenario of the electroweak baryogenesis, the profile of the CP violating bubble wall, created at the first-order phase transition, plays an essential role. We attempt to determine it by solving the equations of motion for the scalars in the two-Higgs-doublet model at the transition temperature. According to the parameters in the potential, we found three solutions. Two of them smoothly connect the CP-violating broken phase and the symmetric phase, while the other connects CP-conserving vacua but violates CP in the intermediate region. We also estimate the chiral charge flux, which will be turned into the baryon density in the symmetric phase by the sphaleron process. (author).

  10. A definability theorem for first order logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butz, C.; Moerdijk, I.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we will present a definability theorem for first order logic This theorem is very easy to state and its proof only uses elementary tools To explain the theorem let us first observe that if M is a model of a theory T in a language L then clearly any definable subset S M ie a subset S

  11. The first order fuzzy predicate logic (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Some analysis tools of fuzzy measures, Sugeno's integrals, etc. are introduced into the semantic of the first order predicate logic to explain the concept of fuzzy quantifiers. The truth value of a fuzzy quantification proposition is represented by Sugeno's integral. With this framework, several important notions of formation rules, fuzzy valutions and fuzzy validity are discussed

  12. First order formalism for quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiser, M.; Holman, R.; Neto, N.P.

    1987-05-01

    We develop a first order formalism for the quantization of gravity. We take as canonical variables both the induced metric and the extrinsic curvature of the (d - 1) -dimensional hypersurfaces obtained by the foliation of the d - dimensional spacetime. After solving the constraint algebra we use the Dirac formalism to quantize the theory and obtain a new representation for the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, defined in the functional space of the extrinsic curvature. We also show how to obtain several different representations of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation by considering actions differing by a total divergence. In particular, the intrinsic and extrinsic time approaches appear in a natural way, as do equivalent representations obtained by functional Fourier transforms of appropriate variables. We conclude with some remarks about the construction of the Hilbert space within the first order formalism. 10 refs

  13. First-order partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, Hyun-Ku; Amundson, Neal R

    2001-01-01

    This first volume of a highly regarded two-volume text is fully usable on its own. After going over some of the preliminaries, the authors discuss mathematical models that yield first-order partial differential equations; motivations, classifications, and some methods of solution; linear and semilinear equations; chromatographic equations with finite rate expressions; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous quasilinear equations; formation and propagation of shocks; conservation equations, weak solutions, and shock layers; nonlinear equations; and variational problems. Exercises appear at the end of mo

  14. Geometry of Lagrangian first-order classical field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria-Enriquez, A.; Munoz-Lecanda, M.C.; Roman-Roy, N.

    1996-01-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the Euler-Lagrange equations in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the jet field formalism (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether's theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied. (orig.)

  15. Geometry of Lagrangian first-order classical field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria-Enriquez, A. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica; Munoz-Lecanda, M.C. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica; Roman-Roy, N. [Univ. Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Telematica

    1996-10-01

    We construct a lagrangian geometric formulation for first-order field theories using the canonical structures of first-order jet bundles, which are taken as the phase spaces of the systems in consideration. First of all, we construct all the geometric structures associated with a first-order jet bundle and, using them, we develop the lagrangian formalism, defining the canonical forms associated with a lagrangian density and the density of lagrangian energy, obtaining the Euler-Lagrange equations in two equivalent ways: as the result of a variational problem and developing the jet field formalism (which is a formulation more similar to the case of mechanical systems). A statement and proof of Noether`s theorem is also given, using the latter formalism. Finally, some classical examples are briefly studied. (orig.)

  16. First order correction to quasiclassical scattering amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    First order (with respect to h) correction to quasiclassical with the aid of scattering amplitude in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is considered. This correction is represented by two-loop diagrams and includes the double integrals. With the aid of classical equations of motion, the sum of the contributions of the two-loop diagrams is transformed into the expression which includes one-dimensional integrals only. The specific property of the expression obtained is that the integrand does not possess any singularities in the focal points of the classical trajectory. The general formula takes much simpler form in the case of one-dimensional systems

  17. Wetting transitions: First order or second order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teletzke, G.F.; Scriven, L.E.; Davis, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    A generalization of Sullivan's recently proposed theory of the equilibrium contact angle, the angle at which a fluid interface meets a solid surface, is investigated. The generalized theory admits either a first-order or second-order transition from a nonzero contact angle to perfect wetting as a critical point is approached, in contrast to Sullivan's original theory, which predicts only a second-order transition. The predictions of this computationally convenient theory are in qualitative agreement with a more rigorous theory to be presented in a future publication

  18. Holographic equipartition from first order action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the idea that gravity is emergent has attract many people's attention. The "Emergent Gravity Paradigm" is a program that develop this idea from the thermodynamical point of view. It expresses the Einstein equation in the language of thermodynamics. A key equation in this paradigm is the holographic equipartition which says that, in all static spacetimes, the degrees of freedom on the boundary equal those in the bulk. And the time evolution of spacetime is drove by the departure from the holographic equipartition. In this paper, we get the holographic equipartition and its generalization from the first order formalism, that is, the connection and its conjugate momentum are considered to be the canonical variables. The final results have similar structure as those from the metric formalism. It gives another proof of holographic equipartition.

  19. First order deformations of the Fourier matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banica, Teodor, E-mail: teo.banica@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Cergy-Pontoise University, 95000 Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2014-01-15

    The N × N complex Hadamard matrices form a real algebraic manifold C{sub N}. The singularity at a point H ∈ C{sub N} is described by a filtration of cones T{sub H}{sup ×}C{sub N}⊂T{sub H}{sup ∘}C{sub N}⊂T{sub H}C{sub N}⊂T{sup ~}{sub H}C{sub N}, coming from the trivial, affine, smooth, and first order deformations. We study here these cones in the case where H = F{sub N} is the Fourier matrix, (w{sup ij}) with w = e{sup 2πi/N}, our main result being a simple description of T{sup ~}{sub H}C{sub N}. As a consequence, the rationality conjecture dim{sub R}(T{sup ~}{sub H}C{sub N})=dim{sub Q}(T{sup ~}{sub H}C{sub N}∩M{sub N}(Q)) holds at H = F{sub N}.

  20. Electroweak interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1984-06-01

    Topics include: introduction to electroweak theory; the Weinberg-Salam theory for leptons; the Weinberg-Salam theory for hadrons-the GIM mechanism; electron scattering as a probe of the electroweak interaction (observation of PV, the weak interaction for nucleons, and parity violation in atoms); and time reversed invariance and electric dipole moments of nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. 52 references

  1. Semilocal and electroweak strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achucarro, A; Vachaspati, T

    We review a class of non-topological defects in the standard electroweak model, and their implications. Starting with the semilocal string, which provides a counterexample to many well-known properties of topological vortices, we discuss electroweak strings and their stability with and without

  2. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.M., E-mail: ymcho7@konkuk.ac.kr [Administration Building 310-4, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kimm, Kyoungtae [Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-10

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein–Weinberg–Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  3. Electroweak Results from CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    We present recent CMS measurements on electroweak boson production including single, double, and triple boson final states. Electroweak processes span many orders of magnitude in production cross section. Measurements of high-rate processes provide stringent tests of the standard model. In addition, rare triboson proceses and final states produced through vector boson scattering are newly accessible with the large integrated luminosity provided by the LHC. If new physics lies just beyond the reach of the LHC, its effects may manifest as enhancements to the high energy kinematics in mulitboson production. We present limits on new physics signatures using an effective field theory which models these modifications as modifications of electroweak gauge couplings. Since electroweak measurements will continue to benefit from the increasing integrated luminosity provided by the LHC, the future prospects of electroweak physics are discussed.

  4. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bödeker, Dietrich [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can 'run away,' that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ∼ 10{sup 14}. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ∼ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  5. Lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the tau and bottom Yukawa couplings on the transport dynamics for electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Although it has generally been assumed in the literature that all Yukawa interactions except those involving the top quark are negligible, we find that the tau and bottom Yukawa interaction rates are too fast to be neglected. We identify an illustrative 'lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis' scenario in which the baryon asymmetry is induced mainly through the presence of a left-handed leptonic charge. We derive analytic formulas for the computation of the baryon asymmetry that, in light of these effects, are qualitatively different from those in the established literature. In this scenario, for fixed CP-violating phases, the baryon asymmetry has opposite sign compared to that calculated using established formulas.

  6. Quantum mechanics and the second law of thermodynamics: an insight gleaned from magnetic hysteresis in the first order phase transition of an isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    J Bardeen proposed that the adiabatic phase transition of mesoscopic-size type I superconductors must be accompanied by magnetic hysteresis in the critical magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to satisfy the second law of thermodynamics, herein referred to as ‘Bardeen Hysteresis’. Bardeen Hysteresis remains speculative in that it has not been reported in the literature. This paper investigates Bardeen Hysteresis as a possible accompaniment to the adiabatic phase transition of isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductors and its implications with respect to the second law of thermodynamics. A causal mechanism for Bardeen Hysteresis is discussed which contrasts with the long accepted causal mechanism of magnetic hysteresis, as first summarized by Pippard, herein referred to as ‘Pippard Hysteresis’. The paper offers guidance for an experimental verification and comments on how the existence of Bardeen Hysteresis has relation to a quantum mechanical basis for the second law of thermodynamics.

  7. Quantum mechanics and the second law of thermodynamics: an insight gleaned from magnetic hysteresis in the first order phase transition of an isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Peter D.

    2012-11-01

    J Bardeen proposed that the adiabatic phase transition of mesoscopic-size type I superconductors must be accompanied by magnetic hysteresis in the critical magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to satisfy the second law of thermodynamics, herein referred to as ‘Bardeen Hysteresis’. Bardeen Hysteresis remains speculative in that it has not been reported in the literature. This paper investigates Bardeen Hysteresis as a possible accompaniment to the adiabatic phase transition of isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductors and its implications with respect to the second law of thermodynamics. A causal mechanism for Bardeen Hysteresis is discussed which contrasts with the long accepted causal mechanism of magnetic hysteresis, as first summarized by Pippard, herein referred to as ‘Pippard Hysteresis’. The paper offers guidance for an experimental verification and comments on how the existence of Bardeen Hysteresis has relation to a quantum mechanical basis for the second law of thermodynamics.

  8. Precision electroweak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro e + e - and p anti p colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct m t measurements. Using the world's electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs' mass are discussed

  9. The electroweak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chris Quigg

    2001-01-01

    After a short essay on the current state of particle physics, the author reviews the antecedents of the modern picture of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and then undertakes a brief survey of the SU(2) L (circle-times) U(1) Y electroweak theory. The authors reviews the features of electroweak phenomenology at tree level and beyond, presents an introduction to the Higgs boson and the 1-TeV scale, and examines arguments for enlarging the electroweak theory. The author concludes with a brief look at low-scale gravity

  10. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3−x}Na{sub x}MnO{sub 3} exhibiting first-order and second-order magnetic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, T.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Dang, N.T. [Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang (Viet Nam); Phan, The-Long [Department of Physics and Oxide Research Center, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, D.S. [Physics Division, School of Science Education, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.W. [Department of Physics and Oxide Research Center, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, S.C., E-mail: scyu@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Polycrystalline orthorhombic samples La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3−x}Na{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0–0.09) were prepared by solid-state reaction. The study of magnetic properties revealed that the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic (FM-PM) transition temperature (T{sub C}) increases from 255 to about 271 K with increasing Na-doping content (x) from 0 to 0.09, respectively. Around the T{sub C}, we have found the samples showing a large magnetocaloric (MC) effect with maximum values of magnetic entropy change (|ΔS{sub max}|) of 7–8 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and relative cooling power RCP = 232–236 J/kg for the samples x = 0.03–0.09 in a magnetic-field interval ΔH = 40 kOe. Detailed analyses of isothermal magnetization data M(T, H) based on Banerjee's criteria indicated a first-to-second-order magnetic-phase transformation taking place at a threshold Na-doping concentration x{sub c} ≈ 0.06. This could also be observed clearly from the feature of entropy universal curves. An assessment of the magnetic-ordering exponent N = dLn|ΔS{sub m}|/dLnH demonstrates an existence of short-range magnetic order in the samples. We believe that the changes of the magnetic properties and MC effect in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3−x}Na{sub x}MnO{sub 3} caused by Na doping are related to the changes in the structural parameters and Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio, which are confirmed by the geometrical and electronic analyses based on X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure. - Highlights: • Geometrical and electronic structures of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3−x}Na{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. • Threshold of first-to-second-order phase transformation in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3−x}Na{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. • Large magneto-caloric effect with |ΔS{sub max}| ≈ 7–8 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}, and RCP = 232–236 J/kg. • Universal curve of magnetic-entropy change.

  11. Electroweak form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    The present status of electroweak nucleon form factors and the N - Δ transition form factors is reviewed. Particularly the determination of dipole mass M A in the axial vector form factor is discussed

  12. Breaking of electroweak symmetry: origin and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, C.

    2008-10-01

    The Higgs boson appears as the corner stone of high energy physics, it might be the cause of the excess of matter that led to the formation of the structures of the universe and it seems that it drives the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. Moreover, when the stability at low energies of the Higgs boson is assured by an extra space dimension, it appears that this extra dimension can explain most issues in the flavor physics that are not understood by the standard model. The first chapter presents the main tools of effective field theories, the role of experimental data in the construction of theories valid beyond the standard model is discussed. The second chapter focuses on the electroweak baryogenesis that allows the testing of new physics via the electroweak phase transition. We detail the calculation of a Higgs potential at finite temperature. We follow the dynamics of the phase transition including nucleation an supercooling. Finally we investigate the prospects of gravity wave detection to see the effects of a strong electroweak phase transition. The 2 last chapters are dedicated to the physics of extra-dimension. The properties of the dynamics of scalar, vector fields with a 1/2 spin plunged in a 5 d. Anti de Sitter geometry are reviewed. We present a model of lepton masses and mixings based on the A 4 non-Abelian discrete symmetry. It is shown that this model does not contradict the tests of electroweak precision. (A.C.)

  13. Electroweak evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Comelli, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Enlarging a previous analysis, where only fermions and transverse gauge bosons were taken into account, we write down infrared-collinear evolution equations for the Standard Model of electroweak interactions computing the full set of splitting functions. Due to the presence of double logs which are characteristic of electroweak interactions (Bloch-Nordsieck violation), new infrared singular splitting functions have to be introduced. We also include corrections related to the third generation Yukawa couplings

  14. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073177

    2016-01-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Stan- dard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  15. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jibo; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Standard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  16. Opening the window for electroweak baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Carena, M S; Wagner, C E M

    1996-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the behaviour of the electroweak phase transition in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, in the presence of light stops. We show that, in previously unexplored regions of parameter space, the order parameter v(T_c)/T_c can become significantly larger than one, for values of the Higgs and supersymmetric particle masses consistent with the present experimental bounds. This implies that baryon number can be efficiently generated at the electroweak phase transition. As a by-product of this study, we present an analysis of the problem of colour breaking minima at zero and finite temperature, and we use it to investigate the region of parameter space preferred by the best fit to the present precision electroweak measurement data, in which the left-handed stops are much heavier than the right-handed ones.

  17. A unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chala, Mikael; Nardini, Germano; Sobolev, Ivan; Moscow State Univ.

    2016-05-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset SO(7)/SO(6). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of SO(7), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new CP-violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  18. First-order phase transitions in a quantum Hall ferromagnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piazza, V.; Pellegrini, V.; Beltram, F.; Wegscheider, W.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 402, č. 9 (1999), s. 638-641 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1010601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 29.491, year: 1999

  19. State of electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, K.

    1984-01-01

    I assess what we know and what we do not know about the electroweak interactions. In particular, I argue that existing data on the electroweak parameters rho, sin 2 theta/sub w/ and G/sub F/ and on the recently discovered W +- and Z 0 allow us reasonably to conclude that: (1) the W +- and Z 0 truly are the elementary massive gauge bosons of SU(2) x U(1) and not the composite bosons of a new strong interaction, and (2) the electroweak scalar sector consists of weak doublets only. The most important thing we do not know is everything else about the electroweak scalar sector. In the hope of soon shedding light on this issue, a new method of searching for electroweak scalars in existing p-barp colliders is proposed. The basis of this method is that the branching ratio of W +- to decay to a charged plus a neutral scalar (expected in non-minimal SU(2) x U(1) models) can be as large as 1-2%, with detectable rates up to scalar masses of approx.35 GeV

  20. First order actions for gravitational systems, strings and membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, U.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss first order actions in general and the construction of first order actions by eliminating Lagrange multipliers in particular. A number of first order actions for gravitational theories are presented. Part of the article reviews first order actions, some of them well-known and some lesser known. New examples of first order actions include Weyl-invariant actions for membranes, with and without rigidity terms, as well as for Abelian and non-Abelian Born-Infeld actions in two dimensions

  1. Finite energy electroweak dyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.M. [Konkuk University, Administration Building 310-4, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    The latest MoEDAL experiment at LHC to detect the electroweak monopole makes the theoretical prediction of the monopole mass an urgent issue. We discuss three different ways to estimate the mass of the electroweak monopole. We first present the dimensional and scaling arguments which indicate the monopole mass to be around 4 to 10 TeV. To justify this we construct finite energy analytic dyon solutions which could be viewed as the regularized Cho-Maison dyon, modifying the coupling strength at short distance. Our result demonstrates that a genuine electroweak monopole whose mass scale is much smaller than the grand unification scale can exist, which can actually be detected at the present LHC. (orig.)

  2. Fundamental composite electroweak dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbey, Alexandre; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying

    2017-01-01

    Using the recent joint results from the ATLAS and CMS collaborations on the Higgs boson, we determine the current status of composite electroweak dynamics models based on the expected scalar sector. Our analysis can be used as a minimal template for a wider class of models between the two limitin...... space at the effective Lagrangian level. We show that a wide class of models of fundamental composite electroweak dynamics are still compatible with the present constraints. The results are relevant for the ongoing and future searches at the Large Hadron Collider....

  3. High-Density Quantum Sensing with Dissipative First Order Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Meghana; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Weimer, Hendrik

    2018-04-13

    The sensing of external fields using quantum systems is a prime example of an emergent quantum technology. Generically, the sensitivity of a quantum sensor consisting of N independent particles is proportional to sqrt[N]. However, interactions invariably occurring at high densities lead to a breakdown of the assumption of independence between the particles, posing a severe challenge for quantum sensors operating at the nanoscale. Here, we show that interactions in quantum sensors can be transformed from a nuisance into an advantage when strong interactions trigger a dissipative phase transition in an open quantum system. We demonstrate this behavior by analyzing dissipative quantum sensors based upon nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamond. Using both a variational method and a numerical simulation of the master equation describing the open quantum many-body system, we establish the existence of a dissipative first order transition that can be used for quantum sensing. We investigate the properties of this phase transition for two- and three-dimensional setups, demonstrating that the transition can be observed using current experimental technology. Finally, we show that quantum sensors based on dissipative phase transitions are particularly robust against imperfections such as disorder or decoherence, with the sensitivity of the sensor not being limited by the T_{2} coherence time of the device. Our results can readily be applied to other applications in quantum sensing and quantum metrology where interactions are currently a limiting factor.

  4. High-Density Quantum Sensing with Dissipative First Order Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Meghana; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Weimer, Hendrik

    2018-04-01

    The sensing of external fields using quantum systems is a prime example of an emergent quantum technology. Generically, the sensitivity of a quantum sensor consisting of N independent particles is proportional to √{N }. However, interactions invariably occurring at high densities lead to a breakdown of the assumption of independence between the particles, posing a severe challenge for quantum sensors operating at the nanoscale. Here, we show that interactions in quantum sensors can be transformed from a nuisance into an advantage when strong interactions trigger a dissipative phase transition in an open quantum system. We demonstrate this behavior by analyzing dissipative quantum sensors based upon nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamond. Using both a variational method and a numerical simulation of the master equation describing the open quantum many-body system, we establish the existence of a dissipative first order transition that can be used for quantum sensing. We investigate the properties of this phase transition for two- and three-dimensional setups, demonstrating that the transition can be observed using current experimental technology. Finally, we show that quantum sensors based on dissipative phase transitions are particularly robust against imperfections such as disorder or decoherence, with the sensitivity of the sensor not being limited by the T2 coherence time of the device. Our results can readily be applied to other applications in quantum sensing and quantum metrology where interactions are currently a limiting factor.

  5. Field Method for Integrating the First Order Differential Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Li-qun; ZHENG Shi-wang; ZHANG Yao-yu

    2007-01-01

    An important modern method in analytical mechanics for finding the integral, which is called the field-method, is used to research the solution of a differential equation of the first order. First, by introducing an intermediate variable, a more complicated differential equation of the first order can be expressed by two simple differential equations of the first order, then the field-method in analytical mechanics is introduced for solving the two differential equations of the first order. The conclusion shows that the field-method in analytical mechanics can be fully used to find the solutions of a differential equation of the first order, thus a new method for finding the solutions of the first order is provided.

  6. Effective field theory, electric dipole moments and electroweak baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, Csaba; White, Graham; Yue, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Negative searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) heavily constrain models of baryogenesis utilising various higher dimensional charge and parity violating (CPV) operators. Using effective field theory, we create a model independent connection between these EDM constraints and the baryon asymmetry of the universe (BAU) produced during a strongly first order electroweak phase transition. The thermal aspects of the high scale physics driving the phase transition are paramaterised by the usual kink solution for the bubble wall profile. We find that operators involving derivatives of the Higgs field yield CPV contributions to the BAU containing derivatives of the Higgs vacuum expectation value (vev), while non-derivative operators lack such contributions. Consequently, derivative operators cannot be eliminated in terms of non-derivative operators (via the equations of motion) if one is agnostic to the new physics that leads to the phase transition. Thus, we re-classify the independent dimension six operators, restricting ourselves to third generation quarks, gauge bosons and the Higgs. Finally, we calculate the BAU (as a function of the bubble wall width and the cutoff) for a derivative and a non-derivative operator, and relate it to the EDM constraints.

  7. Effective field theory, electric dipole moments and electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Csaba; White, Graham [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale School of Physics and Astronomy,Monash University,Victoria 3800 (Australia); Yue, Jason [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University,Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics,The University of Sydney,NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2017-03-07

    Negative searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) heavily constrain models of baryogenesis utilising various higher dimensional charge and parity violating (CPV) operators. Using effective field theory, we create a model independent connection between these EDM constraints and the baryon asymmetry of the universe (BAU) produced during a strongly first order electroweak phase transition. The thermal aspects of the high scale physics driving the phase transition are paramaterised by the usual kink solution for the bubble wall profile. We find that operators involving derivatives of the Higgs field yield CPV contributions to the BAU containing derivatives of the Higgs vacuum expectation value (vev), while non-derivative operators lack such contributions. Consequently, derivative operators cannot be eliminated in terms of non-derivative operators (via the equations of motion) if one is agnostic to the new physics that leads to the phase transition. Thus, we re-classify the independent dimension six operators, restricting ourselves to third generation quarks, gauge bosons and the Higgs. Finally, we calculate the BAU (as a function of the bubble wall width and the cutoff) for a derivative and a non-derivative operator, and relate it to the EDM constraints.

  8. Path integral measure for first-order and metric gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aros, Rodrigo; Contreras, Mauricio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    The equivalence between the path integrals for first-order gravity and the standard torsion-free, metric gravity in 3 + 1 dimensions is analysed. Starting with the path integral for first-order gravity, the correct measure for the path integral of the metric theory is obtained

  9. Fuzzy Reasoning Based on First-Order Modal Logic,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Zhang, Z.; Sui, Y.; Huang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    As an extension of traditional modal logics, this paper proposes a fuzzy first-order modal logic based on believable degree, and gives out a description of the fuzzy first-order modal logic based on constant domain semantics. In order to make the reasoning procedure between the fuzzy assertions

  10. Electroweak interactions at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgia, B.

    1991-01-01

    Electroweak interaction at LEP are a subject based on a wealth of data, given the success of the CERN e + e - storage ring. The author will report on the results from the four experiments, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL after the analysis of about 1/2 of the data collected in 1989 and 1990. The review will cover the electroweak aspects of the process e + e - → Z* → f bar f where the fermions can be either quarks or leptons. The analysis of experimental data is based on the determination of the cross section integrated on the solid angle and on the asymmetry of forward-backward leptons in the final state. In this game the knowledge of the center mass energy is fundamental as the determination of the luminosity by which the event rate is normalized to compute the absolute cross section. Therefore a specific attention is given to these subjects

  11. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  12. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  13. Electro-weak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    By electro-weak theory is meant the unified field theory that describes both weak and electro-magnetic interactions. The development of a unified electro-weak theory is certainly the most dramatic achievement in theoretical physics to occur in the second half of this century. It puts weak interactions on the same sound theoretical footing as quantum elecrodynamics. Many theorists have contributed to this development, which culminated in the works of Glashow, Weinberg and Salam, who were jointly awarded the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics. Some of the important ideas that contributed to this development are the theory of beta decay formulated by Fermi, Parity violation suggested by Lee and Yang, and incorporated into immensely successful V-A theory of weak interactions by Sudarshan and Marshak. At the same time ideas of gauge invariance were applied to weak interaction by Schwinger, Bludman and Glashow. Weinberg and Salam then went one step further and wrote a theory that is renormalizable, i.e., all higher order corrections are finite, no mean feat for a quantum field theory. The theory had to await the development of the quark model of hadrons for its completion. A description of the electro-weak theory is given

  14. Realization of first order optical systems using thin lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Mukunda, N.; Simon, R.

    1983-09-01

    A first order optical system is investigated in full generality within the context of wave optics. We reduce the problem to a study of the ray transfer matrices. The simplest such systems correspond to axially symmetric propagation. Realization of such systems by centrally located lenses separated by finite distances is studied. It is shown that every axially symmetric first order system can be realized using at most three lenses. Among anisotropic systems it is proven that every symplectic ray transfer matrix, and no others, can be realized using lenses and free propagations. Suggestions for further study of the general first order system are outlined. 16 references

  15. Baryogenesis at the electroweak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dine, M.; Huet, P.; Singleton, R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We explore some issues involved in generating the baryon asymmetry at the electroweak scale. A simple two-dimensional model is analyzed which illustrates the role of the effective action in computing the asymmetry. We stress the fact that baryon production ceases at a very small value of the Higgs field; as a result, certain two-Higgs models which have been studied recently cannot produce sufficient asymmetry, while quite generally models with only doublets can barely produce the observed baryon density; models with gauge singlets are more promising. We also review limits on Higgs masses coming from the requirement that the baryon asymmetry not be wiped out after the phase transition. We note that there are a variety of uncertainties in these calculations, and that even in models with a single Higgs doublet one cannot rule out a Higgs mass below 55 GeV. (orig.)

  16. General solution for first order elliptic systems in the plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mshimba, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that a system of 2n real-valued partial differential equations of first order, which under certain assumptions can be transformed to the so-called 'complex normal form', admits a general solution. 15 refs

  17. First-order regional seismotectonic model for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Singh, M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A first-order seismotectonic model was created for South Africa. This was done using four logical steps: geoscientific data collection, characterisation, assimilation and zonation. Through the definition of subunits of concentrations of earthquake...

  18. First-order transitions and the multihistogram method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanot, G.; Lippert, T.; Schilling, K.; Ueberholz, P.

    1992-01-01

    We describe how the multihistogram method can be used to get reliable results from simulations in the critical region of first-order transitions even in the presence of severe hysteresis effects. (orig.)

  19. Electroweak physics with LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davier, M.

    1992-03-01

    The present status of electroweak physics at LEP is presented. The LEP machine and the detectors are described. The decays of Z neutral bosons in both leptonic and hadronic channels are studied. Neutral and charged sector are investigated, and a precise test of the Standard Model is given. Higgs boson searches and τ decay measurements are also described as well as quark mixing and B 0 B-bar 0 oscillations. All the seven contributions are individually indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (K.A.) 100 refs

  20. Electroweak precision tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteil, St.

    2009-12-01

    This document aims at summarizing a dozen of years of the author's research in High Energy Physics, in particular dealing with precision tests of the electroweak theory. Parity violating asymmetries measurements at LEP with the ALEPH detector together with global consistency checks of the Kobayashi-Maskawa paradigm within the CKM-fitter group are gathered in the first part of the document. The second part deals with the unpublished instrumental work about the design, tests, productions and commissioning of the elements of the Pre-Shower detector of the LHCb spectrometer at LHC. Physics perspectives with LHCb are eventually discussed as a conclusion. (author)

  1. Electroweak baryogenesis in extensions of the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromme, L.

    2006-07-07

    We investigate the generation of the baryon asymmetry in two extensions of the Standard Model; these are the {phi}{sup 6} and the two-Higgs-doublet model. Analyzing the thermal potential in the presence of CP violation, we find a strong first order phase transition for a wide range of parameters in both models. We compute the relevant bubble wall properties which then enter the transport equations. In non-supersymmetric models electroweak baryogenesis is dominated by top transport, which we treat in the WKB approximation. We calculate the CP-violating source terms starting from the Dirac equation. We show how to resolve discrepancies between this treatment and the computation in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. Furthermore, we keep inelastic scatterings of quarks and W bosons at a finite rate, which considerably affects the amount of the generated baryon asymmetry depending on the bubble wall velocity. In addition, we improve the transport equations by novel source terms which are generated by CP-conserving perturbations in the plasma. It turns out that their effect is relatively small. Both models under consideration predict a baryon to entropy ratio close to the observed value for a large part of the parameter space without being in conflict with constraints on electric dipole moments. (orig.)

  2. Electroweak baryogenesis in extensions of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromme, L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the generation of the baryon asymmetry in two extensions of the Standard Model; these are the Φ 6 and the two-Higgs-doublet model. Analyzing the thermal potential in the presence of CP violation, we find a strong first order phase transition for a wide range of parameters in both models. We compute the relevant bubble wall properties which then enter the transport equations. In non-supersymmetric models electroweak baryogenesis is dominated by top transport, which we treat in the WKB approximation. We calculate the CP-violating source terms starting from the Dirac equation. We show how to resolve discrepancies between this treatment and the computation in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. Furthermore, we keep inelastic scatterings of quarks and W bosons at a finite rate, which considerably affects the amount of the generated baryon asymmetry depending on the bubble wall velocity. In addition, we improve the transport equations by novel source terms which are generated by CP-conserving perturbations in the plasma. It turns out that their effect is relatively small. Both models under consideration predict a baryon to entropy ratio close to the observed value for a large part of the parameter space without being in conflict with constraints on electric dipole moments. (orig.)

  3. Electroweak probes with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Milov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measuring electroweak bosons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at high energy provide an opportunity to understand temporal evolution of the quark-gluon plasma created in such collisions by constraining the initial state of the interaction. Due to lack of colour charges the bosons and or particles produced in their leptonic decays are unaffected by the quark-gluon plasma and therefore preserve the information about the very early stage of the collision when they were born. This singles EW bosons as a unique and very interesting class of observables in HI collisions. The ATLAS experiment at LHC measures production of electroweak bosons in $pp$, $p$+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions systems. A review of the existing results is given in this proceeding that includes studies made with isolated photons to constraint kinematic properties and flavour composition of associated jets, measurements of $W$ and $Z$ bosons used to estimate nuclear modification of PDF and the production rates of the bosons used to verify geometric...

  4. Formalization of the Resolution Calculus for First-Order Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichtkrull, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A formalization in Isabelle/HOL of the resolution calculus for first-order logic is presented. Its soundness and completeness are formally proven using the substitution lemma, semantic trees, Herbrand’s theorem, and the lifting lemma. In contrast to previous formalizations of resolution, it consi......A formalization in Isabelle/HOL of the resolution calculus for first-order logic is presented. Its soundness and completeness are formally proven using the substitution lemma, semantic trees, Herbrand’s theorem, and the lifting lemma. In contrast to previous formalizations of resolution...

  5. A controllability test for general first-order representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Helmke; J. Rosenthal; J.M. Schumacher (Hans)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a new controllability rank test for general first-order representations. The criterion generalizes the well-known controllability rank test for linear input-state systems as well as a controllability rank test by Mertzios et al. for descriptor systems.

  6. First order normalization in the perturbed restricted three–body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper performs the first order normalization that will be employed in the study of the nonlinear stability of triangular points of the perturbed restricted three – body problem with variable mass. The problem is perturbed in the sense that small perturbations are given in the coriolis and centrifugal forces. It is with variable ...

  7. Conventional hamiltonian for first-order differential systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Lagrangian systems corresponding to a given set of 2n first-order ordinary differential equations are singular ones. In despite this, it is shown that these systems can be put into a Hamiltonian form in the usual manner. (Author) [pt

  8. The Resolution Calculus for First-Order Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichtkrull, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This theory is a formalization of the resolution calculus for first-order logic. It is proven sound and complete. The soundness proof uses the substitution lemma, which shows a correspondence between substitutions and updates to an environment. The completeness proof uses semantic trees, i.e. trees...

  9. An improved solution of first order kinetics for biochemical oxygen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper evaluated selected Biochemical Oxygen Demand first order kinetics methods. Domesticinstitutional wastewaters were collected twice in a month for three months from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife waste stabilization ponds. Biochemical Oxygen Demand concentrations at different days were determined ...

  10. Hopf bifurcation formula for first order differential-delay equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Richard; Verdugo, Anael

    2007-09-01

    This work presents an explicit formula for determining the radius of a limit cycle which is born in a Hopf bifurcation in a class of first order constant coefficient differential-delay equations. The derivation is accomplished using Lindstedt's perturbation method.

  11. Oscillation criteria for first-order forced nonlinear difference equations

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Said R; Agarwal Ravi P; Smith Tim

    2006-01-01

    Some new criteria for the oscillation of first-order forced nonlinear difference equations of the form Δx(n)+q1(n)xμ(n+1) = q2(n)xλ(n+1)+e(n), where λ, μ are the ratios of positive odd integers 0 <μ < 1 and λ > 1, are established.

  12. First-order optical systems with unimodular eigenvalues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, M.J.; Alieva, T.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that a lossless first-order optical system whose real symplectic ray transformation matrix can be diagonalized and has only unimodular eigenvalues, is similar to a separable fractional Fourier transformer in the sense that the ray transformation matrices of the unimodular system and the

  13. Probabilistic peak detection for first-order chromatographic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatka, M.; Vivó-Truyols, G.; Sjerps, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for probabilistic peak detection in first-order chromatographic data. Unlike conventional methods that deliver a binary answer pertaining to the expected presence or absence of a chromatographic peak, our method calculates the probability of a point being affected by

  14. Multidimensional first-order dominance comparisons of population wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Thomas Channing; Siersbæk, Nikolaj; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    In this paper, we convey the concept of first-order dominance (FOD) with particular focus on applications to multidimensional population welfare comparisons. We give an account of the fundamental equivalent definitions of FOD, illustrated with simple numerical examples. An implementable method...

  15. Multidimensional First-Order Dominance Comparisons of Population Wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Nikolaj; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave; Arndt, Thomas Channing

    2017-01-01

    This chapter conveys the concept of first-order dominance (FOD) with particular focus on applications to multidimensional population welfare comparisons. It gives an account of the fundamental equivalent definitions of FOD both in the one-dimensional and multidimensional setting, illustrated...

  16. First-order chemistry in the surface-flux layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    1997-01-01

    of a characteristic turbulent time scale and the scalar mean lifetime. We show that if we use only first-order closure and neglect the effect of the Damkohler ratio on the turbulent diffusivity we obtain another analytic solution for the profiles of the flux and the mean concentration which, from an experimental...

  17. A Lennard-Jones-like perspective on first order transitions in biological helices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskolkov, Nikolay N.; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures with Lennard-Jones self-interactions are studied for optimal conformations. For this purpose, their self-energy is analyzed for extrema with respect to the geometric parameters of the helices. It is found that Lennard-Jones helices exhibit a first order phase transition from...

  18. First-order signals in compact QED with monopole suppressed boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.; Schilling, K.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    1995-01-01

    Pure gauge compact QED on hypercubic lattices is considered with periodically closed monopole currents suppressed. We compute observables on sublattices which are nested around the centre of the lattice in order to locate regions where translation symmetry is approximately recovered. Our Monte Carlo simulations on 24 4 -lattices give indications for a first-order nature of the U(1) phase transition. ((orig.))

  19. A First-Order One-Pass CPS Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Nielsen, Lasse Reichstein

    2001-01-01

    We present a new transformation of λ-terms into continuation-passing style (CPS). This transformation operates in one pass and is both compositional and first-order. Previous CPS transformations only enjoyed two out of the three properties of being first-order, one-pass, and compositional......, but the new transformation enjoys all three properties. It is proved correct directly by structural induction over source terms instead of indirectly with a colon translation, as in Plotkin's original proof. Similarly, it makes it possible to reason about CPS-transformed terms by structural induction over...... source terms, directly.The new CPS transformation connects separately published approaches to the CPS transformation. It has already been used to state a new and simpler correctness proof of a direct-style transformation, and to develop a new and simpler CPS transformation of control-flow information....

  20. A First-Order One-Pass CPS Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Nielsen, Lasse Reichstein

    2002-01-01

    We present a new transformation of call-by-value lambdaterms into continuation-passing style (CPS). This transformation operates in one pass and is both compositional and first-order. Because it operates in one pass, it directly yields compact CPS programs that are comparable to what one would...... write by hand. Because it is compositional, it allows proofs by structural induction. Because it is first-order, reasoning about it does not require the use of a logical relation. This new CPS transformation connects two separate lines of research. It has already been used to state a new and simpler...... correctness proof of a direct-style transformation, and to develop a new and simpler CPS transformation of control-flow information....

  1. A First-Order One-Pass CPS Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Nielsen, Lasse Reichstein

    2003-01-01

    We present a new transformation of λ-terms into continuation-passing style (CPS). This transformation operates in one pass and is both compositional and first-order. Previous CPS transformations only enjoyed two out of the three properties of being first-order, one-pass, and compositional......, but the new transformation enjoys all three properties. It is proved correct directly by structural induction over source terms instead of indirectly with a colon translation, as in Plotkin's original proof. Similarly, it makes it possible to reason about CPS-transformed terms by structural induction over...... source terms, directly.The new CPS transformation connects separately published approaches to the CPS transformation. It has already been used to state a new and simpler correctness proof of a direct-style transformation, and to develop a new and simpler CPS transformation of control-flow information....

  2. First-order error budgeting for LUVOIR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Knight, J. Scott; Feinberg, Lee D.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2017-09-01

    Future large astronomical telescopes in space will have architectures that will have complex and demanding requirements to meet the science goals. The Large UV/Optical/IR Surveyor (LUVOIR) mission concept being assessed by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center is expected to be 9 to 15 meters in diameter, have a segmented primary mirror and be diffraction limited at a wavelength of 500 nanometers. The optical stability is expected to be in the picometer range for minutes to hours. Architecture studies to support the NASA Science and Technology Definition teams (STDTs) are underway to evaluate systems performance improvements to meet the science goals. To help define the technology needs and assess performance, a first order error budget has been developed. Like the JWST error budget, the error budget includes the active, adaptive and passive elements in spatial and temporal domains. JWST performance is scaled using first order approximations where appropriate and includes technical advances in telescope control.

  3. Displacement Convexity for First-Order Mean-Field Games

    KAUST Repository

    Seneci, Tommaso

    2018-05-01

    In this thesis, we consider the planning problem for first-order mean-field games (MFG). These games degenerate into optimal transport when there is no coupling between players. Our aim is to extend the concept of displacement convexity from optimal transport to MFGs. This extension gives new estimates for solutions of MFGs. First, we introduce the Monge-Kantorovich problem and examine related results on rearrangement maps. Next, we present the concept of displacement convexity. Then, we derive first-order MFGs, which are given by a system of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation coupled with a transport equation. Finally, we identify a large class of functions, that depend on solutions of MFGs, which are convex in time. Among these, we find several norms. This convexity gives bounds for the density of solutions of the planning problem.

  4. Local divergence and curvature divergence in first order optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafusire, Cosmas; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.

    2018-06-01

    The far-field divergence of a light beam propagating through a first order optical system is presented as a square root of the sum of the squares of the local divergence and the curvature divergence. The local divergence is defined as the ratio of the beam parameter product to the beam width whilst the curvature divergence is a ratio of the space-angular moment also to the beam width. It is established that the beam’s focusing parameter can be defined as a ratio of the local divergence to the curvature divergence. The relationships between the two divergences and other second moment-based beam parameters are presented. Their various mathematical properties are presented such as their evolution through first order systems. The efficacy of the model in the analysis of high power continuous wave laser-based welding systems is briefly discussed.

  5. First-Order Polynomial Heisenberg Algebras and Coherent States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Celeita, M; Fernández C, D J

    2016-01-01

    The polynomial Heisenberg algebras (PHA) are deformations of the Heisenberg- Weyl algebra characterizing the underlying symmetry of the supersymmetric partners of the Harmonic oscillator. When looking for the simplest system ruled by PHA, however, we end up with the harmonic oscillator. In this paper we are going to realize the first-order PHA through the harmonic oscillator. The associated coherent states will be also constructed, which turn out to be the well known even and odd coherent states. (paper)

  6. Code Generation for a Simple First-Order Prover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jørgen; Schlichtkrull, Anders; Halkjær From, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present Standard ML code generation in Isabelle/HOL of a sound and complete prover for first-order logic, taking formalizations by Tom Ridge and others as the starting point. We also define a set of so-called unfolding rules and show how to use these as a simple prover, with the aim of using t...... the approach for teaching logic and verification to computer science students at the bachelor level....

  7. Symmetric positive differential equations and first order hyperbolic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangmanee, S.

    1981-12-01

    We prove that under some conditions the first order hyperbolic system and its associated mixed initial boundary conditions considered, for example, in Kreiss (Math. Comp. 22, 703-704 (1968)) and Kreiss and Gustafsson (Math. Comp. 26, 649-686 (1972)), can be transformed into a symmetric positive system of P.D.E.'s with admissible boundary conditions of Friedrich's type (Comm. Pure Appl. Math 11, 333-418 (1958)). (author)

  8. Electroweak Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sommer, Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the large integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the excellent understanding of the LHC detectors, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. A review of the measurement of the $W$ boson mass by the ATLAS Collaboration as well as a new measurement of the electroweak mixing angle with the CMS detector are presented. Special emphasis is put on a discussion of the modelling uncertainties and the potential of the latest low-$\\mu$ runs, recorded at the end of 2017 by both collaboration. In addition, the latest measurements of multi-boson final states as well as the electroweak production of single gauge bosons at 13 TeV are summarised. The study of these processes can be used to constrain anomalous gauge couplings in an effective field theory approach, allowing to bridge tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Models also to Higgs boson production.

  9. Electroweak Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sommer, Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the high integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the very good understanding of the LHC detectors, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. In this talk, we review the measurement of the W boson mass by the ATLAS Collaboration as well as the new measurement of the electroweak mixing angle with the CMS detector. Special focus is drawn on a discussion of the modeling uncertainties and the physics potential of the latest low-mu runs, recorded at the end of 2017 by both collaboration. In addition, we will present the latest measurements of multi-boson final states as well as the electroweak production of single gauge bosons at 13 TeV. The study of these processes can be used to constrain anomalous gauge couplings in an effective field theory approach, allowing to bridge tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Models also to the Higgs-boson production.

  10. Electroweak physics and electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.; Hwang, W.Y.P.

    1988-01-01

    The electroweak theory is developed and applied to electron scattering from nucleons and light nuclei. It is shown that these scatterings can be used to test the standard theory and probe structure effects. 33 refs., 5 figs

  11. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings

  12. Baryogenesis at the electroweak scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, A [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India); Mallik, S [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India)

    1995-10-01

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe is considered in the standard model of the electroweak theory with simple extensions of the Higgs sector. The propagation of quarks of masses up to about 5 GeV are considered, taking into account their markedly different dispersion relations due to propagation through the hot electroweak plasma. It is shown that the contribution of the b quark to the baryon asymmetry can be comparable to that for the t quark considered earlier. (orig.)

  13. Baryogenesis at the electroweak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.; Mallik, S.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe is considered in the standard model of the electroweak theory with simple extensions of the Higgs sector. The propagation of quarks of masses up to about 5 GeV are considered, taking into account their markedly different dispersion relations due to propagation through the hot electroweak plasma. It is shown that the contribution of the b quark to the baryon asymmetry can be comparable to that for the t quark considered earlier. (orig.)

  14. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  15. Quantum transport and electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2013-02-15

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  16. Quantum transport and electroweak baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  17. Electroweak physics at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Hemingway, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    On 2 November 2000 the LEP machine was finally closed after 12 years of glorious running. With the 4 operating detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL, an enormous wealth of new data at the highest centre- of-mass energies has been recorded. These lectures will focus on aspects of electroweak physics within the energy span of LEP2, namely 130-209 GeV. All current data are in very good agreement with the electroweak standard model. (50 refs).

  18. Temporal aggregation in first order cointegrated vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Milhøj, Anders

    We study aggregation - or sample frequencies - of time series, e.g. aggregation from weekly to monthly or quarterly time series. Aggregation usually gives shorter time series but spurious phenomena, in e.g. daily observations, can on the other hand be avoided. An important issue is the effect of ...... of aggregation on the adjustment coefficient in cointegrated systems. We study only first order vector autoregressive processes for n dimensional time series Xt, and we illustrate the theory by a two dimensional and a four dimensional model for prices of various grades of gasoline...

  19. Temporal aggregation in first order cointegrated vector autoregressive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Milhøj, Anders

    2006-01-01

    We study aggregation - or sample frequencies - of time series, e.g. aggregation from weekly to monthly or quarterly time series. Aggregation usually gives shorter time series but spurious phenomena, in e.g. daily observations, can on the other hand be avoided. An important issue is the effect of ...... of aggregation on the adjustment coefficient in cointegrated systems. We study only first order vector autoregressive processes for n dimensional time series Xt, and we illustrate the theory by a two dimensional and a four dimensional model for prices of various grades of gasoline....

  20. First Order Description of Black Holes in Moduli Space

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianopoli, Laura; Orazi, Emanuele; Trigiante, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We show that the second order field equations characterizing extremal solutions for spherically symmetric, stationary black holes are in fact implied by a system of first order equations given in terms of a prepotential W. This confirms and generalizes the results in hep-th/0702088. When the black holes are solutions of extended supergravities we are able to find an explicit expression for the prepotentials which reproduce all the attractors of the four dimensional N>2 theories. We discuss a possible extension of our considerations to the non extremal case.

  1. From differential to difference equations for first order ODEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan D.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    When constructing an algorithm for the numerical integration of a differential equation, one should first convert the known ordinary differential equation (ODE) into an ordinary difference equation. Given this difference equation, one can develop an appropriate numerical algorithm. This technical note describes the derivation of two such ordinary difference equations applicable to a first order ODE. The implicit ordinary difference equation has the same asymptotic expansion as the ODE itself, whereas the explicit ordinary difference equation has an asymptotic that is similar in structure but different in value when compared with that of the ODE.

  2. First Order Dominance Techniques and Multidimensional Poverty Indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permanyer, Iñaki; Hussain, M. Azhar

    2017-01-01

    In this empirically driven paper we compare the performance of two techniques in the literature of poverty measurement with ordinal data: multidimensional poverty indices and first order dominance techniques (FOD). Combining multiple scenario simulated data with observed data from 48 Demographic...... between those country comparisons that are sensitive to alternative specifications of basic measurement assumptions and those which are not. To the extent that the FOD approach is able to uncover the socio-economic gradient that exists between countries, it can be proposed as a viable complement...

  3. Semistability of first-order evolution variational inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Saoud

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Semistability is the property whereby the solutions of a dynamical system converge to a Lyapunov stable equilibrium point determined by the system initial conditions. We extend the theory of semistability to a class of first-order evolution variational inequalities, and study the finite-time semistability. These results are Lyapunov-based and are obtained without any assumptions of sign definiteness on the Lyapunov function. Our results are supported by some examples from unilateral mechanics and electrical circuits involving nonsmooth elements such as Coulomb's friction forces and diodes.

  4. Quasivariational Solutions for First Order Quasilinear Equations with Gradient Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, José Francisco; Santos, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    We prove the existence of solutions for a quasi-variational inequality of evolution with a first order quasilinear operator and a variable convex set which is characterized by a constraint on the absolute value of the gradient that depends on the solution itself. The only required assumption on the nonlinearity of this constraint is its continuity and positivity. The method relies on an appropriate parabolic regularization and suitable a priori estimates. We also obtain the existence of stationary solutions by studying the asymptotic behaviour in time. In the variational case, corresponding to a constraint independent of the solution, we also give uniqueness results.

  5. Electroweak penguin diagrams and two-body B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.; Hernandez, O.F.; London, D.; Rosner, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the role of electroweak penguin diagrams in B decays to two light pseudoscalar mesons. We confirm that the extraction of the weak phase α through the isospin analysis involving B→ππ decays is largely unaffected by such operators. However, the methods proposed to obtain weak and strong phases by relating B→ππ, B→πK, and B→K bar K decays through flavor SU(3) will be invalidated if eletroweak penguin diagrams are large. We show that, although the introduction of electroweak penguin contributions introduces no new amplitudes of flavor SU(3), there are a number of ways to experimentally measure the size of such effects. Finally, using SU(3) amplitude relations we present a new way of measuring the weak angle γ which holds even in the presence of electroweak penguin diagrams

  6. Gradient pre-emphasis to counteract first-order concomitant fields on asymmetric MRI gradient systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengzhen; Weavers, Paul T; Trzasko, Joshua D; Shu, Yunhong; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Frigo, Louis M; Bernstein, Matt A

    2017-06-01

    To develop a gradient pre-emphasis scheme that prospectively counteracts the effects of the first-order concomitant fields for any arbitrary gradient waveform played on asymmetric gradient systems, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach using a real-time implementation on a compact gradient system. After reviewing the first-order concomitant fields that are present on asymmetric gradients, we developed a generalized gradient pre-emphasis model assuming arbitrary gradient waveforms to counteract their effects. A numerically straightforward, easily implemented approximate solution to this pre-emphasis problem was derived that was compatible with the current hardware infrastructure of conventional MRI scanners for eddy current compensation. The proposed method was implemented on the gradient driver subsystem, and its real-time use was tested using a series of phantom and in vivo data acquired from two-dimensional Cartesian phase-difference, echo-planar imaging, and spiral acquisitions. The phantom and in vivo results demonstrated that unless accounted for, first-order concomitant fields introduce considerable phase estimation error into the measured data and result in images with spatially dependent blurring/distortion. The resulting artifacts were effectively prevented using the proposed gradient pre-emphasis. We have developed an efficient and effective gradient pre-emphasis framework to counteract the effects of first-order concomitant fields of asymmetric gradient systems. Magn Reson Med 77:2250-2262, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. A general first-order global sensitivity analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chonggang; Gertner, George Zdzislaw

    2008-01-01

    Fourier amplitude sensitivity test (FAST) is one of the most popular global sensitivity analysis techniques. The main mechanism of FAST is to assign each parameter with a characteristic frequency through a search function. Then, for a specific parameter, the variance contribution can be singled out of the model output by the characteristic frequency. Although FAST has been widely applied, there are two limitations: (1) the aliasing effect among parameters by using integer characteristic frequencies and (2) the suitability for only models with independent parameters. In this paper, we synthesize the improvement to overcome the aliasing effect limitation [Tarantola S, Gatelli D, Mara TA. Random balance designs for the estimation of first order global sensitivity indices. Reliab Eng Syst Safety 2006; 91(6):717-27] and the improvement to overcome the independence limitation [Xu C, Gertner G. Extending a global sensitivity analysis technique to models with correlated parameters. Comput Stat Data Anal 2007, accepted for publication]. In this way, FAST can be a general first-order global sensitivity analysis method for linear/nonlinear models with as many correlated/uncorrelated parameters as the user specifies. We apply the general FAST to four test cases with correlated parameters. The results show that the sensitivity indices derived by the general FAST are in good agreement with the sensitivity indices derived by the correlation ratio method, which is a non-parametric method for models with correlated parameters

  8. First-order discrete Faddeev gravity at strongly varying fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the Faddeev formulation of general relativity (GR), which can be characterized by a kind of d-dimensional tetrad (typically d = 10) and a non-Riemannian connection. This theory is invariant w.r.t. the global, but not local, rotations in the d-dimensional space. There can be configurations with a smooth or flat metric, but with the tetrad that changes abruptly at small distances, a kind of “antiferromagnetic” structure. Previously, we discussed a first-order representation for the Faddeev gravity, which uses the orthogonal connection in the d-dimensional space as an independent variable. Using the discrete form of this formulation, we considered the spectrum of (elementary) area. This spectrum turns out to be physically reasonable just on a classical background with large connection like rotations by π, that is, with such an “antiferromagnetic” structure. In the discrete first-order Faddeev gravity, we consider such a structure with periodic cells and large connection and strongly changing tetrad field inside the cell. We show that this system in the continuum limit reduces to a generalization of the Faddeev system. The action is a sum of related actions of the Faddeev type and is still reduced to the GR action.

  9. Electroweak baryogenesis and the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, P.

    1994-01-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is addressed within the context of the standard model of particle physics. Although the minimal standard model has the means of fulfilling the three Sakharov's conditions, it falls short to explaining the making of the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In particular, it is demonstrated that the phase of the CKM mixing matrix is an, insufficient source of CP violation. The shortcomings of the standard model could be bypassed by enlarging the symmetry breaking sector and adding a new source of CP violation

  10. First-order character of the displacive structural transition in BaWO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Da-Yong; Xiao Wan-Sheng; Zhou Wei; Chen Ming; Xiong Xiao-Lin; Song Mao-Shuang

    2012-01-01

    Nearly all displacive transitions have been considered to be continuous or second order, and the rigid unit mode (RUM) provides a natural candidate for the soft mode. However, in-situ X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements show clearly the first-order evidences for the scheelite-to-fergusonite displacive transition in BaWO 4 : a 1.6% volume collapse, coexistence of phases, and hysteresis on release of pressure. Such first-order signatures are found to be the same as the soft modes in BaWO 4 , which indicates the scheelite-to-fergusonite displacive phase transition hides a deeper physical mechanism. By the refinement of atomic displacement parameters, we further show that the first-order character of this phase transition stems from a coupling of large compression of soft BaO 8 polyhedrons to the small displacive distortion of rigid WO 4 tetrahedrons. Such a coupling will lead to a deeper physical insight in the phase transition of the common scheelite-structured compounds. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  11. Structural Optimization based on the Concept of First Order Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinji, Nishiwaki; Hidekazu, Nishigaki; Yasuaki, Tsurumi; Yoshio, Kojima; Noboru, Kikuchi

    2002-01-01

    Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) has been successfully utilized in mechanical industries such as the automotive industry. It is, however, difficult for most mechanical design engineers to directly use CAE due to the sophisticated nature of the operations involved. In order to mitigate this problem, a new type of CAE, First Order Analysis (FOA) has been proposed. This paper presents the outcome of research concerning the development of a structural topology optimization methodology within FOA. This optimization method is constructed based on discrete and function-oriented elements such as beam and panel elements, and sequential convex programming. In addition, examples are provided to show the utility of the methodology presented here for mechanical design engineers

  12. Basic first-order model theory in Mizar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bright Caminati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The author has submitted to Mizar Mathematical Library a series of five articles introducing a framework for the formalization of classical first-order model theory.In them, Goedel's completeness and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems have also been formalized for the countable case, to offer a first application of it and to showcase its utility.This is an overview and commentary on some key aspects of this setup.It features exposition and discussion of a new encoding of basic definitions and theoretical gears needed for the task, remarks about the design strategies and approaches adopted in their implementation, and more general reflections about proof checking induced by the work done.

  13. Kinetics and thermodynamics of first-order Markov chain copolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspard, P.; Andrieux, D. [Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Code Postal 231, Campus Plaine, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-07-28

    We report a theoretical study of stochastic processes modeling the growth of first-order Markov copolymers, as well as the reversed reaction of depolymerization. These processes are ruled by kinetic equations describing both the attachment and detachment of monomers. Exact solutions are obtained for these kinetic equations in the steady regimes of multicomponent copolymerization and depolymerization. Thermodynamic equilibrium is identified as the state at which the growth velocity is vanishing on average and where detailed balance is satisfied. Away from equilibrium, the analytical expression of the thermodynamic entropy production is deduced in terms of the Shannon disorder per monomer in the copolymer sequence. The Mayo-Lewis equation is recovered in the fully irreversible growth regime. The theory also applies to Bernoullian chains in the case where the attachment and detachment rates only depend on the reacting monomer.

  14. Reversible first-order transition in Pauli percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymenko, Mykola; Moessner, Roderich; Shtengel, Kirill

    2015-06-01

    Percolation plays an important role in fields and phenomena as diverse as the study of social networks, the dynamics of epidemics, the robustness of electricity grids, conduction in disordered media, and geometric properties in statistical physics. We analyze a new percolation problem in which the first-order nature of an equilibrium percolation transition can be established analytically and verified numerically. The rules for this site percolation model are physical and very simple, requiring only the introduction of a weight W (n )=n +1 for a cluster of size n . This establishes that a discontinuous percolation transition can occur with qualitatively more local interactions than in all currently considered examples of explosive percolation; and that, unlike these, it can be reversible. This greatly extends both the applicability of such percolation models in principle and their reach in practice.

  15. REGIONAL FIRST ORDER PERIODIC AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS FOR MONTHLY FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyhun ÖZÇELİK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available First order periodic autoregressive models is of mostly used models in modeling of time dependency of hydrological flow processes. In these models, periodicity of the correlogram is preserved as well as time dependency of processes. However, the parameters of these models, namely, inter-monthly lag-1 autocorrelation coefficients may be often estimated erroneously from short samples, since they are statistics of high order moments. Therefore, to constitute a regional model may be a solution that can produce more reliable and decisive estimates, and derive models and model parameters in any required point of the basin considered. In this study, definitions of homogeneous region for lag-1 autocorrelation coefficients are made; five parametric and non parametric models are proposed to set regional models of lag-1 autocorrelation coefficients. Regional models are applied on 30 stream flow gauging stations in Seyhan and Ceyhan basins, and tested by criteria of relative absolute bias, simple and relative root of mean square errors.

  16. Testing First-Order Logic Axioms in AutoCert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki Yung; Denney, Ewen

    2009-01-01

    AutoCert [2] is a formal verification tool for machine generated code in safety critical domains, such as aerospace control code generated from MathWorks Real-Time Workshop. AutoCert uses Automated Theorem Provers (ATPs) [5] based on First-Order Logic (FOL) to formally verify safety and functional correctness properties of the code. These ATPs try to build proofs based on user provided domain-specific axioms, which can be arbitrary First-Order Formulas (FOFs). These axioms are the most crucial part of the trusted base, since proofs can be submitted to a proof checker removing the need to trust the prover and AutoCert itself plays the part of checking the code generator. However, formulating axioms correctly (i.e. precisely as the user had really intended) is non-trivial in practice. The challenge of axiomatization arise from several dimensions. First, the domain knowledge has its own complexity. AutoCert has been used to verify mathematical requirements on navigation software that carries out various geometric coordinate transformations involving matrices and quaternions. Axiomatic theories for such constructs are complex enough that mistakes are not uncommon. Second, adjusting axioms for ATPs can add even more complexity. The axioms frequently need to be modified in order to have them in a form suitable for use with ATPs. Such modifications tend to obscure the axioms further. Thirdly, speculating validity of the axioms from the output of existing ATPs is very hard since theorem provers typically do not give any examples or counterexamples.

  17. Distributions of Autocorrelated First-Order Kinetic Outcomes: Illness Severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Englehardt

    Full Text Available Many complex systems produce outcomes having recurring, power law-like distributions over wide ranges. However, the form necessarily breaks down at extremes, whereas the Weibull distribution has been demonstrated over the full observed range. Here the Weibull distribution is derived as the asymptotic distribution of generalized first-order kinetic processes, with convergence driven by autocorrelation, and entropy maximization subject to finite positive mean, of the incremental compounding rates. Process increments represent multiplicative causes. In particular, illness severities are modeled as such, occurring in proportion to products of, e.g., chronic toxicant fractions passed by organs along a pathway, or rates of interacting oncogenic mutations. The Weibull form is also argued theoretically and by simulation to be robust to the onset of saturation kinetics. The Weibull exponential parameter is shown to indicate the number and widths of the first-order compounding increments, the extent of rate autocorrelation, and the degree to which process increments are distributed exponential. In contrast with the Gaussian result in linear independent systems, the form is driven not by independence and multiplicity of process increments, but by increment autocorrelation and entropy. In some physical systems the form may be attracting, due to multiplicative evolution of outcome magnitudes towards extreme values potentially much larger and smaller than control mechanisms can contain. The Weibull distribution is demonstrated in preference to the lognormal and Pareto I for illness severities versus (a toxicokinetic models, (b biologically-based network models, (c scholastic and psychological test score data for children with prenatal mercury exposure, and (d time-to-tumor data of the ED01 study.

  18. Precision electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Eric B.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of Tevatron electroweak measurements performed by the CDF and Dφ experiments is presented. The current status and future prospects for high precision measurements of electroweak parameters and detailed studies of boson production are highlighted. (author)

  19. TRISTAN electroweak working group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, K.

    1995-01-01

    Model-independent measurements of quantities sensitive to the electroweak physics at TRISTAN energies are proposed for the processes e + e - → e + e - , μ + μ - , τ + τ - , hadrons and heavy-quark (charm- and bottom-quark) jets. Factorization of the scattering amplitudes into the part which is sensitive to short-distance electroweak physics and the rest which is sensitive to long-distance QED and QCD corrections is made, and uncertainties in the latter are studied quantitatively by using existing programs. Electroweak observables are then chosen for each processes such that the uncertainty from the long-distance physics is small and that they can be updated when we reach a better understanding of the QED and QCD corrections. The new scheme will make the data from high luminosity TRISTAN experiments useful for particle physicists of the present as well as those of the future generation. (author)

  20. Weakly Isolated horizons: first order actions and gauge symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Reyes, Juan D.; Vukašinac, Tatjana

    2017-04-01

    The notion of Isolated Horizons has played an important role in gravitational physics, being useful from the characterization of the endpoint of black hole mergers to (quantum) black hole entropy. With an eye towards a canonical formulation we consider general relativity in terms of connection and vierbein variables and their corresponding first order actions. We focus on two main issues: (i) The role of the internal gauge freedom that exists, in the consistent formulations of the action principle, and (ii) the role that a 3  +  1 canonical decomposition has in the allowed internal gauge freedom. More concretely, we clarify in detail how the requirement of having well posed variational principles compatible with general weakly isolated horizons (WIHs) as internal boundaries does lead to a partial gauge fixing in the first order descriptions used previously in the literature. We consider the standard Hilbert-Palatini action together with the Holst extension (needed for a consistent 3  +  1 decomposition), with and without boundary terms at the horizon. We show in detail that, for the complete configuration space—with no gauge fixing—, while the Palatini action is differentiable without additional surface terms at the inner WIH boundary, the more general Holst action is not. The introduction of a surface term at the horizon—that renders the action for asymptotically flat configurations differentiable—does make the Holst action differentiable, but only if one restricts the configuration space and partially reduces the internal Lorentz gauge. For the second issue at hand, we show that upon performing a 3  +  1 decomposition and imposing the time gauge, there is a further gauge reduction of the Hamiltonian theory in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables to a U(1)-gauge theory on the horizon. We also extend our analysis to the more restricted boundary conditions of (strongly) isolated horizons as inner boundary. We show that even when the

  1. Weakly Isolated horizons: first order actions and gauge symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Reyes, Juan D; Vukašinac, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    The notion of Isolated Horizons has played an important role in gravitational physics, being useful from the characterization of the endpoint of black hole mergers to (quantum) black hole entropy. With an eye towards a canonical formulation we consider general relativity in terms of connection and vierbein variables and their corresponding first order actions. We focus on two main issues: (i) The role of the internal gauge freedom that exists, in the consistent formulations of the action principle, and (ii) the role that a 3  +  1 canonical decomposition has in the allowed internal gauge freedom. More concretely, we clarify in detail how the requirement of having well posed variational principles compatible with general weakly isolated horizons (WIHs) as internal boundaries does lead to a partial gauge fixing in the first order descriptions used previously in the literature. We consider the standard Hilbert–Palatini action together with the Holst extension (needed for a consistent 3  +  1 decomposition), with and without boundary terms at the horizon. We show in detail that, for the complete configuration space—with no gauge fixing—, while the Palatini action is differentiable without additional surface terms at the inner WIH boundary, the more general Holst action is not. The introduction of a surface term at the horizon—that renders the action for asymptotically flat configurations differentiable—does make the Holst action differentiable, but only if one restricts the configuration space and partially reduces the internal Lorentz gauge. For the second issue at hand, we show that upon performing a 3  +  1 decomposition and imposing the time gauge, there is a further gauge reduction of the Hamiltonian theory in terms of Ashtekar–Barbero variables to a U (1)-gauge theory on the horizon. We also extend our analysis to the more restricted boundary conditions of (strongly) isolated horizons as inner boundary. We show that even when

  2. Gravitational waves as cosmological probes for new physics between the electroweak and the grand-unification scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Relic gravitational waves, generated by strongly first-order phase transitions in the early Universe, can serve as cosmological probes for new physics beyond the Standard Model. We investigate phase transitions at temperatures between the electroweak and the GUT scale in two extensions of the Standard Model for their possibility to provide detectable gravitational radiation. First, we study the Z 2 symmetry breaking phase transition in the Standard model extended by a real gauge singlet. The analysis yields that the gravitational wave amplitude of the first-order phase transition with a thermally induced barrier is several orders too small for being detectable. The second model we discuss is a left-right symmetric model based on the gauge group SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) B-L generating a first-order phase transition already due to the emergence of a barrier in the tree-level potential. We derive an upper bound on the peak amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum of the order h o 2 Ω GW ≅ 3 . 10 -11 . Hence, for very strong phase transitions a detection with the spaceborne interferometer LISA will be possible, whereas the sensitivity of the (cross-correlated) BBO detector will even allow to observe the gravitational wave spectrum within the whole parameter range of the model. By using the correlation between the characteristic parameters α and β of the gravitational wave spectrum, we finally compute the lower bounds on α(T * ) in dependence of the tunneling temperature T * which are necessary for a detection of the model spectrum by the specific detectors.

  3. Gravitational waves as cosmological probes for new physics between the electroweak and the grand-unification scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2013-04-15

    Relic gravitational waves, generated by strongly first-order phase transitions in the early Universe, can serve as cosmological probes for new physics beyond the Standard Model. We investigate phase transitions at temperatures between the electroweak and the GUT scale in two extensions of the Standard Model for their possibility to provide detectable gravitational radiation. First, we study the Z{sub 2} symmetry breaking phase transition in the Standard model extended by a real gauge singlet. The analysis yields that the gravitational wave amplitude of the first-order phase transition with a thermally induced barrier is several orders too small for being detectable. The second model we discuss is a left-right symmetric model based on the gauge group SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x U(1){sub B-L} generating a first-order phase transition already due to the emergence of a barrier in the tree-level potential. We derive an upper bound on the peak amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum of the order h{sub o}{sup 2}{Omega}{sub GW} {approx_equal} 3 . 10{sup -11}. Hence, for very strong phase transitions a detection with the spaceborne interferometer LISA will be possible, whereas the sensitivity of the (cross-correlated) BBO detector will even allow to observe the gravitational wave spectrum within the whole parameter range of the model. By using the correlation between the characteristic parameters {alpha} and {beta} of the gravitational wave spectrum, we finally compute the lower bounds on {alpha}(T{sub *}) in dependence of the tunneling temperature T{sub *} which are necessary for a detection of the model spectrum by the specific detectors.

  4. Electroweak Baryogenesis in R-symmetric Supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate that electroweak baryogenesis can occur in a supersymmetric model with an exact R-symmetry. The minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric model contains chiral superfields in the adjoint representation, giving Dirac gaugino masses, and an additional set of "R-partner" Higgs superfields, giving R-symmetric \\mu-terms. New superpotential couplings between the adjoints and the Higgs fields can simultaneously increase the strength of the electroweak phase transition and provide additional tree-level contributions to the lightest Higgs mass. Notably, no light stop is present in this framework, and in fact, we require both stops to be above a few TeV to provide sufficient radiative corrections to the lightest Higgs mass to bring it up to 125 GeV. Large CP-violating phases in the gaugino/higgsino sector allow us to match the baryon asymmetry of the Universe with no constraints from electric dipole moments due to R-symmetry. We briefly discuss some of the more interesting phenomenology, particularly of the of the lightest CP-odd scalar.

  5. Probabilistic peak detection for first-order chromatographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatka, M; Vivó-Truyols, G; Sjerps, M J

    2014-03-19

    We present a novel algorithm for probabilistic peak detection in first-order chromatographic data. Unlike conventional methods that deliver a binary answer pertaining to the expected presence or absence of a chromatographic peak, our method calculates the probability of a point being affected by such a peak. The algorithm makes use of chromatographic information (i.e. the expected width of a single peak and the standard deviation of baseline noise). As prior information of the existence of a peak in a chromatographic run, we make use of the statistical overlap theory. We formulate an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive hypotheses concerning presence or absence of different peak configurations. These models are evaluated by fitting a segment of chromatographic data by least-squares. The evaluation of these competing hypotheses can be performed as a Bayesian inferential task. We outline the potential advantages of adopting this approach for peak detection and provide several examples of both improved performance and increased flexibility afforded by our approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models

  7. STANFORD (SLAC): Precision electroweak result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Precision testing of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model has intensified with the recent publication* of results from the SLD collaboration's 1993 run on the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC. Using a highly polarized electron beam colliding with an unpolarized positron beam, SLD physicists measured the left-right asymmetry at the Z boson resonance with dramatically improved accuracy over 1992

  8. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for {open_quotes}new physics{close_quotes} is described.

  9. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burdman, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Chivukula, R.S. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  10. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for ''new physics'' is described

  11. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. Properties of the W ± and Z 0 gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. The emphasis is placed on the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings

  12. Electroweak physics from D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, N.A.

    1993-05-01

    The D0 detector was recently commissioned at the Tevatron p bar p collider and is presently taking data. Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W and Z electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons

  13. First-Order Interfacial Transformations with a Critical Point: Breaking the Symmetry at a Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengfeng; Zhou, Naixie; Zheng, Hui; Ong, Shyue Ping; Luo, Jian

    2018-02-01

    First-order interfacial phaselike transformations that break the mirror symmetry of the symmetric ∑5 (210 ) tilt grain boundary (GB) are discovered by combining a modified genetic algorithm with hybrid Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. Density functional theory calculations confirm this prediction. This first-order coupled structural and adsorption transformation, which produces two variants of asymmetric bilayers, vanishes at an interfacial critical point. A GB complexion (phase) diagram is constructed via semigrand canonical ensemble atomistic simulations for the first time.

  14. A Polarimetric First-Order Model of Soil Moisture Effects on the DInSAR Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zwieback

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil moisture between two radar acquisitions can impact the observed coherence in differential interferometry: both coherence magnitude |Υ| and phase Φ are affected. The influence on the latter potentially biases the estimation of deformations. These effects have been found to be variable in magnitude and sign, as well as dependent on polarization, as opposed to predictions by existing models. Such diversity can be explained when the soil is modelled as a half-space with spatially varying dielectric properties and a rough interface. The first-order perturbative solution achieves–upon calibration with airborne L band data–median correlations ρ at HH polarization of 0.77 for the phase Φ, of 0.50 for |Υ|, and for the phase triplets ≡ of 0.56. The predictions are sensitive to the choice of dielectric mixing model, in particular the absorptive properties; the differences between the mixing models are found to be partially compensatable by varying the relative importance of surface and volume scattering. However, for half of the agricultural fields the Hallikainen mixing model cannot reproduce the observed sensitivities of the phase to soil moisture. In addition, the first-order expansion does not predict any impact on the HV coherence, which is however empirically found to display similar sensitivities to soil moisture as the co-pol channels HH and VV. These results indicate that the first-order solution, while not able to reproduce all observed phenomena, can capture some of the more salient patterns of the effect of soil moisture changes on the HH and VV DInSAR signals. Hence it may prove useful in separating the deformations from the moisture signals, thus yielding improved displacement estimates or new ways for inferring soil moisture.

  15. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-11-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  16. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  17. Electroweak interactions on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu, T.D.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that the lattice fermion doubling phenomenon is connected to the chiral anomaly which is unique to the electroweak interactions. The chiral anomaly is the breaking of chiral gauge symmetry at the quantum level due to the quantum fluctuations. Such breaking, however, is undesirable and to be avoided. The preservation of gauge symmetry imposes stringent constraints on acceptable chiral gauge theory. It is argued that the constraints are unnecessary because the conventional quantization of chiral gauge theory has missed out some crucial contributions of the chiral interactions. The corrected quantization yields consistent theory in which there is no gauge anomaly and in which various mass terms can be introduced with neither the loss of gauge invariance nor the need for the Higgs mechanism. The new quantization also provide a solution to the difficulty of how to model the electroweak interactions on the lattice. 9 refs. 1 fig

  18. Precision electroweak physics at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannelli, M.

    1994-12-01

    Copious event statistics, a precise understanding of the LEP energy scale, and a favorable experimental situation at the Z{sup 0} resonance have allowed the LEP experiments to provide both dramatic confirmation of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions and to place substantially improved constraints on the parameters of the model. The author concentrates on those measurements relevant to the electroweak sector. It will be seen that the precision of these measurements probes sensitively the structure of the Standard Model at the one-loop level, where the calculation of the observables measured at LEP is affected by the value chosen for the top quark mass. One finds that the LEP measurements are consistent with the Standard Model, but only if the mass of the top quark is measured to be within a restricted range of about 20 GeV.

  19. New Gain Controllable Resistor-less Current-mode First Order Allpass Filter and its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaikla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available New first order allpass filter (APF in current mode, constructed from 2 CCCCTAs and grounded capacitor, is presented. The current gain and phase shift can be electronically /orthogonally controlled. Low input and high output impedances are achieved which make the circuit to be easily cascaded to the current-mode circuit without additional current buffers. The operation of the proposed filter has been verified through simulation results which confirm the theoretical analysis. The application example as current-mode quadrature oscillator with non-interactive current control for both of oscillation condition and oscillation frequency is included to show the usability of the proposed filter.

  20. Fit to Electroweak Precision Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, Jens

    2006-01-01

    A brief review of electroweak precision data from LEP, SLC, the Tevatron, and low energies is presented. The global fit to all data including the most recent results on the masses of the top quark and the W boson reinforces the preference for a relatively light Higgs boson. I will also give an outlook on future developments at the Tevatron Run II, CEBAF, the LHC, and the ILC

  1. Precision measurements of electroweak parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Savin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A set of selected precise measurements of the SM parameters from the LHC experiments is discussed. Results on W-mass measurement and forward-backward asymmetry in production of the Drell--Yan events in both dielectron and dimuon decay channels are presented together with results on the effective mixing angle measurements. Electroweak production of the vector bosons in association with two jets is discussed.

  2. Models of electroweak symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Pomarol, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This chapter present models of electroweak symmetry breaking arising from strongly interacting sectors, including both Higgsless models and mechanisms involving a composite Higgs. These scenarios have also been investigated in the framework of five-dimensional warped models that, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, have a four-dimensional holographic interpretation in terms of strongly coupled field theories. We explore the implications of these models at the LHC.

  3. LHCb: Electroweak studies at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salustino Guimaraes, V

    2012-01-01

    Results on the measurement of the $W^{\\pm}$ and $Z^{0}$ cross-sections are presented using final state leptons with pseudorapidities between 2 and 4.5. Due to its acceptance, LHCb can probe a regime of low low-x electroweak boson production, where parton distribution functions are not well constrained. We summarize the $W^{\\pm}$ measurements performed in the decay $\\mu^{\\pm}\

  4. The hierarchy problem of the electroweak standard model revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred

    2013-05-01

    A careful renormalization group analysis of the electroweak Standard Model reveals that there is no hierarchy problem in the SM. In the broken phase a light Higgs turns out to be natural as it is self-protected and self-tuned by the Higgs mechanism. It means that the scalar Higgs needs not be protected by any extra symmetry, specifically super symmetry, in order not to be much heavier than the other SM particles which are protected by gauge- or chiral-symmetry. Thus the existence of quadratic cutoff effects in the SM cannot motivate the need for a super symmetric extensions of the SM, but in contrast plays an important role in triggering the electroweak phase transition and in shaping the Higgs potential in the early universe to drive inflation as supported by observation.

  5. Supersymmetric electroweak baryogenesis, nonequilibrium field theory and quantum Boltzmann equations

    CERN Document Server

    Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    The closed time-path (CPT) formalism is a powerful Green's function formulation to describe nonequilibrium phenomena in field theory and it leads to a complete nonequilibrium quantum kinetic theory. In this paper we make use of the CPT formalism to write down a set of quantum Boltzmann equations describing the local number density asymmetries of the particles involved in supersymmetric electroweak baryogenesis. These diffusion equations automatically and self-consistently incorporate the CP-violating sources which fuel baryogenesis when transport properties allow the CP-violating charges to diffuse in front of the bubble wall separating the broken from the unbroken phase at the electroweak phase transition. This is a significant improvement with respect to recent approaches where the CP-violating sources are inserted by hand into the diffusion equations. Furthermore, the CP-violating sources and the particle number changing interactions manifest ``memory'' effects which are typical of the quantum transp ort t...

  6. The hierarchy problem of the electroweak standard model revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    A careful renormalization group analysis of the electroweak Standard Model reveals that there is no hierarchy problem in the SM. In the broken phase a light Higgs turns out to be natural as it is self-protected and self-tuned by the Higgs mechanism. It means that the scalar Higgs needs not be protected by any extra symmetry, specifically super symmetry, in order not to be much heavier than the other SM particles which are protected by gauge- or chiral-symmetry. Thus the existence of quadratic cutoff effects in the SM cannot motivate the need for a super symmetric extensions of the SM, but in contrast plays an important role in triggering the electroweak phase transition and in shaping the Higgs potential in the early universe to drive inflation as supported by observation.

  7. Transient Angle Stability Analysis of Grid-Connected Converters with the First-order Active Power Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Heng; Wang, Xiongfei

    2018-01-01

    . To tackle this challenge, this paper employs the phase portrait to analyze the transient stability of power converters, and it is found that the better transient stability performance can be achieved if the grid-connected converters are controlled as the first-order nonlinear system. Simulations...

  8. ELECTROWEAK PHYSICS AND PRECISION STUDIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARCIANO, W.

    2005-01-01

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current values of m W , sin 2 θ W (m Z ) # ovr MS# and m t imply a relatively light Higgs which is below the direct experimental bound but possibly consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a 2σ discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described

  9. Electroweak processes at Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Spalla, Margherita; Sestini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the studies of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at LHC after the first year of data taking of Run2, focusing on possible results to be achieved with the analysis of full 2015 and 2016 data. We discuss the measurements of W and Z boson production, with particular attention to the precision determination of basic Standard Model parameters, and the study of multi-boson interactions through the analysis of boson-boson final states. This work is the result of the collaboration between scientists from the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments.

  10. Superconductivity in dense electroweak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, E.J.; De La Incera, V.; Shabad, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The spectrum of fermions in the presence of the W-boson-condensed electro-weak liquid is obtained and nonvanishing spatial component of the fermionic polarization operator is calculated for zero 4-momentum. The manifestation of the Meissner effect is studied. The London penetration depthλ/sub L/ is calculated in the limit of small W-condensate amplitude. The possibility of a special phenomenon of partial magnetic screening due to the mixing angle dependence on the leptonic density is discussed in connection with the magnetic mass problem

  11. Electroweak precision measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    An overview of recent results on electroweak precision measurements from the CMS Collaboration is presented. Studies of the weak boson differential transverse momentum spectra, Z boson angular coefficients, forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan lepton pairs and charge asymmetry of W boson production are made in comparison to the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo generators and theoretical predictions. The results show a good agreement with the Standard Model. As a proof of principle for future W mass measurements, a W-like analysis of the Z boson mass is performed.

  12. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibble, T W B

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. (paper)

  13. Electroweak breaking in supersymmetric models

    CERN Document Server

    Ibáñez, L E

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking in supersymmetric versions of the standard model. After briefly reviewing the possible sources of supersymmetry breaking, we show how the required pattern of symmetry breaking can automatically result from the structure of quantum corrections in the theory. We demonstrate that this radiative breaking mechanism works well for a heavy top quark and can be combined in unified versions of the theory with excellent predictions for the running couplings of the model. (To be published in ``Perspectives in Higgs Physics'', G. Kane editor.)

  14. First order and second order fermi acceleration of energetic charged particles by shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Steady state solutions of the cosmic ray transport equation describing first order Fermi acceleration of energetic charged particles at a plane shock (without losses) and second order Fermi acceleration in the downstream region of the shock are derived. The solutions for the isotropic part of the phase space distribution function are expressible as eigenfunction expansions, being superpositions of series of power law momentum spectra, with the power law indices being the roots of an eigenvalue equation. The above exact analytic solutions are for the case where the spatial diffusion coefficient kappa is independent of momentum. The solutions in general depend on the shock compression ratio, the modulation parameters V 1 L/kappa 1 , V 2 L/kappa 2 (V is the plasma velocity, kappa is the energetic particle diffusion coefficient, and L a characteristic length over which second order Fermi acceleration is effective) in the upstream and downstream regions of the shock, respectively, and also on a further dimensionless parameter, zeta, characterizing second order Fermi acceleration. In the limit as zeta→0 (no second order Fermi acceleration) the power law momentum spectrum characteristic of first order Fermi acceleration (depending only on the shock compression ratio) obtained previously is recovered. Perturbation solutions for the case where second order Fermi effects are small, and for realistic diffusion coefficients (kappainfinityp/sup a/, a>0, p = particle momentum), applicable at high momenta, are also obtained

  15. Superconductivity and magnetic fluctuations developing in the vicinity of strong first-order magnetic transition in CrAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotegawa, H; Matsushima, K; Nakahara, S; Tou, H; Kaneyoshi, J; Nishiwaki, T; Matsuoka, E; Sugawara, H; Harima, H

    2017-01-01

    We report single crystal preparation, resistivity, and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements for new pressure-induced superconductor CrAs. In the first part, we present the difference between crystals made by different thermal sequences and methods, and show the sample dependence of superconductivity in CrAs. In the latter part, we show NQR data focusing the microscopic electronic state at the phase boundary between the helimagnetic and the paramagnetic phases. They suggest strongly that a quantum critical point is absent on the pressure-temperature phase diagram of CrAs, because of the strong first-order character of the magnetic transition; however, the spin fluctuations are observed in the paramagnetic phase. The close relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen even in the vicinity of the first-order magnetic transition in CrAs. (paper)

  16. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p bar p) and electron-positron (e + e - ) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W ± and Z 0 . We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments

  17. Electroweak unification and tree unitarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horejsi, J.

    1993-01-01

    The monograph is an unconventional introduction into the theory of unification of weak and electromagnetic interactions, which is conceptually different from the exposition presented in standard textbooks. A detailed explanation is given of the way to the standard model of electroweak interactions which is based on a straightforward application of the requirement of renormalizability of the perturbation series expansion. The procedure to derive the model is interesting as it demonstrates the necessity of introducing vector bosons and Yang-Mills type interactions and at least one elementary scalar boson to obtain a renormalizable theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions. The book is divided into 5 chapters: introduction, problems encountered in a Fermi type theory, the intermediate vector boson, electrodynamics of vector bosons, tree unitarity, and electroweak interactions. Each chapter is completed with exercise problems to be solved by the reader. The text is supplemented with a number of appendices. The monograph is aimed at undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as at physicists interested in the theory of elementary particles. (Z.J.)

  18. CMS results in Electroweak Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of electroweak studies performed using data collected in 2010 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Besides their intrinsic interest as unique samples to calibrate and understand the CMS detector response to leptons, jets and missing energy, events containing W and Z bosons appear as dominant components in many Higgs seaches and in most of the searches beyond the Standard Model, either as signal or as background. In addition, the excellent level of theoretical and experimental understanding of these processes allows electroweak tests at the LHC at an unprecendented level of precision. CMS uses a wide range of final states to measure cross sections, asymmetries, polarizations and differential distributions in general. The current integrated luminosity is already sufficient to perform not just inclusive measurements using W and Z decays into muons and electrons, but also precise studies of associated jet production and final states containing taus, as well...

  19. Thermodynamics of rotating black branes in gravity with first order string corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, the rotating black brane solutions with zero curvature horizon of classical gravity with first order string corrections are introduced. Although these solutions are not asymptotically anti de Sitter, one can use the counterterm method in order to compute the conserved quantities of these solutions. Here, by reviewing the counterterm method for asymptotically anti de Sitter spacetimes, the conserved quantities of these rotating solutions are computed. Also a Smarr-type formula for the mass as a function of the entropy and the angular momenta is obtained, and it is shown that the conserved and thermodynamic quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, a stability analysis in the canonical ensemble is performed, and it is shown that the system is thermally stable. This is in commensurable with the fact that there is no Hawking-Page phase transition for black object with zero curvature horizon.

  20. Phase transition and gravitational wave phenomenology of scalar conformal extensions of the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzola, Luca; Racioppi, Antonio; Vaskonen, Ville [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-07-15

    Thermal corrections in classically conformal models typically induce a strong first-order electroweak phase transition, thereby resulting in a stochastic gravitational background that could be detectable at gravitational wave observatories. After reviewing the basics of classically conformal scenarios, in this paper we investigate the phase transition dynamics in a thermal environment and the related gravitational wave phenomenology within the framework of scalar conformal extensions of the Standard Model. We find that minimal extensions involving only one additional scalar field struggle to reproduce the correct phase transition dynamics once thermal corrections are accounted for. Next-to-minimal models, instead, yield the desired electroweak symmetry breaking and typically result in a very strong gravitational wave signal. (orig.)

  1. Top down electroweak dipole operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuto, Kaori; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2018-06-01

    We derive present constraints on, and prospective sensitivity to, the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the top quark (dt) implied by searches for the EDMs of the electron and nucleons. Above the electroweak scale v, the dt arises from two gauge invariant operators generated at a scale Λ ≫ v that also mix with the light fermion EDMs under renormalization group evolution at two-loop order. Bounds on the EDMs of first generation fermion systems thus imply bounds on |dt |. Working in the leading log-squared approximation, we find that the present upper bound on |dt | is 10-19 e cm for Λ = 1 TeV, except in regions of finely tuned cancellations that allow for |dt | to be up to fifty times larger. Future de and dn probes may yield an order of magnitude increase in dt sensitivity, while inclusion of a prospective proton EDM search may lead to an additional increase in reach.

  2. Vacuum structure of the electroweak theory in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olesen, P.

    1991-05-01

    In the electroweak theory one can reach the unbroken phase SU(2) x U y (1) by pumping enough magnetic energy into the system. The whole energy is then carried by the fields associated with U y (1), whereas the fields corresponding to SU(2) are in a vacuum state. We show that the vacuum is non-trivial in the sense that it consists of a condensate of zero-field twists which arise in a smooth way from a condensate of vortex lines existing in the broken phase. An explicit vacuum solution is constructed in terms of Weierstrass' elliptic function. (orig.)

  3. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W's and Z's, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed

  4. Introduction to gauge theories of electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The author presents an introduction to electroweak gauge theories. Emphasis is placed on the properties of a general gauge theory. The standard model is discussed as the simplest example to illustrate these properties. (G.T.H.)

  5. Towards the Implementation of First-Order Temporal Resolution:the Expanding Domain Case

    OpenAIRE

    Konev, B; Dixon, C; Degtyarev, A; Fisher, M; Hustadt, U

    2003-01-01

    First-order temporal logic is a concise and powerful notation, with many potential applications in both Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. While the full logic is highly complex, recent work on monodic first-order temporal logics has identified important enumerable and even decidable fragments. In this paper, we develop a clausal resolution method for the monodic fragment of first-order temporal logic over expanding domains. We first define a normal form for monodic formulae and th...

  6. Generalized frameworks for first-order evolution inclusions based on Yosida approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram U. Verma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available First, general frameworks for the first-order evolution inclusions are developed based on the A-maximal relaxed monotonicity, and then using the Yosida approximation the solvability of a general class of first-order nonlinear evolution inclusions is investigated. The role the A-maximal relaxed monotonicity is significant in the sense that it not only empowers the first-order nonlinear evolution inclusions but also generalizes the existing Yosida approximations and its characterizations in the current literature.

  7. Breaking of electroweak symmetry: origin and effects; Brisure de symetrie electrobaible: origine et consequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaunay, C

    2008-10-15

    The Higgs boson appears as the corner stone of high energy physics, it might be the cause of the excess of matter that led to the formation of the structures of the universe and it seems that it drives the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. Moreover, when the stability at low energies of the Higgs boson is assured by an extra space dimension, it appears that this extra dimension can explain most issues in the flavor physics that are not understood by the standard model. The first chapter presents the main tools of effective field theories, the role of experimental data in the construction of theories valid beyond the standard model is discussed. The second chapter focuses on the electroweak baryogenesis that allows the testing of new physics via the electroweak phase transition. We detail the calculation of a Higgs potential at finite temperature. We follow the dynamics of the phase transition including nucleation an supercooling. Finally we investigate the prospects of gravity wave detection to see the effects of a strong electroweak phase transition. The 2 last chapters are dedicated to the physics of extra-dimension. The properties of the dynamics of scalar, vector fields with a 1/2 spin plunged in a 5 d. Anti de Sitter geometry are reviewed. We present a model of lepton masses and mixings based on the A{sub 4} non-Abelian discrete symmetry. It is shown that this model does not contradict the tests of electroweak precision. (A.C.)

  8. In situ and laboratory determined first-order degradation rate constants of specific organic compounds in an aerobic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.H.; Bjerg, P.L.; Nielsen, P.

    1996-01-01

    In situ microcosms (ISM) and laboratory batch microcosms (LBM) were used for determination of the first-order degradation rate constants of benzene, toluene, o-xylene, nitrobenzene, naphthalene, biphenyl, o- and p-dichlorobenzene, 1,1,1 -trichloroethane, tetrachlorometane, trichloroethene......, tetrachloroethene, phenol, o-cresol, 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol, 4,6-o-dichlorocresol, and o- and p-nitrophenol in an aerobic aquifer, All aromatic hydrocarbons were degraded in ISM and LBM experiments. The phenolic hydrocarbons were ail degraded in ISM experiments, but some failed to degrade in LBM experiments....... Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons were degraded neither in ISM nor LBM experiments. Degradation rate constants were determined by a model accounting for kinetic sorption (bicontinuum model), lag phases, and first-order degradation. With a few exceptions, lag phases were less than 2 weeks in both ISM and LBM...

  9. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A., (spokesperson); /St. Petersburg, INP; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; /St. Petersburg, INP; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; /Iowa U.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  10. Non-negligible electroweak penguin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Libo; Li Xingyi

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the leading logarithmic low energy effective Hamiltonian and the Bauer-Stech-Wirbe (BSW) model, the authors calculate the electroweak penguin effects in the two-body hadronic pure penguin processes of B-meson. In the case of B→PP and PV decay, the authors find that the processes involving external penguin diagrams receive large contribution from electroweak penguin effects which can even play dominant role

  11. Electroweak boson production with jets at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hortiangtham, Apichart

    2017-01-01

    The production of electroweak bosons (W, Z or gamma) in association with jets is a stringent test of perturbative QCD and is a background process in searches for new physics. Total and differential cross-section measurements of electroweak bosons produced in association with jets (and heavy flavour quarks) in proton-proton collisions are presented. The data have been recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and are compared to the predictions of event generators and theoretical calculations.

  12. Algebra of strong and electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.S.

    2004-01-01

    The algebraic approach to describing the electroweak and strong interactions is considered within the frames of the binary geometrophysics, based on the principles of the Fokker-Feynman direct interparticle interaction theories of the Kaluza-Klein multidimensional geometrical models and the physical structures theory. It is shown that in this approach the electroweak and strong elementary particles interaction through the intermediate vector bosons, are characterized by the subtypes of the algebraic classification of the complex 3 x 3-matrices [ru

  13. A practical introduction to electroweak radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.

    1991-05-01

    This is a brief introduction into electroweak radiative corrections within the Standard Model, with the emphasis on performing actual calculations. To this end, a complete set of expressions is given that allows the computation of the ρ parameter, the W mass, and Z→fanti f decays for massless fermions, where the anti Manti S scheme has been used. I conclude with an assessment of what we have learned so far from electroweak precision experiments, and a brief outlook. (orig.)

  14. Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector -First Run 2 measurements of electroweak processes -Run 1 measurements of SM parameters, i.e. W mass and weak mixing angle -Recent Run 1 measurements of di- and multi-boson production cross-sections as well as vector boson fusion and scattering processes at 8 TeV -Recent Run 1 measurements of exclusive di-lepton and WW production

  15. Generalized ensemble method applied to study systems with strong first order transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małolepsza, E.; Kim, J.; Keyes, T.

    2015-09-01

    At strong first-order phase transitions, the entropy versus energy or, at constant pressure, enthalpy, exhibits convex behavior, and the statistical temperature curve correspondingly exhibits an S-loop or back-bending. In the canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles, with temperature as the control variable, the probability density functions become bimodal with peaks localized outside of the S-loop region. Inside, states are unstable, and as a result simulation of equilibrium phase coexistence becomes impossible. To overcome this problem, a method was proposed by Kim, Keyes and Straub [1], where optimally designed generalized ensemble sampling was combined with replica exchange, and denoted generalized replica exchange method (gREM). This new technique uses parametrized effective sampling weights that lead to a unimodal energy distribution, transforming unstable states into stable ones. In the present study, the gREM, originally developed as a Monte Carlo algorithm, was implemented to work with molecular dynamics in an isobaric ensemble and coded into LAMMPS, a highly optimized open source molecular simulation package. The method is illustrated in a study of the very strong solid/liquid transition in water.

  16. An assessment of first-order stochastic dispersion theories in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, David A.

    1997-12-01

    Random realizations of three-dimensional exponentially correlated hydraulic conductivity fields are used in a finite-difference numerical flow model to calculate the mean and covariance of the corresponding Lagrangian-velocity fields. The dispersivity of the porous medium is then determined from the Lagrangian-velocity statistics using the Taylor definition. This estimation procedure is exact, except for numerical errors, and the results are used to assess the accuracy of various first-order dispersion theories in both isotropic and anisotropic porous media. The results show that the Dagan theory is by far the most robust in both isotropic and anisotropic media, producing accurate values of the principal dispersivity components for σy as high as 1.0, In the case of anisotropic media where the flow is at an angle to the principal axis of hydraulic conductivity, it is shown that the dispersivity tensor is rotated away from the flow direction in the non-Fickian phase, but eventually coincides with the flow direction in the Fickian phase.

  17. Spatially resolved modelling of inhomogeneous materials with a first order magnetic phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian; Smith, Anders

    2017-01-01

    of regions each having a uniform and defined through a Voronoi-map. We show that demagnetising effects, caused by a finite sample size, and spatial variation in can account for the previously experimentally observed 'virgin' effects in the adiabatic temperature change and isothermal entropy change...

  18. First-order dominance: stronger characterization and a bivariate checking algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Range, Troels Martin; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2018-01-01

    How to determine whether one distribution first-order dominates another is a fundamental problem that has many applications in economics, finance, probability theory, and statistics. Nevertheless, little is known about how to efficiently check first-order dominance for finite multivariate distrib...

  19. The serendipity of electroweak baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe remains unexplained in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The origin of the flavour structure is another major puzzle of the theory. In this article, we report on recent work attempting to link the two themes through the appealing framework of electroweak (EW) baryogenesis. We show that Yukawa couplings of SM fermions can be the source of CP violation for EW baryogenesis if they vary at the same time as the Higgs is acquiring its vacuum expectation value, offering new avenues for EW baryogenesis. The advantage of this approach is that it circumvents the usual severe bounds from electric dipole moments. These ideas apply if the mechanism explaining the flavour structure of the SM is connected to EW symmetry breaking, as motivated for instance in Randall-Sundrum or Composite Higgs models. We compute the resulting baryon asymmetry for different configurations of the Yukawa coupling variation across the bubble wall and show that it can naturally be of the right order. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Higgs cosmology'.

  20. BREM5 electroweak Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, D.C. II.

    1987-01-01

    This is an update on the progress of the BREMMUS Monte Carlo simulator, particularly in its current incarnation, BREM5. The present report is intended only as a follow-up to the Mark II/Granlibakken proceedings, and those proceedings should be consulted for a complete description of the capabilities and goals of the BREMMUS program. The new BREM5 program improves on the previous version of BREMMUS, BREM2, in a number of important ways. In BREM2, the internal loop (oblique) corrections were not treated in consistent fashion, a deficiency that led to renormalization scheme-dependence; i.e., physical results, such as cross sections, were dependent on the method used to eliminate infinities from the theory. Of course, this problem cannot be tolerated in a Monte Carlo designed for experimental use. BREM5 incorporates a new way of treating the oblique corrections, as explained in the Granlibakken proceedings, that guarantees renormalization scheme-independence and dramatically simplifies the organization and calculation of radiative corrections. This technique is to be presented in full detail in a forthcoming paper. BREM5 is, at this point, the only Monte Carlo to contain the entire set of one-loop corrections to electroweak four-fermion processes and renormalization scheme-independence. 3 figures

  1. Fermions on the electroweak string

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, J M; Quirós, Mariano; Moreno, J M; Oaknin, D H; Quiros, M

    1995-01-01

    We construct a simple class of exact solutions of the electroweak theory including the naked Z--string and fermion fields. It consists in the Z--string configuration (\\phi,Z_\\theta), the {\\it time} and z components of the neutral gauge bosons (Z_{0,3},A_{0,3}) and a fermion condensate (lepton or quark) zero mode. The Z--string is not altered (no feed back from the rest of fields on the Z--string) while fermion condensates are zero modes of the Dirac equation in the presence of the Z--string background (no feed back from the {\\it time} and z components of the neutral gauge bosons on the fermion fields). For the case of the n--vortex Z--string the number of zero modes found for charged leptons and quarks is (according to previous results by Jackiw and Rossi) equal to |n|, while for (massless) neutrinos is |n|-1. The presence of fermion fields in its core make the obtained configuration a superconducting string, but their presence (as well as that of Z_{0,3},A_{0,3}) does not enhance the stability of the Z--stri...

  2. The serendipity of electroweak baryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine

    2018-03-06

    The origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe remains unexplained in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The origin of the flavour structure is another major puzzle of the theory. In this article, we report on recent work attempting to link the two themes through the appealing framework of electroweak (EW) baryogenesis. We show that Yukawa couplings of SM fermions can be the source of CP violation for EW baryogenesis if they vary at the same time as the Higgs is acquiring its vacuum expectation value, offering new avenues for EW baryogenesis. The advantage of this approach is that it circumvents the usual severe bounds from electric dipole moments. These ideas apply if the mechanism explaining the flavour structure of the SM is connected to EW symmetry breaking, as motivated for instance in Randall-Sundrum or Composite Higgs models. We compute the resulting baryon asymmetry for different configurations of the Yukawa coupling variation across the bubble wall and show that it can naturally be of the right order.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs cosmology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  3. Probing the A1 to L10 transformation in FeCuPt using the first order reversal curve method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin A. Gilbert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The A1-L10 phase transformation has been investigated in (001 FeCuPt thin films prepared by atomic-scale multilayer sputtering and rapid thermal annealing (RTA. Traditional x-ray diffraction is not always applicable in generating a true order parameter, due to non-ideal crystallinity of the A1 phase. Using the first-order reversal curve (FORC method, the A1 and L10 phases are deconvoluted into two distinct features in the FORC distribution, whose relative intensities change with the RTA temperature. The L10 ordering takes place via a nucleation-and-growth mode. A magnetization-based phase fraction is extracted, providing a quantitative measure of the L10 phase homogeneity.

  4. Conformal dynamics for electroweak symmetry breaking, from LHC to cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Full text. I will first introduce dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking and then present how to resolve some of the long-standing problems using (near) conformal dynamics. In order to construct sensible extension of DEWSB I will then review the state-of-the-art of the phase diagram of gauge theories of fundamental interactions as function of the number of colors, flavors and matter representation. Finally I will introduce recent models known as minimal walking models and show how they lead to natural candidates of dark matter. (author)

  5. Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice electroweak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselov, A.I.; Zubkov, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate numerically lattice Weinberg-Salam model without fermions for realistic values of the fine structure constant and the Weinberg angle. We also analyze the data of the previous numerical investigations of lattice Electroweak theory. We have found that moving along the line of constant physics when the lattice spacing a is decreased, one should leave the physical Higgs phase of the theory at a certain value of a. Our estimate of the minimal value of the lattice spacing is a c = [430 ± 40 GeV] -1 .

  6. Searches for Electroweak Signatures of Supersymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Khoo, Teng Jian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Searches for strongly-produced superparticles at the Large Hadron Collider have excluded gluinos and squarks of all generations up to the TeV scale. While limited by statistics, electroweak signatures remain less thoroughly explored, and in particular the Higgsino sector has proven challenging. Conventional searches for leptons associated with missing transverse momentum do not fully cover the phase space, requiring new approaches to extend experimental sensitivity. Dedicated reconstruction techniques address the challenge posed by mass-degenerate spectra. By looking beyond the assumption of leptonic signatures, searches for gauge-mediated supersymmetry have broken new ground.

  7. First-order Convex Optimization Methods for Signal and Image Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the use of first-order convex optimization methods applied to problems in signal and image processing. First we make a general introduction to convex optimization, first-order methods and their iteration complexity. Then we look at different techniques, which can...... be used with first-order methods such as smoothing, Lagrange multipliers and proximal gradient methods. We continue by presenting different applications of convex optimization and notable convex formulations with an emphasis on inverse problems and sparse signal processing. We also describe the multiple...

  8. First-order dissolution rate law and the role of surface layers in glass performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambow, B.; Müller, R.

    2001-09-01

    The first-order dissolution rate law is used for nuclear waste glass performance predictions since 1984. A first discussion of the role of saturation effects was initiated at the MRS conference that year. In paper (1) it was stated that "For glass dissolution A* (the reaction affinity) cannot become zero since saturation only involves the reacting surface while soluble elements still might be extracted from the glass" [B. Grambow, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 15]. Saturation of silica at the surface and condensation of surface silanol groups was considered as being responsible for the slow down of reaction rates by as much as a factor of 1000. Precipitation of Si containing secondary phases such as quartz was invoked as a mechanism for keeping final dissolution affinities higher than zero. Another (2) paper [A.B. Barkatt, P.B. Macedo, B.C. Gibson, C.J. Montrose, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 3] stated that "… under repository conditions the extent of glass dissolution will be moderate due to saturation with respect to certain major elements (in particular, Si, Al and Ca). Consequently, the concentration levels of the more soluble glass constituents in the aqueous medium are expected to fall appreciable below their solubility limit." The formation of dense surface layers was considered responsible for explaining the saturation effect. The mathematical model assumed stop of reaction in closed systems, once solubility limits were achieved. For more than 15 years the question of the correctness of one or the other concept has seldom been posed and has not yet been resolved. The need of repository performance assessment for validated rate laws demands a solution, particularly since the consequences of the two concepts and research requirements for the long-term glass behavior are quite different. In concept (1) the stability of the `equilibrium surface region' is not relevant because, by definition, this region is stable chemically and after a

  9. Explicit solutions of one-dimensional, first-order, stationary mean-field games with congestion

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Nurbekyan, Levon; Prazeres, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Here, we consider one-dimensional first-order stationary mean-field games with congestion. These games arise when crowds face difficulty moving in high-density regions. We look at both monotone decreasing and increasing interactions and construct

  10. Oscillation Criteria in First Order Neutral Delay Impulsive Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrova, M. B.; Donev, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is dealing with the oscillatory properties of first order neutral delay impulsive differential equations and corresponding to them inequalities with constant coefficients. The established sufficient conditions ensure the oscillation of every solution of this type of equations.

  11. Practical Markov Logic Containing First-Order Quantifiers With Application to Identity Uncertainty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Culotta, Aron; McCallum, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    .... In this paper, we present approximate inference and training methods that incrementally instantiate portions of the network as needed to enable first-order existential and universal quantifiers in Markov logic networks...

  12. Efficient allocations in dynamic private information economies with persistent shocks: a first-order approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapička, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2013), s. 1027-1054 ISSN 0034-6527 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : first-order approach * persistent shocks * private information Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 3.235, year: 2013

  13. The electroweak polarization asymmetry: A guided tour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    A comprehensive review is provided of the electroweak polarization asymmetry at the Z 0 , a highly accurate measure of the Z 0 coupling to fermions. Its significance as a precision test of the Standard Model is explored in detail. Emphasized are the role of electroweak symmetry-breaking and radiative corrections; the non-decoupling of new physics beyond the Z 0 ; and the testing of extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, technicolor, new generations of fermions, grand unification, and new gauge forces. Also discussed are the relationship of the polarization asymmetry to other electroweak observables and its superiority to other Z 0 asymmetries. Experimental issues are briefly presented, stressing the importance of polarization at the SLC and LEP e + e - colliders. 42 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchliffe, I. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  15. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented

  16. O(5) x U(1) electroweak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukku, C.; Sayed, W.A.

    1980-12-01

    An anomaly free O(5) x U(1) theory of electroweak interactions is described which provides a unified description of electroweak phenomena for two families of standard leptons and quarks. No ''new'' non-sequential type fermions of the standard model are introduced as has been the case for all past studies based on this group. The present scheme requires the introduction of two further charged and three more neutral gauge fields over and above the Wsup(+-), Z and photon fields of SU(2) x U(1) giving rise to new neutral and charged currents. In this note we outline our reasons for proposing the present electroweak scheme, give the basic structure of the model, discuss the symmetry breaking pattern which ensures that SU(2)sub(L) x U(1) is the low energy symmetry, point out the new interactions present in the extended framework and obtain limits on the masses of all the gauge fields. (author)

  17. Correction of the first order beam transport of the SLC Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, N.; Barklow, T.; Emma, P.; Krejcik, P.

    1991-05-01

    Correction of the first order transport of the SLC Arcs has been made possible by a technique which allows the full 4x4 transport matrix across any section of Arc to be experimentally determined. By the introduction of small closed bumps into each achromat, it is possible to substantially correct first order optical errors, and notably the cross plane coupling at the exit of the Arcs. 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. Recent results on Electroweak measurements from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benekos Nektarios Chr.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ATLAS measurements of multiboson production processes involving combinations of W,Z and isolated photons are summarized. Measurements using data at 7 TeV and at 8 TeV are presented. The measurements are performed using leptonic decay modes, including the invisible decay Z → v v̅, as well as semileptonic channels. Measurements of single and diboson production in association with two forward jets is sensitive to electroweak vector boson fusion and scattering processes. An observation of the electroweak production of the Z boson and an evidence of same sign WW production are reported.

  19. O(5) x U(1) electroweak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukku, C.; Sayed, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    An anomaly-free O(5) x U(1) theory of electroweak interactions is described which provides a unified description of electroweak phenomena for two families of standard leptons and quarks. No ''new'' nonsequential-type fermions are introduced, unlike the case for all past studies based on this group. The present scheme requires the introduction of two further charged and three more neutral gauge fields over and above those of SU(2) x U(1) giving rise to new neutral and charged currents

  20. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, P. [Comenius U.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  1. Actions, topological terms and boundaries in first-order gravity: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Rubalcava-García, Irais; Vukašinac, Tatjana

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we consider first-order gravity in four dimensions. In particular, we focus our attention in formulations where the fundamental variables are a tetrad eaI and a SO(3, 1) connection ωaIJ. We study the most general action principle compatible with diffeomorphism invariance. This implies, in particular, considering besides the standard Einstein-Hilbert-Palatini term, other terms that either do not change the equations of motion, or are topological in nature. Having a well defined action principle sometimes involves the need for additional boundary terms, whose detailed form may depend on the particular boundary conditions at hand. In this work, we consider spacetimes that include a boundary at infinity, satisfying asymptotically flat boundary conditions and/or an internal boundary satisfying isolated horizons boundary conditions. We focus on the covariant Hamiltonian formalism where the phase space Γ is given by solutions to the equations of motion. For each of the possible terms contributing to the action, we consider the well-posedness of the action, its finiteness, the contribution to the symplectic structure, and the Hamiltonian and Noether charges. For the chosen boundary conditions, standard boundary terms warrant a well posed theory. Furthermore, the boundary and topological terms do not contribute to the symplectic structure, nor the Hamiltonian conserved charges. The Noether conserved charges, on the other hand, do depend on such additional terms. The aim of this manuscript is to present a comprehensive and self-contained treatment of the subject, so the style is somewhat pedagogical. Furthermore, along the way, we point out and clarify some issues that have not been clearly understood in the literature.

  2. Theory of First Order Chemical Kinetics at the Critical Point of Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K; Lang, Joshua R

    2017-10-26

    Liquid mixtures, which have a phase diagram exhibiting a miscibility gap ending in a critical point of solution, have been used as solvents for chemical reactions. The reaction rate in the forward direction has often been observed to slow down as a function of temperature in the critical region. Theories based upon the Gibbs free energy of reaction as the driving force for chemical change have been invoked to explain this behavior. With the assumption that the reaction is proceeding under relaxation conditions, these theories expand the free energy in a Taylor series about the position of equilibrium. Since the free energy is zero at equilibrium, the leading term in the Taylor series is proportional to the first derivative of the free energy with respect to the extent of reaction. To analyze the critical behavior of this derivative, the theories exploit the principle of critical point isomorphism, which is thought to govern all critical phenomena. They find that the derivative goes to zero in the critical region, which accounts for the slowing down observed in the reaction rate. As has been pointed out, however, most experimental rate investigations have been carried out under irreversible conditions as opposed to relaxation conditions [Shen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 8784-8791]. Below, we consider a reaction governed by first order kinetics and invoke transition state theory to take into account the irreversible conditions. We express the apparent activation energy in terms of thermodynamic derivatives evaluated under standard conditions as well as the pseudoequilibrium conditions associated with the reactant and the activated complex. We show that these derivatives approach infinity in the critical region. The apparent activation energy follows this behavior, and its divergence accounts for the slowing down of the reaction rate.

  3. A comparison of zero-order, first-order, and Monod biotransformation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekins, B.A.; Warren, E.; Godsy, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Under some conditions, a first-order kinetic model is a poor representation of biodegradation in contaminated aquifers. Although it is well known that the assumption of first-order kinetics is valid only when substrate concentration, S, is much less than the half-saturation constant, K S , this assumption is often made without verification of this condition. The authors present a formal error analysis showing that the relative error in the first-order approximation is S/K S and in the zero-order approximation the error is K S /S. They then examine the problems that arise when the first-order approximation is used outside the range for which it is valid. A series of numerical simulations comparing results of first- and zero-order rate approximations to Monod kinetics for a real data set illustrates that if concentrations observed in the field are higher than K S , it may be better to model degradation using a zero-order rate expression. Compared with Monod kinetics, extrapolation of a first-order rate to lower concentrations under-predicts the biotransformation potential, while extrapolation to higher concentrations may grossly over-predict the transformation rate. A summary of solubilities and Monod parameters for aerobic benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) degradation shows that the a priori assumption of first-order degradation kinetics at sites contaminated with these compounds is not valid. In particular, out of six published values of K S for toluene, only one is greater than 2 mg/L, indicating that when toluene is present in concentrations greater than about a part per million, the assumption of first-order kinetics may be invalid. Finally, the authors apply an existing analytical solution for steady-state one-dimensional advective transport with Monod degradation kinetics to a field data set

  4. First-order reversal curve analysis in the hysteretic behavior of boron-rich nanocomposite Nd-Fe-B ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F.D. [Laboratorio de Solidos Amorfos, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina) and CONICET (Argentina)]. E-mail: fsaccon@fi.uba.ar; Pampillo, L.G. [Laboratorio de Solidos Amorfos, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Oliva, M.I. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Bercoff, P.G. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Bertorello, H.R. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Sirkin, H.R.M. [Laboratorio de Solidos Amorfos, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina)

    2007-09-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of melt-spun Nd{sub 4.5}Fe{sub 72}Co{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}Al{sub 1}B{sub 17.5} ribbons were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, Moessbauer effect spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and first-order reversal curve distributions. The presence of a solid solution (Fe, Co) in ribbons annealed at 685 C for 10 min was detected from Moessbauer spectra. Correlations between the observed structural changes at higher annealing temperatures and modifications in the interaction fields of precipitated phases are discussed.

  5. First-order reversal curve analysis in the hysteretic behavior of boron-rich nanocomposite Nd-Fe-B ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccone, F.D.; Pampillo, L.G.; Oliva, M.I.; Bercoff, P.G.; Bertorello, H.R.; Sirkin, H.R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of melt-spun Nd 4.5 Fe 72 Co 3 Cr 2 Al 1 B 17.5 ribbons were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, Moessbauer effect spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and first-order reversal curve distributions. The presence of a solid solution (Fe, Co) in ribbons annealed at 685 C for 10 min was detected from Moessbauer spectra. Correlations between the observed structural changes at higher annealing temperatures and modifications in the interaction fields of precipitated phases are discussed

  6. Thermodynamics of the Heat-Flux Avalanches at the First-Order Magnetic Transition in Magnetocaloric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Marco; Bennati, Cecilia; Basso, Vittorio

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the kinetics of first-order magnetic phase transitions by measuring and modeling the heat-flux avalanches corresponding to the irreversible motion of the phase-boundary interface separating the coexisting low- and high-temperature stable magnetic phases. By means of out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics, we encompass the damping mechanisms of the boundary motion in a phenomenological parameter αs. By analyzing the time behavior of the heat-flux signals measured on La (Fe -Mn -Si )13-H magnetocaloric compounds through Peltier calorimetry temperature scans performed at low rates, we relate the linear rise of the individual avalanches to the intrinsic-damping parameter αs.

  7. Electroweak properties of particle physics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksan, R.; Ellis, N.; Falvard, A.; Fayard, L.; Frere, J.M.; Kuehn, J.H.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Roudeau, P.; Wormser, G.

    1991-01-01

    The 23th GIf school was held at Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France from 16 to 20 September 1991. The subject was large: Electroweak properties of heavy quarks. The second part has been devoted to B physics at hadron machines, search for Top, Charm particle physics and Quarkonium physics

  8. Prospects on electroweak physics from the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikas, Pratibha

    2001-01-01

    The abundant production of gauge bosons, gauge boson pairs and top quarks at the LHC will offer the opportunity for comprehensive and challenging tests of theoretical predictions in the electroweak sector. Some issues which influence these measurements followed by prospects on some possible measurements by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN are discussed. (author)

  9. Electroweak Physics in the Forward Region

    CERN Multimedia

    Sirendi, Marek

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has an active electroweak physics programme with measurements of inclusive processes such as Z and W production in leptonic final states already published. The EW working group is also branching into jet physics with completed Z+jet and Z+b-jet analyses. Recent results in this field are presented.

  10. Towards a natural theory of electroweak interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    1998-01-01

    I study theories of electroweak symmetry breaking that may describe naturally the electromagnetic and weak interactions of the elementary particles observed so far (quarks, leptons and gauge bosons). These theories should explain why the energy scale at which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken (246 GeV), called the 'electroweak scale', is seventeen orders of magnitude smaller than the 'Planck scale', which is associated with the quantum origin of gravity. I discuss first theories where the electroweak symmetry is broken by the dynamics of new strong interactions, naturally producing the hierarchy between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale. I show that in a realistic class of models of this type, the new gauge bosons needed for generating the mass of the heaviest quark have couplings which require a careful adjustment in order to be compatible with experimental data. In the case where the strong dynamics produces a composite spinless particle ('Higgs boson') whose interactions break the electroweak symmetry, I derive an upper bound of 460 GeV on the Higgs boson mass from experimental constraints on processes sensitive to new physics. I also discuss a different type of theory that explains the hierarchy of energy scales, based on a special symmetry, called supersymmetry, which requires the existence of new particles ('superpartners'). No superpartners have been seen in experiments. Therefore, if they exist, they must have masses larger than the particles known so far, implying that supersymmetry is not exact. In the simplest models, supersymmetry breaking is transmitted to the superpartners by standard gauge interactions. I show that all known models of this type are likely to be unacceptable because they do not admit a stable and phenomenologically viable ground state of the universe ('vacuum'). I then construct modified versions of these models that permit viable stable vacua. Also, I present a new model in which supersymmetry breaking is

  11. An efficient modularized sample-based method to estimate the first-order Sobol' index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chenzhao; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2016-01-01

    Sobol' index is a prominent methodology in global sensitivity analysis. This paper aims to directly estimate the Sobol' index based only on available input–output samples, even if the underlying model is unavailable. For this purpose, a new method to calculate the first-order Sobol' index is proposed. The innovation is that the conditional variance and mean in the formula of the first-order index are calculated at an unknown but existing location of model inputs, instead of an explicit user-defined location. The proposed method is modularized in two aspects: 1) index calculations for different model inputs are separate and use the same set of samples; and 2) model input sampling, model evaluation, and index calculation are separate. Due to this modularization, the proposed method is capable to compute the first-order index if only input–output samples are available but the underlying model is unavailable, and its computational cost is not proportional to the dimension of the model inputs. In addition, the proposed method can also estimate the first-order index with correlated model inputs. Considering that the first-order index is a desired metric to rank model inputs but current methods can only handle independent model inputs, the proposed method contributes to fill this gap. - Highlights: • An efficient method to estimate the first-order Sobol' index. • Estimate the index from input–output samples directly. • Computational cost is not proportional to the number of model inputs. • Handle both uncorrelated and correlated model inputs.

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the first-order hyperpolarizability of a class of triarylamine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniel L.; Fonseca, Ruben D.; Mendonca, Cleber R.; De Boni, Leonardo; Vivas, Marcelo G.; Ishow, E.; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the static and dynamic first-order hyperpolarizabilities of a class of push-pull octupolar triarylamine derivatives dissolved in toluene. We have combined hyper-Rayleigh scattering experiment and the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock method implemented at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) level of theory to determine the static and dynamic (at 1064 nm) first-order hyperpolarizability (β HRS ) of nine triarylamine derivatives with distinct electron-withdrawing groups. In four of these derivatives, an azoaromatic unit is inserted and a pronounceable increase of the first-order hyperpolarizability is reported. Based on the theoretical results, the dipolar/octupolar character of the derivatives is determined. By using a polarizable continuum model in combination with the DFT calculations, it was found that although solvated in an aprotic and low dielectric constant solvent, due to solvent-induced polarization and the frequency dispersion effect, the environment substantially affects the first-order hyperpolarizability of all derivatives investigated. This statement is supported due to the solvent effects to be essential for the better agreement between theoretical results and experimental data concerning the dynamic first-order hyperpolarizability of the derivatives. The first-order hyperpolarizability of the derivatives was also modeled using the two- and three-level models, where the relationship between static and dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities is given by a frequency dispersion model. Using this approach, it was verified that the dynamic first hyperpolarizability of the derivatives is satisfactorily reproduced by the two-level model and that, in the case of the derivatives with an azoaromatic unit, the use of a damped few-level model is essential for, considering also the molecular size of such derivatives, a good quantitative agreement between theoretical results and experimental data to be observed

  13. A maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation, incorporating a potential treatment of voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Ackroyd's generalized least-squares method for solving the first-order Boltzmann equation is adapted to incorporate a potential treatment of voids. The adaptation comprises a direct least-squares minimization allied with a suitably-defined bilinear functional. The resulting formulation gives rise to a maximum principle whose functional does not contain terms of the type that have previously led to difficulties in treating void regions. The maximum principle is derived without requiring continuity of the flux at interfaces. The functional of the maximum principle is concluded to have an Euler-Lagrange equation given directly by the first-order Boltzmann equation. (author)

  14. First-order symmetrizable hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations including lapse and shift as dynamical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, Kashif

    2002-01-01

    First-order hyperbolic systems are promising as a basis for numerical integration of Einstein's equations. In previous work, the lapse and shift have typically not been considered part of the hyperbolic system and have been prescribed independently. This can be expensive computationally, especially if the prescription involves solving elliptic equations. Therefore, including the lapse and shift in the hyperbolic system could be advantageous for numerical work. In this paper, two first-order symmetrizable hyperbolic systems are presented that include the lapse and shift as dynamical fields and have only physical characteristic speeds

  15. Specifying and Verifying Organizational Security Properties in First-Order Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christoph; Otten, Jens; Kreitz, Christoph; Bibel, Wolfgang

    In certain critical cases the data flow between business departments in banking organizations has to respect security policies known as Chinese Wall or Bell-La Padula. We show that these policies can be represented by formal requirements and constraints in first-order logic. By additionally providing a formal model for the flow of data between business departments we demonstrate how security policies can be applied to a concrete organizational setting and checked with a first-order theorem prover. Our approach can be applied without requiring a deep formal expertise and it therefore promises a high potential of usability in the business.

  16. A novel square-root domain realization of first order all-pass filter

    OpenAIRE

    ÖLMEZ, Sinem; ÇAM, Uğur

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new square-root domain, first order, all-pass filter based on the MOSFET square law is presented. The proposed filter is designed by using nonlinear mapping on the state variables of a state space description of the transfer function. To the best knowledge of the authors, the filter is the first square-root domain first order all-pass structure designed by using state space synthesis method in the literature. The center frequency of the all-pass filter is not only a...

  17. Linear or linearizable first-order delay ordinary differential equations and their Lie point symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Roman; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Winternitz, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    A recent article was devoted to an analysis of the symmetry properties of a class of first-order delay ordinary differential systems (DODSs). Here we concentrate on linear DODSs, which have infinite-dimensional Lie point symmetry groups due to the linear superposition principle. Their symmetry algebra always contains a two-dimensional subalgebra realized by linearly connected vector fields. We identify all classes of linear first-order DODSs that have additional symmetries, not due to linearity alone, and we present representatives of each class. These additional symmetries are then used to construct exact analytical particular solutions using symmetry reduction.

  18. Multilevel solvers of first-order system least-squares for Stokes equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chen-Yao G. [National Chung Cheng Univ., Chia-Yi (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-12-31

    Recently, The use of first-order system least squares principle for the approximate solution of Stokes problems has been extensively studied by Cai, Manteuffel, and McCormick. In this paper, we study multilevel solvers of first-order system least-squares method for the generalized Stokes equations based on the velocity-vorticity-pressure formulation in three dimensions. The least-squares functionals is defined to be the sum of the L{sup 2}-norms of the residuals, which is weighted appropriately by the Reynolds number. We develop convergence analysis for additive and multiplicative multilevel methods applied to the resulting discrete equations.

  19. Signatures of CP-Violating Electroweak Penguins in K and B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, Felix

    2007-01-01

    The B->πK decays with significant electroweak penguin contributions show a puzzling pattern. We explore this ''B->πK puzzle'' through a systematic strategy. The starting point, which is essentially unaffected by electroweak penguins, is the determination of the angle γ of the unitarity triangle through the CP-violating B d 0 ->π + π - , B d 0 ->π - K + asymmetries, yielding γ=(73.9 -6.5 +5.8 ) o , and the extraction of hadronic parameters through the measured B->ππ branching ratios. Using arguments related to the SU(3) flavor symmetry, we convert the hadronic B->ππ parameters into their B->πK counterparts, allowing us to predict the B->πK observables in the Standard Model. We find agreement with the data for those quantities that are only marginally affected by electroweak penguins, while this is not the case for the observables with sizeable electroweak penguin contributions. Since we may also perform a couple of internal consistency checks of our working assumptions, which are nicely satisfied for the current data, and find a small sensitivity of our results to large non-factorizable SU(3)-breaking corrections, the ''B->πK'' puzzle may be due to new physics in the electroweak penguin sector. We show that it can indeed be resolved through such a kind of new physics with a large CP-violating phase. Further insights into the electroweak penguins are provided by the B + ->π 0 K + and B d 0 ->π 0 K S CP asymmetries, and in particular through correlations with various rare K and B decays

  20. First-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single-blade installation setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, Mac; Bergami, Leonardo; Guntur, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    the first-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single blade installation system, where the blade is grabbed by a yoke, which is lifted by the crane and stabilized by two taglines. A simple engineering model is formulated to describe the aerodynamic forcing on the blade subject to turbulent wind...

  1. Determination of astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis by first-order derivative spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Juan; Juan, Liu Xiao; Wu, Ying Hua; Hua, Wu Ying; Zhao, Li Chao; Chao, Zhao Li; Xiao, Su Yao; Yao, Xiao Su; Zhou, Ai Mei; Mei, Zhou Ai; Liu, Xin; Xin, Liu

    2011-01-01

    A highly selective, convenient, and precise method, first-order derivative spectrophotometry, was applied for the determination of astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis. Ethyl acetate and ethanol (1:1, v/v) were found to be the best extraction solvent tested due to their high efficiency and low toxicity compared with nine other organic solvents. Astaxanthin coexisting with chlorophyll and beta-carotene was analyzed by first-order derivative spectrophotometry in order to optimize the conditions for the determination of astaxanthin. The results show that when detected at 432 nm, the interfering substances could be eliminated. The dynamic linear range was 2.0-8.0 microg/mL, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916. The detection threshold was 0.41 microg/mL. The RSD for the determination of astaxanthin was in the range of 0.01-0.06%; the results of recovery test were 98.1-108.0%. The statistical analysis between first-order derivative spectrophotometry and HPLC by T-testing did not exceed their critical values, revealing no significant differences between these two methods. It was proved that first-order derivative spectrophotometry is a rapid and convenient method for the determination of astaxanthin in H. pluvialis that can eliminate the negative effect resulting from the coexistence of astaxanthin with chlorophyll and beta-carotene.

  2. Novel Resistorless First-Order Current-Mode Universal Filter Employing a Grounded Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arslanalp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new bipolar junction transistor (BJT based configuration for providing first-order resistorless current-mode (CM all-pass, low-pass and high-pass filter responses from the same configuration is suggested. The proposed circuit called as a first-order universal filter possesses some important advantages such as consisting of a few BJTs and a grounded capacitor, consuming very low power and having electronic tunability property of its pole frequency. Additionally, types of filter response can be obtained only by changing the values of current sources. The suggested circuit does not suffer from disadvantages of use of the resistors in IC process. The presented first-order universal filter topology does not need any passive element matching constraints. Moreover, as an application example, a second-order band-pass filter is obtained by cascading two proposed filter structures which are operating as low-pass filter and high-pass one. Simulations by means of PSpice program are accomplished to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the developed first-order universal filter.

  3. The mass transfer approach to multivariate discrete first order stochastic dominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental result in the theory of stochastic dominance tells that first order dominance between two finite multivariate distributions is equivalent to the property that the one can be obtained from the other by shifting probability mass from one outcome to another that is worse a finite numbe...

  4. Piecewise linearisation of the first order loss function for families of arbitrarily distributed random variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, R.; Hendrix, E.M.T.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the problem of computing optimal linearisation parameters for the first order loss function of a family of arbitrarily distributed random variable. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the problem in which parameters must be determined for the loss function of a single random variable,

  5. Back-and-forth systems for fuzzy first-order models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dellunde, P.; García-Cerdaña, A.; Noguera, Carles

    (2018) ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GF15-34650L Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Mathematical fuzzy logic * first-order fuzzy logics * non-classical logics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2018/MTR/noguera-0486421.pdf

  6. Weak linear degeneracy and lifespan of classical solutions for first order quasilinear hyperbolic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tatsien

    1994-01-01

    By means of the concept of the weak linear degeneracy, one gets the global existence and the sharp estimate of the lifespan of C 1 solutions to the Cauchy problem for general first order quasilinear hyperbolic systems with small initial data with compact support. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig

  7. Reduction of static field equation of Faddeev model to first order PDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Minoru; Shi Changguang

    2007-01-01

    A method to solve the static field equation of the Faddeev model is presented. For a special combination of the concerned field, we adopt a form which is compatible with the field equation and involves two arbitrary complex functions. As a result, the static field equation is reduced to a set of first order partial differential equations

  8. Efficient allocations in dynamic private information economies with persistent shocks: a first-order approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapička, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2013), s. 1027-1054 ISSN 0034-6527 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : first-order approach * persistent shocks * private information Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 3.235, year: 2013

  9. Variations in the Solution of Linear First-Order Differential Equations. Classroom Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Brian; Osler, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A special project which can be given to students of ordinary differential equations is described in detail. Students create new differential equations by changing the dependent variable in the familiar linear first-order equation (dv/dx)+p(x)v=q(x) by means of a substitution v=f(y). The student then creates a table of the new equations and…

  10. Finding higher order Darboux polynomials for a family of rational first order ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, J.; Claudino, A. L. G. C.; Duarte, L. G. S.; da Mota, L. A. C. P.

    2015-10-01

    For the Darbouxian methods we are studying here, in order to solve first order rational ordinary differential equations (1ODEs), the most costly (computationally) step is the finding of the needed Darboux polynomials. This can be so grave that it can render the whole approach unpractical. Hereby we introduce a simple heuristics to speed up this process for a class of 1ODEs.

  11. Advancing investigation and physical modeling of first-order fire effects on soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Massman; John M. Frank; Sacha J. Mooney

    2010-01-01

    Heating soil during intense wildland fires or slash-pile burns can alter the soil irreversibly, resulting in many significant long-term biological, chemical, physical, and hydrological effects. To better understand these long-term effects, it is necessary to improve modeling capability and prediction of the more immediate, or first-order, effects that fire can have on...

  12. A NEW OSCILLATION CRITERION FOR FIRST ORDER NEUTRAL DELAY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new sufficient condition for the oscillation of all solutions of first order neutral delay differential equations is obtained. Secondly, the result can also be extended to a general neutral differential equation, and many known results in the literatures are improved.

  13. Temporal Frequency Modulates Reaction Time Responses to First-Order and Second-Order Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal frequency and modulation depth on reaction times for discriminating the direction of first-order (luminance-defined) and second-order (contrast-defined) motion, equated for visibility using equal multiples of direction-discrimination threshold. Results showed that reaction times were heavily…

  14. First Order Fire Effects Model: FOFEM 4.0, user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; Robert E. Keane; James K. Brown

    1997-01-01

    A First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM) was developed to predict the direct consequences of prescribed fire and wildfire. FOFEM computes duff and woody fuel consumption, smoke production, and fire-caused tree mortality for most forest and rangeland types in the United States. The model is available as a computer program for PC or Data General computer.

  15. Preferential semantics for action specification in first-order modal action logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersen, Jan; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    In this paper we investigate preferential semantics for declarative specifications in a First Order Modal Action Logic. We address some well known problems: the frame problem, the qualification problem and the ramification problem. We incorporate the assumptions that are inherent to both the frame

  16. Imaging of first-order surface-related multiples by reverse-time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Hu, Hao; Li, Peng; Khan, Majid

    2017-02-01

    Surface-related multiples have been utilized in the reverse-time migration (RTM) procedures, and additional illumination for subsurface can be provided. Meanwhile, many cross-talks are generated from undesired interactions between forward- and backward-propagated seismic waves. In this paper, subsequent to analysing and categorizing these cross-talks, we propose RTM of first-order multiples to avoid most undesired interactions in RTM of all-order multiples, where only primaries are forward-propagated and crosscorrelated with the backward-propagated first-order multiples. With primaries and multiples separated during regular seismic data processing as the input data, first-order multiples can be obtained by a two-step scheme: (1) the dual-prediction of higher-order multiples; and (2) the adaptive subtraction of predicted higher-order multiples from all-order multiples within local offset-time windows. In numerical experiments, two synthetic and a marine field data sets are used, where different cross-talks generated by RTM of all-order multiples can be identified and the proposed RTM of first-order multiples can provide a very interpretable image with a few cross-talks.

  17. Oscillation Criteria of First Order Neutral Delay Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima N. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some new oscillation criteria are given for first order neutral delay differential equations with variable coefficients. Our results generalize and extend some of the well-known results in the literature. Some examples are considered to illustrate the main results.

  18. Reducing the first-order Doppler shift in a Sagnac interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Salumbides, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique to reduce first-order Doppler shifts in crossed atomic/molecular and laser beam setups by aligning two counterpropagating laser beams as part of a Sagnac interferometer. Interference fringes on the exit port of the interferometer reveal minute deviations from perfect

  19. Lindström theorems for fragments of first-order logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, J.; ten Cate, B.; Väänänen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lindström theorems characterize logics in terms of model-theoretic conditions such as Compactness and the Löwenheim-Skolem property. Most existing characterizations of this kind concern extensions of first-order logic. But on the other hand, many logics relevant to computer science are fragments or

  20. Boolean-Like and Frequentistic Nonstandard Semantics for First-Order Predicate Calculus without Functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kramosil, Ivan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2001), s. 45-57 ISSN 1432-7643 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1030803 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : first-order predicate calculus * standard semantics * Boolean-like semantics * frequentistic semantics * completness theorems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  1. On the propagation and the twist of Gaussian light in first-order optical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, M.J.; Nijhawan, O.P.; Gupta, A.K.; Musla, A.K.; Singh, Kehar

    1998-01-01

    A measure for the twist of Gaussian light is expressed in terms of the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function. The propagation law for these moments through first-order optical systems is used to express the twist in the output plane in terms of moments in the input plane, and vice

  2. How much are your geraniums? Taking graph conditions beyond first Order

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Katoen, Joost-Pieter; Langerak, Rom; Rensink, Arend

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has shown how first-order logic can equivalently be expressed through nested graph conditions, also called condition trees, with surprisingly few ingredients. In this paper, we extend condition trees by adding set-based operators such as sums and products, calculated over operands that

  3. Controllability Results For First Order Impulsive Stochastic Functional Differential Systems with State-Dependent Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Parthasarathy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the controllability results of first order impulsive stochastic differential and neutral differential systems with state-dependent delay by using semigroup theory. The controllability results are derived by the means of Leray-SchauderAlternative fixed point theorem. An example is provided to illustrate the theory.

  4. Explicit solutions of one-dimensional, first-order, stationary mean-field games with congestion

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-01-05

    Here, we consider one-dimensional first-order stationary mean-field games with congestion. These games arise when crowds face difficulty moving in high-density regions. We look at both monotone decreasing and increasing interactions and construct explicit solutions using the current formulation. We observe new phenomena such as discontinuities, unhappiness traps and the non-existence of solutions.

  5. Size-Induced Depression of First-Order Transition Lines and Entropy Jump in Extremely Layered Nanocrystalline Vortex Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, M I; Fasano, Y; Cejas Bolecek, N R; Pastoriza, H; Mosser, V; Li, M; Konczykowski, M

    2015-09-25

    We detect the persistence of the solidification and order-disorder first-order transition lines in the phase diagram of nanocrystalline Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8} vortex matter down to a system size of less than one hundred vortices. The temperature location of the vortex solidification transition line is not altered by decreasing the sample size although there is a depletion of the entropy jump at the transition with respect to macroscopic vortex matter. The solid order-disorder phase transition field moves upward on decreasing the system size due to the increase of the surface-to-volume ratio of vortices entailing a decrease on the average vortex binding energy.

  6. A (critical) overview of electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaki, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    This presentation discusses the following points: The standard Higgs, big vs. little hierarchy; Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in supersymmetry and little hierarchy of Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM): Buried Higgs, Bigger quartic (D-terms, Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), fat Higgs,..); Strong dynamics and related models: Technicolor, Monopole condensate, Warped extra dimensions, Realistic RS, Higgs-less, Composite Higgs, Little Higgs. In summary, we do not understand how Higgs is light and still no trace of new physics. In Supersymmetry (SUSY) it calls for extension of MSSM. In strong dynamics models: electroweak penguin (EWP) usually issue (Warped extra dimension - composite Higgs, Higgs-less, Little Higgs, Technicolor, monopole condensation,..). None of them is fully convincing but LHC should settle these

  7. Introduction to gauge theories of electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1982-01-01

    Intended as a lecture for physicists who are not familiar with the sophisticated theoretical models in particle physics. Starting with the standard gauge model of electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions the recent developments of a unified gauge theory of electroweak interactions are shown. Shortcomings in the unitarity problem of the V-A fermi theory of charged intermediate vector bosons. Presented are the spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum mechanics, the abelian higgs model as an example of a spontaneously broken gauge field theory, the minimal gauge group of electroweak interactions, the fermion mass generation. Further on the anomalies in quantum field theory are discussed and the radiative corrections to the vector boson masses are considered. (H.B.)

  8. A determination of electroweak parameters at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Using the deep inelastic ep and ep charged and neutral current scattering cross sections previously published, a combined electroweak and QCD analysis is performed to determine electroweak parameters accounting for their correlation with parton distributions. The data used have been collected by the H1 experiment in 1994 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 117.2 pb. A measurement is obtained of the W propagator mass in charged current ep scattering. The weak mixing angle sinθ is determined in the on-mass-shell renormalisation scheme. A first measurement at HERA is made of the light quark weak couplings to the Z boson and a possible contribution of right-handed isospin components to the weak couplings is investigated.

  9. A Determination of Electroweak Parameters at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Using the deep inelastic e^+p and e^-p charged and neutral current scattering cross sections previously published, a combined electroweak and QCD analysis is performed to determine electroweak parameters accounting for their correlation with parton distributions. The data used have been collected by the H1 experiment in 1994-2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 117.2 pb^{-1}. A measurement is obtained of the W propagator mass in charged current ep scattering. The weak mixing angle sin^2 theta_W is determined in the on-mass-shell renormalisation scheme. A first measurement at HERA is made of the light quark weak couplings to the Z^0 boson and a possible contribution of right-handed isospin components to the weak couplings is investigated.

  10. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    1996-01-01

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from γ-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log 2 behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ''resolved'' photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs

  11. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m w and sin 2 θ w (m z ) ovr MS imply a relatively light Higgs ∼< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described

  12. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Linck, Rebecca Anne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    As part of its ongoing exploration into the nature of the particles produced in high energy proton-proton collisions, the ATLAS detector has been used to perform a number of new precision electroweak measurements. In this talk the recent measurements of the W-boson mass, the Drell-Yan triple-differential cross-section and the polarisation of tau leptons in Z/γ* → ττ decays will be discussed.

  13. Electroweak theory and the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2004-01-01

    There is a natural splitting in four sectors of the theory of the ElectroWeak (EW) Interactions, at pretty different levels of development/test. Accordingly, the 5 lectures are organized as follows, with an eye to the future: Lecture 1: The basic structure of the theory; Lecture 2: The gauge sector; Lecture 3: The flavor sector; Lecture 4: The neutrino sector; Lecture 5: The EW symmetry breaking sector.

  14. Optimal tests for electroweak loop effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kenichi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA

    1986-01-01

    A statistical analysis is given for the experimental precision necessary for establishing loop effects in the electroweak theory. Cases with three observables, gauge boson masses and the Weinberg angle, is analyzed by an optimised test. An information on the Weinberg angle with even 5% error (+-.01 in sin 2 thetasub(W)) is shown to reduce the requirement for the measurements of gauge boson masses significantly. (orig.)

  15. Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The seminar presents an overview of the ATLAS electroweak physics programme. Recent measurements of di-boson and multi-boson production processes involving combinations of W, Z and isolated photons, associated with up to two jets, at 8 TeV proton-proton collisions are discussed. Inclusive, fiducial and differential production cross sections are presented, including vector-boson fusion and vector-boson scattering processes. These measurements allow to derive constraints on anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings.

  16. Electroweak form factors of the Skyrmion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, E.; Sze-Man Tse; Willcox, C.

    1986-01-01

    The electroweak form factors of baryons are studied in the semiclassical approximation to the Skyrme model. General expressions for the form factors are given for arbitrary choices of the Skyrme-model Lagrangian. They are applied to the original two-parameter Skyrme model to compute the electric, magnetic, and axial-vector form factors of the nucleon and the electromagnetic nucleon-Δ transition form factors. The dependence of the form factors on the momentum transfer is compared with phenomenological dipole parametrizations

  17. On stability of electroweak vacuum during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkerin, A., E-mail: andrey.shkerin@epfl.ch [Institut de Théorie des Phénomènes Physiques, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect, 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sibiryakov, S. [Institut de Théorie des Phénomènes Physiques, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect, 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); CERN Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-06-30

    We study Coleman–De Luccia tunneling of the Standard Model Higgs field during inflation in the case when the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We verify that the tunneling rate is exponentially suppressed. The main contribution to the suppression is the same as in flat space–time. We analytically estimate the corrections due to the expansion of the universe and an effective mass term in the Higgs potential that can be present at inflation.

  18. On stability of electroweak vacuum during inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkerin, A.; Sibiryakov, S.

    2015-01-01

    We study Coleman–De Luccia tunneling of the Standard Model Higgs field during inflation in the case when the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We verify that the tunneling rate is exponentially suppressed. The main contribution to the suppression is the same as in flat space–time. We analytically estimate the corrections due to the expansion of the universe and an effective mass term in the Higgs potential that can be present at inflation

  19. On stability of electroweak vacuum during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Shkerin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    We study Coleman-De Luccia tunneling of the Standard Model Higgs field during inflation in the case when the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We verify that the tunneling rate is exponentially suppressed. The main contribution to the suppression is the same as in flat space-time. We analytically estimate the corrections due to the expansion of the universe and an effective mass term in the Higgs potential that can be present at inflation.

  20. Electroweak Calibration of the Higgs Characterization Model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will present the preliminary results of histogram fits using the Higgs Combine histogram fitting package. These fits can be used to estimate the effects of electroweak contributions to the p p -> H mu+ mu- Higgs production channel and calibrate Beyond Standard Model (BSM) simulations which ignore these effects. I will emphasize my findings' significance in the context of other research here at CERN and in the broader world of high energy physics.

  1. Flavor universal dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdman, G.; Evans, N.

    1999-01-01

    The top condensate seesaw mechanism of Dobrescu and Hill allows electroweak symmetry to be broken while deferring the problem of flavor to an electroweak singlet, massive sector. We provide an extended version of the singlet sector that naturally accommodates realistic masses for all the standard model fermions, which play an equal role in breaking electroweak symmetry. The models result in a relatively light composite Higgs sector with masses typically in the range of (400 - 700) GeV. In more complete models the dynamics will presumably be driven by a broken gauged family or flavor symmetry group. As an example of the higher scale dynamics a fully dynamical model of the quark sector with a GIM mechanism is presented, based on an earlier top condensation model of King using broken family gauge symmetry interactions (that model was itself based on a technicolor model of Georgi). The crucial extra ingredient is a reinterpretation of the condensates that form when several gauge groups become strong close to the same scale. A related technicolor model of Randall which naturally includes the leptons too may also be adapted to this scenario. We discuss the low energy constraints on the massive gauge bosons and scalars of these models as well as their phenomenology at the TeV scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Hyperscaling violation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Daniel, E-mail: pelander@purdue.edu [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Lawrance, Robert; Piai, Maurizio [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    We consider a class of simplified models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking built in terms of their five-dimensional weakly-coupled gravity duals, in the spirit of bottom-up holography. The sigma-model consists of two abelian gauge bosons and one real, non-charged scalar field coupled to gravity in five dimensions. The scalar potential is a simple exponential function of the scalar field. The background metric resulting from solving the classical equations of motion exhibits hyperscaling violation, at least at asymptotically large values of the radial direction. We study the spectrum of scalar composite states of the putative dual field theory by fluctuating the sigma-model scalars and gravity, and discuss in which cases we find a parametrically light scalar state in the spectrum. We model the spontaneous breaking of the (weakly coupled) gauge symmetry to the diagonal subgroup by the choice of IR boundary conditions. We compute the mass spectrum of spin-1 states, and the precision electroweak parameter S as a function of the hyperscaling coefficient. We find a general bound on the mass of the lightest spin-1 resonance, by requiring that the indirect bounds on the precision parameters be satisfied, that implies that precision electroweak physics excludes the possibility of a techni-rho meson with mass lighter than several TeV.

  3. Electroweak boson production in Pb+Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Balestri, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Lead-lead collisions at the LHC are capable of producing a system of deconfined quarks and gluons at unprecedented energy density and temperature. Partonic-level interactions and energy-loss mechanisms in the medium can be studied with the aid of electroweak bosons which carry important information about the properties of the medium. Electroweak bosons form a class of unique high-$p_{T}$ probes because their decay products do not interact with the strongly-coupled medium, providing a benchmark for a variety of other phenomena measured with strongly interacting particles. The ATLAS experiment measures isolated high-$p_{T}$ photons, W and Z bosons via different decay channels. New analyses of experimental data obtained at the LHC with lead-lead beams at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. This talk will present a comprehensive study of the scaling properties of electroweak bosons showing linear proportionality of production rates to the nuclear thickness function; rapidity distributions W-decays directly sensitivity to...

  4. Fundamental Physics with Electroweak Probes of Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Saori

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed tremendous progress in the theoretical and computational tools that produce our understanding of nuclei. A number of microscopic calculations of nuclear electroweak structure and reactions have successfully explained the available experimental data, yielding a complex picture of the way nuclei interact with electroweak probes. This achievement is of great interest from the pure nuclear-physics point of view. But it is of much broader interest too, because the level of accuracy and confidence reached by these calculations opens up the concrete possibility of using nuclei to address open questions in other sub-fields of physics, such as, understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, or the particle nature of dark matter. In this talk, I will review recent progress in microscopic calculations of electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in between lowlying nuclear states along with preliminary studies for single- and double-beta decay rates. I will illustrate the key dynamical features required to explain the available experimental data, and, if time permits, present a novel framework to calculate neutrino-nucleus cross sections for A > 12 nuclei.

  5. Novel structures for Discrete Hartley Transform based on first-order moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jun; Zheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Hao; Liu, Jianguo

    2018-03-01

    Discrete Hartley Transform (DHT) is an important tool in digital signal processing. In the present paper, the DHT is firstly transformed into the first-order moments-based form, then a new fast algorithm is proposed to calculate the first-order moments without multiplication. Based on the algorithm theory, the corresponding hardware architecture for DHT is proposed, which only contains shift operations and additions with no need for multipliers and large memory. To verify the availability and effectiveness, the proposed design is implemented with hardware description language and synthesized by Synopsys Design Compiler with 0.18-μm SMIC library. A series of experiments have proved that the proposed architecture has better performance in terms of the product of the hardware consumption and computation time.

  6. Critical ignition conditions in exothermically reacting systems: first-order reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Valeriy Yu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the comparative analysis of the thermal explosion (TE) critical conditions on the planes temperature-conversion degree and temperature-time was conducted. It was established that the ignition criteria are almost identical only at relatively small values of Todes parameter. Otherwise, the results of critical conditions analysis on the plane temperature-conversion degree may be wrong. The asymptotic method of critical conditions calculation for the first-order reactions was proposed (taking into account the reactant consumption). The degeneration conditions of TE were determined. The calculation of critical conditions for specific first-order reaction was made. The comparison of the analytical results obtained with the results of numerical calculations and experimental data showed that they are in good agreement.

  7. Quantum criticality and first-order transitions in the extended periodic Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, I.; Itai, K.; Sólyom, J.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the behavior of the periodic Anderson model in the presence of d-f Coulomb interaction (Udf) using mean-field theory, variational calculation, and exact diagonalization of finite chains. The variational approach based on the Gutzwiller trial wave function gives a critical value of Udf and two quantum critical points (QCPs), where the valence susceptibility diverges. We derive the critical exponent for the valence susceptibility and investigate how the position of the QCP depends on the other parameters of the Hamiltonian. For larger values of Udf, the Kondo regime is bounded by two first-order transitions. These first-order transitions merge into a triple point at a certain value of Udf. For even larger Udf valence skipping occurs. Although the other methods do not give a critical point, they support this scenario.

  8. Elliptic boundary value problems with fractional regularity data the first order approach

    CERN Document Server

    Amenta, Alex

    2018-01-01

    In this monograph the authors study the well-posedness of boundary value problems of Dirichlet and Neumann type for elliptic systems on the upper half-space with coefficients independent of the transversal variable and with boundary data in fractional Hardy-Sobolev and Besov spaces. The authors use the so-called "first order approach" which uses minimal assumptions on the coefficients and thus allows for complex coefficients and for systems of equations. This self-contained exposition of the first order approach offers new results with detailed proofs in a clear and accessible way and will become a valuable reference for graduate students and researchers working in partial differential equations and harmonic analysis.

  9. Critical ignition conditions in exothermically reacting systems: first-order reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Valeriy Yu.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the comparative analysis of the thermal explosion (TE) critical conditions on the planes temperature-conversion degree and temperature-time was conducted. It was established that the ignition criteria are almost identical only at relatively small values of Todes parameter. Otherwise, the results of critical conditions analysis on the plane temperature-conversion degree may be wrong. The asymptotic method of critical conditions calculation for the first-order reactions was proposed (taking into account the reactant consumption). The degeneration conditions of TE were determined. The calculation of critical conditions for specific first-order reaction was made. The comparison of the analytical results obtained with the results of numerical calculations and experimental data showed that they are in good agreement.

  10. Discrete gravity as a local theory of the Poincare group in the first-order formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gionti, Gabriele [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Specola Vaticana, V-00120 Citta Del Vaticano (Vatican City State, Holy See,)

    2005-10-21

    A discrete theory of gravity, locally invariant under the Poincare group, is considered as in a companion paper. We define a first-order theory, in the sense of Palatini, on the metric-dual Voronoi complex of a simplicial complex. We follow the same spirit as the continuum theory of general relativity in the Cartan formalism. The field equations are carefully derived taking in account the constraints of the theory. They look very similar to first-order Einstein continuum equations in the Cartan formalism. It is shown that in the limit of small deficit angles these equations have Regge calculus, locally, as the only solution. A quantum measure is easily defined which does not suffer the ambiguities of Regge calculus, and a coupling with fermionic matter is easily introduced.

  11. Discrete gravity as a local theory of the Poincare group in the first-order formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gionti, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    A discrete theory of gravity, locally invariant under the Poincare group, is considered as in a companion paper. We define a first-order theory, in the sense of Palatini, on the metric-dual Voronoi complex of a simplicial complex. We follow the same spirit as the continuum theory of general relativity in the Cartan formalism. The field equations are carefully derived taking in account the constraints of the theory. They look very similar to first-order Einstein continuum equations in the Cartan formalism. It is shown that in the limit of small deficit angles these equations have Regge calculus, locally, as the only solution. A quantum measure is easily defined which does not suffer the ambiguities of Regge calculus, and a coupling with fermionic matter is easily introduced

  12. Will electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks undergo first-order transition under random attacks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Zhenshan; Zhu, Xuedong; Wang, Xunting

    2016-10-01

    Whether the realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks will undergo first-order transition under random failures still remains a question. To reflect the reality of Chinese electrical cyber-physical system, the "partial one-to-one correspondence" interdependent networks model is proposed and the connectivity vulnerabilities of three realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks are analyzed. The simulation results show that due to the service demands of power system the topologies of power grid and its cyber network are highly inter-similar which can effectively avoid the first-order transition. By comparing the vulnerability curves between electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks and its single-layer network, we find that complex network theory is still useful in the vulnerability analysis of electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks.

  13. On integration of the first order differential equations in a finite terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malykh, M D

    2017-01-01

    There are several approaches to the description of the concept called briefly as integration of the first order differential equations in a finite terms or symbolical integration. In the report three of them are considered: 1.) finding of a rational integral (Beaune or Poincaré problem), 2.) integration by quadratures and 3.) integration when the general solution of given differential equation is an algebraical function of a constant (Painlevé problem). Their realizations in Sage are presented. (paper)

  14. Hydrology and water quality of two first order forested watersheds in coastal South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Amatya; M. Miwa; C.A. Harrison; C.C. Trettin; G. Sun

    2006-01-01

    Two first-order forested watersheds (WS 80 and WS 77) on poorly drained pine-hardwood stands in the South Carolina Coastal Plain have been monitored since mid-1960s to characterize the hydrology, water quality and vegetation dynamics. This study examines the flow and nutrient dynamics of these two watersheds using 13 years (1 969-76 and 1977-81) of data prior to...

  15. Maximum Principles and Boundary Value Problems for First-Order Neutral Functional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domoshnitsky Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain the maximum principles for the first-order neutral functional differential equation where , and are linear continuous operators, and are positive operators, is the space of continuous functions, and is the space of essentially bounded functions defined on . New tests on positivity of the Cauchy function and its derivative are proposed. Results on existence and uniqueness of solutions for various boundary value problems are obtained on the basis of the maximum principles.

  16. Proximity formulae for folding potentials. [Saxon-Woods form factors, first order corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, H; Canto, L F [Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1979-03-05

    The proximity formulae of Brink and Stancu are applied to folding potentials. A numerical study is made for the case of single folding potentials with Saxon-Woods form factors. It is found that a proximity formula is accurate to 1-2% at separations of the order of the radius of the Coulomb barrier and that first order corrections due to first curvature are important. The approximations involved are discussed.

  17. On the summability of divergent power series solutions for certain first-order linear PDEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Hibino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the study of the Borel summability of divergent power series solutions for certain singular first-order linear partial differential equations of nilpotent type. Our main purpose is to obtain conditions which coefficients of equations should satisfy in order to ensure the Borel summability of divergent solutions. We will see that there is a close affinity between the Borel summability of divergent solutions and global analytic continuation properties for coefficients of equations.

  18. Emergent Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with Composite W, Z Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Yanou; Wells, James D

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of electroweak symmetry breaking in a warped extra dimension where electroweak symmetry is broken at the UV (or Planck) scale. An underlying conformal symmetry is broken at the IR (or TeV) scale generating masses for the electroweak gauge bosons without invoking a Higgs mechanism. By the AdS/CFT correspondence the W,Z bosons are identified as composite states of a strongly-coupled gauge theory, suggesting that electroweak symmetry breaking is an emergent phenomenon at the IR scale. The model satisfies electroweak precision tests with reasonable fits to the S and T parameter. In particular the T parameter is sufficiently suppressed since the model naturally admits a custodial SU(2) symmetry. The composite nature of the W,Z-bosons provide a novel possibility of unitarizing WW scattering via form factor suppression. Constraints from LEP and the Tevatron as well as discovery opportunities at the LHC are discussed for these composite electroweak gauge bosons.

  19. First order mean field games - explicit solutions, perturbations and connection with classical mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-01-06

    We present recent developments in the theory of first-order mean-field games (MFGs). A standard assumption in MFGs is that the cost function of the agents is monotone in the density of the distribution. This assumption leads to a comprehensive existence theory and to the uniqueness of smooth solutions. Here, our goals are to understand the role of local monotonicity in the small perturbation regime and the properties of solutions for problems without monotonicity. Under a local monotonicity assumption, we show that small perturbations of MFGs have unique smooth solutions. In addition, we explore the connection between first-order MFGs and classical mechanics and KAM theory. Next, for non-monotone problems, we construct non-unique explicit solutions for a broad class of first-order mean-field games. We provide an alternative formulation of MFGs in terms of a new current variable. These examples illustrate two new phenomena: the non-uniqueness of solutions and the breakdown of regularity.

  20. First order mean field games - explicit solutions, perturbations and connection with classical mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Nurbekyan, Levon; Prazeres, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We present recent developments in the theory of first-order mean-field games (MFGs). A standard assumption in MFGs is that the cost function of the agents is monotone in the density of the distribution. This assumption leads to a comprehensive existence theory and to the uniqueness of smooth solutions. Here, our goals are to understand the role of local monotonicity in the small perturbation regime and the properties of solutions for problems without monotonicity. Under a local monotonicity assumption, we show that small perturbations of MFGs have unique smooth solutions. In addition, we explore the connection between first-order MFGs and classical mechanics and KAM theory. Next, for non-monotone problems, we construct non-unique explicit solutions for a broad class of first-order mean-field games. We provide an alternative formulation of MFGs in terms of a new current variable. These examples illustrate two new phenomena: the non-uniqueness of solutions and the breakdown of regularity.

  1. Data fusion in cyber security: first order entity extraction from common cyber data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobe, Nicklaus A.

    2012-06-01

    The Joint Directors of Labs Data Fusion Process Model (JDL Model) provides a framework for how to handle sensor data to develop higher levels of inference in a complex environment. Beginning from a call to leverage data fusion techniques in intrusion detection, there have been a number of advances in the use of data fusion algorithms in this subdomain of cyber security. While it is tempting to jump directly to situation-level or threat-level refinement (levels 2 and 3) for more exciting inferences, a proper fusion process starts with lower levels of fusion in order to provide a basis for the higher fusion levels. The process begins with first order entity extraction, or the identification of important entities represented in the sensor data stream. Current cyber security operational tools and their associated data are explored for potential exploitation, identifying the first order entities that exist in the data and the properties of these entities that are described by the data. Cyber events that are represented in the data stream are added to the first order entities as their properties. This work explores typical cyber security data and the inferences that can be made at the lower fusion levels (0 and 1) with simple metrics. Depending on the types of events that are expected by the analyst, these relatively simple metrics can provide insight on their own, or could be used in fusion algorithms as a basis for higher levels of inference.

  2. AMD-stability in the presence of first-order mean motion resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A. C.; Laskar, J.; Boué, G.

    2017-11-01

    The angular momentum deficit (AMD)-stability criterion allows to discriminate between a priori stable planetary systems and systems for which the stability is not granted and needs further investigations. AMD-stability is based on the conservation of the AMD in the averaged system at all orders of averaging. While the AMD criterion is rigorous, the conservation of the AMD is only granted in absence of mean-motion resonances (MMR). Here we extend the AMD-stability criterion to take into account mean-motion resonances, and more specifically the overlap of first-order MMR. If the MMR islands overlap, the system will experience generalized chaos leading to instability. The Hamiltonian of two massive planets on coplanar quasi-circular orbits can be reduced to an integrable one degree of freedom problem for period ratios close to a first-order MMR. We use the reduced Hamiltonian to derive a new overlap criterion for first-order MMR. This stability criterion unifies the previous criteria proposed in the literature and admits the criteria obtained for initially circular and eccentric orbits as limit cases. We then improve the definition of AMD-stability to take into account the short term chaos generated by MMR overlap. We analyze the outcome of this improved definition of AMD-stability on selected multi-planet systems from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopædia.

  3. Constructive Solution of Ellipticity Problem for the First Order Differential System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Balabaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We built first order elliptic systems with any possible number of unknown functions and the maximum possible number of unknowns, i.e, in general. These systems provide the basis for studying the properties of any first order elliptic systems. The study of the Cauchy-Riemann system and its generalizations led to the identification of a class of elliptic systems of first-order of a special structure. An integral representation of solutions is of great importance in the study of these systems. Only by means of a constructive method of integral representations we can solve a number of problems in the theory of elliptic systems related mainly to the boundary properties of solutions. The obtained integral representation could be applied to solve a number of problems that are hard to solve, if you rely only on the non-constructive methods. Some analogues of the theorems of Liouville, Weierstrass, Cauchy, Gauss, Morera, an analogue of Green’s formula are established, as well as an analogue of the maximum principle. The used matrix operators allow the new structural arrangement of the maximum number of linearly independent vector fields on spheres of any possible dimension. Also the built operators allow to obtain a constructive solution of the extended problem ”of the sum of squares” known in algebra. 

  4. All electroweak four fermion processes in electron-positron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berends, F.A.; Pittau, R.; Kleiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper studied the electroweak production of all possible four fermion states in e + e - collisions. Since the methods empolyed to evaluate the complete matrix elements and phase space are very general, all four fermion final states in which the charged particles are detected can be considered. Also all kinds of experimental cuts can be imposed. With the help of the constructed event generator a large number of illustrative results is obtained, which show the relevance of backgrounds to a number of signals. For LEP 200 the W-air signal and its background are discussed, for higher energies also Z-air and single W and Z signals and backgrounds are presented. (orig.)

  5. Experimental and micromagnetic first-order reversal curves analysis in NdFeB-based bulk 'exchange spring'-type permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, Horia [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Lupu, Nicoleta [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Stoleriu, Laurentiu [Al. I. Cuza University, Department of Solid State and Theoretical Physics, Blvd. Carol I, 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania)]. E-mail: lstoler@uaic.ro; Postolache, Petronel [Al. I. Cuza University, Department of Solid State and Theoretical Physics, Blvd. Carol I, 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Stancu, Alexandru [Al. I. Cuza University, Department of Solid State and Theoretical Physics, Blvd. Carol I, 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we present the results of applying the first-order reversal curves (FORC) diagram experimental method to the analysis of the magnetization processes of NdFeB-based permanents magnets. The FORC diagrams for this kind of exchange spring magnets show the existence of two magnetic phases-a soft magnetic phase and a hard magnetic one. Micromagnetic modeling is used for validating the hypotheses regarding the origin of the different features of the experimental FORC diagrams.

  6. Next-to-leading-order QCD and electroweak corrections to WWW production at proton-proton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Huss, Alexander; Knippen, Gernot

    2017-09-01

    Triple-W-boson production in proton-proton collisions allows for a direct access to the triple and quartic gauge couplings and provides a window to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. It is an important process to test the Standard Model (SM) and might be background to physics beyond the SM. We present a calculation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections to the production of WWW final states at proton-proton colliders with on-shell W bosons and combine the electroweak with the NLO QCD corrections. We study the impact of the corrections to the integrated cross sections and to kinematic distributions of the W bosons. The electroweak corrections are generically of the size of 5-10% for integrated cross sections and become more pronounced in specific phase-space regions. The real corrections induced by quark-photon scattering turn out to be as important as electroweak loops and photon bremsstrahlung corrections, but can be reduced by phase-space cuts. Considering that prior determinations of the photon parton distribution function (PDF) involve rather large uncertainties, we compare the results obtained with different photon PDFs and discuss the corresponding uncertainties in the NLO predictions. Moreover, we determine the scale and total PDF uncertainties at the LHC and a possible future 100 TeV pp collider.

  7. Thermodynamic variables of first-order entropy corrected Lovelock-AdS black holes: P{-}V criticality analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Amritendu; Biswas, Ritabrata

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a Lovelock-AdS black hole. Taking the first order logarithmic correction term in entropy we analyze the thermodynamic potentials like Helmholtz free energy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy. We find that all the thermodynamic potentials are decreasing functions of correction coefficient α . We also examined this correction coefficient must be positive by analysing P{-}V diagram. Further we study the P{-}V criticality and stability and find that presence of logarithmic correction in it is necessary to have critical points and stable phases. When P{-}V criticality appears, we calculate the critical volume V_c, critical pressure P_c and critical temperature T_c using different equations and show that there is no critical point for this black hole without thermal fluctuations. We also study the geometrothermodynamics of this kind of black holes. The Ricci scalar of the Ruppeiner metric is graphically analysed.

  8. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    KAUST Repository

    Regnery, J.

    2015-05-29

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.

  9. Time discretization of the point kinetic equations using matrix exponential method and First-Order Hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yujin; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Parlos, Alexander G.; Chong, Kil To

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical solution for stiff differential equations using matrix exponential method. • The approximation is based on First Order Hold assumption. • Various input examples applied to the point kinetics equations. • The method shows superior useful and effective activity. - Abstract: A system of nonlinear differential equations is derived to model the dynamics of neutron density and the delayed neutron precursors within a point kinetics equation modeling framework for a nuclear reactor. The point kinetic equations are mathematically characterized as stiff, occasionally nonlinear, ordinary differential equations, posing significant challenges when numerical solutions are sought and traditionally resulting in the need for smaller time step intervals within various computational schemes. In light of the above realization, the present paper proposes a new discretization method inspired by system-theoretic notions and technically based on a combination of the matrix exponential method (MEM) and the First-Order Hold (FOH) assumption. Under the proposed time discretization structure, the sampled-data representation of the nonlinear point kinetic system of equations is derived. The performance of the proposed time discretization procedure is evaluated using several case studies with sinusoidal reactivity profiles and multiple input examples (reactivity and neutron source function). It is shown, that by applying the proposed method under a First-Order Hold for the neutron density and the precursor concentrations at each time step interval, the stiffness problem associated with the point kinetic equations can be adequately addressed and resolved. Finally, as evidenced by the aforementioned detailed simulation studies, the proposed method retains its validity and accuracy for a wide range of reactor operating conditions, including large sampling periods dictated by physical and/or technical limitations associated with the current state of sensor and

  10. First-order transitions, symmetry, and the element of-expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukamel, D.; Krinsky, S.; Bak, P.

    1975-01-01

    The group theoretical method of Landau and Lifshitz was used to derive effective Hamiltonians for certain paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transitions having order-parameters with n greater than or equal to 4 components. A renormalization group analysis in 4-epsilon dimensions was performed. The first-order nature of the order-disorder transitions in Cr(n = 12), Eu(n = 12), UO 2 (n = 6), and MnO(n = 8) can be explained by noting that the corresponding Hamiltonians possess no stable fixed points in 4-epsilon dimensions. It is predicted that all fcc type I(anti m perpendicular anti k), type II and type III(anti m perpendicular [100], anti k = [1/2 01]) antiferromagnetic transitions are first-order. The work is intended to serve as a guide in an experimental search for new examples of first-order transitions. A 2m-component Hamiltonian is also considered which possesses a unique, nonisotropic, stable fixed point for each value of 2m greater than or equal to 4. When 2m = 4, the Hamiltonian describes the paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transitions in TbAu 2 , DyC 2 , Tb, Ho, Dy, and the structural transition in NbO 2 . If these transitions are second-order, it is predicted they all belong to the same universality class. For 2m = 6, the Hamiltonian describes the antiferromagnetic transitions in TbD 2 , Nd, K 2 IrCl 6 , and MnS 2 . These transitions belong to a single universality class

  11. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, J; Wing, A D; Alidina, M; Drewes, J E

    2015-08-01

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e., redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e., less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. First-order design of geodetic networks using the simulated annealing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berné, J. L.; Baselga, S.

    2004-09-01

    The general problem of the optimal design for a geodetic network subject to any extrinsic factors, namely the first-order design problem, can be dealt with as a numeric optimization problem. The classic theory of this problem and the optimization methods are revised. Then the innovative use of the simulated annealing method, which has been successfully applied in other fields, is presented for this classical geodetic problem. This method, belonging to iterative heuristic techniques in operational research, uses a thermodynamical analogy to crystalline networks to offer a solution that converges probabilistically to the global optimum. Basic formulation and some examples are studied.

  13. Estimation of periodic solutions number of first-order differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Gennady; Alferov, Gennady; Gorovenko, Polina; Sharlay, Artem

    2018-05-01

    The paper deals with first-order differential equations under the assumption that the right-hand side is a periodic function of time and continuous in the set of arguments. Pliss V.A. obtained the first results for a particular class of equations and showed that a number of theorems can not be continued. In this paper, it was possible to reduce the restrictions on the degree of smoothness of the right-hand side of the equation and obtain upper and lower bounds on the number of possible periodic solutions.

  14. Absence of first-order unbinding transitions of fluid and polymerized membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotehans, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    1990-01-01

    Unbinding transitions of fluid and polymerized membranes are studied by renormalization-group (RG) methods. Two different RG schemes are used and found to give rather consistent results. The fixed-point structure of both RG's exhibits a complex behavior as a function of the decay exponent tau for the fluctuation-induced interaction of the membranes. For tau greater than tau(S2) interacting membranes can undergo first-order transitions even in the strong-fluctuation regime. These estimates for tau(S2) imply, however, that both fluid and polymerized membranes unbind in a continuous way in the absence of lateral tension.

  15. Programming and Verifying a Declarative First-Order Prover in Isabelle/HOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Alexander Birch; Larsen, John Bruntse; Schlichtkrull, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We certify in the proof assistant Isabelle/HOL the soundness of a declarative first-order prover with equality. The LCF-style prover is a translation we have made, to Standard ML, of a prover in John Harrison’s Handbook of Practical Logic and Automated Reasoning. We certify it by replacing its ke......’s ML environment as an interactive application or can be used standalone in OCaml or Standard ML (or in other functional programming languages like Haskell and Scala with some additional work)....

  16. Lie group classification of first-order delay ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Roman; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Winternitz, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    A group classification of first-order delay ordinary differential equations (DODEs) accompanied by an equation for the delay parameter (delay relation) is presented. A subset of such systems (delay ordinary differential systems or DODSs), which consists of linear DODEs and solution-independent delay relations, have infinite-dimensional symmetry algebras—as do nonlinear ones that are linearizable by an invertible transformation of variables. Genuinely nonlinear DODSs have symmetry algebras of dimension n, . It is shown how exact analytical solutions of invariant DODSs can be obtained using symmetry reduction.

  17. Reliability Estimation of the Pultrusion Process Using the First-Order Reliability Method (FORM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    In the present study the reliability estimation of the pultrusion process of a flat plate is analyzed by using the first order reliability method (FORM). The implementation of the numerical process model is validated by comparing the deterministic temperature and cure degree profiles...... with corresponding analyses in the literature. The centerline degree of cure at the exit (CDOCE) being less than a critical value and the maximum composite temperature (Tmax) during the process being greater than a critical temperature are selected as the limit state functions (LSFs) for the FORM. The cumulative...

  18. NanoSafer vs. 1.1 - Nanomaterial risk assessment using first order modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Keld A.; Saber, Anne T.; Kristensen, Henrik V.

    2013-01-01

    for safe use of MN based on first order modeling. The hazard and case specific exposure as sessments are combined for an integrated risk evaluation and final control banding. Requested material da ta are typically available from the producers’ technical information sheets. The hazard data are given...... using the work room dimensions , ventilation rate, powder use rate, duration, and calculated or given emission rates. The hazard sc aling is based on direct assessment. The exposure band is derived from estimated acute and work day expo sure levels divided by a nano OEL calculated from the OEL...... to construct user specific work scenarios for exposure assessment is considered a highly versatile approach....

  19. An Implementable First-Order Primal-Dual Algorithm for Structured Convex Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many application problems of practical interest can be posed as structured convex optimization models. In this paper, we study a new first-order primaldual algorithm. The method can be easily implementable, provided that the resolvent operators of the component objective functions are simple to evaluate. We show that the proposed method can be interpreted as a proximal point algorithm with a customized metric proximal parameter. Convergence property is established under the analytic contraction framework. Finally, we verify the efficiency of the algorithm by solving the stable principal component pursuit problem.

  20. A Preconditioning Technique for First-Order Primal-Dual Splitting Method in Convex Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a preconditioning technique for the first-order primal-dual splitting method. The primal-dual splitting method offers a very general framework for solving a large class of optimization problems arising in image processing. The key idea of the preconditioning technique is that the constant iterative parameters are updated self-adaptively in the iteration process. We also give a simple and easy way to choose the diagonal preconditioners while the convergence of the iterative algorithm is maintained. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated on an image denoising problem. Numerical results show that the preconditioned iterative algorithm performs better than the original one.

  1. Poverty mapping based on first order dominance with an example from Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar M.; Salvucci, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel first-order dominance (FOD) approach to poverty mapping and compare its properties to small-area estimation. The FOD approach uses census data directly, is straightforward to implement, is multidimensional allowing for a broad conception of welfare and accounts rigorously...... for welfare distributions in both levels and trends. An application to Mozambique highlights the value of the approach, including its advantages in the monitoring and evaluation of public expenditures. We conclude that the FOD approach to poverty mapping constitutes a useful addition to the toolkit of policy...

  2. Poverty mapping based on first order dominance with an example from Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Salvucci, Vincenzo

    We explore a novel first order dominance (FOD) approach to poverty mapping and compare its properties to small area estimation. The FOD approach uses census data directly; is straightforward to implement; is multidimensional allowing for a broad conception of welfare; and accounts rigorously...... for welfare distributions in both levels and trends. An application to Mozambique highlights the value of the approach, including its advantages in the monitoring and evaluation of public expenditures. We conclude that the FOD approach to poverty mapping constitutes a useful addition to the toolkit of policy...

  3. Re-Investigation of Generalized Integrator Based Filters From a First-Order-System Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Zhen; Zhao, Rende; Mattavelli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The generalized integrator (GI)-based filters can be categorized into two types: one is related to quadrature signal generator (QSG), and the other is related to sequence filter (SF). The QSG is used for generating the in-quadrature sinusoidal signals and the SF works for extracting the symmetrical...... extended structures and thus restrict their applications. To overcome the drawback, this paper uses the first-order-system concept to re-investigate the GI-based filters, with which their working principles can be intuitively understood and their structure correlations can be easily discovered. Moreover...

  4. Investigation of the switching characteristics in ferroelectrics by first-order reversal curve diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancu, Alexandru; Mitoseriu, Liliana; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Piazza, Daniele; Galassi, Carmen; Ricinschi, Dan; Okuyama, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    First-order reversal curves (FORC) diagrams are proposed for describing the switching properties in ferroelectric materials. The method is applied for Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 (PZT) ferroelectric ceramics and films with different P(E) hysteresis and microstructural characteristics. The separation of the reversible and irreversible contributions to the ferroelectric polarization is explained in terms of microstructural characteristics of the investigated samples. The influence of parameters as field frequency, crystallite orientation, ferroelectric fatigue and porosity degree on the FORC diagrams is discussed

  5. Holographic currents in first order Gravity and finite Fefferman-Graham expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banados, Maximo; Miskovic, Olivera; Theisen, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We study the holographic currents associated to Chern-Simons theories. We start with an example in three dimensions and find the holographic representations of vector and chiral currents reproducing the correct expression for the chiral anomaly. In five dimensions, Chern-Simons theory for AdS group describes first order gravity and we show that there exists a gauge fixing leading to a finite Fefferman-Graham expansion. We derive the corresponding holographic currents, namely, the stress tensor and spin current which couple to the metric and torsional degrees of freedom at the boundary, respectively. We obtain the correct Ward identities for these currents by looking at the bulk constraint equations

  6. Existence of weak solutions to first-order stationary mean-field games with Dirichlet conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita; Gomes, Diogo A.; Tada, Teruo

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study first-order stationary monotone mean-field games (MFGs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions. While for Hamilton--Jacobi equations Dirichlet conditions may not be satisfied, here, we establish the existence of solutions of MFGs that satisfy those conditions. To construct these solutions, we introduce a monotone regularized problem. Applying Schaefer's fixed-point theorem and using the monotonicity of the MFG, we verify that there exists a unique weak solution to the regularized problem. Finally, we take the limit of the solutions of the regularized problem and using Minty's method, we show the existence of weak solutions to the original MFG.

  7. First-order convex feasibility algorithms for x-ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms in computed tomography (CT) are based on algorithms for solving a particular optimization problem. Design of the IIR algorithm, therefore, is aided by knowledge of the solution to the optimization problem on which it is based. Often times...... problems. Conclusions: Formulation of convex feasibility problems can provide a useful alternative to unconstrained optimization when designing IIR algorithms for CT. The approach is amenable to recent methods for accelerating first-order algorithms which may be particularly useful for CT with limited...

  8. Existence of weak solutions to first-order stationary mean-field games with Dirichlet conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita

    2018-04-19

    In this paper, we study first-order stationary monotone mean-field games (MFGs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions. While for Hamilton--Jacobi equations Dirichlet conditions may not be satisfied, here, we establish the existence of solutions of MFGs that satisfy those conditions. To construct these solutions, we introduce a monotone regularized problem. Applying Schaefer\\'s fixed-point theorem and using the monotonicity of the MFG, we verify that there exists a unique weak solution to the regularized problem. Finally, we take the limit of the solutions of the regularized problem and using Minty\\'s method, we show the existence of weak solutions to the original MFG.

  9. Tunable first-order resistorless all-pass filter with low output impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a voltage mode cascadable single active element tunable first-order all-pass filter with a single passive component. The active element used to realise the filter is a new building block termed as differential difference dual-X current conveyor with a buffered output (DD-DXCCII). The filter is thus realized with the help of a DD-DXCCII, a capacitor, and a MOS transistor. By exploiting the low output impedance, a higher order filter is also realized. Nonideal and parasitic study is also carried out on the realised filters. The proposed DD-DXCCII filters are simulated using TSMC the 0.25 µm technology.

  10. Some remarks on real numbers induced by first-order spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Sune; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of a first-order sentence is the set of natural numbers occurring as the cardinalities of finite models of the sentence. In a recent survey, Durand et al. introduce a new class of real numbers, the spectral reals, induced by spectra and pose two open problems associated to this class...... may occur, and (iv) every right-computable real number between 0 and 1 occurs as the subword entropy of a spectral real. In addition, Durand et al. note that the set of spectral reals is not closed under addition or multiplication. We extend this result by showing that the class of spectral reals...

  11. A calculation methodology applied for fuel management in PWR type reactors using first order perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt has been made to obtain a strategy coherent with the available instruments and that could be implemented with future developments. A calculation methodology was developed for fuel reload in PWR reactors, which evolves cell calculation with the HAMMER-TECHNION code and neutronics calculation with the CITATION code.The management strategy adopted consists of fuel element position changing at the beginning of each reactor cycle in order to decrease the radial peak factor. The bi-dimensional, two group First Order perturbation theory was used for the mathematical modeling. (L.C.J.A.)

  12. First-order systems of linear partial differential equations: normal forms, canonical systems, transform methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Toparkus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider first-order systems with constant coefficients for two real-valued functions of two real variables. This is both a problem in itself, as well as an alternative view of the classical linear partial differential equations of second order with constant coefficients. The classification of the systems is done using elementary methods of linear algebra. Each type presents its special canonical form in the associated characteristic coordinate system. Then you can formulate initial value problems in appropriate basic areas, and you can try to achieve a solution of these problems by means of transform methods.

  13. The scope for first-order tests of light speed anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, H.

    1983-01-01

    New optical experiments aimed at testing light speed anisotropy to first-order in v/c are proposed on the basis of an intuitive enquiry into the physical processes by which the vacuum exhibits zero dispersion when regulating the proppagation of light waves. Such experiments can be justified because standing waves are present in experiments of the Michelson-Morley type and these may have a disturbing influence on light propagation speed in the standing-wave region. Though a null result from an initial experiment is reported, the outcome of a second experiment yet to be performed is needed to reach a conclusion from this investigation

  14. Production of baryon asymmetry of the universe at the electroweak era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India)

    1996-05-01

    Author review the elements which enter the calculation of baryon asymmetry at the electroweak scale. We assume the bubble wall created during the phase transition to be sufficiently thin and show that like the (heavy) t quark, the (light) b quark can also produce the observed baryon asymmetry, provided the CP violation within the wall is about two orders of magnitude larger for b quark compared to that for the t quark. (author). 12 refs.

  15. Looking hard at the electroweak force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, Ulrich; Errede, Steven; Mueller, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    While recent experiments have beautifully confirmed many of the predictions of the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, some direct consequences of the electroweak symmetry involve special properties of the three force carriers - the electrically charged W and neutral Z carrying the weak force and the photon of electromagnetism. These special properties have yet to be measured accurately. In the electroweak picture these force carriers (vector bosons) can interact with each other. These properties are 'non-abelian' - they are dependent on the order in which they are applied. [Most operations can be applied in any order, for example simple arithmetic: 6x(3+2) = (6x3)+(6x2). These are 'abelian'. An example of a non-abelian operator is the logarithm: log(x+y) does not equal log(x) + log(y).] Summarizing the current theoretical and experimental understanding of these self-interactions, and discussing the prospects of measuring them in future experiments, was the purpose of the ''International Symposium on Vector Boson Self-Interactions'' held earlier this year at UCLA, the first meeting entirely devoted to this topic. Progress in measuring the selfcouplings of vector bosons has been fueled recently by the CDF and DO Collaborations at Fermilab's protonantiproton collider. Using data from vector boson pair production, these studies are extracting information on the WW-photon, WWZ and ZZphoton interactions, as well as the magnetic and electric quadrupole moments of the W boson. At UCLA, Hiro Aihara (Berkeley) and Theresa Fuess (Argonne) summarized the CDF and DO results from the 1992-93 run. Information on potential ZZ-gamma interactions can also be gained from single photon production at CERN's LEP electronpositron collider, as detailed by Peter Maettig (Bonn), and from rare B meson decays, reviewed by Steve Playfer (Syracuse)

  16. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the lectures will be on the role of the Higgs boson in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, both in the Standard Model and in models of New Physics. In particular, I will discuss how a determination of its couplings to matter and gauge fields can give important information on the nature and origin of the Higgs boson. I will thus review the picture on Higgs couplings implied by the current experimental data and examine further interesting processes that can be measured in the future.

  17. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the lectures will be on the role of the Higgs boson in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, both in the Standard Model and in models of New Physics. In particular, I will discuss how a determination of its couplings to matter and gauge fields can give important information on the nature and origin of the Higgs boson. I will thus review the picture on Higgs couplings implied by the current experimental data and examine further interesting processes that can be measured in the future.

  18. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the lectures will be on the role of the Higgs boson in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, both in the Standard Model and in models of New Physics. In particular, I will discuss how a determination of its couplings to matter and gauge fields can give important information on the nature and origin of the Higgs boson. I will thus review the picture on Higgs couplings implied by the current experimental data and examine further interesting processes that can be measured in the future.

  19. Electroweak physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, H.

    1993-08-01

    Preliminary results on electroweak physics from the 1992--1993 run with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider are presented. New measurements of the ratio of the W and Z production cross sections times the branching fractions for subsequent decay into leptons are shown. The W width, Γ(W), and a limit on the top-quark mass independent of decay mode are extracted. The status of a measurement of the charge asymmetry of electrons from W decay is given. Also shown are a study of diboson (Wγ, Zγ and WZ) production and a search for a new neutral gauge boson (Z')

  20. The renormalization of the electroweak standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Spiesberger, H.; Hollik, W.

    1984-03-01

    A renormalization scheme for the electroweak standard model is presented in which the electric charge and the masses of the gauge bosons, Higgs particle and fermions are used as physical parameters. The photon is treated such that quantum electrodynamics is contained in the usual form. Field renormalization respecting the gauge symmetry gives finite Green functions. The Ward identities between the Green functions of the unphysical sector allow a renormalization that maintains the simple pole structure of the propagators. Explicit results for the renormalization self energies and vertex functions are given. They can be directly used as building blocks for the evaluation of l-loop radiative corrections. (orig.)

  1. Electroweak symmetry breaking beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, two key issues related to electroweak symmetry breaking are addressed. First, how fine-tuned different models are that trigger this phenomenon? Second, even if a light Higgs boson exists, does it have to be necessarily elementary? After a brief introduction, the fine-tuning aspects of the MSSM, NMSSM, generalized NMSSM and GMSB scenarios shall be reviewed, then the little Higgs, composite Higgs and the Higgsless models shall be compared. Finally, a broad overview will be given on where we stand at the end of 2011. (author)

  2. Constraining Lorentz Violation in Electroweak Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    For practical reasons, the majority of past Lorentz tests has involved stable or quasistable particles, such as photons, neutrinos, electrons, protons, and neutrons. Similar efforts in the electroweak sector have only recently taken shape. Within this context, Lorentz-violation searches in the Standard-Model Extension’s Z-Boson sector will be discussed. It is argued that existing precision data on polarized electron-electron scattering can be employed to extract the first conservative two-sided limits on Lorentz breakdown in this sector at the level of 10-7.

  3. First order augmentation to tensor voting for boundary inference and multiscale analysis in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wai-Shun; Tang, Chi-Keung; Mordohai, Philippos; Medioni, Gérard

    2004-05-01

    Most computer vision applications require the reliable detection of boundaries. In the presence of outliers, missing data, orientation discontinuities, and occlusion, this problem is particularly challenging. We propose to address it by complementing the tensor voting framework, which was limited to second order properties, with first order representation and voting. First order voting fields and a mechanism to vote for 3D surface and volume boundaries and curve endpoints in 3D are defined. Boundary inference is also useful for a second difficult problem in grouping, namely, automatic scale selection. We propose an algorithm that automatically infers the smallest scale that can preserve the finest details. Our algorithm then proceeds with progressively larger scales to ensure continuity where it has not been achieved. Therefore, the proposed approach does not oversmooth features or delay the handling of boundaries and discontinuities until model misfit occurs. The interaction of smooth features, boundaries, and outliers is accommodated by the unified representation, making possible the perceptual organization of data in curves, surfaces, volumes, and their boundaries simultaneously. We present results on a variety of data sets to show the efficacy of the improved formalism.

  4. Transformation of general binary MRF minimization to the first-order case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    We introduce a transformation of general higher-order Markov random field with binary labels into a first-order one that has the same minima as the original. Moreover, we formalize a framework for approximately minimizing higher-order multi-label MRF energies that combines the new reduction with the fusion-move and QPBO algorithms. While many computer vision problems today are formulated as energy minimization problems, they have mostly been limited to using first-order energies, which consist of unary and pairwise clique potentials, with a few exceptions that consider triples. This is because of the lack of efficient algorithms to optimize energies with higher-order interactions. Our algorithm challenges this restriction that limits the representational power of the models so that higher-order energies can be used to capture the rich statistics of natural scenes. We also show that some minimization methods can be considered special cases of the present framework, as well as comparing the new method experimentally with other such techniques.

  5. Paraxial propagation of the first-order chirped Airy vortex beams in a chiral medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jintao; Zhang, Jianbin; Ye, Junran; Liu, Haowei; Liang, Zhuoying; Long, Shangjie; Zhou, Kangzhu; Deng, Dongmei

    2018-03-05

    We introduce the propagation of the first-order chirped Airy vortex beams (FCAiV) in a chiral medium analytically. Results show that the FCAiV beams split into the left circularly polarized vortex (LCPV) beams and the right circularly polarized vortex (RCPV) beams, which have totally different propagation trajectories in the chiral medium. In this paper, we investigate the effects of the first-order chirped parameter β, the chiral parameter γ and the optical vortex on the propagation process of the FCAiV beams. It is shown that the propagation trajectory of the FCAiV beams declines with the chirped parameter increasing. Besides, the increase of the chiral parameter acting on the LCPV beams makes the relative position between the main lobe and the optical vortex further while the effect on the RCPV beams is the opposite. Furthermore, the relative position between the main lobe and the optical vortex contributes to the position of the intensity focusing. Meanwhile, with the chiral parameter increasing, the maximum gradient and scattering forces of the LCPV beams decrease but those of the RCPV beams will increase during the propagation. It is significant that we can control the propagation trajectory, the intensity focusing position and the radiation forces of the FCAiV beams by varying the chirped parameter and the chiral parameter.

  6. Generalized first-order kinetic model for biosolids decomposition and oxidation during hydrothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanableh, A

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop generalized first-order kinetic models to represent hydrothermal decomposition and oxidation of biosolids within a wide range of temperatures (200-450 degrees C). A lumping approach was used in which oxidation of the various organic ingredients was characterized by the chemical oxygen demand (COD), and decomposition was characterized by the particulate (i.e., nonfilterable) chemical oxygen demand (PCOD). Using the Arrhenius equation (k = k(o)e(-Ea/RT)), activation energy (Ea) levels were derived from 42 continuous-flow hydrothermal treatment experiments conducted at temperatures in the range of 200-450 degrees C. Using predetermined values for k(o) in the Arrhenius equation, the activation energies of the various organic ingredients were separated into 42 values for oxidation and a similar number for decomposition. The activation energy values were then classified into levels representing the relative ease at which the organic ingredients of the biosolids were oxidized or decomposed. The resulting simple first-order kinetic models adequately represented, within the experimental data range, hydrothermal decomposition of the organic particles as measured by PCOD and oxidation of the organic content as measured by COD. The modeling approach presented in the paper provide a simple and general framework suitable for assessing the relative reaction rates of the various organic ingredients of biosolids.

  7. Deterministic simulation of first-order scattering in virtual X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. E-mail: nicolas.freud@insa-lyon.fr; Duvauchelle, P.; Pistrui-Maximean, S.A.; Letang, J.-M.; Babot, D

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm is proposed to compute the contribution of first-order Compton- and Rayleigh-scattered radiation in X-ray imaging. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named virtual X-ray imaging. The physical models chosen to account for photon scattering are the well-known form factor and incoherent scattering function approximations, which are recalled in this paper and whose limits of validity are briefly discussed. The proposed algorithm, based on a voxel discretization of the inspected object, is presented in detail, as well as its results in simple configurations, which are shown to converge when the sampling steps are chosen sufficiently small. Simple criteria for choosing correct sampling steps (voxel and pixel size) are established. The order of magnitude of the computation time necessary to simulate first-order scattering images amounts to hours with a PC architecture and can even be decreased down to minutes, if only a profile is computed (along a linear detector). Finally, the results obtained with the proposed algorithm are compared to the ones given by the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and found to be in excellent accordance, which constitutes a validation of our algorithm. The advantages and drawbacks of the proposed deterministic method versus the Monte Carlo method are briefly discussed.

  8. Neutron Transport in Spatially Random Media: An Assessment of the Accuracy of First Order Smoothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2000-01-01

    A formalism has been developed for studying the transmission of neutrons through a spatially stochastic medium. The stochastic components are represented by absorbing plates of randomly varying strength and random position. This type of geometry enables the Feinberg-Galanin-Horning method to be employed and leads to the solution of a coupled set of linear equations for the flux at the plate positions. The matrix of the coefficients contains members that are random and these are solved by simulation. That is, the strength and plate positions are sampled from uniform distributions and the equations solved many times (in this case 10 5 simulations are carried out). Probability distributions for the plate transmission and reflection factors are constructed from which the mean and variance can be computed.These essentially exact solutions enable closure approximations to be assessed for accuracy. To this end, we have compared the mean and variance obtained from the first order smoothing approximation of Keller with the exact results and have found excellent agreement for the mean values but note deviations of up to 40% for the variance. Nevertheless, for the problems considered here, first order smoothing appears to be of practical value and is very efficient numerically in comparison with simulation

  9. Electroweak and strong penguins in B±,0 →ππ,πK and KK decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Palmer, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate CP-violating rates and asymmetry parameters in charged and neutral B→ππ, πK and anti KK decays arising from the interference of tree and penguin (strong and electroweak) amplitudes with different strong and CKM phases. The perturbative strong (electroweak) phases develop at order α s (α em ) from absorptive parts of one-loop matrix elements of the next-to-leading (leading) logarithm corrected effective Hamiltonian. The BSW model is used to estimate the hadronic matrix elements. Based on this model, we find that the effect of strong phases and penguins is substantial in most channels, drastic in many. However, a measurement of the time dependence parameter α ε+ε' in the π + π - channel is only influenced at the 20% level by the complication of the penguins. Recent flavor sum rules developed for B 0,± →ππ, πK, K anti K amplitudes are tested in this model. Some are well satisfied, others badly violated, when electroweak penguins are included. (orig.)

  10. ((ε')/(ε)) and the electroweak penguin contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirigliano, V.; Donoghue, J.F.; Golowich, E.; Maltman, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our dispersive sum rule calculation of the electroweak penguin contribution to ((ε')/(ε)) is reviewed. A more recent analysis based on the finite-energy sum rule approach is described. Finally, a new determination of the electroweak penguin contribution to ((ε')/(ε)) is presented

  11. Searches for Electroweak SUSY by ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Khoo, Teng Jian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    While strongly-produced SUSY and third-generation squark searches have already breached the TeV mass range, direct production of electroweak gauginos is less tightly constrained. New searches are presented, showcasing novel strategies for filling in the gaps in sensitivity to electroweak SUSY at ATLAS and CMS.

  12. First-order reversal curves of single domain particles: diluted random assemblages and chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, R.

    2009-04-01

    Exact magnetic models can be used to calculate first-order reversal curves (FORC) of single domain (SD) particle assemblages, as shown by Newell [2005] for the case of isolated Stoner-Wohlfarth particles. After overcoming experimental difficulties, a FORC diagram sharing many similarities to Newell's model has been measured on a lake sediment sample (see A.P. Chen et al., "Quantification of magnetofossils using first-order reversal curves", EGU General Assembly 2009, Abstracts Vol. 11, EGU2009-10719). This sample contains abundant magnetofossils, as shown by coercivity analysis and electron microscopy, therefore suggesting that well dispersed, intact magnetosome chains are the main SD carriers. Subtle differences between the reversible and the irreversible contributions of the measured FORC distribution suggest that magnetosome chains might not be correctly described by the Stoner-Wohlfarth model. To better understand the hysteresis properties of such chains, a simple magnetic model has been implemented, taking dipole-dipole interactions between particles within the same chain into account. The model results depend on the magnetosome elongation, the number of magnetosomes in a chain, and the gap between them. If the chain axis is subparallel to the applied field, the magnetic moment reverses by a pseudo-fanning mode, which is replaced by a pseudo-coherent rotation mode at greater angles. These reversal modes are intrinsically different from coherent rotation assumed Stoner-Wohlfarth model, resulting in FORC diagrams with a smaller reversible component. On the other hand, isolated authigenic SD particles can precipitate in the sediment matrix, as it might occur for pedogenic magnetite. In this case, an assembly of randomly located particles provides a possible model for the resulting FORC diagram. If the concentration of the particles is small, each particle is affected by a random interaction field whose statistical distribution can be calculated from first

  13. Supersymmetric contribution to the electroweak ρ parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.; Hagiwara, K.

    1990-01-01

    Contributions to the electroweak ρ parameter, the ratio of the neutral- and charged-current strengths at zero-momentum transfer, are studied in the minimal extension of the standard model (SM) with softly broken supersymmetry. The effects of the extended Higgs sector, the gaugino-Higgsino sector, the light-squark--slepton sector and that of the stop-sbottom sector are studied separately, and the role of the custodial SU(2) V symmetry in each sector is clarified. The stop-sbottom sector is found to give potentially a most significant contribution to δρ which can double the standard-model contribution from the top-bottom sector, whereas all the remaining sectors contribute to δρ at the level of at most a few x10 -3 . In the supergravity model with radiative electroweak gauge symmetry breaking there are no extra sources of the SU(2) V breaking at the grand unification scale other than those present already in the SM, and the resulting δρ is found to be significantly smaller than in the general case. Constraints on the allowed range of δρ in the supergravity models are given by taking account of existing and prospective experimental mass limits of additional particles at CERN LEP and Sp bar pS and Fermilab Tevatron

  14. Precision electroweak measurements on the $Z$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

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Eisenstein, B I; Elia, R; Erdos, E; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fan, C; Fernández, J P; Fero, M J; Flood, K; Frey, R; Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Furuno, K; Garwin, E L; Gillman, T; Gladding, G; Hallewell, G D; Hart, E L; Hasegawa, Y; Hasuko, K; Hedges, S; Hertzbach, S S; Hildreth, M D; Hitlin, D G; Honma, A; Huber, J S; Huffer, M E; Hughes, E W; Huynh, X; Hwang, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Johnson, R A; Junk, T R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kang, H J; Karliner, I; Kawahara, H; Kelsey, M H; Kendall, H W; Kim, Y D; King, M; King, R; Kofler, R R; Krishna, N M; Kwon, Y; Labs, J F; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Lath, A; Lauber, J A; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Liu, M X; Loreti, M; Lu, A; Lynch, H L; Ma, J; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Masuda, H; Mazzucato, E; McGowan, J F; McKemey, A K; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Mockett, P M; 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Usher, T; Vavra, J; Vella, E; Venuti, J P; Verdier, R; Wagner, S R; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Wang, J; Watts, S J; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; White, S L; Wickens, F J; Williams, D A; Williams, D C; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Word, G B; Wright, T R; Wyss, J; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, X Q; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H; Zapalac, G; Zdarko, R W; Zeitlin, C; Zhou, J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. The data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarised beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarised asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, $MZ$ and $GZ$, and its couplings to fermions, for example the $ ho$ parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: egin{eqnarray*} MZ & = & 91.1875 pm 0.0021~GeV \\ GZ & = & 2.4952 pm 0.0023~GeV \\ ho_ell & = & 1.0050 pm 0.0010 \\ swsqeffl & =& 0.23153 pm 0.00016 ,. end{eqnarray*} The number of light neutrino species is determined to be $2.9840pm0.0082$, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the pr...

  15. Electroweak processes in external active media

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Expanding on the concept of the authors’ previous book “Electroweak Processes in External Electromagnetic Fields,” this new book systematically describes the investigation methods for the effects of external active media, both strong electromagnetic fields and hot dense plasma, in quantum processes. Solving the solar neutrino puzzle in a unique experiment conducted with the help of the heavy-water detector at the Sudbery Neutrino Observatory, along with another neutrino experiments, brings to the fore electroweak physics in an active external medium. It is effectively demonstrated that processes of neutrino interactions with active media of astrophysical objects may lead, under some physical conditions, to such interesting effects as neutrino-driven shockwave revival in a supernova explosion, a “cherry stone shooting” mechanism for pulsar natal kick, and a neutrino pulsar. It is also shown how poor estimates of particle dispersion in external active media sometimes lead to confusion. The book...

  16. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/whatever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    In these two lectures the author discusses electroweak symmetry breaking from a general perspective, stressing properties that are model independent and follow just from the assumption that the electroweak interactions are described by a spontaneously broken gauge theory. This means he assumes the Higgs mechanism though not necessarily the existence of Higgs bosons. The first lecture presents the general framework of a spontaneously broken gauge theory: (1) the Higgs mechanism sui generis, with or without Higgs boson(s) and (2) the implications of symmetry and unitarity for the mass scale and interaction strength of the new physics that the Higgs mechanism requires. In addition he reviews a softer theoretical argument based on the naturalness problem which leads to a prejudice against Higgs bosons unless they are supersymmetric. This is a prejudice, not a theorem, and it could be overturned in the future by a clever new idea. In the second lecture he illustrates the general framework by reviewing some specific models: (1) the Weinberg-Salam model of the Higgs sector; (2) the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Weinberg-Salam model; and (3) technicolor as an example of the Higgs mechanism without Higgs bosons. He concludes the second lecture with a discussion of strong WW scattering that must occur if L SB lives above 1 TeV. In particular he describes some of the experimental signals and backgrounds at the SSC. 57 refs., 12 figs

  17. Hamilton-Jacobi approach for first order actions and theories with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, M.C.; Pimentel, B.M.; Pompeia, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we analyze systems described by Lagrangians with higher order derivatives in the context of the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism for first order actions. Two different approaches are studied here: the first one is analogous to the description of theories with higher derivatives in the hamiltonian formalism according to [D.M. Gitman, S.L. Lyakhovich, I.V. Tyutin, Soviet Phys. J. 26 (1983) 730; D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Quantization of Fields with Constraints, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, 1990] the second treats the case where degenerate coordinate are present, in an analogy to reference [D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Nucl. Phys. B 630 (2002) 509]. Several examples are analyzed where a comparison between both approaches is made

  18. New developments in analytical calculation of first order scattering for 3D complex objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe; Berthier, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    The principle of the analytical calculation of first order scattering used in our simulation code named VXI (Virtual X-ray Imaging) is based on a double ray-tracing. The first step consists in realizing a ray-tracing from the X-ray source point to each point of the object (an elementary volume in practice) including attenuation effect in the primary beam. This calculation gives the number of photons and their direction arriving on each voxel. A voxel acts as a secondary source which properties accord to the physics of X-ray scattering (Compton and Rayleigh). The second step of the ray-tracing is then done from each voxel of the object in the direction of each pixel of the detector, taking into account the attenuation along the scattering path. To simulate a 3D complex object, the first problem consists in realizing an automatic 3D sampling of the object. This is done by using an octree-based method optimized for deterministic scattering computation. The basic octree method consists in dividing recursively the volume of the object in decreasing-size voxels until each of them is completely included under the surface of the sample. The object volume is then always under evaluated. This is a problem because the scattering phenomenon strongly depends on the real volume of the object. The second problem is that artefacts due to sampling effects can occur in synthesis images. These two particular aspects are taken into account in our simulation code and an optimized octree-based method has been specially developed for this application. To respond to the first problem, our 3D sampling algorithm may accept voxels on the surface of the sample under conditions defined by the user. The second problem is treated in generating a random sampling instead of a regular one. The algorithm developed for 3D sampling is easily configurable, fast (about a few seconds maximum), robust and can be applied to all object shapes (thin, massive). The sampling time depends on the number of

  19. Periodic solutions of first-order functional differential equations in population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Padhi, Seshadev; Srinivasu, P D N

    2014-01-01

    This book provides cutting-edge results on the existence of multiple positive periodic solutions of first-order functional differential equations. It demonstrates how the Leggett-Williams fixed-point theorem can be applied to study the existence of two or three positive periodic solutions of functional differential equations with real-world applications, particularly with regard to the Lasota-Wazewska model, the Hematopoiesis model, the Nicholsons Blowflies model, and some models with Allee effects. Many interesting sufficient conditions are given for the dynamics that include nonlinear characteristics exhibited by population models. The last chapter provides results related to the global appeal of solutions to the models considered in the earlier chapters. The techniques used in this book can be easily understood by anyone with a basic knowledge of analysis. This book offers a valuable reference guide for students and researchers in the field of differential equations with applications to biology, ecology, a...

  20. Sensitivity Weaknesses in Application of some Statistical Distribution in First Order Reliability Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Enevoldsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    It has been observed and shown that in some examples a sensitivity analysis of the first order reliability index results in increasing reliability index, when the standard deviation for a stochastic variable is increased while the expected value is fixed. This unfortunate behaviour can occur when...... a stochastic variable is modelled by an asymmetrical density function. For lognormally, Gumbel and Weibull distributed stochastic variables it is shown for which combinations of the/3-point, the expected value and standard deviation the weakness can occur. In relation to practical application the behaviour...... is probably rather infrequent. A simple example is shown as illustration and to exemplify that for second order reliability methods and for exact calculations of the probability of failure this behaviour is much more infrequent....