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Sample records for finite beta effects

  1. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leboeuf, J.-N.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurita, Gen-ichi

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  2. Configurational Variations and Finite-Beta Effects on Neoclassical Viscosities and Flows in Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.; Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry on neoclassical flows and viscosities for the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) is investigated using the PENTA code [1,2]. Specifically, two topics are investigated: (1) finite-beta effects and (2) configurational variations. The PENTA code is used to calculate flows in HSX with the vacuum magnetic geometry and with finite-beta magnetic surfaces from the VMEC equilibrium code. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX will be discussed.[0pt] [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [0pt] [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006).

  3. Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, R.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Okamoto, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on the neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device are investigated with the DKES (Drift Kinetic Equation Solver) code. In the finite-{beta} configuration, even orbits of deeply trapped particles deviate significantly from magnetic flux surfaces. Thus, neoclassical ripple transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration are several times larger than those in the vacuum configuration under the same condition of temperatures and radial electric fields. When the plasma temperature is several keV, a bifurcation of the electric fields appears under the ambipolarity condition, and sufficient large radial electric fields can be generated. As a result, the ExB drift rectifies orbits of particles and improves significantly the transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration. (author)

  4. Fast sausage modes in magnetic tubes with continuous transverse profiles: effects of a finite plasma beta

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    While standing fast sausage modes in flare loops are often invoked to interpret quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flares, it is unclear as to how they are influenced by the combined effects of a continuous transverse structuring and a finite internal plasma beta ($\\beta_{\\rm i}$). We derive a generic dispersion relation (DR) governing linear sausage waves in straight magnetic tubes for which plasma pressure is not negligible and the density and temperature inhomogeneities of essentially arbitrary form take place in a layer of arbitrary width. Focusing on fast modes, we find that $\\beta_{\\rm i}$ only weakly influences $k_{\\rm c}$, the critical longitudinal wavenumber separating the leaky from trapped modes. Likewise, for both trapped and leaky modes, the periods $P$ in units of the transverse fast time depend only weakly on $\\beta_{\\rm i}$, which is compatible with the fact that the effective wavevectors of fast sausage modes are largely perpendicular to the background magnetic field. However, a weak $...

  5. Fast Sausage Modes in Magnetic Tubes with Continuous Transverse Profiles: Effects of a Finite Plasma Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    While standing fast sausage modes in flare loops are often invoked to interpret quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flares, it is unclear as to how they are influenced by the combined effects of a continuous transverse structuring and a finite internal plasma beta ({β }{{i}}). We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in straight magnetic tubes for which plasma pressure is not negligible, and the density and temperature inhomogeneities of essentially arbitrary form take place in a layer of arbitrary width. Focusing on fast modes, we find that {β }{{i}} only weakly influences {k}{{c}}, the critical longitudinal wavenumber separating the leaky from trapped modes. Likewise, for both trapped and leaky modes, the periods P in units of the transverse fast time depend only weakly on {β }{{i}}, which is compatible with the fact that the effective wave vectors of fast sausage modes are largely perpendicular to the background magnetic field. However, a weak {β }{{i}} dependence of the damping times τ is seen only when the length-to-radius ratio L/R is ∼50% larger than some critical value π /({k}{{c}}R), which itself rather sensitively depends on the density contrast, profile steepness, as well as on how the transverse structuring is described. In the context of QPPs, we conclude that the much simpler zero-beta theory can be employed for trapped modes, as long as one sees the deduced internal Alfvén speed as actually being the fast speed. In contrast, effects due to a finite beta in flare loops should be considered when leaky modes are exploited.

  6. Finite beta effects on low- and high-frequency magnetosonic waves in a two-ion-species plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toida, Mieko; Aota, Yukio [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    A magnetosonic wave propagating perpendicular to a magnetic field in a two-ion-species plasma has two branches, high-frequency and low-frequency modes. The finite beta effects on these modes are analyzed theoretically on the basis of the three-fluid model with finite ion and electron pressures. First, it is shown that the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the low-frequency mode is valid for amplitudes ε<ε{sub max}, where the upper limit of the amplitude ε{sub max} is given as a function of β (β is the ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energy densities), the density ratio, and the cyclotron frequency ratio of two ion species. Next, the linear dispersion relation and KdV equation for the high-frequency mode are derived, including β as a factor. In addition, the theory for heavy ion acceleration by the high-frequency mode pulse and the pulse damping due to this energy transfer in a finite beta plasma are presented.

  7. Finite-beta effects on the nonlinear evolution of the (m = 1; n = 1) mode in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Lynch, V.E.; Rothe, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    The stability and evolution of ISX-B-like plasmas are numerically studied using a reduced set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. For a sequence of equilibria stable to ideal modes, the n = 1 mode changes from a tearing branch to a pressure-driven branch as ..beta../sup p/ is increased. When this mode is unstable at low beta, it is just the (m = 1;n = 1) tearing mode. Higher n modes also become linearly unstable with increasing ..beta../sub p/; they are essentially pressure driven and have a ballooning character. For low values of beta the instability is best described as a ..beta../sub p/ distortion of the (m = 1;n = 1) tearing mode. This mode drives many other helicities through toroidal and nonlinear couplings. As ..beta../sub p/ is increased, the growth of the m = 1 island slows down in time, going from exponential to linear before reconnection occurs. If ..beta../sub p/ is large enough, the island saturates without reconnection. A broad spectrum of other modes, driven by the (m = 1;n = 1) instability, is produced. These results agree with some observed features of MHD activity in ISX-B.

  8. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  9. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence in finite-beta helical plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Maeyama, S.; Nakajima, N.

    2014-05-01

    A saturation mechanism for microturbulence in a regime of weak zonal flow generation is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations. The study identifies a new saturation process of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence originating from the spatial structure of the KBM instabilities in a finite-beta Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma. Specifically, the most unstable KBM in LHD has an inclined mode structure with respect to the mid-plane of a torus, i.e., it has a finite radial wave-number in flux tube coordinates, in contrast to KBMs in tokamaks as well as ion-temperature gradient modes in tokamaks and helical systems. The simulations reveal that the growth of KBMs in LHD is saturated by nonlinear interactions of oppositely inclined convection cells through mutual shearing as well as by the zonal flow. The saturation mechanism is quantitatively investigated by analysis of the nonlinear entropy transfer that shows not only the mutual shearing but also a self-interaction with an elongated mode structure along the magnetic field line.

  10. Volume Effects in Discrete beta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan

    2011-01-01

    We calculate discrete beta functions corresponding to the two-lattice matching for the 2D O(N) models and Dyson's hierarchical model. We describe and explain finite-size effects such as the appearance of a nontrivial infrared fixed point that goes to infinity at infinite volume or the merging of an infrared and an ultraviolet fixed point. We present extensions of the RG flows to the complex coupling plane. We discuss the possibility of constructing a continuous beta function from the discrete one by using functional conjugation methods. We briefly discuss the relevance of these findings for the search of nontrivial fixed points in multiflavor lattice gauge theory models.

  11. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Weiland, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Chalmers University of Technology and EURATOM-VR Association, Gothenburg (Sweden); Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  12. Drift-Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma shear flow along a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-02-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows.

  13. Nuclear Zemach Moments and Finite-Size Corrections to Allowed Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X B; Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    The finite-size correction to $\\beta$-decay plays an important role in determining the expected antineutrino spectra from reactors at a level that is important for the reactor-neutrino anomaly. Here we express the leading-order finite-size correction to allowed $\\beta$-decay in terms of Zemach moments. We calculate the Zemach moments within a Hartree-Fock model using a Skyrme-like energy density functional. We find that the Zemach moments are increased relative to predictions based on the simple assumption of identical uniform nuclear-charge and weak-transition densities. However, for allowed ground-state to ground-state transitions in medium and heavy nuclei, the detailed nuclear structure calculations do not change the finite-size corrections significantly from the simple model predictions, and are only 10-15% larger than the latter even though the densities differ significantly.

  14. Low-energy. beta. -function in a finite super-Yang-Mills model with multiple mass scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Helayel-Neto, J.A. (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1985-02-14

    We compute the one-loop contribution to the low-energy light-fermion gauge coupling in a finite supersymmetric gauge theory with two mass scales: a heavy mass that breaks an initial N=4 supersymmetry down to N=2, but respects the finiteness, and a light mass that, for simplicity, is set to zero. We find that coupling grows with the mass of the heavy intermediate states. Hence the latter do not decouple at low energies, leading to large logarithms that invalidate low-energy perturbation theory. Consequently, further manipulations are required to obtain a meaningful perturbative expansion. Enforcing decoupling through finite renormalizations, that absorb the heavy mass effects into a redefinition of the parameters of the lagrangian, introduces an arbitrary subtraction mass ..mu... The requirement that the S-matrix elements be independent of ..mu.. leads to a non-trivial renormalization-group equation for the low-energy theory, with a non-vanishing ..beta..-function.

  15. Experimental method for reactor-noise measurements of effective beta. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.F.

    1981-09-01

    A variance-to-mean noise technique, modified to eliminate systematic errors from drifting of reactor power, has been used to infer integral values of effective beta for uranium and plutonium fueled fast reactor modk-ups. The measurement technique, including corrections for a finite detector-electrometer time response, is described together with preliminary beta measurement results.

  16. Finite Temperature Casimir Effect for Corrugated Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; SHAO Cheng-Gang; LUO Jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the path-integral method, the corrections to the Casimir energy due to the combined effect of surface roughness and the finite temperature are calculated. For the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates,the lateral Casimir force at finite temperature is obtained. The amplitude of the lateral Casimir force has a maximum at an optimal wavelength of λ≈ 2H with the mean plate distance H. This optimal parameter relation is almost independent of temperature.

  17. Effective permittivity of finite inhomogeneous objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghunathan, S.B.; Budko, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    A generalization of the S-parameter retrieval method for finite three-dimensional inhomogeneous objects under arbitrary illumination and observation conditions is presented. The effective permittivity of such objects may be rigorously defined as a solution of a nonlinear inverse scattering problem.

  18. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  19. Dipole AlfvenVortex with Finite Ion Larmor Radius in a Low-Beta Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-Yu; HE Xian-Tu; LIU Zhen-Xing; CAO Jin-Bin

    2000-01-01

    A set of nonlinear fluid equations which include the effects of ion gyroradius is derived to describe Alfven vortex. The correction of finite ion gyroradius to the Alfven vortex in the inertial region is much more significant than that in the kinetic region. The amplitude of the vortex is enhanced in both regions. The scale of the vortex in the kinetic region becomes larger whereas it becomes smaller in the inertial region.

  20. Finite heat-capacity effects in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence the finite heat capacity of the matrix of regenerators on the performance of cryocoolers. The dynamics of the various parameters is treated in the harmonic approximation focussing on the finite heat-capacity effects, real-gas effects, and heat conduction. It is assumed that the flow resistance is zero, that the heat contact between the gas and the matrix is perfect, and that there is no mass storage in the matrix. Based on an energy-flow analysis, the limiting temperature, temperature profiles in the regenerator, and cooling powers are calculated. The discussion refers to pulse-tube refrigerators, but it is equally relevant for Stirling coolers and GM-coolers.

  1. EFFECTIVE STRESS AND STRAIN IN FINITE DEFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周喆; 秦伶俐; 黄文彬; 王红卫

    2004-01-01

    Whether the concept of effective stress and strain in elastic-plastic theory is still valid under the condition of finite deformation was mainly discussed. The uni-axial compression experiments in plane stress and plane strain states were chosen for study. In the two kinds of stress states, the stress- strain curve described by logarithm strain and rotated Kirchhoff stress matches the experiments data better than the curves defined by other stressstrain description.

  2. Finite temperature effects on CP violating asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Covi, L; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, F; Covi, Laura; Rius, Nuria; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, Francesco

    1998-01-01

    We compute the CP violating decay asymmetries relevant for baryogenesis scenarios involving the out of equilibrium decays of heavy particles, including the finite temperature effects arising from the background of light thermal particles which are present during the decay epoch. Thermal effects can modify the size of CP violation by a sizeable fraction in the decay of scalar particles, but we find interesting cancellations in the thermal corrections affecting the asymmetries in the decays of fermions, as well as in the decay of scalars in supersymmetric theories. We also estimate the effects which arise from the motion of the decaying particles with respect to the background plasma.

  3. Drift-Alfven turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of the finite beta plasma with warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    It was predicted [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 020701 (2016)] that two distinct drift-Alfven instabilities may be developed in the parallel shearing flow of finite beta plasmas ( 1 ≫β≫me/mi ) with comparable ion and electron temperatures. The first one is the shear-flow-modified drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping and exists in the shearless plasma as well. The second one is the shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the combined effect of the velocity shear and ion Landau damping and is absent in the shearless plasma flows. In the present paper, these drift-Alfven instabilities are examined numerically and analytically by including the electromagnetic response of the ions. The levels of the drift-Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of ion scattering by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same nonlinear effect of ion scattering, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating resulting from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence.

  4. The Efimov effect with finite range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms are receiving a lot of attention because of their interesting features in the few- and many-body sector. Strong interactions are frequently obtained in experiment by using a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering to large values. A striking feature of three-body systems with a large scattering is the emergence of a discrete scaling symmetry that is also known as the Efimov effect. The Efimov effect has been observed through the measurement of loss rates in experiments with ultracold atoms. It is, however, also relevant to nuclear physics where the three-nucleon bound state and some halo nuclei are considered to be examples of Efimov states. Such systems can be modeled conveniently with the zero-range limit, however, in many of such experiments the finite range of the interaction leads to significant corrections that need to be taken into account. I will discuss how a finite effective range can be included in calculations for three-body systems that display the Efimov effect and how this leads to novel universal relations. Applications to experiments with homonuclear and heteronuclear ultracold atomic gases are discussed. National Science Foundation PHY-1516077, PHY-1555030.

  5. Effective Stiffness: Generalizing Effective Resistance Sampling to Finite Element Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, Haim

    2011-01-01

    We define the notion of effective stiffness and show that it can used to build sparsifiers, algorithms that sparsify linear systems arising from finite-element discretizations of PDEs. In particular, we show that sampling $O(n\\log n)$ elements according to probabilities derived from effective stiffnesses yields an high quality preconditioner that can be used to solve the linear system in a small number of iterations. Effective stiffness generalizes the notion of effective resistance, a key ingredient of recent progress in developing nearly linear symmetric diagonally dominant (SDD) linear solvers. Solving finite elements problems is of considerably more interest than the solution of SDD linear systems, since the finite element method is frequently used to numerically solve PDEs arising in scientific and engineering applications. Unlike SDD systems, which are relatively easy to precondition, there has been limited success in designing fast solvers for finite element systems, and previous algorithms usually tar...

  6. The lipolytic effect of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor activation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, C A; Kendall, M J; Maxwell, S; Hughes, B

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of activation beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors on the process of lipolysis in human volunteers. Ten male subjects underwent a single-blind randomized cross-over trial using infusions of terbutaline (a specific beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), xamoterol (a partial beta 1-agonist with beta 2-adrenoceptor blocking activity) and saline (placebo control). The effect of these infusions on plasma potassium, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) (total and individual) and insulin levels was studied. 2. Terbutaline infusion induced a significant rise in plasma glucose and a fall in plasma potassium in keeping with its beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant properties. Xamoterol infusion had no significant effect on these values. Terbutaline infusion caused a greater rise in total and individual FFA than xamoterol, but both effects were significantly different from placebo. 3. The possible reasons for these results and their implications on the beta-adrenergic control of lipolysis are discussed. PMID:8383517

  7. Effective condition number for finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Cai; Chien, Cheng-Sheng; Huang, Hung-Tsai

    2007-01-01

    For solving the linear algebraic equations Ax=b with the symmetric and positive definite matrix A, from elliptic equations, the traditional condition number in the 2-norm is defined by Cond.=[lambda]1/[lambda]n, where [lambda]1 and [lambda]n are the maximal and minimal eigenvalues of the matrix A, respectively. The condition number is used to provide the bounds of the relative errors from the perturbation of both A and b. Such a Cond. can only be reached by the worst situation of all rounding errors and all b. For the given b, the true relative errors may be smaller, or even much smaller than the Cond., which is called the effective condition number in Chan and Foulser [Effectively well-conditioned linear systems, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 9 (1988) 963-969] and Christiansen and Hansen [The effective condition number applied to error analysis of certain boundary collocation methods, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 54(1) (1994) 15-36]. In this paper, we propose the new computational formulas for effective condition number Cond_eff, and define the new simplified effective condition number Cond_E. For the latter, we only need the eigenvector corresponding to the minimal eigenvalue of A, which can be easily obtained by the inverse power method. In this paper, we also apply the effective condition number for the finite difference method for Poisson's equation. The difference grids are not supposed to be quasiuniform. Under a non-orthogonality assumption, the effective condition number is proven to be O(1) for the homogeneous boundary conditions. Such a result is extraordinary, compared with the traditional , where hmin is the minimal meshspacing of the difference grids used. For the non-homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, the effective condition number is proven to be O(h-1/2) and , respectively, where h is the maximal meshspacing of the difference grids. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the analysis made.

  8. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  9. The effects of plasma beta and anisotropy instabilities on the dynamics of reconnecting magnetic fields in the heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Schoeffler, K M; Swisdak, M

    2011-01-01

    The plasma {\\beta} (the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) of a system can have a large effect on its dynamics as high {\\beta} enhances the effects of pressure anisotropies. We investigate the effects of {\\beta} in a system of stacked current sheets that break up into magnetic islands due to magnetic reconnection. We find significant differences between {\\beta} 1. At low {\\beta} growing magnetic islands are modestly elongated and become round as contraction releases magnetic stress and reduces magnetic energy. At high {\\beta} the increase of the parallel pressure in contracting islands causes saturation of modestly elongated islands as island cores approach the marginal firehose condition. Only highly elongated islands reach finite size. The kinking associated with the Weibel and firehose instabilities prevents full contraction of these islands, leading to a final state of highly elongated islands in which further reconnection is suppressed. The results are directly relevant to reconnecti...

  10. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  11. Finite-size effects in the spherical model of finite thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamati, H.

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the finite-size effects on the bulk critical behaviour of the d-dimensional mean spherical model confined to a film geometry with finite thickness L is reported. Along the finite direction different kinds of boundary conditions are applied: periodic (p), antiperiodic (a) and free surfaces with Dirichlet (D), Neumann (N) and a combination of Neumann and Dirichlet (ND) on both surfaces. A systematic method for the evaluation of the finite-size corrections to the free energy for the different types of boundary conditions is proposed. The free energy density and the equation for the spherical field are computed for arbitrary d. It is found, for 2 finite-size scaling form at the bulk critical temperature only for (p) and (a). For the remaining boundary conditions the standard finite-size scaling hypothesis is not valid. At d = 3, the critical amplitude of the singular part of the free energy (related to the so-called Casimir amplitude) is estimated. We obtain Δ(p) = -2ζ(3)/(5π) = -0.153 051..., Δ(a) = 0.274 543... and Δ(ND) = 0.019 22..., implying a fluctuation-induced attraction between the surfaces for (p) and repulsion in the other two cases. For (D) and (N) we find a logarithmic dependence on L.

  12. Exponential reduction of finite volume effects with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Cherman, Aleksey; Wagman, Michael L; Yaffe, Laurence G

    2016-01-01

    Flavor-twisted boundary conditions can be used for exponential reduction of finite volume artifacts in flavor-averaged observables in lattice QCD calculations with $SU(N_f)$ light quark flavor symmetry. Finite volume artifact reduction arises from destructive interference effects in a manner closely related to the phase averaging which leads to large $N_c$ volume independence. With a particular choice of flavor-twisted boundary conditions, finite volume artifacts for flavor-singlet observables in a hypercubic spacetime volume are reduced to the size of finite volume artifacts in a spacetime volume with periodic boundary conditions that is four times larger.

  13. Finite Larmor Radius Effects to Arbitrary Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, G.; Hansen, F.R.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1988-01-01

    A representation of a finite Larmor radius plasma is proposed, which permits the transition rL → ∞ without becoming mathematically ill-posed. It is being used in a two-dimensional guiding center plasma spectral code and may have useful analytical applications. The ions are represented as guiding...... centers and the Larmor radius is averaged analytically for every Fourier-mode. Finite Larmor radius densities and velocities are thus obtained from guiding center quantities by application of a filter in wave vector space....

  14. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  15. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  16. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  17. Neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity with effects of finite banana width for finite aspect ratio tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity has been developed to model transport phenomena, especially, toroidal plasma rotation for tokamaks with broken symmetry. Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the results of the numerical codes in the large aspect ratio limit. The theory has since been extended to include effects of finite aspect ratio and finite plasma β. Here, β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the magnetic field pressure. However, there are cases where the radial wavelength of the self-consistent perturbed magnetic field strength B on the perturbed magnetic surface is comparable to the width of the trapped particles, i.e., bananas. To accommodate those cases, the theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity is further extended here to include the effects of the finite banana width. The extended theory is developed using the orbit averaged drift kinetic equation in the low collisionality regimes. The results of the theory can now be used to model plasma transport, including toroidal plasma rotation, in real finite aspect ratio, and finite plasma β tokamaks with the radial wavelength of the perturbed symmetry breaking magnetic field strength comparable to or longer than the banana width.

  18. A joint finite mixture model for clustering genes from independent Gaussian and beta distributed data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yli-Harja Olli

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster analysis has become a standard computational method for gene function discovery as well as for more general explanatory data analysis. A number of different approaches have been proposed for that purpose, out of which different mixture models provide a principled probabilistic framework. Cluster analysis is increasingly often supplemented with multiple data sources nowadays, and these heterogeneous information sources should be made as efficient use of as possible. Results This paper presents a novel Beta-Gaussian mixture model (BGMM for clustering genes based on Gaussian distributed and beta distributed data. The proposed BGMM can be viewed as a natural extension of the beta mixture model (BMM and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The proposed BGMM method differs from other mixture model based methods in its integration of two different data types into a single and unified probabilistic modeling framework, which provides a more efficient use of multiple data sources than methods that analyze different data sources separately. Moreover, BGMM provides an exceedingly flexible modeling framework since many data sources can be modeled as Gaussian or beta distributed random variables, and it can also be extended to integrate data that have other parametric distributions as well, which adds even more flexibility to this model-based clustering framework. We developed three types of estimation algorithms for BGMM, the standard expectation maximization (EM algorithm, an approximated EM and a hybrid EM, and propose to tackle the model selection problem by well-known model selection criteria, for which we test the Akaike information criterion (AIC, a modified AIC (AIC3, the Bayesian information criterion (BIC, and the integrated classification likelihood-BIC (ICL-BIC. Conclusion Performance tests with simulated data show that combining two different data sources into a single mixture joint model greatly improves the clustering

  19. Finite-size effects in silica: a landscape perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saksaengwijit, A; Heuer, A [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and International Graduate School of Chemistry, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2007-05-23

    Finite-size effects are analysed for the well-known BKS model of silica. Results are presented for thermodynamic as well as dynamic observables which play a key role in the analysis of the potential energy landscape. It turns out that, for the analysed temperature range (T{>=}3000 K), a system with only N = 99 particles does not display significant finite-size effects in thermodynamic observables. In agreement with previous work, one observes finite-size effects for the dynamics. However, after rescaling of time the finite-size effects nearly disappear. These results suggest that for BKS-silica a system with only N = 99 particles is sufficiently large to study important properties of structural relaxation in the temperature range considered.

  20. Dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic effects on gastric antral motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P; Gottrup, F

    1984-01-01

    of bethanechol or pentagastrin inducing motor activity patterns as in the phase III of the MMC and the digestive state respectively. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by dopamine. The effect was significantly blocked by specifically acting dopaminergic blockers, while alpha- and beta......-adrenergic blockers were without any significant effects. Dose-response experiments with bethanechol and dopamine showed inhibition of a non-competitive type. Isoprenaline was used alone and in conjunction with selective blockade of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors during infusion of bethanechol which induces a pattern...... similar to phase III in the migrating myoelectric complex. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by isoprenaline. The effect could be significantly blocked by propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blocker) and by using in conjunction the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker practolol...

  1. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  2. Finite temperature Casimir effect for graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Fialkovsky, Ignat V; Vassilevich, Dmitri V

    2011-01-01

    We adopt the Dirac model for quasiparticles in graphene and calculate the finite temperature Casimir interaction between a suspended graphene layer and a parallel conducting surface. We find that at high temperature the Casimir interaction in such system is just one half of that for two ideal conductors separated by the same distance. In this limit single graphene layer behaves exactly as a Drude metal. In particular, the contribution of the TE mode is suppressed, while one of the TM mode saturates the ideal metal value. Behaviour of the Casimir interaction for intermediate temperatures and separations accessible for an experiment is studied in some detail. We also find an interesting interplay between two fundamental constants of graphene physics: the fine structure constant and the Fermi velocity.

  3. Effective results for unit equations over finitely generated domains

    CERN Document Server

    Evertse, Jan-Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Let A be a commutative domain containing Z which is finitely generated as a Z-algebra, and let a,b,c be non-zero elements of A. It follows from work of Siegel, Mahler, Parry and Lang that the equation (*) ax+by=c has only finitely many solutions in elements x,y of the unit group A* of A, but the proof following from their arguments is ineffective. Using linear forms in logarithms estimates of Baker and Coates, in 1979 Gy\\H{o}ry gave an effective proof of this finiteness result, in the special case that A is the ring of S-integers of an algebraic number field. Some years later, Gy\\H{o}ry extended this to a restricted class of finitely generated domains A, containing transcendental elements. In the present paper, we give an effective finiteness proof for the number of solutions of (*) for arbitrary domains A finitely generated over Z. In fact, we give an explicit upper bound for the `sizes' of the solutions x,y, in terms of defining parameters for A,a,b,c. In our proof, we use already existing effective finiten...

  4. Finite Number and Finite Size Effects in Relativistic Bose-Einstein Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiokawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic ideal Bose gas in a rectangular cavity is studied. Finite size corrections to the critical temperature are obtained by the heat kernel method. Using zeta-function regularization of one-loop effective potential, lower dimensional critical temperatures are calculated. In the presence of strong anisotropy, the condensation is shown to occur in multisteps. The criteria of this behavior is that critical temperatures corresponding to lower dimensional systems are smaller than the three dimensional critical temperature.

  5. Effect of heating rate on temperature of titanium alloy (. cap alpha. +. beta. ). -->. beta. transformaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridnev, V.N.; Ivasishin, O.M.; Markovskij, P.E. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1985-01-01

    The effect of doping of two-phase titaniums alloys and morphology of initial structure on the Tsub(t) temperature shift value of (..cap alpha..+..beta..)..--> beta.. transformation depending on heating rate is investigated. It has been found that the Tsub(t) shift occurs in the strictly determined temperature range depending on chemical alloy composition. The Tsub(t) shift is directly proportional to the Ksub(..beta..) coefficient applied as a quantitative alloying characteristic as well as a dimensional factor equal either to the plate thickness or the ..cap alpha..-phase globule diameter depending on the type of initial structure. In the limits of this temperature range the (..cap alpha..+..beta..)..--> beta..-transformation occurs completely according to the diffusion mechanism. The critical heating rate at which maximum permissible Tsub(t) value is attained and above which its stabilization is observed is determined by the same parameters - the alloy doping degree characterized by the Ksub(..beta..) coefficient and the ..cap alpha..-phase crystal dimensions in the initial structure.

  6. Finite Volume Effect of Baryons in Strange Hadronic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Xi; LI Lei; NING Ping-Zhi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2001-01-01

    The finite volume effect of baryons in strange hadronic matter (SHM) is studied within the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. As this effect is concerned, the saturation density of SHM turns lower, and the binding energy per baryon decreases. Its influence to the compression modulus of SHM is also discussed.

  7. Partial wave decomposition of finite-range effective tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Davesne, D; Pastore, A; Navarro, J

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the properties of the finite-range tensor term associated with the Gogny and M3Y effective interactions. In particular, by using a partial wave decomposition of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter, we show how we can extract their tensor parameters directly from microscopic results based on bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Furthermore, we show that the zero-range limit of both finite-range interactions has the form of the N3LO Skyrme pseudo-potential, which thus constitutes a reliable approximation in the density range relevant for finite nuclei. Finally, we use Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results to fix the tensor parameters for the three effective interactions.

  8. An acoustic finite element including viscothermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2007-01-01

    In acoustics it is generally assumed that viscous- en thermal boundary layer effects play a minor role in the propagation of sound waves. Hence, these effects are neglected in the basic set of equations describing the sound field. However, for geometries that include small confinements of air or thi

  9. Numerical {Delta}` studies of the nonlinear finite-{beta} tearing mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletzer, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    Tearing modes have recently attracted attention following theoretical successes in predicting the presence of magnetic island with moderate poloidal m = 3,4 and toroidal n = 2,3 mode numbers during TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) supershots. Classical linear resistive mode theory predicts instability when the asymptotic matching index {Delta}` defined as the jump of logarithmic derivative of the radial magnetic perturbation across the rational surface is positive. Recently, it was suggested that tearing modes could also persist when {Delta}`<0 provided bootstrap current effects are taken into account. In all the above theories, the crucial parameter which determines the stability from both the geometry and equilibrium profiles is {Delta}`. It is shown in the present study that the {Delta}` of the (m=2, n=1) mode computed with the PEST-3 code is virtually always positive. Saturation can nevertheless be achieved provided the symmetry breaking term of a current gradient is included in the resistive layer. (author) 3 figs., 11 refs.

  10. Finite-size effects for anisotropic bootstrap percolation : Logarithmic corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Hulshof, Tim

    2007-01-01

    In this note we analyse an anisotropic, two-dimensional bootstrap percolation model introduced by Gravner and Griffeath. We present upper and lower bounds on the finite-size effects. We discuss the similarities with the semi-oriented model introduced by Duarte.

  11. Analytical theory of finite-size effects in mechanical desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvortsov, A.M.; Klushin, L.I.; Fleer, G.J.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a unique system that allows exact analytical investigation of first- and second-order transitions with finite-size effects: mechanical desorption of an ideal lattice polymer chain grafted with one end to a solid substrate with a pulling force applied to the other end. We exploit the analo

  12. The catalytic role of beta effect in barotropization processes

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Griffies, S M

    2012-01-01

    The vertical structure of freely evolving, continuously stratified, quasi-geostrophic flow is investigated. We predict the final state organization, and in particular its vertical structure, using statistical mechanics and these predictions are tested against numerical simulations. The key role played by conservation laws in each layer, including the fine-grained enstrophy, is discussed. In general, the conservation laws, and in particular that enstrophy is conserved layer-wise, prevent complete barotropization, i.e., the tendency to reach the gravest vertical mode. The peculiar role of the $\\beta$-effect, i.e. of the existence of planetary vorticity gradients, is discussed. In particular, it is shown that increasing $\\beta$ increases the tendency toward barotropization through turbulent stirring. The effectiveness of barotropisation may be partly parameterized using the Rhines scale $2\\pi E_{0}^{1/4}/\\beta^{1/2}$. As this parameter decreases (beta increases) then barotropization can progress further, because...

  13. Effects of amphetamine and beta-endorphin fragments on maze performance in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B; de Boer, S.F.

    1990-01-01

    Fragments of beta-endorphin and amphetamine cause similar effects in some tests of maze behavior in rats. The present study served to compare the influence of amphetamine and two beta-endorphin fragments [beta-endorphin (beta E)-(2-9) and beta E-(2-16)] on maze behavior in more detail. In Experiment

  14. Coulomb effects in Fermi {beta} decay of {sup 74}Rb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oinonen, M. [CERN, EP Div., Geneva (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    Coulomb effects in the {beta} decay of {sup 74}Rb have been studied at ISOLDE. The observation of the non-analog feeding in the {beta} decay allows for an estimation of the Coulomb mixing parameter {delta}{sub IM}{sup 1}. The analysis of the total Coulomb correction {delta}{sub C} is still hampered by the uncertainty in the decay energy. (orig.)

  15. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  16. Suppression of Dielectronic Recombination Due to Finite Density Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolić, D; Korista, K T; Ferland, G J; Badnell, N R

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based-upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (ne = 1 cm^-3) and finite (ne=10^10 ...

  17. Beta decay of deformed r-process nuclei near A = 80 and A= 160, including odd-A and odd-odd nuclei, with the Skyrme finite-amplitude method

    CERN Document Server

    Shafer, T; Fröhlich, C; McLaughlin, G C; Mumpower, M; Surman, R

    2016-01-01

    After identifying the nuclei in the regions near A =80 and A = 160 for which beta-decay rates have the greatest effect on weak and main r-process abundance patterns, we apply the finite-amplitude method (FAM) with Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) to calculate beta-decay half-lives of those nuclei in the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). We use the equal filling approximation to extend our implementation of the charge-changing FAM, which incorporates pairing correlations and allows axially symmetric deformation, to odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. Within this framework we find differences of up to a factor of seven between our calculated beta-decay half-lives and those of previous efforts. Repeated calculations with nuclei near A = 160 and multiple EDFs show a spread of two to four in beta-decay half-lives, with differences in calculated Q values playing an important role. We investigate the implications of these results for r-process simulations.

  18. An effective method to accurately calculate the phase space factors for $\\beta^- \\beta^-$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Neacsu, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Accurate calculations of the electron phase space factors are necessary for reliable predictions of double-beta decay rates, and for the analysis of the associated electron angular and energy distributions. We present an effective method to calculate these phase space factors that takes into account the distorted Coulomb field of the daughter nucleus, yet allows one to easily calculate the phase space factors with good accuracy relative to the most exact methods available in the recent literature.

  19. A Unified View of Finite Range Effects in Efimov Trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas; Ji, Chen; Braaten, Eric; Phillips, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Three-body recombination in ultracold atoms is a process that can demonstrate the appearance of discrete scale invariance due to the Efimov effect. Different features in the scattering length dependent recombination rate are related by universal relations in the so-called zero-range limit. However, experiments are usually carried out with systems that display non-neglible corrections due to the finite range of interatomic interaction. We explain the origin of recently constructed universal relations for systems of three identical bosons interacting through a large scattering length. Range corrected universal relations are calculated using first order perturbation theory and are benchmarked against microcopic calculations that by construction contain finite range effects. We relate our results to work done in other frameworks and explain differences and similarities. We present also relations that are crucial for analyzing experiments in the future.

  20. Implicit Finite-Size Effects in Computer Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Denton, A. R.; EGELSTAFF, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of periodic boundary conditions (implicit finite-size effects) on the anisotropy of pair correlations in computer simulations is studied for a dense classical fluid of pair-wise interacting krypton atoms near the triple point. Molecular dynamics simulation data for the pair distribution function of N-particle systems, as a function of radial distance, polar angle, and azimuthal angle are compared directly with corresponding theoretical predictions [L. R. Pratt and S. W. Haan, J....

  1. The effects of beta-carotene and vitamin E on erythrocytes lipid peroxidation in beta-thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thalassemia is the most common hereditary disease in the world. Thalassemic erythrocytes are exposed to higher oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of beta-carotene and vitamin E on erythrocytes lipid peroxidation in beta-thalassemia patients.
    METHODS: A prospective double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of beta-carotene and vitamin E on lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes membranes was performed on 120 beta-thalassemia major patients in four groups. The patients were supplemented for 4 weeks as follows: group 1 with beta-carotene (13 mg/day, group 2 with vitamin E (550 mg/day, group 3 with beta-carotene plus vitamin E and group 4 with placebo. We prepared all capsules for 4 roups in the same shape and color. Measurements of serum beta-carotene and vitamin E were performed by high performance
    liquid chromatography. After preparation of ghost cells from blood specimens, malondialdehyde (MDA was determined as index of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes membranes before and after treatment. RESULTS: The levels of serum beta-carotene and vitamin E were significantly lower and MDA concentrations in erythrocytes membranes were significantly higher in beta-thalassemia patients compared to controls (P<0.001. In groups that treated with vitamin supplements for 4-weeks, lipid peroxidation rates were significantly reduced after treatment (P<0.001, but in placebo group there was not significant difference (P>0.05.
    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide evidence that an oral treatment with beta-carotene and vitamin E can significantly reduce lipid peroxidation of erythrocytes membranes and could be useful in management of beta-thalassemia major patients. KEYWORDS: Beta-thalassemia major, beta-carotene, vitamin E, malondialdehyde, lipid peroxidation.

  2. Finite-size effects for percolation on Apollonian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auto, Daniel M; Moreira, André A; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2008-12-01

    We study the percolation problem on the Apollonian network model. The Apollonian networks display many interesting properties commonly observed in real network systems, such as small-world behavior, scale-free distribution, and a hierarchical structure. By taking advantage of the deterministic hierarchical construction of these networks, we use the real-space renormalization-group technique to write exact iterative equations that relate percolation network properties at different scales. More precisely, our results indicate that the percolation probability and average mass of the percolating cluster approach the thermodynamic limit logarithmically. We suggest that such ultraslow convergence might be a property of hierarchical networks. Since real complex systems are certainly finite and very commonly hierarchical, we believe that taking into account finite-size effects in real-network systems is of fundamental importance.

  3. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  4. Wave Transformation Modeling with Effective Higher-Order Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hwa Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a finite element method using a higher-order interpolation function for effective simulations of wave transformation. Finite element methods with a higher-order interpolation function usually employ a Lagrangian interpolation function that gives accurate solutions with a lesser number of elements compared to lower order interpolation function. At the same time, it takes a lot of time to get a solution because the size of the local matrix increases resulting in the increase of band width of a global matrix as the order of the interpolation function increases. Mass lumping can reduce computation time by making the local matrix a diagonal form. However, the efficiency is not satisfactory because it requires more elements to get results. In this study, the Legendre cardinal interpolation function, a modified Lagrangian interpolation function, is used for efficient calculation. Diagonal matrix generation by applying direct numerical integration to the Legendre cardinal interpolation function like conducting mass lumping can reduce calculation time with favorable accuracy. Numerical simulations of regular, irregular and solitary waves using the Boussinesq equations through applying the interpolation approaches are carried out to compare the higher-order finite element models on wave transformation and examine the efficiency of calculation.

  5. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Tian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in laboratory.

  6. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Ming; Miao, Rong-Xin

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in laboratory.

  7. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tian-Ming; Miao, Rong-Xin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in la...

  8. Finite baryon density effects on gauge field dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bödeker, Dietrich

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the effective action for QCD gauge fields at finite temperatures and densities, obtained after integrating out the hardest momentum scales from the system. We show that a non-vanishing baryon density induces a charge conjugation (C) odd operator to the gauge field action, proportional to the chemical potential. Even though it is parametrically smaller than the leading C even operator, it could have an important effect on C odd observables. The same operator appears to be produced by classical kinetic theory, allowing in principle for a non-perturbative study of such processes.

  9. Effects of the perfusion of beta-, beta2-, or beta3-adrenergic agonists or epinephrine on in situ adipose tissue lipolysis measured by microdialysis in underfed ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlay, A; Charret, C; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Chilliard, Y

    2001-02-01

    The effects of isoproterenol (ISO, a non-selective beta-agonist), terbutaline (TER, a selective beta2-agonist), CL316243 (CL, a selective beta3-agonist), and epinephrine (EPI, beta- and alpha2-agonist) on in situ lipolytic response of s.c. adipose tissue were investigated in vivo, using a microdialysis method to measure glycerol release, in 12 adult nonlactating and ovariectomized, underfed Lacaune ewes. All the adrenergic compounds were perfused for 120 min at 10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M. They had no lipolytic effect at 10(-6) M. Isoproterenol and EPI at 10(-5) and 10(-4) M enhanced, in the same way, maximal response and area under the concentration curve (AUC) of dialysate glycerol, thus suggesting that involvement of alpha2-adrenoceptors in the control of in situ lipolysis is of minor importance in underfed ewes. Terbutaline had only a slight lipolytic effect at 10(-5) M. This low effect could be due to a lower affinity of TER than of ISO for the beta2-adrenoceptors. The beta3-agonist, CL, had no lipolytic effect whatever the concentration perfused. Further studies are needed to prove the putative presence of beta3-adrenoceptors and their possible role in the ovine adipose tissue.

  10. Effect of fluoroquinolones on mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Hany; Jörns, Anne; Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2014-02-14

    Hyper- and hypoglycaemias are known side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, resulting in a number of fatalities. Fluoroquinolone-induced hypoglycaemias are due to stimulated insulin release by the inhibition of the KATP channel activity of the beta cell. Recently, it was found that fluoroquinolones were much less effective on metabolically intact beta cells than on open cell preparations. Thus the intracellular effects of gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin were investigated by measuring NAD(P)H- and FAD-autofluorescence, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the adenine nucleotide content of isolated pancreatic islets and beta cells. 100 μM of moxifloxacin abolished the NAD(P)H increase elicited by 20mM glucose, while gatifloxacin diminished it and ciprofloxacin had no significant effect. This pattern was also seen with islets from SUR1 Ko mice, which have no functional KATP channels. Moxifloxacin also diminished the glucose-induced decrease of FAD-fluorescence, which reflects the intramitochondrial production of reducing equivalents. Moxifloxacin, but not ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin significantly reduced the effect of 20mM glucose on the ATP/ADP ratio. The mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by 20mM glucose was partially antagonized by moxifloxacin, but not by ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Ultrastructural analyses after 20 h tissue culture showed that all three compounds (at 10 and 100 μM) diminished the number of insulin secretory granules and that gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not moxifloxacin induced fission/fusion configurations of the beta cell mitochondria. In conclusion, fluoroquinolones affect the function of the mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells which may diminish the insulinotropic effect of KATP channel closure and contribute to the hyperglycaemic episodes.

  11. Finite temperature Casimir effect in spacetime with extra compactified dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-02-16

    In this Letter, we derive the explicit exact formulas for the finite temperature Casimir force acting on a pair of parallel plates in the presence of extra compactified dimensions within the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory. Using the piston analysis, we show that at any temperature, the Casimir force due to massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the plates is always attractive and the effect of extra dimensions becomes stronger when the size or number of the extra dimensions increases. These properties are not affected by the explicit geometry and topology of the Kaluza-Klein space.

  12. Effects of finite system-size and finite inhomogeneity on the conductivity of broadly distributed resistor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, T.H

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate the critical path calculation of the conductivity of a random resistor network that has a logarithmically broad distribution of bond conductances. It has been argued that in three dimensions the conductivity prefactor exponent y is equal to the percolation correlation length exponent {nu}, but past numerical computations have always found y<{nu}. Finite-size effects are usually blamed but have never been documented. Our analysis of Monte Carlo data also finds y<{nu}, but we show that the result is not due to finite-size effects. Instead, the observed y<{nu} is due to the effects of finite inhomogeneity. The conductivity is controlled by critical conductors, but the distance between current carrying pathways is less than presumed in the theoretical arguments that lead to y={nu}. The shorter separation distance results in y<{nu}.

  13. Isotope Effects in the Bonds of beta-CrOOH and beta-CrOOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlund Christensen, A.; Hansen, P.; Lehmann, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of orthorhombic chromium oxide hydroxide, beta -CrOOH, and the deuterated compound, beta -CrOOD, were prepared hydrothermally. The crystal structures were determined by powder profile refinement technique using neutron diffraction data. Unit cells are: beta -CrOOH: a equals 4. 862(2) A, b...

  14. An imidazoline compound completely counteracts interleukin-1[beta] toxic effects to rat pancreatic islet [beta] cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Pisanti, Francesco A

    2002-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-1beta decreases insulin and DNA contents in pancreatic islet beta cells, causing structural damage, that it is toxic to cultured human islet beta cells and that it is able to induce apoptosis in these cells....

  15. Effective Polyakov Loop Dynamics for Finite Temperature G(2) Gluodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H; Wozar, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the strong coupling expansion we obtain effective 3-dimensional models for the Polyakov loop in finite-temperature G_2 gluodynamics. The Svetitsky-Jaffe conjecture relates the resulting continuous spin models with G_2 gluodynamics near phase transition points. In the present work we analyse the effective theory in leading order with the help of a generalised mean field approximation and with detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. In addition we derive a Potts-type discrete spin model by restricting the characters of the Polyakov loops to the three extremal points of the fundamental domain of G_2. Both the continuous and discrete effective models show a rich phase structure with a ferromagnetic, symmetric and several anti-ferromagnetic phases. The phase diagram contains first and second order transition lines and tricritical points. The modified mean field predictions compare very well with the results of our simulations.

  16. The Effect of a Finite Measurement Volume on Power Spectra from a Burst Type LDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika; K. George, William

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the effects of a finite size measurement volume on the power spectrum computed fromdata acquired with a burst-type laser Doppler anemometer. The finite measurement volume causes temporal distortions in acquisition of the data resulting in phenomena such as finite processing time and de...

  17. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar; Dorso, C.O.

    2015-01-15

    single structure per cell while the cubic and truncated octahedron show consistent results, with more than one structure per cell. For systems of the size studied in this work these effects are still noticeable, but we find evidence to support that the dependence of the results on the cell geometry becomes smaller as the system size is increased. When the Coulomb interaction is present, the competition between opposing interactions of different range results in a proper, physically meaningful length scale that is independent of the system size and periodic cell of choice. Only under these conditions “finite size effects” will vanish for large enough systems (i.e. cells much larger than this characteristic length). Larger simulations are in order, but our computational capabilities forbid it for the time being.

  18. Finite amplitude effects on drop levitation for material properties measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari Hosseinzadeh, Vahideh; Holt, R. Glynn

    2017-05-01

    The method of exciting shape oscillation of drops to extract material properties has a long history, which is most often coupled with the technique of acoustic levitation to achieve non-contact manipulation of the drop sample. We revisit this method with application to the inference of bulk shear viscosity and surface tension. The literature is replete with references to a "10% oscillation amplitude" as a sufficient condition for the application of Lamb's analytical expressions for the shape oscillations of viscous liquids. Our results show that even a 10% oscillation amplitude leads to dynamic effects which render Lamb's results inapplicable. By comparison with samples of known viscosity and surface tension, we illustrate the complicating finite-amplitude effects (mode-splitting and excess dissipation associated with vorticity) that can occur and then show that sufficiently small oscillations allow us to recover the correct material properties using Lamb's formula.

  19. Ser49Gly of beta1-adrenergic receptor is associated with effective beta-blocker dose in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Yvonne; Levin, Malin C; Eggertsen, Robert; Nyström, Ernst; Mobini, Reza; Schaufelberger, Maria; Andersson, Bert

    2005-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms at codons 49 and 389 of the beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) on the response to beta-blockers and outcome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We genotyped both codons of the beta1-AR in 375 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 492 control subjects. Neither of the polymorphisms was associated with susceptibility for dilated cardiomyopathy. In a retrospective analysis of patients receiving beta-blockers, there was a significant association between long-term survival rate and codon 49 (P = .014) but not codon 389 (P = .08). Despite a similar mean heart rate (69 beats/min), patients with the Ser49 genotype tended to have higher doses of beta-blockade compared with Gly49 carriers (P = .065). In patients receiving a low dose of beta-blockade (< or = 50% of targeted full dose), the 5-year mortality rate was lower among Gly49 carriers than Ser49 patients (risk ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.80; P = .020). In patients receiving high doses of beta-blockers, there was no significant difference in outcome between genotypes (P = .20), which was attributable to a better outcome for Ser49 patients treated with a high dose of beta-blockade as compared with a low dose. Gly49 carriers had a similar survival rate with different doses of beta-blockers. With low-dose beta-blockers, both codon 49 (RR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.89; P = .029) and codon 389 (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.04-5.63, P = .039) were related to 5-year mortality rate. In patients with heart failure, the influence of codon 49 on the outcome and effect of beta-blockers appeared to be more pronounced than that of codon 389. The more common Ser49Ser genotype responded less beneficially to beta-blockade and would motivate genotyping to promote higher doses for the best outcome effect.

  20. Effect of beta blockade on exercise response after cardiac transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bexton, R S; Milne, J R; Cory-Pearce, R; English, T A; Camm, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six cardiac transplant recipients underwent maximal exercise testing before and after the administration of intravenous propranolol to assess the effect of beta blockade on their exercise heart rate response and exercise capacity. Before propranolol the patients were capable of a mean of 6.8 minutes of exercise and heart rate increased from a resting value of 102 +/- 25 a minute to 138 +/- 34 at peak exercise--a mean increase of 35%. All tests were terminated because of tiredness or muscle we...

  1. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamaina, Dario; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners.

  2. Finite size effects in Neutron Star and Nuclear matter simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, P A Giménez

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. We show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the ``nuclear pasta'' phases expected in Neutron Star Matter simulations, but shaped by artificial aspects of the simulations. We explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. We find that different cells may yield different solutions for the same physical conditions (i.e. density and temperature). The particular shape of the solution at a given density can be predicted analytically by energy minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to finite size effects, it does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems and it actually is independent of the system size: The system size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneitie...

  3. Finite Temperature Casimir Effect in Randall-Sundrum Models

    CERN Document Server

    Rypestøl, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The finite temperature Casimir effect for a scalar field in the bulk region of the two Randall-Sundrum models, RSI and RSII, is studied. We calculate the Casimir energy and the Casimir force for two parallel plates with separation $a$ on the visible brane in the RSI model. High-temperature and low-temperature cases are covered. Attractiveness versus repulsiveness of the temperature correction to the force is discussed in the typical special cases of Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Neumann-Neumann, and Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions at low temperature. The Abel-Plana summation formula is made use of, as this turns out to be most convenient. Some comments are made on the related contemporary literature.

  4. Conformation, molecular packing and field effect mobility of regioregular beta,beta'-dihexylsexithiophiophene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiriy, N.; Kiriy, A.; Bocharova, V.

    2004-01-01

    ) V-1 s(-1), which is considerably less than the FEM of alpha,omega-DH6T. To understand the reason for such poor macroscopic electrical properties, the conformation and the molecular packing of beta,beta'-DH6T were systematically studied by means of UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy...

  5. Detrimental effects of beta-blockers in COPD - A concern for nonselective beta-blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, HJ; Zaagsma, J; Postma, DS; Winter, TH; van Hulst, M; Aalbers, R

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: beta-Blockers are known to worsen FEV1 and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma. Both characteristics determine the outcome of COPD, a disease with frequent cardiac comorbidity requiring beta-blocker treatment. Design: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized,

  6. Finite Span Effects on Flap Heating and Effectiveness in a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Flap Span on Centerline Heating Distribution(15 Deflection) ........ ......................... 46 35 Span Edge Effect on Centerline Heat Transfer...Pressure Distributions at 87.5% Chord Station ....... ...................... 50 39 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Pressure Distribution ........... 52 40...Distribution at 87.5% Chord Station ..... ............... 55 43 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Heat Transfer Distribution ..... 56 44 Finite Span Effects

  7. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  8. Human cardiac beta1- or beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the negative chronotropic effect of low-dose pirenzepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubetz, J; Schmuck, S; Wochatz, G; Ruhland, B; Poller, U; Radke, J; Brodde, O E

    2000-05-01

    The M1-muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine in low doses (pirenzepine differ in volunteers with activated cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptors versus activated cardiac beta2-adrenergic receptors. In 17 male volunteers (25 +/- 1 years) we studied effects of pirenzepine infusion (0.5 mg intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion of 0.15 microg/kg/min) on heart rate and heart rate-corrected duration of electromechanical systole (QS2c, as a measure of inotropism) that had been stimulated by activation of cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptors (bicycle exercise in the supine position for 60 minutes at 25 W) or cardiac beta2-adrenergic receptors (continuous intravenous infusion of 100 ng/kg/min terbutaline). Bicycle exercise and terbutaline infusion significantly increased heart rate and shortened QS2c. When pirenzepine was infused 20 minutes after the beginning of the exercise or terbutaline infusion, heart rate decreased in both settings by approximately the same extent (approximately -10 to -14 beats/min), although exercise and terbutaline infusion continued; however, QS2c was not affected. Pirenzepine (0.05 to 1 mg intravenous bolus)-induced decrease in heart rate was abolished after 6 days of transdermal scopolamine treatment of volunteers. Low-dose pirenzepine decreased heart rate by muscarinic receptor stimulation, because this was blocked by scopolamine. Moreover, low-dose pirenzepine did not differentiate between cardiac beta1- or beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation; however, low-dose pirenzepine did not affect cardiac contractility as measured by QS2c. Low-dose pirenzepine therefore exerted a unique pattern of action in the human heart: it decreased heart rate (basal and beta1- and/or beta2-adrenergic receptor-stimulated) without affecting contractility.

  9. Scorpion beta-toxins and voltage-gated sodium channels: interactions and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza Escalona, Martha; Possani, Lourival D

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion beta-toxins (beta-ScTxs) modify the activity of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, thereby producing neurotoxic effects in diverse organisms. For this reason, beta-ScTxs are essential tools not only for discriminating among different channel sub-types but also for studying the mechanisms of channel gating and the structure-function relationship involved in this process. This review considers both the structural and the functional implications of the beta-ScTxs after they bind to their receptor sites, in accord with their classification into a) anti-mammalian beta-ScTxs, b) anti-insect selective excitatory beta-ScTxs, c) anti-insect selective depressant beta-ScTxs and d) beta-ScTxs active on both insect and mammals Nav channels. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of toxin action by the "voltage sensor trapping" model is discussed, and the systemic effects produced by these toxins are reviewed.

  10. Gyrokinetic studies of the effect of beta on drift-wave stability in NCSX

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgaertel, J A; Mikkelsen, D R; Nunami, M; Xanthopoulos, P

    2012-01-01

    The gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2 was used to investigate the effects of plasma beta on linear, collisionless ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEM) in National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry. Plasma beta affects stability in two ways: through the equilibrium and through magnetic fluctuations. The first was studied here by comparing ITG and TEM stability in two NCSX equilibria of differing beta values, revealing that the high beta equilibrium was marginally more stable than the low beta equilibrium in the adiabatic-electron ITG mode case. However, the high beta case had a lower kinetic-electron ITG mode critical gradient. Electrostatic and electromagnetic ITG and TEM mode growth rate dependencies on temperature gradient and density gradient were qualitatively similar. The second beta effect is demonstrated via electromagnetic ITG growth rates' dependency on GS2's beta input parameter. A linear benchmark with gyrokinetic codes GENE and GKV-X is also presented.

  11. Small scale turbulence and the finite Reynolds number effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Tang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Failure to recognize the importance of the finite Reynolds number effect on small scale turbulence has, by and large, resulted in misguided assessments of the first two hypotheses of Kolmogorov ["Local structure of turbulence in an incompressible fluid for very large Reynolds numbers," Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 299-303 (1941)] or K41 as well as his third hypothesis [A. N. Kolmogorov, "A refinement of previous hypotheses concerning the local structure of turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid at high Reynolds number," J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82-85 (1962)] or K62. As formulated by Kolmogorov, all three hypotheses require local isotropy to be valid and the Reynolds number to be very large. In the context of the first hypothesis, there is now strong evidence to suggest that this requirement can be significantly relaxed, at least for dissipative scales and relatively low order moments of the velocity structure function. As the scale increases, the effect of the large scale motion on these moments becomes more prominent and higher Reynolds numbers are needed before K41 and K62 can be tested unambiguously.

  12. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  13. URODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF BETA-ADRENOBLOCKERS: NEBIVOLOL ADVANTAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Savenkov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare urodynamic effects of beta-blockers with different selectivity (propranolol, metoprolol, nebivolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT and concomitant benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.Material and methods. 32 patients (aged 67,5 y.o. in average with HT of 1-2 stages were involved in the study. All patients had BPH (prostate volume >40 sm3 , increase of residual urine volume with moderate or severe low urinary tract symptoms (IPSS 8-25 and reduction of maximum urine flow rate to 5-13 ml/s. The urodynamic effect of beta-blockers was estimated by changes of urination frequency and uroflowmetry indices after single taking and 14-day therapy.Results. Propranolol and metoprolol led to aggravation of urination disorders. Nebivolol resulted in soft urodilating and urostimulating effects. It led to urination improvement and reduced a risk of urodynamic disorders.Conclusion. Urodynamic effects of cardiovascular drugs should be considered by practitioners especially in treatment of elderly patients.

  14. The Effect of Investor Sentiment on Betting Against Beta: A SEM Approach Towards Beta Anomaly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hooman Abdollahi; Seyed Babak Ebrahimi; Hamed Tayebi

    2017-01-01

    .... Drawing on literature the authors propose new multi-factor models to develop our understanding of betting against beta using investor sentiment as well as Structural Equation Modeling methodology...

  15. Effects of Finite-time Singularities on Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kleidis, K

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the impact of finite-time singularities on gravitational waves, in the context of $F(R)$ gravity. We investigate which singularities are allowed to occur during the inflationary era, when gravitational waves are considered, and we discuss the quantitative implications of each allowed singularity. As we show, only a pressure singularity, the so-called Type II and also a Type IV singularity are allowed to occur during the inflationary era. In the case of a Type II, the resulting amplitude of the gravitational wave is zero or almost zero, hence this pressure singularity has a significant impact on the primordial gravitational waves. The case of a Type IV singularity is more interesting since as we show, the singularity has no effect on the amplitude of the gravitational waves. Therefore, this result combined with the fact that the Type IV singularity affects only the dynamics of inflation, leads to the conclusion that the Universe passes smoothly through a Type IV singularity.

  16. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, {theta}, and ellipticity angle, {epsilon}, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n{sub e}, and the electron temperature, T{sub e}, and that the separation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} from {theta} and {epsilon} is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I{sub p}, is known and when I{sub p} is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j{sub {phi}}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j{sub {phi}} without the information of I{sub p} indicates the new method of I{sub p} measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  17. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, θ, and ellipticity angle, ε, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n(e), and the electron temperature, T(e), and that the separation of n(e) and T(e) from θ and ε is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10(20) m(-3), and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I(p), is known and when I(p) is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j(φ), n(e), and T(e) are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j(φ) without the information of I(p) indicates the new method of I(p) measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  18. Finite-Size Scaling Effects in Chromia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, Will; He, Xi; Binek, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Controlling magnetism by electrical means remains a key challenge in the area of spintronics. The use of magnetoelectrically active materials is one of the most promising approaches to this problem. Utilizing Cr2O3 as the magnetoelectric pinning layer in a magnetic heterostructure both temperature assisted and isothermal electrical control of exchange bias have been achieved [1,2]. Interestingly, this ME switching of exchange bias has only been achieved using bulk Cr2O3 crystals, isothermal switching of exchange bias using thin film chromia remains elusive. We investigate the origin of unusually pronounced finite-size scaling effects on the properties of Cr2O3 grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy; in particular we focus on the different temperature dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility of bulk vs. thin film chromia, the change in Nèel temperatures, and the implications for the magneto electric properties of chromia thin films. [4pt] [1] P. Borisov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005).[0pt] [2] X. He et al., Nature Mater. 9, 579 (2010).

  19. Finite temperature Casimir effect in Kaluza-Klein spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we consider the finite temperature Casimir effect in Kaluza-Klein spacetime due the vacuum fluctuation of massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We consider the general case where the extra dimensions (internal space) can be any compact connected manifold or orbifold without boundaries. Using piston analysis, we show that the Casimir force is always attractive at any temperature, regardless of the geometry of the internal space. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force increases as the size of the internal space increases and it reduces to the Casimir force in (3+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime when the size of the internal space shrinks to zero. In the other extreme where the internal space is large, the Casimir force can increase beyond all bound. Asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir force in the low and high temperature regimes are derived and it is observed that the magnitude of the Casimir force grows linearly with temperature in the high temperature regime.

  20. Finite element analysis of hysteresis effects in piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkovics, Reinhard; Landes, Hermann; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Hoffelner, Johann; Lerch, Reinhard

    2000-06-01

    The design of ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, e.g. in medical therapy or production engineering, asks for effective computer aided design tools to analyze the occurring nonlinear effects. In this paper the finite-element-boundary-element package CAPA is presented that allows to model different types of electromechanical sensors and actuators. These transducers are based on various physical coupling effects, such as piezoelectricity or magneto- mechanical interactions. Their computer modeling requires the numerical solution of a multifield problem, such as coupled electric-mechanical fields or magnetic-mechanical fields as well as coupled mechanical-acoustic fields. With the reported software environment we are able to compute the dynamic behavior of electromechanical sensors and actuators by taking into account geometric nonlinearities, nonlinear wave propagation and ferroelectric as well as magnetic material nonlinearities. After a short introduction to the basic theory of the numerical calculation schemes, two practical examples will demonstrate the applicability of the numerical simulation tool. As a first example an ultrasonic thickness mode transducer consisting of a piezoceramic material used for high power ultrasound production is examined. Due to ferroelectric hysteresis, higher order harmonics can be detected in the actuators input current. Also in case of electrical and mechanical prestressing a resonance frequency shift occurs, caused by ferroelectric hysteresis and nonlinear dependencies of the material coefficients on electric field and mechanical stresses. As a second example, a power ultrasound transducer used in HIFU-therapy (high intensity focused ultrasound) is presented. Due to the compressibility and losses in the propagating fluid a nonlinear shock wave generation can be observed. For both examples a good agreement between numerical simulation and experimental data has been achieved.

  1. Sulfonated dyes attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid in a structure-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S J; Sadler, I I; Hawtin, S R; Tailor, V J; Shearman, M S

    1995-09-15

    We recently reported that several sulfate-containing glycosaminoglycans, a class of compounds associated with the beta-amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease, attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid fragments beta 25-35 and beta 1-40. The amyloid-binding sulfonated dye Congo Red was shown to have a similar effect. Using two clonal cell lines, we now demonstrate that several sulfonated dyes attenuate beta-amyloid toxicity and that the protective effect appears specific for compounds whose sulfonate groups can interact with the beta-pleated structure of aggregated amyloid. These results suggest that by binding beta-amyloid these compounds may prevent toxic interactions of the peptide with cells.

  2. Thermal effects on seeded finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M; Madsen, J; Kendl, A

    2016-01-01

    Thermal effects on the perpendicular convection of seeded pressure blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetised fusion plasmas are investigated. Our numerical study is based on a four field full-F gyrofluid model, which entails the consistent description of high fluctuation amplitudes and dynamic finite Larmor radius effects. We find that a temperature perturbation increases the maximal blob velocity and that a finite Larmor radius contributes to highly compact blob structures with finite poloidal motion. An extensive parameter study reveals that a smooth transition to this compact blob regime occurs when the finite Larmor radius effect strength, defined by the ratio of the ion diamagnetic to the perpendicular vorticity, exceeds unity. The maximal blob velocities excellently agree with the inertial velocity scaling law over more than an order of magnitude. We show that the finite Larmor radius effect strength affects the radial transport and verify the here presented empirical scaling law for the maximal radia...

  3. Finite-size effects in parametric subharmonic instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bourget, Baptiste; Dauxois, Thierry; Bars, Michaël Le; Odier, Philippe; Joubaud, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The parametric subharmonic instability in stratified fluids depends on the frequency and the amplitude of the primary plane wave. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical results emphasizing that the finite width of the beam also plays an important role on this triadic instability. A new theoretical approach based on a simple energy balance is developed and compared to numerical and experimental results. Because of the finite width of the primary wave beam, the secondary pair of waves can leave the interaction zone which affects the transfer of energy. Experimental and numerical results are in good agreement with the prediction of this theory, which brings new insights on energy transfers in the ocean where internal waves with finite-width beams are dominant.

  4. Tritium $\\beta$-decay in pionless effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    De-Leon, Hilla; Gazit, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the $\\beta$-decay of tritium, i.e., of its $^3$H nucleus (triton), at next-to-leading order in pionless effective field theory. At this order a low-energy parameter $L_{1A}$ enters the calculation that is also relevant for a high-accuracy prediction of the solar proton-proton fusion rate. We show proper renormalization of our perturbative calculation by an analysis of the residual cutoff dependence in observables. We find that next-to-leading order corrections contribute about $1\\%$ to the triton decay Gamow-Teller strength. We show that these conclusions are insensitive to different arrangements of the effective range expansion. We use these to fix $L_{1A}$ to high accuracy, and provide reliable theoretical and experimental uncertainty estimates.

  5. Atualizações sobre beta-hidroxi-beta-metilbutirato: suplementação e efeitos sobre o catabolismo de proteínas New findings on beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyirate: supplementation and effects on the protein catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everson Araújo Nunes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O beta-hidroxi-beta-metilbutirato, metabólito do aminoácido leucina, vem sendo utilizado como suplemento alimentar, em situações específicas, com o intuito de aumentar ou manter a massa isenta de gordura. Os relatos dos efeitos do beta-hidroxi-beta-metilbutirato em estudos recentes fizeram crescer as expectativas sobre sua utilização em casos patológicos. Também foram demonstrados melhores resultados, quando da sua ingestão, no treinamento de força em indivíduos iniciantes e em idosos. Em humanos o beta-hidroxi-beta-metilbutirato tem sido usado como agente anti-catabólico, e em modelos animais foi demonstrado ser eficaz em inibir a atividade de vias proteolíticas em células musculares de indivíduos caquéticos in vitro e in vivo. Os mecanismos participantes desses processos envolvem: a inibição da atividade do sistema ubiquitina proteossoma ATP-dependente, a inibição de vias de sinalização com participação da proteína quinase C-alfa e a diminuição da concentração citoplasmática do fator nuclear - kappa B livre, eventos relacionados ao decréscimo da proteólise em células musculares.The leucine metabolite beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate has been used as a nutritional supplement in specific situations to prevent losing or to increase lean mass. Recent studies showed interesting results of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate supplementation in certain disease states. Better results have also been demonstrated when it is taken by starters or old individuals doing strength training. In humans, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate has been used as an anticatabolic agent and in animal models it has been demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting the activity of the proteolytic pathways in muscle cells of extremely weak individuals in vivo and in vitro. The mechanisms that participate in this process involve: inhibition of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, inhibition of the signalization pathways involving protein kinase C

  6. Meson Effects on the Chiral Condensate at Finite Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Mei; ZHUANG Peng-Fei; ZHAO Wei-Qin

    2002-01-01

    Meson corrections on the chiral condensate up to next-to-leading order in a 1/Nc expansion at finite densityare investigated in the NJL model with explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Compared with mean-field results, the chiralphase transition is still of the first order while the properties near the critical density for chiral phase transition are foundto change significantly.

  7. Finite temperature Casimir effect in the presence of nonlinear dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Soltani, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a Lagrangian, electromagnetic field in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium is quantized using path-integral techniques and correlation functions of different fields are calculated. The susceptibilities of the nonlinear medium are obtained and their relation to coupling functions are determined. Finally, the Casimir energy and force in the presence of a nonlinear medium at finite temperature is calculated.

  8. Probing finite size effects in $(\\lambda \\Phi^{4})_4$ MonteCarlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Constrained Effective Potential (CEP) is known to be equivalent to the usual Effective Potential (EP) in the infinite volume limit. We have carried out MonteCarlo calculations based on the two different definitions to get informations on finite size effects. We also compared these calculations with those based on an Improved CEP (ICEP) which takes into account the finite size of the lattice. It turns out that ICEP actually reduces the finite size effects which are more visible near the vanishing of the external source.

  9. Is the treatment effect of IFN-beta restored after the disappearance of neutralizing antibodies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, P S; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, who have lost the therapeutic effect of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) owing to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and subsequently revert from a NAb-positive to a NAb-negative state under continued IFN-beta-1b therapy, regain clinical...... effect after reversion. BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that a significant proportion of patients treated with IFN-beta develop NAbs that hamper or abolish the therapeutic effect of IFN-beta. However, some patients, who become NAb-positive under treatment with IFN-beta-1b, may revert to a NAb......-positive. A patient was defined as NAb-positive after two consecutive blood tests separated by at least 6 months. Reversion to a NAb-negative state required at least two consecutive negative tests. To allow for the confounding effect of time we employed a mixed Poisson model. RESULTS: Patients who had been NAb...

  10. Finite size effect on dynamical entanglement entropy: CFT and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Gautam; Ugajin, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent entanglement entropy (EE) is computed for a single interval in two-dimensional conformal theories from a quenched initial state in the presence of spatial boundaries. The EE is found to be periodic in time with periodicity equal to the system size $L$. For large enough $L$, the EE shows a rise to a thermal value (characterized by a temperature $1/\\beta$ determined by the initial state), followed by periodic returns to the original value. This works irrespective of whether the conformal field theory (CFT) is rational or irrational. For conformal field theories with a holographic dual, the large $c$ limit plays an essential role in ensuring that the EE computed from the CFT is universal (independent of the details of the CFT and of boundary conditions) and is exactly matched by the holographic EE. The dual geometry is computed and it interpolates between a BTZ black hole at large $L$ and global AdS at large $\\beta$.

  11. Nonuniversal Finite-Size Effects Near Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, V.

    2008-11-01

    We study the finite-size critical behavior of the anisotropic φ4 lattice model with periodic boundary conditions in a d-dimensional hypercubic geometry above, at, and below Tc. Our perturbation approach at fixed d = 3 yields excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo (MC) data for the finite-size amplitude of the free energy of the three-dimensional Ising model at Tc by Mon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2671 (1985)]. Below Tc a minimum of the scaling function of the excess free energy is found. We predict a measurable dependence of this minimum on the anisotropy parameters. Our theory agrees quantitatively with the non-monotonic dependence of the Binder cumulant on the ferromagnetic next-nearest neighbor (NNN) coupling of the two-dimensional Ising model found by MC simulations of Selke and Shchur [J. Phys. A 38, L739 (2005)]. Our theory also predicts a non-monotonic dependence for small values of the anti-ferromagnetic NNN coupling and the existence of a Lifshitz point at a larger value of this coupling. The tails of the large-L behavior at T ≠ Tc violate both finite-size scaling and universality even for isotropic systems as they depend on the bare four-point coupling of the φ4 theory, on the cutoff procedure, and on subleading long-range interactions.

  12. Effect of Beta-Carotene on Oxidative Stress and Expression of Cardiac Connexin 43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novo, Rosangela; Azevedo, Paula S.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M., E-mail: lzornoff@fmb.unesp.br; Paiva, Sergio A. R. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - Universidade Estadual Paulista ' Júlio de Mesquita Filho' , Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Intervention studies have shown an increased mortality in patients who received beta-carotene. However, the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are still unknown. Evaluate the influence of beta-carotene on oxidative stress and the expression of connexin 43 in rat hearts. Wistar rats, weighing approximately 100 g, were allocated in two groups: Control Group (n = 30), that received the diet routinely used in our laboratory, and Beta-Carotene Group (n = 28), which received beta-carotene (in crystal form, added and mixed to the diet) at a dose of 500 mg of beta carotene/kg of diet. The animals received the treatment until they reached 200-250g, when they were sacrificed. Samples of blood, liver and heart were collected to perform Western blotting and immunohistochemistry for connexin 43; morphometric studies, dosages of beta carotene by high performance liquid chromatography as well as reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione and lipids hydroperoxides were performed by biochemical analysis. Beta-carotene was detected only in the liver of Beta-Carotene Group animals (288 ± 94.7 μg/kg). Levels of reduced/ oxidized glutathione were higher in the liver and heart of Beta-Carotene Group animals (liver - Control Group: 42.60 ± 1.62; liver - Beta-Carotene Group: 57.40 ± 5.90; p = 0.04; heart: - Control Group: 117.40 ± 1.01; heart - Beta-Carotene Group: 121.81 ± 1.32 nmol/mg protein; p = 0.03). The content of total connexin 43 was larger in Beta-Carotene Group. Beta-carotene demonstrated a positive effect, characterized by the increase of intercellular communication and improvement of anti-oxidizing defense system. In this model, mechanism does not explain the increased mortality rate observed with the beta-carotene supplementation in clinical studies.

  13. Comparative effects of three beta blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, and propranolol) on survival after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, S S; McCarter, R J

    2001-04-01

    The beneficial impact of beta blockade after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is clear, but beta-adrenergic blockers differ in multiple characteristics, including lipophilicity and selectivity. The impact of these factors on the effects of beta blockade is unknown. We therefore compared the effects of different beta blockers on mortality after AMI. Charts of 201,752 patients with AMI were abstracted by the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a quality assurance program sponsored by the Health Care Financing Administration. Of the 69,338 patients prescribed beta blockers, we compared mortality of patients receiving different beta-adrenergic blockers using the Cox proportional-hazards model accounting for multiple factors that might influence survival. The mortality rates of the 2 selective agents, metoprolol and atenolol, were virtually identical (13.5% and 13.4% 2-year mortality, respectively). Compared with metoprolol, patients discharged on propranolol had a slightly increased mortality (15.9% 2-year mortality), which may be related to undetected differences at baseline. Survival with all of the drugs was superior to the 23.9% 2-year mortality seen in patients not receiving beta blockers. Beta blockade overall was associated with a 40% improvement in survival. Although the use of beta blockade after AMI has major prognostic importance, the present study suggests that the specific beta blocker chosen will have little influence on mortality.

  14. Proliferative Effect of sTRAIL on Mouse Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Kahraman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Beta cell loss/impairment of function appears as a significant problem in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand was recently correlated with both types of diabetes with a proposed protective effect. TRAIL was also shown to promote survival and proliferation in different cells such as vascular smooth muscle cells and human vascular endothelial cells. Recently, TRAIL was claimed to protect pancreatic beta cells against cytokine-related harm. We hypothesized a proliferative effect for TRAIL on beta cells, and used Min6 mouse pancreatic beta cell line to test our hypothesis.

  15. Effects of simulation parameters on residual stresses for laser shock peening finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hee [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    By using finite element analysis, we proposed an applicable finite element method of laser shock peening (LSP) and discussed various parameters, such as solution time, stability limit, dynamic yield stress, peak pressure, pressure pulse duration, laser spot size, and multiple LSP. The effects of parameters related to the finite element simulation of the LSP process on the residual stresses of 35CD4 30HRC steel alloy are discussed. Parametric sensitivity analyses were performed to establish the optimum processing variables of the LSP process. In addition, we evaluated the effects of initial residual stress, such as welding-induced residual stress field.

  16. Calculating the Finite-Speed-of-Light Effect in Atom Gravimeters with General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This work mainly presents a relativistic analytical calculating method for the finite speed-of-light effect in atom gravimeters, which can simplify the deriva- tion and give a more complete expression for the associated correction.

  17. Combining ordinary and topological finite volume effects for fixed topology simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dromard, Arthur; Gerber, Urs; Mejía-Díaz, Héctor; Wagner, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In lattice quantum field theories with topological sectors, simulations at fine lattice spacings --- with typical algorithms --- tend to freeze topologically. In such cases, specific topological finite size effects have to be taken into account to obtain physical results, which correspond to infinite volume or unfixed topology. Moreover, when a theory like QCD is simulated in a moderate volume, one also has to overcome ordinary finite volume effects (not related to topology freezing). To extract physical results from simulations affected by both types of finite volume effects, we extend a known relation between hadron masses at fixed and unfixed topology by additionally incorporating ordinary finite volume effects. We present numerical results for SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  18. Mitigation Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch Implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory, a simple model is proposed to study the mitigation effect of finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions. In this model, taking account of Ti ≥ Te in Z-pinch implosions we believe that the magnetohydrodynamic plasma responds to a perturbation (~ exp [i (k. x - ωt)]) at frequency (ω + ik2⊥ρ2iΩi) instead of frequency ω, where k2⊥ρ2i is due to the finite Larmor radius effects expressed from the generalkinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed mass-density and velocity include the finite Larmor radius effects. The calculations indicate that, in the wavenumber region of interest, the finite Larmor radius effects can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.

  19. RANDOM MICROSTRUCTURE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AND ITS VERIFICATION FOR EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The present study aims at developing a new method-Random M icrostructure Finite Element Method (RMFEM)for the effective properties of composite materials . In this method, a random microstructure model is used to simulate the microstructure of the real composite materials. The physical fields in such a randm microstructure model under specified boundary and initial conditions are analyzed by finite element method. The effective properties of composite materials can be obtained from the analysis results. As verification, some effective properties of composite materials, such as elastic module,thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and elastoplastic properties, are investigated by random microstructure finite element method. The numerical results are given together with the experimental data. It i- revealed that the random microstructure finite element method is a very valid method for the determination of the effective properties of composite materials.

  20. Lorentz Invariance at Finite Temperature and Its Effect on Production Rate and Equation of State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Lian-Yi; ZHUANG Peng-Fei

    2004-01-01

    The effect of Lorentz invariance breaking on the production rate and the equation of state at finite temperature is investigated in the frame of φ3 theory. The invariance breaking significantly changes the off-shell degree at high temperatures.

  1. Effects of finite element formulation on optimal plate and shell structural topologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of selected membrane, plate and flat shell finite element formulations on optimal topologies are numerically investigated. Two different membrane components are considered. The first is a standard 4-node bilinear quadrilateral...

  2. Electromagnetic effects on dynamics of high-beta filamentary structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on blob dynamics are considered. Electromagnetic BOUT++ simulations on seeded high-beta blobs demonstrate that inhomogeneity of magnetic curvature or plasma pressure along the filament leads to bending of the blob filaments and the magnetic field lines due to increased propagation time of plasma current (Alfvén time). The bending motion can enhance heat exchange between the plasma facing materials and the inner scrape-off layer (SOL) region. The effects of sheath boundary conditions on the part of the blob away from the boundary are also diminished by the increased Alfvén time. Using linear analysis and BOUT++ simulations, it is found that electromagnetic effects in high temperature and high density plasmas reduce the growth rate of resistive drift wave instability when resistivity drops below a certain value. The blobs temperature decreases in the course of its motion through the SOL and so the blob can switch from the electromagnetic to the electrostatic regime where resistive drift waves become important again.

  3. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist mediates the beneficial effects of systemic interferon beta in mice: implications for rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corr, M.; Boyle, D.L.; Ronacher, L.M.; Lew, B.R.; van Baarsen, L.G.; Tak, P.P.; Firestein, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Interferon beta (IFN beta) therapy is effective in multiple sclerosis and murine models of arthritis. Surprisingly, systemic IFN beta treatment induces only minimal improvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To explain this paradox, the authors evaluated the mechanism of IFN beta benefit

  4. The Effect of Beta Adrenergic Blockade on Ratings of Perceived Exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    more favorable approach to this form of therapy can be taken by those who have ques- tioned the efficacy of using beta blockers and exercise training...also consider the effects of beta blockers on exercise prescrip- .tion. Current guidelines by the American College of Sports V% % Z..w .. - L i V % 3...differences between cardioselective and nonselective beta blockers were evaluated. RPE has been described as a useful indicator nf the relative physiological

  5. Effect of the Finite Ion Larmor Radius on the Kelvin‐Helmholtz Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Henning; Popovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics......The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics...

  6. Finite-size effects on semi-directed Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M. A.; Sumour, Muneer A.; Elbitar, A. M.; Shabat, M. M.; Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-04-01

    In scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we study the finite-size effect at different number m of neighbors. So, we investigate the effects of finite network size N for the recently developed semi-directed BA networks (SDBA1 and SDBA2) at fixed 2≤m≤300) and show and explain the gap in the distribution of the number k(i) of neighbors of the nodes i.

  7. In vitro study of intracellular IL-1beta production and beta1 integrins expression in stimulated chondrocytes--effect of rhein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigant-Huselstein, C; Dumas, D; Payan, E; Muller, S; Bensoussan, D; Netter, P; Stoltz, J F

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the intracellular IL-1beta production and beta1 integrins (alpha4/beta1 and alpha5/beta1) expression on chondrocytes. Chondroytes monolayer (human chondrosarcoma cell line HEM-C55) were incubated for 12, 24 and 48 hours in the presence of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, Sigma, France) or recombinant human IL-1alpha (rh-IL1alpha, Becton Dickinson, France). After direct immunolabelling, cells were either analyzed on FACScan flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson, France), or observed under an epi-fluorescence inverted microscope equipped with the CellScan EPR optical scanning acquisition system (IPLab-Scanalytics, USA). We found that the IL-1beta mean fluorescence intensity in flow cytometry and in 3D microscopy was increased in the presence of TNF-alpha or rh-IL-1alpha, and alpha4/beta1 or alpha5/beta1 expression was higher on stimulated cells than on control cells. On the other hand, we have evaluated the in vitro effects of rhein (10(-5) M, Negma, France), an active metabolite of diacerein, on the intracellular IL-1beta and beta1 integrins expressed by stimulated or no-stimulated chondrocytes. The results indicated that rhein leads to a reduction of IL-1beta synthesis whereas a weak decrease of beta1 integrins receptors expression is observed. From this study, it seems that rhein partially reduce cytokine-induced intracellular IL-1beta production, and it has a weak action on alpha4/beta1 or alpha5/beta1 receptors.

  8. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altinoluk Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  9. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Armesto, Nestor; Beuf, Guillaume; Moscoso, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE) accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  10. Effect of finite phosphor thickness on detective quantum efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, R.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holmes, R.B. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper we describe theoretically the relationship between the finite thickness of a phosphor screen and its spatial-frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency DQE(f-). The finite thickness of the screen causes a variation in both the total number of light quanta emitted from the screen in a burst from a given x-ray interaction and in the spatial distribution of the quanta within the light burst (i.e., shape or point spread function (PSF) of the light burst). The variation in magnitude of the burst gives rise to a spatial-frequency-independent reduction in DQE, characterized by the scintillation efficiency As. The variation in PSF causes a roll off in DQE with increasing spatial frequency which we have characterized by the function Rc(f). Both As and Rc(f) can be determined from the moments of the distribution of the spatial Fourier spectrum of light bursts emitted from the phosphor and thus they are related: As is a scaling factor for Rc(f). Our theory predicts that it is necessary for all light bursts which appear at the output to have the same magnitude to maximize As and the same shape to maximize Rc(f). These requirements can lead to the result that the fluorescent screen with the highest modulation transfer function will not necessarily have the highest DQE(f) even at high spatial frequencies.

  11. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  12. Analysis of optical fibers with arbitrary refractive index profiles: accuracy, convergence, and effects of finite cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamil, Lakshman S.; Aicklen, Gregory H.

    1993-06-01

    We have formulated a matrix eigenvalue problem for cylindrical optical fibers from a set of finite difference equations. Numerical solution of this problem yields the propagation constants for propagating modes. The method can be used for arbitrary index profiles, does not require the explicit evaluation of Bessel or modified Bessel functions, and does not use iterative methods to search for the propagation constants as was the case in earlier proposed methods using finite differences. The method is accurate, fast, and simple. We have established the convergence and stability of this method, and explored the effects of finite cladding width on the dispersion characteristics.

  13. The Effects of Narrowband Interference on Finite-Resolution IR-UWB Digital Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    zhang, chao; Ren, Pinyi

    2010-01-01

    Finite-resolution digital receiver is recently considered as a potential way to Ultra Wide Band (UWB) communication systems due to its ability of mitigating the challenge of Analog-Digital Converter (ADC). In this paper, the effects of narrowband interference (NBI) are investigated when finite-resolution digital receiver is used for Impulse Radio-UWB (IR-UWB) system. It is shown that finite-resolution receiver enlarges the impact of NBI. The lower resolution of the UWB receiver is, the more degradations NBI causes.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of estradiol-17beta: implications for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölsch, H; Rao, M L

    2002-11-01

    Estradiol-17beta is the most potent female sex hormone. In addition to its role in the control of primary and secondary sexual characteristics, it also influences the development of the brain. Furthermore, estradiol-17beta possesses neuroprotective properties that are mediated via receptor action and also independently of receptors. Several processes that are regulated by estradiol-17beta might influence the expression of Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Differences between the sexes have been described in both disorders, and it has been suggested that these may be due to the action of oestrogens. Long-term oestrogen replacement has proved to be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. The results, however, are controversial. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo findings, which are summarised in this review, encourage further studies with estradiol-17beta or its analogues as potential adjunctive interventions particularly in "negative syndrome" schizophrenia and in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Thermodynamic study on the effects of beta-cyclodextrin inclusion with berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun-Sheng; Wei, Fang-Di; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Chang-Chun

    2002-01-15

    The fluorescence enhancement of berberine (Berb) as a result of complex with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) is investigated. The association constants of alpha-CD and beta-CD with Berb are 60 and 137 M(-1) at 20 degrees C in pH 7.20 aqueous solution. Effects of temperature on the forming inclusion complexes of beta-CD with Berb have been examined through using fluorescence titration. Enthalpy and entropy values calculated from fluorescence data are -33.7 kJ mol(-1) and 74.3 J x mol(-1) K(-1) respectively. It was found that the dielectric constant of beta-CD cavity is about 24 in a rough analogy with absolute alcohol. These results suggest that the extrusion of 'high energy water' molecules from the cavity of beta-CD and hydrophobic interaction upon the inclusion complex formation are the main forces of the inclusion reaction. Effect of pH on the association of beta-CD with Berb was also studied. Mechanism of the inclusion of beta-CD with Berb is further studied by absorption and NMR measurements. Results show that beta-CD forms a 1:1 inclusion complex with Berb.

  16. Finite size effects on the phase diagram of the thermodynamical cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamical cluster model is known to present a first-order liquid-gas phase transition in the idealized case of an uncharged, infinitely extended medium. However, in most practical applications of this model, the system is finite and charged. In this paper we study how the phase diagram is modified by finite size and Coulomb effects. We show that the thermodynamic anomalies which are associated to the finite system counterpart of first order phase transitions, are correctly reproduced by this effective model. However, approximations in the calculation of the grandcanonical partition sum prevent obtaining the exact mapping between statistical ensembles which should be associated to finite systems. The ensemble inequivalence associated to the transition persists in the presence of Coulomb, but the phase diagram is deeply modified with respect to the simple liquid-gas phase transition characteristic of the neutral system.

  17. Finite size effects in the presence of a chemical potential: A study in the classical non-linear O(2) sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Debasish

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of a chemical potential, the physics of level crossings leads to singularities at zero temperature, even when the spatial volume is finite. These singularities are smoothed out at a finite temperature but leave behind non-trivial finite size effects which must be understood in order to extract thermodynamic quantities using Monte Carlo methods, particularly close to critical points. We illustrate some of these issues using the classical non-linear O(2) sigma model with a coupling $\\beta$ and chemical potential $\\mu$ on a 2+1 dimensional Euclidean lattice. In the conventional formulation this model suffers from a sign problem at non-zero chemical potential and hence cannot be studied with the Wolff cluster algorithm. However, when formulated in terms of world-line of particles, the sign problem is absent and the model can be studied efficiently with the "worm algorithm". Using this method we study the finite size effects that arise due to the chemical potential and develop an effective quantum ...

  18. Tritium $\\beta$-decay in chiral effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Baroni, A; Kievsky, A; Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the Fermi and Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix elements in tritium \\beta-decay by including in the charge-changing weak current the corrections up to one loop recently derived in nuclear chiral effective field theory (\\chi EFT). The trinucleon wave functions are obtained from hyperspherical-harmonics solutions of the Schrodinger equation with two- and three-nucleon potentials corresponding to either \\chi EFT (the N3LO/N2LO combination) or meson-exchange phenomenology (the AV18/UIX combination). We find that contributions due to loop corrections in the axial current are, in relative terms, as large as (and in some cases, dominate) those from one-pion exchange, which nominally occur at lower order in the power counting. We also provide values for the low-energy constants multiplying the contact axial current and three-nucleon potential, required to reproduce the experimental GT matrix element and trinucleon binding energies in the N3LO/N2LO and AV18/UIX calculations.

  19. Estimation of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of soft tissue from indentation using two different-sized indentors: finite element analysis of the finite deformation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A P C; Zheng, Y P

    2005-03-01

    Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a tissue can be simultaneously obtained using two indentation tests with two different sized indentors in two indentations. Owing to the assumption of infinitesimal deformation of the indentation, the finite deformation effect of indentation on the calculated material parameters was not fully understood in the double indentation approach. However, indentation tests with infinitesimal deformation are not practical for the measurement of real tissues. Accordingly, finite element models were developed to simulate the indentation with different indentor diameters and different deformation ratios to investigate the finite deformation effect of indentation. The results indicated that Young's modulus E increased with the increase in the indentation deformation w, if the finite deformation effect of indentation was not considered. This phenomenon became obvious when Poisson's ratio v approached 0.5 and/or the ratio of indentor radius and tissue thickness a/h increased. The calculated Young's modulus could be different by 23% at 10% deformation in comparison with its real value. The results also demonstrated that the finite deformation effect to indentation on the calculation of Poisson's ratio v was much smaller. After the finite deformation effect of indentation was considered, the error of the calculated Young's modulus could be controlled within 5% (a/h = 1) and 2% (a/h = 2) for deformation up to 10%.

  20. Finite size effects in the dynamics of opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, R; Tessone, Claudio J.; Toral, Raul

    2006-01-01

    For some models of relevance in the social sciences we review some examples in which system size plays an important role in the final outcome of the dynamics. We discuss the conditions under which changes of behavior can appear only when the number of agents in the model takes a finite value. Those changes of behavior can be related to the apparent phase transitions that appear in some physical models. We show examples in the Galam's model of opinion transmission and the Axelrod's model of culture formation stressing the role that the network of interactions has on the main results of both models. Finally, we present the phenomenon of system-size stochastic resonance by which a forcing signal (identified as an advertising agent) is optimally amplified by a population of the right (intermediate) size. Our work stresses the role that the system size has in the dynamics of social systems and the inappropriateness of taking the thermodynamic limit for these systems.

  1. Metabolic effects of beta2-agonists in relation to exercise performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Beta2-agonists are frequently used in the treatment of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes. However, aside from a bronchodilatory effect, beta2-agonists have also been shown to improve exercise performance, which makes these substances subjected to misuse by elite...

  2. Chronic beta-blocker treatment in patients with advanced heart failure - Effects on neurohormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teisman, ACH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Boomsma, F; de Kam, PJ; Pinto, YM; de Zeeuw, D; van Gilst, WH

    2000-01-01

    Background: To date, the use of beta-blockers in treating patients with chronic heart failure gains support, this since several large clinical trials reported reduced mortality after chronic beta-blockade. Part of these beneficial effects may result from inhibition of deleterious neurohormone activa

  3. de Haas-van Alphen Effect, LMTO Bandstructure and Fermi Surface of beta-AuMg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunsworth, A. E.; Jan, J. -P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1979-01-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been measured in the ordered alloy beta '-AuMg. The relativistic LMTO bandstructure has been calculated and predicts a Fermi surface in good agreement with experiment. Both bandstructure and Fermi surface are similar in those of other beta brasses with the same...

  4. de Haas-van Alphen Effect, LMTO Bandstructure and Fermi Surface of beta-AgMg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunsworth, A. E.; Jan, J. - P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1978-01-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been measured in the ordered alloy beta '-AgMg. The relativistic LMTO bandstructure has been calculated, and predicts a Fermi surface in good agreement with experiment. Both bandstructure and Fermi surface are similar to those of other beta brasses with the same...

  5. Effect of Addition of Cereal Based Beta-glucan on Technological and Functional Properties of Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Şimşekli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays usage of dietary fibers in foods has been increasing duo to revealing of health benefits. Beta-glucans found especially in oats and barley, are polysaccharide and source of water-soluble dietary fiber. Positive effects of beta-glucans like healing coronary-heart disease, lowering blood cholesterol level, balancing blood sugar level and preventing obesity, made beta-glucans widespread functional food components for producing various foods. In addition to beneficial physiological effects of beta-glucans, they texturize, gelatinize, emulsify and stabilize the foods. They increase viscosity, replace fat and enhance rheological properties in cereal, meat and dairy products. They are also used to produce packing material depending on their mechanical properties and molecular weights. In this review, effects of addition of cereal based beta-glucans on technological and functional properties of various foods are revealed based on previous studies.

  6. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  7. Effect of beta-cyclodextrin nanocavity confinement on the photophysics of robinetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anwesha; Basu, Kaushik; Sengupta, Pradeep K

    2007-12-14

    We have studied the confinement of robinetin, a therapeutically active plant flavonol, in cyclodextrin (CDx) nanocavities, using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Enhanced tautomer emission (arising from excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT)) as well as dramatically blue shifted (approximately 10 nm in beta-CDx and approximately 33 nm in SHP beta-CDx) normal fluorescence observed upon addition of the beta-CDxs indicate that robinetin readily enters the doughnut-shaped hydrophobic cavity of beta-CDx where the chromone moiety is well shielded from external hydrogen bonding perturbations. Detailed analyses of the fluorescence data (emission profile, anisotropy, decay times) indicate that robinetin forms 1:1 inclusion complexes with both natural and chemically modified beta-cyclodextrins (beta-CDx and SHP beta-CDx) with affinity constant values K=195+/-17 M(-1) and 1055+/-48 M(-1) respectively, indicating the prospective utility of SHP beta-CDx in particular as an effective drug carrier. Unlike beta-CDxs, alpha-CDxs do not form inclusion complexes with robinetin. To further characterize the robinetin/beta-CDxs complexes, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies have been performed, which reveal that incorporation of robinetin molecules in the chiral environment of the beta-CDxs strongly affects the electronic transitions of robinetin leading to the occurrence of positive induced circular dichroism (ICD) bands in the near ultra-violet (UV) region. Molecular mechanics calculations show that the inclusion complex with the chromone ring inserted into the beta-CDx cavity is most favorable, in agreement with our spectroscopic data.

  8. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two distinct types of the field theory have been proposed to describe the quantized thermal Hall effect. One of these, known as the gravitational Chern-Simons action, is a kind of topological field theory, and the other is a phenomenological theory relevant to the Strěda formula. In order to solve this problem, we derive microscopically an effective theory that accounts for the quantized thermal Hall effect. In this paper, the two-dimensional Dirac fermion under a static background gravitational field is considered in equilibrium at a finite temperature, from which an effective boundary free energy functional of the gravitational field is derived. This boundary theory is shown to explain the quantized thermal Hall conductivity and thermal Hall current in the bulk by assuming the Lorentz symmetry. The bulk effective theory is consistently determined via the boundary effective theory.

  9. Nonlinear effects of the finite amplitude ultrasound wave in biological tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear effects will occur during the transmission of the finite amplitude wave in biological tissues.The theoretical prediction and experimental demonstration of the nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude wave at the range of biomedical ultrasound frequency and intensity are studied.Results show that the efficiency factor and effective propagation distance will decrease while the attenuation coefficient increases due to the existence of nonlinear effects.The experimental results coincided quite well with the theory.This shows that the effective propagation distance and efficiency factor can be used to describe quantitatively the influence of nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude sound wave in biological tissues.

  10. Cholesterol-lowering effect of beta-glucan from oat bran in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects may decrease when beta-glucan is incorporated into bread and cookies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, D.A.J.M.; Hornstra, G.; Mensink, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Cholesterol-lowering effect of beta-glucan from oat bran in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects may decrease when beta-glucan is incorporated into bread and cookies. Kerckhoffs DA, Hornstra G, Mensink RP. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. BACKGROUND: F

  11. Finite size effects and symmetry breaking in the evolution of networks of competing Boolean nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M; Bassler, K E, E-mail: bassler@uh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Houston, 617 Science and Research 1, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Finite size effects on the evolutionary dynamics of Boolean networks are analyzed. In the model considered, Boolean networks evolve via a competition between nodes that punishes those in the majority. Previous studies have found that large networks evolve to a statistical steady state that is both critical and highly canalized, and that the evolution of canalization, which is a form of robustness found in genetic regulatory networks, is associated with a particular symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics. Here, it is found that finite size networks evolve in a fundamentally different way than infinitely large networks do. The symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics of infinitely large networks that selects for canalizing Boolean functions is broken in the evolutionary dynamics of finite size networks. In finite size networks, there is an additional selection for input-inverting Boolean functions that output a value opposite to the majority of input values. The reason for the symmetry breaking in the evolutionary dynamics is found to be due to the need for nodes in finite size networks to behave differently in order to cooperate so that the system collectively performs as efficiently as possible. The results suggest that both finite size effects and symmetry are fundamental for understanding the evolution of real-world complex networks, including genetic regulatory networks.

  12. Effect of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes on the activity of the transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murvai, M; Borbély, A A; Kónya, J; Gergely, L; Veress, G

    2004-12-01

    The effect of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) E6 and E7 proteins was studied on the transcriptional activity of the human transforming growth factor beta2 (TGF-beta) promoter in different cell lines. Luciferase tests were performed after co-transfection of cells with TGF-beta2 reporter constructs and HPV 16 E6 or E7 expression vectors. HPV 16 E7, but not E6 significantly repressed TGF-beta2 promoter activity in NIH/3T3 cells, which have wild-type p53 and pRb proteins. The repressive effect of HPV 16 E7 on the transcriptional activity of the TGF-beta2 promoter could be localized to the promoter region -528 to -251 relative to the transcriptional start site. Ability of E7 to bind pRb was necessary to inhibit the TGF-beta2 promoter. Over-expression of the transcription factor E2F-1 had an effect on the TGF-beta2 promoter similar to that of E7, which may indicate that HPV 16 E7 represses the TGF-beta2 promoter by releasing E2F from pRb.

  13. Practical security of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with finite sampling bandwidth effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-02-01

    Practical security of the continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) system with finite sampling bandwidth of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at the receiver's side is investigated. We find that the finite sampling bandwidth effects may decrease the lower bound of secret key rate without awareness of the legitimate communicators. This leaves security loopholes for Eve to attack the system. In addition, this effect may restrains the linear relationship of secret key bit rate with repetition rate of the system; subsequently, there is a saturation value for the secret key bit rate with the repetition rate. To resist such kind of effects, we propose a dual sampling detection approach in which two ADCs are employed so that the finite sampling bandwidth effects are removed.

  14. Effects of ultrasound on Transforming Growth Factor-beta genes in bone cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Harle

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic ultrasound (US is a widely used form of biophysical stimulation that is increasingly applied to promote fracture healing. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta, which is encoded by three related but different genes, is known to play a major part in bone growth and repair. However, the effects of US on the expression of the TGF-beta genes and the physical acoustic mechanisms involved in initiating changes in gene expression in vitro, are not yet known. The present study demonstrates that US had a differential effect on these TGF-beta isoforms in a human osteoblast cell line, with the highest dose eliciting the most pronounced up-regulation of both TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 at 1 hour after treatment and thereafter declining. In contrast, US had no effect on TGF-beta2 expression. Fluid streaming rather than thermal effects or cavitation was found to be the most likely explanation for the gene responses observed in vitro.

  15. Standard Model Extension and Casimir effect for fermions at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz and CPT symmetries are foundations for important processes in particle physics. Recent studies in Standard Model Extension (SME) at high energy indicate that these symmetries may be violated. Modifications in the lagrangian are necessary to achieve a hermitian hamiltonian. The fermion sector of the standard model extension is used to calculate the effects of the Lorentz and CPT violation on the Casimir effect at zero and finite temperature. The Casimir effect and Stefan-Boltzmann law at finite temperature are calculated using the thermo field dynamics formalism.

  16. Effects of New Gravitational Interactions on Neutrinoless Double $\\beta$ Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V; Sarkar, U

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that violations of Lorentz invariance orviolations of the equivalence principle can be constrained from thenon-observation of neutrinoless double beta decay. We generalize this analysisto all possible new gravitational interactions and discuss briefly theconstraints for different cases.

  17. Effects of beta-glucan addition to a probiotic containing yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, T; Kealy, T; Mishra, V K

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of addition of beta-glucan from 2 different cereal sources (oat and barley) on growth and metabolic activity of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (Bb-12) as determined by plating on a selective medium in yogurt during prolonged cold storage. These yogurt batches were compared to unsupplemented and inulin supplemented controls. All batches were also assessed for syneresis. Oat beta-glucan addition resulted in improved probiotic viability and stability comparable to that of inulin. It also enhanced lactic and propionic acid production. The barley beta-glucan addition suppressed proteolytic activity more than that from oat. These improvements were hindered by greater syneresis caused likely by thermodynamic incompatibility. Small amplitude oscillatory measurements of acidified model mixture of beta-glucan/skim milk solids showed formation of casein gel within the beta-glucan network. Binary mixtures of beta-glucan and skim milk solids had apparent pseudoplastic and non-Newtonian behavior governed mainly by beta-glucan contribution. Above critical concentrations, the mixtures underwent phase separation with the lower phase rich in protein. The phase diagram also showed that the addition of beta-glucan may be possible at or below 0.24 w/w%.

  18. Central effects of beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radosevich, P.M.; Lacy, D.B.; Brown, L.L.; Williams, P.E.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1989-02-01

    The effects of centrally administered beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog were studied. Intracerebroventricular administration of beta-endorphin (0.2 mg/h) caused a 70% increase in plasma glucose. The mechanism of the hyperglycemia was twofold: there was an early increase in glucose production and a late inhibition of glucose clearance. These changes are explained by marked increases in plasma epinephrine (30-fold) and norepinephrine (6-fold) that occurred during infusion of beta-endorphin. Central administration of beta-endorphin also resulted in increased levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. In addition there was an increase in plasma insulin but no increase in plasma glucagon. Intravenous administration of beta-endorphin did not alter glucose homeostasis. Intracerebroventricular administration of acetylated beta-endorphin did not perturb glucose kinetics or any of the hormones that changed during infusion of the unacetylated peptide. We conclude that beta-endorphin acts centrally to cause hyperglycemia by stimulating sympathetic outflow and the pituitary-adrenal axis. Acetylation of beta-endorphin abolishes the in vivo activity of the peptide.

  19. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... overnight were served a breakfast (450 kcal) with intravenous infusion of saline or synthetic GLP-1 (0.75 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)), and beta-cell function was evaluated by estimating the relationship between glucose concentration and insulin secretion (calculated by deconvolution of C-peptide data). RESULTS...

  20. Effects of interleukin-1 beta on thyrotropin secretion and thyroid hormone uptake in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.J.S. Wassen (Frank); E.P.C.M. Moerings (Ellis); H. van Toor (Hans); E.A. de Vrey (Evelyn); G. Hennemann; M.E. Everts (Maria)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) on basal and TRH-induced TSH release, and the effects of IL-1 beta on the uptake of [125I]T3 and [125I]T4 and on nuclear binding of [125I]T3 were examined. Furthermore,

  1. 75 FR 4877 - In the Matter of Beta Gamma Nuclear Radiology; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Gamma Nuclear Radiology; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective Immediately) I Beta Gamma Nuclear Radiology (BGNR) (Licensee) is the holder of medical License No. 52-25542-01, issued by the U.S...

  2. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    concentration, insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell function increased significantly with increased concentration of iron. .... RESULTS. Effect of Iron on Blood Glucose Concentration .... Gillum, R.F., (2001). Association of serum ferritin and.

  3. Finite element analysis of inclusion effects on high strength steel cord wire drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-liang; Zhao, Tian-Zhang; Zhang, Shi-hong

    2013-05-01

    In wire drawing of high strength steel wire for the application in tier cords, the inclusion plays the key role resulting in wire fractures. The effects of inclusion size, position and shape on wire drawing is investigated via finite element analysis in this paper. A 3D finite element model is developed to analyze the effect of inclusion position on the risk of fracture, and a 2D axisymmetrical finite element model for an inclusion at the wire center is established to investigate the effects of inclusion size and shape on wire fracture. A damage model with the consideration of stress status and plastic strain increment is used to characterize the risk of wire fracture. Finite element analysis results indicate that wire fracture is very critical to the inclusion located at wire core, and inclusion with an elliptical shape and its long axis lining well with the wire axis. Finite element analysis also proves that with the use of 7 degree die instead of 9 degree die is able to reduce the risk of fractures by about 28%.

  4. Defining Effectiveness Using Finite Sets A Study on Computability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macedo, Hugo Daniel dos Santos; Haeusler, Edward H.; Garcia, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies effectiveness in the domain of computability. In the context of model-theoretical approaches to effectiveness, where a function is considered effective if there is a model containing a representation of such function, our definition relies on a model provided by functions betwe...

  5. Kinetic simulation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability: effect of a finite source size

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser instability is widespread in the Universe, producing, e.g., radio emission of the magnetized planets and cool substellar objects. Diagnosing the parameters of astrophysical radio sources requires comprehensive nonlinear simulations of the radiation process. We simulate the electron-cyclotron maser instability in a very low-beta plasma. The model used takes into account the radiation escape from the source region and the particle flow through this region. We developed a kinetic code to simulate the time evolution of an electron distribution in a radio emission source. The model includes the terms describing the particle injection to and escape from the emission source region. The spatial escape of the emission from the source is taken into account by using a finite amplification time. The unstable electron distribution of the horseshoe type is considered. A number of simulations were performed for different parameter sets typical of the magnetospheres of planets and ultracool dwarf...

  6. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay rates of charged pseudoscalar mesons: finite-volume effects

    CERN Document Server

    Tantalo, N; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, C T; Sanfilippo, F; Simula, S

    2016-01-01

    In Carrasco et al. we have recently proposed a method to calculate $O(e^2)$ electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons. The method is based on the observation that the infrared divergent contributions (that appear at intermediate stages of the calculation and that cancel in physical quantities thanks to the Bloch-Nordsieck mechanism) are universal, i.e. depend on the charge and the mass of the meson but not on its internal structure. In this talk we perform a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects associated with our method. In particular we show that also the leading $1/L$ finite-volume effects are universal and perform an analytical calculation of the finite-volume leptonic decay rate for a point-like meson.

  8. Effects of calcium impurity on phase relationship, ionic conductivity and microstructure of Na$^{+}$-$\\beta/beta"$-alumina solid electrolyte

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUNG-TAE LEE; DAE-HAN LEE; SANG-MIN LEE; SANG-SOO HAN; SANG-HYUNG LEE; SUNG-KI LIM

    2016-06-01

    Ca-doped Na$^{+}$-$\\beta/beta"$-alumina was synthesized using a solid-state reaction. The changes in the properties of Na$^{+}$-$\\beta/beta"$-alumina resulting from the presence of Ca impurity were studied. Ca (0–5 wt%) was added to the respective samples, which were then sintered. The specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanningelectron microscopy, densimetry and impedance analysis. In the sintered specimens, the $\\beta"$-alumina phase fraction decreased as Ca content increased, whereas the relative sintered density increased. The surface morphology of Cadoped Na$^{+}$-$\\beta/beta"$-alumina specimens showed a Ca-rich layer, which was the main cause of increase in the specificresistance.

  9. The effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the beta cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina

    2009-01-01

    to stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Furthermore, GLP-1 appears to have multiple positive effects on beta cells. However, GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), which limits the clinical relevance of GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two main classes of GLP-1-based......Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease characterized by insulin resistance and impaired beta-cell function. Treatments that prevent further beta-cell decline are therefore essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is known...

  10. Status of international benchmark experiment for effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}eff)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, S.; Sakurai, T.; Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    To improve the prediction accuracy of the {beta}eff, the program of the international benchmark experiment (Beta Effect Reactor Experiment for a New International Collaborative Evaluation: BERNICE) was planned. This program composed of two parts; BERNICE-MASURCA and BERNICE-FCA. The former one was carried out in the fast critical facility MASURCA of CEA, FRANCE between 1993 and 1994. The latter one started in the FCA, JAERI in 1995 and still is going. In these benchmark experiments, various experimental techniques have been applied for in-pile measurements of the {beta}eff. The accuracy of the measurements was better than 3%. (author)

  11. Thermoelectric Conductivities at Finite Magnetic Field and the Nernst Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Keun-Young; Seo, Yunseok; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We study electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities of a strongly correlated system in the presence of magnetic field by gauge/gravity duality. We consider a general class of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory with axion fields imposing momentum relaxation. Analytic general formulas for DC conductivities and the Nernst signal are derived in terms of the black hole horizon data. For an explicit model study we analyse in detail the Dyonic black hole modified by momentum relaxation effect. In this model, the Nernst signal shows a typical vortex-liquid effect when momentum relaxation effect is comparable to chemical potential. We compute all AC electric, thermal, and thermal conductivities by numerical analysis and confirms that their zero frequency limits precisely reproduce our analytic formulas, which is a non-trivial consistency check of our methods. We discuss the momentum relaxation effect on conductivities including cyclotron frequencies.

  12. Finite-duration Seeding Effects in Powerful Backward Raman Amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.A. Yampolsky; V.M. Malkin; N.J. Fisch

    2003-07-14

    In the process of backward Raman amplification (BRA), the leading layers of the seed laser pulse can shadow the rear layers, thus weakening the effective seeding power and affecting parameters of output pulses in BRA. We study this effect numerically and also analytically by approximating the pumped pulse by the ''*-pulse'' manifold of self-similar solutions. We determine how the pumped pulse projection moves within the *-pulse manifold, and describe quantitatively the effective seeding power evolution. Our results extend the quantitative theory of BRA to regimes where the effective seeding power varies substantially during the amplification. These results might be of broader interest, since the basic equations, are general equations for resonant 3-wave interactions.

  13. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. (INSERM U18, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France))

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  14. Roughness and Finite Size Effect in the NYSE Stock-Price Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Alfi, V; Petri, A; Pietronero, L

    2006-01-01

    We consider the roughness properties of NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) stock-price fluctuations. The statistical properties of the data are relatively homogeneous within the same day but the large jumps between different days prevent the extension of the analysis to large times. This leads to intrinsic finite size effects which alter the apparent Hurst (H) exponent. We show, by analytical methods, that finite size effects always lead to an enhancement of H. We then consider the effect of fat tails on the analysis of the roughness and show that the finite size effects are strongly enhanced by the fat tails. The non stationarity of the stock price dynamics also enhances the finite size effects which, in principle, can become important even in the asymptotic regime. We then compute the Hurst exponent for a set of stocks of the NYSE and argue that the interpretation of the value of H is highly ambiguous in view of the above results. Finally we propose an alternative determination of the roughness in terms of the ...

  15. Early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.

    1988-03-01

    This report summarizes an inhalation exposure experiment that concerns early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung of rats. Both morbidity at 18 months and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter /sup 147/Pm, the alpha-emitter /sup 238/Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1)for pulmonary functional morbidity at 18 months and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis within 18 months. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations after combined chronic alpha and beta irradiation of the lung. A relative biological effectiveness of approximately 7 was obtained for /sup 238/Pu alpha radiation compared to /sup 147/Pm beta radiation for both pulmonary functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. 12 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  17. Effect of mixing rate on Beta-carotene production and extraction by dunaliella salina in two-phase bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hejazi, M.; Andrysiewicz, E.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    beta-Carotene has many applications in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries; Dunaliella salina is currently the main source for natural beta-carotene. We have investigated the effect of mixing rate and whether it leads to the facilitated release of beta-carotene from the cells of Dunali

  18. An effective model for dynamic finite difference calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, T.N.

    1996-01-01

    An effective stress model, which simulates the mechanical effects of pore fluids on deformation and strength of porous materials, is described. The model can directly use SESAME table equations-of-state (EOSs) for the solid and fluid components. the model assumes that undrained (no fluid flow) conditions occur. Elastic and crushing behavior of the pore space can be specified from the results of simple laboratory tests. The model fully couples deviatoric and volumetric behavior in the sense that deviatoric and tensile failure depend on the effective pressure, while volumetric changes caused by deviatoric failure are coupled back to the volumetric behavior of the material. Strain hardening and softening of the yield surface, together with a number of flow rules, can be modeled. This model has been implemented into the SMC123 and CTH codes.

  19. Finite size effects in stimulated laser pair production

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzl, Thomas; Marklund, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We consider stimulated pair production in a strong laser background, using the language of lightcone field theory. In an infinite plane wave, we show that the lightcone momentum transfer to the pair must be a multiple of the laser frequency, which results in the usual interpretation of multi-photon production of pairs with an effective mass. In a pulse, the momentum transfer is continuous, exhibiting resonant behaviour for effective mass pair production. We show that this is completely analogous to a diffraction process, and that the fine structure of the emission rate is that of a diffraction pattern resulting from interference of the produced pairs' wavefunctions.

  20. Finite population size effects in quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Deem, Michael W.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-04-01

    We consider finite population size effects for Crow-Kimura and Eigen quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape. We formulate accurately the iteration procedure for the finite population models, then derive the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (HJE) to describe the dynamic of the probability distribution. The steady-state solution of HJE gives the variance of the mean fitness. Our results are useful for understanding the population sizes of viruses in which the infinite population models can give reliable results for biological evolution problems.

  1. Inhomogeneous condensation in effective models for QCD using the finite-mode approach

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Achim; Wagner, Marc; Rischke, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    We use a numerical method, the finite-mode approach, to study inhomogeneous condensation in effective models for QCD in a general framework. Former limitations of considering a specific ansatz for the spatial dependence of the condensate are overcome. Different error sources are analyzed and strategies to minimize or eliminate them are outlined. The analytically known results for $1+1$ dimensional models (such as the Gross-Neveu model and extensions of it) are correctly reproduced using the finite-mode approach. Moreover, the NJL model in $3+1$ dimensions is investigated and its phase diagram is determined with particular focus on the inhomogeneous phase at high density.

  2. Effect of different beta blockers on penile vascular velocities in hypertensive males

    OpenAIRE

    Samer Malak Botros; Ahmed Mohamed Hussein; Ahmed Shawky Elserafy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Beta blockers are very commonly used as antihypertensive medications in young active individuals. This class has been accused of erectile dysfunction in patients taking them. Problems with erectile function can raise a concern in the treatment of hypertension and may influence the choice of treatment regimens and decisions to discontinue drugs. Aim: The aim was to assess the effect of different beta blockers: nebivolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, and carvedilol on the penile arteria...

  3. RANDOM MICROSTRUCTURE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR EFFECTIVE NONLINEAR PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Some theoretical methods have been reported to deal with nonlinear problems of composite materials but the accuracy is not so good. In the meantime, a lot of nonlinear problems are difficult to be managed by the theoretical methods. The present study aims to use the developed method, the random microstructure finite element method, to deal with these nonlinear problems. In this paper, the random microstructure finite element method is used to deal with all three kinds of nonlinear property problems of composite materials. The analyzed results suggest that the influences of the nonlinear phenomena on the effective properties of composite materials are significant and the random microstructure finite element method is an efficient tool to investigate the nonlinear problems.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Material Microstructure Effects on Predicted Crack Paths Using Finite Element Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Anaïs; Mehmanparast, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The effects of microstructure, grain and grain boundary (GB) properties on predicted damage paths and indicative crack propagation direction have been examined for a polycrystalline material using mesoscale finite element simulations. Numerical analyses were carried out on a compact tension specimen geometry containing granular mesh structures with random grain shapes and sizes of average diameter 100μm. Nanoindentation tests were performed to investigate the dependency of mesoscale hardness measurements on the indentation location with respect to grain and GB regions. Finite element results have shown that under tensile loading conditions, the predicted damage paths are very sensitive to the granular mesh structure, GB properties and individual grain properties. Furthermore, finite element results have revealed that the cracking mode (i.e., transgranular/intergranular) and maximum crack deviation angle are strongly dependent on the material microstructures employed in simulations.

  5. Light Fermion Finite Mass Effects in Non-relativistic Bound States

    CERN Document Server

    Eiras, D; Eiras, Dolors; Soto, Joan

    2000-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for the vacuum polarization effects due to a light fermion with finite mass in the binding energy and in the wave function at the origin of QED and (weak coupling) QCD non-relativistic bound states. Applications to exotic atoms, \\Upsilon (1s) and t\\bar{t} production near threshold are briefly discussed.

  6. THE EFFECT OF NUMERICAL INTEGRATION IN FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N'guimbi; Germain

    2001-01-01

    Abstract. The effect of numerical integration in finite element methods applied to a class of nonlinear parabolic equations is considered and some sufficient conditions on the quadrature scheme to ensure that the order of convergence is unaltered in the presence of numerical integration are given. Optimal Lz and H1 estimates for the error and its time derivative are established.

  7. Inertial Effects on Finite Length Pipe Seismic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A seismic analysis for soil-pipe interaction which accounts for length and constraining conditions at the ends of a continuous pipe is developed. The Winkler model is used to schematize the soil-structure interaction. The approach is focused on axial strains, since bending strains in a buried pipe due to the wave propagation are typically a second-order effect. Unlike many works, the inertial terms are considered in solving equations. Accurate numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of pipe length and constraint conditions on the pipe seismic strain. The obtained results are compared with results inferred from other models present in the literature. For free-end pipelines, inertial effects have significant influence only for short length. On the contrary, their influence is always important for pinned pipes. Numerical simulations show that a simple rigid model can be used for free-end pipes, whereas pinned pipes need more accurate models.

  8. Pressure effect on paramagnet {beta}-US{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: ikeda.shugo@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, H.; Matsuda, T.D.; Tateiwa, N.; Nakamura, A.; Yamamoto, E. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hedo, M.; Uwatoko, Y.; Haga, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Ounki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    Single crystals of paramagnetic semiconductor {beta}-US{sub 2} with the orthorhombic (Pnma) crystal structure were grown by chemical transport method. We measured the electrical resistivity {rho} under high pressure, and magnetization. With increasing pressure, the temperature dependence of {rho} approaches to semimetallic behavior and a kink anomaly appears at T{sub a}. T{sub a} shifts to higher temperature with increasing pressure. From the comparison with ferromagnetic semimetal UTeS having the same crystal structure, it seems that T{sub a} is a ferromagnetic transition.

  9. Analysis on effect of surface fault to site ground motion using finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳政; 罗奇峰

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contact theory is applied to simulate the sliding of surface fault. Finite element method is used to analyze the effect of surface fault to site ground motions. Calculated results indicate that amplification effect is obvious in the area near surface fault, especially on the site that is in the downside fault. The results show that the effect of surface fault should be considered when important structure is constructed in the site with surface fault.

  10. Effective viscoelastic behavior of particulate polymer composites at finite concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dan; HU Geng-kai

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric materials usually present some viscoelastic behavior. To improve the mechanical behavior of these materials, ceramics materials are often filled into the polymeric materials in form of fiber or particle. A micromechanical model was proposed to estimate the overall viscoelastic behavior for particulate polymer composites, especially for high volume concentration of filled particles. The method is based on Laplace transform technique and an elastic model including two-particle interaction. The effective creep compliance and the stress and strainrelation at a constant loading rate are analyzed. The results show that the proposed method predicts a significant stiffer response than those based on Mori-Tanaka's method at high volume concentration of particles.

  11. Effects of chronic delta-9-THC treatment on cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, E.B.; Seifen, E.; Kennedy, R.H.; Kafiluddi, R.; Paule, M.G.; Scallet, A.C.; Ali, S.F.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    This study was designed to determine if chronic treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alters cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in the rat. Following daily oral administration of 10 or 20 mg/kg THC or an equivalent volume of control solvent for 90 days, rats were sacrificed, and sarcolemmal membranes were prepared from ventricular myocardium. Beta-adrenoceptor density and binding affinity estimated with (-)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol; a beta-adrenergic antagonist, were not significantly affected by treatment with THC when compared to vehicle controls. These results suggest that the tolerance to cardiovascular effects of THC which develops during chronic exposure in the rat is not associated with alterations in cardiac beta-adrenoceptors as monitored by radiolabeled antagonist binding.

  12. Effect of beta-cyclodextrin on aroma release and flavor perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Avinash; Linforth, Robert S T; Hort, Joanne; Taylor, Andrew J

    2004-04-07

    Binding and release of volatile compounds to and from beta-cyclodextrin were measured in model aqueous systems using static equilibrium headspace and dynamic headspace dilution. Beta-cyclodextrin decreased the static equilibrium headspace for some volatiles (e.g., ethyl octanoate and decanone) due to binding, but dilution studies demonstrated that binding was readily reversible. Dynamic release of hydrophobic volatile compounds was similar to that observed from emulsions. When beta-cyclodextrin was added to fat free yogurt, the release of a commercial lemon flavoring was modified and was similar to release from a regular fat yogurt. Sensory difference testing confirmed the release results. The data demonstrate that beta-cyclodextrin can be used to modify flavor delivery in both model and real systems; the effects in the latter are sensorially significant.

  13. Interferons beta have vasoconstrictive and procoagulant effects: a woman who developed livedo reticularis and Raynaud phenomenon in association with interferon beta treatment for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rot, Uroš; Ledinek, Alenka Horvat

    2013-12-01

    A 31-year-old woman with MS developed livedo reticularis and secondary Raynaud phenomenon 2.5 years after introduction of interferon beta-1b. The symptoms disappeared after withdrawal of the drug. Livedo reticularis and Raynaud phenomenon as well as pulmonary arterial hypertension, venous sinus thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and renal thrombotic microangiopathy have all been described in association with interferon beta therapy. These complications strongly suggest that type I interferons have vasoconstrictive and procoagulant effects with potentially serious systemic complications.

  14. Role of bioactive food components in diabetes prevention: effects on Beta-cell function and preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoon Sin; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive compounds found in fruits and vegetables can have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic effects and can be protective against various diseases and metabolic disorders. These beneficial effects make them good candidates for the development of new functional foods with potential protective and preventive properties for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the most relevant results concerning the effects of various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, vitamins, and carotenoids on several aspects of beta-cell functionality. Studies using animal models with induced diabetes and diabetic patients support the hypothesis that bioactive compounds could ameliorate diabetic phenotypes. Published data suggest that there might be direct effects of bioactive compounds on enhancing insulin secretion and preventing beta-cell apoptosis, and some compounds might modulate beta-cell proliferation. Further research is needed to establish any clinical effects of these compounds.

  15. Alpha and beta adrenergic effects on metabolism in contracting, perfused muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Galbo, H

    1982-01-01

    The role of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation for the effect of epinephrine on muscle glycogenolysis, glucose- and oxygen uptake and muscle performance was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter at rest and during electrical stimulation (60 contractions/min). Adrenergic stimulation...... was obtained by epinephrine in a physiological concentration (2.4 X 10(-8) M) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade by 10(-5) M phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Epinephrine enhanced net glycogenolysis during contractions most markedly in slow-twitch red fibers. In these fibers the effect...... of alpha-adrenergic receptors and had a positive inotropic effect during contractions which was abolished by alpha- as well as by beta-adrenergic blockade. The results indicate that epinephrine has profound effects on contracting muscle, and that these effects are elicited through different combinations...

  16. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Jun, E-mail: anzai_jun@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro, E-mail: kitamura@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Takenori, E-mail: tnozaki@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Toshie, E-mail: nagayasu_toshie@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Terashima, Akio, E-mail: terashima_akio@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Asano, Taiji, E-mail: asano_taiji@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  17. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Raha, Sandeep [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Denosumab Treatment Effects on Vertebral Strength in Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Varela, Aurore; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ominsky, Michael S; Keaveny, Tony M

    2016-08-01

    Finite element analysis has not yet been validated for measuring changes in whole-bone strength at the hip or spine in people after treatment with an osteoporosis agent. Toward that end, we assessed the ability of a clinically approved implementation of finite element analysis to correctly quantify treatment effects on vertebral strength, comparing against direct mechanical testing, in cynomolgus monkeys randomly assigned to one of three 16-month-long treatments: sham surgery with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), ovariectomy with vehicle (OVX-Vehicle), or ovariectomy with denosumab (OVX-DMAb). After treatment, T12 vertebrae were retrieved, scanned with micro-CT, and mechanically tested to measure compressive strength. Blinded to the strength data and treatment codes, the micro-CT images were coarsened and homogenized to create continuum-type finite element models, without explicit porosity. With clinical translation in mind, these models were then analyzed for strength using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared VirtuOst software application (O.N. Diagnostics, Berkeley, CA, USA), developed for analysis of human bones. We found that vertebral strength by finite element analysis was highly correlated (R(2)  = 0.97; n = 52) with mechanical testing, independent of treatment (p = 0.12). Further, the size of the treatment effect on strength (ratio of mean OVX-DMAb to mean OVX-Vehicle, as a percentage) was large and did not differ (p = 0.79) between mechanical testing (+57%; 95% CI [26%, 95%]) and finite element analysis (+51% [20%, 88%]). The micro-CT analysis revealed increases in cortical thickness (+45% [19%, 73%]) and trabecular bone volume fraction (+24% [8%, 42%]). These results show that a preestablished clinical finite element analysis implementation-developed for human bone and clinically validated in fracture-outcome studies-correctly quantified the observed treatment effects of denosumab on vertebral strength in cynomolgus monkeys. One

  19. Finite Range Effects in Energies and Recombination Rates of Three Identical Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peder Klokmose; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.;

    2013-01-01

    is large. The models are built on contact potentials which take into account finite range effects; one is a two-channel model and the other is an effective range expansion model implemented through the boundary condition on the three-body wave function when two of the particles are at the same point...... in space. We compare the results with the results of the ubiquitous single-parameter zero-range model where only the scattering length is taken into account. Both finite range models predict variations of the well-known geometric scaling factor 22.7 that arises in Efimov physics. The threshold value...... at negative scattering length for creation of a bound trimer moves to higher or lower values depending on the sign of the effective range compared to the location of the threshold for the single-parameter zero-range model. Large effective ranges, corresponding to narrow resonances, are needed...

  20. TGF-beta1 release from biodegradable polymer microparticles: its effects on marrow stromal osteoblast function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controlled release of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) to a bone defect may be beneficial for the induction of a bone regeneration cascade. The objectives of this work were to assess the feasibility of using biodegradable polymer microparticles as carriers for controlled TGF-beta1 delivery and the effects of released TGF-beta1 on the proliferation and differentiation of marrow stromal cells in vitro. METHODS: Recombinant human TGF-beta1 was incorporated into microparticles of blends of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) was co-encapsulated as a porogen. The effects of PEG content (0, 1, or 5% by weight [wt%]) and buffer pH (3, 5, or 7.4) on the protein release kinetics and the degradation of PLGA were determined in vitro for as long as 28 days. Rat marrow stromal cells were seeded on a biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) substrate. The dose response and biological activity of released TGF-beta1 was determined after 3 days in culture. The effects of TGF-beta1 released from PLGA/PEG microparticles on marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were assessed during a 21-day period. RESULTS: TGF-beta1 was encapsulated along with FITC-BSA into PLGA/PEG blend microparticles and released in a multiphasic fashion including an initial burst for as long as 28 days in vitro. Increasing the initial PEG content resulted in a decreased cumulative mass of released proteins. Aggregation of FITC-BSA occurred at lower buffer pH, which led to decreased release rates of both proteins. The degradation of PLGA was increased at higher PEG content and significantly accelerated at acidic pH conditions. Rat marrow stromal cells cultured on PPF substrates showed a dose response to TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles similar to that of added TGF-beta1, indicating that the activity of TGF-beta1 was retained during microparticle

  1. Effect of 10 Week Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Competition and Training Performance in Elite Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise M. Burke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships and after (international or national selection meet supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ±0.8%, mean, ±90% confidence limits of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (−1.3%; ±1.0%, there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (−0.2%; ±1.5% and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  2. Effect of 10 week beta-alanine supplementation on competition and training performance in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Weiliang; Shaw, Greg; Anderson, Megan E; Pyne, David B; Saunders, Philo U; Bishop, David J; Burke, Louise M

    2012-10-09

    Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD) were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter) or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships) and after (international or national selection meet) supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ± 0.8%, mean, ± 90% confidence limits) of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (-1.3%; ± 1.0%), there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (-0.2%; ± 1.5%) and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  3. Effects of beta blockade on sudden cardiac death during acute myocardial infarction and the postinfarction period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarson, A

    1997-11-13

    About half of all deaths after myocardial infarction (MI) are sudden cardiac deaths. Most of these are thought to be due to ventricular fibrillation (VF). A number of interventions and many different antiarrhythmic agents have been investigated, but so far only beta-blocker therapy has been found to produce significant reductions in the risk of sudden cardiac death after MI. Reductions in total mortality and sudden cardiac death were first reported in 1981 in 3 placebo-controlled studies, the Norwegian Timolol Study, the American Beta-Blocker Heart Attack Trial (BHAT), and the Göteborg Metoprolol Trial. A few years later, two very large trials, the Metoprolol in Acute Myocardial Infarction (MIAMI) study and the First International Study of Infarct Survival (ISIS-1), which included 6,000 and 16,000 patients, respectively, showed that beta-blocker therapy could reduce mortality within the first 2 weeks after onset of MI. Data from 24 postinfarction studies with long-term follow-up show an average 20% mortality reduction over 2 years. Pooled results of 28 short-term, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in which beta blockers were given intravenously shortly after onset of MI indicate an average 13% mortality reduction within 2 weeks. In the 16 studies in which the sudden cardiac death rate was reported, the beneficial effect of beta blockade was even more marked: a 34% average reduction of risk. Not all studies with beta blockers, however, have demonstrated a significant reduction in the incidence of sudden cardiac death. Such an effect has been clearly demonstrated only for the more lipophilic beta blockers (timolol, metoprolol, and propranolol). Two of these lipophilic beta blockers, metoprolol and propranolol, have also been shown to prevent VF after MI in clinical studies. Based on observations from animal experiments, it has been proposed that beta blockers with a high degree of lipophilicity penetrate the brain and thereby maintain high vagal tone during

  4. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  5. Dimensionality and Finite Number Effect on BCS Transition of Atomic Fermi Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Hai-Tao; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2005-01-01

    The effect of finite number and dimensionality has been discussed in this paper. The finite number effect has a negative correction to final temperature for 2D or 3D atomic Fermi gases. The changing of final temperature obtained by scanning from BEC region to BCS region are 10% or so with N ≤ 103 and can be negligible when N > 103.However, in 1D atomic Fermi gas, the effect gives a positive correction which greatly changes the final temperature in Fermi gas. This behavior is completely opposed to the 2D and 3D cases and a proper explanation is still to be found.Dimensionality also has a positive correction, in which the more tightly trapping, the higher final temperature one gets with the same particle number. A discussion is also presented.

  6. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Garcia, Odd E.; Larsen, Jeppe Stærk

    2011-01-01

    The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi-periodic do......The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi....... Due to FLR effects, the poloidal up-down symmetry in the particle density field observed in the zero Larmor radius limit is broken. The symmetry breaking implies a poloidal motion of the blobs in the BrB direction. At later times, the direction of the poloidal motion is reversed when the blob...

  7. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Sidorenkov, L. A.; Grimm, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are of importance for the precise determination of Efimov resonance positions from experiments at finite temperatures.

  8. The effects of pomegranate seed extract and beta-sitosterol on rat uterine contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promprom, Wilawan; Kupittayanant, Pakanit; Indrapichate, Korakod; Wray, Susan; Kupittayanant, Sajeera

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum L., Punicaceae) seed extract on uterine contractility. Pomegranate seeds were methanolic extracted and their constituents analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Isometric force was measured in strips of longitudinal rat myometrium and the effects of pomegranate seed extract studied. We found beta-sitosterol to be the main constituent of the extract (16%) and its effects were also investigated. Pomegranate seed extract and beta-sitosterol increased spontaneous contractions in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum effect at 250 mg/100 mL and 1 mg/100 mL, respectively. The amplitude and frequency of the phasic contraction were significantly increased along with basal tension. The effects of pomegranate seed extract were very similar to those of beta-sitosterol. Force produced in the presence of pomegranate seed extract was abolished by the inhibition of L-type calcium channels or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Contractions were not potentiated by pomegranate extract following the inhibition of K channels or inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). The actions of beta-sitosterol and the extract were not blocked by the estrogen receptor blocker, fulvestrant. We conclude that pomegranate seed extract is a potent stimulator of phasic activity in rat uterus. Our data suggest that the uterotonic effect is due to nonestrogenic effects of beta-sitosterol acting to inhibit K channels and SERCA and thereby increasing contraction via calcium entry on L-type calcium channels and MLCK. We suggest that pomegranate extract and beta-sitosterol may be a useful uterine stimulant.

  9. Assembling Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by the Effects of Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Guangde; Huang Lin; Qiu Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    The assembling stabilizing effect of the finite Larmor radius (FLR) and the sheared axial flow (SAF) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation with the sheared axial flow through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kL, where k is the wave number and L is the plasma shell thickness. Numerical solutions are presented. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RayleighTaylor instability are easily stabilized by the individual effect of the finite Larmor radius or the sheared axial flow. The assembling effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and the unstable region can be compressed considerably.

  10. Enoxaparin treatment administered at both early and late stages of amyloid beta deposition improves cognition of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice with differential effects on brain A beta levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, N.M.; Dijk, L. van; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Kiliaan, A.J.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enoxaparin (Enox), a low molecular weight heparin, has been shown to lower brain amyloid beta (A beta) load in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of Enox on cognition was not studied. Therefore, we examined the effect of peripheral Enox treatment on cognition and brain A beta

  11. Finite water depth effect on wave-body problems solved by Rankine source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aichun; Tang, Peng; You, Yunxiang; Liu, Kaizhou

    2017-04-01

    Finite water depth effect for wave-body problems are studied by continuous Rankine source method and non- desingularized technique. Free surface and seabed surface profiles are represented by continuous panels rather than a discretization by isolated points. These panels are positioned exactly on the fluid boundary surfaces and therefore no desingularization technique is required. Space increment method is applied for both free surface source and seabed source arrangements to reduce computational cost and improve numerical efficiency. Fourth order Runge-Kutta iteration scheme is adopted on the free surface updating at every time step. The finite water depth effect is studied quantitatively for a series of cylinders with different B/T ratios. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed model are validated by comparison with published numerical results and experimental data. Numerical results show that hydrodynamic coefficients vary for cylinder bodies with different ratios of B/T. For certain set of B/T ratios the effect of finite water depth increases quickly with the increase of motion frequency and becomes stable when frequency is relatively large. It also shows that water depths have larger hydrodynamic effects on cylinder with larger breadth to draft ratios. Both the heave added mass and damping coefficients increase across the frequency range with the water depths decrease for forced heave motion. The water depths have smaller effects on sway motion response than on heave motion response.

  12. Competition between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanet, François; Martin, John

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the competition between finite-size effects (i.e. discernibility of particles) and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems coupled to the electromagnetic field in vacuum. We consider two hallmarks of cooperative effects, superradiance and subradiance, and compute for each the rate of energy radiated by the atoms and the coherence of the atomic state during the time evolution. We adopt a statistical approach in order to extract the typical behaviour of the atomic dynamics and average over random atomic distributions in spherical containers with prescribed {k}0R with k 0 the radiation wavenumber and R the average interatomic distance. Our approach allows us to highlight the tradeoff between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in superradiance/subradiance. In particular, we show the existence of an optimal value of {k}0R for which the superradiant intensity and coherence pulses are the less affected by dephasing effects induced by dipole-dipole interactions and finite-size effects.

  13. The effect of aging on hydrogen trapping in [beta]-titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, B.G. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Materials Research Center)

    1994-05-01

    The ingress of hydrogen in three [beta]-titanium alloys (Beta-C, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al, and Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al) and an [alpha]-[beta] titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was investigated with a view to characterizing their interaction with hydrogen. A technique referred to as hydrogen ingress analysis by potentiostatic pulsing (HIAPP) was used to obtain anodic current transients for the unaged and aged [beta]-Ti alloys and as-received Ti-6-4 in an acetate buffer (1 mol L[sup [minus]1] HAc/l mol L[sup [minus]1] NaAc, where Ac = acetate). The transients were analyzed using a diffusion/trapping model under interface control conditions to evaluate the trapping constants and hydrogen entry flux in each case. A marked increase in irreversible trapping was observed for the [beta]-titanium alloys with aging and was attributed to precipitation of secondary [alpha] phase. Aging also induced changes in the passive film and hence the hydrogen entry flux. Ti-13-11-3 and Ti-10-2-3 are predicted to become less resistant to hydrogen embrittlement with aging as a result of increase in both the trapping constant (at least for Ti-13-11-3) and the flux. In contrast, the change in resistance of Beta-C Ti with aging is subject to the opposing effects of a reduced flux and an enhanced trapping capability, though the latter appears to have the primary effect, rendering aged Beta-C Ti less resistance to hydrogen embrittlement than the unaged alloy.

  14. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  15. Finite element simulation of texture evolution and Swift effect in NiAl under torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, Thomas; Glüge, Rainer; Klöden, Burghardt; Skrotzki, Werner; Bertram, Albrecht

    2007-09-01

    The texture evolution and the Swift effect in NiAl under torsion at 727 °C are studied by finite element simulations for two different initial textures. The material behaviour is modelled by an elastic-viscoplastic Taylor model. In order to overcome the well-known shortcomings of Taylor's approach, the texture evolution is also investigated by a representative volume element (RVE) with periodic boundary conditions and a compatible microstructure at the opposite faces of the RVE. Such a representative volume element takes into account the grain morphology and the grain interaction. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the modelling of a finite element based RVE leads to a better prediction of the final textures. However, the texture evolution path is not accounted for correctly. The simulated Swift effect depends much more on the initial orientation distribution than observed in experiment. Deviations between simulation and experiment may be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  16. Finite-size effects in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with a charge-density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev-Zotov, Sergei V [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies of finite-size effects in charge-density wave conductors are reviewed. Various manifestations of finite-size effects, including the transverse-size dependence of the nonlinear-conduction threshold field, the Peierls transition temperature, high-frequency conduction, and the relaxation rates of metastable states, are discussed. Resistivity jumps in thin samples, the smeared threshold field for nonlinear conduction, and threshold conduction above the Peierls transition temperature are considered, as are mesoscopic oscillations of the threshold field, one-dimensional conduction in thin crystals, absolute negative conductivity of quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the length dependence of the phase-slip voltage, and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in sliding CDWs. Problems yet to be solved are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  18. Investigation of the effect of beta source and phosphors on photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yürük, Reyyan Kavak; Tütüncüler, Hayriye

    2017-02-01

    In this study, conversion of kinetic energy from the decay of a radioactive isotope to electricity is investigated by using the direct and the indirect conversion methods. In this context, simple nuclear battery models are designed. Analysis for the effect of low-activity radiation from Pm147 and Sr90 beta sources on photovoltaic Si solar cell is presented. Beta radioluminescence nuclear battery models consist of a beta source, a phosphor layer and a solar cell. Phosphor layers with different mass thicknesses are prepared from ZnS:CuCl and SrAl2O4:Eu2+,Dy3+ phosphors. Both the influence of beta sources and the phosphor layers on battery performance is analyzed separately. Effect of beta sources, phosphors are observed on solar cell by measuring the short circuit current and open circuit voltage. The efficiency of the battery models is determined with the obtained results. Furthermore, short circuit current values are analyzed at various times during the irradiation.

  19. Effect of Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine on oxidative stress and the glutathione system in beta cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle M.P.H.J. Boesten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications is the formation of excessive levels of advanced glycation end (AGE products. Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine (CML is one of the best-characterized AGEs. Because little is known about the effects of AGEs on pancreatic beta cells, we investigated the effect of CML on human pancreatic cells and determined the activity and gene expression of glutathione system components. CML at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death in human pancreatic beta cells, which was accompanied by increased intracellular oxidative stress. No changes in the gene expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE were found, although an increase in the level of a target cytokine of RAGE after CML exposure was observed. Additionally we found that CML lowered the levels of GSH and affected the activity and expression of other components of the glutathione system. These changes indicate that the cells are even more vulnerable for oxidative stress after exposure to CML. Since beta cells are low in antioxidant enzymes and repair for oxidized DNA, CML, but most likely also other AGEs, accelerates beta cell dysfunction and increases beta cell death during chronic hyperglycemia.

  20. Effects of thyroid hormone on. beta. -adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have compared the effects of ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/)-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T/sub 3/ treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T/sub 3/ treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites measured by (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, ..beta..-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T/sub 3/-treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T/sub 3/ treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T/sub 3/ treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals.

  1. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on the Cosmic Ray Penetration into an Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. Next, we pe...

  2. Finite element analysis of the stress-concentrating effect of fraenal notches in complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J S; Huggett, R; Harrison, A

    1990-01-01

    Based on clinical experience and empiricism, it was postulated that fraenal notches and midline diastemas lead to fracture of complete dentures. This study used finite element stress analysis to investigate the stress-concentrating effect of a fraenal notch with and without a midline diastema. It was found that a large fraenal notch resulted in high stress levels and that these stresses were augmented more by a narrow median diastema than its wider counterpart.

  3. Effects of Linear Induction Motor Parameters in Its Optimum Design Based on Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad JafarBoland; AbdolAmir Nekoubin

    2009-01-01

    Effective parameters in performance of linear induction motors such as air gap, number of poles and the thickness of secondary must be selected and optimized to increase power coefficients and motor performance significantly. In this paper a double sided linear induction motor in different conditions is designed and next by finite element method analyzed. Then for comparing analytical model and numerical model a linear motor using Matlab software is simulated in different condition. It is cle...

  4. Boundary states and finite size effects in sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Takács, G

    2001-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition is investigated. Using the bootstrap principle the spectrum of boundary bound states is established. Somewhat surprisingly it is found that Coleman-Thun diagrams and bound state creation may coexist. A framework to describe finite size effects in boundary integrable theories is developed and used together with the truncated conformal space approach to confirm the bound states and reflection factors derived by bootstrap.

  5. Calculating the Finite-Tempuerature Effective Potential with the theory Renormalized at Zero-Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we apply the renormalization-group (RG) inspired resummation method to the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature evaluated in the massive scalar 04 model renormalized at zero-temperature, and study whether ourresummation procedure a la RG uccessfully resum the dominant correction terms apperaed in the perturbative caluculation in the T = 0 renormalization scheme or not.Our findings are i) that if we start from the theory renormalized at T = 0, then the condition tha...

  6. The effects of Tai Chi practice on intermuscular beta coherence and the rubber hand illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eKerr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tai Chi (TC is a slow-motion contemplative exercise that is associated with improvements in sensorimotor measures, including decreased force variability, enhanced tactile acuity, and improved proprioception, especially in elderly populations. Here, we carried out two studies evaluating the effect of TC practice on measures associated with sensorimotor processing. In study 1, we evaluated TC’s effects on an oscillatory parameter associated with motor function, beta rhythm (15-30 Hz coherence, focusing specifically on beta rhythm intermuscular coherence (IMC, which is tightly coupled to beta corticomuscular coherence (CMC. We utilized electromyography (EMG to compare beta IMC in older TC practitioners with age-matched controls, as well as novices with advanced TC practitioners. Given previous findings of elevated, maladaptive beta coherence in older subjects, we hypothesized that increased TC practice would be associated with a monotonic decrease in beta IMC, but rather discovered that novice practitioners manifested higher beta IMC than both controls and advanced practitioners, forming an inverted U-shaped practice curve. This finding suggests that TC practice elicits complex changes in sensory and motor processes over the developmental lifespan of TC training. In study 2, we focused on somatosensory (e.g., tactile and proprioceptive responses to the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI in a middle-aged TC group, assessing whether responses to the illusion became dampened with greater cumulative practice. As hypothesized, TC practice was associated with decreased likelihood to misattribute tactile stimulation during the RHI to the rubber hand, although there was no effect of TC practice on measures of proprioception or on subjective reports of ownership. These studies provide preliminary evidence that TC practice modulates beta network coherence in a non-linear fashion, perhaps as a result of the focus on not only efferent motor but also afferent sensory

  7. [Effect of synthetic cyclopentane beta,beta'-triketones on amino acid metabolism in roots of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, E A; Tishchenko, L Ia; Shestak, O P; Novikov, V L; Anisimov, M M

    2009-01-01

    Germination of buckwheat seeds in solutions of synthetic mono- and tricyclic cyclopentane-containing beta,beta'-triketones of various concentrations was accompanied by inhibition of seedling root growth and changes in the contents of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, proline, glutamine, and alanine. The monocyclic triketone also affected the amount of isoleucine. It is likely that the increase in proline content is a nonspecific response significant for enhancing stress tolerance in seedlings.

  8. Effects of modified {beta}-cyclodextrin on thermal stability and conformation of lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Tadashi, E-mail: kamiyama@chem.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satoh, Megumi; Tateishi, Takahiro; Nojiri, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Kimura, Takayoshi [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-03-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of cyclodextrin on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CD influences the hydrophobic interaction of lysozyme by the inclusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CD relatively destabilized the folded state by stabilizing the unfolded state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The destabilization depends on the concentration and the substituent of CD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformation of lysozyme was more spread at unfolded state by inclusion of CD. - Abstract: Effects of cyclic oligosaccharide cyclodextrin (CD) on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified thermodynamically and rheologically by DSC, viscosity, and circular dichroism measurements. The modified {beta}-CD relatively destabilized the folded state of lysozyme by stabilizing the unfolded state due to inclusion of hydrophobic part into the hydrophobic interior of CD. The order of higher destabilization effect was acetyl-{beta}-CD > methyl-{beta}-CD > hydroxypropyl-{beta}-CD. Apparent number of bound CD to unfolded state for methyl-, hydroxypropyl-, and acetyl-{beta}-CD is 6.7 {+-} 0.7, 4.2 {+-} 1.1, and 18.6 {+-} 4.3 and the binding constant is 5.5 {+-} 0.8, 6.7 {+-} 2.4, and 4.4 {+-} 1.2 L mol{sup -1}, respectively. The viscosity for unfolded state was increased with an increase in the each modified {beta}-CD concentration, suggesting that the inclusion of CD on a part of hydrophobic core at unfolded state leads to break the hydrophobic core, then lysozyme would be more spread structure. The substituent of CD can accelerate instability by directly breaking hydrogen bond and/or can restrain instability by increase in hydrophobic interaction. The fact that the each modified CDs has different destabilization effect shows a possibility to control the stability of protein by the substitution of CD.

  9. Finite nuclear size corrections to the recoil effect in hydrogenlike ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, I A; Glazov, D A; Shabaev, V M

    2014-01-01

    The finite nuclear size corrections to the relativistic recoil effect in H-like ions are calculated within the Breit approximation. The calculations are performed for the $1s$, $2s$, and $2p_{1/2}$ states in the range $Z =$ 1-110. The obtained results are compared with previous evaluations of this effect. It is found that for heavy ions the previously neglected corrections amount to about 20% of the total nuclear size contribution to the recoil effect calculated within the Breit approximation.

  10. Hybrid Finite Element Analysis of Free Edge Effect in Symmetric Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN L AUTHOR(S 61102F S.W. Lee237B J.J. Rhiu S.C. Won,, I ~ 7. PENOAMnG ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORES4 S) L. PERFORMING...ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN SYMMETRIC COMPOSITE LAMINATES S. W. Lee I 3. Phi S. C. Wong Department of Aerospace Engineering University of Maryland...collocation method. In this report, we present an efficient hybrid finite element method for analysis of interlaminar stress or free edge effect in

  11. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  12. Effects of mayonnaise on postprandial serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sayaka; Masuda, Yasunobu; Usuda, Mika; Marushima, Ranko; Ueji, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Mineo; Maruyama, Chizuko

    2009-12-01

    To clarify the effects of different physical forms of oil on postprandial serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations, we performed a vegetable meal loading test. Eighteen healthy subjects participated in the test, which consisted of broccoli as a control (CON) meal, broccoli with oil (OIL), and broccoli with mayonnaise (MS), consumed in random order. After collection of fasting blood samples, subjects consumed one of the three test meals. Fasting and postprandial changes in serum carotenoids were assessed 2, 4, and 6 h after ingestion of each test meal. Serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations were measured. Although no significant change was noted after the CON meal, the serum lutein/zeaxanthin concentration was higher at 4 h after consumption of the OIL meal, and at 2, 4 and 6 h after consumption of the MS meal, as compared with the fasting state. Serum beta-carotene concentrations did not change after ingestion of either the CON or the OIL meal but were elevated 2, 4, and 6 h after MS ingestion as compared with the fasting state. The incremental areas under the curves (IAUCs) of serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations were higher after the MS meal than after the CON meal. IAUCs after the OIL meal exhibited no statistically significant differences from the CON and MS meals. We suggest that mayonnaise contributes to increase serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations when consumed with vegetables rich in these carotenoids.

  13. Finite-size effects, pseudocritical quantities and signatures of the chiral critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, L F; Kodama, T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate finite-size effects on the phase diagram of strong interactions, and discuss their influence (and utility) on experimental signatures in high-energy heavy ion collisions. We calculate the modification of the pseudocritical transition line and isentropic trajectories, and discuss how this affects proposed signatures of the chiral critical endpoint. We argue that a finite-size scaling analysis may be crucial in the process of data analysis in the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC and in future experiments at FAIR-GSI. We propose the use of extrapolations, full scaling plots and a chi-squared method as tools for searching the critical endpoint of QCD and determining its universality class.

  14. Homoclinic snaking in plane Couette flow: bending, skewing, and finite-size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, John F

    2015-01-01

    Invariant solutions of shear flows have recently been extended from spatially periodic solutions in minimal flow units to spatially localized solutions on extended domains. One set of spanwise-localized solutions of plane Couette flow exhibits homoclinic snaking, a process by which steady-state solutions grow additional structure smoothly at their fronts when continued parametrically. Homoclinic snaking is well understood mathematically in the context of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Consequently, the snaking solutions of plane Couette flow form a promising connection between the largely phenomenological study of laminar-turbulent patterns in viscous shear flows and the mathematically well-developed field of pattern-formation theory. In this paper we present a numerical study of the snaking solutions, generalizing beyond the fixed streamwise wavelength of previous studies. We find a number of new solution features, including bending, skewing, and finite-size effects. We show that the finite-si...

  15. The Study of Optically Induced Effects due to Bending and Twisting using Vector Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacles-Mariani, J; Rodrigue, G

    2005-05-11

    We study the effects of macroscopic bends and twists in an optical waveguide and how they influence the transmission capabilities of a waveguide. These mechanical stresses and strains distort the optical indicatrix of the medium producing optical anisotropy. The spatially varying refractive indices are incorporated into the full-wave Maxwell's equations. The governing equations are discretized using a vector finite element method cast in a high-order finite element approximation. This approach allows us to study the complexities of the mechanical deformation within a framework of a high-order formulation which can in turn, reduce the computational requirement without degrading its performance. The optical activities generated, total energy produced and power loss due to the mechanical stresses and strains are reported and discussed.

  16. Finite-size effects in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model for a variety of maximum speeds. We show that the low-density limit can be described as a dilute gas of vehicles with a repulsive core. At the transition to jamming, we observe finite-size effects in a variety of quantities describing the flow and the density correlations, but only if the maximum speed Vmax is larger than a certain value. A finite-size scaling analysis of several order parameters shows universal behavior, with scaling exponents that depend on Vmax. The jamming transition at large Vmax can be viewed as the nucleation of jams in a background of freely flowing vehicles. For small Vmax no such clean separation into jammed and free vehicles is possible.

  17. Gauge invariance and finite temperature effective actions of Chern-Simons gauge theories with fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C; Rossini, L; Schaposnik, F A; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of theories of fermions coupled to Chern-Simons gauge fields with a non-abelian gauge group in three dimensions and at finite temperature. Using non-perturbative arguments and gauge invariance, and in contradiction with perturbative results, we show that the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term of the effective actions for the gauge fields at finite temperature can be {\\it at most} an integer function of the temperature. This is in a sense a generalized no-renormalization theorem. We also discuss the case of abelian theories and give indications that a similar condition should hold there too. We discuss consequences of our results to the thermodynamics of anyon superfluids and fractional quantum Hall systems.

  18. Finite boundary effects in problem of a crack perpendicular to and terminating at a bimaterial interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohua Chen; Tzuchiang Wang; Sharon Kao-Walter

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of a crack perpendicular to and terminating at an interface in bimaterial structure with finite boundaries is investigated. The dislocation simulation method and boundary collocation approach are used to derive and solve the basic equations. Two kinds of loading form are considered when the crack lies in a softer or a stiffer material, one is an ideal loading and the other one fits to the practical experiment loading. Complete solutions of the stress field including the T stress are obtained as well as the stress intensity factors. Influences of T stress on the stress field ahead of the crack tip are studied. Finite boundary effects on the stress intensity factors are emphasized. Comparisons with the problem presented by Chen et al. (Int. J.Solids and Structure, 2003, 40, 2731-2755) are discussed also.

  19. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  20. Double-crossover phenomena in Laplacian growth: Effects of sticking probability and finite viscosity ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1990-03-01

    A combined effect of sticking probability and finite viscosity ratio is studied on the pattern formation in Laplacian growth. A renormalization-group theory is developed to study the crossover phenomena between the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and nonfractal structure. A two-stage crossover phenomenon is analyzed by using a three-parameter position-space renormalization-group method. A global flow diagram in three-parameter space is obtained. It is found that there are three nontrivial fixed points, the first Eden point, the DLA point and the second Eden point. The second Eden point corresponding to the dense structure is stable in all directions, while the first Eden point and the DLA point are saddle points. When the sticking probability P is small and the viscosity ratio is finite, the aggregate must cross over from the dense structure, through the DLA fractal, finally to the dense aggregate.

  1. Finite-size effects lead to supercritical bifurcations in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Stephan; Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Clercx, Herman J H; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.224501

    2011-01-01

    In turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio \\Gamma = D/L (D is the diameter and L the height) the Nusselt number Nu is enhanced when the sample is rotated about its vertical axis, because of the formation of Ekman vortices that extract additional fluid out of thermal boundary layers at the top and bottom. We show from experiments and direct numerical simulations that the enhancement occurs only above a bifurcation point at a critical inverse Rossby number $1/\\Ro_c$, with $1/\\Ro_c \\propto 1/\\Gamma$. We present a Ginzburg-Landau like model that explains the existence of a bifurcation at finite $1/\\Ro_c$ as a finite-size effect. The model yields the proportionality between $1/\\Ro_c$ and $1/\\Gamma$ and is consistent with several other measured or computed system properties.

  2. Finite Size Effect in Path Integral Monte Carlo Simulations of 4He Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Wen; CHENG Xin-Lu

    2008-01-01

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are a powerful computational method to study interacting quantum systems at finite temperatures. In this work, PIMC has been applied to study the finite size effect of the simulated systems of 4He. We determine the energy as a function of temperature at saturated-vapor-pressure (SVP) conditions in the temperature range of T ∈ [1.0 K,4.0 K], and the equation of state (EOS) in the ground state for systems consisted of 32, 64 and 128 4He atoms, respectively. We find that the energy at SVP is influenced significantly by the size of the simulated system in the temperature range of T ∈ [2.1 K, 3.0 K] and the larger the system is, the better results are obtained in comparison with the experimental values; while the EOS appeared to be unrelated to it.

  3. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Zouitine, Asmaa [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B. P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Assaid, El Mahdi, E-mail: eassaid@yahoo.fr [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2015-02-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap.

  4. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Chen; Bin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin-orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274102), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-11-0960), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of the Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20134208110001).

  5. The Effects of Tai Chi Practice on Intermuscular Beta Coherence and the Rubber Hand Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Catherine E; Agrawal, Uday; Nayak, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tai Chi (TC) is a slow-motion contemplative exercise that is associated with improvements in sensorimotor measures, including decreased force variability, enhanced tactile acuity, and improved proprioception, especially in elderly populations. Here, we carried out two studies evaluating the effect of TC practice on measures associated with sensorimotor processing. In study 1, we evaluated TC's effects on an oscillatory parameter associated with motor function, beta rhythm (15-30 Hz) coherence, focusing specifically on beta rhythm intermuscular coherence (IMC), which is tightly coupled to beta corticomuscular coherence (CMC). We utilized electromyography (EMG) to compare beta IMC in older TC practitioners with age-matched controls, as well as novices with advanced TC practitioners. Given previous findings of elevated, maladaptive beta coherence in older subjects, we hypothesized that increased TC practice would be associated with a monotonic decrease in beta IMC, but rather discovered that novice practitioners manifested higher beta IMC than both controls and advanced practitioners, forming an inverted U-shaped practice curve. This finding suggests that TC practice elicits complex changes in sensory and motor processes over the developmental lifespan of TC training. In study 2, we focused on somatosensory (e.g., tactile and proprioceptive) responses to the rubber hand illusion (RHI) in a middle-aged TC group, assessing whether responses to the illusion became dampened with greater cumulative practice. As hypothesized, TC practice was associated with decreased likelihood to misattribute tactile stimulation during the RHI to the rubber hand, although there was no effect of TC practice on measures of proprioception or on subjective reports of ownership. These studies provide preliminary evidence that TC practice both modulates beta network coherence in a non-linear fashion, perhaps as a result of the focus on not only efferent motor but also afferent sensory activity

  6. Antiteratogenic Effects of beta-Carotene in Cultured Mouse Embryos Exposed to Nicotine

    OpenAIRE

    C. Lin; Yon, J. M.; Jung, A.Y.; Lee, J. G.; Jung, K. Y.; Lee, B.J.; Yun, Y.W.; Nam, S Y

    2013-01-01

    After maternal intake, nicotine crosses the placental barrier and causes severe embryonic disorders and fetal death. In this study, we investigated whether beta -carotene has a beneficial effect against nicotine-induced teratogenesis in mouse embryos (embryonic day 8.5) cultured for 48 h in a whole embryo culture system. Embryos exposed to nicotine (1 mM) exhibited severe morphological anomalies and apoptotic cell death, as well as increased levels of TNF- alpha , IL-1 beta , and caspase 3 mR...

  7. Unusual Side Effects of Interferon Beta-1a in Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Pour Manshadi, Seyed Mohammad Yousof Mostafavi; Naderi, Nafiseh; Dehghan, Abolfazl; Azizi, Sanaz

    2012-01-01

    This is a descriptive case report of a 30-year-old man with massive epistaxis, echymosis on arms, abnormal CBC and increased plasma urea and creatinine level (i.e. above normal range). Probably, these are as side effects of interferon beta-1a injection. This is the first report according to our literature search (Pub Med, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge, ProQuest, MD consult, Science Direct, and SCOPUS) about interferon beta-1a related abnormal kidney function tests hereafter. Abnormal k...

  8. Adsorption and displacement effects in the gas-chromatography of metal beta-diketonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, P C; Jenkins, C R

    1969-07-01

    A detailed study of the gas chromatography of the aluminium(III), chromium(III) and iron(III) beta-diketonates has shown that their elution and separation characteristics arise from a number of adsorptive effects. Conditions of optimal peak shape for individual compounds are established by varying Chromatographie parameters, and the adsorption of one metal chelate on a column and its subsequent displacement by another chelate are investigated. The chromatography of iron(III) beta-diketonates is seen to be further complicated by gradual elution of a portion of the chelate before the rest of the sample.

  9. Beta-beating in the effective model of the LHC using PTC

    CERN Document Server

    Alabau Pons, C; Schmidt, F; Tomas, R

    2011-01-01

    An effective model of the LHC optics has been developed based on measurements of magnetic field, alignment errors and closed orbit. This model utilizes the Polymorphic Tracking Code, with MAD-X as a front-end, to allow the inclusion of harmonics to arbitrary order in thick lattice elements. Beta-beating calculations have been performed with this model at injection optics and at 3.5 TeV with squeezed optics (Beta=3.5 m at the interaction point) The model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements performed in the 2010 LHC commissioning run.

  10. Effects of putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and beta-phenylethylamine on cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Baldi, Antonella; Cheli, Federica

    2008-01-01

    A bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1) and three-dimensional collagen primary bovine organoids were used to evaluate the effects of cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermicline and beta-phenylethylamine on mammary epithelial cells. Each biogenic amine was diluted in several concentratio...

  11. Effects of putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and beta-phenylethylamine on cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Baldi, Antonella; Cheli, Federica

    2008-01-01

    A bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1) and three-dimensional collagen primary bovine organoids were used to evaluate the effects of cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermicline and beta-phenylethylamine on mammary epithelial cells. Each biogenic amine was diluted in several concentratio...

  12. Antiteratogenic Effects of beta-Carotene in Cultured Mouse Embryos Exposed to Nicotine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, C.; Yon, J.M.; Jung, A.Y.; Lee, J.G.; Jung, K.Y.; Lee, B.J.; Yun, Y.W.; Nam, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    After maternal intake, nicotine crosses the placental barrier and causes severe embryonic disorders and fetal death. In this study, we investigated whether beta -carotene has a beneficial effect against nicotine-induced teratogenesis in mouse embryos (embryonic day 8.5) cultured for 48 h in a whole

  13. Local and global effects of beta decays on r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, O L; Borzov, I N; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear beta decay rates are an essential ingredient in simulations of the astrophysical r-process. Most of these rates still rely on theoretical modeling. However, modern radioactive ion-beam facilities have allowed to measure beta half lives of some nuclei on or close to the r-process path. These data indicate that r-process half lives are in general shorter than anticipated in the standard theoretical predictions based on the Finite Range Droplet Model (FRDM). The data have also served as important constraints for improved predictions of half lives based on continuum QRPA calculations on top of the energy-density functional theory. Although these calculations are yet limited to spherical nuclei, they include the important r-process waiting point nuclei close to and at the neutron magic numbers $N=50, 82$ and 126. We have studied the impact of these new experimental and theoretical half lives on r-process nucleosynthesis within the two astrophysical sites currently favored for the r process: the neutrino-dr...

  14. Effect of environmental estrogens on IL-1beta promoter activity in a macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, M F; Bi, Y; Cox, L; Berk, D; Howlett, A C; Bellone, C J

    1998-10-01

    Environmental estrogens or estrogen disrupters have recently received a great deal of attention because of their potential health impact on reproductive tissues. Few, if any, studies have been made on the impact of these compounds on the immune system. We sought to determine the activities of various environmental estrogens on the modulation of the interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) gene in a model monocytic cell line, hER + IL-1beta-CAT+. This cell line stably transfected with the human estrogen receptor, and an IL-1beta promoter construct fused to the CAT reporter gene allows us to monitor the effect of estrogenic compounds on IL-1beta promoter activity. 17beta-estradiol (E2) markedly enhanced lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) induced IL-1beta promoter-driven CAT activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mycotoxins alpha-zearalenol and zearalenone both exhibited full agonist activity, but at lower potencies, with EC50 values of 1.8 and 54 nM, respectively, compared with E2 at 0.5 nM. In addition, genistein was a very low-potency agonist, having an EC50 of 1.5 microM. Similar to the E2 response, the slope factors for alpha-zearalenol, zearalenone, and genistein were close to 3.0, suggesting positive cooperativity in the estrogenic response. The activity of the mycotoxins appeared to be mediated through the estrogen receptor, since both the antiestrogens H1285 and ICI 182,780 effectively inhibited their agonist activity in a dose-dependent manner. Representative environmental estrogenic compounds both from plant and industrial sources were also tested. Unlike the mycoestrogens, none of the compounds, with the exception of genistein, synergized with LPS to enhance IL-1beta promoter activity. When tested for antiestrogenic activity, the industrial compound 4-octylphenol was able to antagonize the response to E2; however, the response was three orders of magnitude less potent than H 1285. Naringenin, a plant flavonoid, showed little or no ability to antagonize the response to E2

  15. High harmonic fast waves in high beta plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    High harmonic fast magnetosonic wave in high beta/high dielectric plasmas is investigated. including the finite-Larmor-radius effects. In this regime, due to the combination of group velocity slow down and the high beta enhancement, the electron absorption via electron Landau and electron magnetic pumping becomes significant enough that one can expect a strong ({approximately} 100%) single pass absorption. By controlling the wave spectrum, the prospect of some localized electron heating and current drive appears to be feasible in high beta low-aspect-ratio tokamak regimes. Inclusion of finite-Larmor-radius terms shows an accessibility limit in the high ion beta regime ({beta}{sub i} = 50% for a deuterium plasma) due to mode-conversion into an ion Bernstein-wave-like mode while no beta limit is expected for electrons. With increasing ion beta, the ion damping can increase significantly particularly near the beta limits. The presence of energetic ion component expected during intense NBI and {alpha}-heating does not appear to modify the accessibility condition nor cause excessive wave absorption.

  16. The low-energy effective theory of QCD at small quark masses in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    At low energies the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be described effectively in terms of the lightest particles of the theory, the pions. This approximation is valid for temperatures well below the mass difference of the pions to the next heavier particles. We study the low-energy effective theory at very small quark masses in a finite volume V. The corresponding perturbative expansion in 1/{radical}(V) is called {epsilon} expansion. At each order of this expansion a finite number of low-energy constants completely determine the effective theory. These low-energy constants are of great phenomenological importance. In the leading order of the {epsilon} expansion, called {epsilon} regime, the theory becomes zero-dimensional and is therefore described by random matrix theory (RMT). The dimensionless quantities of RMT are mapped to dimensionful quantities of the low-energy effective theory using the leading-order lowenergy constants {sigma} and F. In this way {sigma} and F can be obtained from lattice QCD simulations in the '' regime by a fit to RMT predictions. For typical volumes of state-of-the-art lattice QCD simulations, finite-volume corrections to the RMT prediction cannot be neglected. These corrections can be calculated in higher orders of the {epsilon} expansion. We calculate the finite-volume corrections to {sigma} and F at next-to-next-to-leading order in the {epsilon} expansion. We also discuss non-universal modifications of the theory due to the finite volume. These results are then applied to lattice QCD simulations, and we extract {sigma} and F from eigenvalue correlation functions of the Dirac operator. As a side result, we provide a proof of equivalence between the parametrization of the partially quenched low-energy effective theory without singlet particle and that of the super-Riemannian manifold used earlier in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume without

  17. Finite temperature effect on mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ge; Hong-Xiang, Sun; Yi-Jun, Guan; Gan-He, Zeng

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries are studied by molecular dynamics method at finite temperatures. The finite temperature reduces the ultimate strengths of the graphenes with different types of grain boundaries. More interestingly, at high temperatures, the ultimate strengths of the graphene with the zigzag-orientation grain boundaries at low tilt angles exhibit different behaviors from those at lower temperatures, which is determined by inner initial stress in grain boundaries. The results indicate that the finite temperature, especially the high one, has a significant effect on the ultimate strength of graphene with grain boundaries, which gives a more in-depth understanding of their mechanical properties and could be useful for potential graphene applications. Project supported by the Nation Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347219 and 11404147), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20140519), the Training Project of Young Backbone Teacher of Jiangsu University, the Advanced Talents of Jiangsu University, China (Grant No. 11JDG118), the Practice Innovation Training Program Projects for Industrial Center of Jiangsu University, China, and the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201308).

  18. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bo; Grimm, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy-dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are ...

  19. The effect of finite pore length on ion structure and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Konrad; Abele, Manuel; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Holm, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous supercapacitors play an important role in modern energy storage systems, and their modeling is essential to predict and optimize the charging behaviour. Two classes of models have been developed that consist of finite and infinitely long pores. Here, we show that although both types of models predict qualitatively consistent results, there are important differences emerging due to the finite pore length. In particular, we find that the ion density inside a finite pore is not constant, but increases linearly from the pore entrance to the pore end, where the ions form a strongly layered structure. This hinders a direct quantitative comparison between the two models. In addition, we show that although the ion density between the electrodes changes appreciably with the applied potential, this change has a minor effect on charging. Our simulations also reveal a complex charging behaviour, which is adsorption-driven at high voltages, but it is dominated either by co-ion desorption or by adsorption of both types of ions at low voltages, depending on the ion concentration.

  20. Yang-Mills theory as bimetrical gravity: Polarization effects and finite-energy gluon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovsky, Oleg V

    2002-01-01

    In this report a gravity representation of Yang-Mills theory is given. Using this approach, one obtains new information on solutions of classical YM theory. Singular solutions (black-hole-like solutions) of the YM equations are discussed in connection with bimetrical gravity. The behaviour of these solutions in a theory with a 'cosmological' Lambda-part is also investigated. A physical interpretation of such solutions is given. Using an effective field theory approach we try to show that quantum fluctuations and vacuum polarization effects lead to the generation of finite-energy objects in QCD.

  1. Finite line-source model for borehole heat exchangers. Effect of vertical temperature variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandos, Tatyana V.; Fernandez, Esther; Santander, Juan Luis G.; Isidro, Jose Maria; Perez, Jezabel; Cordoba, Pedro J. Fernandez de [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montero, Alvaro; Urchueguia, Javier F. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    A solution to the three-dimensional finite line-source (FLS) model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) that takes into account the prevailing geothermal gradient and allows arbitrary ground surface temperature changes is presented. Analytical expressions for the average ground temperature are derived by integrating the exact solution over the line-source depth. A self-consistent procedure to evaluate the in situ thermal response test (TRT) data is outlined. The effective thermal conductivity and the effective borehole thermal resistance can be determined by fitting the TRT data to the time-series expansion obtained for the average temperature. (author)

  2. Effects of Linear Induction Motor Parameters in Its Optimum Design Based on Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad JafarBoland

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective parameters in performance of linear induction motors such as air gap, number of poles and the thickness of secondary must be selected and optimized to increase power coefficients and motor performance significantly. In this paper a double sided linear induction motor in different conditions is designed and next by finite element method analyzed. Then for comparing analytical model and numerical model a linear motor using Matlab software is simulated in different condition. It is clear from the results that with optimal value of effective parameters, power losses decreased the performance of motor is improved and efficiency of linear motor is increased.

  3. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Shweta, E-mail: jshweta09@gmail.com; Sharma, Prerana [Department of Physics, Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, M.P.456010 (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain, M. P. - 456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  4. Effect of platform switching on the peri-implant bone: A finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Amparo; Peiró, Germán; Ródenas, Juan-José; López-Mollá, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a relation between the presence and location of the micro-gap and the loss of peri implant bone. Several authors have shown that the treatments based on the use of platform switching result in less peri-implant bone loss and an increased tissue stability. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the platform switching on the distribution of stresses on the peri-implant bone using the finite element method. Material and Methods A realistic 3D full-mandible finite element model representing cortical bone and trabecular bone was used to study the distribution of the stress on the bone induced by an implant of diameter 4.1 mm. Two abutments were modelled. The first one, of diameter 4.1 mm, was used in the reference model to represent a conventional implant. The second one, of diameter 3.2 mm, was used to represent the implant with platform switching. Both models were subjected to axial and oblique masticatory loads. Results The analyses showed that, although no relevant differences can be found for the trabecular bone, the use of platform switching reduces the maximum stress level in the cortical bone by almost 36% with axial loads and by 40% with oblique loads. Conclusions The full 3D Finite Element model, that can be used to investigate the influence of other parameters (implant diameter, connexion type, …) on the biomechanical behaviour of the implant, showed that this stress reduction can be a biomechanical reasons to explain why the platform switching seems to reduce or eliminate crestal bone resorption after the prosthetic restoration. Key words:Dental implant, platform switching, finite element method. PMID:26535094

  5. Effects of beta-blockers on heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effects of beta-blockers on the prognosis of the heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF remain controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the impact of beta-blockers on mortality and hospitalization in the patients with HFpEF. METHODS: A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases from 2005 to June 2013 was conducted. Clinical studies reporting outcomes of mortality and/or hospitalization for patients with HFpEF (EF ≥ 40%, being assigned to beta-blockers treatment and non-beta-blockers control group were included. RESULTS: A total of 12 clinical studies (2 randomized controlled trials and 10 observational studies involving 21,206 HFpEF patients were included for this meta-analysis. The pooled analysis demonstrated that beta-blocker exposure was associated with a 9% reduction in relative risk for all-cause mortality in patients with HFpEF (95% CI: 0.87 - 0.95; P < 0.001. Whereas, the all-cause hospitalization, HF hospitalization and composite outcomes (mortality and hospitalization were not affected by this treatment (P=0.26, P=0.97, and P=0.88 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The beta-blockers treatment for the patients with HFpEF was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, but not with a lower risk of hospitalization. These finding were mainly obtained from observational studies, and further investigations are needed to make an assertion.

  6. The effect of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid on energy metabolism: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Oudman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine kinase plays a key role in cellular energy transport. The enzyme transfers high-energy phosphoryl groups from mitochondria to subcellular sites of ATP hydrolysis, where it buffers ADP concentration by catalyzing the reversible transfer of the high-energy phosphate moiety (P between creatine and ADP. Cellular creatine uptake is competitively inhibited by beta-guanidinopropionic acid. This substance is marked as safe for human use, but the effects are unclear. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the effect of beta-guanidinopropionic acid on energy metabolism and function of tissues with high energy demands. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and searched the electronic databases Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and LILACS from their inception through March 2011. Furthermore, we searched the internet and explored references from textbooks and reviews. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, we retrieved 131 publications, mainly considering the effect of chronic oral administration of beta-guanidinopropionic acid (0.5 to 3.5% on skeletal muscle, the cardiovascular system, and brain tissue in animals. Beta-guanidinopropionic acid decreased intracellular creatine and phosphocreatine in all tissues studied. In skeletal muscle, this effect induced a shift from glycolytic to oxidative metabolism, increased cellular glucose uptake and increased fatigue tolerance. In heart tissue this shift to mitochondrial metabolism was less pronounced. Myocardial contractility was modestly reduced, including a decreased ventricular developed pressure, albeit with unchanged cardiac output. In brain tissue adaptations in energy metabolism resulted in enhanced ATP stability and survival during hypoxia. CONCLUSION: Chronic beta-guanidinopropionic acid increases fatigue tolerance of skeletal muscle and survival during ischaemia in animal studies, with modestly reduced myocardial contractility. Because it is marked as safe for human

  7. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  8. Finite element modelling for the investigation of edge effect in acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen Lee, Chean; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Ma, Hong-Wei; Braden, Derek R.

    2016-02-01

    In acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages, edge effect is often presented as artifacts of C-scan images, which may potentially obscure the detection of defects such as cracks and voids in the solder joints. The cause of edge effect is debatable. In this paper, a 2D finite element model is developed on the basis of acoustic micro imaging of a flip-chip package using a 230 MHz focused transducer to investigate acoustic propagation inside the package in attempt to elucidate the fundamental mechanism that causes the edge effect. A virtual transducer is designed in the finite element model to reduce the coupling fluid domain, and its performance is characterised against the physical transducer specification. The numerical results showed that the under bump metallization (UBM) structure inside the package has a significant impact on the edge effect. Simulated wavefields also showed that the edge effect is mainly attributed to the horizontal scatter, which is observed in the interface of silicon die-to-the outer radius of solder bump. The horizontal scatter occurs even for a flip-chip package without the UBM structure.

  9. Effects of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam upon morphine-tolerant-dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1980-05-01

    The effects in mice of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam on the analgesic response to morphine, on the intensity of tolerance and on the physical dependence on the analgesic have been examined. The two amino acids increased the analgesic response to morphine in a dose-related manner. However, both compounds were ineffective in the analgesic test (hot plate) when administered without morphine. Diazepam was ineffective in the analgesic test and it did not alter morphine analgesia, except when administered in a high dose which decreased and analgesic response. Glycine, either in single or repeated doses, did not modify tolerance to morphine, whereas beta-alanine induced a dose-related partial antagonism, which promptly reached a plateau. Diazepam induced a small decrease in the intensity of tolerance to the analgesic. The abstinence syndrome to morphine, induced by naloxone administration to primed mice, was reduced by single doses of glycine or beta-alanine. Diazepam behaved as a weak inhibitor of the abstinence syndrome when administered at a high dose. The potentiation of morphine analgesia and the antagonism of the abstinence syndrome induced by the amino acids may be related to their hyperpolarizing action in the c.n. system. The effects of beta-alanine on morphine tolerance cannot be explained by the same mechanism.

  10. The effect of noise on beta-cell burst period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2006-01-01

    on numerical simulations. We show here how the application of two recent methods allows an analytic treatment of the stochastic effects on the location of the saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcations, which determine the burst period. Thus, the stochastic system can be analyzed similarly to the deterministic...

  11. A finite-element approach to evaluating the size effects of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Yang Fan; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-12-01

    The size effects that reveal the dramatic changes of mechanical behaviour at nanoscales have traditionally been analysed for regular beam systems. Here, the method of using finite-element analysis is explored with the intention of evaluating the size effects for complex nanostructures. The surface elasticity theory and generalized Young-Laplace equation are integrated into a beam element to account for the size effects in classical Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories. Computational results match well with the theoretical predictions on the size effect for a cantilever beam and a cubic unit cell containing 24 horizontal/vertical ligaments. For a simply supported nanowire, it is found that the results are very close to the experimental data. With the assumption that nanoporous gold is composed of many randomly connected beams, for the first time, the size effect of such a complex structure is numerically determined.

  12. Bad Beta, Good Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John; Vuolteenaho, Tuomo

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains the size and value "anomalies" in stock returns using an economically motivated two-beta model. We break the beta of a stock with the market portfolio into two components, one reflecting news about the market's future cash flows and one reflecting news about the market's discount rates. Intertemporal asset pricing theory suggests that the former should have a higher price of risk; thus beta, like cholesterol, comes in "had" and "good" varieties. Empirically, we find that v...

  13. Finite volume effects in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rokash, Alexander; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    We present a lattice calculation of neutron-deuteron scattering at very low energies and investigate in detail the impact of the topological finite-volume corrections. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of pionless effective field theory at leading order in the low-energy expansion. Using lattice sizes and a lattice spacing comparable to those employed in nuclear lattice simulations, we find that the topological volume corrections must be taken into account in order to obtain correct results for the neutron-proton S-wave scattering lengths.

  14. Effective optical response of silicon to sunlight in the finite-difference time-domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; John, Sajeev

    2012-01-01

    The frequency dependent dielectric permittivity of dispersive materials is commonly modeled as a rational polynomial based on multiple Debye, Drude, or Lorentz terms in the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. We identify a simple effective model in which dielectric polarization depends both on the electric field and its first time derivative. This enables nearly exact FDTD simulation of light propagation and absorption in silicon in the spectral range of 300-1000 nm. Numerical precision of our model is demonstrated for Mie scattering from a silicon sphere and solar absorption in a silicon nanowire photonic crystal.

  15. Numerical Effectiveness of Different Formulations of the Rigid Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiec-Wójcik I.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an application of different formulations of the rigid finite element method (RFEM to dynamic analysis of flexible beams. We discuss numerical effectiveness of the classical RFEM and an alternative approach in which continuity of displacements is preserved by means of constraint equations. The analysis is carried out for a benchmark problem of the spin-up motion in planar and spatial cases. Torsion is omitted for numerical simulations and two cases of the new approach are considered. The results obtained by means of these methods are compared with the results obtained using a nonlinear two-node superelement

  16. Aether field in extra dimensions: Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-01-01

    The Lorentz and C P T symmetries are not violated at the highest laboratory energies available. However these symmetries may be violated at Planck scale. A particular development is to investigate the breakdown of Lorentz and C P T symmetries by introducing an aether field that exhibits nonzero vacuum expectation value along the fifth dimension. The interactions of the aether field with scalar, electromagnetic, and fermions fields are analyzed. The Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature are calculated using the Thermo Field Dynamics formalism.

  17. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.F., E-mail: alesandroferreira@fisica.ufmt.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada); Khanna, Faqir C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  18. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  19. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  20. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  1. Stability and Convergence of an Effective Finite Element Method for Multiterm Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method (FEM for multiterm fractional partial differential equations (MT-FPDEs is studied for obtaining a numerical solution effectively. The weak formulation for MT-FPDEs and the existence and uniqueness of the weak solutions are obtained by the well-known Lax-Milgram theorem. The Diethelm fractional backward difference method (DFBDM, based on quadrature for the time discretization, and FEM for the spatial discretization have been applied to MT-FPDEs. The stability and convergence for numerical methods are discussed. The numerical examples are given to match well with the main conclusions.

  2. Casimir Effect at finite temperature for the CPT-even extension of QED

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, L M; Helayël-Neto, J A

    2016-01-01

    By the thermofield dynamics (TFD) formalism we obtain the energy-momentum tensor for the Electromagnetism with Lorentz Breaking Even term of the Standard Model Extended (SME) Sector in a topology $S^{1}\\times S^{1}\\times R^{2}$. We carry out the compactification by a generalized TFD-Bogoliubov transformation that is used to define a renormalized energy-momentum tensor, and the Casimir energy and pressure at finite temperature are then derived. A comparative analysis with the electromagnetic case is developed, and we remark the influence of the background in the traditional Casimir effect.

  3. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  4. Finite-orbit-width effects on the geodesic acoustic mode in the toroidally rotating tokamak plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    The Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in a torodial rotating tokamak plasma is analytically investigated by taking into account the finite-orbit-width (FOW) resonance effect to the 3rd order. The analytical result is shown to agree well with the numerical solution. The dependence of the damping rate on the toroidal Mach number $M$ relies on $k_r \\rho_i$. For sufficiently small $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate monotonically decreases with $M$. For relatively large $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate increases with $M$ until approaching the maximum and then decreases with $M$.

  5. Finite size effects in the static structure factor of dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletov, A. E., E-mail: askar@physics.kz; Yerimbetova, L. T.; Mukhametkarimov, Ye. S.; Ospanova, A. K. [Department of Physics and Technology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi av. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-15

    Based on the previously developed pseudopotential model of the dust particles interaction, which takes into account both the finite size and screening effects, the equilibrium distribution functions are investigated in a broad range of plasma parameters. The treatment stems entirely from the renormalization theory of plasma particles interactions which leads to the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In particular, an analytical expression for the static structure factor of the dust particles is proposed and its non-monotonic behavior in the hyper-netted chain approximation is found in a specified domain of plasma parameters to indicate the formation of short- or even long-range order in the system.

  6. Effects of Crimping on Mechanical Performance of Nitinol Stent Designed for Femoral Artery: Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematzadeh, F.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Nitinol stents are used to minimize improper dynamic behavior, low twistability, and inadequate radial mechanical strength of femoral artery stents. In this study, finite element method is used to investigate the effect of crimping and Austenite finish temperature ( A f) of Nitinol on mechanical performance of Z-shaped open-cell femoral stent under crimping conditions. Results show that low A f Nitinol has better mechanical and clinical performance due to small chronic outward force, large radial resistive force, and appropriate superelastic behavior.

  7. Dynamic Stability of Viscoelastic Plates with Finite Deformation and Shear Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 程昌钧; 等

    2002-01-01

    Based on Reddy's theory of plates with higher-order shear deformations and the Boltzmann superposition principles,the governing equations were established for dynamic stability of viscoelastic plates with finite deformations taking account of shear effects,The Galerkin method was applied to simplify the set of equations.The numerical methods in nonlinear dynamics were used to solve the simplified system.It could e seen that there are plenty of dynamic properties for this kind of viscoelastic plates under transverse harmonic loads.The influences of the transverse shear deformations and material parameter on the dynamic behavior of nonlinear viscoelatic plates were investigated.

  8. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, W. X.; Wang, L J; Feng, T. N.; Jiang, C.H.; Fan, Y. B.; M. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes ...

  9. Splinting effect on posterior implants under various loading modes: a 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchard, Erwan; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Jacq, Romain; Bouton, Antoine; Pierrisnard, Laurent; Naveau, Adrien

    2011-09-01

    This three-dimensional finite element study compared stresses, intensities and displacements of three mandibular posterior implants restored with cemented crowns (two molars and a premolar in straight line), splinted versus non-splinted. Hundred newton occlusal loads were vertically or horizontally applied, either on one single crown or on all of them. Maximal stresses and implants displacements were higher under horizontal loading. Splinting major effects appeared under single horizontal load with a decrease in stresses (34-49%) and displacements (16-19%) of the loaded crown. Splinting seems more appropriate for implant-supported restorations submitted to frequent single horizontal or oblique loads than vertical ones.

  10. Unusual finite size effects on critical temperature in fcc Ising antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, J.; Diep, H. T.; Ghazali, A.; Lallemand, P.

    1988-04-01

    A new multispin coding technique is presented for Monte Carlo simulation of antiferromagnetic Ising spin systems on an fcc lattice. The nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions J1 and J2 are included. This technique allows a considerable gain in CPU time and computer memory. As a first application, we have studied samples of 4L3 spins with L up to 48. An unusual behavior of the critical temperature with increasing L is found in the case of nearest-neighbor interaction in zero field. Finite size effects on the locations of tricrical points in the (T,J2/J1) plane are discussed.

  11. Interacting spins in a cavity: Finite-size effects and symmetry-breaking dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    , and for small chains, we find significant and nontrivial finite-size effects. Below the first-order phase transition, even quite large spin chains of 30–40 spins give rise to a mean photon number and number fluctuations significantly above the mean-field vacuum result. Near the second-order phase critical point......-transition the random character of the measurement process causes a measurement-induced symmetry breaking in the system. This symmetry breaking occurs on the time scale needed for an observer to gather sufficient information to distinguish between the two possible (mean-field) symmetry-broken states....

  12. Numerical Study of Nonperturbative Corrections to the Chiral Separation Effect in Quenched Finite-Density QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhr, Matthias; Buividovich, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the nonrenormalization of the chiral separation effect (CSE) in quenched finite-density QCD in both confinement and deconfinement phases using a recently developed numerical method which allows us, for the first time, to address the transport properties of exactly chiral, dense lattice fermions. This finding suggests that CSE can be used to fix renormalization constants for axial current density. Explaining the suppression of the CSE which we observe for topologically nontrivial gauge field configurations on small lattices, we also argue that CSE vanishes for self-dual non-Abelian fields inside instanton cores.

  13. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  14. PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta have both similar and distinct effects on myofiber switching toward an oxidative phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Frandsen, Lis; Schjerling, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha and -1beta (PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta) were overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultures of primary rat skeletal muscle cells derived from neonatal myoblasts. Effects on muscle fiber type transition and metabolism...

  15. Effectiveness of interferon-beta and temozolomide combination therapy against temozolomide-refractory recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Hajime

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas recur even after extensive surgery and chemo-radiotherapy. Although a relatively novel chemotherapeutic agent, temozolomide (TMZ, has demonstrated promising activity against recurrent glioma, the effects last only a few months and drug resistance develops thereafter in most cases. Induction of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT in tumors is considered to be responsible for resistance to TMZ. Interferon-beta has been reported to suppress MGMT in an experimental glioma model. Here we report a patient with TMZ-refractory anaplastic astrocytoma (AA who was treated successfully with a combination of interferon-beta and TMZ. Case presentation A patient with recurrent AA after radiation-chemotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy was treated with TMZ. After 6 cycles, the tumor became refractory to TMZ, and the patient was treated with interferon-beta at 3 × 106 international units/body, followed by 5 consecutive days of 200 mg/m2 TMZ in cycles of 28 days. After the second cycle the tumor decreased in size by 50% (PR. The tumor showed further shrinkage after 8 months and the patient's KPS improved from 70% to 100%. The immunohistochemical study of the initial tumor specimen confirmed positive MGMT protein expression. Conclusion It is considered that interferon-beta pre-administration increased the TMZ sensitivity of the glioma, which had been refractory to TMZ monotherapy.

  16. Dual aminergic regulation of central beta adrenoceptors. Effect of atypical antidepressants and 5-hydroxytryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manier, D.H.; Gillespie, D.D.; Sulser, F.

    1989-06-01

    Nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding curves reveals that the (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol-labeled receptor population with low affinity for isoproterenol is increased by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and this increase is abolished by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in vivo. Desipramine (DMI) decreased the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity to the same degree in PCPA-treated animals as in control animals, thus explaining the reported discrepancy between beta adrenoceptor number and responsiveness of the beta adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system. Mianserin also selectively reduced the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity in membrane preparations of normal animals, whereas fluoxetine selectively abolished the upregulation of the low affinity sites in reserpinized animals and had no effect on either receptor population from brain of normal animals. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding for the interpretation of drug action and encourage the pursuit of the molecular neurobiology of the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) link in brain.

  17. The Effect of Adjuvants on Penetration of beta-cypermethrin Through the Epidermis of Cabbage Leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; ZHANG Li-ta; ZHENG Fei-neng; CHEN Fu-liang; LIANG Wen-ping

    2002-01-01

    The effects of three types of adjuvant (mineral oil, higher aliphatic acid and nonionic surfactant) on the penetration of beta-cypermethrin through the cabbage leaf surface were studied. The results showed that the penetration was positively correlated with both the concentration of adjuvant and the time after application, in a given range of treatment. A synergistic effect of two types of adjuvant on the penetration was found. Some physical properties of emulsions were determined. The change of the structures of the cabbage leaf surface by these adjuvants was observed from photomicrographs. The mechanism concerned with the effect of these adjuvants on the penetration of beta-cypermethrin through the cabbage leaf surface was tentatively discussed.

  18. Effects of 17beta-trenbolone in male eelpout Zoarces viviparus exposed to ethinylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M; Madsen, Steffen S; Bjerregaard, Poul; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between 17beta-trenbolone (TB) and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), male eelpout, Zoarces viviparus, was exposed for 21 days (April to May 2008) to 5 ng l(-1) EE2 and 5 or 20 ng l(-1) TB, separately or in combination in a flow-through SW system. The effects on hepatosomatic (HSI) and gonadosomatic index (GSI), plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentration, gonadal histology, hepatic and testicular Vtg mRNA and estrogen receptor (ERalpha) mRNA expression were investigated. No effects on HSI were observed. A significant decrease was observed in the GSI of all males exposed to EE2 (300-fold), hepatic Vtg mRNA (>450-fold), and ERalpha mRNA (>100-fold) when compared to controls. This study shows that lower concentrations of 17beta-trenbolone are unable to counteract the EE2 estrogenic effects when the exposure is simultaneous.

  19. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P

    2010-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms that enable cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inhibit transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling during mammary tumorigenesis remain unknown. We show here that TGF-beta selectively stimulated the expression of the PGE2 receptor EP2, which increased normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell (MEC) invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and resistance to TGF-beta-induced cytostasis. Mechanistically, elevated EP2 expression in normal MECs inhibited the coupling of TGF-beta to Smad2/3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI1) expression, while EP2 deficiency in these same MECs augmented Smad2/3 activation and PAI expression stimulated by TGF-beta. Along these lines, engineering malignant MECs to lack EP2 expression prevented their growth in soft agar, restored their cytostatic response to TGF-beta, decreased their invasiveness in response to TGF-beta, and potentiated their activation of Smad2/3 and expression of PAI stimulated by TGF-beta. More important, we show that COX-2 or EP2 deficiency both significantly decreased the growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis of mammary tumors produced in mice. Collectively, this investigation establishes EP2 as a potent mediator of the anti-TGF-beta activities elicited by COX-2/PGE2 in normal and malignant MECs. Our findings also suggest that pharmacological targeting of EP2 receptors may provide new inroads to antagonize the oncogenic activities of TGF-beta during mammary tumorigenesis.-Tian, M., Schiemann, W. P. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

  20. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Falgari, P; Signer, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of $\\Gamma_X/m_X$, with $\\Gamma_X$ and $m_X$ the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the $q \\bar{q}$ partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the na\\" ive counting $\\sim \\Gamma_t/m_t \\sim 1%$. However, they can be si...

  1. QCD effective potential with strong magnetic fields at zero and finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Sho; Arai, Takashi; Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2014-09-01

    In this contribution, we will discuss QCD vacuum in strong magnetic fields. As a first step towards understanding the effects of magnetic fields on QCD vacuum properties, we analytically derive the Euler-Heisenberg action for QCD + QED at zero and finite temperatures. From the action, at zero temperature, we found that the chromo-magnetic field prefers to be parallel to the external magnetic field, and thus the QCD vacuum with strong magnetic fields is spatially anisotropic. This result is consistent with recent lattice data. Furthermore, the chromo-magnetic condensate increases with an increasing magnetic field, which supports the ``gluonic magnetic catalysis'' as observed in current lattice data. Next, we will discuss the effective potential with strong magnetic fields at finite temperatures. In particular, we focus on the influence of the magnetic field on the center symmetry in QCD. The pure Yang-Mills theory has the center symmetry (being spontaneously broken at high temperature), but dynamical quarks explicitly break it. We will show how the magnetic fields affect the explicit symmetry breaking, by using the effective potential for the Polyakov loop. We will also discuss the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in strong magnetic fields in terms of nonperturbative approaches such as functional renormalization group.

  2. Kinetic-Scale Magnetic Turbulence and Finite Larmor Radius Effects at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Khazanov, G. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2011-01-01

    We use a nonstationary generalization of the higher-order structure function technique to investigate statistical properties of the magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft during its first flyby (01/14/2008) through the near-Mercury space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction. Our analysis shows, for the first time, that kinetic-scale fluctuations play a significant role in the Mercury's magnetosphere up to the largest resolvable timescale (approx.20 s) imposed by the signal nonstationariry, suggesting that turbulence at this plane I is largely controlled by finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, we report the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered at the outbound (dawn-side) magnetopause. Overall, our measurements indicate that the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as the surrounding region, are strongly affected by non-MHD effects introduced by finite sizes of cyclotron orbits of the constituting ion species. Physical mechanisms of these effects and their potentially critical impact on the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetic field remain to be understood.

  3. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  4. Finite Density Fat QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, R; Di Carlo, G; Galante, A; Grillo, A F

    2000-01-01

    Lattice formulation of Finite Baryon Density QCD is problematic from computer simulation point of view; it is well known that for light quark masses the reconstructed partition function fails to be positive in a wide region of parameter space. For large bare quark masses, instead, it is possible to obtain more sensible results; problems are still present but restricted to a small region. We present evidence for a saturation transition independent from the gauge coupling $\\beta$ and for a transition line that, starting from the temperature critical point at $\\mu=0$, moves towards smaller $\\beta$ with increasing $\\mu$ as expected from simplified phenomenological arguments.

  5. Effect of hydrostatic pressure of various magnitudes on osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Collodel, Giulia; Petraglia, Angela; Nerucci, Fabiola; Moretti, Elena; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Several in vitro studies have shown the importance of mechanical compression or hydrostatic pressure (HP) as a modulator of cartilage metabolism. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro effects of cyclical low HP (1-5 MPa) and continuous high HP (24 MPa) applied in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-1beta on human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. Chondrocytes obtained from OA cartilage were cultivated for 48 h and then exposed to pressurization in the presence or absence of IL-1beta. After pressurization, the culture medium was collected to detect the amount of proteoglycans (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) and the chondrocytes were immediately fixed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and processed for immunocytochemistry to localize the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). A significant increase in the level of PG and a small, non-significant, decrease in NO production were observed upon exposure to cyclical low HP. On the other hand, exposure to continuous high HP resulted in a significant decrease in the PG levels and a significant increase in NO production. The presence of IL-1beta led to a significant decrease in PG levels as well as a significant increase in NO production. The cyclical low HP did not increase the PG levels significantly but caused a statistically significant decrease in NO production in cultures damaged with IL-1beta. The continuous high HP in chondrocyte cultures stimulated with IL-1beta did not significantly decrease PG production, but significantly increased NO production. The results concerning metabolic production were further confirmed by morphological findings obtained by TEM and immunocytochemical studies. The findings of this study confirmed that the response of chondrocytes varies with magnitude and frequency of HP. These findings are important to understand aetiopathogenetic mechanisms of OA and to find out which type of physical activity may be best suited for the prevention and therapy of OA.

  6. Contribution of alpha4beta1 integrin to the antiallergic effect of levocabastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Ahmed R; Bucolo, Claudio; Baiula, Monica; Spartà, Antonino; Govoni, Paolo; Bedini, Andrea; Fascì, Domenico; Spampinato, Santi

    2008-09-15

    Levocabastine is an antiallergic drug acting as a histamine H1-receptor antagonist. In allergic conjunctivitis (AC), it may also antagonize up-regulation of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressed on epithelial conjunctival cells. However, little is known about its effects on eosinophils, important effector cells in AC. The adhesion molecule integrin alpha(4)beta(1) is expressed in eosinophils; it interacts with the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fibronectin (FN) in vascular endothelial cells and contributes to eosinophil activation and infiltration in AC. This study provides evidence that in a scintillation proximity assay levocabastine (IC(50) 406 microM), but not the first-generation antihistamine chlorpheniramine, displaced (125)I-FN binding to human integrin alpha(4)beta(1) and, in flow cytometry analysis, levocabastine antagonized the binding of a primary antibody to integrin alpha(4) expressed on the Jurkat cell surface. Levocabastine, but not chlorpheniramine, binds the alpha(4)beta(1) integrin and prevents eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1, FN or human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro. Similarly, levocabastine affects alpha(L)beta(2)/ICAM-1-mediated adhesion of Jurkat cells. In a model of AC levocabastine eye drops reduced the clinical aspects of the late-phase reaction and the conjunctival expression of alpha(4)beta(1) integrin by reducing infiltrated eosinophils. We propose that blockade of integrin-mediated cell adhesion might be a target of the antiallergic action of levocabastine and may play a role in preventing eosinophil adhesion and infiltration in AC.

  7. Overexpression of estrogen receptor beta alleviates the toxic effects of beta-amyloid protein on PC12 cells via non-hormonal ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Lihui Si; Xiaoxi Li; Weiguo Deng; Haimiao Yang; Yuyan Yang; Yan Fu

    2012-01-01

    After binding to the estrogen receptor, estrogen can alleviate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid protein, and thereby exert a therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease patients. Estrogen can increase the incidence of breast carcinoma and endometrial cancer in post-menopausal women, so it is not suitable for clinical treatment of Alzheimer's disease. There is recent evidence that the estrogen receptor can exert its neuroprotective effects without estrogen dependence. Real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry results showed that, compared with non-transfected PC12 cells, adenovirus-mediated estrogen receptor β gene-transfected PC12 cells exhibited lower expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β under stimulation with beta-amyloid protein and stronger protection from apoptosis. The Akt-specific inhibitor Abi-2 decreased the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of estrogen receptor β gene-transfection. These findings suggest that overexpression of estrogen receptor β can alleviate the toxic effect of beta-amyloid protein on PC12 cells, without estrogen dependence. The Akt pathway is one of the potential means for the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the estrogen receptor.

  8. Effects of yoga exercise on salivary beta-defensin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Nobuhiko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Satomi; Tanabe, Yoko; Lee, Eunjae; Akama, Takao

    2013-10-01

    Yoga stretching can be done comfortably and easily by beginners and older adults to compensate for lack of exercise or poor health maintenance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of yoga stretching on mucosal immune functions, primarily human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) in saliva. Fifteen healthy adults (age, 60.4 ± 8.0 years) participated in the study. Participants rested for 90 min on the first day and performed yoga for 90 min on the second day. Measurements were carried out before and after rest or yoga. Saliva samples were collected by chewing a sterile cotton at a frequency of 60 cycles per min. Salivary HBD-2 concentration was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBD-2 concentration after yoga stretching (165.4 ± 127.1 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that before yoga stretching (84.1 ± 63.4 pg/mL; p yoga stretching (232.8 ± 192.9 pg/min) was significantly higher than that before yoga stretching (110.7 ± 96.8 pg/min; p yoga) was significantly higher than that on the first day (rest). POMS score of anger-hostility was lower after yoga than before. Yoga stretching for 90 min can increase salivary HBD-2 expression in older adults. Therefore, yoga stretching might be useful for older adults and athletes to maintain their health.

  9. Thermal Effects on Vibration and Control of Piezocomposite Kirchhoff Plate Modeled by Finite Elements Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and numerical results of the modeling of a smart plate are presented for optimal active vibration control. The smart plate consists of a rectangular aluminum piezocomposite plate modeled in cantilever configuration with surface bonded thermopiezoelectric patches. The patches are symmetrically bonded on top and bottom surfaces. A generic thermopiezoelastic theory for piezocomposite plate is derived, using linear thermopiezoelastic theory and Kirchhoff assumptions. Finite element equations for the thermopiezoelastic medium are obtained by using the linear constitutive equations in Hamilton’s principle together with the finite element approximations. The structure is modelled analytically and then numerically and the results of simulations are presented in order to visualize the states of their dynamics and the state of control. The optimal control LQG-Kalman filter is applied. By using this model, the study first gives the influences of the actuator/sensor pair placement and size on the response of the smart plate. Second, the effects of thermoelastic and pyroelectric couplings on the dynamics of the structure and on the control procedure are studied and discussed. It is shown that the effectiveness of the control is not affected by the applied thermal gradient and can be applied with or without this gradient at any time of plate vibrations.

  10. Capacity Scaling of Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Effect of Finite Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Si-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    We study the capacity scaling of wireless ad hoc networks considering the effect of finite wavelength. $n$ source--destination pairs are assumed to be randomly placed in areas of 1 (dense network) and $n$ (extended network). \\"{O}zg\\"{u}r \\emph{et al.} showed that the linear capacity scaling is possible for the dense network and the extended network with path-loss exponent equal to 2, which is achieved by hierarchical cooperation (HC). However, such a linear capacity scaling was shown to violate the physical limit on degrees of freedom by Franceschetti \\emph{et al}. The cause of the contradiction is the idealized channel model used in the analysis of the HC, in which the channel correlation due to the finite wavelength is ignored. In this paper, we use a channel model that captures the channel correlation correctly, modify the HC accordingly, and analyze its throughput scaling in terms of both $n$ and the wavelength. Our result shows exactly how the throughput scaling of HC is degraded due to the effect of fi...

  11. Effective spectral density functions from finite cut-off frequencies of baths

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Xian-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Firstly, we obtain the effective spectral density functions of baths for two basic open quantum systems by setting cut-off frequencies of the baths finite. By using the spectral density functions and the conventional ones from infinite cut-off frequency of the baths we investigate the dynamics of open qubits. When the cut-off frequencies of the baths are smaller than about 5 times of the Rabi frequency of the qubits, the two kinds of spectral density functions result in different qubits' dynamics. Secondly, we obtain the effective spectral density functions of the baths for another two complex models from finite cut-off frequencies of the baths and through which we investigate the dynamics of open qubits in these models. One of these models is a quantum system couple to an intermediate harmonic oscillator and both of them couple to their independent baths respectively, and the other is both of them couple to a common bath. The qubit in the later model has longer decoherence and relaxation times. In the invest...

  12. Finite volume effects in pion-kaon scattering and reconstruction of the kappa(800) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the kappa(800) on the lattice is a challenging task that starts to become feasible due to the rapid progress in recent-years lattice QCD calculations. As the resonance is broad, special attention to finite-volume effects has to be paid, because no sharp resonance signal as from avoided level crossing can be expected. In the present article, we investigate the finite volume effects in the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory using next-to-leading order terms. After a fit to meson-meson partial wave data, lattice levels for piK scattering are predicted. In addition, levels are shown for the quantum numbers in which the sigma(600), f_0(980), a_0(980), phi(1020), K*(892), and rho(770) appear, as well as the repulsive channels. Methods to extract the kappa(800) signal from the lattice spectrum are presented. Using pseudo-data, we estimate the precision that lattice data should have to allow for a clear-cut extraction of this resonance. To put the results into context, in particular the req...

  13. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes in the computational simulation. A precise 3-dimensional finite element model was constructed based on an in-vitro specimen of human foot and ankle. Young’s moduli were assigned as four levels of 7.3, 14.6, 21.9 and 29.2 GPa respectively. The proximal tibia and fibula were completely limited to six degrees of freedom, and the ankle was loaded to inversion 10° and 20° through the calcaneus. Six cadaveric foot-ankle specimens were loaded as same as the finite element model, and strain was measured at two positions of the distal fibula. The bone stress was less affected by assignment of Young’s modulus. With increasing of Young’s modulus, the bone strain decreased linearly. Young’s modulus of 29.2 GPa was advisable to get the satisfactory surface strain results. In the future study, more ideal model should be constructed to represent the nonlinearity, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as the same time to provide reasonable outputs of the interested parameters.

  14. Loss of acoustic black hole effect in a structure of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2016-07-01

    The Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) effect takes place in thin-walled structures with diminishing thickness as a result of the reduction in the bending wave speed. It was shown to exist as a broadband phenomenon, based on wave propagation theory in structures of semi-infinite size. The ABH effect exhibits appealing features for various applications, such as passive vibration control, energy harvesting, and sound radiation control. In this paper, we demonstrate the disappearance of the ABH effect in a finite beam at specific frequency ranges above the cut-on frequency, both experimentally and theoretically. Analyses show that the phenomenon takes place at frequencies which are close to the low order local resonant frequencies of the portion of the beam demarcated by the position of the excitation force. These frequencies can be predicted so that the phenomenon can be avoided for the targeted frequency ranges in ABH applications.

  15. QCD Dirac Spectrum at Finite Chemical Potential: Anomalous Effective Action, Berry Phase and Composite Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2015-01-01

    We show that the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential using a 2-matrix model in the spontaneously broken phase, is amenable to a generic 2-dimensional effective action on a curved eigenvalue manifold. The eigenvalues form a droplet with strong screening and non-linear plasmons. The droplet is threaded by a magnetic vortex which is at the origin of a Berry phase. The adiabatic transport in the droplet maps onto the one in the fractional quantum Hall effect, suggesting that composite fermions at half filling are Dirac particles. We use this observation to argue for two novel anomalous effects in the edge transport of composite fermions, and conversely on a novel contribution to the QCD quark condensate in a rotating frame.

  16. Continuum and Symmetry-Conserving Effects in Drip-line Nuclei Using Finite-range Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N

    2007-01-01

    We report the first calculations of nuclear properties near the drip-lines using the spherical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory with a finite-range force supplemented by continuum and particle number projection effects. Calculations were carried out in a basis made of the eigenstates of a Woods-Saxon potential computed in a box, thereby garanteeing that continuum effects were properly taken into account. Projection of the self-consistent solutions on good particle number was carried out after variation, and an approximation of the variation after projection result was used. We give the position of the drip-lines and examine neutron densities in neutron-rich nuclei. We discuss the sensitivity of nuclear observables upon continuum and particle-number restoration effects.

  17. Historical agriculture alters the effects of fire on understory plant beta diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, W Brett; Orrock, John L; Collins, Cathy D; Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Veldman, Joseph W; Walker, Joan L

    2015-02-01

    Land-use legacies are known to shape the diversity and distribution of plant communities, but we lack an understanding of whether historical land use influences community responses to contemporary disturbances. Because human-modified landscapes often bear a history of multiple land-use activities, this contingency can challenge our understanding of land-use impacts on plant diversity. We address this contingency by evaluating how beta diversity (the spatial variability of species composition), an important component of regional biodiversity, is shaped by interactions between historical agriculture and prescribed fire, two prominent disturbances that are often coincident in terrestrial ecosystems. At three study locations spanning 450 km in the southeastern United States, we surveyed longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities across 232 remnant and post-agricultural sites with differing prescribed fire regimes. Our results demonstrate that agricultural legacies are a strong predictor of beta diversity, but the direction of this land-use effect differed among the three study locations. Further, although beta diversity increased with prescribed fire frequency at each study location, this effect was influenced by agricultural land-use history, such that positive fire effects were only documented among sites that lacked a history of agriculture at two of our three study locations. Our study not only highlights the role of historical agriculture in shaping beta diversity in a fire-maintained ecosystem but also illustrates how this effect can be contingent upon fire regime and geographic location. We suggest that interactions among historical and contemporary land-use activities may help to explain dissimilarities in plant communities among sites in human-dominated landscapes.

  18. Effects of. beta. -cyclodextrin on the luminescence of para amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, J.H.; Walker, R.G. (Royal Military Coll. of Science, Shrivenham (UK))

    1981-05-11

    Beta-cyclodextrin has been added to para amino benzoic acid (PABA) and luminescence changes observed for the PABA anion. The intensity of fluorescence was increased upon complexation of the PABA at 298 K due to the prevention of collisional deactivation of the PABA, but at 77 K the fluorescence was reduced due to the increase of vibrational deactivation modes available to the complex relative to the free PABA. The luminescence effects were interpreted as inclusion complexation of the PABA anion.

  19. Increased glucocorticoid sensitivity in pancreatic beta-cells : Effects on glucose metabolism and insulin release

    OpenAIRE

    Davani, Behrous

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by three pathological alterations: (1) insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, (2) increased hepatic glucose production and (3) impaired insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cells. Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert profound effects on glucose homeostasis. They decrease glucose uptake and increase hepatic glucose production. In addition, they may directly inhibit insulin release. The main aim of this thesis was to investigate...

  20. The effective exponent gamma(Q) and the slope of the beta function

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, P M

    2016-01-01

    The slope of the beta function at a fixed point is commonly thought to be RG invariant and to be the critical exponent gamma* that governs the approach of any physical quantity R to its fixed-point limit: R*-R proportional to Q^gamma*. Chyla has shown that this is not quite true. Here we define a proper RG invariant, the "effective exponent" gamma(Q), whose fixed-point limit is the true gamma*.

  1. Low to high confinement transition theory of finite-beta drift-wave driven shear flow and its comparison with data from DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzdar, P. N.; Kleva, R. G.; Groebner, R. J.; Gohil, P.

    2004-03-01

    Shear flow stabilization of edge turbulence in tokamaks has been the accepted paradigm for the improvement in confinement observed in high (H) confinement mode plasmas. Results on the generation of zonal flow and fields in finite β plasmas are presented. This theory yields a criterion for bifurcation from low to high (L-H) confinement mode, proportional to Te/√Ln , where Te is the electron temperature and Ln is the density scale-length at the steepest part of the density gradient. When this parameter exceeds a critical value (mostly determined by the strength of the toroidal magnetic field), the transition occurs. The predicted threshold based on this parameter shows good agreement with edge measurements on discharges undergoing L-H transitions in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, R. Anderson, F. Batty et al., in Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research, 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159]. The observed differences in the transitions with the reversal of the toroidal magnetic field are reconciled in terms of this critical parameter due to the differences in the density gradient scale-lengths in the edge. The theory also provides a possible explanation for lowered threshold power, pellet injection H modes in DIII-D, thereby providing a unified picture of the varied observations on the L-H transition.

  2. Effect of pathogenic mutations on the structure and dynamics of Alzheimer's A beta 42-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassler, Kristin; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that soluble A beta-amyloid oligomers play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and present direct effectors of synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Three pathological E22-A beta-amyloid point mutants (E22G, E22K, E22Q) and the deletion mutant E22 Delta exhibit an enhanced tendency to form prefibrillar aggregates. The present study assessed the effect of these four mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent structural and energetic analyses. Our data shows that E22 plays a unique role in wild type A beta, since it has a destabilising effect on the oligomer structure due to electrostatic repulsion between adjacent E22 side chains. Mutations in which E22 is replaced by an uncharged residue result in higher oligomer stability. This effect is also observed to a lesser extent for the E22K mutation and is consistent with its lower pathogenicity compared to other mutants. Interestingly, deletion of E22 does not destroy the amyloid fold but is compensated by local changes in the backbone geometry that allow the preservation of a structurally important salt bridge. The finding that all mutant oligomers investigated exhibit higher internal stability than the wild type offers an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced oligomer formation and stability.

  3. Effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Iwasaki, M; Koshiura, R

    1982-12-01

    Effects of several autonomic agents on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells were studied. When beta-adrenergic stimulants such as isoproterenol, epinephrine, terbutaline and turobuterol were added at concentrations over 10(-14) M 15 to 60 min before mitomycin C, the colony-forming ability of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited more than by mitomycin C alone. The action of isoproterenol and epinephrine on the colony-forming ability of the cells was abolished by propranolol. The intracellular cyclic AMP level of HeLa cells reached the peak of about two-fold the basal level at 30 min after the addition of 10(-8) M isoproterenol. In combination with mitomycin C, the high level of intracellular cyclic AMP induced by isoproterenol was maintained for a significantly longer period in comparison with that by isoproterenol alone, while mitomycin C alone caused essentially no change in the cyclic AMP level. The pretreatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP also enhanced the effect of mitomycin C. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that the synergistic effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is mediated via stimulation of the beta-adrenoceptors of HeLa cells which elevates the intracellular cyclic AMP for a long time in combination with mitomycin C.

  4. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38\\/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  5. Integral validation of the effective beta parameter for the MOX reactors and incinerators; Validation integrale des estimations du parametre beta effectif pour les reacteurs Mox et incinerateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zammit-Averlant, V

    1998-11-19

    {beta}{sub eff}, which represents the effective delayed neutron fraction, is an important parameter for the reactor nominal working as well as for studies of its behaviour in accidental situation. In order to improve the safety of nuclear reactors, we propose here to validate its calculation by using the ERANOS code with ERALIB1 library and by taking into account all the fission process physics through the {nu} energy dependence. To validate the quality of this calculation formalism, we calculated uncertainties as precisely as possible. The experimental values of {beta}{sub eff}, as well their uncertainties, have also been re-evaluated for consistency, because these `experimental` values actually contain a calculated component. We therefore obtained an entirely coherent set of calculated and measured {beta}{sub eff}. The comparative study of the calculated and measured values pointed out that the JEF2.2 {nu}{sub d} are already sufficient because the (E-C)/C are inferior to 3 % in average and in their uncertainly bars. The experimental uncertainties, even if lightly superior to those previously edited, remain inferior to the uncertainties of the calculated values. This allowed us to fit {nu}{sub d} with {beta}{sub eff}. This adjustment has brought an additional improvement on the recommendations of the {nu}{sub d} average values, for the classical scheme (thermal energy, fast energy) and for the new scheme which explains the {nu}{sub d} energy dependence. {beta}{sub eff}, for MOX or UOX fuel assemblies in thermal or fast configurations, can therefore be obtained with an uncertainty due to the nuclear data of about 2.0 %. (author) 110 refs.

  6. Finite source effects in microlensing: A precise, easy to implement, fast and numerical stable formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, C -H; Seitz, S; Bender, R

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a numerically fast and stable description for the microlensing magnification of an extended source (either uniform or limb darkened) that holds in any magnification regime. We show that our method of evaluating the magnification can be implemented into a light curve fitting routine using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We compare the accuracy and computation times to previous methods that either work in the high magnification regime only, or have a numerical instability problem due to the evaluation of an elliptic integral. In addition we also provide the equations including finite lens effects in microlensing light curves. We apply our methods to the MACHO-1995-BLG-30 and the OGLE-2003-BLG-262 events and obtain results consistent to former studies. We derive an upper limit for the OGLE-2003-BLG-262 event lens size. We conclude that our method allows to simultaneously search for point-source and finite source microlensing events in future large area microlensing surveys...

  7. Mesh locking effects in the finite volume solution of 2-D anisotropic diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Putti, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Strongly anisotropic diffusion equations require special techniques to overcome or reduce the mesh locking phenomenon. We present a finite volume scheme that tries to approximate with the best possible accuracy the quantities that are of importance in discretizing anisotropic fluxes. In particular, we discuss the crucial role of accurate evaluations of the tangential components of the gradient acting tangentially to the control volume boundaries, that are called into play by anisotropic diffusion tensors. To obtain the sought characteristics from the proposed finite volume method, we employ a second-order accurate reconstruction scheme which is used to evaluate both normal and tangential cell-interface gradients. The experimental results on a number of different meshes show that the scheme maintains optimal convergence rates in both L2 and H1 norms except for the benchmark test considering full Neumann boundary conditions on non-uniform grids. In such a case, a severe locking effect is experienced and documented. However, within the range of practical values of the anisotropy ratio, the scheme is robust and efficient. We postulate and verify experimentally the existence of a quadratic relationship between the anisotropy ratio and the mesh size parameter that guarantees optimal and sub-optimal convergence rates.

  8. Investigation of finite-size effects in chemical bonding of AuPd nanoalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Beien [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Oğuz, Ismail Can; Guesmi, Hazar, E-mail: hazar.guesmi@enscm.fr [CNRS-ICG UMR 5253, équipe MACS, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier (France)

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the size-dependent changes in energetic, vibrational, and electronic properties of C–O gas molecule interacting with surface Pd atom of a variety of AuPd nanoalloy structures are investigated by means of first principles calculations. The variation in C–O adsorption energies, C–O vibration frequencies (ν{sub C−O}), and Pd d-bond centers (ε{sub d}) on a series of non-supported Au{sub n−1}–Pd{sub 1} nanoparticles (with n varying from 13 to 147) and on two semi-finite surfaces are inspected with cluster size. We demonstrate for the first time that, with small AuPd bimetallic three-dimensional clusters as TOh{sub 38}, one can reach cluster size convergence even for such a sensitive observable as the adsorption energy on a metal surface. Indeed, the results show that the adsorbate-induced perturbation is extremely local and it only concerns the isolated Pd interacting with the reactive gas molecule. Except for 13 atom clusters, in which molecular behaviour is predominant, no finite-size effects are observed for surface Pd atom substituted in AuPd free nanoclusters above 38 atoms.

  9. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  10. Breakup and finite-range effects on the 8B(d,n)9C reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of 8B(p,{\\gamma})9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined by a three-body coupled-channels analysis of the transfer reaction 8B(d,n)9C at 14.4 MeV/nucleon. Effects of the breakup channels of deuteron are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). It is found that the transfer process through the deuteron breakup states, its interference with that through the deuteron ground state in particular, gives a large increase in the transfer cross section. The finite-range effects with respect to the proton- neutron relative coordinate are found to be less than 5%. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 33 +/- 10 eVb is obtained that is smaller than the result of the previous DWBA analysis by about 26%.

  11. Extramuscular myofascial force transmission alters substantially the acute effects of surgical aponeurotomy: assessment by finite element modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, Can; Koopman, Bart; Grootenboer, Henk; Huijing, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Effects of extramuscular myofascial force transmission on the acute effects of aponeurotomy were studied using finite element modeling and implications of such effects on surgery were discussed. Aponeurotomized EDL muscle of the rat was modeled in two conditions: (1) fully isolated (2) with intact

  12. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose...... of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response...... GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes....

  13. The effect of interferon-beta on black holes in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Francesca; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Gallo, Antonio; Gaindh, Deeya; Yao, Karen

    2007-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immunological disorder of the CNS. Linked to an initial transient inflammation as the result of blood-brain barrier leakage, the disease progresses into a neurodegenerative phase. MRI is the most powerful paraclinical tool for diagnosing and monitoring MS. Although contrast enhancing lesions are the visible events of blood-brain barrier breakdown, accumulation of hypointense lesions, namely black holes, are recognised as irreversible axonal loss. IFN-beta is administered as a first-line drug in MS patients. However, whether the effect of IFN-beta extends beyond just prevention of blood-brain barrier leakage and further prevents the formation of black holes or promotes their recovery once formed, is not yet understood.

  14. Finite-element method for calculation of the effective permittivity of random inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Viktor; Brosseau, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of designing new solid-state materials from calculations performed with the help of computers applied to models of spatial randomness has attracted an increasing amount of interest in recent years. In particular, dispersions of particles in a host matrix are scientifically and technologically important for a variety of reasons. Herein, we report our development of an efficient computer code to calculate the effective (bulk) permittivity of two-phase disordered composite media consisting of hard circular disks made of a lossless dielectric (permittivity ɛ2 ) randomly placed in a plane made of a lossless homogeneous dielectric (permittivity ɛ1 ) at different surface fractions. Specifically, the method is based on (i) a finite-element description of composites in which both the host and the randomly distributed inclusions are isotropic phases, and (ii) an ordinary Monte Carlo sampling. Periodic boundary conditions are employed throughout the simulation and various numbers of disks have been considered in the calculations. From this systematic study, we show how the number of Monte Carlo steps needed to achieve equilibrated distributions of disks increases monotonically with the surface fraction. Furthermore, a detailed study is made of the dependence of the results on a minimum separation distance between disks. Numerical examples are presented to connect the macroscopic property such as the effective permittivity to microstructural characteristics such as the mean coordination number and radial distribution function. In addition, several approximate effective medium theories, exact bounds, exact results for two-dimensional regular arrays, and the exact dilute limit are used to test and validate the finite-element algorithm. Numerical results indicate that the fourth-order bounds provide an excellent estimate of the effective permittivity for a wide range of surface fractions, in accordance with the fact that the bounds become progressively narrower as

  15. A study of finite volume effect on the multiple-frequencies coherence of VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    1993-08-01

    In the past few years, the technique of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) has been developed on VHF radar. By using this technique, the characteristics of a very thin atmospheric lay structure, which is embedded in the radar volume and cannot be solved by conventional VHF radar with only one operational frequency, can be determined through the calculation of the coherence and the phase from the two echo signals with different operational frequencies. According to FDI theory, assuming that the range and antenna beam weighting effect can be ignored, the coherence will approach zero if the layer thickness is fairly greater than the radar volume. However, in this study, it will be shown that if a rectangular pulse is transmitted and the atmospheric refractivity irregularities are distributed uniformly in the radar volume, that is, there is no narrow layer structure existing in the scattering volume, the coherence of two signals with different operational frequencies is still high and its behavior can be described by the equation C is approximately equal to Sinc((Delta)k L)/(l + N/S), where C is the coherence, Delta K is the wavenumber difference between two carrier frequencies, L is the effective scale of scattering volume, and N/S is the noise-to-signal power ratio. This feature can be interpreted physically by the finite volume filtering effect on the turbulent wavenumber spectrum. This theoretical prediction has been compared with the FDI experiments carried out by the Chung-Li VHF radar, and the results are quite reasonable. Thus, it is suggested that when the FDI technique is applied to estimate the thickness and the position of a thin layer, the finite volume filtering effect should be taken into account.

  16. Effect of heterogeneity in radiosensitivity on LQ based isoeffect formalism for low {alpha}/{beta} cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, Vitali [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Change of fractionation for external beam radiation therapy based on linear-quadratic (LQ) formalism assumes that a single {alpha}/{beta} is sufficient to characterize tumour response to dose fractionation. In reality, both inter-patient and intra-tumour heterogeneity might affect the applicability of iso effectiveness formalism. The impact of heterogeneity on recently proposed hypofractionation schemes for the prostate has been analysed. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was assumed to be Gaussian distributed with a mean value of 1.5 Gy. Gaussian and lognormal distributions for a were modelled. TCP model parameters were adjusted to lead to TCP=0.80 for 70 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. TCP loss from heterogeneity and doses required to restore TCP=0.80 were calculated. The effect of heterogeneity was moderate. Doses to restore TCP=0.80 in most cases were less than 1 Gy. The largest TCP loss was 4%. The difference between predictions of single {alpha}/{beta} and heterogeneity models is too small to be detected in a clinical trial.

  17. The effect of beta blockade on stress-induced cognitive dysfunction in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigel, H C

    1991-07-01

    Test anxiety is severely disabling to students whose fear of examinations causes cognitive dysfunction that paralyzes their thinking the way stage fright impairs actors ability to act. In studies using subjective evaluations among actors and musicians, beta-blockade relieved stage fright and has been used informally to treat test anxiety in students without objective measures of effectiveness. The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) was chosen as an objective test instrument to confirm the effect of beta-blockade on test anxiety and performance. Thirty-two high school students who had already taken the SAT before enrolling in this study and who had stress-induced cognitive dysfunction on exams were given 40 mg of propranolol one hour before they retook those tests. Mean SAT scores with beta-blockade were 130 points higher than on the initial SAT done before entering the study without medication (p = less than .01). A single dose of propranolol immediately before the SAT permitted improved performance in students prone to cognitive dysfunction due to test anxiety.

  18. The influence of temperature dynamics and dynamic finite ion Larmor radius effects on seeded high amplitude plasma blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, M.; Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, J.; Kendl, A.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal effects on the perpendicular convection of seeded pressure blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetised fusion plasmas are investigated. Our numerical study is based on a four field full-F gyrofluid model, which entails the consistent description of high fluctuation amplitudes and dynamic finite Larmor radius effects. We find that the maximal radial blob velocity increases with the square root of the initial pressure perturbation and that a finite Larmor radius contributes to highly compact blob structures that propagate in the poloidal direction. An extensive parameter study reveals that a smooth transition to this compact blob regime occurs when the finite Larmor radius effect strength, defined by the ratio of the magnetic field aligned component of the ion diamagnetic to the \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} vorticity, exceeds unity. The maximal radial blob velocities agree excellently with the inertial velocity scaling law over more than an order of magnitude. We show that the finite Larmor radius effect strength affects the poloidal and total particle transport and present an empirical scaling law for the poloidal and total blob velocities. Distinctions to the blob behaviour in the isothermal limit with constant finite Larmor radius effects are highlighted.

  19. Self-assembly of a novel beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibiting strong quantum confinement effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Zhen; Tang, Qun; Xie, Qin; Qian, Yitai

    2005-05-01

    The 3D beta-In2S3 flowerlike architecture assembled from nanoflakes was prepared via a novel complex-precursor assisted (CPA) solvothermal route. The as-prepared beta-In2S3 powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transition electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra, and photoluminescence spectrum. The novel 3D beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibit a strong quantum confinement effect. FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the coordinative chemical effect in the complex. A possible mechanism was discussed.

  20. Effects of Vitamin E and Zinc Supplementation on Antioxidants in Beta-Thalassemia Major Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Keshtkar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:In beta thalassemic patients, tissue damage occurs due to oxidative stress and it happens because of the accumulation of iron in the body. This study was conducted to determine the effect of zinc and vitamin E supplementation on antioxidant status in beta-thalassemic major patients. Methods:This double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 120 beta thalassemic patients older than 18 years. Patients were randomly categorized in four groups. Zinc (50mg/day and vitamin E (400mg/day supplements were administered for former and latter group, respectively. In the third group both supplements were administered in similar doses. The fourth (control group received no supplement. The effect of supplementations on serum zinc and vitamin E, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and body mass index (BMI were measured at the beginning and the end of the study. Findings:Serum zinc levels in group 1 and 3 were significantly increased (P<0.007 and P<0.005, respectively. Serum vitamin E levels in group 2 and 3 were also increased significantly (P<0.001. Mean GPX activity in group1, 2 and 3 decreased significantly (P<0.015, P<0.032 and P<0.029, respectively. Mean SOD activity and TAC did not show significant change after supplementation. BMI had significant increase in all treated groups (P<0.001. Conclusion:Our results suggest that beta thalassemic patients have enhanced oxidative stress and administration of selective antioxidants may preclude oxidative damage.

  1. Effects of Vitamin E and Zinc Supplementation on Antioxidants in Beta thalassemia major Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammadreza; Aboomardani, Maryam; Rafraf, Maryam; Arefhosseini, Seyed-Rafie; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Joshaghani, Hamidreza

    2011-01-01

    Objective In beta thalassemic patients, tissue damage occurs due to oxidative stress and it happens because of the accumulation of iron in the body. This study was conducted to determine the effect of zinc and vitamin E supplementation on antioxidant status in beta-thalassemic major patients. Methods This double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 120 beta thalassemic patients older than 18 years. Patients were randomly categorized in four groups. Zinc (50mg/day) and vitamin E (400mg/day) supplements were administered for former and latter group, respectively. In the third group both supplements were administered in similar doses. The fourth (control) group received no supplement. The effect of supplementations on serum zinc and vitamin E, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured at the beginning and the end of the study. Findings Serum zinc levels in group 1 and 3 were significantly increased (P<0.007 and P<0.005, respectively). Serum vitamin E levels in group 2 and 3 were also increased significantly (P<0.001). Mean GPX activity in group1, 2 and 3 decreased significantly (P<0.015, P<0.032 and P<0.029, respectively). Mean SOD activity and TAC did not show significant change after supplementation. BMI had significant increase in all treated groups (P<0.001). Conclusion Our results suggest that beta thalassemic patients have enhanced oxidative stress and administration of selective antioxidants may preclude oxidative damage. PMID:23056757

  2. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Finite Automation

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This self-paced narrated tutorial covers the following about Finite Automata: Uses, Examples, Alphabet, strings, concatenation, powers of an alphabet, Languages (automata and formal languages), Deterministic finite automata (DFA) SW4600 Automata, Formal Specification and Run-time Verification

  4. Effect of natural {beta}-carotene supplementation in children exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Amotz, A. [Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, Haifa (Israel); Yatziv, S. [Pediatric Department, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Sela, M. [Maxillary-Facial Rehabilitation, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Greenberg, S.; Rachmilevich, B.; Shwarzman, M.; Weshler, Z. [Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1998-10-01

    Attempts were made to evaluate 709 children (324 boys and 385 girls) who had been exposed long-term to different doses of radiation during and after the Chernobyl accident and had moved to Israel between 1990 and 1994. Upon arrival, all of them underwent a check-up for most common clinical disorders and were then divided into three groups according to their residences (distance from the reactor) and the level of irradiation exposure: no radiation, <5 Ci/m{sup 2}, and >5 Ci/m{sup 2}, respectively. Blood serum analyses for total carotenoids, retinol, {alpha}-tocopherol and oxidized conjugated dienes in 262 of the children showed increased HPLC levels of conjugated dienes, indicating increased levels of oxidation of in vivo blood lipids in children from the contaminated areas. The levels were higher in girls than in boys. Some 57 boys and 42 girls were given a basal diet with a diurnal supplementation of 40 mg natural 9-cis and all-trans equal isomer mixture {beta}-carotene in a capsulated powder form of the alga Dunaliella bardawil, for a period of 3 months. Blood serum analyses were regularly conducted before supplementation to determine the baseline effect of radiation exposure to the children, after 1 and 3 months of natural {beta}-carotene supplementation. After supplementation, the levels of the oxidized conjugated dienes decreased in the children`s sera without any significant changes in the level of total carotenoids, retinol or {alpha}-tocopherol. Other common blood biochemicals were within the normal range for all tests and no statistical differences before or after supplementation of {beta}-carotene were noted. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses for carotenoids in the blood detected mainly oxycarotenoids, and to a lesser extent, all-trans {beta}-carotene, {alpha}-carotene, but not 9-cis {beta}-carotene. The results suggest that irradiation increases the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation in the Chernobyl children and that natural {beta

  5. Effects of beta-blockade on atrial and atrioventricular nodal refractoriness, and atrial fibrillatory rate during atrial fibrillation in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; van de Ven, LLM; Witting, W; Crijns, JGM; Haaksma, J; Bel, KJ; de Langen, CDJ; Lie, KI

    1997-01-01

    Despite their widespread use in atrial fibrillation, the effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockers on atrial and atrioventricular (AV) nodal refractoriness, and atrial fibrillatory rate during atrial fibrillation have been incompletely characterised. In particular, it is unknown whether additional sodiu

  6. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  7. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  8. Calculation of the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects in nanowires using a decoupled finite element analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    A simple and effective decoupled finite element analysis method was developed for simulating both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) and barium titanate (BTO) nanowires (NWs). The piezoelectric potential distribution on a ZnO NW was calculated under three deformation conditions (cantilever, three-point, and four-point bending) and compared to the conventional fully coupled method. The discrepancies of the electric potential maximums from these two methods were found very small, validating the accuracy and effectiveness of the decoupled method. Both ZnO and BTO NWs yielded very similar potential distributions. Comparing the potential distributions induced by the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects, we identified that the middle segment of a four-point bending NW beam is the ideal place for measuring the flexoelectric coefficient, because the uniform parallel plate capacitor-like potential distribution in this region is exclusively induced by the flexoelectric effect. This decoupled method could provide a valuable guideline for experimental measurements of the piezoelectric effects and flexoelectric effects in the nanometer scale.

  9. Finite quantum gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  10. Dissociation of beta-adrenoceptor-induced effects on amylase secretion and cyclic adenosine 3', 5' monophosphate accumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsöö, B.; Danielsson, A.; Henriksson, R; Idahl, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    By using a multi-channel microperifusion system the effects of noradrenaline, the beta1-adrenoceptor agonist prenalterol, and the beta2-selective agonist terbutaline were studied on amylase pig submandibular glands. 2 Noradrenaline caused significant amylase discharge and cyclic AMP accumulation. 3 Prenalterol was as effective as noradrenaline in causing amylase release but did not significantly affect the cyclic AMP content. 4 Terbutaline stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation, but had little ef...

  11. Effects of finiteness on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection above horizontal plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-06-01

    A rigorous and systematic computational and theoretical study, the first of its kind, for the laminar natural convective flow above rectangular horizontal surfaces of various aspect ratios ϕ (from 1 to ∞) is presented. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations (for ϕ → ∞) and three-dimensional CFD simulations (for 1 ≤ ϕ cases, with the complex three-dimensional solutions revealed here. The present computational study establishes the region of a high-aspect-ratio planform over which the results of the similarity theory are approximately valid, the extent of this region depending on the Grashof number. There is, however, a region near the edge of the plate and another region near the centre of the plate (where a plume forms) in which the similarity theory results do not apply. The sizes of these non-compliance zones decrease as the Grashof number is increased. The present study also shows that the similarity velocity profile is not strictly obtained at any location over the plate because of the entrainment effect of the central plume. The 3-D CFD simulations of the present paper are coordinated to clearly reveal the separate and combined effects of three important aspects of finiteness: the presence of leading edges, the presence of planform centre, and the presence of physical corners in the planform. It is realised that the finiteness due to the presence of physical corners in the planform arises only for a finite value of ϕ in the case of 3-D CFD simulations (and not in 2-D CFD simulations or similarity theory). The presence of physical corners is related here to several significant aspects of the solution - the conversion of in-plane velocity to out-of-plane velocity near the diagonals, the star-like non-uniform distribution of surface heat flux on heated planforms, the three-dimensionality of the temperature field, and the complex spatial structure of the velocity iso-surfaces. A generic theoretical correlation for the Nusselt

  12. Reply to ``Comment on `Nonanalyticity of the optimized effective potential with finite basis sets' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.

    2013-10-01

    The Comment by Friedrich does not dispute the central result of our paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.85.052508 85, 052508 (2012)] that nonanalytic behavior is present in long-established mathematical pathologies arising in the solution of finite basis optimized effective potential (OEP) equations. In the Comment, the terms “balancing of basis sets” and “basis-set convergence” imply a particular order towards the limit of a large orbital basis sets where the large-orbital-base limit is always taken first, before the large-auxiliary-base limit, until overall convergence is achieved, at a high computational cost. The authors claim that, on physical grounds, this order of limits is not only sufficient, but also necessary in order to avoid the mathematical pathologies. In response to the Comment, we remark that it is already written in our paper that the nonanalyticity trivially disappears with large orbital basis sets. We point out that the authors of the Comment give an incorrect proof of this statement. We also show that the order of limits towards convergence of the potential is immaterial. A recent paper by the authors of the Comment proposes a partial correction for the incomplete orbital basis error in the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. Similar to the correction developed in our paper, this correction also benefits from an effectively complete orbital basis, even though only a finite orbital basis is employed in the calculation. This shows that it is unnecessary to take, in practice, the limit of an infinite orbital basis in order to avoid mathematical pathologies in the OEP. Our paper is a significant contribution in that direction with general applicability to any choice of basis sets. Finally, contrary to an allusion in the abstract and assertions in the main text of the Comment that unphysical oscillations of the OEP are supposedly attributed to the common energy denominator approximation, in fact, such

  13. Differential effects of ongoing EEG beta and theta power on memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sebastian; Schneider, Signe Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Recently, elevated ongoing pre-stimulus beta power (13–17 Hz) at encoding has been associated with subsequent memory formation for visual stimulus material. It is unclear whether this activity is merely specific to visual processing or whether it reflects a state facilitating general memory formation, independent of stimulus modality. To answer that question, the present study investigated the relationship between neural pre-stimulus oscillations and verbal memory formation in different sensory modalities. For that purpose, a within-subject design was employed to explore differences between successful and failed memory formation in the visual and auditory modality. Furthermore, associative memory was addressed by presenting the stimuli in combination with background images. Results revealed that similar EEG activity in the low beta frequency range (13–17 Hz) is associated with subsequent memory success, independent of stimulus modality. Elevated power prior to stimulus onset differentiated successful from failed memory formation. In contrast, differential effects between modalities were found in the theta band (3–7 Hz), with an increased oscillatory activity before the onset of later remembered visually presented words. In addition, pre-stimulus theta power dissociated between successful and failed encoding of associated context, independent of the stimulus modality of the item itself. We therefore suggest that increased ongoing low beta activity reflects a memory promoting state, which is likely to be moderated by modality-independent attentional or inhibitory processes, whereas high ongoing theta power is suggested as an indicator of the enhanced binding of incoming interlinked information. PMID:28192459

  14. [Central effects of five beta-adrenergic receptor blockers in healthy volunteers: a quantitative EEG study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabot, C; Pechadre, J C; Beudin, P; Lauxerois, M; Trolese, J F; Kantelip, J P; Ducher, J L; Gibert, J

    1989-03-01

    The effects of five beta blockers on the central nervous system of healthy subjects was studied by computerized EEG analysis. All subjects underwent continuous recording with a Holter magnetic type recorder during the experimental period. For 10 consecutive days, five groups of subjects received alternately placebo and the beta blockers acebutolol 600 mg, carteolol 20 mg, metoprolol 200 mg, pindolol 30 mg and sotalol 320 mg. EEG recordings (C4/P4, P4/02 and C3/P3, P3/01) lasting 5 min were made between 8.30 and 9.30 a.m. Subjects were at rest with eyes closed and there was no vigilance control. The signal was recorded on a magnetic tape recorder and then processed by Nicolet MED 80 system. Comparisons of absolute and relative powers and of average frequencies were then made between the different sequences and groups. The possible correlations between the changes observed in the power spectrum and the clinical, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic specific properties of each beta blocker are discussed.

  15. Can {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene supplementation reduce adverse radiation effects on salivary glands?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funegaard, U.; Johansson, I.; Ericson, T. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cariology; Malmer, B.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-31

    In this study, we evaluated whether supplementation with antioxidant vitamins can reduce the adverse effects of irradiation on the salivary glands in the rat. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given a basic diet providing 0.6 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and no {beta}-carotene per day. In two groups the basic diet was supplemented with 3.4 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and 6 mg {beta}-carotene per day from 14 days before irradiation until 12 days after complete irradiation. One group of rats given basic diet and one group given supplemented diet were irradiated with 7 Gy daily for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol and pilocarpine-stimulated whole saliva was collected from all rats 2, 4 and 26 weeks after irradiation. Vitamin-supplemented irradiated rats had higher secretion rates on all three occasions compared with those of irradiated rats given basic diet. The changes in saliva composition seen in irradiated rats were less accentuated in vitamin-supplemented, irradiated rats. The proportions of acinar cells were significantly decreased both in parotid and submandibular glands 26 weeks after irradiation. Supplementation with {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene did not alter the morphology of the glands. (author).

  16. Anomalous finite-size effects in the Battle of the Sexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The Battle of the Sexes describes asymmetric conflicts in mating behavior of males and females. Males can be philanderer or faithful, while females are either fast or coy, leading to a cyclic dynamics. The adjusted replicator equation predicts stable coexistence of all four strategies. In this situation, we consider the effects of fluctuations stemming from a finite population size. We show that they unavoidably lead to extinction of two strategies in the population. However, the typical time until extinction occurs strongly prolongs with increasing system size. In the meantime, a quasi-stationary probability distribution forms that is anomalously flat in the vicinity of the coexistence state. This behavior originates in a vanishing linear deterministic drift near the fixed point. We provide numerical data as well as an analytical approach to the mean extinction time and the quasi-stationary probability distribution.

  17. DIFFERENTIAL QUADRATURE METHOD FOR BENDING OF ORTHOTROPIC PLATES WITH FINITE DEFORMATION AND TRANSVERSE SHEAR EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 程昌钧

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Reddy' s theory of plates with the effect of higher-order shear deformations, the governing equations for bending of orthotropic plates with finite deformations were established. The differential quadrature ( DQ ) method of nonlinear analysis to the problem was presented. New DQ approach, presented by Wang and Bert (DQWB), is extended to handle the multiple boundary conditions of plates. The techniques were also further extended to simplify nonlinear computations. The numerical convergence and comparison of solutions were studied. The results show that the DQ method presented is very reliable and valid. Moreover, the influences of geometric and material parameters as well as the transverse shear deformations on nonlinear bending were investigated.Numerical results show the influence of the shear deformation on the static bending of orthotropic moderately thick plate is significant.

  18. Finite size effects on the electromagnetic field enhancement from low-dimensional silver nanoshell dimer arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Youlin [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhao, Ke [ORNL; Jia, Yu [Zhengzhou University, China; Hu, Xing [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional 1D and two-dimensional 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy SERS. It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic EM field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. 2008 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3009293

  19. Finite Size Effects on the Electromagnetic Field Enhancement from Low-dimensional Silver Nanoshell Dimer Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youlin; Zhao, Ke; Jia, Yu; Hu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-03-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic (EM) field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. [K. Zhao et al, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 081102 (2005); Y. L. Song et al, accepted by J. Chem. Phys.

  20. Finite temperature Casimir effect for massive scalars in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Erdas, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged, massive scalar field confined between very large, perfectly conducting parallel plates is studied using the zeta function regularization technique. The scalar field satisfies Dirichlet boundary conditions at the plates and a magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is present. Four equivalent expressions for the zeta function are obtained, which are exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature, scalar field mass, and plate distance. The zeta function is used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the scalar field and the Casimir pressure on the plates, in the case of high temperature, small plate distance, strong magnetic field and large scalar mass. In all cases, simple analytic expressions of the zeta function, free energy and pressure are obtained, which are very accurate and valid for practically all values of temperature, plate distance, magnetic field and mass.

  1. Finite temperature Casimir effect for charged massless scalars in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Erdas, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The zeta function regularization technique is used to study the finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged and massless scalar field confined between parallel plates and satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions at the plates. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is included. Three equivalent expressions for the zeta function are obtained, which are exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature and plate distance. These expressions of the zeta function are used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the scalar field and the pressure on the plates, in the case of high temperature, small plate distance and strong magnetic field. In all cases, simple analytic expressions are obtained for the free energy and pressure which are accurate and valid for practically all values of temperature, plate distance and magnetic field.

  2. Finite Size Effects in Adsorption of Helium Mixtures by Alkali Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, M.; Guilleumas, M.; Hernández, E. S.; Mayol, R.; Pi, M.; Szybisz, L.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of mixed 3He-4He droplets on alkali surfaces at zero temperature, within the frame of Finite Range Density Functional theory. The properties of one single 3He atom on 4He_N4 droplets on different alkali surfaces are addressed, and the energetics and structure of 4He_N4+3He_N3 systems on Cs surfaces, for nanoscopic 4He drops, are analyzed through the solutions of the mean field equations for varying number N3 of 3He atoms. We discuss the size effects on the single particle spectrum of 3He atoms and on the shapes of both helium distributions.

  3. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  4. Finite size effects on textured surfaces: recovering contact angles from vagarious drop edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Rivetti, Marco; Teisseire, Jérémie; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-02-18

    A clue to understand wetting hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces is the relation between receding contact angle and surface textures. When the surface textures are large, there is a significant distribution of local contact angles around the drop. As seen from the cross section, the apparent contact angle oscillates as the triple line recedes. Our experiments demonstrate that the origin of these oscillations is a finite size effect. Combining side and bottom views of the drop, we take into account the 3D conformation of the surface near the edge to evaluate an intrinsic contact angle from the oscillations of the apparent contact angle. We find that for drops receding on axisymmetric textures the intrinsic receding contact angle is the minimum value of the oscillation while for a square lattice it is the maximum.

  5. Kinetic-scale magnetic turbulence and finite Larmor radius effects at Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, V M; Khazanov, G V; Donovan, E F; Boardsen, S A; Anderson, B J; Korth, H

    2011-01-01

    We use a nonstationary generalization of the higher-order structure function technique to investigate statistical properties of the magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft during its first flyby (01/14/2008) through the near Mercury's space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind -- magnetosphere interaction. Our analysis shows, for the first time, that kinetic-scale fluctuations play a significant role in the Mercury's magnetosphere up to the largest resolvable time scale ~20 s imposed by the signal nonstationarity, suggesting that turbulence at this planet is largely controlled by finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, we report the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered...

  6. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  7. Simple rules govern finite-size effects in scale-free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenda, Sara

    2011-01-01

    We give an intuitive though general explanation of the finite-size effect in scale-free networks in terms of the degree distribution of the starting network. This result clarifies the relevance of the starting network in the final degree distribution. We use two different approaches: the deterministic mean-field approximation used by Barab\\'asi and Albert (but taking into account the nodes of the starting network), and the probability distribution of the degree of each node, which considers the stochastic process. Numerical simulations show that the accuracy of the predictions of the mean-field approximation depend on the contribution of the dispersion in the final distribution. The results in terms of the probability distribution of the degree of each node are very accurate when compared to numerical simulations. The analysis of the standard deviation of the degree distribution allows us to assess the influence of the starting core when fitting the model to real data.

  8. Quantum Otto cycle with inner friction: finite-time and disorder effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecce, A.; Galve, F.; Lo Gullo, N.; Dell'Anna, L.; Plastina, F.; Zambrini, R.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of inner friction, by which a quantum heat engine is unable to follow adiabatically its strokes and thus dissipates useful energy, is illustrated in an exact physical model where the working substance consists of an ensemble of misaligned spins interacting with a magnetic field and performing the Otto cycle. The effect of this static disorder under a finite-time cycle gives a new perspective of the concept of inner friction under realistic settings. We investigate the efficiency and power of this engine and relate its performance to the amount of friction from misalignment and to the temperature difference between heat baths. Finally we propose an alternative experimental implementation of the cycle where the spin is encoded in the degree of polarization of photons.

  9. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  10. Lack of effect of beta-blocker on flat dose response to thiazide in hypertension: efficacy of low dose thiazide combined with beta-blocker.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Increasing the dose of a thiazide diuretic used alone in patients with essential hypertension has little further effect on blood pressure but increases the deleterious metabolic consequences of the diuretic. The effect of a beta-blocker on this flat dose response is not known. In two randomised crossover studies the effect of 12.5 mg, 25 mg, and 50 mg hydrochlorothiazide combined with 400 mg acebutolol was assessed. The mean fall in supine blood pressure was about 15% and was the same whateve...

  11. Boundary electron and beta dosimetry-quantification of the effects of dissimilar media on absorbed dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft-tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta-ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radiommunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods had to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus-32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods are compared with experimental data. Monte Carlo results compare satisfactory with experimental results for the boundaries considered.

  12. Antidiuretic effect of ritodrine with and without beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritse, R; Pinas, I M; Reuwer, P J; Haspels, A A; Charbon, G A; Beijer, H J

    1985-11-01

    Dose-related effects of ritodrine and ritodrine combined with metoprolol on urinary excretion rate were studied in anesthetized dogs. Urine production was abruptly reduced after a total dose of 4 micrograms.kg-1 of ritodrine. This effect could not be antagonized by metoprolol, although the ritodrine-induced decrease of mean arterial pressure and renal arterial blood flow was significantly inhibited. The possible role of fluid retention during tocolytic treatment, even with beta-adrenergic blockade, in the etiology of pulmonary edema is discussed with a review on recent literature.

  13. Effect of beta-blocker therapy on functional status in patients with heart failure--a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Køber, Lars; Christensen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results of randomised control trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of beta-blockers on functional status in patients with chronic heart failure are conflicting. AIM: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs evaluating the effect of beta-blockers on New York Heart...... Association (NYHA) classification and exercise tolerance in chronic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: We selected 28 RCTs evaluating beta-blocker versus placebo in addition to ACE inhibitor therapy. Combined results of 23 RCTs showed that beta-blockers improved NYHA class by at least one class with odds...... ratio (OR) 1.80 (1.33-2.43) pbeta-blockers had no significant effect...

  14. Effect of whey hydrolysate formula on the transfer of beta-lactoglobulin into serum and milk in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Y; Kawata, Y; Mizumachi, K; Kurisaki, J

    1998-10-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the effect of whey hydrolysate formula on the transfer of an antigen into serum and milk. The concentrations of beta-lactoglobulin in serum and milk were positively correlated (p IgA concentration. The fecal anti-beta-lactoglobulin IgA of mice fed hydrolysate formula for 12 weeks was significantly higher than that of the control formula-fed mice (p IgA elicited by the feeding of hydrolysate formula may reduce the transfer of beta-lactoglobulin into serum and milk.

  15. Stimulatory effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) on beta2-adrenoceptors of guinea pig tracheal chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, H; Boskabady, M H; Ahmadzadef Vostakolaei, H

    2008-12-01

    To study the mechanism(s) of the relaxant effects of Crocus sativus (Iridaceae), the stimulatory effect of aqueous-ethanolic extracts of this plant and one of its constituent, safranal was examined on beta-adrenoceptors in tracheal chains of guinea pigs. The beta(2)-adrenergic stimulatory was tested by performing the cumulative concentration-response curves of isoprenaline-induced relaxation of pre-contracted isolated guinea pig tracheal chains. The studied solutions were included two concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract from Crocus sativus (0.1 and 0.2g%), safranal (1.25 and 2.5 microg), 10nM propranolol, and saline. The study was done in two different conditions including: non-incubated (group 1, n=9) and incubated tissues with 1 microM chlorpheniramine (group 2, n=6). The results showed clear leftward shifts in isoprenaline curves obtained in the presence of only higher concentration of the extract in group 1 and its both concentrations in group 2 compared with that of saline. The EC(50) (the effective concentration of isoprenaline, causing 50% of maximum response) obtained in the presence of both concentrations of the extract (0.17+/-0.06 and 0.12+/-0.02) and safranal (0.22+/-0.05 and 0.22+/-0.05) in group 1 and only in the presence of two concentrations of the extract (1.16+/-0.31 and 0.68+/-0.21) in group 2 was significantly lower compared to saline (1.00+/-0.22 and 4.06+/-1.04 for groups 1 and 2, respectively) (pCrocus sativus on beta(2)-adrenoceptors which is partially due to its constituent, safranal. A possible inhibitory effect of the plant on histamine (H(1)) receptors was also suggested.

  16. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta thalassemia is found in people of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin genes found on chromosomes ...

  17. Finite element analysis for normal pressure hydrocephalus: The effects of the integration of sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakseung; Park, Dae-Hyeon; Yi, Seong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Byung C; Czosnyka, Marek; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2015-08-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is increasingly used to investigate the brain under various pathological changes. Although FEA has been used to study hydrocephalus for decades, previous studies have primarily focused on ventriculomegaly. The present study aimed to investigate the pathologic changes regarding sulcal deformation in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Two finite element (FE) models-an anatomical brain geometric (ABG) model and the conventional simplified brain geometric (SBG) model-of NPH were constructed. The models were constructed with identical boundary conditions but with different geometries. The ABG model contained details of the sulci geometry, whereas these details were omitted from the SBG model. The resulting pathologic changes were assessed via four biomechanical parameters: pore pressure, von Mises stress, pressure, and void ratio. NPH was induced by increasing the transmantle pressure gradient (TPG) from 0 to a maximum of 2.0 mmHg. Both models successfully simulated the major features of NPH (i.e., ventriculomegaly and periventricular lucency). The changes in the biomechanical parameters with increasing TPG were similar between the models. However, the SBG model underestimated the degree of stress across the cerebral mantle by 150% compared with the ABG model. The SBG model also overestimates the degree of ventriculomegaly (increases of 194.5% and 154.1% at TPG = 2.0 mmHg for the SBG and ABG models, respectively). Including the sulci geometry in a FEA for NPH clearly affects the overall results. The conventional SBG model is inferior to the ABG model, which accurately simulated sulcal deformation and the consequent effects on cortical or subcortical structures. The inclusion of sulci in future FEA for the brain is strongly advised, especially for models used to investigate space-occupying lesions.

  18. Finite element method calculations of GMI in thin films and sandwiched structures: Size and edge effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Arribas, A. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: alf@we.lc.ehu.es; Barandiaran, J.M.; Cos, D. de [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The impedance values of magnetic thin films and magnetic/conductor/magnetic sandwiched structures with different widths are computed using the finite element method (FEM). The giant magneto-impedance (GMI) is calculated from the difference of the impedance values obtained with high and low permeability of the magnetic material. The results depend considerably on the width of the sample, demonstrating that edge effects are decisive for the GMI performance. It is shown that, besides the usual skin effect that is responsible for GMI, an 'unexpected' increase of the current density takes place at the lateral edge of the sample. In magnetic thin films this effect is dominant when the permeability is low. In the trilayers, it is combined with the lack of shielding of the central conductor at the edge. The resulting effects on GMI are shown to be large for both kinds of samples. The conclusions of this study are of great importance for the successful design of miniaturized GMI devices.

  19. Finite-size and correlation-induced effects in Mean-field Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Touboul, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The brain's activity is characterized by the interaction of a very large number of neurons that are strongly affected by noise. However, signals often arise at macroscopic scales integrating the effect of many neurons into a reliable pattern of activity. In order to study such large neuronal assemblies, one is often led to derive mean-field limits summarizing the effect of the interaction of a large number of neurons into an effective signal. Classical mean-field approaches consider the evolution of a deterministic variable, the mean activity, thus neglecting the stochastic nature of neural behavior. In this article, we build upon a recent approach that includes correlations and higher order moments in mean-field equations, and study how these stochastic effects influence the solutions of the mean-field equations, both in the limit of an infinite number of neurons and for large yet finite networks. We show that, though the solutions of the deterministic mean-field equation constitute uncorrelated solutions of...

  20. Finite Larmor radius effects in the nonlinear dynamics of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Sarto, D [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS-Nancy University, Campus Victor Grignard - BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Marchetto, C [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Pegoraro, F; Califano, F, E-mail: daniele.delsarto@ijl.nancy-universite.fr, E-mail: marchetto@ifp.cnr.it, E-mail: pegoraro@df.unipi.it, E-mail: califano@df.unipi.it [Physics Department and CNISM, Pisa University, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    We provide numerical evidence of the role of finite Larmor radius effects in the nonlinear dynamics of magnetic field line reconnection in high-temperature, strong guide field plasmas in a slab configuration, in the large {Delta}' regime. Both ion and electron temperature effects introduce internal energy variations related to mechanical compression terms in the energy balance, thus contributing to regularize the gradients of the ion density with respect to the cold regimes. For values of the Larmor radii that are not asymptotically small, the two temperature effects are no longer interchangeable, in contrast to what is expected from linear theory, and the differences are measurable in the numerical growth rates and in the nonlinear evolution of the density layers. We interpret such differences in terms of the change, due to ion temperature effects, of the Lagrangian advection of the 'plasma invariants' that are encountered in the cold-ion, warm-electron regime. The different roles of the ion and ion-sound Larmor radii in the reconnection dynamics near the X- and O-points are evidenced by means of a local quadratic expansion of the fields.

  1. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2001-01-01

    with beta-blockers, but the effect of this treatment on arterial compliance has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the effects of propranolol on the arterial compliance of patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty patients with cirrhosis underwent a haemodynamic......) of 17.8 mmHg, and responded to beta-blocker treatment with a significant reduction in the HVPG (-16%; P beta-adrenergic blockade (1.27 versus 1.29 ml/mmHg, +2%, ns), whereas...... with beta-blockers increases small vessel (arteriolar) vascular tone towards the normal level, but does not affect the elevated compliance of the larger arteries in patients with cirrhosis....

  2. Involvement of PLC-beta3 in the effect of morphine on memory retrieval in passive avoidance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E; Lehmann, D; Vivoli, E; Norcini, M; Ghelardini, C

    2010-06-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is one signalling effector enzyme whose activity is directly modulated by opioids. Several physiological studies have implicated PLC-linked pathways in in-vivo pain regulation and opioid tolerance. Co-administration of PLC-beta(2/3) activity blocker M119 with morphine resulted in a dramatic increase in morphine-induced amnesic effect in mice, proving a role for beta subunit of PLC enzyme in these processes. Administration of morphine to mice at amnesic dose increased PLC-beta(3) activity, with respect to basal value, in the membrane-soluble material from anterior cortex and hippocampal formation in brain areas. PLC-beta(3) appears to be simultaneously implicated in both analgesic and amnesic effects induced by administration of morphine to mice suggesting a commonality in the molecular mechanisms of morphine-induced analgesia and memory impairment.

  3. Differential effect on serum neopterin and serum beta 2-microglobulin is induced by treatment in Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Schattenkerk, J K; Hofmann, B

    1994-01-01

    Forty-three human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) were enrolled in a study of adjunctive corticosteroid treatment for 10 days versus placebo, in addition to antimicrobial treatment. Levels of neopterin and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) were......% and approximately 30%, respectively, and returned to baseline after discontinuation of corticosteroid treatment. Antimicrobial treatment alone did not affect either neopterin or beta 2M in healthy controls. Results indicate that treatment has a differential effect on the immune response: increased macrophage...... activation leading to neopterin production and decreased production of beta 2M by lymphocytes. Further, addition of corticosteroids modified and decreased this immune activation and may explain the earlier demonstrated beneficial effect of corticosteroids in PCP treatment....

  4. Effect of beta blockade on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) thallium-201 images in patients with coronary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narahara, K.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Hazen, J.F.; Brizendine, M.; Mena, I.

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of beta blockers on thallium-201 (Tl-201) single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in 12 patients with coronary disease using an automated computer algorithm. Maximal exercise heart rate and blood pressure were reduced and exercise time was increased with beta blockers. Estimated stress defect size decreased from 47 +/- 36.3 gm during placebo treatment to 32 +/- 27.1 gm during beta blocker therapy (-32%; p less than 0.01). The placebo treatment redistribution defect was estimated to be 28 +/- 29.8 gm. It fell to 15 +/- 23.3 gm with beta blockade (-46%; p less than 0.005). All patients had a stress Tl-201 defect during placebo treatment and eight had redistribution defects consistent with residual scar. During beta blocker therapy, 2 of 12 patients had normal stress-redistribution studies and only five patients had redistribution defects. Beta blockade can reduce exercise and redistribution Tl-201 SPECT defect size significantly while simultaneously increasing exercise time and reducing angina. Beta blockers may unmask or may eliminate evidence of redistribution. Tl-201 SPECT imaging may be useful in defining the reduction in ischemia produced by cardiac drugs.

  5. Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate and isoproterenol on lipolysis in isolated adipocytes from periparturient dairy cows and cows with clinical ketosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Drift, S. G. A.; Everts, R. R.; Houweling, M.; van Leengoed, L. A. M. G.; Stegeman, J. A.; Tielens, A. G. M.; Jorritsma, R.

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro model was used to investigate effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate and isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic receptor agonist) on lipolysis in isolated adipocytes from late pregnant and recently calved dairy cows (n = 5) and cows with clinical ketosis (n =3). Incubation with 3.0 mmol/L beta-hydroxyb

  6. Leukocyte redistribution: effects of beta blockers in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan von Haehling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines is a well established factor in the progression of chronic heart failure (CHF. Changes in cellular immunity have not been widely studied, and the impact of standard medication is uncertain. Here we investigate whether a leukocyte redistribution occurs in CHF and whether this effect is influenced by beta-blocker therapy. METHODOLOGY: We prospectively studied 75 patients with systolic CHF (age: 68+/-11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 32+/-11%, New York Heart Association class 2.5+/-0.7 and 20 age-matched healthy control subjects (age: 63+/-10 years. We measured the response of cells to endotoxin exposure in vitro, analysed subsets of lymphocytes using flow cytometry, and assessed plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory markers interleukin 1, 6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While no differences in the number of leukocytes were noted between patients with CHF and healthy controls, we detected relative lymphopenia in patients with CHF (p<0.001 vs. control, mostly driven by reductions in T helper cells and B cells (both p<0.05. The number of neutrophils was increased (p<0.01. These effects were pronounced in patients who were beta-blocker naïve (32% of all patients with CHF. Increased plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis receptor-1 correlated with the relative number of lymphocyte subsets. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CHF, we detected a redistribution of leukocyte subsets, i.e. an increase in neutrophils with relative lymphopenia. These effects were pronounced in patients who were beta-blocker naïve. The underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  7. Negative effect of 17-beta-estradiol on growth parameters of goldifsh (Carassius auratus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Tarkhani; Mohammad Reza Imanpoor; Mohammad Forouhar Vajargah; Sayede Amene Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of 17-beta-estradiol on growth factors of goldfish (Carassius auratus). Methods:To perform the test, 17-beta-estradiol was given 3 months period to fish at different doses as followed: control group, Group 1: 10 mg/kg food, Group 2: 25 mg/kg food and Group 3: 50 mg/kg food. For this purpose, a solution of hormone in pure ethanol used to spray on food. Feeding was done 3 times daily as an appetite. Comparing the mean values measured for length and weight usingANOVA. Results:Indicated with increase length and weight, the effects of the hormone get more distinct, so that with increase concentration of hormone, reduce weight and length. Conclusions: Estradiol along with testosterone and progesterone regulates final stages of oocyte maturation and ovulation. Various studies have proven the different concentrations of this hormone has different effects on the growth of different fishes. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of this hormone on growth factors ofCarassius auratus.

  8. Monounsaturated fatty acids prevent the deleterious effects of palmitate and high glucose on human pancreatic beta-cell turnover and function

    OpenAIRE

    Maedler, Kathrin; Oberholzer, José; Bucher, Pascal Alain Robert; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Donath, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity contribute to the impaired beta-cell function observed in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the effect of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids at different glucose concentrations on human beta-cell turnover and secretory function. Exposure of cultured human islets to saturated fatty acid and/or to an elevated glucose concentration for 4 days increased beta-cell DNA fragmentation and decreased beta-cell proliferation. In contrast, the monounsaturated palmitol...

  9. Effects of beta interferon on human fibroblasts at different population doubling levels. Proliferation, cell volume, thymidine uptake, and DNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Cellular aging had no effect on the ability of beta interferon to increase cell volume and population doubling time in 76-109 cells, a line of human skin fibroblasts. However, DNA synthesis in cells at high population doubling levels (PDL 55-70) was inhibited after 72 h of beta interferon treatment (1,000 U/ml) while no inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed in cells at middle population doubling levels (PDL 30-40).

  10. Effect of clavulanic acid on the activities of ten beta-lactam agents against members of the Bacteroides fragilis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, F; Auger, F; Lacroix, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clavulanic acid reduced the MICs of amoxicillin, carbencillin , cefamandole, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, cephalothin, and penicillin G, but not of cefoxitin or moxalactam, against 77 isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group, all rapidly beta-lactamase positive by the nitrocefin slide test. It had no effect on the susceptibilities of eight Bacteroides distasonis strains that were slowly beta-lactamase positive (18 h of incubation). PMID:6732233

  11. The effect of cryo-storage on the beta 2-adrenoceptor density and responsiveness in intact human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, P; Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of cryo-storage on beta 2-adrenoceptor number and formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in intact human lymphocytes as a measure of the beta 2-adrenoceptor responsiveness. Cryo-storage at -196 degrees C up to 12 months caused no significant...... results indicate that the method should be further modified in order to preserve the lymphocyte responsiveness after cryo-storage....

  12. Finite element procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Finite element procedures are now an important and frequently indispensable part of engineering analyses and scientific investigations. This book focuses on finite element procedures that are very useful and are widely employed. Formulations for the linear and nonlinear analyses of solids and structures, fluids, and multiphysics problems are presented, appropriate finite elements are discussed, and solution techniques for the governing finite element equations are given. The book presents general, reliable, and effective procedures that are fundamental and can be expected to be in use for a long time. The given procedures form also the foundations of recent developments in the field.

  13. Short-range correlation effects on the nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar; Speranza, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a calculation of the nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}$Ca, carried out taking into account nucleon-nucleon correlations in both coordinate- and spin-space. Our numerical results, obtained using nuclear matter correlation functions, suggest that inclusion of correlations leads to a $\\sim$ $20\\%$ decrease of the matrix element, with respect to the shell model prediction. This conclusion is supported by the results of an independent calculation, in which correlation effects are taken into account using the spectroscopic factors of $^{48}$Ca obtained from an {\\em ab intitio} many body approach.

  14. Effect of pregnancy on differentiation of minor Beta-Thalassemia from iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanei M

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of Iron-deficiency anemia and Beta-Thalassemia, two common causes of anemia, affects the treatment in pregnant women. To help the diagnosis, we have tried to asses the pure effect of gestation on diagnostic criteria, eliminating iron and folate deficiency. In a prospective study, 46 thalassemic women were given Ferrous Sulphate tablets and Folate. Some indices, CBC and HbA2 were measured before and after treatment during pregnancy. The haemoglobin and HbA2 decreased and MCV increased, all with significant P value. We concluded that HbA2, independent of iron, will decrease during pregnancy and MCV will increase

  15. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway....... Furthermore, using Northern blot analysis it was shown that SOCS-3 can completely inhibit GH-induced insulin production in these cells. Finally, 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that SOCS-3 inhibits GH-induced proliferation of INS-1 cells...

  16. The effects of moderate drinking and abstinence on serum and urinary beta-hexosaminidase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäinen, P; Jokelainen, K; Roine, R; Suokas, A; Salaspuro, M

    1990-02-01

    The effects of moderate alcohol intake on serum (SHEX)- and urinary beta-hexosaminidase (UHEX) were studied in ten healthy volunteers, who ingested 60 g of 100% ethanol daily for 10 days. The drinking period was preceded and followed by an abstinence period. Moderate drinking and abstinence were rapidly and significantly reflected on SHEX, while UHEX levels did not change significantly during the study. Gramma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) decreased during the first abstinence period (P less than 0.05), but stayed thereafter at a constant level. It is concluded that SHEX may better reflect recent alcohol consumption than UHEX, GGT, ASAT or ALAT.

  17. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  18. Analysis of the effects of weak floor strata on longwall face stability using finite element modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jin-rong; Debasis Deb; Y. P. Chugh

    2001-01-01

    Higher production, better safety standard, and potential for automation are some of the benefits of longwall mining. Today, longwall face advances at a faster rate exposing many diversified rock layers in a short period of time. It is now a serious challenge to cope with ground control problems such as roof falls, face and floor failure, and excessive shield loading as fast as possible to minimize production and monetary losses. In Illinois Coal Mines, the existence of week floor strata blow the coal seam may pose additional problems related to floor heaving,shield base punching, and associated roof and face falls. In this study, the effects of week floor on longwall grouJd control are analyzed using two-dimensional finite element models. A two-leg 635.6 ton (700-short-ton) yielding capacity shield is included in the models to evaluate the effects of different thicknees and material properties of the weak floor. The study indicates that the thickness and material properties of weak floor have significant effects on shield loading, the distribution and intensity of front abutment stress, failure zones in the surrounding strata, roof-to-floor convergence, and floor punching by the shield base.

  19. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  20. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Asuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998. It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  1. The effects of strong magnetic fields and rotation on soliton stars at finite temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We study the effects of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation on the properties of soliton stars in Lee-Wick model when a temperature dependence is introduced into this model. We first recall the properties of the Lee-Wick model and study the properties of soliton solutions, in particular, the stability condition, in terms of the parameters of the model and in terms of the number of fermions N inside the soliton (for very large N) in the presence of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation. We also calculate the effects of gravity on the stability properties of the soliton stars in the simple approximation of coupling the Newtonian gravitational field to the energy density inside the soliton, treating this as constant throughout. Following Cottingham and Vinh Mau, we also make an analysis at finite temperature and show the possibility of a phase transition which leads to a model with parameters similar to those considered by Lee and his colleagues but in the presence of magnetic fields and rotation. More specifically, the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the soliton mass and transition temperature are computed explicitly. We finally study the evolution on these magnetized and rotating soliton stars with the temperature from the early universe to the present time.

  2. Effectiveness of beta-blocker therapy in daily practice patients with advanced chronic heart failure; is there an effect-modification by age?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, D.; deJongste, M.J.L.; Lucas, C.; Cleuren, G.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Ranchor, A.V.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims The effects of beta-blockers in daily practice patients with advanced chronic heart failure (CHF) and a broad range of ejection fraction (EF) are not well established. We aimed to assess, first, the association between beta-blocker prescription at discharge and mortality in a cohort of patients

  3. Transforming growth factor beta 1 prevents cytokine-mediated inhibitory effects and induction of nitric oxide synthase in the RINm5F insulin-containing beta-cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabley, J G; Cunningham, J M; John, N; Di Matteo, M A; Green, I C

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if the growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1), could prevent induction of nitric oxide synthase and cytokine-mediated inhibitory effects in the insulin-containing, clonal beta cell line RINm5F. Treatment of RINm5F cells for 24 h with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) (100 pM) induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and inhibited glyceraldehyde-stimulated insulin secretion. Combinations of IL-1 beta (100 pM), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (100 pM) and interferon-gamma (100 pM) reduced RINm5F cell viability (determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay) and de novo protein synthesis, as measured by incorporation of radiolabelled amino acids into perchloric acid-precipitable protein. Pretreatment of RINm5F cells with TGF beta 1 (10 pM) for 18 or 24 h, prior to the addition of either IL-1 beta or combined cytokines, prevented cytokine-induced inhibition of insulin secretion, protein synthesis and the loss of cell viability. TGF beta 1 pretreatment inhibited cytokine-induced expression and activity of nitric oxide synthase in RINm5F cells as determined by Western blotting and by cytosolic conversion of radiolabelled arginine into labelled citrulline and nitric oxide. Chemically generated superoxide also induced expression of nitric oxide synthase possibly due to direct activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF kappa B, an effect prevented by both an antioxidant and TGF beta 1 pretreatment. In conclusion, the mechanism of action of TGF beta 1 in blocking cytokine inhibitory effects was by preventing induction of nitric oxide synthase.

  4. Beta-ecdysone has bone protective but no estrogenic effects in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Christel, David; Kapur, Priya; Nguyen, Ba Tiep; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    Estrogens exert beneficial effects in the bone. Their chronic use however bares several risks. Therefore intensive search for non-estrogenic, bone protective compounds is going on. We observed that an extract of Tinospora cordifolia has antiosteoporotic effects and identified 20-OH-Ecdysone (beta-Ecdysone=Ecd) as a possible candidate for this action. Ovariectomized (ovx) rats were treated orally over 3 months with no Ecd (control) or 18, 57 or 121 mg Ecd/day/animal. Estradiol-17beta benzoate (E2) 159 microg/day/animal) fed animals served as positive controls. Bone mineral density (BMD) of tibia was measured by quantitative computer tomography, serum Osteocalcin and CrossLaps were measured in a ligand binding assay. Utilizing an estrogen receptor (ER) containing cytosolic extract of porcine uteri the capability of Ecd to bind to ER was tested. Ecd did not bind to ER. BMD was reduced by more than 50% in the control. In the Ecd animals BMD was dose dependently higher. Serum CrossLaps was lower in the Ecd and E2 group while serum Osteocalcin levels were decreased in the E2 but increased in the Ecd fed animals. Ecd has an antiosteoporotic effect which does not involve activation of ER.

  5. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathers, C.M.; Spivey, W.H.; Levin, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO.

  6. [Effectiveness of the treatment with beta-glucan in the HPV-CIN 1 lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardamaglia, P; Carraro, C; Mancino, P; Stentella, P

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the beta-glucan in women with abnormal cytology, including the women with a positive screening for ASCUS-LSIL furtherly divided in women with positive cytology (ASCUS or LSIL) and negative colposcopy and women with abnormal cytology, positive colposcopy and human papilloma virus (HPV)-CIN1 hystology who opted for follow-up. From September 2007 to December 2008, 60 women with ASCUS-LSIL diagnosis were recruited at the ambulatory of Lasersurgery and Cervico-Vaginal Patology, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Policlinico Umberto I of Rome. The women was subdivided in two groups: 1) women with cytological diagnosis of ASCUS or LSIL and negative colposcopy; 2) women with abnormal cytology, positive colposcopy and HPV-CIN1 histology, who opted for follow-up. All the women were treated with two cycles of a daily topical application of beta-glucan for 20 consecutive days with a suspension of 10 days. The effects of beta-glucan were analyzed with colposcopy and cytology at 3.6 and 12 months from the beginning of the therapy. After 3 months of treatment, of the 30 women with positive cytology and negative colposcopy, 80% with ASCUS diagnosis resulted negative, 35% with LSIL diagnosis resulted negative; after 6 months 100% with ASCUS diagnosis resulted negative, 70% with LSIL diagnosis resulted negative; after 12 months 85% with LSIL diagnosis resulted negative. Of the 30 women with positive cytology, positive colposcopy and HPV-CIN1 histology after 3 months 20% resulted negative, after 6 months 60% resulted negative and after 12 months 80% resulted negative. The persistence of the HPV-CIN1 histology was verified in the 13% of the women. For these women the definitive treatment was the TFD. Our study demonstrate the effectiveness of the treatment with beta-glucan in the women with ASCUS-LSIL lesions and HPV-CIN1 lesions, increasing of the regressions rate after 12 months of the treatment of the 15-20%.

  7. Effect of resveratrol and beta-sitosterol in combination on reactive oxygen species and prostaglandin release by PC-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Atif B; Burr, Andrew T; Fink, Carol S

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this project was to identify some possible mechanisms by which two common phytochemicals, resveratrol and beta-sitosterol, inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. These mechanisms include the effect of the phytochemicals on apoptosis, cell cycle progression, prostaglandin synthesis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Prostaglandins have been known to play a role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. PC-3 cells were supplemented with 50 microM resveratrol or 16 microM beta-sitosterol alone or in combination for up to 5 days. Phytochemical supplementation resulted in inhibition in cell growth. beta-Sitosterol was more potent than resveratrol and the combination of the two resulted in greater inhibition than supplementation with either alone. Long-term supplementation with resveratrol or beta-sitosterol elevated basal prostaglandin release but beta-sitosterol was much more potent than resveratrol in this regard. beta-Sitosterol was more effective than resveratrol in inducing apoptosis and the combination had an intermediate effect after 1 day of supplementation. Cells supplemented with resveratrol were arrested at the G1 phase and at the G2/M phase in the case of beta-sitosterol while the combination resulted in cell arrest at the two phases of the cell cycle. beta-Sitosterol increased ROS production while resveratrol decreased ROS production. The combination of the two phytochemicals resulted in an intermediate level of ROS. The observed changes in prostaglandin levels and ROS production by these two phytochemicals may suggest their mediation in the growth inhibition. The reduction in ROS level and increase by resveratrol supplementation in PC-3 cells reflects the antioxidant properties of resveratrol. It was concluded that these phytochemicals may induce the inhibition of tumor growth by stimulating apoptosis and arresting cells at different locations in the cell cycle and the mechanism may involve alterations in

  8. PED/PEA-15 induces autophagy and mediates TGF-beta1 effect on muscle cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, S; Oriente, F; Botta, G; Cabaro, S; Iovane, V; Paciello, O; Viggiano, D; Perruolo, G; Formisano, P; Beguinot, F

    2012-07-01

    TGF-beta1 has been shown to induce autophagy in certain cells but whether and how this action is exerted in muscle and whether this activity relates to TGF-beta1 control of muscle cell differentiation remains unknown. Here, we show that expression of the autophagy-promoting protein phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15) progressively declines during L6 and C2C12 skeletal muscle cell differentiation. PED/PEA-15 underwent rapid induction upon TGF-beta1 exposure of L6 and C2C12 myoblasts, accompanied by impaired differentiation into mature myotubes. TGF-beta1 also induced autophagy in the L6 and C2C12 cells through a PP2A/FoxO1-mediated mechanism. Both the TGF-beta1 effect on differentiation and that on autophagy were blocked by specific PED/PEA-15 ShRNAs. Myoblasts stably overexpressing PED/PEA-15 did not differentiate and showed markedly enhanced autophagy. In these same cells, the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine rescued TGF-beta1 effect on both autophagy and myogenesis, indicating that PED/PEA-15 mediates TGF-beta1 effects in muscle. Muscles from transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 featured a significant number of atrophic fibers, accompanied by increased light chain 3 (LC3)II to LC3I ratio and reduced PP2A/FoxO1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, these mice showed significantly impaired locomotor activity compared with their non-transgenic littermates. TGF-beta1 causes transcriptional upregulation of the autophagy-promoting gene PED/PEA-15, which in turn is capable to induce atrophic responses in skeletal muscle in vivo.

  9. The effect of concrete floor roughness on bovine claws using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, A; Verhegghe, B; De Belie, N

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between bovine claws and a concrete floor with defined roughness and friction coefficients is described using a finite element model. The model was built by using x-ray tomography scanner images of an unloaded fore and hind bovine claw. These images were used to reproduce the geometry of the claw horn capsule, which was used to create a finite element model. Young's moduli of 382, 261, and 13.6 MPa were attributed to the dorsal wall horn, abaxial and axial wall horn, and bulb horn, respectively. Poisson's ratio was set at 0.38. The horn was considered an isotropic elastic material. The model was completed by introducing a rigid support that simulated a concrete floor. The floor was moved to establish contact with the claw and was loaded with a force of 2 or 6 kN. The top border area of the horn capsule was fixed, but angular rotations were allowed. With this model, the effect of varying floor roughness and claw-floor friction on contact pressures and von Mises stresses in the claw horn could be evaluated. This was demonstrated by simulating the contact between the claw models and a smooth and rough floor with a center-line roughness value R(a) of 0 or 0.175 mm, respectively, either without friction or with a static coefficient of friction of 0.75 and a dynamic coefficient of friction of 0.65. Contact pressures ranged from 2.14 to 27.55 MPa. The roughness of the floor was the main determinant in subsequent contact pressures. Maximum von Mises stresses were registered in the claw sole and were mostly between 5.04 and 16.44 MPa, but could be higher in specific situations. The variables claw (fore or hind) and floor (smooth or rough) had significant effects on the contact pressures; in addition, the floor resulted in significantly different von Mises stresses in the claw horn. The variable friction (frictionless or with friction) had a significant effect on the von Mises stresses. The load did not result in significantly different contact pressures and

  10. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  11. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  12. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, Can A.; Koopman, Bart H.F.J.M.; Grootenboer, Henk J.; Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to al

  13. Finite size effects in the presence of a chemical potential: A study in the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of a chemical potential, the physics of level crossings leads to singularities at zero temperature, even when the spatial volume is finite. These singularities are smoothed out at a finite temperature but leave behind nontrivial finite size effects which must be understood in order to extract thermodynamic quantities using Monte Carlo methods, particularly close to critical points. We illustrate some of these issues using the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model with a coupling β and chemical potential μ on a 2+1-dimensional Euclidean lattice. In the conventional formulation this model suffers from a sign problem at nonzero chemical potential and hence cannot be studied with the Wolff cluster algorithm. However, when formulated in terms of the worldline of particles, the sign problem is absent, and the model can be studied efficiently with the “worm algorithm.” Using this method we study the finite size effects that arise due to the chemical potential and develop an effective quantum mechanical approach to capture the effects. As a side result we obtain energy levels of up to four particles as a function of the box size and uncover a part of the phase diagram in the (β,μ) plane.

  14. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, C.A.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to

  15. The finite size effect of galaxies on the cosmic virial theorem and the pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Suto, Y; Suto, Yasushi; Jing, Yi-Peng

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the finite size of galaxies on estimating small-scale relative pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions from the cosmic virial theorem (CVT). Specifically we evaluate the effect by incorporating the finite core radius $r_c$ in the two-point correlation function of mass, i.e. softening $r_s$ on small scales. We analytically obtain the lowest-order correction term for $\\gamma 2$. Compared with the idealistic point-mass approximation ($r_s=r_c=0$), the finite size effect can significantly reduce the small-scale velocity dispersions of galaxies at scales much larger than $r_s$ and $r_c$. Even without considering the finite size of galaxies, nonzero values for $r_c$ are generally expected, for instance, for cold dark matter (CDM) models with a scale-invariant primordial spectrum. For these CDM models, a reasonable force softening $r_s\\le 100 \\hikpc$ would have rather tiny effect. We present the CVT predictions for the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion in the CDM models normalized by t...

  16. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  17. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  18. Magnetic field effects on the static quark potential at zero and finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Mariti, Marco; Mesiti, Michele; Negro, Francesco; Rucci, Andrea; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the static Q Q ¯ potential at zero and finite temperature in the presence of a constant and uniform external magnetic field B →, for several values of the lattice spacing and for different orientations with respect to B →. As a byproduct, we provide continuum limit extrapolated results for the string tension, the Coulomb coupling and the Sommer parameter at T =0 and B =0 . We confirm the presence in the continuum of a B -induced anisotropy, regarding essentially the string tension, for which it is of the order of 15% at |e |B ˜1 GeV2 and would suggest, if extrapolated to larger fields, a vanishing string tension along the magnetic field for |e |B ≳4 GeV2. The angular dependence for |e |B ≲1 GeV2 can be nicely parametrized by the first allowed term in an angular Fourier expansion, corresponding to a quadrupole deformation. Finally, for T ≠0 , the main effect of the magnetic field is a general suppression of the string tension, leading to a early loss of the confining properties: this happens even before the appearance of inverse magnetic catalysis in the chiral condensate, supporting the idea that the influence of the magnetic field on the confining properties is the leading effect originating the decrease of Tc as a function of B .

  19. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Crack Depth and Crack Opening On the Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the effect of crack depth and opening on the girder, finite element method (FEM has been used in this paper. In FE analysis, six nodded two dimensional plane elements (PLANE-2 are considered. Each node has two degree of freedom such as UX and UY. For the plane elements, a plane stress width/thickness option is chosen. For analytical model of crack of the concrete bridge girder, crack opening was increased from 0.2 mm to 1mm at an interval 0.2 mm and crack depth also increased from 30 mm to 150 mm at an interval 30 mm. The models were discreatized by a triangular mesh and convergence test was executed to obtain satisfactory results from the Plane-2 element. From the numerical result, it is seen that the principal stress become a higher with increased the crack depth and also crack opening with respect to load increasing. But the crack depth at 90 mm and crack opening at 0.6 mm, it has more effect on the girder because the stress concentration is higher than other crack depth and opening.

  20. Unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain methods for modeling the Sagnac effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitski, Roman; Scheuer, Jacob; Steinberg, Ben Z

    2013-02-01

    We present two unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods for modeling the Sagnac effect in rotating optical microsensors. The methods are based on the implicit Crank-Nicolson scheme, adapted to hold in the rotating system reference frame-the rotating Crank-Nicolson (RCN) methods. The first method (RCN-2) is second order accurate in space whereas the second method (RCN-4) is fourth order accurate. Both methods are second order accurate in time. We show that the RCN-4 scheme is more accurate and has better dispersion isotropy. The numerical results show good correspondence with the expression for the classical Sagnac resonant frequency splitting when using group refractive indices of the resonant modes of a microresonator. Also we show that the numerical results are consistent with the perturbation theory for the rotating degenerate microcavities. We apply our method to simulate the effect of rotation on an entire Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguide (CROW) consisting of a set of coupled microresonators. Preliminary results validate the formation of a rotation-induced gap at the center of a transfer function of a CROW.

  1. Finite cell-size effects on protein variability in Turing patterned tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buceta, Javier

    2017-08-01

    Herein we present a framework to characterize different sources of protein expression variability in Turing patterned tissues. In this context, we introduce the concept of granular noise to account for the unavoidable fluctuations due to finite cell-size effects and show that the nearest-neighbours autocorrelation function provides the means to measure it. To test our findings, we perform in silico experiments of growing tissues driven by a generic activator-inhibitor dynamics. Our results show that the relative importance of different sources of noise depends on the ratio between the characteristic size of cells and that of the pattern domains and on the ratio between the pattern amplitude and the effective intensity of the biochemical fluctuations. Importantly, our framework provides the tools to measure and distinguish different stochastic contributions during patterning: granularity versus biochemical noise. In addition, our analysis identifies the protein species that buffer the stochasticity the best and, consequently, it can help to determine key instructive signals in systems driven by a Turing instability. Altogether, we expect our study to be relevant in developmental processes leading to the formation of periodic patterns in tissues. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Effects of Frequency and Acceleration Amplitude on Osteoblast Mechanical Vibration Responses: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone cells are deformed according to mechanical stimulation they receive and their mechanical characteristics. However, how osteoblasts are affected by mechanical vibration frequency and acceleration amplitude remains unclear. By developing 3D osteoblast finite element (FE models, this study investigated the effect of cell shapes on vibration characteristics and effect of acceleration (vibration intensity on vibrational responses of cultured osteoblasts. Firstly, the developed FE models predicted natural frequencies of osteoblasts within 6.85–48.69 Hz. Then, three different levels of acceleration of base excitation were selected (0.5, 1, and 2 g to simulate vibrational responses, and acceleration of base excitation was found to have no influence on natural frequencies of osteoblasts. However, vibration response values of displacement, stress, and strain increased with the increase of acceleration. Finally, stress and stress distributions of osteoblast models under 0.5 g acceleration in Z-direction were investigated further. It was revealed that resonance frequencies can be a monotonic function of cell height or bottom area when cell volumes and material properties were assumed as constants. These findings will be useful in understanding how forces are transferred and influence osteoblast mechanical responses during vibrations and in providing guidance for cell culture and external vibration loading in experimental and clinical osteogenesis studies.

  3. Effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Hyungoo

    2013-11-01

    For studies on particle-laden flows involving particle transport and dispersion, the prediction capability of hydrodynamic forces on the particle in a non-uniform flow is one of the central issues. However, existing analytical expressions and empirical correlations are mainly made based on the homogeneous flow conditions such as uniform or uniform shear flows. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers. To do so, we perform direct numerical simulations of flow over a sphere in an inhomogeneous flow. In this study, we consider three different kinds of the inhomogeneous flows: cosine, hyperbolic cosine and hyperbolic secant profiles. The Reynolds number of the sphere based on the freestream velocity and sphere diameter is 100. The present simulations show that the quasi-steady drag forces in inhomogeneous flows are reasonably estimated by standard drag law based on the relative velocity if the fluid velocity seen by the particle is evaluated by surface average. The results support Loth and Dorgan (2009)'s proposed formula. In the final presentation, the effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces would be presented in more detail.

  4. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold n......). Below that critical size, finite-size effects can be observed, and we show those to be related to variations in the local atomic structure augmented by quantum size effects for the smallest clusters.......We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...... nanoparticles ranging from 13 to 1,415 atoms, or 0.8–3.7 nm, have been made possible by exploiting massively parallel computing on up to 32,768 cores on the Blue Gene/P computer at Argonne National Laboratory. We show that bulk surface properties are obtained for clusters larger than ca. 560 atoms (2.7 nm...

  5. Low-energy effective field theory for finite-temperature relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action governing the infrared dynamics of relativistic superfluids at finite temperature. We organize our derivation in an effective field theory fashion-purely in terms of infrared degrees of freedom and symmetries. Our degrees of freedom are the superfluid phase \\psi, and the comoving coordinates for the volume elements of the normal fluid component. The presence of two sound modes follows straightforwardly from Taylor-expanding the action at second order in small perturbations. We match our description to more conventional hydrodynamical ones, thus linking the functional form of our Lagrangian to the equation of state, which we assume as an input. We re-derive in our language some standard properties of relativistic superfluids in the high-temperature and low-temperature limits. As an illustration of the efficiency of our methods, we compute the cross-section for a sound wave (of either type) scattering off a superfluid vortex at temperatures right beneath the critical on...

  6. Finite-size effect and Kondo screening effect in an A-B ring with a quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Shao-Quan; Wang Shun-Jin; Sun Wei-Li; Yu Wan-Lun

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the ground state of a closed dot-ring system with a magnetic flux in the Kondo regime are studied theoretically by means of a one-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is solved by means of the slave-boson mean-field theory. It is shown that at T=0, a suppressed Kondo effect exists in this system even when the mean level spacing of electrons in the ring is larger than the bulk Kondo temperature. The physical quantities depend sensitively on both the parity of the system and the size of the ring; the rich physical behaviour can be attributed to the coexistence of both the finite-size effect and the Kondo screening effect. It is also possible to detect the Kondo screening cloud by measuring the persistent current or the zero field impurity susceptibility Ximp directly in future experiments.

  7. Marked effect of beta-lactoglobulin polymorphism on the ratio of casein to total protein in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundén, A; Nilsson, M; Janson, L

    1997-11-01

    The relationship between genetic variants for milk protein and the composition of milk was analyzed on 4475 repeated milk samples from individual cows; 371 dairy cows of the Swedish Red and White breed and 204 cows of the Swedish Holstein breed were used. The registrations included percentages of casein, protein, fat, and lactose in combination with milk yield and SCC. The genotype of individual cows for alpha(s1)-CN, beta-CN, kappa-CN, and beta-LG was determined by alkaline and acidic PAGE. A mixed animal model was used for the analysis; beta-LG and aggregate casein genotypes were included simultaneously as separate fixed effects in the statistical model. The results suggest a positive additive effect of the beta-LG B allele on casein content and on the ratio of casein to total protein. For the latter trait, the beta-LG genotype accounted for a relatively large part of the phenotypic variance, corresponding to a reduction in residual variance of 11% when included in the model. The corresponding value for casein content was 0.5%. The lack of unfavorable associations between milk protein variants and the traits included in this study makes the beta-LG gene an obvious candidate when the breeding objective is improved conversion of milk protein into cheese.

  8. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (Pniacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  9. Effect of friction at the walls of MHD channel on the flow for finite Rm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrent' ev, I.V.; Sidorenkov, S.I.

    1986-10-01

    A method to prove the fact that the string tension sigma in strongly coupled lattice gauge theories is of the form sigma = -log ..beta..+sigma is an analytic function of the inverse coupling ..beta.. = 1/g/sup 2/, is presented. Its relation to random surface methods, in particular to the work of Debrushin and Holicky-acute-accent, Kotecky-acute-accent, and Zahradnik, is discussed.

  10. The effects of beta-blockers on dobutamine-atropine stress echocardiography: early protocol versus standard protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitzel Luis H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the effects of Beta-blockers during Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography (DSE comparing the hemodynamic benefits of an early administration of atropine in patients taking or not Beta-blockers. Methods One hundred and twenty-one patients were submitted to dobutamine stress echocardiography for the investigation of myocardial ischemia. The administration of atropine was randomized into two groups: A or B (early protocol when atropine was administered at 10 and 20 mcg/kg/min of dobutamine, respectively and C (standard protocol with atropine at 40 mcg/kg/min of dobutamine. Analysis of the effects of Beta-blockers was done regarding the behavior pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, test time, number of conclusive and inconclusive (negative sub-maximum test results, total doses of atropine and dobutamine, and general complications. Results Beta-blocked patients who received early atropine (Group A&B had a significantly lower double product (p = 0.008, a higher mean test time (p = 0.010 and required a higher dose of atropine (p = 0.0005 when compared to the patients in this group who were not Beta-blocked. The same findings occurred in the standard protocol (Group C, however the early administration of atropine reduced test time both in the presence and absence of this therapy (p = 0.0001. The patients with Beta-blockers in Group A&B had a lower rate of inconclusive tests (26% compared to those in Group C (40%. Complications were similar in both groups. Conclusion The chronotropic response during dobutamine stress echocardiography was significantly reduced with the use of Beta-blockers. The early administration of atropine optimized the hemodynamic response, reduced test time in patients with or without Beta-blockers and reduced the number of inconclusive tests in the early protocol.

  11. Effect of sterilization on the properties of CDHA-OCP-beta-TCP biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreley Morejón-Alonso

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the method of sterilization on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of a new bone repairing material was studied. The material was obtained by thermal hydrolysis of beta-tricalcium phosphate/orthophosphoric acid cement and was composed of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate (OCP, and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Partial decomposition of the OCP was observed after sterilization for the three methods. Decomposition increased to the following sequence of sterilization methods: ethylene oxide; autoclaving; dry oven. On the other hand, mechanical strength decreased with regard to non sterilized material in the sterilization sequence: ethylene oxide; dry oven; autoclaving. The compressive strength was 8.5 ± 1.0; 9.0 ± 1.2; 8.2 ± 0.8 and 6.5 ± 1.0 MPa, whereas diametral tensile strength was 2.1 ± 0.3; 2.5 ± 0.1; 1.9 ± 0.9 and 1.6 ± 0.3 for the material sterilized by ethylene oxide, dry oven, and autoclaving, respectively. Several compositional and microstuctural changes were detected after dry heat and autoclave sterilization. Ethylene oxide sterilization had lesser effect on the chemical composition and strength than dry heat and autoclaving.

  12. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  13. Effects of cranberry juice on pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics following oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Andrew, Marilee A; Wang, Joanne; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Grady, Richard W; Phillips, Brian; Shen, Danny D; Anderson, Gail D

    2009-07-01

    Cranberry juice consumption is often recommended along with low-dose oral antibiotics for prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Because multiple membrane transporters are involved in the intestinal absorption and renal excretion of beta-lactam antibiotics, we evaluated the potential risk of pharmacokinetic interactions between cranberry juice and the beta-lactams amoxicillin (amoxicilline) and cefaclor. The amoxicillin-cranberry juice interaction was investigated in 18 healthy women who received on four separate occasions a single oral test dose of amoxicillin at 500 mg and 2 g with or without cranberry juice cocktail (8 oz) according to a crossover design. A parallel cefaclor-cranberry juice interaction study was also conducted in which 500 mg cefaclor was administered with or without cranberry juice cocktail (12 oz). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and nonlinear mixed-effects compartmental modeling. We conclude that the concurrent use of cranberry juice has no significant effect on the extent of oral absorption or the renal clearance of amoxicillin and cefaclor. However, delays in the absorption of amoxicillin and cefaclor were observed. These results suggest that the use of cranberry juice at usual quantities as prophylaxis for UTI is not likely to alter the pharmacokinetics of these two oral antibiotics.

  14. Thermodynamic Effect of Platinum Addition to beta-NiAl: An Initial Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    An initial investigation was conducted to determine the effect of platinum addition on the activities of aluminum and nickel in beta-NiAl(Pt) over the temperature range 1354 to 1692 K. These measurements were made with a multiple effusion-cell configured mass spectrometer (multi-cell KEMS). The results of this study show that Pt additions act to decreased alpha(Al) and increased the alpha(Ni) in beta-NiAl(Pt) for constant X(sub Ni)/X(sub Al) approx. = 1.13, while at constant X(sub Al) the affect of Pt on Al is greatly reduced. The measured partial enthalpies of mixing indicate Al-atoms have a strong self interaction while Ni- and Pt-atoms in have similar interactions with Al-atoms. Conversely the binding of Ni-atoms in beta-NiAl decreases with Pt addition independent of Al concentration. These initial results prove the technique can be applied to the Ni-Al-Pt system but more activity measurements are required to fully understand the thermodynamics of this system and how Pt additions improved the scaling behavior of nickel-based superalloys. In addition, with the choice of a suitable oxide material for the effusion-cell, the "closed" isothermal nature of the effusion-cell allows the direct investigation of an alloy-oxide equilibrium which resembles the "local-equilibrium" description of the metal-scale interface observed during high temperature oxidation. It is proposed that with an Al(l) + Al2O3(s) experimental reference state together with the route measurement of the relative partial-pressures of Al(g) and Al2O(g) allows the activities of O and Al2O3 to be determined along with the activities of Ni and Al. These measurements provide a direct method of investigating the thermodynamics of the metal-scale interface of a TGO-scale.

  15. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H. Henry

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. PMID:27226540

  16. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H Henry

    2016-07-08

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  17. A study on the optimization of finite volume effects of B K in lattice QCD by using the CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Cho, Kihyeon

    2015-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the non-perturbative implementation of field theory to solve the QCD theory of quarks and gluons by using the Feynman path integral approach. We calculate the kaon CP (charge-parity) violation parameter B K generally arising in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. Because lattice simulations are performed on finite volume lattices, the finite volume effects must be considered to exactly estimate the systematic error. The computational cost of numerical simulations may increase dramatically as the lattice spacing is decreased. Therefore, lattice QCD calculations must be optimized to account for the finite volume effects. The methodology used in this study was to develop an algorithm to parallelize the code by using a graphic processing unit (GPU) and to optimize the code to achieve as close to the theoretical peak performance as possible. The results revealed that the calculation speed of the newly-developed algorithm is significantly improved compared with that of the current algorithm for the finite volume effects.

  18. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, Leticia F; Kodama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    We discuss how the finiteness of the system created in a heavy-ion collision affects possible signatures of the QCD critical endpoint. We show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current heavy-ion collisions and address the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint.

  19. Pharmacologic inhibition of the TGF-beta type I receptor kinase has anabolic and anti-catabolic effects on bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S Mohammad

    Full Text Available During development, growth factors and hormones cooperate to establish the unique sizes, shapes and material properties of individual bones. Among these, TGF-beta has been shown to developmentally regulate bone mass and bone matrix properties. However, the mechanisms that control postnatal skeletal integrity in a dynamic biological and mechanical environment are distinct from those that regulate bone development. In addition, despite advances in understanding the roles of TGF-beta signaling in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the net effects of altered postnatal TGF-beta signaling on bone remain unclear. To examine the role of TGF-beta in the maintenance of the postnatal skeleton, we evaluated the effects of pharmacological inhibition of the TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI kinase on bone mass, architecture and material properties. Inhibition of TbetaRI function increased bone mass and multiple aspects of bone quality, including trabecular bone architecture and macro-mechanical behavior of vertebral bone. TbetaRI inhibitors achieved these effects by increasing osteoblast differentiation and bone formation, while reducing osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Furthermore, they induced the expression of Runx2 and EphB4, which promote osteoblast differentiation, and ephrinB2, which antagonizes osteoclast differentiation. Through these anabolic and anti-catabolic effects, TbetaRI inhibitors coordinate changes in multiple bone parameters, including bone mass, architecture, matrix mineral concentration and material properties, that collectively increase bone fracture resistance. Therefore, TbetaRI inhibitors may be effective in treating conditions of skeletal fragility.

  20. A Finite Model Property for Intersection Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Statman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the relational theory of intersection types known as BCD has the finite model property; that is, BCD is complete for its finite models. Our proof uses rewriting techniques which have as an immediate by-product the polynomial time decidability of the preorder <= (although this also follows from the so called beta soundness of BCD.

  1. Boundary Electron and Beta Dosimetry-Quantification of the Effects of Dissimilar Media on Absorbed Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Josane C.

    1991-02-01

    This work quantifies the changes effected in electron absorbed dose to a soft-tissue equivalent medium when part of this medium is replaced by a material that is not soft -tissue equivalent. That is, heterogeneous dosimetry is addressed. Radionuclides which emit beta particles are the electron sources of primary interest. They are used in brachytherapy and in nuclear medicine: for example, beta -ray applicators made with strontium-90 are employed in certain ophthalmic treatments and iodine-131 is used to test thyroid function. More recent medical procedures under development and which involve beta radionuclides include radioimmunotherapy and radiation synovectomy; the first is a cancer modality and the second deals with the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the possibility of skin surface contamination exists whenever there is handling of radioactive material. Determination of absorbed doses in the examples of the preceding paragraph requires considering boundaries of interfaces. Whilst the Monte Carlo method can be applied to boundary calculations, for routine work such as in clinical situations, or in other circumstances where doses need to be determined quickly, analytical dosimetry would be invaluable. Unfortunately, few analytical methods for boundary beta dosimetry exist. Furthermore, the accuracy of results from both Monte Carlo and analytical methods has to be assessed. Although restricted to one radionuclide, phosphorus -32, the experimental data obtained in this work serve several purposes, one of which is to provide standards against which calculated results can be tested. The experimental data also contribute to the relatively sparse set of published boundary dosimetry data. At the same time, they may be useful in developing analytical boundary dosimetry methodology. The first application of the experimental data is demonstrated. Results from two Monte Carlo codes and two analytical methods, which were developed elsewhere, are compared

  2. Finite-size effects and scaling for the thermal QCD deconfinementphase transition within the exact color-singlet partition function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladrem, M.; Ait-El-Djoudi, A. [Ecole Normale Superieure-Kouba, Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, B.P. 92, Vieux-Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-10-01

    We study the finite-size effects for the thermal quantum chromodynamics (QCD) deconfinement phase transition, and use a numerical finite-size scaling analysis to extract the scaling exponents characterizing its scaling behavior when approaching the thermodynamic limit (V{yields}{infinity}). For this, we use a simple model of coexistence of hadronic gas and color-singlet quark gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. The color-singlet partition function of the QGP cannot be exactly calculated and is usually derived within the saddle-point approximation. When we try to do calculations with such an approximate color-singlet partition function, a problem arises in the limit of small temperatures and/or volumes VT{sup 3}<<1, requiring additional approximations if we want to carry out calculations. We propose in this work a method for an accurate calculation of any quantity of the finite system, without any approximation. By probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature, it turns out that, in a finite-size system, all singularities in the thermodynamic limit are smeared out and the transition point is shifted away. A numerical finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of the obtained data allows us to determine the scaling exponents of the QCD deconfinement phase transition. Our results expressing the equality between their values and the space dimensionality is a consequence of the singularity characterizing a first-order phase transition and agree very well with the predictions of other FSS theoretical approaches to a first-order phase transition and with the results of calculations using Monte Carlo methods in both lattice QCD and statistical physics models. (orig.)

  3. The effect of anharmonicity in epitaxial interfaces. I. Substrate-induced dissociation of finite epitaxial islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchev, Andrey; Markov, Ivan

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of finite epitaxial islands in the periodic field of the substrate is theoretically investigated whereby the role of anharmonicity in the interatomic forces of the deposit is examined. The harmonic potential, traditionally adopted in the model of Frank and van der Merwe, is replaced by Toda and Morse potentials and sets of difference recursion equations, governing the static properties of such a system, are derived and solved numerically. Thus a new effect of substrate-induced rupture of anharmonic chains migrating on the surface, is found. It is shown that dissociation of migrating clusters is enhanced, if: (i) The substrate potential becomes increasingly modulated, (ii) the natural misfit between deposit and substrate is decreased (in absolute value), (iii) the misfit is negative, rather than positive (with the same absolute value) and (iv) the size of the cluster increases. A relation between dislocations in the chain and rupture appears to exist, suggesting dilatons (enormously stretched interatomic bonds) as the origin for destruction. The influence of anharmonicity on the equilibrium structure of the overgrowth is considered in Part II.

  4. Finite temperature effective action, AdS_5 black holes, and 1/N expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís; Liu, H; Wadia, S; Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Gomez, Cesar; Liu, Hong; Wadia, Spenta

    2005-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological matrix model to study string theory in AdS_5 \\times S_5 in the canonical ensemble. The model reproduces all the known qualitative features of the theory. In particular, it gives a simple effective potential description of Euclidean black hole nucleation and the tunnelling between thermal AdS and the big black hole. It also has some interesting predictions. We find that there exists a critical temperature at which the Euclidean small black hole undergoes a Gross-Witten phase transition. We identify the phase transition with the Horowitz-Polchinski point where the black hole horizon size becomes comparable to the string scale. The appearance of the Hagedorn divergence of thermal AdS is due to the merger of saddle points corresponding to the Euclidean small black hole and thermal AdS. The merger can be described in terms of a cusp (A_3) catastrophe and divergences at the perturbative string level are smoothed out at finite string coupling using standard techniques of catastrophe the...

  5. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  6. Logarithmic finite-size effects on interfacial free energies: Phenomenological theory and Monte Carlo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    The computation of interfacial free energies between coexisting phases (e.g., saturated vapor and liquid) by computer simulation methods is still a challenging problem due to the difficulty of an atomistic identification of an interface and interfacial fluctuations on all length scales. The approach to estimate the interfacial tension from the free-energy excess of a system with interfaces relative to corresponding single-phase systems does not suffer from the first problem but still suffers from the latter. Considering d-dimensional systems with interfacial area Ld -1 and linear dimension Lz in the direction perpendicular to the interface, it is argued that the interfacial fluctuations cause logarithmic finite-size effects of order ln(L)/Ld -1 and order ln(Lz)/Ld -1, in addition to regular corrections (with leading-order const/Ld -1). A phenomenological theory predicts that the prefactors of the logarithmic terms are universal (but depend on the applied boundary conditions and the considered statistical ensemble). The physical origin of these corrections are the translational entropy of the interface as a whole, "domain breathing" (coupling of interfacial fluctuations to the bulk order parameter fluctuations of the coexisting domains), and capillary waves. Using a new variant of the ensemble switch method, interfacial tensions are found from Monte Carlo simulations of d =2 and d =3 Ising models and a Lennard-Jones fluid. The simulation results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Finite-size effects in a metallic multichannel ring with Kondo impurity: Persistent currents and magnetoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvyagin, A.A. [B. I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, 47, Lenin Avenue, 310164, Kharkov (Ukraine); Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron {Gamma}{sub 8} into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect, or to the electron-assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential in an external magnetic field. Another possible realization could be a quantum dot coupled to two equal rings of the same length subject to an electrostatic potential difference. We consider the Bethe ansatz equations for this model and derive the tower structure of the finite-size corrections to the ground-state energy. These results are used to discuss the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference pattern in the persistent charge and spin currents, and the magnetoresistivity due to the scattering of electrons off the impurity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Effect of Stent Radial Force on Stress Pattern After Deployment: A Finite Element Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Murphy, Olive; Bahmanyar, Reza; McLeod, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The present article presents a method for assessing the radial stiffness of nitinol stents. An idealized stent model was created, and its radial stiffness was calculated by means of finite element modeling. The calculations were validated against experimental measurements. The variation of radial stiffness with geometrical dimensions was calculated, and the effect of increasing radial stiffness on endovascular deployment was analyzed. Peak tensile and compressive stresses as well as stent penetration were calculated in the case of an idealized pulmonary artery model having realistic dimensions as well as stiffness. The results of stress calculations were compared with a second set of simulations, where an idealized behavior of the stent (uniform expansion to a theoretical contact diameter) was modeled. The results show how in reality nitinol stents behave in a non-ideal way, having a non-uniform expansion and exerting non-uniform pressure on the contact areas with the artery. Such non-ideality decreases though with the increase in radial stiffness. The radial force alone may be insufficient in describing the stent-artery interaction, and numerical modeling proves to be necessary for capturing such complexity.

  9. Effects of cerium on Sn-Ag-Cu alloys based on finite element simulation and experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; XUE Songbai; CHEN Yan; HAN Zongjie; WANG Jianxin; YU Shenglin; LU Fangyan

    2009-01-01

    Effect of small addition of rare earth on Sn-Ag-Cu solder was investigated by finite element method based on creep model of low stress and high stress and experiments respectively. It was found that addition of rare earths evidently improved the resistance to creep deformation of the solder, so that the reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu-Ce solder joint could be improved remarkably. Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis results showed that, mechanical properties of alloys bearing Ce were better than that of the original alloy, and the optimum content of Ce was about 0.03wt.%. After aging intermetallic compound between solder joint and Cu substrate was observed and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDX). Results showed that the thickness of intermetallic compound layer would became thinner when the addition of Ce was about 0.03wt.%, and the grains of intermetallic compound became finer, and the microstructure was more homogeneous than that in the original Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu interface.

  10. Effect of finite magnetic film thickness on Néel coupling in spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kools, J. C. S.; Kula, W.; Mauri, Daniele; Lin, Tsann

    1999-04-01

    Spin valves are widely studied due to their application as magnetoresistive material in magnetic recording heads and other magnetic field sensors. An important film property is the interlayer coupling field (called offset field Ho or ferromagnetic coupling field Hf). It has been shown that the Néel model for orange-peel coupling can be applied successfully to describe this interlayer coupling. The waviness associated with the developing granular structure is thereby taken as the relevant waviness. The original Néel model describes the ferromagnetic magnetostatic interaction between two ferromagnetic layers, of infinite thickness, separated by a nonmagnetic spacer with a correlated interface waviness. In this article, this physical picture is refined to account for the effect of the finite thickness of the magnetic films in a spin valve. Magnetic poles created at the outer surfaces of the magnetic layers result in an antiferromagnetic interaction with the poles at the inner surface of the opposite layer. A simple model is presented for the different interactions in a top spin valve (columnar structure with cumulative waviness on a flat substrate) and for a bottom spin valve (columnar structure with conformal waviness on a way substrate). Comparison to experimental data, shows that the free and pinned layer thickness dependence can be understood from this refined picture.

  11. Axial anomaly effects in finite isospin $\\chi$PT in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Prabal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider finite isospin chiral perturbation theory including the effects of the axial anomaly (through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term) in a strong magnetic field. We firstly prove that in a strong external magnetic field ($H_{\\rm ext}$) or more precisely the Schwinger limit, where photon back-reactions are suppressed, only neutral pions can condense and the condensation of charged pions is forbidden. Secondly, we find that the $\\pi^{0}$ domain wall is an example of a phase that can exist in a strong magnetic field and suggest the existence of a new phase transition line from the normal vacuum state to the $\\pi^{0}$ domain wall state. This phase transition exists for non-zero pion masses if the baryon chemical potential exceeds a critical value $16\\pi f_{\\pi}^{2}m_{\\pi}/eH_{\\rm ext}$. The phase transition line persists away from the Schwinger limit when the photons can back-react to the external magnetic field.

  12. Effects of dose reduction on bone strength prediction using finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, D.; Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Mei, Kai; Kopp, Felix K.; Foehr, Peter; Noel, Peter B.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dose reduction, by means of tube exposure reduction, on bone strength prediction from finite-element (FE) analysis. Fresh thoracic mid-vertebrae specimens (n = 11) were imaged, using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), at different intensities of X-ray tube exposures (80, 150, 220 and 500 mAs). Bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from the mid-slice of each specimen from MDCT images. Differences in image quality and geometry of each specimen were measured. FE analysis was performed on all specimens to predict fracture load. Paired t-tests were used to compare the results obtained, using the highest CT dose (500 mAs) as reference. Dose reduction had no significant impact on FE-predicted fracture loads, with significant correlations obtained with reference to 500 mAs, for 80 mAs (R2  = 0.997, p analysis. Reduced CT dose will enable early diagnosis and advanced monitoring of osteoporosis and associated fracture risk.

  13. [Finite Element Analysis of Effect of Key Dimension of Nitinol Stent on Its Fatigue Behaviour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Shengzhang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the fatigue behavior of nitinol stents, we used the finite element method to simulate the manufacture processes of nitinol stents, including expanding, annealing, crimping, and releasing procedure in applications of the clinical treatments. Meanwhile, we also studied the effect of the crown area dimension of stent on strain distribution. We then applied a fatigue diagram to investigate the fatigue characteristics of nitinol stents. The results showed that the maximum strain of all three stent structures, which had different crown area dimensions under vessel loads, located at the transition area between the crown and the strut, but comparable deformation appeared at the inner side of the crown area center. The cause, of these results was that the difference of the area moment of inertia determined by the crown dimension induced the difference of strain distribution in stent structure. Moreover, it can be drawn from the fatigue diagrams that the fatigue performance got the best result when the crown area dimension equaled to the intermediate value. The above results proved that the fatigue property of nitinol stent had a close relationship with the dimension of stent crown area, but there was no positive correlation.

  14. Tuning surface reactivity by finite size effects: role of orbital symmetry in the d - band model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Paul; Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino; Weitering, Hanno

    Catalytic activity depends sensitively on the strength of the interactions between reactant molecules and catalyst surface: too weak and the catalyst cannot capture enough molecules to react; too strong and the reaction products do not desorb, blocking further reactions. The ability to control the binding strength of molecules to metal surfaces is thus fundamental to the design of efficient and selective catalysts. Catalyst design often relies on increasing the interaction strength on relatively non-reactive materials by introducing active sites. Here, we present a complementary approach: we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time. While bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, we find that Pd films thinner than 6 atom layers are surprisingly inert to oxidation. This observation can be explained with the d-band model only when it is applied to the orbitals directly involved in the bonding. The insight into orbital specific contributions to surface reactivity could be useful in the design of catalysts. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  15. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on isokinetic force and cycling performance in highly trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Samuel T; Bellinger, Phillip M; Driller, Matthew W; Shing, Cecilia M; Fell, James W

    2013-12-01

    Beta-alanine may benefit short-duration, high-intensity exercise performance. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to examine the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on aspects of muscular performance in highly trained cyclists. Sixteen highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 7 yr; mass = 70 ± 7 kg; VO2max = 67 ± 4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) supplemented with either beta-alanine (n = 8, 65 mg · kg - 1BM) or a placebo (n = 8; dextrose monohydrate) over 4 weeks. Pre- and postsupplementation cyclists performed a 4-minute maximal cycling test to measure average power and 30 reciprocal maximal isokinetic knee contractions at a fixed angular velocity of 180° · sec(-1) to measure average power/repetition, total work done (TWD), and fatigue index (%). Blood pH, lactate (La-) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were measured pre- and postisokinetic testing at baseline and following the supplementation period. Beta-alanine supplementation was 44% likely to increase average power output during the 4-minute cycling time trial when compared with the placebo, although this was not statistically significant (p = .25). Isokinetic average power/repetition was significantly increased post beta-alanine supplementation compared with placebo (beta-alanine: 6.8 ± 9.9 W, placebo: -4.3 ± 9.5 W, p = .04, 85% likely benefit), while fatigue index was significantly reduced (p = .03, 95% likely benefit). TWD was 89% likely to be improved following beta-alanine supplementation; however, this was not statistically significant (p = .09). There were no significant differences in blood pH, lactate, and HCO3- between groups (p > .05). Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation resulted in worthwhile changes in time-trial performance and short-duration muscular force production in highly trained cyclists.

  16. Absorption, by humans, of beta-carotene from fortified soybean oil added to rice: effect of heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra-de-Oliveira, J E; Fávaro, R M; Leonardo, I R; Jordão Júnior, A A; Vannucchi, H

    1998-08-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the absorption of beta-carotene in humans when rice is prepared with refined cooking soybean oil fortified with beta-carotene and to assess the effect of heat treatment on its bioavailability. Sixteen healthy adults subjects participated in two experimental trials. Studies were carried out during two experimental periods of 11 days with a 12-day interval between them. Beta carotene was added to the soybean cooking oil and rice was cooked with it or it was added to the rice after cooking. Experimental diets included these two kinds of rice during the first day and fasting blood samples were collected on different days. All of the test diets were low in carotenoids. Plasma carotenoids were measured by HPLC method. beta-carotene absorption was calculated through postabsorptive peak rise in plasma beta-carotene and the total area under the absorption curve was determined by the trapezoidal method for the 11-day period. Absorption of carotene from heated or unheated fortified soybean oil were similar. Peak plasma carotene rise was different in men and women, p oil used in the preparation of rice is absorbed, heated or not, and could be a practical source of provitamin A. Developing countries looking for strategies to increase vitamin A intake could use fortification of vegetable oils with synthetic beta-carotene as a simple method.

  17. Few active mechanisms of the neutrinoless double beta-decay and effective mass of Majorana neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that there exist many mechanisms that may contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay (0nbb-decay). By exploiting the fact that the associated nuclear matrix elements are target dependent we show that, given definite experimental results on a sufficient number of targets, one can determine or sufficiently constrain all lepton violating parameters including the mass term. As a specific example we show that, assuming the observation of the 0nbb-decay in three different nuclei, e.g., 76Ge, 100Mo and 130Te, and just three lepton number violating mechanisms (light and heavy neutrino mass mechanisms as well as R-parity breaking SUSY mechanism) being active, there are only four different solutions for the lepton violating parameters, provided that they are relatively real. In particular, assuming evidence of the 0nbb-decay of 76Ge, the effective neutrino Majorana mass |m_bb| can be almost uniquely extracted by utilizing other existing constraints (cosmological observations and tritium beta-decay ex...

  18. Effects of cytostatic drugs on plasma level and renal excretion of beta-acetyldigoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, J; Zilly, W; Wilke, J

    1981-10-01

    Mucosal defects decrease digoxin absorption in patients with malabsorption syndromes. Since the intestinal mucosa can be damaged by cytostatic drugs, we investigated their effects on digoxin plasma levels and urinary digoxin excretion. In six patients with malignant lymphoma who received 0.8 mg beta-acetyldigoxin before and 24 hr after treatment with a combination of cyclophosphamide, oncovin, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) or cyclophosphamide, oncovin, and prednisone (COP), plasma digoxin concentrations were measured 0 to 8 hr after the dose and areas under the plasma concentration-time curves were calculated. In 15 patients on 0.3 mg of beta-acetyldigoxin daily, plasma glycoside concentrations and renal excretion were measured daily before and after COPP, COP, cyclophosphamide, oncovin, cytosine-arabinosine, and prednisone (COAP), or adriamycin, bleomycin, and prednisone (ABP) treatment schemes. The diminished steady-state glycoside plasma concentrations and daily renal glycoside excretion during the 24 to 168 hr after the cytostatic drug established reversible impairment of digoxin absorption. The delayed time to peak after a single dose of digoxin during cytostatic drug therapy shows that extent and rate of digoxin absorption are reduced. To maintain adequate control of digoxin therapy in patients treated with cytostatic drugs, plasma levels should be monitored.

  19. Beta radiation effects in sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs-substituted pollucite

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, N J; Conradson, S D; Weber, W J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of high-energy beta radiation on the long-range and local structure of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs-substituted CsAlSi sub 2 O sub 6 (pollucite) was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques at the Cs K-edge. Analysis of the XRD pattern of pollucite with an absorbed dose of 10 sup 1 sup 8 beta decays/g using Rietveld analysis indicates a 0.5-1% volume expansion of the tetrahedral structure as measured at 50 K and a minor displacement of the Cs cation toward the face of one of the six-membered rings. Analysis of the real-space pair-distribution function obtained from Fourier transformation of the diffraction pattern indicates significant correlated movement of the (Si,Al)-O pairs and large static disorder between Cs-O pairs. Analysis of the Cs K-edge XAS revealed substantial contributions from the Cs atomic X-ray absorption. This likely results from the exceedingly long Cs-O bond distances in the pollucite structure, which diminish the fine structure of the XAS os...

  20. Does TGF Beta Suppressing Effect of Simvastatin Lead to Protection Against Surgical Adhesion Band Formation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Shahabuddin Hoseini

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal adhesions are the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Infertility in women and chronic abdominal-pelvic pain are the other problems of adhesiogenesis which impose a great economic burden on the population health. On the other hand, increased levels of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β are shown to play a role in formation of adhesion bands and can impair peritoneal fibrinolysis. Moreover, simvastatin, an immunomodulator agent, can down-regulate TGF-β. Although it is shown in previous studies that simvastatin antagonizes the interaction between TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, no human study exists on the effect of simvastatin on surgical adhesion band formation. We hypothesize that simvastatin, through its effect on reducing the level of TGF-β, may be useful in preventing adhesion band formation after surgical procedures. Surely, this hypothesis should be assessed in several experimental and clinical trials.

  1. Quantification of Randomly-methylated-{beta}-cyclodextrin effect on liposome: An ESR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammenos, A., E-mail: A.Grammenos@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, Institute of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Bahri, M.A.; Guelluy, P.H. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, Institute of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Piel, G. [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, CHU, B36, University of Liege, 1 Av. de l' Hopital, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, Institute of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2009-12-04

    In the present work, the effect of Randomly-methylated-{beta}-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on the microviscosity of dimyristoyl-L-{alpha} phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer was investigated using the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The ability of Rameb to extract membrane cholesterol was demonstrated. For the first time, the percentage of cholesterol extracted by Rameb from cholesterol doped DMPC bilayer was monitored and quantified throughout a wide Rameb concentration range. The effect of cholesterol on the inner part of the membrane was also investigated using 16-doxyl stearic acid spin label (16-DSA). 16-DSA seems to explore two different membrane domains and report their respective microviscosities. ESR experiments also establish that the presence of 30% of cholesterol in DMPC liposomes suppresses the jump in membrane fluidity at lipids phase-transition temperature (23.9 {sup o}C).

  2. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Gray, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from /sup 147/Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from /sup 90/Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Industrial Catalysis%Effects of beta nucleating agent on mechanical properties of polypropylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽; 王文燕; 张怀志; 侯雅丽

    2016-01-01

    通过在抗冲聚丙烯基础树脂中添加自主研制的酰胺型高效β成核剂,在升高聚丙烯耐热温度的同时有效提高聚丙烯树脂EPS30 R的冲击强度,研究酰胺型β成核剂PA-01、TMB-5和FB-1添加量对聚丙烯树脂EPS30 R力学性能的影响,通过微观形态分析增韧的内在原因,并考察成核剂对聚丙烯树脂EPS30 R的成核效果。结果表明,添加β成核剂后,聚丙烯的力学性能明显改善,且β成核剂诱导聚丙烯的成核效果较好。%By adding self-developed high-efficiency amide β nucleating agents into impact polypropylene base resin,the heat resistance temperature of polypropylene was improved and meanwhile the impact strength of polypropylene resin EPS30R was also effectively improved. The effects of the amounts of amideβnucleating agents PA-01 ,TMB-5 and FB-1 on the mechanical properties of polypropylene resin EPS30 R were researched by microscopic morphological analysis of toughening internal causes. The influence of nucleating agent on nucleating effect of polypropylene resin EPS30R was also investigated. The results showed that after adding beta nucleating agent,the mechanical properties of polypropylene were improved obviously,and nucleating effect of polypropylene induced by beta nucleating agent was better.

  4. Antiremodeling effects on the left ventricle during beta-blockade with metoprolol in the treatment of chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønning, Bjørn Aaris; Nilsson, J C; Sondergaard, Lars

    2000-01-01

    index remained unchanged, whereas LV mass index decreased in both groups (175 g/m2 to 160 g/m2 in the placebo group [p = 0.005] and 179 g/m2 to 164 g/m2 in the metoprolol CR/XL group [p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first randomized study to demonstrate that the beta1-blocker metoprolol CR......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of beta1-blockade on left ventricular (LV) size and function for patients with chronic heart failure. BACKGROUND: Large-scale trials have shown that a marked decrease in mortality can be obtained by treatment of chronic heart...... failure with beta-adrenergic blocking agents. Possible mechanisms behind this effect remain yet to be fully elucidated, and previous studies have presented insignificant results regarding suspected LV antiremodeling effects. METHODS: In this randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blind substudy...

  5. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  6. Finite unified theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondragon, M [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico 01000 D.F. (Mexico); Zoupanos, G, E-mail: myriam@fisica.unam.m, E-mail: zoupanos@mail.cern.c [Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus: Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou, Athens (Greece)

    2009-06-01

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 GUTs in which a complete reduction of couplings has been achieved. FUTs realize an old field theoretical dream and have remarkable predictive power. Reduction of dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exists RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of the beta-functions in certain N=1 supersymmetric GUTS even to all orders. Furthermore, developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations also in this dimensionful sector of the theories. Of particular interest for the construction of realistic theories is a RGI sum rule for the soft scalar masses holding to all orders.

  7. Mechanical loading prevents the stimulating effect of IL-1{beta} on osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Bakker, Astrid D.; Everts, Vincent [Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klein-Nulend, Jenneke, E-mail: j.kleinnulend@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteocyte incubation with IL-1{beta} stimulated osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditioned medium from IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-1{beta} upregulated RANKL and downregulated OPG gene expression by osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYR61 is upregulated in mechanically stimulated osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical loading of osteocytes may abolish IL-1{beta}-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by higher plasma and synovial fluid levels of interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and by increased bone resorption. Since osteocytes are known to regulate bone resorption in response to changes in mechanical stimuli, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} affects osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in the presence or absence of mechanical loading of osteocytes. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were pre-incubated with IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml) for 24 h. Cells were either or not subjected to mechanical loading by 1 h pulsating fluid flow (PFF; 0.7 {+-} 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) in the presence of IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml). Conditioned medium was collected after 1 h PFF or static cultures. Subsequently mouse bone marrow cells were seeded on top of the IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes to determine osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from mechanically loaded or static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes was added to co-cultures of untreated osteocytes and mouse bone marrow cells. Gene expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61/CCN1), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by osteocytes was determined immediately after PFF. Incubation of osteocytes with IL-1{beta}, as well as conditioned medium from static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased the formation of osteoclasts. However, conditioned medium from mechanically loaded IL

  8. Effects of pituitary beta-endorphin secretagogues on the concentration of beta-endorphin in rat cerebrospinal fluid : evidence for a role of vasopressin in the regulation of brain beta-endorphin release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barna, I; Sweep, C G; Veldhuis, H D; Wiegant, V M; De Wied, D

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of beta-endorphin-immunoreactivity (beta E-IR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma of rats was determined following intracerebroventricular (ICV) treatment of conscious animals with substances known to stimulate the release of beta E and other pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derive

  9. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T;

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective...

  10. Effects of beetroot (Beta vulgaris) preparations on the Maillard reaction products in milk and meat-protein model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rackauskienea, I.; Pukalskas, A.; Rimantas Venskutonis, P.; Fiore, A.M.; Troise, A.D.; Fogliano, V.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of beetroots (Beta vulgaris) on the formation of Maillard reaction (MR) products possessing health, nutritional and sensory implications were studied. The effect of dried beetroot juice on the formation of Ne-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and Ne-(2-furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine) was det

  11. Effect of non-uniform basic temperature gradients on Marangoni convection with a boundary slab of finite conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumara I S,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The linear stability analysis of Marangoni convection in a fluid layer with a boundary slab of finite conductivity is considered. The effects of various non uniform temperature gradients are investigated. The lower boundary is a considered to be a thin slab of finite conductivity instead of a regular rigid surface. At the contact surface between the thin slab and the fluid layer the thermalboundary conditions are used and the upper surface is considered to be free and insulating to temperature perturbation and also surface tension effects are allowed. The resulting eigen value problem is solved exactly. The critical values of the Marangoni numbers for the onset of Marangoni convection are calculated for different temperature profile and the latter is found to be critically dependent on the depth ratio and conductivity ratio. The effects of the thermal conductivity and the thickness of the solid plate on the onset of convective instability with different temperature profile arestudied in detail.

  12. Fast finite element calculation of effective conductivity of random continuum microstructures: The recursive Poincaré-Steklov operator method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Thomas J.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-08-01

    The effective conductivity of a block of composite can be extracted from the Dirichlet-to-Neumann Poincaré-Steklov operator (PSO) for that block. In this paper, a domain decomposition method for computing the PSO over a finite element mesh is discussed. A new numerical strategy is introduced to accelerate the computation of this operator, using the Schur complement to calculate the PSO for the smallest subdomains, then recursively merging subdomain PSOs up to the full domain. At each step of the algorithm, information extraneous to the PSO is discarded. The effective conductivity values computed by this method are identical to those obtained from a basic Finite Element Method, an order of magnitude faster and with much less computer memory consumed. As proof of concept, effective conductivity measurements are presented for a percolating random fractal-like microstructure across a range of phase fractions.

  13. Effect of crack on the impact response of plates by the extended finite element method (X-FEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberkak, Rachid [University of Blida, Soumaa (Algeria); Bachene, Mourad [University of Medea, Medea (Algeria); Rechak, Said [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-15

    The dynamic response of cracked isotropic plates subjected to impact loading is studied in this paper. The impact properties of cracked plate are compared with the virgin ones to predict the eventual presence of discontinuities in plates. The extended finite element method (X-FEM) is employed in the mathematical modeling of the impact problem, wherein the effects of shear deformation is considered. Conventional finite element without any discontinuity is initially conducted in the numerical implementation. Enriched functions are then added to the nodal displacement field for element nodes that contain cracks. The effects of crack length and crack position on contact force and on plate deflection are analyzed. Results show that the maximal contact force decreases as the deflection increases with increasing crack length a . The effect of crack position on the dynamic response is less pronounced when the crack is near the fixed end.

  14. The effects of 12 weeks of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate free acid supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and power in resistance-trained individuals: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jacob M; Ryan P. Lowery; Joy, Jordan M; Andersen, J. C.; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Stout, Jeffrey R; Duncan, Nevine; Fuller, John C; Baier, Shawn M.; Naimo, Marshall A.; Rathmacher, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Studies utilizing beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation in trained populations are limited. No long-term studies utilizing HMB free acid (HMB-FA) have been conducted. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of HMB-FA supplementation on skeletal muscle hypertrophy, body composition, strength, and power in trained individuals. We also determined the effects of HMB-FA on muscle damage and performance during an overreaching cycle. Methods A three-phase dou...

  15. Effect of finite Coulomb interaction on full counting statistics of electronic transport through single-molecule magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Haibin, E-mail: xhb98326110@163.co [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Nie, Y.-H., E-mail: nieyh@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Li, Z.-J.; Liang, J.-Q. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2011-01-17

    We study the full counting statistics (FCS) in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) with finite Coulomb interaction U. For finite U the FCS, differing from U{yields}{infinity}, shows a symmetric gate-voltage-dependence when the coupling strengths with two electrodes are interchanged, which can be observed experimentally just by reversing the bias-voltage. Moreover, we find that the effect of finite U on shot noise depends on the internal level structure of the SMM and the coupling asymmetry of the SMM with two electrodes as well. When the coupling of the SMM with the incident-electrode is stronger than that with the outgoing-electrode, the super-Poissonian shot noise in the sequential tunneling regime appears under relatively small gate-voltage and relatively large finite U, and dose not for U{yields}{infinity}; while it occurs at relatively large gate-voltage for the opposite coupling case. The formation mechanism of super-Poissonian shot noise can be qualitatively attributed to the competition between fast and slow transport channels.

  16. General finite-size effects for zero-entropy states in one-dimensional quantum integrable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliëns, Sebas; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    We present a general derivation of the spectrum of excitations for gapless states of zero entropy density in Bethe ansatz solvable models. Our formalism is valid for an arbitrary choice of bare energy function which is relevant to situations where the Hamiltonian for time evolution differs from the Hamiltonian in a (generalized) Gibbs ensemble, i.e. out of equilibrium. The energy of particle and hole excitations, as measured with the time-evolution Hamiltonian, is shown to include additional contributions stemming from the shifts of the Fermi points that may now have finite energy. The finite-size effects are also derived and the connection with conformal field theory discussed. The critical exponents can still be obtained from the finite-size spectrum, however the velocity occurring here differs from the one in the constant Casimir term. The derivation highlights the importance of the phase shifts at the Fermi points for the critical exponents of asymptotes of correlations. We generalize certain results known for the ground state and discuss the relation to the dressed charge (matrix). Finally, we discuss the finite-size corrections in the presence of an additional particle or hole, which are important for dynamical correlation functions.

  17. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the whitening activity of {beta}-glucan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Sung, Nak Yun; Jung, Pil Moon; Choi, Jong Il; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ju Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Eui Hong [Chungnam Naitonal University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    This study evaluated the change in whitening activity of {beta}-glucan by gamma-irradiation. Tyrosinase inhibition was significantly increased in the samples with 30, 50, 10 kGy irradiated {beta}-glucan. Melanin synthesis of irradiated {beta}-glucan was measured from B16BL6 melanoma cell line treated with {alpha}-melanin stimulating hormone. Melanin synthesis was increased in the {alpha}-melanin stimulating hormone added group. However, it was decreased in the groups of 30, 50 and 100 kGy gamma-irradiated {beta}-glucan treated with {alpha}-melanin stimulating hormone. These results indicate that gamma irradiated {beta}-glucan may elevate the whitening activity. Therefore, gamma-irradiated {beta}-glucan could be used for nutraceutical foods in cosmetic industry.

  18. Beta-globin YAC transgenes exhibit uniform expression levels but position effect variegation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, R; Greally, J M; Tanimoto, K; Hwang, S; Feng, Y Q; Engel, J D; Fiering, S; Bouhassira, E E

    2000-03-01

    Expression of a construct integrated at different genomic locations often varies because of position effects that have been subcategorized as stable (decreased level of expression) and variegating (decreased proportion of expressing cells). It is well established that locus control regions (LCRs) generally overcome position effects in transgenes. However, whether stable and variegated position effects are equally overcome by an intact LCR has not been determined. We report that single-copy yeast artificial chromosome transgenes containing an unmodified human beta -globin locus were not subject to detectable stable position effects but did undergo mild to severe variegating position effects at three of the four non-centromeric integration sites tested. We also find that, at a given integration site, the distance and the orientation of the LCR relative to the regulated gene contributes to the likelihood of variegating position effects, and can affect the magnitude of its transcriptional enhancement. DNase I hypersensitive site (HSS) formation varies with the proportion of expressing cells, not the level of gene expression, suggesting that silencing of the transgene is associated with a lack of HSS formation in the LCR region. We conclude that transcriptional enhancement and variegating position effects are caused by fundamentally different but inter-dependent mechanisms.

  19. New Calculations for Phase Space Factors Involved in Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Stoica, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    We present new results for the phase space factors involved in double beta decay for beta-beta- transitions to ground states and excited 0+1 states, for isotopes of experimental interest. The Coulomb distortion of the electron wave functions is treated by solving numerically the Dirac equation with inclusion of the finite nuclear size and electron screening effects, and using a Coulomb potential derived from a realistic proton density distribution in the daughter nucleus. Our results are compared with other results from literature, obtained in different approximations, and possible causes that can give differences are discussed.

  20. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Palhares, Letícia F; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the finiteness of the system created in heavy ion collisions, we show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current experiments and demonstrate the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint. Using data from RHIC and SPS and assuming finite-size scaling, we find that RHIC data from 200 GeV down to 19.6 GeV is only consistent with a critical point at \\mu \\gtrsim 510 MeV. We also present predictions for the fluctuations at lower energies currently being investigated in the Beam Energy Scan program.

  1. Effect of an artificial disc on lumbar spine biomechanics: a probabilistic finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Mann, Anke; Zander, Thomas; Bergmann, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different parameters on the mechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine were in most cases determined deterministically with only one uncertain parameter varied at a time while the others were kept fixed. Thus most parameter combinations were disregarded. The aim of the study was to determine in a probabilistic finite element study how intervertebral rotation, intradiscal pressure, and contact force in the facet joints are affected by the input parameters implant position, implant ball radius, presence of scar tissue, and gap size in the facet joints. An osseoligamentous finite element model of the lumbar spine ranging from L3 vertebra to L5/S1 intervertebral disc was used. An artificial disc with a fixed center of rotation was inserted at level L4/L5. The model was loaded with pure moments of 7.5 Nm to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. In a probabilistic study the implant position in anterior-posterior (ap) and in lateral direction, the radius of the implant ball, and the gap size of the facet joint were varied. After implanting an artificial disc, scar tissue may develop, replacing the anterior longitudinal ligament. Thus presence and absence of scar tissue were also simulated. For each loading case studied, intervertebral rotations, intradiscal pressures and contact forces in the facet joints were calculated for 1,000 randomized input parameter combinations in order to determine the probable range of these output parameters. Intervertebral rotation at implant level varies strongly for different combinations of the input parameters. It is mainly affected by gap size, ap-position and implant ball radius for flexion, by scar tissue and implant ball radius for extension and lateral bending, and by gap size and implant ball radius for axial torsion. For extension, intervertebral rotation at implant level varied between 1.4 degrees and 7.5 degrees . Intradiscal pressure in the adjacent discs is only slightly affected by all

  2. Effect of long-acting beta2 agonists on exacerbation rates of asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) on the asthma exacerbation rate in pediatric patients. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) that included the use of LABAs to treat symptoms of pediatric asthma in children on inhaled...... requiring a change in prescribed medication or not defined but reported as an asthma exacerbation or an asthma-related hospitalization. Analysis of data from the eight studies revealed no apparent protection from an asthma exacerbation among children on a LABA compared to patients on comparator treatment...... that reported asthma-related hospitalizations. The lack of evidence for the control of asthma exacerbations in children regularly using a LABA should bring into question its general use as add-on therapy. Studies should be designed to directly explore the implications of these observations in pediatric patients....

  3. {beta}-ray irradiation effects in RbBr: Eu crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco B, J.M.; Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R. [Universidad de Sonora, 83190 hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Defects induced by {beta}-ray irradiation in RbBr: Eu{sup 2+} crystals doped with a high concentration of Eu{sup 2+} ions are studied by means of optical absorption (OA), thermoluminescence (TL), and optically stimulated TL (OSTL). The fading, dose, and optical bleaching effects on the TL glow curves of room temperature irradiated samples has been analyzed. OA indicates that irradiation of samples at room temperature induce the formation of F but not F{sub z} centers. The TL glow curves show peaks at 267, 303, and 403 K. The 267 K glow peak disappear in less than 1 s under blue light or infrared radiation photo bleaching. A high sensitivity to the ionizing radiation has been observed. These results confirm that this material is an efficient phosphor. (Author)

  4. The "edge effect" after implantation of beta-emitting (55Co) stents with high initial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervinka, Pavel; St'ásek, Josef; Costa, Marco Aurelio; Stursa, Jan; Fiser, Miloslav; Vodnanský, Petr; Kocisová, Michaela; Veselka, Josef; Pleskot, Miloslav; Malý, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and the cause of "edge restenosis" after implantation of high activity 41.1 microCi +/- 1.2 microCi = 1520 kBq +/- 44 kBq, beta-emitting (55Co) stents. Proton bombarding in cyclotron has brought the radioactivity. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) investigation has been completed in 10 patients. The angiographies performed at 6 month revealed restenosis >50% in 5 cases (50%). The analysis of edges (5 mm distally and proximally to the last stent struts) showed no significant changes in TVV (187.3 +/- 62.60 mm3 and 176.9 +/- 53.5 mm3) but PMV increase significantly (i.e. neointimal proliferation) from 61.9 +/- 31.2 mm3 to 82.2 +/- 43.4 mm3 (pedge effect"/neointimal hyperplasia was in this trial sharp fall-off in radiation at the edges of the stents.

  5. Effect of shock wave reapplication on urinary n-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in canine kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A.Q.R. Fortes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Renal tubular damage can be assessed with the aid of urinary dosing of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG and it is possible to demonstrate a significant correlation between shock wave and damage to renal parenchyma. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of shock wave reapplication over urinary NAG in canine kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors submitted 10 crossbred dogs to 2 applications of 2000 shock waves in a 24-hour interval in order to assess urinary NAG values after 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. RESULTS: Twelve hours following the first shockwave application there was an increase in NAG of 6.47 ± 5.44 u/g creatinine (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Shock wave reapplication with a 24-hour interval did not cause any increase in urinary NAG.

  6. Effect of Microwave on Fluidized Bed Drying of Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of inlet air temperature and velocity on the drying characteristics of beetroot’s (Beta vulgaris L. pieces in microwave assisted fluidized bed drying (MAFBD system. The results were compared with samples of beetroot dried in a fluidized bed dryer (FBD at the same combination of temperatures and air velocities. The selected inlet air temperatures and inlet air velocities were 60°C, 67.50°C and 75°C and 9 m/s, 10.50 m/s and 12 m/s, respectively. Moisture content and outlet air humidity was measured at 5 minutes interval. The MAFBD method offered two to three times reduction in drying time as compared to the FBD method. It was also observed that the beetroot samples obtained from the MAFBD system had lower final moisture content than those obtained from the FBD system.

  7. Beta-lactam type molecular scaffolds for antiproliferative activity: synthesis and cytotoxic effects in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Mary J; Carr, Miriam; Knox, Andrew J S; Zisterer, Daniela M; Lloyd, David G

    2008-10-01

    A series of novel beta-lactam containing compounds are described as antiproliferative agents and potential selective modulators of the oestrogen receptor. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of these compounds on human MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 breast cancer cells. The compounds are designed to contain three aryl ring substituents arranged on the heterocyclic azetidin-2-one (beta-lactam), thus providing conformationally restrained analogues of the triarylethylene arrangement exemplified in the tamoxifen type structure. The compounds demonstrated potency in antiproliferative assays against MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line at low micromolar to nanomolar concentrations with low cytotoxicity and moderate binding affinity to the oestrogen receptor. The effect of a number of aryl and amine functional group substitutions on the antiproliferative activity of the beta-lactam products was explored and a brief computational structure-activity relationship investigation with molecular simulation was investigated.

  8. Statistical analysis of beta decays and the effective value of g_A in the pnQRPA framework

    CERN Document Server

    Deppisch, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) statistical analysis of a number of measured ground-state-to-ground-state single $\\beta^+$/electron-capture and $\\beta^-$ decays in the nuclear mass range A = 62 - 142. The corresponding experimental comparative half-lives (log ft values) are compared with the theoretical ones obtained by the use of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) with G-matrix based effective interactions. The MCMC analysis is performed separately for 47 isobaric triplets and 28 more extended isobaric chains of nuclei to extract values and uncertainties for the effective axial-vector coupling constant g_A in nuclear-structure calculations performed in the pnQRPA framework. As far as available, measured half-lives for two-neutrino double beta-minus decays occurring in the studied isobaric chains are analyzed as well.

  9. Effects of feeding Beta vulgaris saccharifera bulb for fattening desert lambs under tropical conditions of Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Mohammed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of introducing Sugar Beet bulb as a cheap substitute for grains in rations formulated for sheep fattening. Materials and Methods: This trial was conducted at the Experimental unit of Rural Development and extension center, Faculty of animal production, University of Gezira. Twenty four Sudanese desert lambs (Ashgur ecotype were purchased from local markets to assess the effects of replacing grain with Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris saccharifera Bulb on feed lot performance, carcass traits under tropical conditions of Sudan. Sugar Beet bulb was incorporated in three rations with a control ration (A: control, B, C, D at percentages of 0, 11, 22, and 33. Results: The results showed that total weight gain and daily feed intake in group D were significantly different at (P<0.05 where values of 5.59±1.73 and 0.94± 0.13 kg were recorded. Total weight gain, daily dry matter intake, daily energy intake and feed conversion ratio were in the range of 10.67- 5.59, 1.03-0.83, 0.33-0.27and 11.77- 7.70 kg respectively. Treatments showed no significant differences at (P<0.05 for slaughter weight, empty body weight, dressing % on slaughter weight basis and dressing % on empty weight basis, the obtained results for these traits were 27.78-25.37, 24.76- 22.22, 45.80- 43.45% and 51.41- 49.65%. Carcass cuts (Leg, Loin, Rack, Plate and Neck & shoulder weight and percentages showed no significant differences among treatments. Conclusion: It is concluded that replacing expensive grains with Beta vulgaris bulb can be practiced in sheep fattening project up to 22% with excellent results. [Vet. World 2012; 5(6.000: 330-334

  10. Five variants of the beta-globin gene without clinical or hematological effects: Hb Maryland [beta 47(CD6)Asp-->His], Hb Kent [beta 37(C3)Trp-->Cys], Hb Visayan [beta 136(H14)Gly-->Cys], Hb Cutlerville [beta 138(H16)Ala-->Val] and Hb Hornchurch [beta 43(CD2)Glu-->Lys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, James D; Kaur, Prabhjot; Kozak, Elizabeth A; Lum, Sophia; Alter, David N

    2008-01-01

    We report on five hemoglobin (Hb) beta chain variants that were initially identified either by electrophoretic, chromatographic or isoelectric focusing (IEF) methods. These variants do not appear to be associated with clinical or hematological abnormalities. All variants were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis.

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of 17beta-estradiol: involvement of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and (or) sigma-1 receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-10-01

    17beta-estradiol has been reported to possess antidepressant-like activity in animal models of depression, although the mechanism for its effect is not well understood. The present study is an effort in this direction to explore the mechanism of the antidepressant-like effect of 17beta-estradiol in a mouse model(s) of behavioral depression (despair behavior). Despair behavior, expressed as helplessness to escape from a situation (immobility period), as in a forced swim test in which the animals are forced to swim for a total of 6 min, was recorded. The antiimmobility effects (antidepressant-like) of 17beta-estradiol were compared with those of standard drugs like venlafaxine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). 17beta-estradiol produced a U-shaped effect in decreasing the immobility period. It had no effect on locomotor activity of the animal. The antidepressant-like effect was comparable to that of venlafaxine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). 17beta-estradiol also exhibited a similar profile of antidepressant action in the tail suspension test. When coadministered with other antidepressant drugs, 17beta-estradiol (5 microg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the antiimmobility effect of subeffective doses of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, i.p.), venlafaxine (2 mg/kg, i.p.), or bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not of desipramine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or tranylcypromine (2 mg/kg, i.p.), in the forced swim test. The reduction in the immobility period elicited by 17beta-estradiol (20 microg/kg, i.p.) was reversed by haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist), SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a D(1) dopamine receptor antagonist), and sulpiride (5 mg/kg, i.p.; a specific dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist). In mice pretreated with (+)-pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist), 17beta-estradiol (5 microg/kg, i.p.) produced a synergistic effect. In contrast, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.; a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid), rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.; another sigma

  12. On the fate of the Standard Model at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Luigi Delle; Urbano, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we revisit and update the computation of thermal corrections to the stability of the electroweak vacuum in the Standard Model. At zero temperature, we make use of the full two-loop effective potential, improved by three-loop beta functions with two-loop matching conditions. At finite temperature, we include one-loop thermal corrections together with resummation of daisy diagrams. We solve numerically---both at zero and finite temperature---the bounce equation, thus providing an accurate description of the thermal tunneling. We find that at finite temperature the instability bound excludes values of the top mass $M_t \\gtrsim 173.6$ GeV, assuming $M_h \\simeq 125$ GeV and including uncertainties on the strong coupling. We discuss the validity and temperature-dependence of this bound in the early Universe, with a special focus on the reheating phase after inflation.

  13. Note: A method for correction of finite pulse time effects in flash diffusivity measurements of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Yang, Liping; Zhong, Qiu; Xu, Zijun; Luo, Caiyun

    2016-08-01

    A data correction method that can reduce finite pulse time effects in the flash method is presented in this article. Based on the physical model of the classical flash method, the present method uses the cutoff time moment of laser heating as zero point. This article investigated the case of constant heat flux heating by using the theoretical method and obtained a new calculation formula. The formula was tested in the case where half temperature rise time is less than the pulse time (i.e., τ0/t0.5 > 1), and the result was satisfactory. Theoretically, this method can correct the effect of any finite pulse time and significantly expand the scope of application of the flash method.

  14. 3-D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF WELDING RESIDUAL STRESS ON HYDROGEN DIFFUSION IN HYDROGEN CONTAINED ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen distribution of 16MnR steel weldment in hydrogen contained environment was calculated using the finite element method (FEM). The effect of welding residual stress on hydrogen diffusion has been discussed using a 3-D sequential coupling finite element analysis procedure complied by Abaqus code. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient in weld metal, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the base metal of the 16MnR steel weldment were measured using the electrochemical permeation technique. The hydrogen diffusion without the effect of stress was also calculated and compared. Owing to the existence of welding residual stress, the hydrogen concentration was obviously increased and the hydrogen would diffuse and accumulate in the higher stress region.

  15. Acute and timing effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB on indirect markers of skeletal muscle damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While chronic β-Hydroxy β-Methylbutyrate (HMB supplementation (≥ 2 wk lowers exercise induced muscle damage, its acute or timing effects have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and timing effects of oral HMB supplementation on serum creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, muscle soreness, and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Methods Sixteen non-resistance trained men (22 ± 2 yrs were assigned to HMB-Pre or HMB-Post groups. In a crossover design, all subjects performed 55 maximal eccentric knee extension/flexion contractions on 2 occasions on either the right or left leg. HMB-Pre (N = 8 randomly received 3 grams of either a placebo or HMB before and a placebo after exercise. HMB-Post (N = 8 received a placebo before and either 3 grams of HMB or a placebo after exercise. Muscle damage tests were recorded before, at 8, 24, 48, and 72 hrs post exercise. Results There was a reduction in MVC and an increase in soreness in the quadriceps and hamstrings following exercise (p p = 0.07, there was no time × group effect. Serum indices of damage increased, peaking at 48 hrs for CK (773% (p p Conclusion Our findings suggest no clear acute or timing effects of HMB supplementation. However, consuming HMB before exercise appeared to prevent increases in LDH.

  16. Estrogenic effect of the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 on endogenous estrogen receptor alpha and beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrim, Cândida Z; Amado, Francisco L; Helguero, Luisa A

    2011-03-01

    Estrogens are key regulators in mammary development and breast cancer and their effects are mediated by estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ). These two receptors are ligand activated transcription factors that bind to regulatory regions in the DNA known as estrogen responsive elements (EREs). ERα and ERβ activation is subject to modulation by phosphorylation and p42/p44 MAP kinases are the best characterized ER modifying kinases. Using a reporter gene (3X-ERE-TATA-luciferase) to measure activation of endogenous ERs, we found that MEK1 inhibitor PD98059, used in concentrations insufficient to inhibit MEK1 activation of p42/p44 MAP kinases, exerted estrogenic effects on the reporter gene and on the ERE-regulated RIP 140 protein. Such estrogenic effects were observed in mammary epithelial HC11 cells and occur on unliganded ERα and ligand activated ERβ. Additionally, concentrations of PD98059 able to inhibit p42/p44 phosphorylation were not estrogenic. Further, inhibition of p42 MAP kinase expression with siRNAs also resulted in loss of PD98059 estrogenic effect. In summary, PD98059 in concentrations below the inhibitory for MEK1, exerts estrogenic effects in HC11 mammary epithelial cells.

  17. Spin-orbit interaction and asymmetry effects on Kondo ridges at finite magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grap, Stephan; Andergassen, Sabine; Paaske, Jens

    2011-01-01

    ridges, which are robust against SOI as time-reversal symmetry is preserved. As a result of the crossing of a spin-up and a spin-down level at vanishing SOI, two additional Kondo plateaus appear at finite B. They are not protected by symmetry and rapidly vanish if the SOI is turned on. Left...

  18. Synchronization of oscillators with long range interaction: Phase transition and anomalous finite size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marodi, M.; D'ovidio, Francesco; Vicsek, T.

    2002-01-01

    Synchronization in a lattice of a finite population of phase oscillators with algebraically decaying, non-normalized coupling is studied by numerical simulations. A critical level of decay is found, below which full locking takes place if the population contains a sufficiently large number of ele...

  19. Numerical analysis of finite Debye-length effects in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Soni, G.;

    2009-01-01

    to the electrode size, i.e., for nanofluidic systems. However, even for electrode dimensions in the micrometer range, the discrepancies in velocity due to the finite Debye length can be more than 10% for an electrode of zero height and more than 100% for electrode heights comparable to the Debye length....

  20. Purcell effect for finite-length metal-coated and metal nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin V.; Willatzen, Morten; Bordo, Vladimir G.

    2014-01-01

    as functions of the cylinder radius, the emitter position, and the transition frequency for both configurations. We contrast the results for finite-length nanowires with those obtained in the infinite-length approximation and find considerable differences in the Purcell factor magnitude....