WorldWideScience

Sample records for final hazards summary

  1. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  2. 77 FR 65314 - Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste..., Missouri received final authorization to implement its hazardous waste management program effective...

  3. 75 FR 51678 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...; Final Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Environmental... Software (DRAS), EPA has concluded that the petitioned waste is not hazardous waste. This exclusion applies.... What are the limits of this exclusion? D. How will OxyChem manage the waste if it is delisted? E....

  4. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

  5. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grants Program Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP, CFDA Number: 97.039) provides grants to States and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures...

  6. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grants Program Summary - API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP, CFDA Number: 97.039) provides grants to States and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures...

  7. 75 FR 50932 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts applied to EPA for final ] authorization of certain changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  8. 76 FR 6564 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Immediate final rule. SUMMARY: Florida has applied to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  9. 75 FR 58328 - Nebraska: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Nebraska: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste... final authorization for these revisions to its Federally-authorized hazardous waste program, along with...

  10. 77 FR 38530 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Immediate final rule. SUMMARY: Louisiana has applied to the EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  11. 77 FR 69765 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant Colorado Final Authorization to operate its hazardous waste program...

  12. Fact Sheet About the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    October 28, 2016, EPA finalized a rule that revises the hazardous waste generator regulations by making them easier to understand and providing greater flexibility in how hazardous waste is managed to better fit today's business operations.

  13. Final summary report. [Summaries of research activities at Cornell University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J A

    1978-01-01

    A summary is presented of the topics covered during the period, from 1960 to 1978, of the contract. The general area of the research has been theoretical solid state physics. A list of publications produced during the contract is given. (GHT)

  14. Innovative Technology Development Program. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, J.

    1995-08-01

    Through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a national applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program, whose goal has been to resolve the major technical issues and rapidly advance technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The Innovative Technology Development (ITD) Program was established as a part of the DOE, Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program. The plan is part of the DOE`s program to restore sites impacted by weapons production and to upgrade future waste management operations. On July 10, 1990, DOE issued a Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) through the Idaho Operations Office to solicit private sector help in developing innovative technologies to support DOE`s clean-up goals. This report presents summaries of each of the seven projects, which developed and tested the technologies proposed by the seven private contractors selected through the PRDA process.

  15. Frequent Questions about the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQs including What are the benefits of these revisions to the generator regulations? What changed in the final regulations since proposal? How and why will the hazardous waste generator regulations be reorganized? When will this rule become effective?

  16. Hazardous Waste Sites not making the final EPA National Priority List of Hazardous Waste Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — These are sites from EPA CERCLIS list that are not final National-Priority-List Hazardous Waste sites. The data was obtained from EPA's LandView CDs.

  17. Kaohsiung Municipal Government: Feasibility study for Kaohsiung hazardous waste management plan. Executive summary. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-01

    The document is the Executive Summary of a report resulting from a feasibility study conducted for the Republic of China. The objective of the study was to: survey hazardous industrial wastes within Kaohsiung Municipality, analyze the feasibility for planning a hazardous waste treatment and disposal system, develop recommendations for waste minimization and transportation, and identify possible methods of private sector operation.

  18. Workshop summary: Water as hazard and water as heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Rationale: In a changing climate, hydrological and meteorological hazards related to water provoke more and more losses. Water courses are also causing other types of hazards, as alluvionar soil deposits are raising vulnerability to earthquakes through the Mexico City effect. On the other hand, water itself is a vulnerable habitat. To deal with the later, living museums including acquaria are planned, to raise awareness to protect the ecological diversity of water and water sites. Protecting water sites can be, at times, also protection against water related hazards, as landscape architecture begun to recognise recently. Floodplains are an alternative to dams and dikes. This would be already enough to underline water as dual element, but the duality goes futher. Having to think about duality, we think of Chinese philosophy. Water (or the lack of it, as in drought) destroys life as a hazard, but gives life as well. To this symbology of giving life is connected to role of water as heritage, to building culture next to the water. Architecture of river and coastalscapes underline this. Leisure architecture is connected to this, and includes also architectural objects such as bathes. Workshop I was a two day workshop, first day presentations and second day study tours. The morning session included introduction of the topic and then in chronological order approaches from archaeology of water sites, Ottoman time, and late 19th century. The Ottoman time approach was connected to an initiative shown in the introduction, from riverbed to seashore. The 19th century presentation was on the villa Gamberaia, a villa of a Romanian princess in Italy, featured on the poster of the workshop. In the 1966 floods in Florence which have an anniversary this year it was used as a symbol to maintain the positive significance of water. Places in the villa garden also make reference to hazards, as the earthquake shaped water fountain behind. The second part of presentations featured the

  19. HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ARMY PACKAGE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1955-07-27

    The APPR-I is described and the various hazards are reviewed. Because of the reactor's location near the nation's Capitol, containment is of the utmost importance. The maximum energy release in any possible accident is 7.4 million Btu's which is completely contained within a 7/8 inch thick steel cylindrical shell with hemispherical ends. The vapor container is 60 ft high and 32 ft in diameter and is lined on the inside with 2 ft of reinforced concrete which provides missile protection and is part of the secondary shield. All possible nuclear excursions are reviewed and the energy from any of these is insignificant compared to the stored energy in the water. The maximum credible accident is caused hy the reactor running constantly at its maximum power of 10 Mw and through an extremely unlikely sequence of failures, causing the temperature of the water in the primary and secondary systeras to rise to saturation; whereupon a rupture occurs releasing the stored energy of 7.4 million Btu's into the vapor container. If the reactor core melts during the incident, a maximum of 10/sup 8/ curies of activity is released. While it appears impossible for a rupture of the vapor container to oecur except by sabotage or bombing, the hazards to the surrounding area are discussed in the event of such a rupture occurring simultaneously with the maximum credible accident. (auth)

  20. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: VITRIFICATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY HAZARDOUS AND/OR RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A performance summary of an advanced multifuel-capable combustion and melting system (CMS) for the vitrification of hazardous wastes is presented. Vortex Corporation has evaluated its patented CMS for use in the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclid...

  1. 78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the.... Therefore, we grant Oklahoma Final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program with the changes...

  2. 77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... has applied to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... Tennessee final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program with the changes described in the...

  3. 78 FR 35766 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Carolina has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the... final complete program revision application, seeking authorization of changes to its hazardous waste...

  4. 77 FR 69788 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to the EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The EPA proposes to grant final authorization to the hazardous waste...

  5. 76 FR 37021 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... has applied to the EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... opportunity to apply for final authorization to operate all aspects of their hazardous waste management...

  6. 77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant Oklahoma Final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program...

  7. 77 FR 13200 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... has applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant the State of Texas Final Authorization to operate its hazardous waste...

  8. Energy study of pipeline transportation systems. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W. F.

    1977-12-31

    The basic objectives of the overall study were to (1) characterize the pipeline industry and understand its energy consumption in each of the five major pipeline-industry segments: gas, oil, slurry, fresh water, and waste water; (2) identify opportunities for energy conservation in the pipeline industry, and to recommend the necessary R, D, and D programs to exploit those opportunities; (3) characterize and understand the influence of the Federal government on introduction of energy conservative innovations into the pipeline industry; and (4) assess the future potential of the pipeline industry for growth and for contribution to the national goal of energy conservation. This project final report is an executive summary presenting the results from the seven task reports.

  9. 78 FR 25579 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ...-.07(1). Treatment Exemptions for 10/04/05......... Hazardous Waste Mixtures (``Headworks exemptions... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  10. 75 FR 43478 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Island has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Rhode Island...

  11. 77 FR 38566 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  12. 77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  13. 77 FR 47797 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Arkansas has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  14. 76 FR 37048 - Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  15. 78 FR 15338 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Solid Waste... proposes to grant final authorization to New York for these changes, with limited exceptions. EPA has...

  16. 78 FR 70255 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of revisions to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to West Virginia. In the...

  17. 75 FR 35720 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Massachusetts has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Massachusetts...

  18. Final Report: Seismic Hazard Assessment at the PGDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhinmeng [KY Geological Survey, Univ of KY

    2007-06-01

    Selecting a level of seismic hazard at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for policy considerations and engineering design is not an easy task because it not only depends on seismic hazard, but also on seismic risk and other related environmental, social, and economic issues. Seismic hazard is the main focus. There is no question that there are seismic hazards at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant because of its proximity to several known seismic zones, particularly the New Madrid Seismic Zone. The issues in estimating seismic hazard are (1) the methods being used and (2) difficulty in characterizing the uncertainties of seismic sources, earthquake occurrence frequencies, and ground-motion attenuation relationships. This report summarizes how input data were derived, which methodologies were used, and what the hazard estimates at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant are.

  19. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

    2007-09-10

    This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

  20. 75 FR 9345 - Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... necessary to assure that all hazardous waste generated is designated for treatment, storage, or disposal in...'' enclosed treatment facility''. deleted and words ``of a hazardous waste'' added. MAC R 299.9108(k) 6/21... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision...

  1. Frequent Questions about the Hazardous Waste Export-Import Revisions Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Answers questions such as: What new requirements did EPA finalize in the Hazardous Waste Export-Import Revisions Final Rule? Why did EPA implement these changes now? What are the benefits of the final rule? What are the compliance dates for the final rule?

  2. Applied research and development private sector accomplishments. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Zielke, M.M.; Erickson, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Because of the nature of most US Department of Energy (DOE) operations, contamination at DOE sites presents complex problems. DOE sites may have radioactive, hazardous, or mixed contamination. The major contaminants include radionuclides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and heavy metals. The contamination exists in soils, groundwater, and buildings and materials. DOE`s special problems in site remediation have created a need for better and less costly technologies. Thus, DOE has implemented several initiatives for developing new technologies. This report describes the results of the first set of procurement contracts in this area. Similar research and development (R&D) activities are currently managed for DOE by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center.

  3. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... exclude (or delist) a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sludge filter cake (called sludge hereinafter... to the petition submitted by Tokusen, to delist the WWTP sludge. After careful analysis and use of... waste. This exclusion applies to 2,000 cubic yards per year of the WWTP sludge with Hazardous Waste...

  4. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  5. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  6. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States). Div. of Biogeochemistry; Miller, W.P. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Soil Science

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models. Executive Summary of Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertson, Carolyn M.; And Others

    A summary is presented of the final report, "Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models." The final report presents a set of linked investigations of the effects of training teachers in effective classroom management practices in a series of school-based workshops. Four purposes were addressed by the study: (1) to…

  8. Anatomy studies for an artificial heart. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, R.J.; Nose, Y.

    1977-12-01

    In the interval from February of 1972 through December of 1977, studies were conducted relating to the anatomical feasibility of implanting a total artificial heart system. These studies included both the calf as an experimental animal as well as the ultimate human recipient of the artificial heart system. Studies with the calf included definition of the thoracic anatomy relative to the size, shape, and vascular connections for implanting the blood pump. To test the animal's tolerance to an implanted engine system, mockups of the thermal converter were implanted chronically in various locations within the calf. No problems developed in retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal implants ranging from 8 to 15 months. A study to determine accelerations experienced by an abdominally implanted thermal converter was performed in calves. Under the most severe conditions, accelerations of a maximum of 34 Gs were experienced. The largest effort was devoted to defining the human anatomy relative to implanting an artificial heart in the thorax. From a number of data sources, including cadavers as well as living patients, a quantitative, statistical analysis of the size and shape of the male thorax was obtained. Finally, an in vivo study of a functional intrathoracic compliance bag in a calf demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  9. Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-12-01

    of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning

  10. Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-12-01

    of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning

  11. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The AMB wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) are monitored for selected constituents to comply with the Natural Resources Defense council et al. Consent Decree of May 1988 that identifies the Met Lab HWMF as subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In addition, the wells are monitored, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During the fourth quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  12. The First National Pain Medicine Summit--final summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, Philipp M; Brock, Charles; David, Jose; Crossno, Ronald; Gitlow, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    several viable avenues to achieving our stated goal, "excellence in the delivery of high quality, cost-effective pain care to the patients we serve," including the development of Pain Medicine as a distinct specialty with ACGME accredited residency programs and ABMS certification. The Pain Medicine Summit concluded with a number of recommendations, including the following: That the pain community remains engaged in addressing the issues raised and in mitigating the barriers. That the recommendations be referred to the AMA and the PPMSSC for support and implementation. That another national Pain Medicine Summit with enhanced participation be convened. That consideration be given to convening an International Pain Summit in conjunction with the IASP World Congress in Montreal.   That the final report of the Pain Medicine Summit be widely disseminated. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Summary of Natural Hazard Statistics for 2015 in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Storm Dust Devil Rain Fog High Wind Waterspout Fire Weather Mud Slide Volcanic Ash Miscellaneous Total 0 ... the most deadly hazard in 2015, claiming 176 victims, up significantly from 40 deaths in 2014. Rip ...

  14. Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, H.

    2004-07-01

    Summaries of conferences consist of subjective views of the reviewer, on what he remarked, of what he thought was important. And yet some of these remarks may be of interest to all participants. The event called "inspiration" may happen when scientist A gets an idea because of a brilliant or of stupid remark she heard when scientist B gave a summary. So, what is a good review? A review that broadens the perspective of at least some people in the audience. I hope that my attempt works. Let's see.

  15. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Veneziano, D.; Toro, G.; O' Hara, T.; Drake, L.; Patwardhan, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Kenney, R.; Winkler, R.; Coppersmith, K.

    1986-07-01

    A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity parameters of those sources, and functions for the attenuation of seismic energy, incorporating multiple input interpretations by earth scientists. Uncertainties reflecting permissible alternative inperpretations are quantified by use of probability logic trees and are propagated through the hazard results. The methodology is flexible and permits, for example, interpretations of seismic sources that are consistent with earth-science practice in the need to depict complexity and to accommodate alternative hypotheses. This flexibility is achieved by means of a tectonic framework interpretation from which alternative seismic sources are derived. To estimate rates of earthquake recurrence, maximum use is made of the historical earthquake database in establishing a uniform measure of earthquake size, in identifying independent events, and in detemining the completeness of the earthquake record in time, space, and magnitude. Procedures developed as part of the methodology permit relaxation of the usual assumption of homogeneous seismicity within a source and provide unbiased estimates of recurrence parameters. The methodology incorporates the Poisson-exponential earthquake recurrence model and an extensive assessment of its applicability is provided. Finally, the methodology includes procedures to aggregate hazard results from a number of separate input interpretations to obtain a best-estimate value of hazard, together with its uncertainty, at a site.

  16. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1994 - 1997; Sammanfattning av det nordiska forskningsprogrammet foer kaernsaekerhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Lemmens, A. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This is a summary report of the NKS research program carried out 1994 - 1997. It is basically a compilation of the executive summaries of the final reports on the nine scientific projects carried out during that period. It highlights the conclusions, recommendations and other results of the projects. (au)

  17. Evaluation of Hazardous Faults in the Intermountain West Region - Summary and Recommendations of a Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Anthony J.; Haller, Kathleen M.; Maharrey, Joseph Z.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) has the responsibility to provide nationwide information and knowledge about earthquakes and earthquake hazards as a step to mitigating earthquake-related losses. As part of this mission, USGS geologists and geophysicists continue to study faults and structures that have the potential to generate large and damaging earthquakes. In addition, the EHP, through its External Grants Program (hereinafter called Program), supports similar studies by scientists employed by state agencies, academic institutions, and independent employers. For the purposes of earthquake hazard investigations, the Nation is geographically subdivided into tectonic regions. One such region is the Intermountain West (IMW), which here is broadly defined as starting at the eastern margin of the Rocky Mountains in New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and extending westward to the east side of the Sierra Nevada mountains in eastern California and into the Basin and Range-High Plateaus of eastern Oregon and Washington. The IMW contains thousands of faults that have moved in Cenozoic time, hundreds of which have evidence of Quaternary movement, and thus are considered to be potential seismic sources. Ideally, each Quaternary fault should be studied in detail to evaluate its rate of activity in order to model the hazard it poses. The study of a single fault requires a major commitment of time and resources, and given the large number of IMW faults that ideally should be studied, it is impractical to expect that all IMW Quaternary faults can be fully evaluated in detail. A more realistic approach is to prioritize a list of IMW structures that potentially pose a significant hazard and to focus future studies on those structures. Accordingly, in June 2008, a two-day workshop was convened at the USGS offices in Golden, Colorado, to seek information from representatives of selected State Geological Surveys in the IMW and with

  18. Technical summary of groundwater quality protection program at Savannah River Plant. Volume 1. Site geohydrology, and solid and hazardous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, E.J.; Gordon, D.E. (eds.)

    1983-12-01

    The program for protecting the quality of groundwater underlying the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is described in this technical summary report. The report is divided into two volumes. Volume I contains a discussion of the general site geohydrology and of both active and inactive sites used for disposal of solid and hazardous wastes. Volume II includes a discussion of radioactive waste disposal. Most information contained in these two volumes is current as of December 1983. The groundwater quality protection program has several elements which, taken collectively, are designed to achieve three major goals. These goals are to evaluate the impact on groundwater quality as a result of SRP operations, to restore or protect groundwater quality by taking corrective action as necessary, and to ensure disposal of waste materials in accordance with regulatory guidelines.

  19. 76 FR 36879 - Minnesota: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ..., September 16, 1992 (57 FR 42832) Standards Applicable to Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment... Characteristic Wastes Whose Treatment Standards Were Vacated, Checklist 124, May 24, 1993 (58 FR 29860) Hazardous... State Hazardous Waste Programs, Checklist 153, July 1, 1996 (61 FR 34252) Hazardous Waste Treatment...

  20. Federal Register Notice: Final Rule Listing as Hazardous Wastes Certain Dioxin Containing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is amending the regulations for hazardous waste management under the RCRA by listing as hazardous wastes certain wastes containing particular chlorinated dioxins, -dibenzofurans, and -phenols, and by specifying a engagement standards for these wastes.

  1. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, Executive Summary, Volume I, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, David; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    1988-06-01

    This Executive Summary, Volume I, of the lower Flathead System Fisheries Study Final Report, was prepared to provide a study overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists. The contents provide an introduction to the study and its objectives, a short description of the study area, a discussion of the major findings and conclusions of the study, and the description of fisheries management alternatives available to managers of the lower Flathead system. Technical reports were prepared for those portions of the study dealing with the lower Flathead River and its tributaries, Volume II, and the South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III. The annual hydrographic regime of the Flathead system, consisting of upper rivers, lake and lower river, has been modified by the construction and operation of two major hydroelectric facilities, Hungry Horse Dam on the south fork Flathead River and Kerr Dam at the outlet of Flathead Lake. The modified hydrographic regime has resulted in significant impacts to kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and several species of trout. Kerr Dam, closed in 1938, controls Flathead Lake levels between 878.7 m (2883 ft) and 881.8 m (2893 ft) and discharges into the lower Flathead River. Kerr Dam is a 63.4 m (208 ft) high concrete arch structure located 7.2 km (4.5 miles) downstream from the outlet of Flathead Lake. The facility is used by Montana Power Company primarily for system frequency load control with some use for low level base load. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Approaches and practices related to hazardous waste management, processing and final disposal in germany and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos, J.A.L.; Pereira, F.A.; Tomich, S. [CETREL S.A., Camacari, BA (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A general overview of the existing management and processing of hazardous wastes technologies in Germany and Brazil is presented in this work. Emphasis has been given to the new technologies and practices adopted in both countries, including a comparison of the legislation, standards and natural trends. Two case studies of large industrial hazardous waste sites are described. 9 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. 75 FR 65432 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... relevant) authority 1. Zinc Fertilizer Rule. 67 FR 48393-48415, New Mexico Statute (Checklist 200). July 24... Contaminated October 7, 2002. Annotated (NMSA) Batteries. (Checklist 201). 1978, Section 74- 4-1. Hazardous... November 3, 2008, effective March 1, 2009. 3. Hazardous Air Pollutant 67 FR 77687-77692, New Mexico...

  4. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  5. 78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The State of..., Region 6, Regional Authorization Coordinator, (6PD-O), Multimedia Planning and Permitting Division,...

  6. 76 FR 19004 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The State of... 6, Regional Authorization Coordinator, (6PD-O), Multimedia Planning and Permitting Division, at...

  7. 75 FR 65442 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The State of New... Patterson, Region 6, Regional Authorization Coordinator, (6PD-O), Multimedia Planning and...

  8. 76 FR 62303 - California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... and Mineral Processing Wastes; (7) Hazardous Soils Treatment Standards and Exclusions; (8... Compliance Date for Characteristic Slags; (11) Treatment Standards for Spent Potliners from Primary Aluminum... for PCBs in Soil; and (14) Certain Land Disposal Restrictions Technical Corrections and...

  9. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

  10. Energy conservation in the meat-processing industry. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, E.J.; Hendrickson, R.L.

    1979-06-30

    This summary covers the following aspects of the meat processing industry: hot boning and electrical stimulation, refrigeration energy - hot vs cold processing, the role of locational factors and industrial orientation, modeling energy consumption in the meat processing industry, and management considerations. (MHR)

  11. [Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

  12. 77 FR 13248 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The State of Texas has... Authorization Coordinator, (6PD-O), Multimedia Planning and Permitting Division, at the address shown below....

  13. 78 FR 15299 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ..., additional testing, reporting and emergency procedures, and closure requirements: 374-2.5(a)(5) introductory.... New York regulates used oil containing greater than 50 ppm of PCB wastes as hazardous waste, unless... wastes under the Federal RCRA program. PCB wastes are regulated under the Federal Toxic...

  14. 78 FR 70225 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5... Waste Management System'' (33 CSR 20), effective June 16, 2011; and Title 45, Series 25 ``Control of Air Pollution from Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities'' (45 CSR 25), effective June 16...

  15. 78 FR 54178 - Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... limitations of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). New Federal requirements and... Processed in a Gasification System to Produce Synthetic Gas, Revision Checklist 216. National Emission... FR 77954, 9 VAC Sec. Sec. 20- Fuel Exclusion, Revision December 19, 60-18, 20-60-261. Checklist...

  16. A compendium on mobile robots used in hazardous environments: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meieran, H.B.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents a compendium of information regarding specific mobile robotic/teleoperated vehicles which are employed in a spectrum of hazardous environments, including the nuclear industry. These devices can be used to inspect, locate, identify, manipulate, and/or maintain components and items in the hazardous environment as well as act as mobile surveillance/sensing/reconnaissance platforms while monitoring the various constituents in the hazardous atmospheres. Furthermore, they can be used as transporters of tools, equipment, and material to and from the hazardous environment. This initial compendium is restricted to those devices which are able to maneuver on the surface of floors and other terrain features in both out-of-water and shallow water situations; subsequent compendiums will present information regarding underwater devices which can be used in the nuclear/fossil fueled/hydraulic based electric power generating and other utility industries and information updates for the initial volume. This compendium excludes those devices which are being considered for applications in outer space. 17 refs.

  17. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

  18. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-30

    A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  19. Alternative scenarios for Federal transportation policy. Volume I. Summary. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlaender, A.; Simpson, R.

    1977-01-01

    A summary is given of research evaluating the economic effects of existing and prospective federal policies governing intercity and international freight and passenger transportation enterprises in the economy of the United States. The analysis encompasses all modes of transportation, including rail, motor, water, air and intermodal coordinative institutions, and focuses upon the impact of alternative regulatory policies. However, other federal policies including subsidy, taxation, procurement, government ownership and investment, special programs for particular transportation industry problems and impacts of general national policies on transportation will be included when relevant. Economic evaluation includes the study of efficient resource allocation and distributional effects of alternative policies together with consideration of both partial and general equilibrium effects. The research is interdisciplinary in scope, drawing upon engineering, economics, statistics, law and administration.

  20. Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy systems. Final report. Volume I. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-12-01

    A summary report of a study program whose principal objective was to develop methods for the technical and economic evaluation of potential missions (applications) for photovoltaic solar energy conversion in the southwestern United States in the 1980 to 2000 period is presented. A secondary objective was to apply the methodology, when developed, to the evaluation of a number of illustrative examples of candidate missions in order to obtain at least a preliminary indication of the competitive position of the photovoltaic technology in the future energy economy of the Southwest. Because of their large potential significance, most of the effort in the study was devoted to two main classes of missions: on-site applications (in which the photovoltaic system serves an electric load point that is colocated with the system) and central station power plant applications. A smaller amount of attention was given to the electrolytic production of hydrogen with electric power generated by the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. (WHK)

  1. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  2. 77 FR 12497 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Environmental... waste is not a hazardous waste. This exclusion conditionally excludes the petitioned waste from the.... What decision is EPA finalizing and why? B. What are the terms of this exclusion? C. When is...

  3. Delivery of Speech Services to Minorities, 1997-2001. Final Performance Report. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Mary Ann

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a project designed to prepare speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to work with culturally and linguistically diverse infant/toddlers, preschoolers, children, and youth, specifically those of Mexican-American heritage. The project supported graduate students earning a master's degree in…

  4. Subtask 1.11 -- Spectroscopic field screening of hazardous waste and toxic spills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisanti, A.A.

    1997-10-01

    Techniques for the field characterization of soil contamination due to spillage of hazardous waste or toxic chemicals are time-consuming and expensive. Thus more economical, less time-intensive methods are needed to facilitate rapid field screening of contaminated sites. The overall objective of this project is to study the feasibility of using an evanescent field absorbance sensor Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic sensor coupled with cone penetrometry as a field screening method. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: design an accessory for use with FT-IR that interfaces the spectrometer to a cone penetrometer; characterize the response of the FT-IR accessory to selected hydrocarbons in a laboratory-simulated field environment; and determine the ability of the FT-IR-CPT instrument to measure hydrocarbon contamination in soil by direct comparison with a reference method (e.g., Soxhlet extraction followed by gas chromatography) to quantify hydrocarbons from the same soil.

  5. Portable sensor for hazardous waste. Final report, March 31, 1995--May 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, L.G.; Hunter, A.J.R.; Fraser, M.E.; Davis, S.H.; Finson, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes accomplishments for the second phase of a 5-year program designed to develop a portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection. The approach is to excite atomic fluorescence by the technique of Spark-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (SIBS). The principal goals for this second phase of the program were to demonstrate sensitive detection of additional species, both RCRA metals (Sb, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, As, Hg) and radionuclides (U, Th, Tc); to identify potential applications and develop instrument component processes, including, sample collection and excitation, measurement and test procedures, and calibration procedures; and to design a prototype instrument. Successful completion of these task results in being able to fabricate and field test a prototype of the instrument during the program`s third phase.

  6. Assessment of uncertainties in risk analysis of chemical establishments. The ASSURANCE project. Final summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, K.; Kozine, Igor; Markert, Frank;

    2002-01-01

    This report summarises the results obtained in the ASSURANCE project (EU contract number ENV4-CT97-0627). Seven teams have performed risk analyses for the same chemical facility, an ammonia storage. The EC's Joint Research Centre at Ispra and RisøNational Laboratory co-ordinated the exercise...... on the ranking among the adherents of the probabilistic approach. Breaking down the modelling of both frequencyand consequence assessments into suitably small elements and conducting case studies allowed identifying root causes of uncertainty in the final risk assessments. Large differences were found in both...... the frequency assessments and in the assessment ofconsequences. The report gives a qualitative assessment of the importance to the final calculated risk of uncertainties in assumptions made, in the data and the calculation methods used. This assessment can serve as a guide to areas where, in particular...

  7. 76 FR 56708 - Ohio: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... February 16, 2009. From Production of Dyes, Pigments, and Food, Drug and Cosmetic Colorants; Mass Loadings...; 3745-51-30; 3745- From Production of Dyes, 51-32; 3745-270-20; 3745-270-40; Effective Pigments, and Food, Drug and February 16, 2009. Cosmetic Colorants; Mass Loadings-Based Listing; Final...

  8. Summary of flammable gas hazard and potential consequences in tank waste remediation system facility at the Hanford site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-11

    This document provides a summary of the flammable gas program since 1992. It provides the best understanding of generation, retention, release of flammable gases. It gives a composition for each of the flammable gas tanks, calculates postulated concentrations in the event of a release, calculates the pressure obtained during a burn, and provides radiological and toxicological consequences. Controls from the analysis are found in WHC-SD-WM-SAR-067.

  9. Alligator rivers analogue project. Final report; volume 1; summary of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R

    1992-07-01

    The Koongarra uranium ore deposit is located in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Many of the processes that have controlled the development of this natural system are relevant to the performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. An agreement was reached in 1987 by a number of agencies concerned with radioactive waste disposal to set up the International Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) to study relevant aspects of the hydrological and geochemical evolution of the site. The Project ran for five years. The aims of the study were: to contribute to the production of reliable and realistic models for radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to the assessment of the safety of radioactive waste repositories; to develop methods of validation of models using a combination of laboratory and field data associated with the Koongarra uranium deposit; and to encourage maximum interaction between modellers and experimentalists in achieving these objectives. It was anticipated that the substantial databases generated in the field and laboratory studies would then be used to develop and test geochemical and radionuclide transport models. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project is one of a series of 16 volumes.

  10. Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration - Heat Recovery Systems. Annex 26. Final report. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. (ed.) [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Annex 26 has produced three deliverables: (1) Workshop (October 2000) proceedings Stockholm, Sweden, on CD-ROM (HPP-AN26-1); (2) Final report, described in this record; and (3) Final report, Volume 2, Country reports, on CD-ROM (HPP-AN26-3). Each of these reports, available from the HPC, provide valuable information for practitioners (designers, installers) and manufacturers of supermarket refrigeration systems. Annex 26 is the first international project under the IEA Heat Pump Programme that links refrigeration and heat pump technology. Recovering heat from advanced supermarket refrigeration systems for space and water heating purposes seems obvious and is beneficial for owners and operators. Because there are world-wide a great number of supermarkets that offer frozen and chilled food and further growth of this sector may be expected, the amount of energy used for refrigeration is enormous and will likely increase substantially in the near future. Annex 26 analysed several advanced supermarket refrigeration systems and came to remarkable conclusions as far as energy conservation and TEWI reduction is concerned. The conclusions justify that advanced supermarket systems with heat recovery should receive great attention and support. And there is still further research needed in several areas. The Annex also included a thorough system cost analyses and proposals for cost reductions are given.

  11. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. Final status report and summary of accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1994-07-15

    This final DOE report for grant award number DE-FG22-90PC 90291 presents the results of our efforts to better understand the Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O3 catalytic system for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide to selectively form oxygenated products. The content of this report is divided into three major sections and a fourth, concluding section which addresses our major research accomplishments, as well as documents the most significant publications and presentations associated with this grant. The three main sections which make up the body of this report are presented in the in form of manuscripts which, in turn, summarize our progress in three areas of this project. The three body sections are organized as follows: Section I--Evidence for site isolation in Rh-Mo bimetallic catalysts derived from organometallic clusters; Section II--Surface Chemistry of Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An analysis of surface acidity; and Section III--Comparative study of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Catalysts. Section IV summarizes major accomplishments. The content of this final report is meant to generally highlight our progress in both characterizing the nature of the Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system and probing its reactivity for insight on the oxygenate synergy present in this class of catalysts.

  12. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Patrick [NSTec

    2014-02-14

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  13. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    The University of Minnesota Grid-ICES was divided into four identifiable programs in order to study the feasibility of each of the parts of the ICES independently. The total program involves cogeneration, fuel conversion, fuel substitution, and energy conservation by system change. This Phase II report substantiates the theory that the Basic Grid ICES is not only energy-effective, but it will become cost effective as unit operating costs adjust to supply and demand in the 1980's. The Basic Program involves the cogeneration of steam and electricity. The University of Minnesota has been following an orderly process of converting its Central Heating Plant from gas-oil to 100% coal since 1973. The first step in the transition is complete. The University is presently 100% on coal, and will begin the second step, the test burning of low Btu Western coal during the spring, summer, and fall, and high Btu Eastern coal during the high thermal winter period. The final step to 100% Western coal is planned to be completed by 1980. In conjunction with the final step a retired Northern States Power generating plant has been purchased and is in the process of being retrofitted for topping the existing plant steam output during the winter months. The Basic Plan of ICES involves the add-on work and expense of installing additional boiler capacity at Southeast Steam and non-condensing electric generating capability. This will permit the simultaneous generation of electricity and heat dependent upon the thermal requirements of the heating and cooling system in University buildings. This volume presents an overview of the Community and the ICES. (MCW)

  14. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

  15. Executive summary and guide to final report: Advisory committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    On January 15, 1994, President Clinton appointed the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments to investigate reports of possibly unethical experiments funded by the government decades ago. The Committee was directed to uncover the history of human radiation experiments during the period 1944 through 1974 and to examine cases in which the government had intentionally released radiation into the environment for research purposes. The Committee was further charged with identifying the ethical and scientific standards for evaluating these events, and with making recommendations to ensure that whatever wrongdoing may have ocurred in the past cannot be repeated. The Committee undertook three projects: A review of how each agency of the federal government that currently conducts or funds research involving human subjects regulates this activity or oversees it; An examination of the documents and consent forms of research projects that are today sponsored by the federal government in order to develop insight into the current status of protections for the rights and interests of human subjects; and, Interviews of nearly 1,900 patients receiving out-patient medical care in private hospitals and federal facilities throughout the country. This booklet provides an overview of the Final Report, summarizing each chapter.

  16. Reduced dust emission industrial vacuum system. Final report/project accomplishments summary, CRADA Number KCP941001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerganian, S. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Wilson, S. [Billy Goat Industries, Lee`s Summit, MO (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify the design of a Billy Goat Industries VQ series industrial litter vacuum cleaner currently in production to allow it to be effective in a dusty environment. Other desired results were that the new design be easily and economically manufacturable, safe and easy for the operator to use and maintain, and easily adaptable to the rest of the Billy Goat Industries product line. To meet these objectives, the project plan was divided into four main phases. The first phase consisted of design overview and concept development. The second phase consisted of developing a detailed design based on the lessons learned from the prototype built in the first phase. The third phase consisted of refinement of the detailed design based on testing and marketing review. The fourth phase consisted of final reporting on the activities of the CRADA. The project has been terminated due to technical difficulties and a lack of confidence that practical, marketable solutions to these problems could be found.

  17. Data and Summaries for Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-Fired Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table 1 summarizes and explanis the Operating Conditions of the SCR Reactor used in the Benzene-Destruction.Table 2 summarizes and explains the Experimental Design and Test Results.Table 3 summarizes and explains the Estimates for Individual Effects and Cross Effects Obtained from the Linear Regression Models for Destruction of C6H6 and Reduction of NO.Fig. 1 shows the Down-flow SCR reactor system in detail.Fig. 2 shows the graphical summary of the Effect of the inlet C6H6 concentration to the SCR reactor on the destruction of C6H6.Fig.3 shows the summary of Carbon mass balance for C6H6 destruction promoted by the V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Lee , C., Y. Zhao, S. Lu, and W.R. Stevens. Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Polutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-fired Selective Catalyst Reduction Systems. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, USA, 30(3): 2240-2247, (2016).

  18. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, B. L. [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Roelke, Daniel [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Brooks, Bryan [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Grover, James [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-10-11

    blooms. Our numerical modeling results support the idea that cyanobacteria, through allelopathy, control the timing of golden algae blooms in Lake Granbury. The in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco also revealed that as golden algae blooms develop, there are natural enemies (a species of rotifer, and a virus) that help slow the population growth. Again, better characterization of these organisms is a high priority as it may be key to managing golden algae blooms. Our laboratory and in-lake experiments and field monitoring have shown that nutrient additions will remove toxicity and prevent golden algae from blooming. In fact, other algae displace the golden algae after nutrient additions. Additions of ammonia are particularly effective, even at low doses (much lower than what is employed in fish hatchery ponds). Application of ammonia in limited areas of lakes, such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. The laboratory experiments and field monitoring also show that the potency of toxins produced by P. parvum is greatly reduced when water pH is lower, closer to neutral levels. Application of mild acid to limited areas of lakes (but not to a level where acidic conditions are created), such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. Finally, our field monitoring and mathematical modeling revealed that flushing/dilution at high enough levels could prevent P. parvum from forming blooms and/or terminate existing blooms. This technique could work using deeper waters within a lake to flush the surface waters of limited areas of the same lakes, such as in coves and should be explored as a management option. In this way, water releases from upstream reservoirs would not be necessary and there would be no addition of nutrients in the lake.

  19. STUDIES TO SUPPORT DEPLOYMENT OF EDIBLE OILS AS THE FINAL CVOC REMEDIATION IN T AREA SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riha, B; Brian02 Looney, B; Miles Denham, M; Christopher Bagwell, C; Richard Hall, R; Carol Eddy-Dilek, C

    2006-10-31

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the feasibility of using edible oils for remediation of the low but persistent chlorinated solvent (cVOC) groundwater contamination at the SRS T-Area. The following studies were completed: (1) Review of cVOC degradation processes and edible oil delivery for enhanced bioremediation. (2) Column studies to investigate placing neat oil on top of the water table to increase oil saturation and sequestration. (3) Analysis of T-Area groundwater geochemistry to determine the applicability of edible oils for remediation at this site. (4) Microcosm studies to evaluate biotic and abiotic processes for the T-Area groundwater system and evaluation of the existing microbial community with and with out soybean oil amendments. (5) Monitoring of a surrogate vadose zone site undergoing edible oil remediation at the SRS to understand partitioning and biotransformation products of the soybean oil. (6) Design of a delivery system for neat and emulsified edible oil deployment for the T-Area groundwater plume. A corresponding white paper is available for each of the studies listed. This paper provides a summary and overview of the studies completed for the remediation of the T-Area groundwater plume using edible oils. This report begins with a summary of the results and a brief description of the preliminary oil deployment design followed by brief descriptions of T-Area and current groundwater conditions as related to edible oil deployment. This is followed by a review of the remediation processes using edible oils and specific results from modeling, field and laboratory studies. Finally, a description of the preliminary design for full scale oil deployment is presented.

  20. CalTOX, a multimedia total exposure model for hazardous-waste sites; Part 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in health-risk assessments that address contaminated soils and the contamination of adjacent air, surface water, sediments, and ground water. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify and reduce uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure models. This report provides an overview of the CalTOX model components, lists the objectives of the model, describes the philosophy under which the model was developed, identifies the chemical classes for which the model can be used, and describes critical sensitivities and uncertainties. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a dynamic model that can be used to assess time-varying concentrations of contaminants introduced initially to soil layers or for contaminants released continuously to air or water. This model assists the user in examining how chemical and landscape properties impact both the ultimate route and quantity of human contact. Multimedia, multiple pathway exposure models are used in the CalTOX model to estimate average daily potential doses within a human population in the vicinity of a hazardous substances release site. The exposure models encompass twenty-three exposure pathways. The exposure assessment process consists of relating contaminant concentrations in the multimedia model compartments to contaminant concentrations in the media with which a human population has contact (personal air, tap water, foods, household dusts soils, etc.). The average daily dose is the product of the exposure concentrations in these contact media and an intake or uptake factor that relates the concentrations to the distributions of potential dose within the population.

  1. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Final Report. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document presents the executive summary of the final report of Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory), a 3-year study at Indiana University. Project STEEL achieved four major goals: (1) development, implementation, and evaluation of a microcomputer-based observation system for codification, storage, and…

  2. NASA Hazard Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews The NASA Hazard Analysis process. The contents include: 1) Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Spaceflight; 2) Subsystem Safety Engineering Through the Project Life Cycle; 3) The Risk Informed Design Process; 4) Types of NASA Hazard Analysis; 5) Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA); 6) Hazard Analysis Process; 7) Identify Hazardous Conditions; 8) Consider All Interfaces; 9) Work a Preliminary Hazard List; 10) NASA Generic Hazards List; and 11) Final Thoughts

  3. Southern California Earthquake Center - SCEC1: Final Report Summary Alternative Earthquake Source Characterization for the Los Angeles Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, B

    2003-02-26

    geometrical and slip-rate parameters, including full uncertainty distributions, and a set of logic trees that define alternative source characterizations, particularly for sets of fault systems having inter-dependent geometries and kinematics resulting from potential intersection and interaction in the sub-surface. All of these products exist in a form suitable for input to earthquake likelihood and seismic hazard analyses. In addition, moment-balanced Poissonian earthquake rates for the alternative multi-segment characterizations of each fault system have been estimated. Finally, this work has served an important integrative function in that the exchange and debate of data, results and ideas that it has engendered has helped to focus SCEC research over the past six years on to key issues in tectonic deformation and faulting.

  4. The recent trends and perspectives for final refusing of the hazardous waste in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Krstev, Boris; Lazarov, Aleksandar; Krstev, Aleksandar; Danevski, Tome; Trajkova, Sofce; Golomeov, Blagoj; Golomeova, Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the developments of industrial production and increased consumption with produced hazardous waste, although in the last two to three decades technological processes has been reported, the amounts of hazardous waste has been significantly increased, which is a worrying problem for today's civilization. The current state of treatment of waste can qualify as irregular and chaotic. This unfavorable situation is result to lack of a system for integrated management of the waste ...

  5. Final evaluation of PETC coal conversion solid and hazardous wastes. Final report, September 15, 1977-November 30, 1979. [PETC's own operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, R.D.; Shapiro, M.; Bern, J.

    1979-08-01

    Hazards and pollutional impacts from residuals generated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center are explained in the context of hazardous waste regulations proposed by the federal government (RCRA). Nine hazard characteristics are defined and an overview of their significance to PETC is presented. Pollutional impacts on air, water and land are discussed in the energy research perspective. Legislative and statutory relationships between the Center and local, county, state and federal enforcement agencies are listed and analyzed. Expected liability resting on the Center in this framework is outlined. One hundred seven different chemical and indeterminate wastes were reported in an inventory conducted as an earlier task of this project. All of these are tabulated, classified in accordance with the latest proposed federal regulations, with recommended treatment and disposal methodologies included. The existing residuals management system is described to establish baseline conditions in preparing the recommended system. Management policies as they are presently practiced are included in the presentation. A recommended residuals management plan is offered for consideration. It includes the organizational arrangement of PETC personnel, a description of authority and responsibilities of the various human elements of the plan, an information network with detailed data sheets and installation of a mandatory manifest system, a carefully designed hazardous chemical storage area, and short as well as long term choices.

  6. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Veneziano, D.; Van Dyck, J.; Toro, G.; O' Hara, T.; Drake, L.; Patwardhan, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Keeney, R.; Winkler, R.

    1988-11-01

    Aided by its consultant, the US Geologic Survey (USGS), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed ''Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.'' This topical report was submitted jointly by the Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in July 1986 and was revised in February 1987. The NRC staff concludes that SOG/EPRI Seismic Hazard Methodology as documented in the topical report and associated submittals, is an acceptable methodology for use in calculating seismic hazard in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). These calculations will be based upon the data and information documented in the material that was submitted as the SOG/EPRI topical report and ancillary submittals. However, as part of the review process the staff conditions its approval by noting areas in which problems may arise unless precautions detailed in the report are observed. 23 refs.

  7. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report describes and summarizes a probabilistic evaluation of ground motions for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this evaluation is to provide a basis for updating the seismic design criteria for the INEL. In this study, site-specific seismic hazard curves were developed for seven facility sites as prescribed by DOE Standards 1022-93 and 1023-96. These sites include the: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL); Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP or CPP); Power Burst Facility (PBF); Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); Naval Reactor Facility (NRF); and Test Area North (TAN). The results, probabilistic peak ground accelerations and uniform hazard spectra, contained in this report are not to be used for purposes of seismic design at INEL. A subsequent study will be performed to translate the results of this probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to site-specific seismic design values for the INEL as per the requirements of DOE Standard 1020-94. These site-specific seismic design values will be incorporated into the INEL Architectural and Engineering Standards.

  8. Revision of TRH 11 (1999-2000). Recovery of road damage – discussion document on a provisional basis for possible new estimation of mass fees – under review for TRH 11 (2000) – final summary report V1.0

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available (2000) -- --- FINAL SUMMARY REPORT V1.0 --- Authors: M De Beer I M Sallie Y van Rensburg PREPARED FOR: National Department of Transport Abnormal Loads Technical Committee Pretoria South Africa PREPARED BY... DAMAGE - DISCUSSION DOCUMENT ON A PROVISIONAL BASIS FOR POSSIBLE NEW ESTIMATION OF MASS FEES - UNDER REVIEW FOR TRH 11 (2000) - FINAL SUMMARY REPORT V1.0 - Author: M De Beer, I M Sallie and Y van Rensburg Client: NDoT, South Africa Client...

  9. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  10. Investigation of lithium-thionyl chloride battery safety hazards. Final report 28 Sep 81-31 Dec 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, A.I.; Gabriel, K.A.; Burns, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    In the ten years since the feasibility of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell was first recognized (1) remarkable progress has been made in hardware development. Cells as large as 16,000 Ah (2) and batteries of 10.8 MWh (3) have been demonstrated. In a low rate configuration, energy densities of 500 to 600 Wh/kg are easily achieved. Even in the absence of reported explosions, safety would be a concern for such a dense energetic package; the energy density of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell is approaching that of dynamite (924 Wh/kg). In fact explosions have occurred. In general the hazards associated with lithium-thionyl chloride batteries may be divided into four categories: Explosions as a result of an error in battery design. Very large cells were in prototype development prior to a full appreciation of the hazards of the system. It is possible that some of the remaining safety issues are related to cell design; Explosions as a result of external physical abuse such as cell incineration and puncture; Explosions due to short circuiting which could lead to thermal runaway reactions. These problems appear to have been solved by changes in the battery design (4); and Expolsions due to abnormal electrical operation (i.e., charging (5) and overdischarging (6) and in partially or fully discharged cells on storage (7 and 8).

  11. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  12. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration

  13. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power

  14. Assessment of industrial hazardous waste practices, storage and primary batteries industries. Final report, Apr--Sep 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, L.C.; Wetzel, R.; Casana, J.; Slimak, K.

    1975-01-01

    This report, which covers battery manufacturing operations, is one of a series of several studies which examine land-destined wastes from selected industries. The battery industry is divided into two groups by the Bureau of Census: Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 3691 Storage Batteries (such as lead--acid automobile batteries) and SIC 3692 Primary Batteries (such as carbon--zinc flashlight batteries). The battery industry was studied because heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium, zinc, and lead are used in some of its manufacturing processes. These metals can be toxic in certain concentrations and forms. The potentially hazardous wastes destined for land disposal from the battery industry consist of industrial processing wastes, reject cells, and sludges from water pollution control devices. The amount of sludges destined for land disposal is expected to experience a large short term increase as water effluent guidelines are implemented. The impact of water effluent guidelines on land disposal of wastes is the largest single factor in determining future trends for this industry.

  15. Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Annex 2 To the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission. Case Study Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    "Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Annex 2 To the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission. Case Study Summaries" is designed as a companion document to the final report "Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Final…

  16. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kevin [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beeghly, Joel H. [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-11-30

    About 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable. This Executive Summary describes efforts to dewater the magnesium hydroxide and gypsum slurries and then process the solids into a more user friendly and higher value form. To eliminate the cost of solids disposal in its first generation Thiosorbic® system, the Dravo Lime Company developed the ThioClear® process that utilizes a magnesium based absorber liquor to remove S02 with minimal suspended solids. Magnesium enhanced lime is added to an oxidized bleed stream of thickener overflow (TOF) to produce magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and gypsum (CaS04 • 2H20), as by-products. This process was demonstrated at the 3 to 5 MW closed loop FGD system pilot plant at the Miami Fort Station of Cinergy, near Cincinnati, Ohio with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-91-6. A similar process strictly for'recovery and reuse of Mg(OH)2 began operation at the Zimmer Station of Cinergy in late 1994 that can produce 900 pounds of Mg(OH)2 per hour and 2,600 pounds of gypsum per hour. This by-product plant, called the Zimmer Slipstream Magnesium Hydroxide Recovery Project Demonstration, was conducted with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-921-004. Full scale ThioClear® plants began operating in 1997 at the 130 MW Applied Energy Services plant, in Monaca, PA, and in year 2000 at the 1,330 MW Allegheny Energy Pleasants Station at St. Marys, WV.

  17. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The conceptual design of an advanced central receiver power system using liquid sodium as a heat transport medium has been completed by a team consisting of the Energy Systems Group (prime contractor), McDonnell Douglas, Stearns-Roger, The University of Houston, and Salt River Project. The purpose of this study was to determine the technical and economic advantages of this concept for commercial-scale power plants. This final report covers all tasks of the project. These tasks were as follows: (1) review and analysis of preliminary specification; (2) parametric analysis; (3) select commercial configuration; (4) commercial plant conceptual design; (5) assessment of commercial plant; (6) advanced central receiver power system development plan; (7) program plan; (8) reports and data; (9) program management; and (10) safety analysis. A programmatic overview of the accomplishments of this program is given. The 100-MW conceptual commercial plant, the 281-MW optimum plant, and the 10-MW pilot plant are described. (WHK)

  18. Hospital ventilation standards and energy conservation: a summary of the literature with conclusions and recommendations. Final report, FY 78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollowell, C.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1978-09-01

    This research examines the basis of current hospital HVAC standards and determines if they can be relaxed on criteria that do not compromise the health, safety, and comfort of patients and staff and has acceptance of the health care community. Chapter 2 summarizes existing standards in use throughout the United States governing hospital ventilation systems and the thermal environment. Chapter 3 explores the role of air in hospital-acquired infections. Chapter 4 explores the realm of indoor air quality within the hospital. Chapter 5 contains a discussion concerning the influence of thermal factors on patient comfort. Chapter 6 discusses the hospital odor problem with regards to ventilation rates. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations developed from the literature review and from a small working conference sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

  19. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  20. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste; Alternative Requirements for Hazardous Waste Determination and Accumulation of Unwanted Material at Laboratories Owned by Colleges and Universities and Other Eligible Academic Entities Formally Affiliated With Colleges and Universities. Final Rule. Federal Register, Environmental Protection Agency. 40 CFR Parts 261 and 262. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is finalizing an alternative set of generator requirements applicable to laboratories owned by eligible academic entities, as defined in this final rule. The rule provides a flexible and protective set of regulations that address the specific nature of hazardous waste generation and…

  2. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Ludowise

    2009-06-17

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site. A material at risk calculation was performed that determined the radiological inventory for each burial ground to be Hazard Category 3.

  3. Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  4. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report - Calendar Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Patrick [NSTec

    2015-02-17

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  5. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-16

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  6. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  7. Summary evaluation of the video, {open_quotes}Transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials: Safety for all concerned{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, M.C.; Young, C.F.

    1993-07-01

    Outreach materials are often developed and distributed without evaluation of their effectiveness. This report provides a glimpse of the effectiveness of one of the US Department of Energy`s videos on transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials. Data from a survey developed by Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. are summarized. This survey was sent to recipients of the video at three to six weeks after they had received and viewed the video. The response rate is unknown; hence, the results suggest the range of perspectives on the video, rather than the representativeness of those perspectives. The results are also limited by incomplete responses to the survey. Most respondents were middle school and high school teachers who resided throughout the country. Respondents used the video in nearly all school subjects. Most respondents indicated that the video was fairly good and appreciated the factual information, although some saw it as propaganda. Respondents indicated that they would like additional information on hazardous wastes, nuclear power, and transportation. The test crashes were mentioned as a highlight of the video. Recommendations for revising the video and survey are included.

  8. Summary of November 2010 meeting to evaluate turbidite data for constraining the recurrence parameters of great Cascadia earthquakes for the update of national seismic hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a meeting of geologists, marine sedimentologists, geophysicists, and seismologists that was held on November 18–19, 2010 at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. The overall goal of the meeting was to evaluate observations of turbidite deposits to provide constraints on the recurrence time and rupture extent of great Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquakes for the next update of the U.S. national seismic hazard maps (NSHM). The meeting was convened at Oregon State University because this is the major center for collecting and evaluating turbidite evidence of great Cascadia earthquakes by Chris Goldfinger and his colleagues. We especially wanted the participants to see some of the numerous deep sea cores this group has collected that contain the turbidite deposits. Great earthquakes on the CSZ pose a major tsunami, ground-shaking, and ground-failure hazard to the Pacific Northwest. Figure 1 shows a map of the Pacific Northwest with a model for the rupture zone of a moment magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake on the CSZ and the ground shaking intensity (in ShakeMap format) expected from such an earthquake, based on empirical ground-motion prediction equations. The damaging effects of such an earthquake would occur over a wide swath of the Pacific Northwest and an accompanying tsunami would likely cause devastation along the Pacifc Northwest coast and possibly cause damage and loss of life in other areas of the Pacific. A magnitude 8 earthquake on the CSZ would cause damaging ground shaking and ground failure over a substantial area and could also generate a destructive tsunami. The recent tragic occurrence of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake highlights the importance of having accurate estimates of the recurrence times and magnitudes of great earthquakes on subduction zones. For the U.S. national seismic hazard maps, estimating the hazard from the Cascadia subduction zone has been based on coastal paleoseismic evidence of great

  9. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  10. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    CERN Document Server

    Grams, W H

    2000-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from t...

  11. Summary of November 2010 meeting to evaluate turbidite data for constraining the recurrence parameters of great Cascadia earthquakes for the update of national seismic hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a meeting of geologists, marine sedimentologists, geophysicists, and seismologists that was held on November 18–19, 2010 at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. The overall goal of the meeting was to evaluate observations of turbidite deposits to provide constraints on the recurrence time and rupture extent of great Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquakes for the next update of the U.S. national seismic hazard maps (NSHM). The meeting was convened at Oregon State University because this is the major center for collecting and evaluating turbidite evidence of great Cascadia earthquakes by Chris Goldfinger and his colleagues. We especially wanted the participants to see some of the numerous deep sea cores this group has collected that contain the turbidite deposits. Great earthquakes on the CSZ pose a major tsunami, ground-shaking, and ground-failure hazard to the Pacific Northwest. Figure 1 shows a map of the Pacific Northwest with a model for the rupture zone of a moment magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake on the CSZ and the ground shaking intensity (in ShakeMap format) expected from such an earthquake, based on empirical ground-motion prediction equations. The damaging effects of such an earthquake would occur over a wide swath of the Pacific Northwest and an accompanying tsunami would likely cause devastation along the Pacifc Northwest coast and possibly cause damage and loss of life in other areas of the Pacific. A magnitude 8 earthquake on the CSZ would cause damaging ground shaking and ground failure over a substantial area and could also generate a destructive tsunami. The recent tragic occurrence of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake highlights the importance of having accurate estimates of the recurrence times and magnitudes of great earthquakes on subduction zones. For the U.S. national seismic hazard maps, estimating the hazard from the Cascadia subduction zone has been based on coastal paleoseismic evidence of great

  12. Volcanic Hazard Maps; the results and progress made by the IAVCEI Hazard Map working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Eliza; Lindsay, Jan; Wright, Heather

    2017-04-01

    The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk set up a working group on Hazard Maps in 2014. Since then, the group has led or co-organised three major workshops, and organized two thematic conference sessions. In particular we have initiated a series of workshops, named the "State of the Hazard Map" which we plan to continue (the first was held at COV8 (State of the Hazard Map 1) and second at COV9 (State of the Hazard Map 2) and the third will be held at IAVCEI General Assembly in Portland. The broad aim of these activities is to work towards an IAVCEI-endorsed considerations or guidelines document for volcanic hazard map generation. The workshops have brought together people from around the world working on volcanic hazard maps, and have had four primary objectives: 1) to review (and collect further data on) the diverse variety of methods and rationales currently used to develop maps; 2) to openly discuss approaches and experiences regarding how hazard maps are interpreted and used by different groups; 3) to discuss and prepare the IAVCEI Guidelines document; and lastly, 4) Discuss options for finalizing, publishing and disseminating the Guidelines document (e.g. wiki, report, open-source publication). This presentation will provide an update of the results and outcomes of those initiatives. This includes brief outcomes of the reviews undertaken, a survey that has been constructed in order to gather additional data, the planned structure for the guidelines documents and a summary of the key findings to date. The majority of the participants of these activities so far have come from volcano observatories or geological surveys, as these institutions commonly have primary responsibility for making operational hazard map. It is important however that others in the scientific community that work on quantification of volcanic hazard contribute to these guidelines. We therefore invite interested parties to become involved.

  13. Final safety analysis addendum to hazard summary report, experimental breeder reactor No. II (EBR-II): the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, R M; Monson, L R; Price, C C; Hooker, D W

    1979-04-01

    This report evaluates abnormal and accident conditions postulated for the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system (CGCS). Major considerations include loss of CGCS function with a high level of cover-gas activity, loss of the liquid-nitrogen coolant required for removing fission products from the cover gas, contamination of the cover gas from sources other than the reactor, and loss of system pressure boundary. Calculated exposures resulting from the maximum hypothetical accident (MHA) are less than 2% of the 25-Rem limit stipulated in U.S. Regulation 10 CFR 100; i.e., a person standing at any point on an exclusion boundary (area radius of 600 m) for 2 h following onset of the postulated release would receive less than 0.45 Rem whole-body dose. The on-site whole-body dose (10 m from the source) would be less than 16 Rem.

  14. Hazard and socioenvironmental weakness: radioactive waste final disposal in the perception of the Abadia de Goias residents, GO, Brazil; Risco e vulnerabilidade socioambiental: o deposito definitivo de rejeitos radioativos na percepcao dos moradores de Abadia de Goias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Elaine Campos

    2005-07-01

    The work searches into the hazard and the weakness which involves the community around the radioactive waste final disposal, localized in Abadia de Goias municipality, Goias state, Brazil. In order to obtain a deep knowledge on the characteristic hazards of the modernity, the sociological aspects under discussion has been researched in the Anthony Giddens and Ulrich Beck works. The phenomenon was analyzed based on the the subjective experiences of the residents, which live there for approximately 16 years. This temporal analysis is related to the social impact suffered by the residents due to the radioactive wastes originated from the radiation accident with 137 cesium in Goiania, GO, Brazil, in 1987. In spite of the local security, they identified the disposal as a hazard source, although the longer time residents have been better adaptation. The weakness of the local is significant by the proximity of residences near the area of the radioactive waste final disposal. (author)

  15. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2007-04-12

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  16. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-20

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  17. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-12-06

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  18. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  19. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving Illinois' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from ``Hazardous/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators'' (HMIWI). The Illinois Environmental...

  20. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve, through direct final rulemaking, Illinois' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI...

  1. 77 FR 24405 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving Indiana's revised State Plan to control air pollutants from ``Hazardous/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators'' (HMIWI). The Indiana Department of...

  2. Development and application of a permit information system for shale oil (PERMISSO). Final report appendix: summary sheets of regulations required for oil shale development, June 1978--May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This appendix is comprised of summaries of various governmental permits, licenses and other approvals required for oil shale development. The summaries were completed during the period June--October 1978, and are current as of July 1, 1978, although more recent authority was cited in some cases. One of the major purposes of Phase II of the project will be to update these summaries as statutes and regulations are added, changed or eliminated. This updating will be particularly important in the case of environmental permits and approvals. Many legislative and regulatory changes affecting environmental requirements are pending at this time and will alter many of the summaries herein. In addition, many regulatory proposals have been or likely will be challenged in the courts. When such conflicts are resolved further changes may be in order.

  3. Hazardous Waste: Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page on hazardous waste transportation . Top of Page Hazardous Waste Recycling, Treatment, Storage and Disposal To the extent possible, EPA ... Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) provide temporary storage and final treatment or disposal for hazardous wastes. Since they manage large volumes of waste and ...

  4. 77 FR 17573 - Hazard Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ..., 1915 and 1926 Hazard Communication; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 58 / Monday... Administration 29 CFR Parts 1910, 1915, and 1926 RIN 1218-AC20 Hazard Communication AGENCY: Occupational Safety... modifying its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform to the United Nations' Globally Harmonized...

  5. Preliminary assessment of hazardous-waste pretreatment as an air-pollution-control technique. Final report, 25 July 1983-31 July 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivey, J.J.; Allen, C.C.; Green, D.A.; Wood, J.P.; Stallings, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    The report evaluates twelve commercially available treatment techniques for their use in removing volatile constituents from hazardous and potentially hazardous waste streams. A case study of the cost of waste treatment is also provided for each technique. The results show that air stripping or evaporation coupled with carbon adsorption of the off gases; steam stripping; and batch distillation are the most widely applicable pretreatment techniques. The cost-effectiveness of pretreatment varies widely with waste-stream characteristics and type of pretreatment, with typical values being between $55 and $1,800 per megagram of volatile removed.

  6. Health hazard evaluation/toxicity determination report 73-73-143, Inland Manufacturing Co. , General Motors Corporation, Dayton, Ohio. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhe, R.L.

    1974-10-01

    NIOSH conducted a health hazard survey in a boiler room of a steam plant to evaluate worker exposure to coal dust containing silica and fly ash during the boiler clean-up operation. Based on these environmental measurements and on employee interviews, it was determined that the silica containing dusts were not toxic at the concentrations found on this survey. (GRA)

  7. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  8. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1998-2001; Sammanfattning av det nordiska forsknings-programmet for karnsakerhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T. (ed.)

    2002-11-01

    The results of the 1998 - 2001 NKS program are presented in the form of executive summaries, highlighting the conclusions, recommendations and other findings and results of the six projects carried out during that period. The titles of the six projects are: Risk assessment and strategies for safety (NKS/SOS-1); Reactor safety (NKS/SOS-2); Radioactive waste (NKS/SOS-3); Nuclear Emergency preparedness (NKS/BOK-1); Radiological and environmental consequences (NKS/BOK-2); Nuclear threats from Nordic surroundings (NKS/SBA-1) (ln)

  9. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three articles relevant to school crisis response: (1) "Factors Contributing to Posttraumatic Growth," summarized by Steve DeBlois; (2) "Psychological Debriefing in Cross-Cultural Contexts" (Stacey Rice); and (3) "Brain Abnormalities in PTSD" (Sunny Windingstad). The first summary reports the findings of a…

  10. Design and operation of power systems with large amounts of wind power. Final summary report, IEA WIND Task 25, Phase two 2009 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Robitaille, A. [Hydro Quebec, Montreal QC (Canada)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    This report provides a summary of the results from recent wind integration studies. The studies address concerns about the impact of wind power's variability and uncertainty on power system reliability and costs as well as grid reinforcement needs. Quantifiable results are presented as summary graphs: results as a MW-increase in reserve requirements, or euro/MWh increase in balancing costs, or results for capacity value of wind power. Other results are briefly summarised, together with existing experience on the issues. There is already significant experience in integrating wind power in power systems. The mitigation of wind power impacts include more flexible operational methods, incentivising flexibility in other generating plants, increasing interconnection to neighbouring regions, and application of demand-side flexibility. Electricity storage is still not as cost effective in larger power systems as other means of flexibility, but is already seeing initial applications in places with limited transmission. Electricity markets, with cross-border trade of intra-day and balancing resources and emerging ancillary services markets, are seen as promising for future large penetration levels for wind power. (orig.)

  11. Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power: Final Summary Report, IEA WIND Task 25, Phase Three 2012-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, Hannele; Kiviluoma, Juha; Forcione, Alain; Milligan, Michael; Smith, Charles J.; Dillon, Jody; Dobschinski, Jan; van Roon, Serafin; Cutululis, Nicolaos; Orths, Antje; Eriksen, Peter Borre; Carlini, Enrico Maria; Estanqueiro, Ana; Bessa, Ricardo; Soder, Lennart; Farahmand, Hossein; Torres, Jose Rueda; Jianhua, Bai; Kondoh, Junji; Pineda, Ivan; Strbac, Goran

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes recent findings on wind integration from the 16 countries participating in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind collaboration research Task 25 in 2012-2014. Both real experience and studies are reported. The national case studies address several impacts of wind power on electric power systems. In this report, they are grouped under long-term planning issues and short-term operational impacts. Long-term planning issues include grid planning and capacity adequacy. Short-term operational impacts include reliability, stability, reserves, and maximizing the value in operational timescales (balancing related issues). The first section presents variability and uncertainty of power system-wide wind power, and the last section presents recent wind integration studies for higher shares of wind power. Appendix 1 provides a summary of ongoing research in the national projects contributing to Task 25 in 2015-2017.

  12. An Investigation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Sonochemistry for Destruction of Hazardous Waste - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Inez

    2000-09-14

    During the last 20 years, various legislative acts have mandated the reduction and elimination of water and land pollution. In order to fulfill these mandates, effective control and remediation methods must be developed and implemented. The drawbacks of current hazardous waste control methods motivate the development of new technology, and the need for new technology is further driven by the large number of polluted sites across the country. This research explores the application and optimization of ultrasonic waves as a novel method by which aqueous contaminants are degraded. The primary objective of the investigation is to acquire a deeper fundamental knowledge of acoustic cavitation and cavitation chemistry, and in doing so, to ascertain how ultrasonic irradiation can be more effectively applied to environmental problems. Special consideration is given to the types of problems and hazardous chemical substrates found specifically at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The experimental work is divided into five broad tasks, to be completed over a period of three years. The first task is to explore the significance of physical variables during sonolysis, such as ultrasonic frequency. The second aim is an understanding of sonochemical degradation kinetics and by-products, complemented by information from the detection of reactive intermediates with electron paramagnetic resonance. The sonolytic decomposition studies will focus on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Investigation of activated carbon regeneration during ultrasonic irradiation extends sonochemical applications in homogeneous systems to heterogeneous systems of environmental interest. Lastly, the physics and hydrodynamics of cavitation bubbles and bubble clouds will be correlated with sonochemical effects by performing high-speed photographic studies of acoustically cavitating aqueous solutions. The most important benefit will be fundamental information which will allow a more optimal application of

  13. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  14. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  15. Executive Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace. It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasi...

  16. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Umatilla, Tucannon, Asotin, and Grande Ronde River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Umatilla and Grande Ronde River basins, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the

  17. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database

  18. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Report for the Waste Loading Area, Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-08-19

    The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions were less than the established release criteria. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation.

  19. Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System. Executive Summary. Final report. Phase I, February 1, 1977--May 31, 1977. [Univ. of Minnesota Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    A brief review of the University of Minnesota's program for a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) is given. The Community energy system focuses on modifications to the central heating plant on campus, wherein the capability of generating additional steam and by-product electricity will be established by acquiring a retired generating plant. A second area of importance is the adding on of Community gas/oil committed loads to the coal-fired system. The third area of importance in the proposed total ICES involves the installation of a pyrolysis system for the safe disposal of infections and hazardous waste whereby a low Btu gas will be generated. This will then be utilized in the plant as a supplement to its primary fuel requirements. The fourth area being investigated is the conversion of part of the steam distribution system to a variable flow and variable-temperature hot water system. Economics indicate that hot water will most likely be the distribution system for co-generation plants in the future. (MCW)

  20. THEREDA. Thermodynamic reference data base. Phase II. Release of thermodynamic data. Summary and final report; THEREDA. Thermodynamische Referenz-Datenbasis. Phase II. Freigabe thermodynamischer Daten. Zusammenfassung der Abschlussberichte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Gaona, Xavier; Marquardt, Christian; Montoya, Vanessa [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung; Bok, Frank; Richter, Anke [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Moog, Helge C.; Scharge, Tina [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Voigt, Wolfgang [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Wilhelm, Stefan [AF Consult AG, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    The final report on the thermodynamic reference data base THEREDA covers the following issues: project management, quality management (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf HZDR and GRS), data base interfaces, documentation, uranium (HZDR), other nuclides (Karlsruhe Institute for technology, KIT), data for cement minerals and their reaction products (AF-Consult, GRS), phosphate (GRS), systems with CO2 and carbonate at variable temperatures and pressure (Bergakademie Freiberg, TUBAF).

  1. Summary of the FERC final rules on comparable open access, stranded cost recovery, and same-time information systems: order 888 and order 889

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    FERC Final Rules of wholesale electricity generation and transmission services and their impact in implementing non-discriminatory open access to transmission facilities in the United States, were discussed. The article focused on the scope of the rule, the definition of legal authority, comparability, ancillary services, real-time information networks, co-ordination arrangements for power pools, public utility companies, and independent system operators. Rules concerning pro forma tariffs, definition of federal and state jurisdictions, and the mechanism for settling problems of stranded costs were also explained.

  2. Final proceedings of the second solar heating and cooling commercial demonstration program contractors' review. Volume 1. Summary and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The Second Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program Contractors' Review was attended by over 300 representatives from demonstration projects, the Department of Energy (DOE), other Federal agencies, and Government contractors. This volume presents a thorough study of the 140 project papers printed in the three-volume proceedings. A comprehensive table describing the 140 sites is included. This table presents a description of the sites not only in terms of equipment and performance, but also those regarding their problems, successes, and other experiences. The panel discussions on demonstration projects, the National Solar Data Program and the Commercial Demonstration Program are summarized and analyzed. The results of a special survey of Commercial Demonstration Program contractors are presented. Finally, the results of a polling of Review participants on the effectiveness of the meeting are detailed. (WHK)

  3. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  4. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, members of the NASP Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group provide summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among rescue workers. The second article explored the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention, which is…

  5. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng;

    2013-01-01

    of the datasets. But some other fundamental ones, like those for heavy hitters and quantiles, are not (known to be) mergeable. In this article, we demonstrate that these summaries are indeed mergeable or can be made mergeable after appropriate modifications. Specifically, we show that for ϵ-approximate heavy...

  6. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, N.; van Nimwegen, N.; van der Erf, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Demography Monitor 2008 gives a concise overview of current demographic trends and related developments in education, the labour market and retirement for the European Union and some other countries. This executive summary highlights the major findings of the Demography Monitor 2008 and further

  7. Long-term scenarios and strategies for the deployment of renewable energies in Germany in view of European and global developments. Summary of the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsch, Joachim; Pregger, Thomas; Scholz, Yvonne [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Stuttgart (Germany). Abt. Systemanalyse und Technikbewertung] [and others

    2012-03-31

    The German Federal government's ''Energy Concept'' [Energiekonzept 2010] of 28 September 2010 and the subsequent energy laws of summer 2011 presented a long-term political timetable for climate protection and the transformation of the energy supply in Germany [the ''Energiewende'']. It calls for emissions of greenhouse gases in Germany to be reduced by 80% to 95% from the 1990 level by the year 2050. For energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions alone, this target requires a reduction of at least 85%, aiming in the final result at a power supply that is almost emission-free. A transformation of the power supply to renewable sources of energy, accompanied by a substantial increase in energy efficiency, is the appropriate strategy for this. The challenges presented by this transformation of the power system are considerable, and their full extent has not yet been grasped. This study presents results of systems-analysis examinations of the transformation of electricity, heat, and fuel generation that were developed as part of a three-year research project for the Federal Ministry of the Environment (final report [Nitsch et al. 2012]). The work is based on projects carried out in previous years by the DLR with varying project partners for the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Federal Environment Agency (UBA). In essence, self-consistent energy scenarios for long-term expansion of renewables and for the remaining supply of energy, and the structural and economic effects to be derived from these, were developed. In addition, the project partners, the DLR in Stuttgart and the Fraunhofer Institut fur Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik (IWES) in Kassel, performed simulations of the future electricity supply as it develops over time, some of them with spatial resolution. This enabled the scenarios for electricity generation to be validated with respect to load coverage, and also

  8. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

    2002-12-01

    This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

  9. Wastes = Resources. Summary (public version). Final report. January 2011 - January 2012; Afval = Grondstof. Samenvatting (publieksversie). Eindrapport. Periode Januari 2011 - Januari 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffmans, S.; De Lint, S.; Karsch, P. [Partners for Innovation, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    The aim of the project 'Waste = Resource' is to give a boost to efficient and high-quality (re)use of raw materials and waste streams in the business sector of the harbor area of Amsterdam/Zaanstad, Netherlands. The objective was to set up at least four projects in the period 1 February 2011-31 January 2012. This final report summarizes the work performed, findings and results [Dutch] Het doel van het project 'Afval = Grondstof' is een impuls te geven aan een efficient en hoogwaardig (her)gebruik van grondstoffen en reststromen in het bedrijfsleven in de havenregio Amsterdam/Zaanstad. De doelstelling was om gedurende de projectperiode (1 februari 2011 - 31 januari 2012) minimaal vier projecten op te zetten, die passen binnen de doelstellingen van het programma en waarvan er minimaal twee met de realisatie gestart zijn. Dit eindrapport geeft een overzicht van de uitgevoerde werkzaamheden, bevindingen en de resultaten tot aan de einddatum van het project (eind januari 2012)

  10. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. This volume summarizes the results of the study. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  11. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  12. Geology, summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabins, F. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Trends in geologic application of remote sensing are identified. These trends are as follows: (1) increased applications of orbital imagery in fields such as engineering and environmental geology - some specific applications include recognition of active earthquake faults, site location for nuclear powerplants, and recognition of landslide hazards; (2) utilization of remote sensing by industry, especially oil and gas companies, and (3) application of digital image processing to mineral exploration.

  13. Profile summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.

  14. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  15. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  16. Final Summary: Genre Theory in Information Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This chapter offers a re-description of knowledge organization in light of genre and activity theory. Knowledge organization needs a new description in order to account for those activities and practices constituting and causing concrete knowledge organization activity. Genre and activity...... theory is put forward as a framework for situating such a re-description. Findings By means of genre and activity theory, the chapters argues that understanding the genre and activity systems, in which every form of knowledge organization is embedded, makes us capable of seeing how knowledge organization...... informing and shaping concrete forms of knowledge organization activity. With this, we are able to understand how knowledge organization activity also contributes to construct genre and activity systems and not only aid them....

  17. Executive Summary-Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R. R.

    2004-02-18

    The primary goal since inception of this DOE grant award in 1991 to Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, has been to support competitive research fellowships aimed at solving important medical problems, contributing significant new knowledge and/or technology. This approach was taken according to the original intent of the DOE program, to foster excellent centers for research and development of lasers and optics in medicine. Laser photomedicine broadly encompasses optical therapy and optical diagnostics, within any organ system. The research supported clearly reflects this breadth and depth.

  18. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  19. Final Summary: Genre Theory in Information Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This chapter offers a re-description of knowledge organization in light of genre and activity theory. Knowledge organization needs a new description in order to account for those activities and practices constituting and causing concrete knowledge organization activity. Genre and activity...... theory is put forward as a framework for situating such a re-description. Findings By means of genre and activity theory, the chapters argues that understanding the genre and activity systems, in which every form of knowledge organization is embedded, makes us capable of seeing how knowledge organization...... informing and shaping concrete forms of knowledge organization activity. With this, we are able to understand how knowledge organization activity also contributes to construct genre and activity systems and not only aid them....

  20. 78 FR 14577 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance ] and Mitigation Administration, FEMA... Road, Minot, ME 04258. Town of Poland Town Office, 1231 Maine Street, Poland, ME 04274. Town...

  1. 78 FR 9406 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Georgetown......... Georgetown Township Office, 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49428. Charter Township of... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate...

  2. 78 FR 48882 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... 47012. Miami County, Kansas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1270 City of Fontana City Hall, 204 East North Street, Fontana, KS 66026. City of Louisburg City Hall, 5 South Peoria Street,...

  3. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... County, New Mexico, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1242 City of Clovis Administrative Office, 321 North Connelly Street, Clovis, NM 88101. Unincorporated Areas of Curry County. Curry County Administrative Office, 700 North Main Street, Clovis, NM 88101. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No....

  4. 78 FR 36220 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Tupelo City Hall, Planning Department, 71 East Troy Street, Tupelo, MS 38804. City of Saltillo 142 Front Avenue, Saltillo, MS 38866. Town of Verona City Hall, 194 Main Street, Verona, MS 38879. Unincorporated...

  5. 78 FR 29763 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    .... Department of Planning Services, 200 East Berry Street, Suite 150, Fort Wayne, IN 46802. Tate County.... Unincorporated Areas of Tate County.. Tate County Courthouse, 201 South Ward Street, Senatobia, MS...

  6. 78 FR 29760 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ..., 9544 Depot Street, Holland Patent, NY 13354. Village of New Hartford Village Codes Department, Butler..., NY 13502. Town of Annsville Annsville Code Enforcement Office, 9042 Meadows Road, Taberg, NY 13471..., 2651 State Route 12B, Deansboro, NY 13328. Town of New Hartford Codes and Zoning Office, 111 New...

  7. Electrostatic hazards

    CERN Document Server

    Luttgens, Günter; Luttgens, Gnter; Luttgens, G Nter

    1997-01-01

    In the US, UK and Europe there is in excess of one notifiable dust or electrostatic explosion every day of the year. This clearly makes the hazards associated with the handling of materials subject to either cause or react to electrostatic discharge of vital importance to anyone associated with their handling or industrial bulk use. This book provides a comprehensive guide to the dangers of static electricity and how to avoid them. It will prove invaluable to safety managers and professionals, as well as all personnel involved in the activities concerned, in the chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and petrochemical process industries. The book makes extended use of case studies to illustrate the principles being expounded, thereby making it far more open, accessible and attractive to the practitioner in industry than the highly theoretical texts which are also available. The authors have many years' experience in the area behind them, including the professional teaching of the content provided here. Günte...

  8. ULSGEN (Uplink Summary Generator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-F.; Schrock, M.; Reeve, T.; Nguyen, K.; Smith, B.

    2014-01-01

    Uplink is an important part of spacecraft operations. Ensuring the accuracy of uplink content is essential to mission success. Before commands are radiated to the spacecraft, the command and sequence must be reviewed and verified by various teams. In most cases, this process requires collecting the command data, reviewing the data during a command conference meeting, and providing physical signatures by designated members of various teams to signify approval of the data. If commands or sequences are disapproved for some reason, the whole process must be restarted. Recording data and decision history is important for traceability reasons. Given that many steps and people are involved in this process, an easily accessible software tool for managing the process is vital to reducing human error which could result in uplinking incorrect data to the spacecraft. An uplink summary generator called ULSGEN was developed to assist this uplink content approval process. ULSGEN generates a web-based summary of uplink file content and provides an online review process. Spacecraft operations personnel view this summary as a final check before actual radiation of the uplink data. .

  9. Lead Ingestion Hazard in Hand Soldering Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    RD-Ai45 663 LEAD INGESTION HAZARD IN HAND SOLDERING ENVIRONMENTS i/i (U) NAVAL WEAPONS CENTER CHINA LAKE CA E R MONSALVE MAY 84 NWC-TP-6545...6545 Lead Ingestion Hazard in Hand Soldering Environments (JD CD I) by Elisabeth R. Monsalve a y- Safety and Security Department I MAY 1984 NAVAL...COVERED LEAD INGESTION HAZARD IN HAND SOLDERING ENVIRONMENTS A summary report 6. PERFORMING ONG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(q) I. CONTRACT O GRANT NUM6ERt

  10. 76 FR 57662 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National... withdrawal of the direct final action (76 FR 45432) is effective as of September 16, 2011. ADDRESSES... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous waste, Hazardous...

  11. Climatic change and health. Which problems are caused by thermophile hazardous organisms? Final report. Environment and health: climatic change; Klimawandel und Gesundheit. Welche Probleme verursachen Waerme liebende Schadorganismen? Abschlussbericht. Umwelt and Gesundheit: Klimawandel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustin, Jobst; Muecke, Hans-Guido (comps.)

    2010-03-15

    Climatic changes can cause health hazards due to thermophile harmful organisms, especially those with increased allergic potentials. The meeting covered the following topics: climatic change induced health hazards and the German adaptation strategies; the complex relation between climatic change and allergies; ambrosia propagation in Germany - hazards for health and biodiversity; climatic change induced reaction of hygienically precarious organism in urban regions; monitoring and abatement of Thaumetopoea processionea in Bavarian woods; climatic change and pollen flight dynamics; Thaumetopoea processionea as cause for non-distinctive respiratory systems diseases; risk and protection factors for the development of asthma and allergies during infancy; abatement of pathogenic or invasive harmful organisms in Switzerland; health hazards in connection with Thaumetopoea processionea - examples from Bavaria; retrospective analysis of EPS diseases during 2004 and 2005 in the region Kleve.

  12. COMPUTERS HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Augustynek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, over 12.6 million Polish users of the Web registered. On the average, each of them spent 21 hours and 37 minutes monthly browsing the Web. That is why the problems of the psychological aspects of computer utilization have become an urgent research subject. The results of research into the development of Polish information society carried out in AGH University of Science and Technology, under the leadership of Leslaw H. Haber, in the period from 2000 until present time, indicate the emergence dynamic changes in the ways of computer utilization and their circumstances. One of the interesting regularities has been the inverse proportional relation between the level of computer skills and the frequency of the Web utilization.It has been found that in 2005, compared to 2000, the following changes occurred:- A significant drop in the number of students who never used computers and the Web;- Remarkable increase in computer knowledge and skills (particularly pronounced in the case of first years student- Decreasing gap in computer skills between students of the first and the third year; between male and female students;- Declining popularity of computer games.It has been demonstrated also that the hazard of computer screen addiction was the highest in he case of unemployed youth outside school system. As much as 12% of this group of young people were addicted to computer. A lot of leisure time that these youths enjoyed inducted them to excessive utilization of the Web. Polish housewives are another population group in risk of addiction to the Web. The duration of long Web charts carried out by younger and younger youths has been another matter of concern. Since the phenomenon of computer addiction is relatively new, no specific therapy methods has been developed. In general, the applied therapy in relation to computer addition syndrome is similar to the techniques applied in the cases of alcohol or gambling addiction. Individual and group

  13. Summary proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    A public meeting was convened by the Department of Energy (DOE) on February 10 and 11, 1994 in order to discuss government plans for the export of clean coal technologies -- The ``Clean Coal International Technology Transfer Program.`` In the sections that follow, brief descriptions are provided of the background to the solicitation and the public meeting, and how the meeting was conducted. Subsequent chapters of this report present the discussions that ensued at the meeting, and the views, recommendations, and concerns that were expressed by attendees. Chapter 4 consists of the actual text used for presentations, where such text was provided by the presenter. It should be noted that the agenda for the second day, the session on financing issues, differs from the agenda that was published prior to the meeting. This is due to the fact that a severe snowstorm occurred on the night of February 10 and into February 11. Many of the scheduled speakers were not able to get to the meeting and substitute speakers actually gave presentations. The revised agenda was quite successful. Again, presentations are included in Chapter 4 where the text was provided. Finally, an appendix contains attendee registration data.

  14. Integrating Community Volcanic Hazard Mapping, Geographic Information Systems, and Modeling to Reduce Volcanic Hazard Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajo Sanchez, Jorge V.

    This dissertation is composed of an introductory chapter and three papers about vulnerability and volcanic hazard maps with emphasis on lahars. The introductory chapter reviews definitions of the term vulnerability by the social and natural hazard community and it provides a new definition of hazard vulnerability that includes social and natural hazard factors. The first paper explains how the Community Volcanic Hazard Map (CVHM) is used for vulnerability analysis and explains in detail a new methodology to obtain valuable information about ethnophysiographic differences, hazards, and landscape knowledge of communities in the area of interest: the Canton Buenos Aires situated on the northern flank of the Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano, El Salvador. The second paper is about creating a lahar hazard map in data poor environments by generating a landslide inventory and obtaining potential volumes of dry material that can potentially be carried by lahars. The third paper introduces an innovative lahar hazard map integrating information generated by the previous two papers. It shows the differences in hazard maps created by the communities and experts both visually as well as quantitatively. This new, integrated hazard map was presented to the community with positive feedback and acceptance. The dissertation concludes with a summary chapter on the results and recommendations.

  15. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  16. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS, T.B.

    1999-05-11

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

  17. 76 FR 45600 - Order of Succession for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control AGENCY: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Director of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control for the Department of...

  18. The influence of advanced generations of equipment of information- and communication technology on the energy consumption in Germany up to the year 2010 - possibilities to increase energy efficiency and -conservation in this domains. Final report. Summary of final report. Annex; Der Einfluss moderner Geraetegenerationen der Informations- und Kommunikationstechnik auf den Energieverbrauch in Deutschland bis zum Jahr 2010 - Moeglichkeiten zur Erhoehung der Energieeffizienz und zur Energieeinsparung in diesen Bereichen. Abschlussbericht. Kurzfassung des Abschlussberichts. Summary of the final report. Anhang zum Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, C.; Eichhammer, W.; Friedewald, M.; Georgieff, P.; Rieth-Hoerst, S.; Schlomann, B.; Zoche, P.; Aebischer, B.; Huser, A.

    2003-01-01

    For 2001, this study ascertained an electricity demand of 38 TWh for ICT end-use appliances in households and offices and their associated infrastructure. This corresponds to a share of almost 8% of the total electricity consumption of final consumption sectors in Germany (AGEB 2002). About 50% of the power demand are accounted for by household end-use appliances, a further 20% by office end-use appliances, the remaining 30% by the infrastructure required. A clear increase in the power demand by 45% up to 55.4 TWh is anticipated up to 2010 which is primarily caused by the increasing significance of ICT infrastructure. The stock of appliances and systems of ICT infrastructure will grow noticeably and since these devices, such as servers or mobile communications systems, are continuously operated, the consumption growth in normal mode is the strongest. The consumption in standby mode shows an increasing tendency, most notably up to the middle of the decade, whereas it decreases in off-mode. However, this has less to do with efforts for greater efficiency and more to do with the expected substitution of the off- by the standby mode (especially in televisions). (orig.) [German] Fuer das Jahr 2001 wurde in dieser Untersuchung ein den IuK-Endgeraeten in Haushalten und Bueros und der zugehoerigen Infrastruktur zuzurechnender Strombedarf in Hoehe von 38 TWh ermittelt. Dies entspricht einem Anteil von knapp 8% am gesamten Stromverbrauch der Endverbrauchssektoren in Deutschland (AGEB 2002). Rund 50% des Strombedarfs entfallen dabei auf die Haushalts-Endgeraete, weitere gut 20% auf die Buero-Endgeraete, die restlichen rund 30% auf die dafuer erforderliche Infrastruktur. Bis 2010 wird mit einem deutlichen Anstieg des Strombedarfs um 45% auf 55,4 TWh gerechnet, der vor allem durch die zunehmende Bedeutung der IuK-Infrastruktur verursacht wird. Da die meisten der im Bestand deutlich wachsenden Geraete und Anlagen der IuK-Infrastruktur wie Server oder Mobilfunkanlagen dauerhaft

  19. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  20. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Laura K.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2016-04-01

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e., that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk, and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied generalized Pareto model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard random variable X with corresponding failure time series T should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with opportunities for future extensions.

  1. Compact Visualisation of Video Summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćalić Janko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for compact and intuitive video summarisation aimed at both high-end professional production environments and small-screen portable devices. To represent large amounts of information in the form of a video key-frame summary, this paper studies the narrative grammar of comics, and using its universal and intuitive rules, lays out visual summaries in an efficient and user-centered way. In addition, the system exploits visual attention modelling and rapid serial visual presentation to generate highly compact summaries on mobile devices. A robust real-time algorithm for key-frame extraction is presented. The system ranks importance of key-frame sizes in the final layout by balancing the dominant visual representability and discovery of unanticipated content utilising a specific cost function and an unsupervised robust spectral clustering technique. A final layout is created using an optimisation algorithm based on dynamic programming. Algorithm efficiency and robustness are demonstrated by comparing the results with a manually labelled ground truth and with optimal panelling solutions.

  2. CO{sub 2} intensity in electricity delivered to Swiss end-users. Summary report; Intensite CO{sub 2} de l'electricite vendue aux consommateurs finaux en Suisse. Resume du rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, M.; Volkart, K.; Widmer, D

    2009-07-15

    In this short summary report published by TEP Energy GmbH in Zuerich the main findings of a study made for the Swiss gas and oil industries on the effective CO{sub 2} intensities involved in Swiss electricity consumption are presented and discussed. The authors present their ideas on how CO{sub 2} emissions should be calculated on the basis of figures on Swiss power generation, imports and exports in a European context. The results obtained from the use of three methods for viewing Swiss electricity consumption involving net and gross power export and import are briefly discussed.

  3. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  4. Visualizing Summary Statistics and Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Potter, K.

    2010-08-12

    The graphical depiction of uncertainty information is emerging as a problem of great importance. Scientific data sets are not considered complete without indications of error, accuracy, or levels of confidence. The visual portrayal of this information is a challenging task. This work takes inspiration from graphical data analysis to create visual representations that show not only the data value, but also important characteristics of the data including uncertainty. The canonical box plot is reexamined and a new hybrid summary plot is presented that incorporates a collection of descriptive statistics to highlight salient features of the data. Additionally, we present an extension of the summary plot to two dimensional distributions. Finally, a use-case of these new plots is presented, demonstrating their ability to present high-level overviews as well as detailed insight into the salient features of the underlying data distribution. © 2010 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Seismic hazard assessment; Valutazione della pericolosita` sismica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paciello, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a brief summary of the most commonly used methodologies for seismic hazard assessment. The interest is focused on the probabilistic approach, which can take into account the uncertainties of input data and provides results better comparable with those obtained from hazard analyses of other natural phenomena. Calculation methods, input data and treatment of variability are examined. Some examples of probabilistic seismic hazard maps are moreover presented. [Italiano] Questo lavoro presenta un breve sommario delle piu` comuni metodologie utilizzate per la valutazione della pericolosita` sismica di un sito. Una particolare attenzione e` rivolta all`approccio probabilistico, che permette di tener conto delle incertezze legate ai dati iniziali e fornisce risultati piu` facilmente confrontabili con quelli ottenuti da analisi di pericolosita` di altri fenomeni naturali. Vengono presi in esame i metodi di calcolo, i dati di base e il trattamento delle incertezze. Vengono inoltre presentati alcuni esempi di carte di pericolosita` sismica di tipo probabilistico.

  6. Budget Summary of Changes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — The Summary of Changes dataset extracted from PBGC's congressional budget justification. It contains all administrative and program increases and decreases including...

  7. FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary is a summarized dataset describing all federally declared disasters, starting with the first disaster declaration in 1953,...

  8. Assessment of international air pollution prevention and control technology. Volume 1. Executive summary. Report to Congress under CAA amendments of 1990, section 901(e) public law 101-549. Final report, December 1993-December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burklin, C.; Gundappa, M.; Jones, D.

    1996-08-01

    The report gives results of a study that identifies new and innovative air pollution prevention and/or control technologies, of selected industrialized countries, that are not currently used extensively in the U.S. The study addressed technologies that prevent or control the emissions of the pollutants from each of four sources of air pollution: (1) Urban emissions--ozone precursors to include nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic componds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and air toxics; (2) Motor vehicle emissions--NOx, carbon monoxide (CO), and PM; (3) Toxic air emissions--any one of the 189 compounds on the list of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the 1990 CAAA (Title III); and (4) Acid deposition--NOx, sulfur oxides (SOx), and, to a lesser extent, VOCs. The report describes the approach taken to identify potentially useful technologies, gives results of the technology search and evaluation, and describes the selected technologies.

  9. Innovative technology summary report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-09

    Traditional site characterization methods rely on preplanned sampling programs and off-site analysis of samples to determine the extent and level of hazardous waste contamination. This process is costly and time-consuming. Static work plans specify the numbers and locations of samples to be collected, as well as the analyses to be performed on collected samples. Sampling crews are mobilized, samples are collected, and the crews are demobilized before final results become available. Additional sampling programs are often required to resolve uncertainties raised by the initial sampling and analysis results. The drawbacks of a traditional approach to sampling program design and execution are high costs per sample, pressure to over sample while at the site, and inevitable surprises in the analytical results that require additional sampling to resolve. A key step in the characterization of hazardous wastes at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is determination of the extent of contamination. The proper number and placement of sampling locations is required to both minimize characterization costs and guarantee that contamination extent can be estimated with reasonable confidence. Because ''soft'' information (i.e., historical records, computer modeling results, past experience, etc.) for a site are usually just as important as ''hard'' laboratory results, the approach taken must include a quantitative way of accounting for both hard and soft site data. An alternative to traditional sampling programs is Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs). ASAPs rely on field analytical methods to generate sample results quickly enough to have an impact on the course of the sampling program. Rather than a static work plan, ASAPs are based on dynamic work plans that specify the logic for how sampling numbers, locations, and analyses will be determined as the program proceeds. To ensure that the sampling stays on track, ASAPs also rely

  10. Software safety hazard analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Techniques for analyzing the safety and reliability of analog-based electronic protection systems that serve to mitigate hazards in process control systems have been developed over many years, and are reasonably well understood. An example is the protection system in a nuclear power plant. The extension of these techniques to systems which include digital computers is not well developed, and there is little consensus among software engineering experts and safety experts on how to analyze such systems. One possible technique is to extend hazard analysis to include digital computer-based systems. Software is frequently overlooked during system hazard analyses, but this is unacceptable when the software is in control of a potentially hazardous operation. In such cases, hazard analysis should be extended to fully cover the software. A method for performing software hazard analysis is proposed in this paper.

  11. Requirements for Notification, Evaluation and Reduction of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Property and Housing Receiving Federal Assistance; Response to Elevated Blood Lead Levels. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    This final rule amends HUD's lead-based paint regulations to reduce blood lead levels in children under age six (6) who reside in federally-owned or -assisted pre-1978 housing, formally adopting a revised definition of "elevated blood lead level" (EBLL) in children under the age of six (6), in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance. It also establishes more comprehensive testing and evaluation procedures for the housing where such children reside. This final rule also addresses certain additional elements of the CDC guidance pertaining to assisted housing and makes technical corrections and clarifications. This final rule, which follows HUD's September 1, 2016, proposed rule, takes into consideration public comments submitted in response to the proposed rule.

  12. CHRIS: Hazard Assessment Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-12

    CODE AIJ 91 HAZARD ASSESSMENT CODE-ABC KLMN 95 A. VENTING GAS FIRE -CODE AB 97 B. LIOUID FIRE-CODE AKL 97 C. WATER POLLUTION HAZARDS - CODE AK 99 D...The Hazard Calculation Codes for liquefied natural gas are: AB — venting gas fire . AC - gas dispersion, ADE — liquid fire, and ADFG...5.4). Spill Amount Wind Velocity Wind Direction Weather ppm tons knots Primary Code ABCKLMN Code AB - Venting Gas Fire Assessment

  13. Installation-Restoration Program Stage 3. McClellan AFB, California. Remedial investigation/feasibility study ground-water sampling and analysis program, January through March 1989 data summary. Final report, January-March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-19

    This Data Summary presents the results of ground-water sampling activities conducted on and in the vicinity of McClellan Air Force Base from the sampling period of January through March, 1989. Concentrations of purgeable halocarbons and aromatic compounds detected in 336 wells 26 monitoring wells are located on base in Area A, B, C, D, and adjacent on-base areas and off-base in the Northwest and Southwest areas. There was no detected increase in the areal extent of contaminated ground-water, nor was there any increase in the depth that contaminated ground-water was detected. The Area D extraction system is effectively operating to change hydraulic gradients, so groundwater in Area D flows toward the extraction wells. Contaminant concentrations have decreased in Area D deep zone monitoring wells. Samples from three middle-zone monitoring wells located in Area D also show decreases in contaminant concentration during this sampling period. Decreasing contaminant concentrations have stabilized in shallow zone monitoring wells located off-base, west of Area D.

  14. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report; Sicherheits- und Risikofragen im Nachgang zu den nuklearen Stoer- und Unfaellen in Japan. Zusammenfassender Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2015-03-15

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  15. Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program - GSHAP legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu Danciu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program - or simply GSHAP, when launched, almost two decades ago, aimed at establishing a common framework to evaluate the seismic hazard over geographical large-scales, i.e. countries, regions, continents and finally the globe. Its main product, the global seismic hazard map was a milestone, unique at that time and for a decade have served as the main reference worldwide. Today, for most of the Earth’s seismically active regions such Europe, Northern and Southern America, Central and South-East Asia, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the GSHAP seismic hazard map is outdated. The rapid increase of the new data, advance on the earthquake process knowledge, technological progress, both hardware and software, contributed all in updates of the seismic hazard models. We present herein, a short retrospective overview of the achievements as well as the pitfalls of the GSHAP. Further, we describe the next generation of seismic hazard models, as elaborated within the Global Earthquake Model, regional programs: the 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model, the 2014 Earthquake Model for Middle East, and the 2015 Earthquake Model of Central Asia. Later, the main characteristics of these regional models are summarized and the new datasets fully harmonized across national borders are illustrated for the first time after the GSHAP completion.

  16. Landslides Hazard Assessment Using Different Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coman Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Romania represents one of Europe’s countries with high landslides occurrence frequency. Landslide hazard maps are designed by considering the interaction of several factors which, by their joint action may affect the equilibrium state of the natural slopes. The aim of this paper is landslides hazard assessment using the methodology provided by the Romanian national legislation and a very largely used statistical method. The final results of these two analyses are quantitative or semi-quantitative landslides hazard maps, created in geographic information system environment. The data base used for this purpose includes: geological and hydrogeological data, digital terrain model, hydrological data, land use, seismic action, anthropic action and an inventory of active landslides. The GIS landslides hazard models were built for the geographical area of the Iasi city, located in the north-east side of Romania.

  17. 75 FR 74770 - Final Treasury Decision; Comment Request for Regulation Project [127391-07], (TD 9403 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Final Treasury Decision; Comment Request for Regulation Project , (TD 9403 Final) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final Regulations. SUMMARY: The Department...

  18. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  19. Biofuels: Project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  20. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  1. Investigation of Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Battery Safety Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE BATTERY SAFETY HAZARDS(U) GOULD RESEARCH CENTER ROLLING MEADOWS IL MATERIALS LAB A I ATTIA ET...838-012 7 ontract No. 60921-81-C-0363 6// Investigation of Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Battery Safety Hazards AD A 1 T 2 , Alan I. Attia Gould Research...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Investigation of Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Final Report Battery Safety Hazards 9/28/81 - 12/31/82 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  2. Natural hazards science strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Jones, Lucile M.; Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Love, Jeffrey J.; Neal, Christina A.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Plunkett, Michael L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wein, Anne; Perry, Suzanne C.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in natural hazards is to develop and apply hazard science to help protect the safety, security, and economic well-being of the Nation. The costs and consequences of natural hazards can be enormous, and each year more people and infrastructure are at risk. USGS scientific research - founded on detailed observations and improved understanding of the responsible physical processes - can help to understand and reduce natural hazard risks and to make and effectively communicate reliable statements about hazard characteristics, such as frequency, magnitude, extent, onset, consequences, and where possible, the time of future events. To accomplish its broad hazard mission, the USGS maintains an expert workforce of scientists and technicians in the earth sciences, hydrology, biology, geography, social and behavioral sciences, and other fields, and engages cooperatively with numerous agencies, research institutions, and organizations in the public and private sectors, across the Nation and around the world. The scientific expertise required to accomplish the USGS mission in natural hazards includes a wide range of disciplines that this report refers to, in aggregate, as hazard science. In October 2010, the Natural Hazards Science Strategy Planning Team (H-SSPT) was charged with developing a long-term (10-year) Science Strategy for the USGS mission in natural hazards. This report fulfills that charge, with a document hereinafter referred to as the Strategy, to provide scientific observations, analyses, and research that are critical for the Nation to become more resilient to natural hazards. Science provides the information that decisionmakers need to determine whether risk management activities are worthwhile. Moreover, as the agency with the perspective of geologic time, the USGS is uniquely positioned to extend the collective experience of society to prepare for events outside current memory. The USGS has critical statutory

  3. Natural hazards science strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Jones, Lucile M.; Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Love, Jeffrey J.; Neal, Christina A.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Plunkett, Michael L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wein, Anne; Perry, Suzanne C.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in natural hazards is to develop and apply hazard science to help protect the safety, security, and economic well-being of the Nation. The costs and consequences of natural hazards can be enormous, and each year more people and infrastructure are at risk. USGS scientific research—founded on detailed observations and improved understanding of the responsible physical processes—can help to understand and reduce natural hazard risks and to make and effectively communicate reliable statements about hazard characteristics, such as frequency, magnitude, extent, onset, consequences, and where possible, the time of future events.To accomplish its broad hazard mission, the USGS maintains an expert workforce of scientists and technicians in the earth sciences, hydrology, biology, geography, social and behavioral sciences, and other fields, and engages cooperatively with numerous agencies, research institutions, and organizations in the public and private sectors, across the Nation and around the world. The scientific expertise required to accomplish the USGS mission in natural hazards includes a wide range of disciplines that this report refers to, in aggregate, as hazard science.In October 2010, the Natural Hazards Science Strategy Planning Team (H–SSPT) was charged with developing a long-term (10-year) Science Strategy for the USGS mission in natural hazards. This report fulfills that charge, with a document hereinafter referred to as the Strategy, to provide scientific observations, analyses, and research that are critical for the Nation to become more resilient to natural hazards. Science provides the information that decisionmakers need to determine whether risk management activities are worthwhile. Moreover, as the agency with the perspective of geologic time, the USGS is uniquely positioned to extend the collective experience of society to prepare for events outside current memory. The USGS has critical statutory

  4. MSIS State Summary Datamarts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS State Summary Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  5. Annual Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single-year summaries of observations at Weather Bureau and cooperative stations across the United States. Predominantly the single page Form 1066, which includes...

  6. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  7. Global Climate Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Hourly Summaries are simple indicators of observational normals which include climatic data summarizations and frequency distributions. These typically...

  8. Summary of Comprehensive Conservation Plan : Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document offers a summary of Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge's 2005 Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan. In addition to offering a brief discussion of...

  9. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  10. 77 FR 66783 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; Revision To Increase Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 RIN 2050-AG73] National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan... Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan, to acknowledge advancements in technologies... Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to amend the National Oil and...

  11. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  12. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  13. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  14. Hazardous Materials Hazard Analysis, Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    ACCIDENTS IN OREGON, 1976-1979 INJURY RATE FATALITY RATE (per 100 million nilles ) (per 100 million miles) Injuries Fatalities 100 - 94. 8 80 75 - - 6...commercial vehicle Involved. Driver fault--icy road conditions caused truck to jack -knIfe and skid. Resulted in hazardous material spill and relase and...Wheel gem tanks retrieved her body. Huerta Mayor Jack Pirog said Mobil Chemi- Corp. i Mendota. She distributed the revived after emergency treatment at

  15. Moral Hazard and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumennasan, Norovsambuu

    2014-01-01

    Economists perceive moral hazard as an undesirable problem because it undermines efficiency. Carefully designed contracts can mitigate the moral hazard problem, but this assumes that a team is already formed. This paper demonstrates that these contracts are sometimes the reason why teams do...... not form. Formally, we study the team formation problem in which the agents’ efforts are not verifiable and the size of teams does not exceed quota r . We show that if the team members cannot make transfers, then moral hazard affects stability positively in a large class of games. For example, a stable...

  16. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01

    to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  17. Automated Standard Hazard Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebler, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The current system used to generate standard hazard reports is considered cumbersome and iterative. This study defines a structure for this system's process in a clear, algorithmic way so that standard hazard reports and basic hazard analysis may be completed using a centralized, web-based computer application. To accomplish this task, a test server is used to host a prototype of the tool during development. The prototype is configured to easily integrate into NASA's current server systems with minimal alteration. Additionally, the tool is easily updated and provides NASA with a system that may grow to accommodate future requirements and possibly, different applications. Results of this project's success are outlined in positive, subjective reviews complete by payload providers and NASA Safety and Mission Assurance personnel. Ideally, this prototype will increase interest in the concept of standard hazard automation and lead to the full-scale production of a user-ready application.

  18. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is playing a major role in development of technologies for cleanup of toxic and hazardous waste in military...

  19. Natural Hazards Image Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photographs and other visual media provide valuable pre- and post-event data for natural hazards. Research, mitigation, and forecasting rely on visual data for...

  20. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  1. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  2. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet 002-97 Revised March 2008 What Are Volcano Hazards? Volcanoes give rise to numerous geologic and ... as far as 15 miles from the volcano. Volcano Landslides A landslide or debris avalanche is a ...

  3. Developing hazardous waste programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Developing a fully operational hazardous waste regulatory system requires at least 10 to 15 years—even in countries with strong legal and bureaucratic institutions, according to a report on "The Evolution of Hazardous Waste Programs," which was funded by Resources for the Future (RFF) and the World Bank's South Asia Environment Group, and issued on June 4.The report, which compares the experiences of how four developed and four developing countries have created hazardous waste programs, indicates that hazardous waste issues usually do not become a pressing environmental issue until after countries have dealt with more direct threats to public health, such as contaminated drinking water and air pollution. The countries examined include Indonesia, Thailand, Germany, and the United States.

  4. Earthquake hazard assessment after Mexico (1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degg, M R

    1989-09-01

    The 1985 Mexican earthquake ranks foremost amongst the major earthquake disasters of the twentieth century. One of the few positive aspects of the disaster is that it provided massive quantities of data that would otherwise have been unobtainable. Every opportunity should be taken to incorporate the findings from these data in earthquake hazard assessments. The purpose of this paper is to provide a succinct summary of some of the more important lessons from Mexico. It stems from detailed field investigations, and subsequent analyses, conducted by the author on the behalf of reinsurance companies.

  5. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, H. K.; Ichinose, G. A.; Somerville, P. G.; Polet, J.

    2006-12-01

    The recent tsunami disaster caused by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake has focused our attention to the hazard posed by large earthquakes that occur under water, in particular subduction zone earthquakes, and the tsunamis that they generate. Even though these kinds of events are rare, the very large loss of life and material destruction caused by this earthquake warrant a significant effort towards the mitigation of the tsunami hazard. For ground motion hazard, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) has become a standard practice in the evaluation and mitigation of seismic hazard to populations in particular with respect to structures, infrastructure and lifelines. Its ability to condense the complexities and variability of seismic activity into a manageable set of parameters greatly facilitates the design of effective seismic resistant buildings but also the planning of infrastructure projects. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) achieves the same goal for hazards posed by tsunami. There are great advantages of implementing such a method to evaluate the total risk (seismic and tsunami) to coastal communities. The method that we have developed is based on the traditional PSHA and therefore completely consistent with standard seismic practice. Because of the strong dependence of tsunami wave heights on bathymetry, we use a full waveform tsunami waveform computation in lieu of attenuation relations that are common in PSHA. By pre-computing and storing the tsunami waveforms at points along the coast generated for sets of subfaults that comprise larger earthquake faults, we can efficiently synthesize tsunami waveforms for any slip distribution on those faults by summing the individual subfault tsunami waveforms (weighted by their slip). This efficiency make it feasible to use Green's function summation in lieu of attenuation relations to provide very accurate estimates of tsunami height for probabilistic calculations, where one typically computes

  6. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  7. Phytoremediation of Hazardous Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE Phytoremediation of Hazardous Wastes 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven C. McCutcheon, N. Lee Wolfe, Laura H. Carreria and Tse-Yuan Ou 5... phytoremediation (the use of plants to degrade hazardous contaminants) was developed. The new approach to phytoremediation involves rigorous pathway analyses...SUBJECT TERMS phytoremediation , nitroreductase, laccase enzymes, SERDP 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 8 16. PRICE CODE N/A 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  8. Final Great Lakes Exercise 1 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    and Ivar Singsaas, Joint industry program on oil spill contingency for Arctic and ice-covered waters Summary Report, SINTEF Materials and Chemistry...dated 10.04.2010, SINTEF Report No. 32, File: http://www.crrc.unh.edu/workshops/nrda_arctic/summary.report.080410.final_lett_enkeltsidig1.pdf 13

  9. Training hazard perception skills. [previously known as: Training hazard perception.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Hazard perception is an essential skill in the driving task, but it is still badly developed among novice drivers. Hazard perception consists of more than perceiving hazards. It also concerns appraising the seriousness of the hazards, and knowing how to act to avert them. There are indications that

  10. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  11. Training hazard perception skills. [previously known as: Training hazard perception.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Hazard perception is an essential skill in the driving task, but it is still badly developed among novice drivers. Hazard perception consists of more than perceiving hazards. It also concerns appraising the seriousness of the hazards, and knowing how to act to avert them. There are indications that

  12. Chemical process hazards analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  13. MIV Project: Executive Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzotti, Mariolina T.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Neefs, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report gives an executive summary of the achievements and results from the project.......Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report gives an executive summary of the achievements and results from the project....

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrolein (2003 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Acrolein: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Acrolein and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database.

  15. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  17. Geothermal energy. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief descriptions of geothermal projects funded through the Department of Energy during FY 1978 are presented. Each summary gives the project title, contractor name, contract number, funding level, dates, location, and name of the principal investigator, together with project highlights, which provide informaion such as objectives, strategies, and a brief project description. (MHR)

  18. Nucleon Spin: Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Frank

    1995-01-01

    This talk summarises the discussions during the conference on the spin structure of the nucleon held at Erice; July 1995. The summary focuses on where we have come, where we are now, and the emerging questions that direct where we go next in the quest to understand the nucleon spin.

  19. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  20. Summary of Research 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    the quality and quantity of sleep in U.S. Navy recruits. An examination of the activity level ( actigraphy ) data will show how much sleep recruits...25 Research Summaries Generative Decision Support Architecture Project...35 Monterey Security Enhanced Architecture Project ................................................................................. 36 Project

  1. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  2. Executive Summaries: CIL '90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsweiler, John A., Jr.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents summaries of 12 papers presented at the 1990 Computers in Libraries Conference. Topics discussed include online searching; microcomputer-based serials management; microcomputer-based workstations; online public access catalogs (OPACs); multitype library networking; CD-ROM searches; locally mounted online databases; collection evaluation;…

  3. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  4. Treatment of Uncertainties in Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, we have developed a framework for developing probabilistic tsunami inundation maps, which includes comprehensive quantification of earthquake recurrence as well as uncertainties, and applied it to the development of a tsunami hazard map of California. The various uncertainties in tsunami source and propagation models are an integral part of a comprehensive probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA), and often drive the hazard at low probability levels (i.e. long return periods). There is no unique manner in which uncertainties are included in the analysis although in general, we distinguish between "natural" or aleatory variability, such as slip distribution and event magnitude, and uncertainties due to an incomplete understanding of the behavior of the earth, called epistemic uncertainties, such as scaling relations and rupture segmentation. Aleatory uncertainties are typically included through integration over distribution functions based on regression analyses, whereas epistemic uncertainties are included using logic trees. We will discuss how the different uncertainties were included in our recent probabilistic tsunami inundation maps for California, and their relative importance on the final results. Including these uncertainties in offshore exceedance waveheights is straightforward, but the problem becomes more complicated once the non-linearity of near-shore propagation and inundation are encountered. By using the probabilistic off-shore waveheights as input level for the inundation models, the uncertainties up to that point can be included in the final maps. PTHA provides a consistent analysis of tsunami hazard and will become an important tool in diverse areas such as coastal engineering and land use planning. The inclusive nature of the analysis, where few assumptions are made a-priori as to which sources are significant, means that a single analysis can provide a comprehensive view of the hazard and its dominant sources

  5. Rebuttal Finale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Katznelson, Ron D

    2011-01-01

    Professor Mark Lemley wrote an article about the Myth of the sole inventor, to which we provided a critique, with an executive summary of the critique published here on IPWatchdog.com. On October 9, 2011, he wrote a response to our critique, and this is our reply. In his October 9 response, Lemley...

  6. Hazard Communication Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichak, S.

    1991-01-01

    The current rate of technological advances has brought with it an overwhelming increase in the usage of chemicals in the workplace and in the home. Coupled to this increase has been a heightened awareness in the potential for acute and chronic injuries attributable to chemical insults. The Hazard Communication Standard has been introduced with the desired goal of reducing workplace exposures to hazardous substances and thereby achieving a corresponding reduction in adverse health effects. It was created and proclaimed by the US Department of Labor and regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1 tab.

  7. Transportation of hazardous goods

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    A general reminder: any transportation of hazardous goods by road is subject to the European ADR rules. The goods concerned are essentially the following: Explosive substances and objects; Gases (including aerosols and non-flammable gases such as helium and nitrogen); Flammable substances and liquids (inks, paints, resins, petroleum products, alcohols, acetone, thinners); Toxic substances (acids, thinners); Radioactive substances; Corrosive substances (paints, acids, caustic products, disinfectants, electrical batteries). Any requests for the transport of hazardous goods must be executed in compliance with the instructions given at this URL: http://ts-dep.web.cern.ch/ts-dep/groups/he/HH/adr.pdf Heavy Handling Section TS-HE-HH 73793 - 160364

  8. Lightning hazards to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    Lightning hazards and, more generally, aircraft static electricity are discussed by a representative for the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. An overview of these atmospheric electricity hazards to aircraft and their systems is presented with emphasis on electrical and electronic subsystems. The discussion includes reviewing some of the characteristics of lightning and static electrification, trends in weather and lightning-related mishaps, some specific threat mechanisms and susceptible aircraft subsystems and some of the present technology gaps. A roadmap (flow chart) is presented to show the direction needed to address these problems.

  9. 76 FR 76677 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ....: EPA-R08-RCRA-2011-0823; FRL-9502-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of... industrial solid waste. If finalized, the EPA would conclude that ConocoPhillips' petitioned waste is... subject to Federal RCRA delisting, to manage industrial waste. II. Background A. What is a listed waste...

  10. 14 CFR 77.39 - Effective period of determination of no hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hazard. 77.39 Section 77.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Proposed Construction on Navigable Airspace § 77.39 Effective period of determination of no hazard. (a) Unless it is otherwise extended, revised, or terminated, each final determination of no hazard made...

  11. Nuclear Energy Innovation Workshops. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jackson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Phil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear energy innovation workshops were organized and conducted by INL on March 2-4, 2015 at the five NUC universities and Boise State University. The output from these workshops is summarized with particular attention to final summaries that were provided by technical leads at each of the workshops. The current revision includes 3-4 punctuation corrections and a correction of the month of release from May to June.

  12. Estimating hurricane hazards using a GIS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taramelli

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a GIS-based integrated approach to the Multi-Hazard model method, with reference to hurricanes. This approach has three components: data integration, hazard assessment and score calculation to estimate elements at risk such as affected area and affected population. First, spatial data integration issues within a GIS environment, such as geographical scales and data models, are addressed. Particularly, the integration of physical parameters and population data is achieved linking remotely sensed data with a high resolution population distribution in GIS. In order to assess the number of affected people, involving heterogeneous data sources, the selection of spatial analysis units is basic. Second, specific multi-hazard tasks, such as hazard behaviour simulation and elements at risk assessment, are composed in order to understand complex hazard and provide support for decision making. Finally, the paper concludes that the integrated approach herein presented can be used to assist emergency management of hurricane consequences, in theory and in practice.

  13. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Implementation of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Final Recommendations and Associated Actions for the 104th Fighter Wing, Massachusetts Air National Guard at Westfield-Barnes Airport, Westfield, Massachusetts. Volume 1: Executive Summary through Chapter 9.0, and Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    1978). European diseases were introduced as early as 1500 AD, reducing indigenous populations by as much as 90 percent (State of Massachusetts 2006...for the Massachusetts National Guard EIS Westfield-Barnes Airport, Westfield Massachusetts Final – October 2007 Marek , Kevin. 2006. ANG/CEVP...risk factors in the development of hypertension, cardiovascular disease , and other nervous disorders, have never been proven to occur as chronic

  14. Current electrosurgical practice: hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J

    1985-01-01

    The beneficial aspects of electrosurgical cutting and coagulating techniques are nearly too numerous to list. The major contribution and electrosurgery has been to drastically reduce both blood loss and operative time resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality. There are, as well, procedures which would not be possible without electrosurgery. Nonetheless, as a source of high energy in the operating theatre, there are hazards attendant to the use of electrosurgery. Moreover, since high frequency signals are involved, the nature of the machine-patient interactions creating a potentially hazardous situation many not be easily identifiable. The significant hazards of electrosurgery in use are: explosions of combustible mixtures including anaesthesia gas and bowel gas; interference with instruments and pacemakers; stimulation of excitable tissues which on occasion has apparently caused ventricular fibrillation; and accidental radio frequency burns. Though the rate of incidents is low--in terms of the number per 100 000 procedures--individual accidents tend to be fairly catastrophic and traumatic to both the patient and surgical team. Frequently, litigation results from these accidents. Though the hazards cannot be eliminated, the probability of an incident can be minimized by careful technique.

  15. Maintenance and hazardous substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhl, K.; Terwoert, J.; Cabecas, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance workers come into close contact with a broad variety of often hazardous chemicals. Depending on the specific type, these chemicals may not only cause diseases like skin sores or cancer, but many of them are highly flammable and explosive. This e-facts focuses on the specific risks relate

  16. Laser Hazards Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-31

    Copeland , H. P., and DeRose, L. B., Evaluation and control of hazards in laser light shows, Hlth Physics 31(2): 189-190 (1976). 58. Blaney, L., Perspectives...School of Aerospace Med, Brooks AF Base, TX, 51: 304 (1974). 434. Weston , B. A., Laser Systems-Code of Practice, Ministry of Technology Safety Services

  17. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework in which principal and agent knowingly hold asymmetric beliefs regarding the probability of success of their enterprise. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium...

  18. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium contract. On the one hand, an optimistic or overconfident agent disproportionately values success-contingent payments...

  19. Health Care Wide Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Hazards (Lack of) PPE Slips/Trips/Falls Stress Tuberculosis Universal Precautions Workplace Violence Use of Medical Lasers Health Effects Use ... Needlesticks Noise Mercury Inappropriate PPE Slips/Trips/Falls ... of Universal Precautions Workplace Violence For more information, see Other Healthcare Wide ...

  20. Hazards of Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Research, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Common concern for the protection and improvement of the environment and the enhancement of human health and welfare underscore the purpose of this special report on the hazards of mercury directed to the Secretary's Pesticide Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report summarizes the findings of a ten-member study…

  1. Cadmium - is it hazardous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zartner-Nyilas, G.; Valentin, H.; Schaller, K.H.; Schiele, R.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarizes the state of knowledge and experience on cadmium. Biological, toxicological and epidemiological data have been evaluated. Cd pollution of the environment is reviewed under the aspect of human health. Uptake in food, threshod values of Cd exposure of the population, types and extent of health hazards, possible carcinogenic effects and future fields of research are discussed.

  2. Prometheus Project final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Randall

    2005-01-01

    This Final Report serves as an executive summary of the Prometheus Project's activities and deliverables from November 2002 through September 2005. It focuses on the challenges from a technical and management perspective, what was different and innovative about this project, and identifies the major options, decisions, and accomplishments of the Project team as a whole. However, the details of the activities performed by DOE NR and its contractors will be documented separately in accordance with closeout requirements of the DOE NR and consistent with agreements between NASA and NR.

  3. Palomares Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-15

    disarmament conference was in progress in Geneva. The Soviet representative took advantage of the accident stating that, "only a fortunate stroke of luck saved...is particu- larly fitting that this summary of the Palomares accident , one of many specific instances of Dr. Langham’s valuable assistance to the ooD...be dedicated to his memory. We do so in fond appreciati.on. 3 THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFf BLANK 4 FOREWORD The accident which occurred over

  4. Blois V: Experimental summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  5. Unit 5. Thermodynamics (Summary)

    OpenAIRE

    Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Summary of the "Unit 5. Thermodynamics" of course "Physical Foundations of Engineering I". Degree in Sound and Image Engineering, in Telecommunications. Polytechnic School of the University of Alicante Resumen del "Tema 5. Termodinámica" de la asignatura "Fundamentos Físicos de la Ingeniería I". Grado en Ingeniería en Sonido e Imagen en Telecomunicaciones. Escuela Politécnica Superior. Universidad de Alicante.

  6. Air Treatment Project: Final Summary Report and Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    number matching and velocity measurements. Papers and Publications Heinsohn, R. J., Spaeder, T. A., Albano , M. T., Schmelzle, J. P. and Fetter, R. 0...then disappeared. Heinsohn, R. J., Spaeder, T. A., Albano , M. T., Schmelzle, J. P., Fetter, R. 0. and Farson, D. F., "Ultraviolet and Radical...1994 and Albano , 1994). The kinetic mechanisms were incorporated into the flow field model by introducing the species mass conservation equation for

  7. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of the study, government programs under investigation, and a brief review of the approach are presented. Potential markets for photovoltaic systems relevant to the study are described. The response of the photovoltaic supply industry is then considered. A model which integrates the supply and demand characteristics of photovoltaics over time was developed. This model also calculates the economic benefits associated with various government subsidy programs. Results are derived under alternative possible supply, demand, and macroeconomic conditions. A probabilistic analysis of the costs and benefits of a $380 million federal photovoltaic procurement initiative, as well as certain alternative strategies, is summarized. Conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis are presented.

  8. Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Green, S. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Howard, M. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Yesalusky, M. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Modlin, N. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) was a project to produce best-estimate atmospheric state measurements at the: 1. DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Clouds and Radiation Test-bed (CART) site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (11–14 December 2012) 2. Poker Flat Alaska Research Range (PFRR) located in Poker Flat, Alaska (19–26 February 2013) 3. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (24–28 April 2013) 4. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (9–15 July 2013) 5. DOE ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site located in Darwin, Australia (27 September–3 October 2013).

  9. Rafinesque's Bat Artificial Habitat Stabilization Project: Final Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Work on these houses was aimed at stabilizing the roofs by covering them with tin, replacing the doors with either solid wood or steel and sealing the windows...

  10. MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team : Final Report 2013 : Overall Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  11. Ways Youth Receive Information about Marihuana. Final Report Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitz, Albert C.; Clark, Richard E.

    A description was sought of the types of sources of information about marijuana used by 300 middle class fifth, seventh, and eleventh grade students. During individual meetings with experienced female interviewers, students were asked to relate sources which were most influential in providing information about marihuana at the following stages:…

  12. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  13. NATO MSG-048 C-BML Final Report Summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heffner, K.; Reus, N.M. de; Mevassvik, O.M.; Schade, U.; Gomez-Veiga, R.; Brook, A.; Khimeche, L.; Pullen, J.M.; Simonsen, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 48 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language for multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with simulation systems. Its work in defining and demonstrating

  14. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMott, PJ [Colorado State University; Suski, KJ [Colorado State University; Hill, TCJ [Colorado State University; Levin, EJT [Colorado State University

    2015-03-01

    The first ever ice nucleating particle (INP) measurements to be collected at the Southern Great Plains site were made during a period from late April to June 2014, as a trial for possible longer-term measurements at the site. These measurements will also be used to lay the foundation for understanding and parameterizing (for cloud resolving modeling) the sources of these climatically important aerosols as well as to augment the existing database containing this knowledge. Siting the measurements during the spring was intended to capture INP sources in or to this region from plant, soil, dust transported over long distances, biomass burning, and pollution aerosols at a time when they may influence warm-season convective clouds and precipitation. Data have been archived of real-time measurements of INP number concentrations as a function of processing conditions (temperature and relative humidity) during 18 days of sampling that spanned two distinctly different weather situations: a warm, dry and windy period with regional dust and biomass burning influences in early May, and a cooler period of frequent precipitation during early June. Precipitation delayed winter wheat harvesting, preventing intended sampling during that perturbation on atmospheric aerosols. INP concentrations were highest and most variable at all temperatures in the dry period, where we attribute the INP activity primarily to soil dust emissions. Additional offline INP analyses are underway to extend the characterization of INP to cover the entire mixed phase cloud regime from -5°C to -35°C during the full study. Initial comparisons between methods on four days show good agreement and excellent future promise. The additional offline immersion freezing data will be archived as soon as completed under separate funding. Analyses of additional specialized studies for specific attribution of INP to biological and smoke sources are continuing via the National Science Foundation and National Aeronautics and Space Administration funding that helped support instrumentation used for the measurements described herein. Aerosol Observing System aerosol data will be vital to the interpretation and parameterization of results as part of analyses for publications in preparation.

  15. Scalable Emergency Response System for Oceangoing Assets. Final Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-20

    units on stand-by with YJ-81s carrying a chemical payload. They also load a mix of Q- 5s with dedicated chemical or HE 250kg bomb payloads. No longer a...and API results contradicted each other, the isolates were typed by partial 16S rRNA sequencing, the golden standard of bacterial identification...if percent identification was higher than or equal to 90% similarity index. Samples that were decided to be appropriate for 16S rRNA analysis were

  16. MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team : Final Report 2012 : Overall Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  17. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the Program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

  18. Clean Air for London (CLEARFLO) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsnop, D. R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Williams, L. R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Herndon, S. C. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Dubey, M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ng, N. L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Thornton, J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Knighton, B. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Coulter, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Prévôt, Ash [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-03-01

    This field campaign funded the participation of scientists from seven different research groups and operated over thirty instruments during the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. The campaign took place at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 kilometers southeast of central London. The primary science questions for the ClearfLo winter IOP (intensive operational periods) were: 1) “what is the urban increment of particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants in the greater London area?” and 2) “what is the contribution of solid fuel use for home heating to wintertime PM?” An additional motivation for the Detling measurements was the question of whether coatings on black carbon particles enhance absorption.

  19. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  20. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials: Final Summary of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sam

    2002-07-01

    The objectives and goals of this project were to investigate and develop high efficient, lightweight, and cost effective materials for potential photovoltaic applications, such as solar energy conversion or photo detector devices. Specifically, as described in the original project proposal, the target material to be developed was a block copolymer system containing an electron donating (or p-type) conjugated polymer block coupled to an electron withdrawing (or n-type) conjugated polymer block through a non-conjugated bridge unit. Due to several special requirements of the targeted block copolymer systems, such as electron donating and withdrawing substituents, conjugated block structures, processing requirement, stability requirement, size controllability, phase separation and self ordering requirement, etc., many traditional or commonly used block copolymer synthetic schemes are not suitable for this system. Therefore, the investigation and development of applicable and effective synthetic protocols became the most critical and challenging part of this project. During the entire project period, and despite the lack of a proposed synthetic polymer postdoctoral research associate due to severe shortage of qualified personnel in the field, several important accomplishments were achieved in this project and are briefly listed and elaborated. A more detailed research and experimental data is listed in the Appendix.

  1. Material for Point Design (final summary of DIME material)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-25

    These slides summarize the motivation of the Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) project, the “point design” of the Polar Direct Drive (PDD) version of the NIF separated reactant capsule, the experimental requirements, technical achievements, and some useful backup material. These slides are intended to provide much basic material in one convenient location and will hopefully be of some use for subsequent experimental projects.

  2. Wind energy applications in agriculture: executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M.L.; Buzenberg, R.J.; Glynn, E.F.; Johnson, G.L.; Shultis, J.K.; Wagner, J.P.

    1979-08-01

    This report presents an assessment of the potential use of wind turbine generator systems (WTGS) in US agriculture. In particular, this report presents the number of WTGS's economically feasible for use in US agriculture and the conditions which yielded economic feasibility of WTGS's for certain agricultural applications. In addition, for each case, i.e., set of assumed conditions, under which WTGS's were found to be economically feasible, this report identifies (1) the agricultural WTGS applications in terms of location, type and size (complete farm and dedicated-use applications); (2) the number of WTGS's by wind machine and generator size category; (3) aggregate energy conversion potential; and (4) other technical and economic WTGS performance data for particular applications. This report also describes the methodology, data and assumptions used for the analysis. A major part of the study was the development and use of a rigorous analytical system to assess an application's wind power generation and use potential.

  3. THEREDA. Thermodynamic reference database. Summary of final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmaier, Marcus; Bube, Christiane; Marquardt, Christian [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung; Brendler, Vinzenz; Richter, Anke [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Moog, Helge C.; Scharge, Tina [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Voigt, Wolfgang [TU Bergakademie Freiburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie; Wilhelm, Stefan [AF-Colenco AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    2011-03-15

    A long term safety assessment of a repository for radioactive waste requires evidence, that all relevant processes are known and understood, which might have a significant positive or negative impact on its safety. In 2002, a working group of five institutions was established to create a common thermodynamic database for nuclear waste disposal in deep geological formations. The common database was named THEREDA: Thermodynamic Reference Database. The following institutions are members of the working group: Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiochemistry - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal - Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry - AF-Colenco AG, Baden, Switzerland, Department of Groundwater Protection and Waste Disposal - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Braunschweig. For the future it is intended that its usage becomes mandatory for geochemical model calculations for nuclear waste disposal in Germany. Furthermore, it was agreed that the new database should be established in accordance with the following guidelines: Long-term usability: The disposal of radioactive waste is a task encompassing decades. The database is projected to operate on a long-term basis. This has influenced the choice of software (which is open source), the documentation and the data structure. THEREDA is adapted to the present-day necessities and computational codes but also leaves many degrees of freedom for varying demands in the future. Easy access: The database is accessible via the World Wide Web for free. Applicability: To promote the usage of the database in a wide community, THEREDA is providing ready-to-use parameter files for the most common codes. These are at present: PHREEQC, EQ3/6, Geochemist's Workbench, and CHEMAPP. Internal consistency: It is distinguished between dependent and independent data. To ensure the required internal consistency of THEREDA, the thermodynamic data are structured and stored in a way that upon modification of independent data the dependent data are recalculated automatically. Comprehensiveness: The thermodynamic database in THEREDA will be as comprehensive as necessary for thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the frame of radioactive waste disposal without compelling the user to supplement the database with own data. As the currently available thermodynamic data reported in literature are far from being comprehensive and various systems have not even been investigated at all, THEREDA is using values from chemical analogues and estimated values to fill data gaps wherever this is possible within a reasonable uncertainty. THEREDA is thus providing a set of thermodynamic data for geochemical calculations and it documents the quality of the data at any time. The database can thus be used to identify gaps in knowledge and as tool to control future research activities. Documentation: All data entered are classified as to their origin and quality. Thus, even when data of less quality or estimated data are entered, the user is always alerted to this fact. In addition, all data are classified according to the type of experiment, they were derived from. Activities within the time for which this report is valid cover a wide range of aspects. At first, a data model had to be designed from scratch which allows for the storage of thermodynamic data, at the same time facilitating export into code-specific parameter files. Creating the data model emphasis was laid upon its long term usage. Thus, a degree of abstraction was chosen which exceeds todays necessities and allows for future extensions. Technically the databank is implemented on a web server. Programs were created, which permit reading and writing access to the data. From the created webpages programs can be called that produce code specific parameter files ready for download upon specific request by the user. THEREDA can thus be thought of as a databank in conjunction with a suite of peripheral programs, which aims at administrating, processing

  4. Amyris, Inc. Integrated Biorefinery Project Summary Final Report - Public Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, David; Sato, Suzanne; Garcia, Fernando; Eppler, Ross; Cherry, Joel

    2014-03-12

    The Amyris pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) leveraged Amyris synthetic biology and process technology experience to upgrade Amyris’s existing Emeryville, California pilot plant and fermentation labs to enable development of US-based production capabilities for renewable diesel fuel and alternative chemical products. These products were derived semi-synthetically from high-impact biomass feedstocks via microbial fermentation to the 15-carbon intermediate farnesene, with subsequent chemical finishing to farnesane. The Amyris IBR team tested and provided methods for production of diesel and alternative chemical products from sweet sorghum, and other high-impact lignocellulosic feedstocks, at pilot scale. This enabled robust techno-economic analysis (TEA), regulatory approvals, and a basis for full-scale manufacturing processes and facility design.

  5. MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team : Final Report 2015 : Overall Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  6. SMES-ETM Final Environmental Issues Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    avian navigation. It is suspected that birds use the earth’s magnetic field to navigate. Whereas the magnetic navigation mechanism of certain ocean ...certain ocean fish has been established, little is known about the navigation mechanism of birds. There is, therefore, concern over the possible... deoxygenated sickled erythrocyte (an abnormal type of blood cell). It has been shown that these cells, in which the deoxygenated hemoglobin is

  7. Shortwave Hyperspectral Observations During MAGIC Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, P. J. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States); Marshak, A. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States); Yang, W. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign was initiated to improve our understanding of low-level marine clouds that have a significant influence on the Earth’s climate. The campaign was conducted using an ARM mobile facility deployed on a commercial ship traveling between Honolulu, Hawaii, and Los Angeles, California, from October 2012 to September 2013. The solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) was deployed on July 6, 2013, through the end of the campaign. The SSFR was calibrated and installed by Warren Gore of NASA Ames Research Center, and the data is and will be analyzed by Drs. Alexander Marshak and Weidong Yang of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Dr. Samuel LeBlanc of NASA Ames Research Center, Dr. Sebastian Schmidt of the University of Colorado-Boulder, and Dr. Patrick McBride of Atmospheric & Space Technology Research Associates in Boulder, Colorado.

  8. MAGIC Cloud Properties from Zenith Radiance Data Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J. -Y.C. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cloud droplet size and optical depth are the most fundamental properties for understanding cloud formation, dissipation and interactions with aerosol and drizzle. They are also a crucial determinant of Earth’s radiative and water-energy balances. However, these properties are poorly predicted in climate models. As a result, the response of clouds to climate change is one of the major sources of uncertainty in climate prediction.

  9. Summary of Plutonium-238 Production Alternatives Analysis Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Werner; Wade E. Bickford; David B. Lord; Chadwick D. Barklay

    2013-03-01

    The Team implemented a two-phase evaluation process. During the first phase, a wide variety of past and new candidate facilities and processing methods were assessed against the criteria established by DOE for this assessment. Any system or system element selected for consideration as an alternative within the project to reestablish domestic production of Pu-238 must meet the following minimum criteria: Any required source material must be readily available in the United States, without requiring the development of reprocessing technologies or investments in systems to separate material from identified sources. It must be cost, schedule, and risk competitive with existing baseline technology. Any identified facilities required to support the concept must be available to the program for the entire project life cycle (notionally 35 years, unless the concept is so novel as to require a shorter duration). It must present a solution that can generate at least 1.5 Kg of Pu-238 oxide per year, for at least 35 years. It must present a low-risk, near-term solution to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s urgent mission need. DOE has implemented this requirement by eliminating from project consideration any alternative with key technologies at less than Technology Readiness Level 5. The Team evaluated the options meeting these criteria using a more detailed assessment of the reasonable facility variations and compared them to the preferred option, which consists of target irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), target fabrication and chemical separations processing at the ORNL Radiochemical Engineering Development Center, and neptunium 237 storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex at INL. This preferred option is consistent with the Records of Decision from the earlier National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation

  10. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - Commercial Hazardous Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Commercial Hazardous Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Hazardous Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to...

  11. Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

  12. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Nasir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  13. Hazard perception in traffic. [previously knows as: Hazard perception.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Hazard perception is an essential part of the driving task. There are clear indications that insufficient skills in perceiving hazards play an important role in the occurrence of crashes, especially those involving novice drivers. Proper hazard perception not only consists of scanning and perceiving

  14. Hazardous waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembra, R.L

    1989-01-01

    This report has found that while most states have accomplished few or no cleanups of sites contaminated by hazardous waste, some have enacted tough cleanup laws, committed relatively large resources to the cleanup effort, and achieved considerable results. At the 17 cleanup sites analyzed, state cleanup plans were generally stringent. However, no federal standards have been set for over half of the contaminants found at these sites. For 11 sites, the states set cleanup levels without doing formal risk assessments. Also, most states reviewed did not consider the full range of alternatives EPA requires. Most states have not shown that they can effectively clean up large, hazardous waste sites. This report recommends that EPA turn sites targeted for cleanup over to the states only if there are adequate controls and oversight.

  15. FEMA DFIRM Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA flood hazard delineations are used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to designate the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and for insurance rating...

  16. Seismic hazard maps for Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur; Harmsen, Stephen; Mueller, Charles; Calais, Eric; Haase, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We have produced probabilistic seismic hazard maps of Haiti for peak ground acceleration and response spectral accelerations that include the hazard from the major crustal faults, subduction zones, and background earthquakes. The hazard from the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden, Septentrional, and Matheux-Neiba fault zones was estimated using fault slip rates determined from GPS measurements. The hazard from the subduction zones along the northern and southeastern coasts of Hispaniola was calculated from slip rates derived from GPS data and the overall plate motion. Hazard maps were made for a firm-rock site condition and for a grid of shallow shear-wave velocities estimated from topographic slope. The maps show substantial hazard throughout Haiti, with the highest hazard in Haiti along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and Septentrional fault zones. The Matheux-Neiba Fault exhibits high hazard in the maps for 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, although its slip rate is poorly constrained.

  17. The Additive Hazard Mixing Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LI; Xiao-liang LING

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the aging and dependence properties in the additive hazard mixing models including some stochastic comparisons.Further,some useful bounds of reliability functions in additive hazard mixing models are obtained.

  18. 78 FR 4333 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; Revision To Increase Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 RIN 2050-AG73 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan... are withdrawing the direct final rule for National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency... 7, 2012. DATES: Effective January 22, 2013, EPA withdraws the direct final rule published at 77...

  19. 75 FR 33724 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National...) Region 6 is publishing a direct final Notice of Deletion of the soils of Operable Unit 1 and the... and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). This direct final partial deletion is...

  20. Hazardous and toxic waste management in Botswana: practices and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Meng, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Hazardous and toxic waste is a complex waste category because of its inherent chemical and physical characteristics. It demands for environmentally sound technologies and know-how as well as clean technologies that simultaneously manage and dispose it in an environmentally friendly way. Nevertheless, Botswana lacks a system covering all the critical steps from importation to final disposal or processing of hazardous and toxic waste owing to limited follow-up of the sources and types of hazardous and toxic waste, lack of modern and specialised treatment/disposal facilities, technical know-how, technically skilled manpower, funds and capabilities of local institutions to take lead in waste management. Therefore, because of a lack of an integrated system, there are challenges such as lack of cooperation among all the stakeholders about the safe management of hazardous and toxic waste. Furthermore, Botswana does not have a systematic regulatory framework regarding monitoring and hazardous and toxic waste management. In addition to the absence of a systematic regulatory framework, inadequate public awareness and dissemination of information about hazardous and toxic waste management, slower progress to phase-out persistent and bio-accumulative waste, and lack of reliable and accurate information on hazardous and toxic waste generation, sources and composition have caused critical challenges to effective hazardous and toxic waste management. It is, therefore, important to examine the status of hazardous and toxic waste as a waste stream in Botswana. By default; this mini-review article presents an overview of the current status of hazardous and toxic waste management and introduces the main challenges in hazardous and toxic waste management. Moreover, the article proposes the best applicable strategies to achieve effective hazardous and toxic waste management in the future. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-09-23

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

  2. Industrial hazard and safety handbook

    CERN Document Server

    King, Ralph W

    1979-01-01

    Industrial Hazard and Safety Handbook (Revised Impression) describes and exposes the main hazards found in industry, with emphasis on how these hazards arise, are ignored, are identified, are eliminated, or are controlled. These hazard conditions can be due to human stresses (for example, insomnia), unsatisfactory working environments, as well as secret industrial processes. The book reviews the cost of accidents, human factors, inspections, insurance, legal aspects, planning for major emergencies, organization, and safety measures. The text discusses regulations, codes of practice, site layou

  3. Hazard Maps in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Emphasizes the use of geophysical hazard maps and illustrates how they can be used in the classroom from kindergarten to college level. Depicts ways that hazard maps of floods, landslides, earthquakes, volcanoes, and multi-hazards can be integrated into classroom instruction. Tells how maps may be obtained. (SLM)

  4. Identifying and modeling safety hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

    2000-03-29

    The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

  5. FY 1996 activity summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  6. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  7. Rebuttal Finale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Katznelson, Ron D

    2011-01-01

    Professor Mark Lemley wrote an article about the Myth of the sole inventor, to which we provided a critique, with an executive summary of the critique published here on IPWatchdog.com. On October 9, 2011, he wrote a response to our critique, and this is our reply. In his October 9 response, Lemley...... asserts that our critique engaged in ad hominem attack. Our critique notes that he “neglected” to mention critical facts, that “his scholarship is unreliable,” and that “no reader should take his radical proposals for new patent law seriously.” We regret that Lemley regards this treatment of his treatment...

  8. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-07

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

  9. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Emissions from Lime Manufacturing Plants Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Lime Manufacturing Plants. This document provides a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  10. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  11. Flood hazard and management: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, Howard S

    2006-08-15

    This paper discusses whether flood hazard in the UK is increasing and considers issues of flood risk management. Urban development is known to increase fluvial flood frequency, hence design measures are routinely implemented to minimize the impact. Studies suggest that historical effects, while potentially large at small scale, are not significant for large river basins. Storm water flooding within the urban environment is an area where flood hazard is inadequately defined; new methods are needed to assess and manage flood risk. Development on flood plains has led to major capital expenditure on flood protection, but government is attempting to strengthen the planning role of the environmental regulator to prevent this. Rural land use management has intensified significantly over the past 30 years, leading to concerns that flood risk has increased, at least at local scale; the implications for catchment-scale flooding are unclear. New research is addressing this issue, and more broadly, the role of land management in reducing flood risk. Climate change impacts on flooding and current guidelines for UK practice are reviewed. Large uncertainties remain, not least for the occurrence of extreme precipitation, but precautionary guidance is in place. Finally, current levels of flood protection are discussed. Reassessment of flood hazard has led to targets for increased flood protection, but despite important developments to communicate flood risk to the public, much remains to be done to increase public awareness of flood hazard.

  12. Intern Summary Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Topics covered include: Probe Station Antenna Range; LERCIP 2004 Summary; L.E.R.C.I.P. Internship Summary; Hubble Space Telescope Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Analyses; GRABER - the Duct Tape of Space and JIMO Heat Conducting Foam; CDF and PDF Comparison Between Humacao, Puerto Rico and Florida; Development of the On-board Aircraft Network; Development of the Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP); An Overview of My 2004 Summer Internship [Non-destructive Evaluation]; My Summer Experience as an Administrative Officer Assistant [in the Safety and Assurance Directorate Office]; Programming an Experiment Control System; Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed; Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites; Feasibility of EB Welded Hastelloy X and Combination of Refractory Metals; My Work in the NASA Glenn History Office and Records Management Office; Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center]; Drinking Water Database; Design of an EXB Probe; and Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen.

  13. 75 FR 11002 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Appendix IX volatiles, semivolatiles, metals, pesticides, herbicides, dioxins and PCB for the sampling on... testing is at level higher than the delisting level allowed by the Division Director in granting...

  14. 76 FR 74709 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... to leachate data or ground water monitoring data) or any other data relevant to the delisted waste... exclusion applies to the centrifuge solids generated at Beaumont Refinery's Beaumont, Texas facility... located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202,...

  15. 75 FR 60632 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and analytical data from the Beaumont Refinery, Beaumont, Texas facility. C. How will Beaumont... offsite Landfill, so no ground water monitoring data for disposal of this waste stream in the landfill is... environmental data (including but not limited to leachate data or ground water monitoring data) or any...

  16. 76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, also the Agency or we in this preamble) today is granting a petition submitted by Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., the current owner, and to BWX Technologies, Inc., as predecessor in interest to the current owner, identified collectively hereafter in this preamble as ``B&W NOG,'' to exclude (or delist) on a one-time basis from the lists......

  17. 77 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... these ND species filtered through soil and nature decayed in the soil? Response: As documented in the... fine sand layer that underlies the North Landfarm but overlies a clay liner. Within said sand layer are... been ``filtered through soil and nature decayed in the soil'' and have had sufficient opportunity...

  18. 77 FR 56558 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... regulatory docket at no cost for the first 100 pages and at a cost of $0.15 per page for additional copies... processes; (2) Historical sampling data of the IWTP sludge; (3) Analytical results from four samples for.... Methods must meet Performance Based Measurement System Criteria in which the Data Quality Objectives...

  19. 76 FR 72311 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Scrubber water blowdown produced by the RKI's air pollution control equipment is also derived from the... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is granting a petition submitted by Eastman Chemical Corporation--Texas...) bottom ash, RKI fly ash, and RKI scrubber water blowdown. The RKI bottom ash and the RKI fly ash are...

  20. 75 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... benzene, ethyl ether, methyl isobutyl ketone, n-butyl alcohol, cyclohexane, methanol. F005 Toluene, methyl...- dichlorobenzene, trichlorofluoromethane. F003 N.A., xylene, acetone, ethyl acetate, ethyl benzene, ethyl ether... operates a majority of individual production plants at the facility, there are some production plants...

  1. Space debris executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-09-01

    Spacecraft, boosters, and fragments are potential hazards to space vehicles, and it is argued that collisions between them could produce a cascade that could preclude activity in LEO in 25 to 50 years. That has generated pressure for constraints on military space operations, so the AF SAB performed a study of technical aspects of the debris problem. The Study was independent of the efforts of the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) as well as those of and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which is the principal advocate for cascades and constraints. Most work on space debris has been performed by AFSPC and JSC, so the Study was in part an assessment of their efforts, in which both have been cooperative. The Study identified the main disagreements and quantified their impacts. It resolved some issues and provided bounds for the rest. It treated radar and optical observations; launch, explosion, and decay rates; and the number and distribution of fragments from explosions and collisions. That made it possible to address hazard to manned spacecraft at low altitudes and the possibility of cascading at higher altitudes, both of which now appear less likely.

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  3. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  4. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  5. 76 FR 62442 - Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement for Upper Truckee River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement for Upper Truckee.... ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact... publication of the final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. ADDRESSES: The...

  6. Evaluation of seismic hazard at the northwestern part of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, M.; Shokry, M. M. F.; Mohamed, A. M. E.; Helal, A. M. A.; Mohamed, Abuoelela A.; El-Hadidy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the seismic hazard at the northwestern Egypt using the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment approach. The Probabilistic approach was carried out based on a recent data set to take into account the historic seismicity and updated instrumental seismicity. A homogenous earthquake catalogue was compiled and a proposed seismic sources model was presented. The doubly-truncated exponential model was adopted for calculations of the recurrence parameters. Ground-motion prediction equations that recently recommended by experts and developed based upon earthquake data obtained from tectonic environments similar to those in and around the studied area were weighted and used for assessment of seismic hazard in the frame of logic tree approach. Considering a grid of 0.2° × 0.2° covering the study area, seismic hazard curves for every node were calculated. Hazard maps at bedrock conditions were produced for peak ground acceleration, in addition to six spectral periods (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 s) for return periods of 72, 475 and 2475 years. The unified hazard spectra of two selected rock sites at Alexandria and Mersa Matruh Cities were provided. Finally, the hazard curves were de-aggregated to determine the sources that contribute most of hazard level of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for the mentioned selected sites.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review and Summary Documents for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon tetrachloride is a volatile haloalkane with a wide range of industrial and chemical applications. It is produced commercially from chlorination of a variety of low molecular weight hydrocarbons such as carbon disulfide, methanol, methane, propane, and ethylene dichloride. It is also produced by thermal chlorination in the production of tetrachloroethylene. Major uses of carbon tetrachloride have been in the recovery of tin from tin plating waste, in formulation of petrol additives and refrigerants, in metal degreasing and agricultural fumigants, in chlorination of organic compounds, in the production of semiconductors, in the reduction of fire hazard, as a solvent for rubber cement, and as a catalyst in polymer technology. Its production has been decreasing and it is no longer permitted in products intended for home use. Despite this ban, carbon tetrachloride has been detected at 314 hazardous waste sites. EPA's assessment of noncancer health effects and carcinogenic potential of carbon tetrachloride was last prepared and added to the IRIS database in 1991. The IRIS program is preparing an assessment that will incorporate health effects information available for carbon tetrachloride, and current risk assessment methods. The IRIS assessment for carbon tetrachloride will consist of a Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary. The Toxicological Review is a critical review of the physiochemical and toxicokinetic properties of a chemical, and its toxicity

  9. Communication in hazardous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, W N; Herold, T R

    1986-01-01

    Radios were investigated for use in hazardous environments where protective breathing equipment such as plastic suits and respirators interfere with communication. A radio system, manufactured by Communications-Applied technology (C-AT), was identified that was designed specifically for hazardous environment communications. This equipment had been used successfully by the US Army and NASA for several years. C-AT equipment was evaluated in plantwide applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) using temporary frequencies obtained by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR). Radios performed well in all applications, which included a tritium facility, high-level caves, a nuclear reactor building, tank farm, and a canyon building interior. Permanent frequencies were obtained by DOE-SR for two complete six-man C-AT systems at SRP. Because of the relatively short range of these systems, replicates will cover all applications of this type of equipment plantwide. Twelve radio systems are currently being used successfully in plantwide applications.

  10. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 08: The "Golden Rule" and other lessons on communicating about hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Other fact sheets identified considerations for communicating about hazards, talked about the importance of working locally, and discussed the seven laws of effective hazard communication. This fact sheet introduces the "Golden Rule" of hazard communication and shares some final lessons from hazard educators.

  11. Learning to drive: from hazard detection to hazard handling

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Mary Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Hazard perception has been found to correlate with crash involvement, and has thus been suggested as the most likely source of any skill gap between novice and experienced drivers. The most commonly used method for measuring hazard perception is to evaluate the perception-reaction time to filmed traffic events. It can be argued that this method lacks ecological validity and may be of limited value in predicting the actions drivers’ will take to hazards encountered. The first two studies of th...

  12. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment of Babol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Abdollahzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of Babol, one of big cities in north of Iran. Many destructive earthquakes happened in Iran in the last centuries. It comes from historical references that at least many times; Babol has been destroyed by catastrophic earthquakes. In this paper, the peak horizontal ground acceleration over the bedrock (PGA is calculated by a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA. For this reason, at first, a collected catalogue, containing both historical and instrumental events that occurred in a radius of 200 km of Babol city and covering the period from 874 to 2004 have been gathered. Then, seismic sources are modeled and recur¬rence relationship is established. After elimination of the aftershocks and foreshocks, the main earthquakes were taken into consideration to calculate the seismic parameters (SP by Kijko method. The calculations were performed using the logic tree method and four weighted attenuation relationships Ghodrati, 0.35, Khademi, 0.25, Ambraseys and Simpson, 0.2, and Sarma and Srbulov, 0.2. Seismic hazard assessment is then carried out for 8 horizontal by 7 vertical lines grid points using SEISRISK III. Finally, two seismic hazard maps of the studied area based on Peak Horizontal Ground Acceleration (PGA over bedrock for 2 and 10% probability of ex¬ceedance in one life cycles of 50 year are presented. These calculations have been performed by the Poisson distribution of two hazard levels. The results showed that the PGA ranges from 0.32 to 0.33 g for a return period of 475 years and from 0.507 to 0.527 g for a return period of 2475 years. Since population is very dense in Babol and vulnerability of buildings is high, the risk of future earthquakes will be very significant.

  13. Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

  14. Periurbanisation and natural hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Loison

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In mountainous areas in recent decades urbanisation has expanded to areas where low ground adjoins mountainsides that are unstable in a number of respects. Periurbanisation in mountain basins with unstable sides poses specific problems that local players have to address. The Lavanchon basin (southeast of Grenoble, which is subject to very rapid urban growth combined with particularly dynamic mountainsides, is representative of the way activity is being brought into closer contact with potential hazards. A diachronic study of changes in land use between 1956 and 2001 shows how valley infrastructures at the bottom of mountainsides have become increasingly dense. In this context, a survey was carried out among a number of residents in the Lavanchon basin in an attempt to evaluate the degree of awareness that the population has of the natural hazards to which it is exposed. The results show that slightly more than half of the population surveyed was aware of the problem of natural hazards being present in the area, with most inhabitants being more concerned about industrial and pollution hazards. New residents were unaware of or were unwilling to accept the reality of hazards. The low incidence of significant natural events, the effectiveness of the protective structures built, the absence of information provided by the public authorities and the division of the basin between several management bodies appear to have engendered a feeling of safety from natural phenomena. The geographical distribution of appreciation of the hazard clearly shows a distinction between those inhabitants living on the low ground and those at the bottom of the mountainsides, and this corresponds fairly closely with the historical and current location of the main potentially hazardous events that have occurred.Dans les territoires de montagne, les dernières décennies ont vu l’expansion de l’urbanisation vers les zones de contact entre la plaine et les versants, lieux

  15. Linguistic Summaries in Small Area Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Hudec

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Data collection in small area statistics also copes with missing values. In the municipal statistics we can recognize more or less similar municipalities and more or less dependent indicators. Therefore, an approach capable to process this uncertainty is desirable. Data produced in small area statistics are valuable source for users. Data dissemination which mimics human reasoning in searching and evaluation data could be a suitable solution. Thus, there is a space for improving both processes by linguistic summaries which are based on fuzzy logic. Finally, the paper discusses future research and development topics in this field.

  16. Management Strategy for Hazardous Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Vilgerts, J; Timma, L; Blumberga, D.

    2012-01-01

    During the past year authorities, manufactures and scientists have been focused on the management and treatment methods of hazardous wastes, because they realized that “prevention costs” of activities connected to handling of hazardous waste are lower than “restoration costs” after damage is done. Uncontrolled management of hazardous substances may lead to contamination of any ecosystem on Earth: freshwater, ocean and terrestrial. Moreover leakage of toxic gasses creates also air pollution...

  17. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework in which principal and agent knowingly hold asymmetric beliefs regarding the probability of success of their enterprise. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium......-powered incentives are sufficient to induce any given effort level. If the agent is overall moderately overconfident, the latter effect dominates; because the agent bears less risk in this case, he actually benefits from his overconfidence. If the agent is significantly overconfident, the former effect dominates......; the agent is then exposed to an excessive amount of risk, which is harmful to him. An increase in overconfidence--either about the base probability of success or the extent to which effort affects it--makes it more likely that high levels of effort are implemented in equilibrium....

  18. Runoff inundation hazard cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineux, N.; Degré, A.

    2012-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, Europe suffered from more than hundred major inundations, responsible for some 700 deaths, for the moving of about half a million of people and the economic losses of at least 25 billions Euros covered by the insurance policies. Within this context, EU launched the 2007/60/CE directive. The inundations are natural phenomenon. They cannot be avoided. Nevertheless this directive permits to better evaluate the risks and to coordinate the management measures taken at member states level. In most countries, inundation maps only include rivers' overflowing. In Wallonia, overland flows and mudflows also cause huge damages, and must be included in the flood hazard map. Indeed, the cleaning operations for a village can lead to an estimated cost of 11 000 €. Average construction cost of retention dams to control off-site damage caused by floods and muddy flows was valued at 380 000€, and yearly dredging costs associated with these retention ponds at 15 000€. For a small city for which a study was done in a more specific way (Gembloux), the mean annual cost for the damages that can generate the runoff is about 20 000€. This cost consists of the physical damages caused to the real estate and movable properties of the residents as well as the emergency operations of the firemen and the city. On top of damages to public infrastructure (clogging of trenches, silting up of retention ponds) and to private property by muddy flows, runoff generates a significant loss of arable land. Yet, the soil resource is not an unlimited commodity. Moreover, sediments' transfer to watercourses alters their physical and chemical quality. And that is not to mention the increased psychological stress for people. But to map overland flood and mud flow hazard is a real challenge. This poster will present the methodology used to in Wallonia. The methodology is based on 3 project rainfalls: 25, 50 and 100 years return period (consistency with the cartography of the

  19. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc.......) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  20. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  1. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  2. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  3. Guidelines for hazard evaluation procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi 1 . Hazard Evaluation Procedures ... Management Overview ... ... Part I Preface 11 Introduction to the Guidelines 1.1 Background ... 1.2 Relationship...

  4. Delinquency Prevention Works. Program Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchik, Shay

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) compiled this summary in order to assist states and jurisdictions in their delinquency prevention efforts. The summary provides a synthesis of current information on a broad range of programs and strategies which seek to prevent delinquency. The theory of risk-focused prevention is…

  5. 76 FR 30027 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Site-Specific Treatment Variance for Hazardous Selenium-Bearing Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Treatment Variance for Hazardous Selenium-Bearing Waste Treatment Issued to Chemical Waste Management in... Direct Final rule pertains to the treatment of a hazardous waste generated by the Owens-Brockway Glass... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 268 Land Disposal Restrictions: Site-Specific Treatment Variance for Hazardous...

  6. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  7. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  8. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  9. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  10. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  11. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  12. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  13. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  14. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  15. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  16. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  17. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  18. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  19. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in San Diego County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  20. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  1. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Los Angeles County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  2. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Tanis

    2005-11-25

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below.

  3. NPR hazards review: (Phase 1, Production only appendixes). Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.R.; Trumble, R.E.

    1962-08-15

    The NPR Hazards Review is being issued in a series of volumes. Volume 1, which has already been published, was of the nature of an expanded summary. It included the results of hazards analyses with some explanatory material to put the results in context. Volume 2 presents results of reviews made after the preparation of Volume 1. It also contains supporting material and details not included in Volume 1. Volumes 1 and 2 together provide a nearly complete ``Design Hazards Review of the NPR.`` However, certain remaining problems still exist and are to be the subject of a continuing R&D program. These problems and programs are discussed in Appendix H. Neither Volume 1 nor Volume 2 treat operational aspects of reactor hazards in detail. This area of concern will be the primary subject of a third volume of the NPR Hazards Review. This third volume, to be prepared and issued at a later date, may also contain information supplementing Volumes 1 and 2.

  4. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

    2010-05-10

    Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

  5. Identification of Potential Hazard using Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, R. M.; Syahputri, K.; Rizkya, I.; Siregar, I.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted in the paper production’s company. These Paper products will be used as a cigarette paper. Along in the production’s process, Company provides the machines and equipment that operated by workers. During the operations, all workers may potentially injured. It known as a potential hazard. Hazard identification and risk assessment is one part of a safety and health program in the stage of risk management. This is very important as part of efforts to prevent occupational injuries and diseases resulting from work. This research is experiencing a problem that is not the identification of potential hazards and risks that would be faced by workers during the running production process. The purpose of this study was to identify the potential hazards by using hazard identification and risk assessment methods. Risk assessment is done using severity criteria and the probability of an accident. According to the research there are 23 potential hazard that occurs with varying severity and probability. Then made the determination Risk Assessment Code (RAC) for each potential hazard, and gained 3 extreme risks, 10 high risks, 6 medium risks and 3 low risks. We have successfully identified potential hazard using RAC.

  6. ThinkHazard! - Linking natural hazard information to decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, B.; Fraser, S. A.; Simpson, A.; Balog, S.; Murnane, R. J.; Deparday, V.

    2016-12-01

    Development projects, from construction of schools, hospitals, bridges, or dams, to new agricultural programs are often at risk of being adversely affected by natural hazards in their design lifetime. The design of such projects must consider disaster and climate risks to ensure investment is sustainable and "disaster and climate proofed". A significant challenge for those who want incorporate climate and disaster risk into projects, is accessing appropriate and understandable information on which risks exist and how to reduce these risks. The result is that too few development projects properly consider the full range of hazards present, and are at high risk of being left unprepared down the line. The Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery has developed ThinkHazard!, an open-source, simple yet robust, online hazard screening tool providing hazard level at a user's specified location, for eight hazards. We describe the structure and development of ThinkHazard!, which is intended to be the first source of information for project managers unfamiliar with all the potential hazards in their project location, acting as a stepping stone or gateway to accessing more detailed information to incorporate disaster risk management in their projects.

  7. Astronautics summary and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Anatoly Ivanovich; Menshikov, Valery Alexandrovich

    2003-01-01

    The monograph by A.I.Kiselev, A.A. Medvedev and Y.A.Menshikov, Astronautics: Summary and Prospects, aroused enthusiasm both among experts and the public at large. This is due to the felicitous choice of presentation that combines a simple description of complex space matters with scientificsubstantiation of the sub­ jectmatter described. The wealth of color photos makes the book still more attractive, and it was nominated for an award at the 14th International Moscow Book Fair, being singled out as the "best publication of the book fair". The book's popularity led to a second edition, substantially revised and enlarged. Since the first edition did not sufficiently cover the issues of space impact on ecology and the prospective development of space systems, the authors revised the entire volume, including in it the chapter "Space activity and ecology" and the section "Multi-function space systems". Using the federal monitoring system, now in the phase of system engi­ neering, as an example, the authors consi...

  8. A New Probabilistic Seismic Hazard for mainland Spain. Main differences with the Building Code Hazard Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezcua, J.; Rueda, J.; Garcia Blanco, R.

    2009-05-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for mainland Spain that takes into account recent new results in seismicity, seismic zoning and strong ground attenuation no considered in the previous PSHAs studies published is presented. Those new input data has been obtained by us as a three steep project carried out in order to get a new hazard map for mainland Spain. We have used a new earthquake catalogue obtained for the area in which the earthquakes are given in moment magnitude through specific deduced relationships for our territory based on intensity data, Mezcua et al. (2004). Beside that, we also include a new seismogenetic zoning based in the recent partial zoning studies performed by different authors. Finally we have developed a new strong ground motion relationship for the area, Mezcua et al. (2008). With this new data a logic tree process has been defined to quantify the epistemic uncertainty related with those parts of the process. Finally, after a weighting scheme a mean hazard map for PGA on rock type condition for 10 % exceendence probability in 50 years is presented. In order to investigate main differences with the official hazard map from the Building Code we performed from one side the map of differences and also a map of impact expressed in % of the values obtained in relation with the presented in the official map. Main differences are in both directions: an overestimation (0.04g) of the official hazard map in those areas corresponding with the greatest PGA values corresponding to the south and southeastern part of the country due to the use of local attenuation relations and an underestimation for the rest of the country with a maximum of the order of 0.06g close to the maximum of the map in southern Spain.

  9. The potential hazards of xenotransplantation: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y; Magre, S; Patience, C

    2005-04-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular the transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human recipients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and microbial factors involved in xenotransplantation. The issues reviewed include the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology, and the rejection mechanism and attempts to overcome this immunological challenge. The authors discuss advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection through the creation of genetically modified pigs, more suited to the human micro-environment. Finally, in regard to microbial hazards, the authors review possible viral infections originating from pigs.

  10. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Chiapas State (SE Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lomelí, Anabel Georgina; García-Mayordomo, Julián

    2015-04-01

    The Chiapas State, in southeastern Mexico, is a very active seismic region due to the interaction of three tectonic plates: Northamerica, Cocos and Caribe. We present a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) specifically performed to evaluate seismic hazard in the Chiapas state. The PSHA was based on a composited seismic catalogue homogenized to Mw and was used a logic tree procedure for the consideration of different seismogenic source models and ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). The results were obtained in terms of peak ground acceleration as well as spectral accelerations. The earthquake catalogue was compiled from the International Seismological Center and the Servicio Sismológico Nacional de México sources. Two different seismogenic source zones (SSZ) models were devised based on a revision of the tectonics of the region and the available geomorphological and geological maps. The SSZ were finally defined by the analysis of geophysical data, resulting two main different SSZ models. The Gutenberg-Richter parameters for each SSZ were calculated from the declustered and homogenized catalogue, while the maximum expected earthquake was assessed from both the catalogue and geological criteria. Several worldwide and regional GMPEs for subduction and crustal zones were revised. For each SSZ model we considered four possible combinations of GMPEs. Finally, hazard was calculated in terms of PGA and SA for 500-, 1000-, and 2500-years return periods for each branch of the logic tree using the CRISIS2007 software. The final hazard maps represent the mean values obtained from the two seismogenic and four attenuation models considered in the logic tree. For the three return periods analyzed, the maps locate the most hazardous areas in the Chiapas Central Pacific Zone, the Pacific Coastal Plain and in the Motagua and Polochic Fault Zone; intermediate hazard values in the Chiapas Batholith Zone and in the Strike-Slip Faults Province. The hazard decreases

  11. Hazard identification and control in the pre-blasting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-kun; ZHU Hai-long; CHEN Jian-qiang

    2011-01-01

    Major mineral hazard identifications should consider perilous types of fatal accidents in collieries from its definition,and then set existent hazardous objects and their relevant amount as referenced factors.Eliminating hazards in systems and decreasing risks are their essential purposes with help of hazard identification,risk evaluation and management.By pre-control on major hazards,fatal accidents are avoided,stuffs' safety and healthy are protected,levels of safe management are enhanced,and perpetual systems are built up finally.However,choosing the proper identification and evaluation is a problem all along.Based on specific condition in Jiangou Coal Mine,method of LEC was applied for hazard identification and evaluation in the pre-blasting process within horizontal section top-coal mechanized caving of steep seams.And control measures to of each hazard were put forward.The identification method combining qualitative and quantitative analysis.So,it is practical and operable for the method to develop the given scientific research and has a distinctive impact on high efficiency and safety products for pre-blasting in horizontal section top-coal mechanized caving of steep seams.

  12. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  13. Uranium enrichment management review: summary of analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    In May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within the Department of Energy requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. After extensive investigation, analysis, and discussion, the review group presented its findings and recommendations in a report on December 2, 1980. The following pages contain background material on which that final report was based. This report is arranged in chapters that parallel those of the uranium enrichment management review final report - chapters that contain summaries of the review group's discussion and analyses in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. Further information, in-depth analysis, and discussion of suggested alternative management practices are provided in five appendices.

  14. Robust water hazard detection for autonomous off-road navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuo-zhong YAO; Zhi-yu XIANG; Ji-lin LIU

    2009-01-01

    Existing water hazard detection methods usually fail when the features of water surfaces are greatly changed by the surroundings, e.g., by a change in illumination. This paper proposes a novel algorithm to robustly detect different kinds of water hazards for autonomous navigation. Our algorithm combines traditional machine learning and image segmentation and uses only digital cameras, which are usually affordable, as the visual sensors. Active learning is used for automatically dealing with problems caused by the selection, labeling and classification of large numbers of training sets. Mean-shift based image segmentation is used to refine the final classification. Our experimental results show that our new algorithm can accurately detect not only 'common' water hazards, which usually have the features of both high brightness and low texture, but also 'special' water hazards that may have lots of ripples or low brightness.

  15. Emissions inventories and options for control SUMMARY REPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart RJ; Amstel AR van; Born GJ van den; Kroeze C; MTV; LAE

    1994-01-01

    This report is the final summary report of the project "Social causes of the greenhouse effect ; emissions inventories and options for control", funded by the National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP) and the Environment Directorate of the Ministry of Housing,

  16. Mathematical model of a utility firm. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-08-21

    The project was aimed at developing an understanding of the economic and behavioral processes that take place within a utility firm, and without it. This executive summary, one of five documents, gives the project goals and objectives, outlines the subject areas of investigation, discusses the findings and results, and finally considers applications within the electric power industry and future research directions. (DLC)

  17. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

  18. Information Gathering at the Fiesta Educativa '80. Final Report Executive Summary [and] Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwest Regional Laboratory for Educational Research and Development, Los Alamitos, CA.

    The two documents describe California's efforts to collect information on the needs of Spanish speaking parents of developmentally disabled children. Fiesta Educativa was the name of a conference offering workshops and exhibits to more than 1,000 parents and professionals. During the Third Annual Fiesta, information was collected via…

  19. Global Polynomial Kernel Hazard Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiabu, Munir; Miranda, Maria Dolores Martínez; Nielsen, Jens Perch;

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new bias reducing method for kernel hazard estimation. The method is called global polynomial adjustment (GPA). It is a global correction which is applicable to any kernel hazard estimator. The estimator works well from a theoretical point of view as it asymptotically...

  20. Global Polynomial Kernel Hazard Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiabu, Munir; Miranda, Maria Dolores Martínez; Nielsen, Jens Perch

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new bias reducing method for kernel hazard estimation. The method is called global polynomial adjustment (GPA). It is a global correction which is applicable to any kernel hazard estimator. The estimator works well from a theoretical point of view as it asymptotically redu...

  1. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated fu...

  2. 75 FR 50761 - Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... risks of chemical substances in a site-specific situation and thereby support risk management decisions... support the first two steps (hazard identification and dose-response evaluation) of the risk assessment... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the...

  3. Hazard classification or risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    The EU classification of substances for e.g. reproductive toxicants is hazard based and does not to address the risk suchsubstances may pose through normal, or extreme, use. Such hazard classification complies with the consumer's right to know. It is also an incentive to careful use and storage...... and to substitute with less toxic compounds. Actually, if exposure is constant across product class, producersmay make substitution decisions based on hazard. Hazard classification is also useful during major accidents where there is no time for risk assessment and the exposure is likely to be substantial enough...... be a poor substitute for a proper risk assessment as low potency substances can constitute a risk if the exposure is high enough and vice versa. Examples illustrating the strength and limitations of hazard classification, risk assessment and toxicological potency will be presented with focus on reproductive...

  4. Seismic hazard assessment of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafory-Ashtiany

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of the new seismic hazard map of Iran is based on probabilistic seismic hazard computation using the historical earthquakes data, geology, tectonics, fault activity and seismic source models in Iran. These maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Iran in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines, and seismic hazard zoning, by using current probabilistic procedures. They display the probabilistic estimates of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA for the return periods of 75 and 475 years. The maps have been divided into intervals of 0.25 degrees in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions to calculate the peak ground acceleration values at each grid point and draw the seismic hazard curves. The results presented in this study will provide the basis for the preparation of seismic risk maps, the estimation of earthquake insurance premiums, and the preliminary site evaluation of critical facilities.

  5. Pricing hazardous substance emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staring, Knut; Vennemo, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses pricing of emissions to air of several harmful substances. It combines ranking indices for environmentally harmful substances with economic valuation data to yield price estimates. The ranking methods are discussed and a relative index established. Given the relative ranking of the substances, they all become valued by assigning a value to one of them, the `anchor` substance, for which lead is selected. Valuations are provided for 19 hazardous substances that are often subject to environmental regulations. They include dioxins, TBT, etc. The study concludes with a discussion of other categories of substances as well as uncertainties and possible refinements. When the valuations are related to CO, NOx, SOx and PM 10, the index system undervalues these pollutants as compared to other studies. The scope is limited to the outdoor environment and does not include global warming and eutrophication. The indices are based on toxicity and so do not apply to CO{sub 2} or other substances that are biologically harmless. The index values are not necessarily valid for all countries and should be considered as preliminary. 18 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Hamburger hazards and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Røssvoll, Elin; Langsrud, Solveig; Scholderer, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that many consumers eat rare hamburgers and that information about microbiological hazards related to undercooked meat not necessarily leads to more responsible behavior. With this study we aim to investigate whether consumers' willingness to eat hamburgers depends on the emotions they experience when confronted with the food. A representative sample of 1046 Norwegian consumers participated in an online experiment. In the first part, participants were randomly divided into two groups. One group was confronted with a picture of a rare hamburger, whereas the other group was confronted with a picture of a well-done hamburger. The respondents were instructed to imagine that they were served the hamburger on the picture and then to indicate which emotions they experienced: fear, disgust, surprise, interest, pleasure, or none of these. In part two, all respondents were confronted with four pictures of hamburgers cooked to different degrees of doneness (rare, medium rare, medium well-done, well-done), and were asked to state their likelihood of eating. We analyzed the data by means of a multivariate probit model and two linear fixed-effect models. The results show that confrontation with rare hamburgers evokes more fear and disgust than confrontation with well-done hamburgers, that all hamburgers trigger pleasure and interest, and that a consumer's willingness to eat rare hamburgers depends on the particular type of emotion evoked. These findings indicate that emotions play an important role in a consumer's likelihood of eating risky food, and should be considered when developing food safety strategies.

  7. Radiation hazard control report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Morishima, Hiroshige; Araki, Yasusuke; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Hiraji, Chihiro; Nagai, Shoya [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The document of radiation hazard control from April 2001 to March 2002 in the research institute of atomic energy of Kinki University was reported and actual data were presented. 106 personnel were subjected to the control, the reactor maximal output was 1W with total output of 399,64 W center dot h for total 718.23 h and the institute underwent the inspection by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for twice, which resulting in getting satisfactory evaluation. The control involved was for the personnel, laboratories and field. The first was done mainly with film badges and sometimes with pocket dosimeters, and revealed the exposure of 0.480 mSv at maximum. The laboratory dose equivalent was continuously measured with the ionization chamber area monitor and sometimes with the ionization chamber survey meters, GM tube survey meters and scintillation survey meters. The film badge and TLD were also used. In addition, concentrations of radioactivity were measured in the exhaust gas and water with the dust-monitor and overall-monitor, respectively, and surface densities by smear-method with 2 pi-gas flow and liquid scintillation counters. The field control was carried out by calculation of environmental gamma-ray dose equivalent rate based on monthly TLD dose data and by actual beta-ray measurement of environmental specimens collected at every 3 months. (J.P.N.)

  8. Radiation hazard control report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Morishima, Hiroshige; Araki, Yasusuke; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Matsubayashi, Hideki; Hiraji, Chihiro [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    The document of radiation hazard control from April 2000 to March 2001 in the research institute of atomic energy of Kinki University was reported and actual data were presented. Seventy five personnel were subjected to the control, the reactor maximal output was 1W with total output of 463.74 W center dot h for total 777.34 h and the institute underwent the inspection by Science and Technology Agency for 3 times, which resulting in getting satisfactory evaluation. The control involved was for the personnel, laboratories and field. The first was done mainly with film badges and sometimes with pocket dosimeters, and revealed the exposure of 0.264 mSv at maximum. The laboratory dose equivalent was continuously measured with the ionization chamber area monitor and sometimes with the ionization chamber survey meters, GM tube survey meters and scintillation survey meters. The film badge and TLD were also used. In addition, concentrations of radioactivity were measured in the exhaust gas and water with the dust-monitor and overall-monitor, respectively, and surface densities by smear-method with the 2 pi-gas flow and liquid scintillation counters. The field control was carried out by calculation of environmental gamma-ray dose equivalent rate based on monthly TLD dose data and by actual beta-ray measurement of environmental specimens collected at every 3 months. (J.P.N.)

  9. Earthquake Hazard and Risk in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Porto, N.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Alaska is one of the most seismically active and tectonically diverse regions in the United States. To examine risk, we have updated the seismic hazard model in Alaska. The current RMS Alaska hazard model is based on the 2007 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Alaska (Wesson et al., 2007; Boyd et al., 2007). The 2015 RMS model will update several key source parameters, including: extending the earthquake catalog, implementing a new set of crustal faults, updating the subduction zone geometry and reoccurrence rate. First, we extend the earthquake catalog to 2013; decluster the catalog, and compute new background rates. We then create a crustal fault model, based on the Alaska 2012 fault and fold database. This new model increased the number of crustal faults from ten in 2007, to 91 faults in the 2015 model. This includes the addition of: the western Denali, Cook Inlet folds near Anchorage, and thrust faults near Fairbanks. Previously the subduction zone was modeled at a uniform depth. In this update, we model the intraslab as a series of deep stepping events. We also use the best available data, such as Slab 1.0, to update the geometry of the subduction zone. The city of Anchorage represents 80% of the risk exposure in Alaska. In the 2007 model, the hazard in Alaska was dominated by the frequent rate of magnitude 7 to 8 events (Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and large magnitude 8+ events had a low reoccurrence rate (Characteristic) and therefore didn't contribute as highly to the overall risk. We will review these reoccurrence rates, and will present the results and impact to Anchorage. We will compare our hazard update to the 2007 USGS hazard map, and discuss the changes and drivers for these changes. Finally, we will examine the impact model changes have on Alaska earthquake risk. Consider risk metrics include average annual loss, an annualized expected loss level used by insurers to determine the costs of earthquake insurance (and premium levels), and the

  10. Hazard Management Dealt by Safety Professionals in Colleges: The Impact of Individual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih; Chen, Chi-Hsiang; Yi, Nai-Wen; Lu, Pei-Chen; Yu, Shan-Chi; Wang, Chien-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying, evaluating, and controlling workplace hazards are important functions of safety professionals (SPs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the content and frequency of hazard management dealt by safety professionals in colleges. The authors also explored the effects of organizational factors/individual factors on SPs’ perception of frequency of hazard management. The researchers conducted survey research to achieve the objective of this study. The researchers mailed questionnaires to 200 SPs in colleges after simple random sampling, then received a total of 144 valid responses (response rate = 72%). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the hazard management scale (HMS) extracted five factors, including physical hazards, biological hazards, social and psychological hazards, ergonomic hazards, and chemical hazards. Moreover, the top 10 hazards that the survey results identified that safety professionals were most likely to deal with (in order of most to least frequent) were: organic solvents, illumination, other chemicals, machinery and equipment, fire and explosion, electricity, noise, specific chemicals, human error, and lifting/carrying. Finally, the results of one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated there were four individual factors that impacted the perceived frequency of hazard management which were of statistical and practical significance: job tenure in the college of employment, type of certification, gender, and overall job tenure. SPs within colleges and industries can now discuss plans revolving around these five areas instead of having to deal with all of the separate hazards. PMID:27918474

  11. Hazard Management Dealt by Safety Professionals in Colleges: The Impact of Individual Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Chih Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying, evaluating, and controlling workplace hazards are important functions of safety professionals (SPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the content and frequency of hazard management dealt by safety professionals in colleges. The authors also explored the effects of organizational factors/individual factors on SPs’ perception of frequency of hazard management. The researchers conducted survey research to achieve the objective of this study. The researchers mailed questionnaires to 200 SPs in colleges after simple random sampling, then received a total of 144 valid responses (response rate = 72%. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the hazard management scale (HMS extracted five factors, including physical hazards, biological hazards, social and psychological hazards, ergonomic hazards, and chemical hazards. Moreover, the top 10 hazards that the survey results identified that safety professionals were most likely to deal with (in order of most to least frequent were: organic solvents, illumination, other chemicals, machinery and equipment, fire and explosion, electricity, noise, specific chemicals, human error, and lifting/carrying. Finally, the results of one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA indicated there were four individual factors that impacted the perceived frequency of hazard management which were of statistical and practical significance: job tenure in the college of employment, type of certification, gender, and overall job tenure. SPs within colleges and industries can now discuss plans revolving around these five areas instead of having to deal with all of the separate hazards.

  12. Hazard Management Dealt by Safety Professionals in Colleges: The Impact of Individual Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih; Chen, Chi-Hsiang; Yi, Nai-Wen; Lu, Pei-Chen; Yu, Shan-Chi; Wang, Chien-Peng

    2016-12-03

    Identifying, evaluating, and controlling workplace hazards are important functions of safety professionals (SPs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the content and frequency of hazard management dealt by safety professionals in colleges. The authors also explored the effects of organizational factors/individual factors on SPs' perception of frequency of hazard management. The researchers conducted survey research to achieve the objective of this study. The researchers mailed questionnaires to 200 SPs in colleges after simple random sampling, then received a total of 144 valid responses (response rate = 72%). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the hazard management scale (HMS) extracted five factors, including physical hazards, biological hazards, social and psychological hazards, ergonomic hazards, and chemical hazards. Moreover, the top 10 hazards that the survey results identified that safety professionals were most likely to deal with (in order of most to least frequent) were: organic solvents, illumination, other chemicals, machinery and equipment, fire and explosion, electricity, noise, specific chemicals, human error, and lifting/carrying. Finally, the results of one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated there were four individual factors that impacted the perceived frequency of hazard management which were of statistical and practical significance: job tenure in the college of employment, type of certification, gender, and overall job tenure. SPs within colleges and industries can now discuss plans revolving around these five areas instead of having to deal with all of the separate hazards.

  13. 78 FR 58989 - Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Locations; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... Hazardous Locations; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is extending the comment period for the notice of..., 2013, until November 30, 2013. We are extending the comment period at the request of industry to ensure...

  14. 78 FR 58515 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Bird Hazard Reduction Program at John F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent and public scoping process. SUMMARY: We are advising the... hazards from mute swans residing at Gateway National Recreation Area. Lethal methods could include shooting or euthanasia in conjunction with live traps. Non-lethal methods could include live-capture...

  15. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  16. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TIbased electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  17. Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

  18. No Safe Place: Environmental Hazards & Injustice along Mexico's Northern Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.; Aguilar, Maria de Lourdes Romo; Aldouri, Raed

    2010-01-01

    This article examines spatial relationships between environmental hazards (i.e., pork feed lots, brick kilns, final assembly plants and a rail line) and markers of social marginality in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Juarez represents an opportunity for researchers to test for patterns of injustice in a recently urbanizing metropolis of the Global South.…

  19. No Safe Place: Environmental Hazards & Injustice along Mexico's Northern Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.; Aguilar, Maria de Lourdes Romo; Aldouri, Raed

    2010-01-01

    This article examines spatial relationships between environmental hazards (i.e., pork feed lots, brick kilns, final assembly plants and a rail line) and markers of social marginality in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Juarez represents an opportunity for researchers to test for patterns of injustice in a recently urbanizing metropolis of the Global South.…

  20. A new probabilistic shift away from seismic hazard reality in Italy?

    CERN Document Server

    Nekrasova, Anastasia; Kossobokov, Volodya; Panza, Giuliano F

    2014-01-01

    Objective testing is a key issue in the process of revision and improvement of seismic hazard assessments. Therefore we continue the rigorous comparative analysis of past and newly available hazard maps for the territory of Italy against the seismic activity observed in reality. The final Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP) results and the most recent version of Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe (SHARE) project maps, along with the reference hazard maps for the Italian seismic code, all obtained by probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), are cross-compared to the three ground shaking maps based on the duly physically and mathematically rooted neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA). These eight hazard maps for Italy are tested against the available data on ground shaking. The results of comparison between predicted macroseismic intensities and those reported for past earthquakes (in the time interval from 1000 to 2014 year) show that models provide rather conservative estimates, which ten...

  1. Preface and Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Primary Physics with Secondary Beams of K L 's Not all of physics can be explored by primary beams of electrons and protons, however much these have taught us over the past 60 years. Electron-positron colliders give access to restricted sets of quantum numbers. From proton-proton collisions we have long learned about all manner of high energy reactions. However, access to excited mesons and baryons has been most universally achieved with pion and kaon secondary beams, and latterly pho-ton beams both virtual and real. Nowadays the wealth of information on polarized photon beams on polarized targets has totally revolutionized baryon spectroscopy, especially in the lightest flavor sector. The measurement of polarization asymmetries has constrained partial wave analyses far beyond anything conceivable with pion beams. Nevertheless, these only give access to the product of photocouplings of each excited baryon and its coupling to the hadron final state, such as πN , ππN , ηN , etc. Contemporaneously, in the meson sector, the COMPASS experiment with pion beams on protons at 190 GeV/c, together with heavy flavor decays in e + e - annihilation, have given access to multi-meson final states, like 2π, 3π, with greater precision than ever before. This has given hints and suggestions of new resonances, like the a 1 (1420). To understand the constituent structure of hadrons requires information on the relationship of each meson and baryon to those with different flavors, but the same J P quantum numbers. At its simplest, this is to understand the quark model multiplet structure, where this is appropriate. What is more, so ubiquitous are ππ, πK, KK, ηπ, ηK, ... final states as the decay products of almost every hadron, that knowledge of the properties of these is critical to every analysis. Unitarity colors and shapes the universality of such final state interactions in each set of quantum numbers. This means that however precise our

  2. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2008 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2007 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves and reserve base information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves and reserve base reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the International Strategic Minerals

  3. Anadromous fish inventory: Summary volume

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary volume, with discussion, on anadromous fish inventories, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs/escapements,...

  4. Summary 2010 Greenhouse Gas Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This file contains a summary of the publicly available data from the GHG Reporting Program for 2010. This data includes non-confidential data reported by facilities...

  5. Summary of The History Manifesto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Noortje

    2016-06-01

    This essay provides a brief, impartial summary of some main points of The History Manifesto, of the debate among historians that it has engendered, and of its connection to previous debates in and about the history of the sciences.

  6. Lunar Core Drive Tubes Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains a brief summary and high resolution imagery from various lunar rock and core drive tubes collected from the Apollo and Luna missions to the moon.

  7. Long term performance session summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanauer, S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents brief summaries of reports given on plutonium disposal. Topics include: performance of waste forms; glass leaching; ceramic leaching; safeguards and security issues; safeguards of vitrification; and proliferation risks of geologic disposal.

  8. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09

    was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton©) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

  9. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  10. Station Climatic Summaries, Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    265 MEXICO - Acapulco 768056 8403 ................................ 267 Campeche 766950 8403................271 Chetumal 767500...0 0 1 # # I I # or I OPERATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA SUMMARY STATION: CHETUMAL , MEXICO STATIONS #: 767500 1CAO ID: NILC LOCATION: 18030’N, 88*18’W...0 0 0 0 0 0 # ALL HOURS I # # 1 # # # # # # 1 1 ]% OPERATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA SUMMARY SUPPLEMENT STATION: CHETUMAL , MEXICO STATIONS #: 767500 ICAO ID

  11. Reintroduction Plan for Bison at RMA-NWR [Final Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the final draft summary of a USFWS plan details the agency's intention to reintroduce bison into portions of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife...

  12. Publishable summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial....... Phase 2: Development of mirror based test cutting heads. Phase 3: Test and evaluation of the cutting heads on high power CO2 laser sources in the 6-12 kW power range. The test phase concentrates on cutting steels, applied in the heavy industry. In the first part of the project fundamental studies have...... gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...

  13. Publishable summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    . Phase 2: Development of mirror based test cutting heads. Phase 3: Test and evaluation of the cutting heads on high power CO2 laser sources in the 6-12 kW power range. The test phase concentrates on cutting steels, applied in the heavy industry. In the first part of the project fundamental studies have......This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial...... gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...

  14. 76 FR 56294 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan National Priorities List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan National... of the direct final action (76 FR 41719) is effective as of September 13, 2011. ADDRESSES... in 40 CFR Part 300 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous...

  15. 78 FR 10005 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 29 / Tuesday... RIN 2060-AQ93 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland...

  16. Geophysics and Seismic Hazard Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuGuihua; ZhouYuanze; YuSheng

    2003-01-01

    The earthquake is a natural phenomenon, which often brings serious hazard to the human life and material possession. It is a physical process of releasing interior energy of the earth, which is caused by interior and outer forces in special tectonic environment in the earth, especially within the lithosphere. The earthquake only causes casualty and loss in the place where people inhabit. Seismic hazard reduction is composed of four parts as seismic prediction, hazard prevention and seismic engineering, seismic response and seismic rescuing, and rebuilding.

  17. 76 FR 42052 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... Petroleum Refineries AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule; partial withdrawal... Petroleum Refineries. EPA is now providing final notice of the partial withdrawal. DATES: As of August 17... signed a final rule amending the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum...

  18. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyin; Siu, Yim Ling; Mitchell, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  19. 75 FR 37730 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Petroleum Refineries AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY... air pollutants from heat exchange systems at petroleum refineries. These requirements were published as amendments to the national emission standards for petroleum refineries. In this notice, we are...

  20. Uncertainty on shallow landslide hazard assessment: from field data to hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefolini, Emanuele; Tolo, Silvia; Patelli, Eduardo; Broggi, Matteo; Disperati, Leonardo; Le Tuan, Hai

    2015-04-01

    empirical relations with geotechnical index properties. Site specific information was regionalized at map scale by (hard and fuzzy) clustering analysis taking into account spatial variables such as: geology, geomorphology and hillslope morphometric variables (longitudinal and transverse curvature, flow accumulation and slope), the latter derived by a DEM with 10 m cell size. In order to map shallow landslide hazard, Monte Carlo simulation was performed for some common physically based models available in literature (eg. SINMAP, SHALSTAB, TRIGRS). Furthermore, a new approach based on the use of Bayesian Network was proposed and validated. Different models, such as Intervals, Convex Models and Fuzzy Sets, were adopted for the modelling of input parameters. Finally, an accuracy assessment was carried out on the resulting maps and the propagation of uncertainty of input parameters into the final shallow landslide hazard estimation was estimated. The outcomes of the analysis are compared and discussed in term of discrepancy among map pixel values and related estimated error. The novelty of the proposed method is on estimation of the confidence of the shallow landslides hazard mapping at regional level. This allows i) to discriminate regions where hazard assessment is robust from areas where more data are necessary to increase the confidence level and ii) to assess the reliability of the procedure used for hazard assessment.

  1. Engineering Annual Summary 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimolitsas, S

    1999-05-01

    Unlike most research and development laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is responsible for delivering production-ready designs. Unlike most industry, LLNL is responsible for R and D that must significantly increase the nation's security. This rare combination of production engineering expertise and national R and D agenda identifies LLNL as one of the few organizations today that conducts cutting-edge engineering on grand-scale problems, while facing enormous technical risk and undergoing diligent scrutiny of its budget, schedule, and performance. On the grand scale, cutting-edge technologies are emerging from our recent ventures into ''Xtreme Engineering{trademark}.'' Basically, we must integrate and extend technologies concurrently and then push them to their extreme, such as building very large structures but aligning them with extreme precision. As we extend these technologies, we push the boundaries of engineering capabilities at both poles: microscale and ultrascale. Today, in the ultrascale realm, we are building NIF, the world's largest laser, which demands one of the world's most complex operating systems with 9000 motors integrated through over 500 computers to control 60,000 points for every laser shot. On the other pole, we have fabricated the world's smallest surgical tools and the smallest instruments for detecting biological and chemical agents used by antiterrorists. Later in this Annual Summary, we highlight some of our recent innovations in the area of Xtreme Engineering, including large-scale computer simulations of massive structures such as major bridges to prepare retrofitting designs to withstand earthquakes. Another feature is our conceptual breakthrough in developing the world's fastest airplane, HyperSoar, which can reach anywhere in the planet in two hours at speeds of 6700 mph. In the last few years, Engineering has significantly pushed the technology in structural

  2. Engineering Annual Summary 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimolitsas, S.; Gerich, C.

    2000-04-11

    a 100 percent data capture rate. came to an end. Within an intense three-month period, Engineering effectively transitioned its 150 employees working on this project to other Laboratory projects. We leveraged our competence in microsystems and biosciences to establish a robust technical presence in the field of biological and chemical weapons defense. This year, we saw successful operational tests of several hand-held versions of our analytical instruments. Concurrently, we saw our efforts in information technologies and medical devices pay off significantly, when both these areas grew robustly. In the operations area, Engineering underwent an important change in its technology investment strategy. In 1998, we consolidated our nine technical thrust areas into five Engineering Technology Centers and restructured these centers to form the Engineering Science and Technology Program, reporting directly to my office. In 1999, we completed the selection of four of the five Directors to lead each of these areas and moved from startup to true enterprise. This 1999 Summary highlights these five Centers.

  3. Hazardous-environment problems: Mobile robots to the rescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meieran, H.B. (PHD Technologies, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a rationale for employing a spectrum of similar mobile robots to conduct appropriate common missions for the following five hazardous-environment issues: (1) dismantlement of nuclear weapons; (2) environmental restoration and waste management of US Department of Energy weapons sites; (3) operations in nuclear power plants and other facilities; (4) waste chemical site remediation and cleanup activities; and (5) assistance in handling toxic chemical/radiation accidents. Mobile robots have been developed for several hazardous-environment industries, the most visible ones being construction/excavation/tunneling, explosive ordnance/bomb disposal (EOD), fire-fighting, military operations, mining, nuclear, and security. A summary of the range of functions that mobile robots are currently capable of conducting is presented.

  4. EFEHR - the European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk: beyond the web-platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danciu, Laurentiu; Wiemer, Stefan; Haslinger, Florian; Kastli, Philipp; Giardini, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk (EEFEHR) represents the sustainable community resource for seismic hazard and risk in Europe. The EFEHR web platform is the main gateway to access data, models and tools as well as provide expertise relevant for assessment of seismic hazard and risk. The main services (databases and web-platform) are hosted at ETH Zurich and operated by the Swiss Seismological Service (Schweizerischer Erdbebendienst SED). EFEHR web-portal (www.efehr.org) collects and displays (i) harmonized datasets necessary for hazard and risk modeling, e.g. seismic catalogues, fault compilations, site amplifications, vulnerabilities, inventories; (ii) extensive seismic hazard products, namely hazard curves, uniform hazard spectra and maps for national and regional assessments. (ii) standardized configuration files for re-computing the regional seismic hazard models; (iv) relevant documentation of harmonized datasets, models and web-services. Today, EFEHR distributes full output of the 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model, ESHM13, as developed within the SHARE project (http://www.share-eu.org/); the latest results of the 2014 Earthquake Model of the Middle East (EMME14), derived within the EMME Project (www.emme-gem.org); the 2001 Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Project (GSHAP) results and the 2015 updates of the Swiss Seismic Hazard. New datasets related to either seismic hazard or risk will be incorporated as they become available. We present the currents status of the EFEHR platform, with focus on the challenges, summaries of the up-to-date datasets, user experience and feedback, as well as the roadmap to future technological innovation beyond the web-platform development. We also show the new services foreseen to fully integrate with the seismological core services of European Plate Observing System (EPOS).

  5. 77 FR 26755 - Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Underground Injection Control Program; Hazardous Waste Injection Restrictions; Petition for... final decision allows the continued underground injection by Diamond Shamrock, of the specific...

  6. Portable sensor for hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, L.G.; Fraser, M.E.; Davis, S.J. [Physical Sciences Inc., Andover, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We are beginning the second phase of a three and a half year program designed to develop a portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection. The ultimate goal of the program is to develop our concept to the prototype instrument level. Our monitor will be a compact, portable instrument that will allow real-time, in situ, monitoring of hazardous wastes. This instrument will be able to provide the means for rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map the areas of greatest contamination. Remediation efforts can then focus on these areas. Further, our instrument can show whether cleanup technologies are successful at reducing hazardous materials concentrations below regulated levels, and will provide feedback to allow changes in remediation operations, if necessary, to enhance their efficacy.

  7. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to investigate an active optical 3D imaging LADAR as the sensor for an automated Landing Hazard Avoidance system for spacecraft landing on the Moon...

  8. FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

    2001-01-22

    The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  9. Exporting hazards to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkes, D B

    1998-01-01

    The health of people in developing countries is threatened by the importation of hazardous products, wastes and industrial processes from the developed world. Combating this menace is a facet of environmental protection and management of the planet's resources.

  10. 2013 FEMA Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  11. Natural Hazards - A National Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    The USGS Role in Reducing Disaster Losses -- In the United States each year, natural hazards cause hundreds of deaths and cost billions of dollars in disaster aid, disruption of commerce, and destruction of homes and critical infrastructure. Although the number of lives lost to natural hazards each year generally has declined, the economic cost of major disaster response and recovery continues to rise. Each decade, property damage from natural hazards events doubles or triples. The United States is second only to Japan in economic damages resulting from natural disasters. A major goal of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to reduce the vulnerability of the people and areas most at risk from natural hazards. Working with partners throughout all sectors of society, the USGS provides information, products, and knowledge to help build more resilient communities.

  12. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  13. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  14. National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) is a compilation of GIS data that comprises a nationwide digital Flood Insurance Rate Map. The GIS data and services are...

  15. Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Comprehensive, peer-reviewed toxicology data for about 5,000 chemicals. The data bank focuses on the toxicology of potentially hazardous chemicals. It is enhanced...

  16. USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Barnhard, T.P.; Leyendecker, E.V.; Wesson, R.L.; Harmsen, S.C.; Klein, F.W.; Perkins, D.M.; Dickman, N.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Hopper, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed new probabilistic seismic hazard maps for the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. These hazard maps form the basis of the probabilistic component of the design maps used in the 1997 edition of the NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures, prepared by the Building Seismic Safety Council arid published by FEMA. The hazard maps depict peak horizontal ground acceleration and spectral response at 0.2, 0.3, and 1.0 sec periods, with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years, corresponding to return times of about 500, 1000, and 2500 years, respectively. In this paper we outline the methodology used to construct the hazard maps. There are three basic components to the maps. First, we use spatially smoothed historic seismicity as one portion of the hazard calculation. In this model, we apply the general observation that moderate and large earthquakes tend to occur near areas of previous small or moderate events, with some notable exceptions. Second, we consider large background source zones based on broad geologic criteria to quantify hazard in areas with little or no historic seismicity, but with the potential for generating large events. Third, we include the hazard from specific fault sources. We use about 450 faults in the western United States (WUS) and derive recurrence times from either geologic slip rates or the dating of pre-historic earthquakes from trenching of faults or other paleoseismic methods. Recurrence estimates for large earthquakes in New Madrid and Charleston, South Carolina, were taken from recent paleoliquefaction studies. We used logic trees to incorporate different seismicity models, fault recurrence models, Cascadia great earthquake scenarios, and ground-motion attenuation relations. We present disaggregation plots showing the contribution to hazard at four cities from potential earthquakes with various magnitudes and

  17. Interconditionality geomorphosites and natural hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORINA GRECU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the inter-dependency reports between hazards and geomorphosites, even proposing the term of geohazsite for the sites generated by hazards. There is a double significance of the geomorphologic hazards in relation to geosites: of sites generation and of site alteration, vulnerability or even destruction. The geosite can be vulnerable not only at the generating hazard but also to other hazards, generally associated. The geosites constitute into a sequence of temporary dynamic equilibrium of an evolutive system. In this respect, correlations must be done between geomorphosites as a landform and the geomorphologic hazards, in the perspective of dynamic geomorphology.In the process of geomorphosite identification and selection some characteristics of the landform as response to natural and/or antropic hazards are taken into account. Geomorphosites thus become elements at risk, vulnerable to the environmental factors and to the natural and/or antropic hazards.The study is partially integrated in the digital platform on geomorphosites. This e-learning device was initiated and developed by the University of Lausanne, Switzerland (Emmanuel Reynard, director, Luci Darbellay in collaboration with five universities: University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy (Paola Coratza, University of Savoie, France (Fabien Hobléa and Nathalie Cayla, University of Minho, Portugal (Paulo Pereira, University of Bucharest, Romania (Laura Comanescu and Florina Grecu, University of Paris IV – Sorbonne, France (Christian Giusti. The course, developed with the Learning Management System Moodle, is a completely free-access course. It is divided into four parts: (1 Generalities; (2 Methods; (3 Conservation and promotion; (4 Example.

  18. Progress in NTHMP Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, F.I.; Titov, V.V.; Mofjeld, H.O.; Venturato, A.J.; Simmons, R.S.; Hansen, R.; Combellick, R.; Eisner, R.K.; Hoirup, D.F.; Yanagi, B.S.; Yong, S.; Darienzo, M.; Priest, G.R.; Crawford, G.L.; Walsh, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Hazard Assessment component of the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program has completed 22 modeling efforts covering 113 coastal communities with an estimated population of 1.2 million residents that are at risk. Twenty-three evacuation maps have also been completed. Important improvements in organizational structure have been made with the addition of two State geotechnical agency representatives to Steering Group membership, and progress has been made on other improvements suggested by program reviewers. ?? Springer 2005.

  19. Probabilistic analysis of tsunami hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E.L.; Parsons, T.

    2006-01-01

    Determining the likelihood of a disaster is a key component of any comprehensive hazard assessment. This is particularly true for tsunamis, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models. We discuss probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) from the standpoint of integrating computational methods with empirical analysis of past tsunami runup. PTHA is derived from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), with the main difference being that PTHA must account for far-field sources. The computational methods rely on numerical tsunami propagation models rather than empirical attenuation relationships as in PSHA in determining ground motions. Because a number of source parameters affect local tsunami runup height, PTHA can become complex and computationally intensive. Empirical analysis can function in one of two ways, depending on the length and completeness of the tsunami catalog. For site-specific studies where there is sufficient tsunami runup data available, hazard curves can primarily be derived from empirical analysis, with computational methods used to highlight deficiencies in the tsunami catalog. For region-wide analyses and sites where there are little to no tsunami data, a computationally based method such as Monte Carlo simulation is the primary method to establish tsunami hazards. Two case studies that describe how computational and empirical methods can be integrated are presented for Acapulco, Mexico (site-specific) and the U.S. Pacific Northwest coastline (region-wide analysis).

  20. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  1. Hazard categorization for 300 area N reactor fuel fabrication and storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    A final hazard categorization has been prepared for the 300 Area Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92, ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'' (DOE 1992). Prior to using the hazard category methodology, hazard classifications were prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) controlled manual, WHC-CM-4-46, ''Safety Analysis Manual'', Chapter 4.0, ''Hazard Classification.'' A hazard classification (Huang 1995) was previously prepared for the FSS in accordance with WHC-CM-4-46. The analysis lead to the conclusion that the FSS should be declared a Nuclear facility with a Moderate Hazard Class rating. The analysis and results contained in the hazard classification can be used to provide additional information to support other safety analysis documentation. Also, the hazard classification provides analyses of the toxicological hazards inherent with the FSS inventory: whereas, a hazard categorization prepared in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92, considers only the radiological component of the inventory.

  2. FISRE summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O. [TT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2002-11-01

    The goals and main results of FISRE-project (Fire Safety Research) from the years 1999-2002 are reported in the presentation. The project has been organized into three subprojects the titles of which cover: (1) effect of smoke and heat on electronics; (2) modelling of fire scenarios for SPA; and (3) active fire protection equipment. Critical heating times of metal case equipment have been measured and modelled. A universal design curve was proposed for risk analysis. Exposing real and mock-up circuitry to smoke acute effects of smoke and humidity were studied on insulation resistance of electronics used in programmable automation. Relevant physical parameters of smoke and electrical performance of circuitry were measured online. A quantitative calculation model for smoke exposure, deposition on surfaces, and required protective layer performance is proposed. A new practical method for measuring of emissivity of metal surfaces was proposed, and tested by experiments. A Monte Carlo calculation platform PFS is presented for the distribution of the probability of the next target loss time in a cable tunnel in a NPP. Preliminary results using realistic distributions of the input parameters are shown. Use of database is widened for general fire scenarios. A new time lag model for smoke detectors is proposed. Modelling of active fire protection devices was started. Data collection and reduction work for extracting reliability data of fire detection and sprinkler systems in both nuclear and non-nuclear installations was carried out and preliminary analyses performed. Finally, applications of new performance based fire safety engineering are demonstrated by describing some recently constructed buildings. (author)

  3. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  4. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  5. Advance of Hazardous Operation Robot and its Application in Special Equipment Accident Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qin-Da; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Geng-Feng

    A survey of hazardous operation robot is given out in this article. Firstly, the latest researches such as nuclear industry robot, fire-fighting robot and explosive-handling robot are shown. Secondly, existing key technologies and their shortcomings are summarized, including moving mechanism, control system, perceptive technology and power technology. Thirdly, the trend of hazardous operation robot is predicted according to current situation. Finally, characteristics and hazards of special equipment accident, as well as feasibility of hazardous operation robot in the area of special equipment accident rescue are analyzed.

  6. Computer software summaries. Numbers 325 through 423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The National Energy Software Center (NESC) serves as the software exchange and information center for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These summaries describe agency-sponsored software which is at the specification stage, under development, being checked out, in use, or available at agency offices, laboratories, and contractor installations. They describe software which is not included in the NESC library due to its preliminary status or because it is believed to be of limited interest. Codes dealing with the following subjects are included: cross section and resonance integral calculations; spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems; static design studies; depletion, fuel management, cost analysis, and power plant economics; space-independent kinetics; space--time kinetics, coupled neutronics--hydrodynamics--thermodynamics; and excursion simulations; radiological safety, hazard and accident analysis; heat transfer and fluid flow; deformation and stress distribution computations, structural analysis, and engineering design studies; gamma heating and shield design; reactor systems analysis; data preparation; data management; subsidiary calculations; experimental data processing; general mathematical and computing system routines; materials; environmental and earth sciences; space sciences; electronics and engineering equipment; chemistry; particle accelerators and high-voltage machines; physics; magnetic fusion research; biology and medicine; and data. (RWR)

  7. Southern Appalachian assessment. Summary report, Report 1 of 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This final report for the Southern Appalachian Man and the Biosphere Program is comprised of two documents: (1) a brief summary of programs and projects, and (2) a more extensive summary report included as an attachment. The purpose of the program is to promote a sustainable balance between the conservation of biological diversity, compatible economic uses, and cultural values across the Southern Appalachians. Program and project areas addressing regional issues include environmental monitoring and assessment, sustainable development/sustainable technologies, conservation biology, ecosystem management, environmental education and training, cultural and historical resources, and public information and education. The attached summary report is one of five that documents the results of the Southern Appalachian Assessment; it includes atmospheric, social/cultural/economic, terrestrial, and aquatic reports.

  8. Wind energy systems: program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  9. Wind energy systems: program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  10. Slope stability hazard management systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Weather-related geo-hazards are a major concern for both natural slopes and man-made slopes and embankments.Government agencies and private companies are increasingly required to ensure that there is adequate protection of sloping surfaces in order that interaction with the climate does not produce instability. Superior theoretical formulations and computer tools are now available to address engineering design issues related to the near ground surface soil-atmospheric interactions. An example is given in this paper that illustrates the consequences of not paying adequate attention to the hazards of slope stability prior to the construction of a highway in South America. On the other hand, examples are given from Hong Kong and Mainland China where significant benefits are derived from putting in place a hazard slope stability management system. Some results from a hazard management slope stability study related to the railway system in Canada are also reported. The study took advantage of recent research on unsaturated soil behaviour and applied this information to real-time modelling of climatic conditions. The quantification of the water balance at the ground surface, and subsequent infiltration, is used as the primary tool for hazard level assessment. The suggested hazard model can be applied at either specific high risk locations or in a more general, broad-based manner over large areas. A more thorough understanding of unsaturated soil behaviour as it applies to near ground surface soils,along with the numerical computational power of the computer has made it possible for new approaches to be used in slope hazard management engineering.

  11. Map Your Hazards! - an Interdisciplinary, Place-Based Educational Approach to Assessing Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability, Risk and Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, B. D.; McMullin-Messier, P. A.; Schlegel, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    'Map your Hazards' is an educational module developed within the NSF Interdisciplinary Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future program (InTeGrate). The module engages students in place-based explorations of natural hazards, social vulnerability, and the perception of natural hazards and risk. Students integrate geoscience and social science methodologies to (1) identify and assess hazards, vulnerability and risk within their communities; (2) distribute, collect and evaluate survey data (designed by authors) on the knowledge, risk perception and preparedness within their social networks; and (3) deliver a PPT presentation to local stakeholders detailing their findings and recommendations for development of a prepared, resilient community. 'Map your Hazards' underwent four rigorous assessments by a team of geoscience educators and external review before being piloted in our classrooms. The module was piloted in a 300-level 'Volcanoes and Society' course at Boise State University, a 300-level 'Environmental Sociology' course at Central Washington University, and a 100-level 'Natural Disasters and Environmental Geology' course at the College of Western Idaho. In all courses students reported a fascination with learning about the hazards around them and identifying the high risk areas in their communities. They were also surprised at the low level of knowledge, inaccurate risk perception and lack of preparedness of their social networks. This successful approach to engaging students in an interdisciplinary, place-based learning environment also has the broad implications of raising awareness of natural hazards (survey participants are provided links to local hazard and preparedness information). The data and preparedness suggestions can be shared with local emergency managers, who are encouraged to attend the student's final presentations. All module materials are published at serc.carleton.edu/integrate/ and are appropriate to a wide range of classrooms.

  12. Fact Sheets: Final Rules to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Metal Cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the August 2003 final rule fact sheet and the December 2005 final rule fact sheet that contain information on the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Surface Coating of Metal Cans.

  13. Experimental plasma research project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    This report contans descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Measurements and Instrumentation; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  14. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  15. 2014 Zero Waste Strategic Plan Executive Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrons, Ralph J.

    2016-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, primarily on Department of Energy (DOE) permitted land on approximately 2,800 acres of Kirtland Air Force Base. There are approximately 5.5 million square feet of buildings, with a workforce of approximately 9200 personnel. Sandia National Laboratories Materials Sustainability and Pollution Prevention (MSP2) program adopted in 2008 an internal team goal for New Mexico site operations for Zero Waste to Landfill by 2025. Sandia solicited a consultant to assist in the development of a Zero Waste Strategic Plan. The Zero Waste Consultant Team selected is a partnership of SBM Management Services and Gary Liss & Associates. The scope of this Plan is non-hazardous solid waste and covers the life cycle of material purchases to the use and final disposal of the items at the end of their life cycle.

  16. Urban Heat Wave Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Jedlovec, G.; Crane, D. L.; Meyer, P. J.; LaFontaine, F.

    2016-12-01

    Heat waves are one of the largest causes of environmentally-related deaths globally and are likely to become more numerous as a result of climate change. The intensification of heat waves by the urban heat island effect and elevated humidity, combined with urban demographics, are key elements leading to these disasters. Better warning of the potential hazards may help lower risks associated with heat waves. Moderate resolution thermal data from NASA satellites is used to derive high spatial resolution estimates of apparent temperature (heat index) over urban regions. These data, combined with demographic data, are used to produce a daily heat hazard/risk map for selected cities. MODIS data are used to derive daily composite maximum and minimum land surface temperature (LST) fields to represent the amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle and identify extreme heat days. Compositing routines are used to generate representative daily maximum and minimum LSTs for the urban environment. The limited effect of relative humidity on the apparent temperature (typically 10-15%) allows for the use of modeled moisture fields to convert LST to apparent temperature without loss of spatial variability. The daily max/min apparent temperature fields are used to identify abnormally extreme heat days relative to climatological values in order to produce a heat wave hazard map. Reference to climatological values normalizes the hazard for a particular region (e.g., the impact of an extreme heat day). A heat wave hazard map has been produced for several case study periods and then computed on a quasi-operational basis during the summer of 2016 for Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, St. Louis, MO, and Huntsville, AL. A hazard does not become a risk until someone or something is exposed to that hazard at a level that might do harm. Demographic information is used to assess the urban risk associated with the heat wave hazard. Collectively, the heat wave hazard product can warn people in urban

  17. Target reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding. Task two: summary of available reservoir and geological data. Vol. II: Rocky Mountain states geological and reservoir data. Part 4: Paradox, Uinta, eastern Utah overthrust, Big Horn, Wind River, Powder River, Red Desert, and Great Divide basins; CACHE-Ismay through WERTZ-Madison fields. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, L.B.; Marlow, R.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes work performed by Gruy Federal, Inc., as the second of six tasks under contract with the US Department of Energy. The stated objective of this study is to build a solid engineering foundation to serve as the basis for field mini- and pilot tests in both high and low oil saturation carbonate reservoirs for the purpose of extending the technology base in carbon dioxide miscible flooding. The six tasks in this study are: (1) summary of available CO/sub 2/ field test data; (2) summary of existing reservoir and geological data; (3) selection of target reservoirs; (4) selection of specific reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ injection tests; (5) selection of specific sites for test wells in carbonate reservoirs; and (6) drilling and coring activities. The report for Task Two consists of a summary of existing reservoir and geological data on carbonate reservoirs located in west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and the Rocky Mountain states. It is contained in two volumes, each with several parts. The present volume, in four parts, is a summary of reservoir data for fields in the Rocky Mountain states. Volume One contains data for Permian basin fields in west Texas and southeast New Mexico. While a serious effort was made to obtain all publicly available data for the fields considered, sufficiently reliable data on important reservoir parameters were not always available for every field. The data in Volume II show 143 carbonate reservoirs in the study area may be suitable for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding. Using a general estimate of enhanced oils recovery by CO/sub 2/ flooding of 10% of original oil in place, some 619 million barrels of oil could be recovered by widespread application of CO/sub 2/ flooding in the study area. Mississippian and Ordovician reservoirs appear to be the most promising targets for the process.

  18. 75 FR 37790 - Lauryl Sulfate Salts; Antimicrobial Registration Review Final Work Plan and Proposed Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... AGENCY Lauryl Sulfate Salts; Antimicrobial Registration Review Final Work Plan and Proposed Registration.... SUMMARY: This notice announces the availability of EPA's final work plan and proposed registration review... with the posting of a summary document, containing a preliminary work plan, for public comment....

  19. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.; El-Hadidy, M.; Deif, A.; Abou Elenean, K.

    2012-12-01

    The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5° × 0.5°) within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA) values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  20. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  1. USING BLOGS TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ SUMMARY WRITING ABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orachorn KITCHAKARN,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The research compared students’ summary writing ability before and after they were taught through blog, a new medium or tool for written communication and interaction in many different languages around the world. The research design is a kind of one group pretest posttest. Participants were 33 first-year students who studied EN 011 course (English in Action in the first semester of the academic year 2012 at Bangkok University. They were divided into six groups. Five or six students in each group created a blog; www.blogger.com, and they worked together for fourteen weeks to produce six pieces of summary written work. Each member in the group worked through providing comments, editing and revising on the blog until the group got a final summary paper and submitted that to the teacher for grading. The instruments used in this study were (1 two summary writing tests (2 a questionnaire surveying students’ attitude toward learning through blogs, and (3 postings on blogs to reflect their learning experience. The results revealed that after the students worked together on weblogs, their English summary writing mean score of the posttest was higher than that of the pretest, and they had positive attitudes towards using weblogs in learning. Regarding cooperative learning experiences through using weblogs, most students thought that it was interesting, a new experience to work with their friends on the weblogs.

  2. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  3. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  4. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  5. How to control chemical hazards

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Improving protection against chemical hazards is one of the 2012 CERN safety objectives identified by the Director General. Identifying and drawing up a complete inventory of chemicals, and assessing the associated risks are important steps in this direction.   The HSE Unit has drawn up safety rules, guidelines and forms to help you to meet this objective. We would like to draw your attention to: • safety guidelines C-0-0-1 and C-1-0-2 (now also available in French), which deal with the identification of hazardous chemicals and the assessment of chemical risk; • safety guideline C-1-0-1, which deals with the storage of hazardous chemicals. All safety documents can be consulted at: cern.ch/regles-securite The HSE Unit will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Write to us at: safety-general@cern.ch The HSE Unit

  6. Biomass energy systems program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Research programs in biomass which were funded by the US DOE during fiscal year 1978 are listed in this program summary. The conversion technologies and their applications have been grouped into program elements according to the time frame in which they are expected to enter the commercial market. (DMC)

  7. The meteorite impact-induced tsunami hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünnemann, K; Weiss, R

    2015-10-28

    When a cosmic object strikes the Earth, it most probably falls into an ocean. Depending on the impact energy and the depth of the ocean, a large amount of water is displaced, forming a temporary crater in the water column. Large tsunami-like waves originate from the collapse of the cavity in the water and the ejecta splash. Because of the far-reaching destructive consequences of such waves, an oceanic impact has been suggested to be more severe than a similar-sized impact on land; in other words, oceanic impacts may punch over their weight. This review paper summarizes the process of impact-induced wave generation and subsequent propagation, whether the wave characteristic differs from tsunamis generated by other classical mechanisms, and what methods have been applied to quantify the consequences of an oceanic impact. Finally, the impact-induced tsunami hazard will be evaluated by means of the Eltanin impact event.

  8. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 2.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  9. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  10. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  11. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 2.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  12. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  13. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 0.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  14. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 0.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  15. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  16. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 0.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal Storm...

  17. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal...

  18. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 2.0 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal...

  19. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 1.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal...

  20. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) sea-level rise 0.5 m: wave-hazard projections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Projected Hazard: Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. Model Summary: The Coastal...