WorldWideScience

Sample records for final focus interaction

  1. Cosmological Final Focus Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J

    2004-01-01

    We develop the many striking parallels between the dynamics of light streams from distant galaxies and particle beams in accelerator final focus systems. Notably the deflections of light by mass clumps are identical to the kicks arising from the long-range beam-beam interactions of two counter-rotating particle beams (known as parasitic crossings). These deflections have sextupolar as well as quadrupolar components. We estimate the strength of such distortions for a variety of circumstances and argue that the sextupolar distortions from clumping within clusters may be observable. This possibility is enhanced by the facts that (1) the sextupolar distortions of background galaxies is a factor of 5 smaller than the quadrupolar distortion, (2) the angular orientation of the sextupolar and quadrupolar distortions from a mass distribution would be correlated, appearing as a slightly curved image, (3) these effects should be spatially clumped on the sky

  2. International workshop on final focus and interaction regions of next generation linear colliders: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary ''issues'' talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the ''issues'' and ''summary'' talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued to address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems

  3. Final focus nomenclature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.

    1986-01-01

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number

  4. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  5. Final focus nomenclature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  6. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient superconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  7. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient supperconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  8. Final focus system for TLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal β function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs

  10. Final Focus Systems in Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor

    1998-01-01

    In colliding beam facilities, the ''final focus system'' must demagnify the beams to attain the very small spot sizes required at the interaction points. The first final focus system with local chromatic correction was developed for the Stanford Linear Collider where very large demagnifications were desired. This same conceptual design has been adopted by all the future linear collider designs as well as the SuperConducting Supercollider, the Stanford and KEK B-Factories, and the proposed Muon Collider. In this paper, the over-all layout, physics constraints, and optimization techniques relevant to the design of final focus systems for high-energy electron-positron linear colliders are reviewed. Finally, advanced concepts to avoid some of the limitations of these systems are discussed

  11. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10 33 to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point

  12. A final focus system for the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Brown, K.; Emma, P.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Wilson, P.

    1995-06-01

    The final focus of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) demagnifies electron and positron beams of 250--750 GeV energy down to a transverse size of about 2.5 x 350 nm 2 at the interaction point (IP). The basic layout, momentum bandwidth, vibration tolerances, wakefield effects, and the tunability of the proposed final focus design are discussed. Also a perspective is given on the crab cavity and on effects of the solenoid field in the interaction region

  13. The final focus test beam project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 μm. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwin, J.

    1992-08-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We will outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We will discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, will be described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC will be given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC)

  15. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwing, J.

    1992-01-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread , bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, are described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC are given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). (Author) 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  16. The stabilisation of final focus system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The StaFF (stabilisation of final focus) system will use interferometers to monitor the relative ... quadrupole magnets will be the most demanding application, where mutual and beam- ... interferometers to measure lines of a geodetic network to record relative motion between two beam ... coupled interferometer design.

  17. Results of Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Dieter R

    2003-06-13

    The beam experiments of Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) started in September 1993 at SLAC, and have produced a 1.7 {micro}m x 75 nm spot of 46 GeV electron beam. A number of new techniques involving two nanometer spot-size monitors have been developed. Several beam diagnostic/tuning schemes are applied to achieve and maintain the small spot. This experiment opens the way toward the nanometer world for future linear colliders.

  18. General method for final focus system design for circular colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo de Maria

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Colliders use final focus systems to reduce the transverse beam sizes at the interaction point in order to increase collision event rates. The maximum focal strength (gradient of the quadrupoles, and the maximum beam size in them, together limit the beam size reduction that is possible. The goal of a final focus system design is to find the best compromise between quadrupole aperture and quadrupole gradient, for the magnet technology that is used. This paper develops a design method that identifies the intrinsic limitations of a final focus system, validates the results of the method against realistic designs, and reports its application to the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider final focus.

  19. Mask locations in the SLC final focus region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cence, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The location of four sets of masks needed to shield against background in the final focus region of the SLC is shown. The main point of this note is to update the results of Miller and Sens taking into account the recent changes that have been made in the optics of the SLC beams. For the latest beam design we use the TRANSPORT output dated 5-13-83. This design assumes that the final bends will form an S about the interaction point and that the final quadrupoles will be superconducting and will be placed about 8 feet from the interaction point

  20. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given

  1. Global tuning knobs for the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, N.J.; Irwin, J.; Woodley, M.

    1993-04-01

    The beam phase space at the exit of a given transport line generally depends on the incoming beam conditions, and thus in order to adjust the beam parameters at the exit of the line requires a prior knowledge of the initial beam parameters. The same is generally true for final focus systems. A tuning algorithm for β matching the SLC final focus is reported here in which no prior knowledge of the exact incoming phase space is required. Only a single beam size diagnostic located at either the interaction point (IP) or an image of the IP is required, together with a knowledge of the linear lattice from the quadrupoles to the tuning point. The algorithm is presented within the Lie Algebra framework. Although the algorithm is presented here is specific to linear collider final focus systems, the technique is generally applicable to any beamline

  2. A conceptual design of Final Focus Systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.

    1987-06-01

    Linear colliders are a relatively recent development in the evolution of particle accelerators. This report discusses some of the approaches that have been considered for the design of Final Focus Systems to demagnify the beam exiting from a linac to the small size suitable for collisions at the interaction point. The system receiving the most attention is the one adopted for the SLAC Linear Collider. However, the theory and optical techniques discussed should be applicable to the design efforts for future machines

  3. Beam based alignment of the SLC final focus sextupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.; Irwin, J.; Phinney, N.; Raimondi, P.; Toge, N.; Walker, N.J.; Ziemann, V.

    1993-05-01

    The strong demagnification inherent in final focus systems requires local cancellation of the resulting chromaticty. Strong sextupole pair separated by a -I transform are positioned π/2 in the betatron phase away from the Interaction Point (IP) in order to cancel chromatic aberrations primarily due to the final quadrupoles. Sextupole alignment is critical in order to provide orthogonal tuning of the chromaticty and, in the case of the SLC, to limit the third and higher order optical aberrations generated from misaligned and 'nested' horizontal and vertical sextupole pairs. Reported here is a novel technique for aligning the beam centroid to the sextupole centers, which uses measurements of the criticality dependent parameter - the beam size at the IP. Results for the SLC final focus sextupoles are presented, where a resolution of <50 μm is achieved

  4. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research

  5. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  6. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bogomyagkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DAΦNE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DAΦNE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  7. Measuring micron size beams in the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; DeBarger, S.

    1994-10-01

    A pair of high resolution wire scanners have been built and installed in the SLC final focus. The final focus optics uses a set of de-magnifying telescopes, and an ideal location for a beam size monitor is at one of the magnified image points of the interaction point. The image point chosen for these scanners is in the middle of a large bend magnet. The design beam spots here are about 2 microns in the vertical and 20 microns in the horizontal plane. The scanners presented a number of design challenges. In this paper we discuss the mechanical design of the scanner, and fabrication techniques of its ceramic wire support card which holds many 4 and 7 um carbon wires. Accurate motion of the wire during a scan is critical. In this paper we describe tests of stepper motors, gear combinations, and radiation hardened encoders needed to produce the required motion with a step resolution of 80 nanometers. Also presented here are the results of scattered radiation detector placement studies carried out to optimize the signal from the 4 micron wires. Finally, we present measurements from the scanner

  8. Investigation of focusing of relativistic electron and positron bunches moving in cold plasma. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amatuni, A.Ts.; Elbakian, S.S.; Khachatryan, A.G.; Sekhpossian, E.V.

    1995-03-01

    This document is the final report on a project to study focusing effects of relativistic beams of electrons and positrons interacting with a cold plasma. The authors consider three different models for the overdense cold plasma - electron bunch interaction. They look at coulomb effects, wakefield effects, bunch parameters, and the effects of trains of pulses on focusing properties

  9. A Novel Final Focus Design for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-05-30

    The length, complexity and cost of the present Final Focus designs for linear colliders grows very quickly with the beam energy. In this letter, a novel final focus system is presented and compared with the one proposed for NLC. This new design is simpler, shorter and cheaper, with comparable bandwidth, tolerances and tunability. Moreover, the length scales slower than linearly with energy allowing for a more flexible design which is applicable over a much larger energy range.

  10. FOCUS: a fire management planning system -- final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick W. Bratten; James B. Davis; George T. Flatman; Jerold W. Keith; Stanley R. Rapp; Theodore G. Storey

    1981-01-01

    FOCUS (Fire Operational Characteristics Using Simulation) is a computer simulation model for evaluating alternative fire management plans. This final report provides a broad overview of the FOCUS system, describes two major modules-fire suppression and cost, explains the role in the system of gaming large fires, and outlines the support programs and ways of...

  11. Embedded Interaction 2009: final report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ............................................................................................. 6 • Towards an affordable alternative educational video game input device ............ 7 • Hand-crafted physical syntax elements for illetterate children: initial concepts ... 9 • Providing disabled persons in developing countries access... communication and player coordination skills development. • Hand-crafted physical syntax elements for illetterate children: initial concepts A more comprehensive presentation on these research results was presented at IDC: Interaction Design for Children...

  12. Final focus system tuning studies towards Compact Linear Collider feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Latina, A.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present the latest results regarding the tuning study of the baseline design of the final focus system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC-FFS). CLIC aims to provide collisions to the experiments at a luminosity above 1034 c m-2 s-1 . In order to deliver such luminosity in a single pass machine, the vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP) is reduced to about 1 nm, which imposes unprecedented tuning difficulties to the system. In previous studies, 90% of the machines reached 90% of the nominal luminosity at the expense of 18 000 luminosity measurements, when considering beam position monitor errors and transverse misalignments of magnets for a single beam case. In the present study, additional static imperfections as, roll misalignments, strength v2.epss are included. Moreover both e- and e+ beamlines are properly simulated. A new tuning procedure based on linear and nonlinear knobs is implemented to effectively cure the most relevant beam size aberrations at the IP. The obtained results for single and double beam studies under solely static imperfections are presented.

  13. The completed design of the SLC Final Focus System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.; Brown, K.L.; Fieguth, T.

    1987-02-01

    The design of the SLC Final Focus System has evolved from its initial conceptual design into its final form. This final design is described including a review of the critical decisions influencing the adoption of particular features. The creation of a feasible design has required that these decisions be tempered by practical considerations such as site constraints, correction of optical errors caused by imperfections, and accommodations requested by engineers and particle detector physicists. As this is the first such system to be built, it is hoped that the experience gained will be useful for the design of future systems

  14. Beam dynamics in the SLC final focus system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1987-06-01

    The SLC luminosity is reached by colliding beams focused to about 2 μm transverse sizes. The Final Focus System (FFS) must enable, beyond its basic optical design, the detection and correction of errors accumulated in the system. In this paper, after summarizing the design, we review the sensitivity to such errors and the ability to correct them. The overall tuning strategy involves three phases: single beam spot minimization, steering the beams in collision and luminosity optimization with beam-beam effects

  15. Superstrong Adjustable Permanent Magnet for a Linear Collider Final Focus

    CERN Document Server

    Iwashita, Y

    2004-01-01

    Super-strong permanent magnets are being considered as one of the candidates for the final focus quadrupole magnets in a linear collider. A short prototype with temperature compensation included and variable strength capability has been designed and fabricated. Fabrication details and some magnetic measurement results will be presented.

  16. Review of tolerances at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Roy, G.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The authors review the tolerances associated with the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). The authors have computed the acceptability window of the input beam for orbit jitter, emittance beta functions mismatch, incoming dispersion and coupling; tolerances on magnet alignment, strength and multipole content; and the initial tuneability capture of the line

  17. Review of tolerances at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Roy, G.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    We review the tolerances associated with the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). We have computed the acceptability window of the input beam for orbit jitter, emittance beta functions mismatch, incoming dispersion and coupling; tolerances on magnet alignment, strength and multipole content; and the initial tuneability capture of the line. 2 refs., 1 fig

  18. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, J; Decker, V; Hendrickson, L; Markiewicz, T W; Partridge, R; Seryi, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  19. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system

  20. The optics of the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Brown, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Oide, K.

    1991-05-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), currently under construction at the end of the SLAC Linac, is being built by an international collaboration as a test bed for ideas and methods required in the design and construction of final focus systems for next generation e + e - linear colliders. The FFTB lattice is based on the previously developed principle of using sextupole pairs in a dispersive region to compensate chromaticity. The linear lattice was optimized for length, and implementation of diagnostic procedures. The transformations between sextupole pairs (CCX and CCY) are exactly -I, the matrix for the intermediate transformer (BX) is exactly diagonal, and the dispersion function has zero slope at the sextupoles and is thus zero at the minimum of the β x function in the intermediate transformer. The introduction of sextupoles in final focus systems leads to the presence of additional optical aberrations, and synchrotron radiation in the dipoles also enlarges the final spot size. The important fourth-order optical aberrations which determine the main features of the design have been identified. Additional lower order aberrations arise in the implementation of these designs, since the real system is not the ideal design. We concentrate on these aberrations and describe strategies for their diagnosis and correction

  1. Probing LINEAR Collider Final Focus Systems in SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Paul Conrad Vaagen

    2017-01-01

    A challenge for future linear collider final focus systems is the large chromaticity produced by the final quadrupoles. SuperKEKB will be correcting high levels of chromaticity using the traditional scheme which has been also proposed for the CLIC FFS. We present early simulation results indicating that lowering β*у in the SuperKEKB Low Energy Ring might be possible given on-axis injection and low bunch current, opening the possibility of testing chromaticity correction beyond FFTB level, similar to ILC and approaching that of CLIC. CLIC – Note – 1077

  2. The optics of the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Brown, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Oide, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), currently under construction at the end of the SLAC Linac, is being built by an international collaboration as a test bed for ideas and methods required in the design and construction of final focus systems for next generation e + e - linear colliders. The FFTB lattice shown is based on the previously developed principle of using sextupole pairs in a dispersive region to compensate chromaticity. The linear lattice was optimized for length, and implementation of diagnostic procedures. The transformations between sextupole pairs (CCX and CCY) are exactly -I, the matrix for the intermediate transformer (BX) is exactly diagonal, and the dispersion function has zero slope at the sextupoles and is thus zero at the minimum of the β x function in the intermediate transformer

  3. Plasma lenses for SLAC Final Focus Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, D.; Cline, D.; Joshi, C.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Su, J.J.; Williams, R.; Chen, P.; Gundersen, M.; Katsouleas, T.; Norem, J.

    1991-01-01

    A collaborative group of accelerator and plasma physicists and engineers has formed with an interest in exploring the use of plasma lenses to meet the needs of future colliders. Analytic and computational models of plasma lenses are briefly reviewed and several design examples for the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam are presented. The examples include discrete, thick, and adiabatic lenses. A potential plasma source with desirable lens characteristics is presented

  4. Drift Compression and Final Focus Options for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    A drift compression and final focus lattice for heavy ion beams should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. We show that this requirement implies that the drift compression design needs to satisfy a self-similar symmetry condition. For un-neutralized beams, the Lie symmetry group analysis is applied to the warm-fluid model to systematically derive the self-similar drift compression solutions. For neutralized beams, the 1-D Vlasov equation is solved explicitly, and families of self-similar drift compression solutions are constructed. To compensate for the deviation from the self-similar symmetry condition due to the transverse emittance, four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of the drift compression such that the entire beam pulse can be focused onto the same focal spot

  5. Final focus test beam alignment: A draft proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.; Ruland, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam is a transport line designed to transmit 50 GeV electron beams of SLC emittance (3 x 10 -10 radian-meters) straight through the central arm of the Beam Switchyard (BSY C line) with a final focus point out in the Research Yard but relatively near the end of the switchyard tunnel. The hardware, methods and procedures outlined in this proposal are dedicated to measuring the placement of mechanical objects with respect to certain defined geometric axes. We wish to emphasize that the very difficult problems of locating the effective magnetic axes of focusing elements, the effective electrical center of beam position monitors and even the effective axis of the incident beam relative to mechanical reference surfaces is outside the scope of this work. Further, this proposal is restricted to the act of measurement and does not consider the vital task of on-line mechanical repositioning of elements that will, in likelihood, be called upon during operation of the system. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  6. The Final Focus Test Beam laser referene system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressler, V.E.; Ruland, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    The original design for the SLAC linac included an alignment reference system with 270 diffraction gratings situated along the 3000 meter linac. These gratings have provided SLAC with a global reference line repeatable to within 200 micro meters. For the Final Focus Test Beam, this laser system has been extended and 13 new diffraction gratings have been installed. Improvements targets and the availability of new instruments allows us to evaluate the performance of the laser reference system at the 510 micro meter level. An explanation of the system and the results of our evaluation are presented

  7. A Dynamic Alignment System for the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruland, R.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Fischer, G.; Plouffe, D.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) was conceived as a technological stepping stone on the way to the next linear collider. Nowhere is this more evident than with the alignment subsystems. Alignment tolerances for components prior to beam turn are almost an order of magnitude smaller than for previous projects at SLAC. Position monitoring systems which operate independent of the beam are employed to monitor motions of the components locally and globally with unprecedented precision. An overview of the FFTB alignment system is presented herein

  8. Systematic investigation of SLC final focus tolerances to errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoly, O.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we review the tolerances of the SLC final focus system. To calculate these tolerances we used the error analysis routine of the program FFADA which has been written to aid the design and the analysis of final focus systems for the future linear colliders. This routine, complete by S. Fartoukh, systematically reviews the errors generated by the geometric 6-d Euclidean displacements of each magnet as well as by the field errors (normal and skew) up to the sextipolar order. It calculates their effects on the orbit and the transfer matrix at the second order in the errors, thus including cross-talk between errors originating from two different magnets. It also translates these effects in terms of tolerance derived from spot size growth and luminosity loss. We have run the routine for the following set of beam IP parameters: σ * x = 2.1 μm; σ * x' = 300 μrd; σ * x = 1 mm; σ * y = 0.55 μm; σ * y' = 200 μrd; σ * b = 2 x 10 -3 . The resulting errors and tolerances are displayed in a series of histograms which are reproduced in this paper. (author)

  9. Electron beam final focus system for Thomson scattering at ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krämer, J.M., E-mail: jmkr@danfysik.dk [Danfysik A/S, Gregersensvej 8, 2630 Taastrup (Denmark); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Budde, M.; Bødker, F. [Danfysik A/S, Gregersensvej 8, 2630 Taastrup (Denmark); Irman, A.; Jochmann, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kristensen, J.P. [Danfysik A/S, Gregersensvej 8, 2630 Taastrup (Denmark); Lehnert, U.; Michel, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schramm, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-09-11

    The design of an electron beam final focus system (FFS) aiming for high-flux laser-Thomson backscattering X-ray sources at ELBE is presented. A telescope system consisting of four permanent magnet based quadrupoles was found to have significantly less chromatic aberrations than a quadrupole doublet or triplet as commonly used. Focusing properties like the position of the focal plane and the spot size are retained for electron beam energies between 20 and 30 MeV by adjusting the position of the quadrupoles individually on a motorized stage. The desired ultra-short electron bunches require an increased relative energy spread up to a few percent and, thus, second order chromatic effects must be taken into account. We also present the design and test results of the permanent magnet quadrupoles. Adjustable shunts allow for correction of the field strength and compensation of deviations in the permanent magnet material. For a beam emittance of 13 mm mrad, we predict focal spot sizes of about 40 μm (rms) and divergences of about 10 mrad using the FFS.

  10. Electron beam final focus system for Thomson scattering at ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, J.M.; Bødker, F.; Irman, A.; .Jochmann A.; Kristensen, J.P.; Lehnert U., HZDR; Michel, P.; Schrammb, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2015.10.067

    2016-01-01

    The design of an electron beam final focus system (FFS) aiming for high-flux laser-Thomson backscattering X-ray sources at ELBE is presented. A telescope system consisting of four permanent magnet based quadrupoles was found to have significantly less chromatic aberrations than a quadrupole doublet or triplet as commonly used. Focusing properties like the position of the focal plane and the spot size are retained for electron beam energies between 20 and 30 MeV by adjusting the position of the quadrupoles individually on a motorized stage. The desired ultra-short electron bunches require an increased relative energy spread up to a few percent and, thus, second order chromatic effects must be taken into account. We also present the design and test results of the permanent magnet quadrupoles. Adjustable shunts allow for correction of the field strength and compensation of deviations in the permanent magnet material. For a beam emittance of 13 mm mrad, we predict focal spot sizes of about 40 μm (rms) and diverg...

  11. Electron Beam Final Focus System For Thomson Scattering At Elbe

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, J.M.; Bødkera, F.; Irman, A.; Jochmann, A.; Kristensena, J.P.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schramm, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2015.10.067

    2016-01-01

    The design of an electron beam final focus system (FFS) aiming for high-flux laser-Thomson backscattering X-ray sources at ELBE is presented. A telescope system consisting of four permanent magnet based quadrupoles was found to have significantly less chromatic aberrations than a quadrupole doublet or triplet as commonly used. Focusing properties like the position of the focal plane and the spot size are retained for electron beam energies between 20 and 30 MeV by adjusting the position of the quadrupoles individually on a motorized stage. The desired ultra-short electron bunches require an increased relative energy spread up to a few percent and, thus, second order chromatic effects must be taken into account. We also present the design and test results of the permanent magnet quadrupoles. Adjustable shunts allow for correction of the field strength and compensation of deviations in the permanent magnet material. For a beam emittance of 13 mm mrad, we predict focal spot sizes of about 40 μm (rms) and diverg...

  12. A superconducting magnet upgrade of the ATF2 final focus

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, B; Escallier, J; He, P; Jain, P; Marone, A; Wanderer, P; Wu, KC; Hauviller, C; Marin, E; Tomas, R; Zimmermann, F; Bolzon, B; Jeremie, A; Kimura, N; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Okugi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomaru, T; Tsuchiya, K; Urakawa, J; Yamamoto, A; Bambade, P; Coe, P; Urner, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; White, G

    2010-01-01

    The ATF2 facility at KEK is a proving ground for linear collider technology with a well instrumented extracted beam line and Final Focus (FF). The primary ATF2 goal is to demonstrate the extreme beam demagnification and spot stability needed for a linear collider FF [1]. But the ATF2 FF uses water cooled magnets and the ILC baseline has a superconducting (SC) FF [2]. We plan to upgrade ATF2 and replace some of the warm FF magnets with SC FF magnets. The ATF2 SC magnets, like the ILC FF, will made via direct wind construction [3]. ATF2 coil winding is in progress at BNL and warm magnetic measurements indicate we have achieved good field quality. Studies indicate that having ATF2 FF magnets with larger aperture and better field quality should allow reducing the ATF2 FF beta function for study of focusing regimes relevant to CLIC [4]. The ATF2 magnet cryostat will have laser view ports for directly monitoring cold mass movement. We plan to make stability measurements at BNL and KEK to relate ATF2 FF magnet perfo...

  13. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  14. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Optical tuning of arcs and final focus section of the Standard Linear Collider (SLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustements of the beam phase-space at the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance [fr

  17. Analytical approach to chromatic correction in the final focus system of circular colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Cai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A conventional final focus system in particle accelerators is systematically analyzed. We find simple relations between the parameters of two focus modules in the final telescope. Using the relations, we derive the chromatic Courant-Snyder parameters for the telescope. The parameters are scaled approximately according to (L^{*}/β_{y}^{*}δ, where L^{*} is the distance from the interaction point to the first quadrupole, β_{y}^{*} the vertical beta function at the interaction point, and δ the relative momentum deviation. Most importantly, we show how to compensate its chromaticity order by order in δ by a traditional correction module flanked by an asymmetric pair of harmonic multipoles. The method enables a circular Higgs collider with 2% momentum aperture and illuminates a path forward to 4% in the future.

  18. Operational experience with optical matching in the SLC Final Focus System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.; Burchat, P.; Burke, D.

    1989-01-01

    In the SLC Final Focus System, all components of transverse phase-space and the couplings between them must be controlled to minimize the beam size at the interaction point. After summarizing the experimental algorithm and the on-line tuning programs, we present a consistent set of measurements and describe our present understanding of the various contributions to this beam size. 17 refs., 9 figs

  19. Non-linear optics for the final focus of the single-pass-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Spencer, J.E.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the final focus system (FFS) is to demagnify the beam envelope in the Collider arc lattice to a size suitable for beam collisions at the interaction region. The final spot size is determined by the beam emittance, the beta function β* at the IR, the momentum spread in the beam, and the quality of the FFS optics. In particular, if the focusing system is not chromatically corrected, the momentum dispersion in the beam can lead to a substantial degradation in the quality of the final focus. The objective is to design a FFS for 50 GeV/c within approx. 100 meters having an IR spot size sigma/sub xy/ of approximately 2 μm for a beam emittance of epsilon = 3 x 10 -10 m-rad and a momentum spread of delta = +-0.5%. This requires a β/sub x,y/ equal to or less than 1 cm. This report considers the problems encountered in the design of a final focus system that will reliably provide the desired beam size for collisions

  20. Analysis of higher order optical aberrations in the SLC final focus using Lie Algebra techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, N.J.; Irwin, J.; Woodley, M.

    1993-04-01

    The SLC final focus system is designed to have an overall demagnification of 30:1, with a β at the interaction point (β*) of 5 mm, and an energy band pass of ∼0.4%. Strong sextupole pairs are used to cancel the large chromaticity which accrues primarily from the final triplet. Third-order aberrations limit the performance of the system, the dominating terms being U 1266 and U 3466 terms (in the notation of K. Brown). Using Lie Algebra techniques, it is possible to analytically calculate the soave of these terms in addition to understanding their origin. Analytical calculations (using Lie Algebra packages developed in the Mathematica language) are presented of the bandwidth and minimum spot size as a function of divergence at the interaction point (IP). Comparisons of the analytical results from the Lie Algebra maps and results from particle tracking (TURTLE) are also presented

  1. Radiation Load Optimization in the Final Focus System of FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Roman; Cerutti, Francesco; Tomás, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    With a center-of-mass energy of up to 100 TeV, FCC-hh will produce highly energetic collision debris at the Interaction Point (IP). Protecting the final focus quadrupoles from this radiation is challenging, since the required amount of shielding placed inside the magnets will reduce the free aperture, thereby limiting the β^{*} reach and luminosity. Hence, radiation mitigation strategies that make best use of the available aperture are required. In this paper, we study the possibility to split the first quadrupole Q1 into two quadrupoles with individual apertures, in order to distribute the radiation load more evenly and reduce the peak dose.

  2. Final 6D Muon Ionization Colling using Strong Focusing Quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, T. L. [Mississippi U.; Acosta, J. G. [Mississippi U.; Cremaldi, L. M. [Mississippi U.; Oliveros, S. J. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. J. [Mississippi U.; Neuffer, D. V. [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Abstract Low emittance muon beam lines and muon colliders are potentially a rich source of BSM physics for future exper- imenters. A muon beam normalized emittance of ax,y,z = (280, 280, 1570)µm has been achieved in simulation with short solenoids and a betatron function of 3 cm. Here we use ICOOL and MAD-X to explore using a 400 MeV/c muon beam and strong focusing quadrupoles to achieve a normalized transverse emittance of 100 µm and complete 6D cooling. The low beta regions, as low as 5 mm, produced by the quadrupoles are occupied by dense, low Z absorbers, such as lithium hydride or beryllium, that cool the beam transversely. Equilibrium transverse emittance is linearly proportional to the transverse betatron function. Reverse emittance exchange with septa and/or wedges is then used to decrease transverse emittance from 100 to 25 µm at the expense of longitudinal emittance for a high energy lepton collider. Cooling challenges include chromaticity correction, ssband overlap, quadrupole acceptance, and staying in phase with RF.

  3. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented

  4. Focus group testing for the vehicle scrappage program : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    Canada's national vehicle scrappage program was designed to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and smog-forming emissions by removing personal vehicles with model years of 1995 and older from Canadian road systems. The program will also promote sustainable transportation alternatives and recycling programs to prevent the release of other toxic substances into the environment. Incentives designed to encourage Canadians to scrap older vehicles may include cash incentives and rebates towards the purchase of a new vehicle, free transit passes, and other options designed to support sustainable transportation. This paper discussed a research program conducted to assess target audience responses to the programs and its proposed incentives. The survey was conducted with a series of 20 focus groups located in major cities across Canada. Sessions were comprised of between 6 to 10 participants from lower-income and higher-income households. All groups responded negatively to both the overall policy as well as to specific program elements. The study showed that most participants were not aware that older vehicles emit significantly higher levels of harmful emissions. The research audience did not understand distinctions between smog-producing emissions and GHG emissions. Participants also believed that personal vehicles had a minor negative impact on the environment compared to trucks, industry, and vehicle fleets. Participants felt a sense of pride in the ways in which they had maintained their older vehicles, and also perceived them as safer than newer vehicles. It was concluded that many participants were resistant to facts presented to them about older vehicles, and felt that the incentives were insufficient to trigger action. The effectiveness of advertising materials designed to promote the program was also assessed. 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  5. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  6. Design optimization of the International Linear Collider Final Focus System with a long L*

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, Fabien

    This Master's Thesis work has been done in the Aerospace Engineering master's programme framework and carried out at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It was conducted under the 500 GeV e-e+ International Linear Collider (ILC) study and focused on the design and performance optimization of the Final Focus System (FFS). The purpose of the final focus system of the future linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) is to demagnify the beam to the required transverse size at the interaction point (IP). The FFS is designed for a flat-beam in a compact way based on a local chromaticity correction which corrects both horizontal and vertical chromaticities simultaneously. An alternative FFS configuration based on the traditional scheme with two dedicated chromatic correction sections for horizontal and vertical chromaticities and a long L * option has been developed. A longer free space between the last quadrupole and the IP allows to place the last quadrupole on a stable ground, with fewer engineering ...

  7. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-01

    The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

  9. An Analysis of Interaction Patterns in the Focus Group Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavora Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the analysis of a focus group interview of a moderator and a group of undergraduate students on the topic of self-regulation of learning. The purpose of the investigation was to identify interaction patterns that appeared in the talk of participants and the moderator. In the stream of communication two rudimentary interaction patterns were recognized. The first pattern was named the Catalogue. It consists of a sequence of turns of participants who respond to a request of the moderator and who provide their answers, one by one, without reacting on the content of the previous partner(s talk. The other interaction pattern was called the Domino. In this pattern participants respond to each other. The Catalogue pattern prevailed in the interview. Alongside with identification of patterns of interaction the study demonstrated the functions of the common ground and its accomplishment in the talk of the moderator and participants.

  10. Double scattering and final-state interaction in Xd ---> YNN

    CERN Document Server

    Alberi, G; Thomé, Z D

    1974-01-01

    A unified approach to double scattering, as well as the final-state interaction of the two nucleons at small and large momentum transfers are given. The closure sum rule for the final-state interaction at small momentum transfers is shown explicitly in a simple model for the deuteron wave function and nucleon interaction. An application for the process K/sup +/d to K/sup 0/pp is given, trying to explain discrepancies present in recent experiments. (35 refs).

  11. Bunch-length and beam-timing monitors in the SLC final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Yocky, G.; Whittum, D.H.; Seidel, M.; Ng, C.K.; McCormick, D.; Bane, K.L.F.

    1998-07-01

    During the 1997/98 luminosity run of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), two novel RF-based detectors were brought into operation, in order to monitor the interaction-point (IP) bunch lengths and fluctuations in the relative arrival time of the two colliding beams. Both bunch length and timing can strongly affect the SLC luminosity and had not been monitored in previous years. The two new detectors utilize a broad-band microwave signal, which is excited by the beam through a ceramic gap in the final-focus beam pipe and transported outside of the beam line vault by a 160-ft long X-Band waveguide. The authors describe the estimated luminosity reduction due to bunch-length drift and IP timing fluctuation, the monitor layout, the expected responses and signal levels, calibration measurements, and beam observations

  12. Neutron interactions with biological tissue. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of neutrons with tissue through the ejected secondary charged particles. The authors used theoretical calculations whose input includes neutron cross section data; range, stopping power, ion yield, and straggling information; and geometrical properties. Outputs are initial and slowing-down spectra of charged particles, kerma factors, average values of quality factors, microdosimetric spectra, and integral microdosimetric parameters such as bar y F , bar y D , y * . Since it has become apparent that nanometer site sizes are also relevant to radiobiological effects, the calculations of event size spectra and their parameters were extended to these smaller diameters. This information is basic to radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection of workers, and standards for neutron dose measurement

  13. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. We report here procedures we have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto

    1991-01-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. The authors report here procedures they have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring

  15. Implementation and validation of the linear collider final focus prototype: ATF2 at KEK (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The two linear collider projects (ILC and CLIC) require beam delivery systems with the same local chromaticity correction scheme in the final focus. ATF2 at KEK (Japan), an implementation of this scheme scaled down in energy, uses the beam extracted from ATF, which is one of the most successful damping rings in the world. The ATF2 goals are to prove the feasibility and the stability of the linear collider final focus system and to define and test the experimental correction procedures. The nominal beam sizes at the interaction point are 3 μm horizontally and 37 nm vertically. The work in this thesis was started before the commissioning and covered its first year at KEK. At the beginning, we observed that the stripline BPMs were not working properly so we investigated their behavior in detail. The problem was characterized and later solved in 2010 by upgrading the electronics. We then developed an efficient procedure to check the modeling of the beam line, comparing measurements of transfer matrices to model predictions calculated on line. After obtaining a good agreement, we were able to successfully test the trajectory correction algorithm which had been developed, reducing the difference between BPM measurements and the target values down to 0.5 mm horizontally and 0.2 mm vertically. We also successfully developed an algorithm to reconstruct pulse to pulse beam trajectory fluctuations with sub-micron precision. This reconstruction also gave a precise determination of the energy fluctuation, allowing a global fit of the dispersion function along the beam line with a precision of a few mm. A simple and robust IP beam size tuning method using sextupoles displacements was also studied in simulation, whose performance indicates that, given some assumptions on the error level of the beam, convergence within 20% of the nominal beam size should be possible in 8 hours with a 80% probability. (author)

  16. Final-state interaction in processes of deuteron breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1974-12-01

    Interaction between particles in the final state of reactions can strongly affect the experimental angular distributions, as in the scattering processes with the breaking of the deuteron target, where the final state interaction is responsible for the disappearance of the differential cross section in the front direction. It is then necessary to include the contribution of the final state interaction to small angles of incoherent processes particle-deuteron. In this work line, an analysis is made of the process πd → πpn for different values of the incident energy. The data obtained are compared with existing experimental data. The hypothesis is also considered of the nucleon which collides with the incident particle being outside the mass layer. An analytical extension of the resonant amplitude πN outwards the mass layer is also used

  17. Coulomb Final State Interactions for Gaussian Wave Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Heinz, Ulrich W

    1999-01-01

    Two-particle like-sign and unlike-sign correlations including Coulomb final state interactions are calculated for Gaussian wave packets emitted from a Gaussian source. We show that the width of the wave packets can be fully absorbed into the spatial and momentum space widths of an effective emission function for plane wave states, and that Coulomb final state interaction effects are sensitive only to the latter, but not to the wave packet width itself. Results from analytical and numerical calculations are compared with recently published work by other authors.

  18. Exploring the triplet parameters space to optimise the final focus of the FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2141109; Abelleira, Jose; Seryi, Andrei; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges when designing final focus systems of particle accelerators is maximising the beam stay clear in the strong quadrupole magnets of the inner triplet. Moreover it is desirable to keep the quadrupoles in the triplet as short as possible for space and costs reasons but also to reduce chromaticity and simplify corrections schemes. An algorithm that explores the triplet parameter space to optimise both these aspects was written. It uses thin lenses as a first approximation and MADX for more precise calculations. In cooperation with radiation studies, this algorithm was then applied to design an alternative triplet for the final focus of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  19. Summary of the working group on high current transport and final focus lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, A.A.

    1978-09-01

    The group reviewed recent work, and then addressed itself to relating the current understanding of relevant beam transport effects to the four reference concepts. In addition there was discussion on plans for future experimental and theoretical work. Discussions covered the following topics: (1) Transverse instabilities on intense beams through periodic focusing systems, (2) evaluation and correction of chromatic aberrations in the final beam transport lines, (3) evaluation and correction of geometric aberrations due to quadrupole fringe fields, and (4) ion focusing by electrons

  20. Final state interaction effect on correlations in narrow particles pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the space-time dimensions of the particle production region is discussed. The basic formulae, taking into account he effects of quantum statistics and final state interaction, and the conditions of their applicability are given

  1. Planning that works: Empowerment through stakeholder focused interactive planning (SFIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.E.; Ison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful planning tool that can enable government, private industries, and public interest organizations to actualize their visions through sound decision making. The stakeholder focused interactive planning model is designed to integrate and ultimately gain stakeholder investment in the success of attainment of their vision. The only concessions required of the planning organization using this process is the acceptance of the premise that sustained vision success requires the support of both internal and external stakeholders and that each step in the process must be used as a validation of the previous step and essential to the completion of the next step. What is stakeholder/public involvement? It is the process in which the stakeholders (both internal and external) values, interests and expectations are included in decision-making processes. The primary goal of public involvement efforts is to include all those who have a stake in the decision, whether or not they have already been identified. Stakeholders are individuals, contractors, clients, suppliers, public organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, federal agencies, and other parties affected by decisions

  2. Radiation damage and waste management options for the sombrero final focus system and neutron dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.; Meier, W.R.; Reyes, S.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design did not completely address the issues associated with the final focus system. While past work calculated neutron fluences for a grazing incidence metal mirror (GIMM) and a final focus mirror, scattering off of the final optical component was not included, and thus, fluences in the final focus mirror were significantly underestimated. In addition, past work did not consider neutron-induced gamma-rays. Finally, power plant lifetime waste volumes may have been underestimated as neutron activation of the neutron dumps and building structure were not addressed. In the present work, a modified version of the SOMBRERO target building is presented where a significantly larger open solid-angle fraction (5%) is used to enhance beam smoothing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). The GIMMs are replaced with transmissive fused silica wedges and have been included in three-dimensional neutron and photon transport calculations. This work shows that a power plant with a large open solid-angle fraction, needed for beam smoothing with a DPSSL, is acceptable from tritium breeding, and neutron activation points-of-view. (authors)

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  4. Final State Interactions in Hadronic WW Decay at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Dierckxsens, M

    2002-01-01

    An overview is given of the study of final state interactions in hadronically decaying W pairs produced in e^+e^--collisions as it is performed by the four LEP experiments. Bose-Einstein correlations are investigated by comparing like- with unlike-signed pairs of pions and/or using the mixed event analysis technique. Colour reconnection is examined with a method that compares the particle flow distributions in inter-jet regions.

  5. New final focus concepts at 5 TeV and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1998-07-01

    At multi-TeV energies, the length of conventional beam-delivery systems becomes excessive, raising doubts about the value of a compact, high-gradient accelerator to future high-energy physics. In this paper, the reasons for the unfavorable length scaling are discussed, and alternative design concepts are described, for which final focus and collimation systems are orders of magnitude shorter and which produce higher luminosity at lower beam power than conventional approaches. These concepts include a sextupole-free final focus, linac energy-spread compensation, bunch combination and laser collimation. They are compatible with novel acceleration techniques, such as an active matrix linac. A consistent parameter set for a 5 TeV collider is presented

  6. Conceptual design of bend, compression, and final focus components of ILSE [Induction Linac System Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Fong, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Thur, W.

    1989-03-01

    The Induction Linac System Experiment (ILSE) includes a 180/degree/ bend system, drift compression line and a final focus, which test the analogous features of a heavy ion driver for inertial fusion. These components are novel in their transport of a space-charge-dominated ion beam with large head-to-tail velocity tilt. Their conceptual design is presented, including calculations of the beam envelope, momentum dispersion, and engineering design of magnets, vacuum system, diagnostics, alignment, and support. 3 refs., 5 figs

  7. Studies of final state interactions via femtoscopy in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Femtoscopy is a technique enabling measurements of the space-time characteristics of particle-emitting sources. However, the femtoscopic analysis is also sensitive to the interaction cross-section. In this paper we show the first preliminary measurements of $\\rm K^0_SK^{\\pm}$ correlation functions in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV. These correlations originate from the final-state interactions which proceed through the $a_0(980)$ resonance only and can be employed to constrain its parameters. A similar approach can be applied to baryon pairs to extract the unknown interaction cross-sections for some (anti-)baryon-(anti-)baryon pairs. We show baryon--baryon and baryon--anti-baryon correlation functions of protons and lambdas, as well as discuss shortly the fitting method.

  8. An electrodynamical model for the ion behaviour in the final plasma focus stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambreanu, V.; Doloc, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma focus devices (PFDs) are strong sources of fusion neutrons but the problem of which interactions are responsible for the fusion reactions is still open since neither of the proposed theoretical models has been confirmed experimentally. A model for the trajectories of the deuteron ions in a configuration of selfconsistent electromagnetic fields is proposed starting from an empirical plasma model which describes the plasma focus collapse and column phases. The proposed model is only electrodynamical under the assumption of a uniform current density and an infinite length of the plasma column, not taking into account the fluid characteristics of the plasma. (author)

  9. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering

  10. Protein–Phospholipid Interaction Motifs: A Focus on Phosphatidic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Tanguy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular membranes are composed of thousands of different lipids usually maintained within a narrow range of concentrations. In addition to their well-known structural and metabolic roles, signaling functions for many lipids have also emerged over the last two decades. The latter largely depend on the ability of particular classes of lipids to interact specifically with a great variety of proteins and to regulate their localization and activity. Among these lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA plays a unique role in a large repertoire of cellular activities, most likely in relation to its unique biophysical properties. However, until recently, only incomplete information was available to model the interaction between PA and its protein partners. The development of new liposome-based assays as well as molecular dynamic simulation are now providing novel information. We will review the different factors that have shown to modulate the capacity of PA to interact with specific domains in target proteins.

  11. Perceptual Interactions Between Electrodes Using Focused and Monopolar Cochlear Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McDermott, Hugh J.; Swanson, Brett A.

    2015-01-01

    -matched sequential and simultaneous stimuli composed of 2 spatially separated pulse trains was measured as function of the electrode separation. Results indicated a strong current-summation interaction for simultaneous stimuli in the MP mode for separations up to at least 4.8 mm. No significant interaction was found......In today’s cochlear implant (CI) systems, the monopolar (MP) electrode configuration is the most commonly used stimulation mode, requiring only a single current source. However, with an implant that will allow simultaneous activation of multiple independent current sources, it is possible...

  12. Preliminary disposal limits, plume interaction factors, and final disposal limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-11

    In the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA), each final disposal limit was constructed as the product of a preliminary disposal limit and a plume interaction factor. The following mathematical development demonstrates that performance objectives are generally expected to be satisfied with high confidence under practical PA scenarios using this method. However, radionuclides that experience significant decay between a disposal unit and the 100-meter boundary, such as H-3 and Sr-90, can challenge performance objectives, depending on the disposed-of waste composition, facility geometry, and the significance of the plume interaction factor. Pros and cons of analyzing single disposal units or multiple disposal units as a group in the preliminary disposal limits analysis are also identified.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion driver enhancements: Final focusing systems and compact heavy-ion driver designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Required elements of an inertial confinement fusion power plant are modeled and discussed. A detailed analysis of two critical elements of candidate drivers is done, and new component designs are proposed to increase the credibility and feasibility of each driver system. An analysis of neutron damage to the final elements of a laser focusing system is presented, and multilayer -- dielectric mirrors are shown to have damage lifetimes which axe too short to be useful in a commercial power plant. A new final-focusing system using grazing incidence metal mirrors to protect sensitive laser optics is designed and shown to be effective in extending the lifetime of the final focusing system. The reflectivities and damage limits of grazing incidence metal mirrors are examined in detail, and the required mirror sizes are shown to be compatible with the beam sizes and illumination geometries currently envisioned for laser drivers. A detailed design and analysis is also done for compact arrays of superconducting magnetic quadrupoles, which are needed in a multi-beam heavy-ion driver. The new array model is developed in more detail than some previous conceptual designs and models arrays which are more compact than arrays scaled from existing single -- quadrupole designs. The improved integrated model for compact arrays is used to compare the effects of various quadrupole array design choices on the size and cost of a heavy-ion driver. Array design choices which significantly affect the cost of a heavy-ion driver include the choice of superconducting material and the thickness of the collar used to support the winding stresses. The effect of these array design choices on driver size and cost is examined and the array model is used to estimate driver cost savings and performance improvements attainable with aggressive quadrupole array designs with high-performance superconductors

  14. FCC-hh final-focus for flat-beams: parameters and energy deposition studies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081283; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Seryi, Andrei; Van Riesen-Haupt, Leon; Besana, Maria Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The international Future Circular Collider (FCC) study comprises the study of a new scientific structure in a tunnel of 100 km. This will allow the installation of two accelerators, a 45.6–175 GeV lepton collider and a 100-TeV hadron collider. An optimized design of a final-focus system for the hadron collider is presented here. The new design is more compact and enables unequal ${\\beta}$$^{∗}$ in both planes, whose choice is justified here. This is followed by energy deposition studies, where the total dose in the magnets as a consequence of the collision debris is evaluated.

  15. The proposed alignment system for the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruland, R.E.; Fischer, G.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the current state of work in progress with respect to the geometry, alignment requirements, scenarios, and hardware for meeting the tolerances of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. The methods and systems proposed acknowledge that component motion at the micron level, from whatever cause (ground motion, thermal effects, etc.) must be measured on-line and compensated for on relatively short time scales. To provide an integrated alignment/positioning package, some unique designs for reference systems, calibration of effect electric and magnetic centers, and component movers are introduced. 24 refs., 28 figs

  16. Longitudinal compression of heavy-ion beams with minimum requirements on final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Mark, J.W.K.; Brandon, S.T.; Lee, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to compress a heavy-ion beam longitudinally in such a way that the compressed pulse has a constant line-charge density profile and uniform longitudinal momentum. These conditions may be important from the standpoint of final focusing. By realizing the similarity of the equations that describe the 1-D charged-particle motion to the equations that describe 1-D ideal gas flow, the evolution of lambda and the velocity tilt can be calculated using the method of characteristics developed for unsteady supersonic gasdynamics. Particle simulations confirm the theory. Various schemes for pulse shaping have been investigated

  17. Mechanical design of a pre-isolator for the CLIC final focusing magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A; Ramos, F; Siegrist, N

    2012-01-01

    Due to the very small vertical beam sizes, the final focusing elements at the future CLIC linear collider need to be stable against vibrations to below 0.15 nanometres at frequencies above about 4 Hz. One of the key elements in the strategy to achieve such a stable environment is a passive, heavy pre-isolator. In this report, the results from the dynamic finite element analyses of the proposed design for such a passive preisolator are summarized. Furthermore, the results from a low frequency, heavy mass passive vibration isolation test set-up used to validate the calculations are shown.

  18. Nonlinear interactions of focused resonance cone fields with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R.L.; Gekelman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A simple yet novel rf exciter structure has been developed for generating remotely intense rf fields in a magnetoplasma. It is a circular line source of radius R in a plane perpendicularB 0 driven with an rf signal at ω 0 E/sub rf/ 2 /nkT/sub e/>0.2, a strong density depression in the focal region (deltan/n>40%) is observed. The density perturbation modifies the cone angle and field distribution. This nonlinear interaction leads to a rapid growth of ion acoustic wave turbulence and a corresponding random rf field distribution in a broadened focal region. The development of the interaction is mapped in space and time

  19. Adjustable, short focal length permanent-magnet quadrupole based electron beam final focus system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Lim

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Advanced high-brightness beam applications such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS depend on achieving of ultrasmall spot sizes in high current beams. Modern injectors and compressors enable the production of high-brightness beams having needed short bunch lengths and small emittances. Along with these beam properties comes the need to produce tighter foci, using stronger, shorter focal length optics. An approach to creating such strong focusing systems using high-field, small-bore permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs is reported here. A final-focus system employing three PMQs, each composed of 16 neodymium iron boride sectors in a Halbach geometry has been installed in the PLEIADES ICS experiment. The field gradient in these PMQs is 560   T/m, the highest ever reported in a magnetic optics system. As the magnets are of a fixed field strength, the focusing system is tuned by adjusting the position of the three magnets along the beam line axis, in analogy to familiar camera optics. This paper discusses the details of the focusing system, simulation, design, fabrication, and experimental procedure in creating ultrasmall beams at PLEIADES.

  20. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, G.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.

  1. Focus talk on interactions between jets and medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppert, Joerg

    2006-01-01

    The energy and momentum lost by a hard parton propagating through hot and dense matter has to be redistributed during the nuclear medium evolution. Apart from heating the medium, there is the possibility that collective modes are excited leading to the emergence of Mach cones or Cherenkov radiation. Recent two-particle correlation measurements by STAR [F. Wang [STAR Collaboration], J. Phys. G 30, S1299 (2004) [arXiv:nucl-ex/0404010]; C. Gagliardi, these proceedings] and PHENIX [S. S. Adler et al. [PHENIX Collaboration], arXiv:nucl-ex/0507004; N. Ajitanand, these proceedings] at RHIC indicate that such phenomena may play an important role in understanding the jet-medium interactions. Possible collective modes are discussed and it is demonstrated that Mach cones as created by colorless or colored sound are a possible explanation of the hardronic two-particle correlation data

  2. Drug-drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yvette; Setia, Sajita; Lima, Graca

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions.

  3. Drug–drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Y

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Yvette Low,1 Sajita Setia,2 Graca Lima3 1Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte. Ltd., Singapore; 3Global Medical Affairs, Asia-Pacific Region, Pfizer, Hong Kong Abstract: Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions. Keywords: desvenlafaxine, polypharmacy, comorbidities, depression, pharmacokinetics

  4. Drug–drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yvette; Setia, Sajita; Lima, Graca

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions. PMID:29497300

  5. Study of $\\pi^{-}p$ interactions with neutral final states

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a study of the production of neutral particles or states decaying into photons in the reaction $\\pi^{-} + p \\rightarrow M^{0} + n$ at SPS energies. \\\\ \\\\ Special attention is paid to the measurement of the production of heavy particles with hidden quantum numbers and of possible new heavy spinless states decaying into two photons. \\\\ \\\\ The large four-momentum transfer behaviour of binary processes involving known neutral mesons and the production of new meson resonances with high mass and spin will also be studied. Complex multiparticle final states will be analysed as a by-product.\\\\ \\\\ The central unit of the experimental set-up is a 4000 cell Cerenkov hodoscope spectrometer (GAMS) which allows the measurement of the momentum vector of each $\\gamma$ in a multigamma event. \\\\ \\\\ The longitudinal position of the interaction point in the liquid hydrogen target is measured by the Cerenkov light intensity. \\\\ \\\\ A guard system, made of scintillation counters and lead-glass Cerenkov counters, ...

  6. Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  7. A Superstrong Adjustable Permanent Magnet for the Final Focus Quadrupole in a Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, T.

    2004-01-01

    A super strong permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) was fabricated and tested. It has an integrated strength of 28.5T with overall length of 10 cm and a 7mm bore radius. The final focus quadrupole of a linear collider needs a variable focal length. This can be obtained by slicing the magnet into pieces along the beamline direction and rotating these slices. But this technique may lead to movement of the magnetic center and introduction of a skew quadrupole component when the strength is varied. A ''double ring structure'' can ease these effects. A second prototype PMQ, containing thermal compensation materials and with a double ring structure, has been fabricated. Worm gear is selected as the mechanical rotating scheme because the double ring structure needs a large torque to rotate magnets. The structure of the second prototype PMQ is shown

  8. Status report on active stabilisation of a linear collider final focus quadrupole mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lottin, J.; Brunetti, L.; Formosa, F.; Adloff, C.; Bastian, Y.; Bolzon, B.; Cadoux, F.; Geffroy, N.; Girard, C.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Peltier, F.

    2006-01-01

    The measurements done with the sensors available in our laboratories used for ground motion analysis are presented. The first sensors studied are seismic sensors measuring ground velocity, other sensors are accelerometers available for measuring ground acceleration. The first step has been to characterize the sensors, the second step has been to model and simulate the acceleration in order to identify Eigen frequencies and to display mode shapes. The third step has been to assess the performances of a new algorithm for disturbance rejection. In order to facilitate the analysis, a reduced-size mock-up has been used. The goal was to eliminate or at least to reduce as much as possible the main frequencies of the disturbance. A new mock-up is currently being developed that will have a geometry closer to a final focus quadrupole. Measurements will be done to validate the whole system in view of active stabilization for a future linear collider

  9. Status report on active stabilisation of a linear collider final focus quadrupole mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, J.; Brunetti, L.; Formosa, F. [Universite de Savoie, ESIA, 74 - Annecy (France); Adloff, C.; Bastian, Y.; Bolzon, B.; Cadoux, F.; Geffroy, N.; Girard, C.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Peltier, F. [LAPP-IN2P3-CNRS, 74 - Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    2006-07-01

    The measurements done with the sensors available in our laboratories used for ground motion analysis are presented. The first sensors studied are seismic sensors measuring ground velocity, other sensors are accelerometers available for measuring ground acceleration. The first step has been to characterize the sensors, the second step has been to model and simulate the acceleration in order to identify Eigen frequencies and to display mode shapes. The third step has been to assess the performances of a new algorithm for disturbance rejection. In order to facilitate the analysis, a reduced-size mock-up has been used. The goal was to eliminate or at least to reduce as much as possible the main frequencies of the disturbance. A new mock-up is currently being developed that will have a geometry closer to a final focus quadrupole. Measurements will be done to validate the whole system in view of active stabilization for a future linear collider.

  10. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Hoon, Michiel Jan Laurens [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal compression of space-charge dominated beams can be achieved by imposing a head-to-tail velocity tilt on the beam. This tilt has to be carefully tailored, such that it is removed by the longitudinal space-charge repulsion by the time the beam reaches the end of the drift compression section. The transverse focusing lattice should be designed such that all parts of the beam stay approximately matched, while the beam smoothly expands transversely to the larger beam radius needed in the final focus system following drift compression. In this thesis, several drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression. The occurrence of mismatches due to a rapidly increasing current was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of drift compression to errors in the initial velocity tilt and current profile was studied. These calculations were done using a new computer code that accurately calculates the longitudinal electric field in the space-charge dominated regime.

  11. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Y.; Bambade, P.; Tauchi, T.; White, G. R.; Boogert, S.

    2013-06-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs), it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  12. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Renier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs, it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  13. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  14. The causes and consequences of an avoidance-focus for interracial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, E Ashby; Butz, David A

    2006-06-01

    The current work examined the causes and consequences of non-Black people's desire to avoid interracial interactions (an avoidance-focus). Expecting to respond with racial bias in inter-racial interactions was argued to result in an avoidance-focus for such interactions, which was hypothesized to have negative implications for the quality of interracial interactions. Across three studies, feedback indicating that non-Black participants would respond with racial bias in interactions with Black people resulted in anxiety and the desire to avoid the interaction. In addition, when participants with an avoidance-focus interacted with a Black confederate (Study 2), they had shorter interactions that were rated as less pleasant by the confederate and participant as compared to those without an avoidance-focus. Avoidance-focused participants were less interested in future interactions and came across as more avoidant and biased to their partner than less avoidance-focused participants. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for racial relations.

  15. Physical characteristics that predict final basal insulin dose in type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a special focus on BMI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A. C. R.; Bolli, G. B.; Dain, M.-P.; Wang, E.; Holleman, F.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to predict final insulin dose based on patient's characteristics would allow for efficient titration for patients with higher dose needs. The primary aim of this post-hoc analysis of the L2T3 study was to determine predictors for final dose. Specifically, we focused on the

  16. Focused transport of intense charged particle beams. Final technical report FY/93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Many recent developments in accelerator technology have increased the need for a better understanding of the physics of intense-beam transport. Of particular interest to the work described here is the appearance, as beam intensities are increased, of a class of nonlinear phenomena which involve the collective interaction of the beam particles. Beam intensity, used as a measure of the importance of space-charge collective behavior, depends on the ratio of current to emittance. The nonlinear beam dynamics, and any resulting emittance growth, which are characteristic of the intense-beam regime, can therefore occur even at low currents in any accelerator system with sufficiently high intensity, especially in the low beta section. Furthermore, since emittance of a beam is difficult to reduce, the ultimate achievement of necessary beam luminosities requires the consideration of possible causes of longitudinal and transverse emittance growth at every stage of the beam lifetime. The research program described here has addressed the fundamental physics which comes into play during the transport, acceleration and focusing of intense beams. Because of the long term and ongoing nature of the research program discussed here, this report is divided into two sections. The first section constitutes a long term revue of the accomplishments which have resulted from the research effort reported, especially in pioneering the use of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation techniques for simulation of the dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in particle accelerators. The following section emphasizes, in more detail, the accomplishments of the FY 92/93 period immediately prior to the termination of this particular avenue of support. 41 refs

  17. Final state interactions in electron induced trinucleon breakup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijgaard, E. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis presents an exact analysis of the electromagnetic breakup process of a trinucleon system. The one-photon exchange mechanism is reviewed. The relevant components of the nuclear current are discussed and the off-shell one-body current matrix elements are derived to accommodate the evaluation of the trinucleon nuclear structure functions. The Faddeev equations are introduced. To facilitate the numerical evaluations the unitary pole expansion (UPE) is employed to describe a local S-wave spin-dependent interaction in a series of separable potential terms. The UPE convergence properties for the trinucleon bound state as well as for the N-N and N-d scattering observables are investigated. In view of the electromagnetic two-body and three-body breakup analysis the half off-shell wave functions for 3N→Nd and 3N→3N scattering are calculated. The nuclear structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup processes are derived and exactly calculated. Results are presented and discussed for several kinetamic configurations. The nuclear response functions of the trinucleon breakup processes are calculated for a momentum transfer Q = 400 MeV/c. The results are compared with recent experimental data for the longitudinal and transverse response of both trinucleon systems. The three-body contributions to the response functions result from an essentially fourfold numerical integration of the invariant electromagnetic three-body breakup amplitude. A detailed derivation of this amplitude is presented and the treatment of the subsequent integration is discussed. An extension is formulated to include D-state components in the trinucleon bound state as well as in the disconnected final state components for the two-body breakup process. One kinematic situation is studied with the D-state extension. For the three-body breakup processes only the PWIA response is determined with the D-state component in the

  18. Operational Experiences Tuning the ATF2 Final Focus Optics Towards Obtaining a 37nm Electron Beam IP Spot Size

    CERN Document Server

    White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Bai, Sha; Bambade, Philip; Renier, Yves; Bolzon, Benoit; Kamiya, Yoshio; Komamiya, Sachio; Oroku, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Marin, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of the ATF2 research accelerator is to test a scaled version of the final focus optics planned for use in next-generation linear lepton colliders. ATF2 consists of a 1.3 GeV linac, damping ring providing lowemittance electron beams (<12pm in the vertical plane), extraction line and final focus optics. The design details of the final focus optics and implementation at ATF2 are presented elsewhere. The ATF2 accelerator is currently being commissioned, with a staged approach to achieving the design IP spot size. It is expected that as we implement more demanding optics and reduce the vertical beta function at the IP, the tuning becomes more difficult and takes longer. We present here a description of the implementation of the tuning procedures and describe operational experiences and performances

  19. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  20. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bambade, P; Amann, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Apsimon, R; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bellomo, P; Bett, D; Blair, G; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Coe, P; Constance, B; Delahaye, J P; Deacon, L; Elsen, E; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Geffroy, N; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Guler, H; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jeremie, A; Jones, J; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lyapin, A; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Molloy, S; Naito, T; Nakamura, T; Nelson, J; Okamoto, D; Okugi, T; Oroku, M; Park, Y J; Parker, B; Paterson, E; Perry, C; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Renier, Y; Resta-Lopez, J; Rimbault, C; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Scarfe, A; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Swinson, C; Takahashi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomas, R; Urakawa, J; Urner, D; Verderi, M; Wang, M H; Warden, M; Wendt, M; White, G; Wittmer, W; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, Y; Yoda, H; Yokoya, K; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, F; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.042801

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  1. Applications in soil-structure interactions. Final report, June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhaveri, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    Complex phenomenon of soil-structure interaction was assessed. Relationships between the characteristics of the earthquake ground motions, the local soil and geologic conditions, and the response of the structures to the ground motions were studied. (I) The use of the explicit finite-difference method to study linear elastic soil-structure interaction is described. A linear two-dimensional study of different conditions that influence the dynamic compliance and scattering properties of foundations is presented. (II) The FLUSH computer code was used to compute the soil-structure interaction during SIMQUAKE 1B, an experimental underground blast excitation of a 1/12-scale model of a nuclear containment structure. Evaluation was performed using transient excitation, applied to a finite-difference grid. Dynamic foundation properties were studied. Results indicate that the orientation and location of the source relative to the site and the wave environment at the site may be important parameters to be considered. Differences between the computed and experimental recorded responses are indicated, and reasons for the discrepancy are suggested. (III) A case study that examined structural and ground response data tabulated and catalogued from tests at the Nevada Test Site for its applicability to the soil-structure interaction questions of interest is presented. Description, methods, and evaluation of data on soil-structure interaction from forced vibration tests are presented. A two-dimensional finite-difference grid representing a relatively rigid structure resting on uniform ground was analyzed and monitored. Fourier spectra of monitored time histories were also evaluated and are presented. Results show clear evidence of soil-structure interaction and significant agreement with theory. 128 figures, 18 tables

  2. Summary of the working group on high current transport and final focus lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Transverse instabilities of intense beams in periodic transport lines are reviewed. Chromatic aberrations in the final beam transport lines and geometric aberrations due to quadrupole fringe fields are discussed and corrections to reduce them are evaluated. The implications for four reference designs are evaluated by comparing the tune depression, momentum spread, and emittance

  3. Multimuon final states in high energy muon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.W.

    1977-01-01

    Multimuon final states observed in the MSU-Fermilab deep inelastic muon scattering apparatus are presented. These events, observed at both 150 and 275-GeV, are more numerous and the extra muons have qualitative different production characteristics than muons expected from conventional sources. Origin of these events are examined. The implication of the data on the understanding of scaling violation observed in muon scattering is discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

  5. Estimation of Threshold for the Signals of the BLMs around the LHC Final Focus Triplet Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Hoa, C; Mauri, M; Mereghetti, A; Sapinski, M; Wildner, E; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2012-01-01

    The Interaction Points of the Large Hadron Collider are the regions where the two circulating beams collide. Hence, the magnets the closest to any Interaction Point are exposed to an elevated radiation field due to the collision debris. In this study the signal in the Beam Loss Monitors due to the debris is estimated. In addition, for three different scenarios of beam losses, the energy density in the coils and the signal in the Beam Loss Monitors at quench are computed. It is shown that the Beam Loss Monitors, as presently installed on the vacuum vessel of the magnets, cannot disentangle the signal due to a localised loss from the constant signal due to the debris in case of steady-state losses.

  6. Microwave simulation of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Various electron and ion current, electric field, and magnetic field probes were developed and tested during the course of the investigation. A three dimensional probe drive system was constructed in order to investigate two and three dimensional phenomena occurring in the microwave plasma interaction. In most of the experiments reported here, a 1 GHz, 40 kilowatt, pulsed rf source (Applied Microwave), was used. The antenna was a 20 0 horn. A dipole fed parabolic antenna system capable of producing a focussed microwave beam at 2.3 GHz was developed and bench tested. This system will be used in future investigations at higher power levels

  7. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-01-01

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ''Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source'' (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 x 1 cm

  8. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. This project assumes that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to the interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process.

  9. Influence of a Parent-Child Interaction Focused Bookmaking Approach on Maternal Parenting Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Lisa K.; Seedall, Ryan B.; Innocenti, Mark S.; Roggman, Lori A.; Cook, Gina A.; Hagman, Amanda M.; Jump Norman, Vonda K.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of our parent-child interaction focused bookmaking intervention with 89 families and their toddlers receiving early intervention services. Participating early intervention providers (N = 24) were assigned to either continue providing services as usual or participate in training to implement the bookmaking approach in their…

  10. Atoms and Ions Interacting with Particles and Fields: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robicheaux, Francis [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2014-09-18

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. The duration of the grant was the 10 year period from 8/2003 to 8/2013. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 65 peer reviewed publications over these 10 years with 8 of the publications in Physical Review Letters; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B, ...). I will disuss the results for the periods of time relevant for each grant period.

  11. TRANSITION FROM ADVERSARIAL TO COOPERATIVE STRATEGIC INTERACTION; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. CANAVAN

    2001-01-01

    This note extends the game theoretic analysis of strategic conflicts begun in earlier Seminars on Planetary Emergencies to interactions with and without defenses between two or more adversaries with more realistic target structures. It reviews the essentials of game theory as applied to the analysis of strategic decisions, the application of first and second strike costs as payoffs, and solution optimization, which resolves several inconsistencies seen with earlier metrics. The stability of the current bilateral offensive configuration is shown to be high and insensitive to deep reductions in offensive forces, the deployment of limited defenses, and the exchange of significant offensive forces for defenses. The transition from adversarial to cooperative interaction is represented by the progressive reduction of the parameters representing each side's preference for damaging or deterring the other, which monotonically improves stability. Estimates of strike incentives in bilateral and trilateral configurations are reduced by the inclusion of high value targets in both sides' force allocations, which dominates the details of offensive and defensive forces. The shift to high value targets stabilizes trilateral offensive configurations, a result that differs with that from analyses based on military costs only. When defenses are included, they lead to a balance between a large defended side and small undefended side that resembles the balance between two large sides. Including the large side's preference for defense of high value targets in the analyses reduces its strike incentives and thus the small side's incentive to preempt. However, it also removes the large sides' ability to deter, so the stability of multi-polar configurations continues to be controlled by the least stable dyad, which places constraints on the size of defenses that can be deployed stably that could be more stringent than those from the bilateral balance

  12. Optics Designs of Final-Focus Systems for Future LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira, J L; Zimmermann, Frank; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The main topic of the thesis is the study of a novel option for the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comprising a large Piwinski angle, flat beams, and crab waists. Flat beams and crab waists are not only pre-requisites for a crab-waist scheme, but, even by themselves; each of these two elements alone could boost the luminosity of the existing collider as built. The new optics involves an upgrade of the interaction region of the two high-luminosity experiments, ATLAS and CMS, in order to provide them with a substantially higher luminosity. To this end, a flat-beam optics scenario has been explored for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), with a much reduced vertical beta function at the interaction point (IP), $\\beta_y^*$. In addition, a large Piwinski angle is considered. Advantages of a large Piwinski angle include a reduction in the hourglass effect over the length of the collision area, which allows for the significant $\\beta_y^*$ decrease. In addition there is a reduction of the be...

  13. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  14. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  15. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  16. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A.; Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A.; Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P.; Siccama, A.; Ikonen, K.; Parozzi, F.; Kolev, N.; Caira, M.

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues

  17. Final Report - Few-Body Studies Using Electromagnetic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, Blaine [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2018-01-25

    The work discussed here is an extension of work previously funded by U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-97ER41025. Measurements of charged pion photoproduction from deuterium using the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory previously made by us, as members of the LEGS Collaboration, resulted in the most interesting result of two decades of work. By measuring the production of a charged pion (π+) in coincidence with an emitted photon we observed structures in the residual two-nucleon system. These indicated the existence of rare, long-lived states not explicable by standard nuclear theory; they suggested a set of configurations not explicable in terms of a nucleon-nucleon pair. The existence of such “exotic” structures has formed the foundation for most of the work that has ensued. Several measurements at various laboratories have supported, but not proved, the existence of these exotic states. The rarity of these states made their existence undetectable in most previous measurements. Only by observing characteristic signatures of such states (i.e., decay photons), by using very specific kinematics which isolate certain reaction products, or by measuring polarization-dependent observables. During the period of this grant we pursued and made progress on the development of experiments to be performed at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) of the Tri Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). Our understanding of photon- and electron-induced nuclear reactions depends on understanding of the basic electron and photon interaction. Recently, the issue of two-photon contributions has arisen in the context of deeply inelastic electron scattering. One way to address this is to measure asymmetries in the Bethe-Heitler ee process. We also made progress in developing the detectors required to measure these asymmetries at HIGS. During the last several years the apparent discrepancy between the size of the proton as measured

  18. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The end of the Cold War and the decision to reduce the size of the nuclear weapons production complex have created a need for DOE to deactivate, decontaminate, and decommission (D ampersand D) a large number of aging, surplus facilities. The nature and magnitude of the facility D ampersand D problems require EM to facilitate the development and application of technologies that will address these problems quickly and cost-effectively. The needed technologies can best be provided by integrating the strengths of DOE's national laboratories with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. To help focus and direct these activities toward achieving DOE's goals, the EM Office of Technology Development (OTD) devised the strategic concept of an Integrated Demonstration (ID), which involves selecting, demonstrating, testing, and evaluating an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific EM problems, such as those posed by D ampersand D. The ID approach allows optimal use of DOE's resources by avoiding duplication of effort and ensuring rapid demonstration of applicable technologies. Many technologies, including both the commercially mature and the innovative, are combined and evaluated for a cradle-to-grave solution to specific EM problems in areas such as D ampersand D. The process will involve transforming an existing problem condition to a desired end state, recycling waste materials generated, wherever feasible, and minimizing requirements for waste disposal. The D ampersand D ID Strategic Plan has been prepared by a Technical Support Group (TSG) assembled from various sites within the DOE Complex and intended to identify cross-cutting problem areas amenable to applications of the D ampersand D ID concept and to develop specific ID proposals for these problem areas

  19. Active and passive computed tomography mixed waste focus area final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G K; Camp, D C; Decman, D J; Jackson, J A; Martz, H E; Roberson, G P.

    1998-01-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Characterization Development Strategy delineates an approach to resolve technology deficiencies associated with the characterization of mixed wastes. The intent of this strategy is to ensure the availability of technologies to support the Department of Energy s (DOE) mixed-waste, low-level or transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste characterization management needs. To this end the MWFA has defined and coordinated characterization development programs to ensure that data and test results necessary to evaluate the utility of non-destructive assay technologies are available to meet site contact handled waste management schedules. Requirements used as technology development project benchmarks are based in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan. These requirements include the ability to determine total bias and total measurement uncertainty. These parameters must be completely evaluated for waste types to be processed through a given nondestructive waste assay system constituting the foundation of activities undertaken in technology development projects. Once development and testing activities have been completed, Innovative Technology Summary Reports are generated to provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user or customer technology selection. The active and passive computed tomography non-destructive assay system is one of the technologies selected for development by the MWFA. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the active and passive computed tomography (A ampersand XT) nondestructive assay (NDA) technology to identify and accurately quantify all detectable radioisotopes in closed containers of waste. This technology will be applicable to all types of waste regardless of their classification-low level, transuranic or mixed. Mixed waste contains radioactivity and hazardous organic species. The scope of our technology is to develop a non-invasive waste-drum scanner that

  20. Older Adults Perceptions of Technology and Barriers to Interacting with Tablet Computers: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Clausen, Maria Giatsi; Gow, Alan J

    2017-10-04

    New technologies provide opportunities for the delivery of broad, flexible interventions with older adults. Focus groups were conducted to: (1) understand older adults' familiarity with, and barriers to, interacting with new technologies and tablets; and (2) utilize user-engagement in refining an intervention protocol. Eighteen older adults (65-76 years old; 83.3% female) who were novice tablet users participated in discussions about their perceptions of and barriers to interacting with tablets. We conducted three separate focus groups and used a generic qualitative design applying thematic analysis to analyse the data. The focus groups explored attitudes toward tablets and technology in general. We also explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using tablets, familiarity with, and barriers to interacting with tablets. In two of the focus groups, participants had previous computing experience (e.g., desktop), while in the other, participants had no previous computing experience. None of the participants had any previous experience with tablet computers. The themes that emerged were related to barriers (i.e., lack of instructions and guidance, lack of knowledge and confidence, health-related barriers, cost); disadvantages and concerns (i.e., too much and too complex technology, feelings of inadequacy, and comparison with younger generations, lack of social interaction and communication, negative features of tablets); advantages (i.e., positive features of tablets, accessing information, willingness to adopt technology); and skepticism about using tablets and technology in general. After brief exposure to tablets, participants emphasized the likelihood of using a tablet in the future. Our findings suggest that most of our participants were eager to adopt new technology and willing to learn using a tablet. However, they voiced apprehension about lack of, or lack of clarity in, instructions and support. Understanding older adults' perceptions of technology

  1. Living Kidney Donor: Continuity of Care Focused on Professional Expertise, Organisation and Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Kirsten

    demand. - Patients receiving an organ from a living donor have a better prognosis. - The surgical technique removing the kidney from the living donor laparoscopically carries a  lower risk than open nephrectomy. - Relatives are willing to donate a kidney Objectives: - To investigate current practice...... concerning living kidney donation at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. - to develop a homogeneous, ideal and realistic practice for living kidney donation focused on health-professional expertise, organisation and interaction between professionals and living donor. - To promote inter...

  2. Interactive performance and focus groups with adolescents: the power of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E; Aroian, Karen J; Warren, Stefanie; Wirth, Jeff

    2012-12-01

    Conducting focus groups with adolescents can be challenging given their developmental needs, particularly with sensitive topics. These challenges include intense need for peer approval, declining social trust, short attention span, and reliance on concrete operations thinking. In this article, we describe an adaptation of interactive performance as an alternative to traditional focus group method. We used this method in a study of discrimination experienced by Muslims (ages 13-17) and of peer pressure to engage in sexual behavior experienced by Hispanic girls (ages 10-14). Recommendations for use of this method include using an interdisciplinary team, planning for large amounts of disclosure towards the end of the focus group, and considering the fit of this method to the study topic. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impact of focused training on communication skills of final-year medical students in a medical school in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Nayyar; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Basheer, Aneesh; Kandasamy, Ravichandran

    2015-01-01

    Although communication skills are important for a good physician-patient relationship, Indian medical curricula give very little emphasis on training medical students in this aspect. To determine the change in communication skills of final-year medical students following focused training. This was an educational interventional study done at Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, a tertiary care teaching hospital in South India, to assess communication skills among final-year MBBS students. Fifty-two students (24 males and 28 females) participated in the study. A pre-test was conducted in the form of an objectively structured clinical examination (OSCE), followed by focused training for four hours. The same OSCE was administered as post-test. A comparison between the pre-test and post-test scores was done using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Ninety-six per cent of participants (50 out of 52) showed improvement in their performance after the focused training. The mean marks of the pre-test and post-test were 10.77± 3 and 18.04±2, respectively, out of a maximum mark of 20 (pcommunication skills of medical students. Hence, it may be included in the curriculum of undergraduate medical teaching programmes in India.

  4. Effect of focusing field error during final beam bunching in heavy-ion-beam driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Kawata, S.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-01-01

    Emittance growth due to the transverse focusing field error is investigated during the final beam bunching in the energy driver system of heavy ion inertial fusion. The beam bunch is longitudinally compressed during the transport with the field error in the continuous focusing (CF) or the alternating gradient (AG) field lattices. Numerical calculation results show the only 2% difference of the emittance growth between the cases with and without field error in the CF lattice. In the case of the AG lattice model with the field error of 10%, the emittance growth of 2.4 times is estimated, and the major difference between the CF and AG models is indicated from the numerical simulations. (author)

  5. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is that increased magnification causes some rays to travel through the detection scintillator at steep angles, introducing parallax errors due to variable depth-of-interaction in scintillator material, especially towards the edges of the detector field of view. These parallax errors ultimately limit the resolution of pinhole preclinical SPECT systems, especially for higher energy isotopes that can easily penetrate through millimeters of scintillator material. A pixellated, focused-cut (FC) scintillator, with its pixels laser-cut so that they are collinear with incoming rays, can potentially compensate for these parallax errors and thus improve the system resolution. We performed the first experimental evaluation of a newly developed focused-cut scintillator. We scanned a Tc-99 m source across the field of view of pinhole gamma camera with a continuous scintillator, a conventional “straight-cut” (SC) pixellated scintillator, and a focused-cut scintillator, each coupled to an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) detector by a fiber-optic taper, and compared the measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values. We show that the FWHMs of the focused-cut scintillator projections are comparable to the FWHMs of the thinner SC scintillator, indicating the effectiveness of the focused-cut scintillator in compensating parallax errors.

  6. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G; Nagarkar, Vivek V

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is that increased magnification causes some rays to travel through the detection scintillator at steep angles, introducing parallax errors due to variable depth-of-interaction in scintillator material, especially towards the edges of the detector field of view. These parallax errors ultimately limit the resolution of pinhole preclinical SPECT systems, especially for higher energy isotopes that can easily penetrate through millimeters of scintillator material. A pixellated, focused-cut (FC) scintillator, with its pixels laser-cut so that they are collinear with incoming rays, can potentially compensate for these parallax errors and thus improve the system resolution. We performed the first experimental evaluation of a newly developed focused-cut scintillator. We scanned a Tc-99m source across the field of view of pinhole gamma camera with a continuous scintillator, a conventional "straight-cut" (SC) pixellated scintillator, and a focused-cut scintillator, each coupled to an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) detector by a fiber-optic taper, and compared the measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values. We show that the FWHMs of the focused-cut scintillator projections are comparable to the FWHMs of the thinner SC scintillator, indicating the effectiveness of the focused-cut scintillator in compensating parallax errors.

  7. Effects of Atwood number on shock focusing in shock-cylinder interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junfeng; Ding, Juchun; Luo, Xisheng; Zhai, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of shock-accelerated heavy-gas cylinder surrounded by the air with different Atwood numbers (A_t=0.28, 0.50, 0.63) is investigated, concentrating on shock focusing and jet formation. Experimentally, a soap film technique is used to generate an ideal two-dimensional discontinuous gas cylinder with a clear surface, which can guarantee the observation of shock wave movements inside the cylinder. Different Atwood numbers are realized by different mixing ratios of SF_6 and air inside the cylinder. A high-speed schlieren system is adopted to capture the shock motions and jet morphology. Numerical simulations are also performed to provide more information. The results indicate that an inward jet is formed for low Atwood numbers, while an outward jet is generated for high Atwood numbers. Different Atwood numbers will lead to the differences in the relative velocities between the incident shock and the refraction shock, which ultimately results in the differences in shock competition near the downstream pole. The morphology and feature of the jet are closely associated with the position and intensity of shock focusing. The pressure and vorticity contours indicate that the jet formation should be attributed to the pressure pulsation caused by shock focusing, and the jet development is ascribed to the vorticity induction. Finally, a time ratio proposed in the previous work for determining the shock-focusing type is verified by experiments.

  8. The relation of electrode voltages to charge position in SLC arc and final focus beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fordham, C.

    1989-01-01

    The position of a charged particle beam can be measured with a Beam Position Monitor (BPM) by converting the voltages induced on its array of electrodes into a position offset from the array's center. Most of the BPMs in the Arcs and Final Focus of the SLC use four stripline electrodes arranged symmetrically around the beam; normalized voltage differences are calculated as the difference divided by the sum of voltages on opposite electrode pairs. The resulting number is multiplied by a conversion factor, denoted in this paper as S b , to give the offset (in millimeters) of the charge from the center of the BPM. Prior to installation in the beam line, the BPMs were calibrated with a charge pulse on a rod. Owing to geometric effects which will be discussed later, a different conversion factor had to be used for calibration. It will be denoted here by S r . This paper gives the results of calculations and measurements of S r and S b for Arc and Final Focus BPMs. This paper also describes the relevant physical properties of the several types of BPMs and calculations of the expected scale factors, the measurement methods used, and gives the results of measurements, which are compared with the theoretical expectations. 2 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  10. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.edu

    2009-07-07

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  11. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Preeclampsia: Focus on Gene–Gene Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. Luizon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, but only about half of patients on antihypertensive therapy achieve blood pressure control. Preeclampsia is defined as pregnancy-induced hypertension and proteinuria, and is associated with increased maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Similarly, a large number of patients with preeclampsia are non-responsive to antihypertensive therapy. Pharmacogenomics may help to guide the personalized treatment for non-responsive hypertensive patients. There is evidence for the association of genetic variants with variable response to the most commonly used antihypertensive drugs. However, further replication is needed to confirm these associations in different populations. The failure to replicate findings from single-locus association studies has prompted the search for novel statistical methods for data analysis, which are required to detect the complex effects from multiple genes to drug response phenotypes. Notably, gene–gene interaction analyses have been applied to pharmacogenetic studies, including antihypertensive drug response. In this perspective article, we present advances of considering the interactions among genetic polymorphisms of different candidate genes within pathways relevant to antihypertensive drug response, and we highlight recent findings related to gene–gene interactions on pharmacogenetics of hypertension and preeclampsia. Finally, we discuss the future directions that are needed to unravel additional genes and variants involved in the responsiveness to antihypertensive drugs.

  12. A Comparative Study on Java Technologies for Focus and Cursor Handling in Accessible Dynamic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitngernmadan, Prajaks; Miesenberger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    For an interactive application, supporting and guiding the user in fulfilling tasks is most important. The behavior of the application that will guide users through the procedures until they finish the task has to be designed intuitively and well guiding, especially if the users has only restricted or no access to the visual and spatial arrangement on the screen. Therefore, the focus/cursor management plays an important role for orientation and navigating through the interaction. In the frame of ongoing research on a software tool supporting blind people in more efficiently doing mathematical calculations, we researched how Java technologies support implementing an accessible Graphical User Interface (GUI) with an additional focus on usable accessibility in terms of guiding blind users through the process of solving mathematical calculations. We used Java Swing [1] and Eclipse SWT [2] APIs for creating a series of prototypes. We tested a) accessibility and usability of the prototypes for blind people when using screen reader software and refreshable Braille display and b) the implementation support to developers provided by both technologies. It turned out that Eclipse SWT API delivered best results under Windows operating system.

  13. Development of nanometer resolution C-Band radio frequency beam position monitors in the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaton, T.; Mazaheri, G.

    1998-08-01

    Using a 47 GeV electron beam, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) produces vertical spot sizes around 70 nm. These small beam sizes introduce an excellent opportunity to develop and test high resolution Radio Frequency Beam Position Monitors (RF-BPMs). These BPMs are designed to measure pulse to pulse beam motion (jitter) at a theoretical resolution of approximately 1 nm. The beam induces a TM 110 mode with an amplitude linearly proportional to its charge and displacement from the BPM's (cylindrical cavity) axis. The C-band (5,712 MHz) TM 110 signal is processed and converted into beam position for use by the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Presented are the experimental procedures, acquisition, and analysis of data demonstrating resolution of jitter near 25 nm. With the design of future e + e - linear colliders requiring spot sizes close to 3 nm, understanding and developing RF-BPMs will be essential in resolving and controlling jitter

  14. Final-state interactions and relativistic effects in the quasielastic (e,e') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, C.R.; Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545); Picklesimer, A.; Van Orden, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse response functions for the inclusive quasielastic (e,e') reaction are analyzed in detail. A microscopic theoretical framework for the many-body reaction provides a clear conceptual (nonrelativistic) basis for treating final-state interactions and goes far beyond simple plane-wave or Hermitean potential models. The many-body physics of inelastic final-state channels as described by optical and multiple scattering theories is properly included by incorporating a full complex optical potential. Explicit nonrelativistic and relativistic momentum-space calculations quantitatively demonstrate the importance of such a treatment of final-state interactions for both the transverse and longitudinal response. Nonrelativistic calculations are performed using final-state interactions based on phenomenology, local density models, and microscopic multiple scattering theory. Relativistic calculations span a similar range of models and employ Dirac bound-state wave functions. The theoretical extension to relativistic dynamics is of course not clear, but is done in obvious parallel to elastic proton scattering. Extensive calculations are performed for 40 Ca at momentum transfers of 410, 550, and 700 MeV/c. A number of interesting physical effects are observed, including significant relativistic suppressions (especially for R L ), large off-shell and virtual pair effects, enhancement of the tails of the response by the final-state interactions, and large qualitative and even shape distinctions between the predictions of the various models of the final-state interactions. None of the models is found to be able to simultaneously predict the data for both response functions. This strongly suggests that additional physical mechanisms are of qualitative importance in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering

  15. Gene-environment interaction in Major Depression: focus on experience-dependent biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eLopizzo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is a multifactorial and polygenic disorder, where multiple and partially overlapping sets of susceptibility genes interact each other and with the environment, predisposing individuals to the development of the illness. Thus, MDD results from a complex interplay of vulnerability genes and environmental factors that act cumulatively throughout individual's lifetime. Among these environmental factors, stressful life experiences, especially those occurring early in life, have been suggested to exert a crucial impact on brain development, leading to permanent functional changes that may contribute to life long risk for mental health outcomes. In this review we will discuss how genetic variants (polymorphisms, SNPs within genes operating in neurobiological systems that mediate stress response and synaptic plasticity, can impact, by themselves, the vulnerability risk for MDD; we will also consider how this MDD risk can be further modulated when gene X environment interaction is taken into account. Finally, we will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms, and in particular of DNA methylation and miRNAs expression changes, in mediating the effect of the stress on the vulnerability risk to develop MDD. Taken together, in this review we aim to underlie the role of genetic and epigenetic processes involved in stress and neuroplasticity related biological systems on development of MDD after exposure to early life stress, thereby building the basis for future research and clinical interventions.

  16. How decays and final-state interactions affect velocity correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieand, K.L.; Pratt, S.E.; Balantekin, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    We study rapidity correlations by calculating two-particle correlation functions and fractorial moments for a simple thermal model of ultrarelativistic-heavy-ion collisions. In this model correlations arise from decays of unstable hadrons and the final-state interactions of the measured particles. These correlations are shown to be similar but smaller than correlations due to phase separation. (orig.)

  17. Increased drop formation frequency via reduction of surfactant interactions in flow-focusing microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephides, Dimitris N; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-01-27

    Glass capillary based microfluidic devices are able to create extremely uniform droplets, when formed under the dripping regime, at low setup costs due to their ease of manufacture. However, as they are rarely parallelized, simple methods to increase droplet production from a single device are sought. Surfactants used to stabilize drops in such systems often limit the maximum flow rate that highly uniform drops can be produced due to the lowering interfacial tension causing jetting. In this paper we show that by simple design changes we can limit the interactions of surfactants and maximize uniform droplet production. Three flow-focused configurations are explored: a standard glass capillary device (consisting of a single round capillary inserted into a square capillary), a nozzle fed device, and a surfactant shielding device (both consisting of two round capillaries inserted into either end of a square capillary). In principle, the maximum productivity of uniform droplets is achieved if surfactants are not present. It was found that surfactants in the standard device greatly inhibit droplet production by means of interfacial tension lowering and tip-streaming phenomena. In the nozzle fed configuration, surfactant interactions were greatly limited, yielding flow rates comparable to, but lower than, a surfactant-free system. In the surfactant shielding configuration, flow rates were equal to that of a surfactant-free system and could make uniform droplets at rates an order of magnitude above the standard surfactant system.

  18. Development of nanometer resolution C-Band radio frequency beam position monitors in the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaton, T.; Mazaheri, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Shintake, T. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Using a 47 GeV electron beam, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) produces vertical spot sizes around 70 nm. These small beam sizes introduce an excellent opportunity to develop and test high resolution Radio Frequency Beam Position Monitors (RF-BPMs). These BPMs are designed to measure pulse to pulse beam motion (jitter) at a theoretical resolution of approximately 1 nm. The beam induces a TM{sub 110} mode with an amplitude linearly proportional to its charge and displacement from the BPM's (cylindrical cavity) axis. The C-band (5,712 MHz) TM{sub 110} signal is processed and converted into beam position for use by the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Presented are the experimental procedures, acquisition, and analysis of data demonstrating resolution of jitter near 25 nm. With the design of future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders requiring spot sizes close to 3 nm, understanding and developing RF-BPMs will be essential in resolving and controlling jitter.

  19. On the role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, Bastian; Niecknig, Franz; Schneider, Sebastian P.

    2012-01-01

    The study of Dalitz plots of heavy-meson decays to multi-hadron final states has received intensified interest by the possibility to gain access to precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of such Dalitz plots. We illustrate some of the theoretical tools, predominantly taken from dispersion theory, available for these and related purposes, and discuss the low-energy decays ω,φ→3π in some more detail.

  20. On the role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, Bastian, E-mail: kubis@hiskp.uni-bonn.de [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Niecknig, Franz; Schneider, Sebastian P. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    The study of Dalitz plots of heavy-meson decays to multi-hadron final states has received intensified interest by the possibility to gain access to precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of such Dalitz plots. We illustrate some of the theoretical tools, predominantly taken from dispersion theory, available for these and related purposes, and discuss the low-energy decays {omega},{phi}{yields}3{pi} in some more detail.

  1. On the role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Bastian; Niecknig, Franz; Schneider, Sebastian P.

    2012-04-01

    The study of Dalitz plots of heavy-meson decays to multi-hadron final states has received intensified interest by the possibility to gain access to precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of such Dalitz plots. We illustrate some of the theoretical tools, predominantly taken from dispersion theory, available for these and related purposes, and discuss the low-energy decays ω,ϕ→3π in some more detail.

  2. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the

  3. Designing Focused Chemical Libraries Enriched in Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors using Machine-Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynès, Christelle; Host, Hélène; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Laconde, Guillaume; Leroux, Florence; Mazars, Anne; Deprez, Benoit; Fahraeus, Robin; Villoutreix, Bruno O.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) may represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. So far, only a minute fraction of the estimated 650,000 PPIs that comprise the human interactome are known with a tiny number of complexes being drugged. Such intricate biological systems cannot be cost-efficiently tackled using conventional high-throughput screening methods. Rather, time has come for designing new strategies that will maximize the chance for hit identification through a rationalization of the PPI inhibitor chemical space and the design of PPI-focused compound libraries (global or target-specific). Here, we train machine-learning-based models, mainly decision trees, using a dataset of known PPI inhibitors and of regular drugs in order to determine a global physico-chemical profile for putative PPI inhibitors. This statistical analysis unravels two important molecular descriptors for PPI inhibitors characterizing specific molecular shapes and the presence of a privileged number of aromatic bonds. The best model has been transposed into a computer program, PPI-HitProfiler, that can output from any drug-like compound collection a focused chemical library enriched in putative PPI inhibitors. Our PPI inhibitor profiler is challenged on the experimental screening results of 11 different PPIs among which the p53/MDM2 interaction screened within our own CDithem platform, that in addition to the validation of our concept led to the identification of 4 novel p53/MDM2 inhibitors. Collectively, our tool shows a robust behavior on the 11 experimental datasets by correctly profiling 70% of the experimentally identified hits while removing 52% of the inactive compounds from the initial compound collections. We strongly believe that this new tool can be used as a global PPI inhibitor profiler prior to screening assays to reduce the size of the compound collections to be experimentally screened while keeping most of the true PPI inhibitors. PPI-HitProfiler is

  4. Positive animal welfare states and encouraging environment-focused and animal-to-animal interactive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Affective neuroscience, incorporating neurophysiology and neuropsychology, is providing increasing evidence that certain behaviours of animals may be interpreted in terms of what they are intending to achieve, i.e. their goals. It is also providing evidence that allows inferences to be made about the affective contents of some goal-directed behaviours. These neuroscience-supported inferences are aligned with recommendations based on prior behaviour-based investigations of animals' preferences, aversions and priorities, and these observations together support the cautious use of particular behaviours to infer what the accompanying affects may be. In this review, therefore, some attention is given to negative affects and their relationships to poor animal welfare, but the primary focus is the positive affects animals may experience when they successfully engage in rewarding goal-directed behaviours, encapsulated in the concept of positive affective engagement. The review draws together reports of environment-focused and animal-to-animal interactive behaviours observed in a range of species and under diverse circumstances in order to illustrate the likely widespread occurrence of the positive affects that may accompany them. Particular consideration is given to affects that are potentially associated with some aspects of exploration and food acquisition in stimulus rich or impoverished environments, and to those that may be associated with aspects of the affiliative interactions of bonding or bond affirmation, maternal care, play and sexual activity. It is concluded that animals given the opportunity to engage in such activities may experience some positive affects. However, the intensity of an animal's experience of particular positive affects is likely to range from zero to very high because the associated behaviours occur intermittently, variation may occur during different phases of a goal-directed behaviour, and other positive or negative affects experienced at

  5. Designing focused chemical libraries enriched in protein-protein interaction inhibitors using machine-learning methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Reynès

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs may represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. So far, only a minute fraction of the estimated 650,000 PPIs that comprise the human interactome are known with a tiny number of complexes being drugged. Such intricate biological systems cannot be cost-efficiently tackled using conventional high-throughput screening methods. Rather, time has come for designing new strategies that will maximize the chance for hit identification through a rationalization of the PPI inhibitor chemical space and the design of PPI-focused compound libraries (global or target-specific. Here, we train machine-learning-based models, mainly decision trees, using a dataset of known PPI inhibitors and of regular drugs in order to determine a global physico-chemical profile for putative PPI inhibitors. This statistical analysis unravels two important molecular descriptors for PPI inhibitors characterizing specific molecular shapes and the presence of a privileged number of aromatic bonds. The best model has been transposed into a computer program, PPI-HitProfiler, that can output from any drug-like compound collection a focused chemical library enriched in putative PPI inhibitors. Our PPI inhibitor profiler is challenged on the experimental screening results of 11 different PPIs among which the p53/MDM2 interaction screened within our own CDithem platform, that in addition to the validation of our concept led to the identification of 4 novel p53/MDM2 inhibitors. Collectively, our tool shows a robust behavior on the 11 experimental datasets by correctly profiling 70% of the experimentally identified hits while removing 52% of the inactive compounds from the initial compound collections. We strongly believe that this new tool can be used as a global PPI inhibitor profiler prior to screening assays to reduce the size of the compound collections to be experimentally screened while keeping most of the true PPI inhibitors. PPI

  6. Designing focused chemical libraries enriched in protein-protein interaction inhibitors using machine-learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynès, Christelle; Host, Hélène; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Laconde, Guillaume; Leroux, Florence; Mazars, Anne; Deprez, Benoit; Fahraeus, Robin; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Sperandio, Olivier

    2010-03-05

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) may represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. So far, only a minute fraction of the estimated 650,000 PPIs that comprise the human interactome are known with a tiny number of complexes being drugged. Such intricate biological systems cannot be cost-efficiently tackled using conventional high-throughput screening methods. Rather, time has come for designing new strategies that will maximize the chance for hit identification through a rationalization of the PPI inhibitor chemical space and the design of PPI-focused compound libraries (global or target-specific). Here, we train machine-learning-based models, mainly decision trees, using a dataset of known PPI inhibitors and of regular drugs in order to determine a global physico-chemical profile for putative PPI inhibitors. This statistical analysis unravels two important molecular descriptors for PPI inhibitors characterizing specific molecular shapes and the presence of a privileged number of aromatic bonds. The best model has been transposed into a computer program, PPI-HitProfiler, that can output from any drug-like compound collection a focused chemical library enriched in putative PPI inhibitors. Our PPI inhibitor profiler is challenged on the experimental screening results of 11 different PPIs among which the p53/MDM2 interaction screened within our own CDithem platform, that in addition to the validation of our concept led to the identification of 4 novel p53/MDM2 inhibitors. Collectively, our tool shows a robust behavior on the 11 experimental datasets by correctly profiling 70% of the experimentally identified hits while removing 52% of the inactive compounds from the initial compound collections. We strongly believe that this new tool can be used as a global PPI inhibitor profiler prior to screening assays to reduce the size of the compound collections to be experimentally screened while keeping most of the true PPI inhibitors. PPI-HitProfiler is

  7. Implementation and validation of the linear collider final focus prototype: ATF2 at KEK (Japan); Implementation et validation de la focalisation finale du collisionneur lineaire: ATF2 at KEK (Japan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, Y.

    2010-06-15

    The two linear collider projects (ILC and CLIC) require beam delivery systems with the same local chromaticity correction scheme in the final focus. ATF2 at KEK (Japan), an implementation of this scheme scaled down in energy, uses the beam extracted from ATF, which is one of the most successful damping rings in the world. The ATF2 goals are to prove the feasibility and the stability of the linear collider final focus system and to define and test the experimental correction procedures. The nominal beam sizes at the interaction point are 3 {mu}m horizontally and 37 nm vertically. The work in this thesis was started before the commissioning and covered its first year at KEK. At the beginning, we observed that the stripline BPMs were not working properly so we investigated their behavior in detail. The problem was characterized and later solved in 2010 by upgrading the electronics. We then developed an efficient procedure to check the modeling of the beam line, comparing measurements of transfer matrices to model predictions calculated on line. After obtaining a good agreement, we were able to successfully test the trajectory correction algorithm which had been developed, reducing the difference between BPM measurements and the target values down to 0.5 mm horizontally and 0.2 mm vertically. We also successfully developed an algorithm to reconstruct pulse to pulse beam trajectory fluctuations with sub-micron precision. This reconstruction also gave a precise determination of the energy fluctuation, allowing a global fit of the dispersion function along the beam line with a precision of a few mm. A simple and robust IP beam size tuning method using sextupoles displacements was also studied in simulation, whose performance indicates that, given some assumptions on the error level of the beam, convergence within 20% of the nominal beam size should be possible in 8 hours with a 80% probability. (author)

  8. Final State Interactions and Polarization Observables in the Reaction pp → pKΛ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high quality hyperon beams, final state interactions in hyperon production reactions are a compelling tool to study hyperon-nucleon interactions. The COSY-TOF experiment has recently been upgraded in order to reconstruct the pK+Λ final state with sufficient precision to determine the spin triplet pΛ scattering length with a polarized proton beam. We find an unexpected behavior of the K+ analyzing power which prevents the extraction method to be used with the available statistics. A theoretical explanation is pending. Furthermore, the polarized beam together with the self analyzing decay of the Λ allows us to determine the Λ depolarization. This is especially sensitive to K+ and π exchange in the production mechanism. Our finding verifies, to a large extent, the result from DISTO [2] that has so far been the only measurement close to the production threshold.

  9. Nurse-family interaction in Malaysian palliative care settings: a focused literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Pathma; O Connor, Margaret; Barnett, Tony; Lee, Susan; Peters, Louise

    2011-10-01

    Palliative care in Malaysia developed in the 1990s to improve the quality of life of people with advanced cancer. Like many other countries, Malaysia faces its own challenges in providing palliative care to patients and their families. In Malaysian culture, families play a significant part in providing care to the dying. Connecting with families in patient care is therefore important. This paper reports a focused literature review evaluating studies on the care of the families of terminally ill people in palliative care environments in Malaysia. The search engines CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar were searched for literature published from January 2000 to April 2010 relating to family care in palliative care environments. Due to a paucity of research on family care in Malaysia, the search was broadened to include relevant studies on family care internationally. Four themes were identified: delivering palliative care in Malaysia, communicating with families, crossing cultural boundaries, and the caring experience of nurses. The studies indicate the importance of the nurse-family interaction in providing optimal and culturally appropriate palliative care. This paper emphasizes the need for research into the nurse's role in family care and for developing a theory appropriate to the Malaysian culture and other countries with cultural diversity.

  10. Comparative Study of the Tuning Performances of the Nominal and Long L* CLIC Final Focus System at √s = 380 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, F; Marin, E; Tomás, R

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of static imperfections for emittance preservation is one of the most important and challenging tasks faced by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) beam delivery system. A simulation campaign has been performed to recover the nominal luminosity by means of different alignment procedures. The state of the art of the tuning studies is drawn up. Comparative studies of the tuning performances and a tuning-based final focus system design optimization for two L options are presented. The effectiveness of the tuning techniques applied to these different lattices will be decisive for the final layout of the CLIC final focus system at √s = 380 GeV.

  11. Optimal conditions for the generation of the third harmonic of focused radiation in a self-interaction regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, I A; Usmanov, T

    1998-01-01

    A method developed for the analysis of the interaction of wave beams in a self-interaction regime is used to determine the changes in the optimal conditions for third-harmonic generation with changes in the degree of focusing of the fundamental-frequency radiation in isotropic media. Conditions under which a redistribution of the intensities and phases of the interacting wave beams reduces the efficiency of third-harmonic generation are identified. It is shown that, under strong focusing conditions, there may be additional extrema in the dependence of the intensity of the harmonic on the density of the medium. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. Thomas [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  13. LED tests TTO 2010-2011. Focus on energy. Final report; LED Proeven TTO 2010-2011. Focus op energie. Eindverslag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peekstok, T.; Duyvesteijn, R.; Persoon, S.; Sanders, J.; De Jong, A. [Tuinbouw Techniek Ontwikkeling TTO, Honselersdijk (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    An overview is given of research results of the application of LED in the horticulture, focusing on high-growing vegetable crops. In this report LED illuminance research for tomatoes is outlined. The project has been carried out from October 2010 to May 2011 in the demonstration nursery Westland. Also, briefly attention is paid to LED lighting tests, performed by TTO (Horticulture Technology Development) in 2008 and 2009 [Dutch] Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de onderzoeksresultaten in de toepassing van LED belichting in de glastuinbouw, met nadruk op hoogopgaande groentegewassen. In dit verslag wordt het onderzoek met LED belichting in tomaat van telersvereniging 'Tuinbouw Techniek Ontwikkeling' (TTO) uiteengezet. Dit project heeft plaatsgevonden vanaf oktober 2010 tot mei 2011 in de Demokwekerij Westland. Hiernaast worden de proeven met LED belichting, welke uitgevoerd zijn door TTO in 2008 en 2009, kort samengevat.

  14. Students' and teachers' focus of attention in classroom interaction — subtle sources for the reproduction of social disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Anna-Marietha; Prediger, Susanne; Quasthoff, Uta; Heller, Vivien

    2018-01-01

    Mathematics classroom interaction has often been described as an important context for involving all students. However, this article shows that teacher-student-interaction is still not really in the focus of teachers' attention. Based on classroom video studies, some authors hypothesize that the implicitness of establishing norms and practices is, among others, an obstacle for students with low socio-economic status. The article intends to put this hypothesis into perspective by investigating teachers' and students' focus of attention on classroom interaction in video-stimulated group discussions (six discussions with 5-6 students, four discussions with 5-9 teachers). The data analysis used inductive procedures of category development, frequency analysis, and deeper qualitative analysis of the transcripts. For students' focus of attention, differential patterns could be extrapolated: Whereas students of high socio-economic status seem to be more attentive to teacher's contextual expectations, the students of low socio-economic status seem to be more focused on general norms without taking into account contextual expectations. For the teachers, the analysis shows that interactive mechanisms of teacher-student exchanges in classrooms are usually not in the teachers' focus of attention. Additionally, the teachers address, but rarely problematize the implicitness by which norms and practices are established. Together with the differential findings on students' attention, these findings are discussed with respect to equity concerns and consequences for professional development of teachers.

  15. A final state interaction model for K and eta decay into three pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, A.G.

    1973-07-01

    The Khuri-Treiman model is adapted in a relativistic formalism with the electromagnetic mass differences of the pions in the final state taken into account to produce new predictions for the relative decay rates and the slope parameters of the four reactions K→3x and the two reactions eta→3x. The pion-pion interaction is investigated in terms of the N/D method and as well as the normal pure pole approximations for the N functions. The Khuri-Treiman equations are solved for the best solutions from both the pure pole and the mixed pole and cut models. (author)

  16. Λ flow in heavy-ion collisions: The role of final-state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.Q.; Ko, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Lambda flow in Ni+Ni collisions at SIS energies is studied in the relativistic transport model (RVUU 1.0). It is found that for primordial lambdas the flow is considerably weaker than proton flow. The inclusion of final-state interactions, especially the propagation of lambdas in the mean-field potential, brings the lambda flow close to that of protons. An accurate determination of the lambda flow in heavy-ion experiments is shown to be very useful for studying lambda properties in dense matter. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Perceptual and Cognitive Load Interact to Control the Spatial Focus of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, Karina J.; Caparos, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Caparos and Linnell (2009, 2010) used a variable-separation flanker paradigm to show that (a) when cognitive load is low, increasing perceptual load causes spatial attention to focus and (b) when perceptual load is high, decreasing cognitive load causes spatial attention to focus. Here, we tested whether the effects of perceptual and cognitive…

  18. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY FOCUSED ON MOVEMENTS AND INTERACTIONS IN THE WORK ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Bae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how the interior layout of the workspace can affect employees’ number of steps and face-to-face interactions. Eighteen participants were recruited for the study and the data was collected over ten business days. The participants completed self-report forms to report the number of steps and interactions they had daily. A positive relationship was found between distance and the number of steps and interactions. A negative correlation was found between depth, a construct of the space syntax theory, and the number of steps and interactions. The findings further examined whether the results support a social ecological model with the relationships between distance, depth, the number of steps and interaction, and moderate variables (personal, environmental, and organizational factors. Findings indicated that the number of steps, as a function of human behavior, was affected by distance and depth (as environmental factors, age and years of working (as personal factors, and work hours (as an organizational factor.

  19. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Parametric Receiving Arrays, Focused Finite Amplitude Sound, & Noncollinear Tone-Noise Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    fields (see also Chapter 4 of Ref. 22). Like our investigation, theirs is based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov ( KZK ) equa- tion [23,24...25,26], also based on the KZK e(iualiou, is limited to weakly nonlinear systems. However, the practical case of a focused circular source with gain of...iment. The demonstrated abihty of the KZK equation to accurately model focused sound fields from reahstic sources [i.e., having abrupt edges and

  20. Interactive Multimedia Software on Fundamental Particles and Forces. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack Sculley

    1999-01-01

    Research in the SBIR Phase 2 grant number 95 ER 81944 centered on creating interactive multimedia software for teaching basic concepts in particle physics on fundamental particles and forces. The work was undertaken from February 1997 through July 1998. Overall the project has produced some very encouraging results in terms of product development, interest from the general public and interest from potential Phase 3 funders. Although the original Phase 3 publisher, McGraw Hill Home Interactive, was dissolved by its parent company, and other changes in the CD-ROM industry forced them to change their focus from CD-ROM to the Internet, there has been substantial interest from software publishers and online content providers in the content developed in the course of the Phase 2 research. Results are summarized

  1. Experimental studies of the interaction between people and virtual humans with a focus on social anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, X.

    2010-01-01

    Psychotherapy has been one of the major applications of Virtual Reality technology; examples include fear of flying, heights, spiders, and post‐traumatic stress disorder. Virtual reality has been shown to be useful, in the context of exposure therapy for the treatment of social anxiety, such as fear of public speaking, where the clients learn how to conquer their anxiety through interactions with Virtual Characters (avatars). This thesis is concerned with the interaction between human p...

  2. Focusing on Culture-Related Episodes in a Teletandem Interaction between a Brazilian and an American Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, Maisa A.; Funo, Ludmila B. A.; Telles, João A.

    2016-01-01

    Teletandem is a telecollaborative learning context that involves pairs of native (or competent) speakers of different languages interacting through voice, text and webcam image. Using Skype, each participant plays the role of learner for half an hour, speaking and practising the language of his/her partner. This paper focuses on a teletandem…

  3. Interaction of dense nitrogen plasma with SS304 surface using APF plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrashteh, M.; Habibi, M.; Heydari, E.

    2012-04-01

    The nitridation of SS304 surfaces is obtained by irradiating nitrogen ions from Amirkabir plasma focus device, which use multiple focus deposition shots at optimum distance 10 cm from the anode. The Vickers Micro-Hardness values are improved more than twice for the nitrided samples comparing to the nonnitrided ones. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is carried out in order to explore the phase changes in the near surface structure of the metals. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) indicate changes in surface morphology which are the emergence of smooth and uniform film on the surface of the nitrided metals.

  4. Species interactions in the western Baltic Sea: With focus on the ecological role of whiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Stine Dalmann

    , which potentially prey on and compete for food with whiting. Here, the growth dynamics and feeding ecology of whiting in the western Baltic Sea is investigated and discussed in an ecosystem context. Furthermore, the diet of the harbour porpoise is examined and the interactions between whiting, cod......, implementation of the models in strategic management advice for commercially important fish stocks and protected marine mammals is not common practice. This is due to the lack of sufficient information about species interactions including knowledge about the diet, food intake and growth dynamics. This thesis...

  5. The Use of Flexible, Interactive, Situation-Focused Software for the E-Learning of Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Ralph Edward

    This paper discusses the classroom, home, and distance use of new, flexible, interactive, application-oriented software known as Active Learning Suite. The actual use of the software, not just a controlled experiment, is reported on. Designed for the e-learning of university mathematics, the program was developed by a joint U.S.-Russia team and…

  6. Proposing an Evaluation Framework for Interventions: Focusing on Students' Behaviours in Interactive Science Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauan, Nils Petter; DeWitt, Jennifer; Kolstø, Stein Dankert

    2017-01-01

    Materials designed for self-guided experiences such as worksheets and digital applications are widely used as tools to enable interactive science exhibitions to support students' progress towards conceptual understanding. However, there is a need to find expedient ways to evaluate the quality of educational experiences resulting from the use of…

  7. High quality interaction in the classroom: a focus for professional learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, R.; de Blauw, A.

    2008-01-01

    Oral language education is important throughout primary school for the development of language and learning. Yet in today's educational practice this core principle is neglected and classroom interactions lack quality. Teachers know that supporting students to participate actively in learning is

  8. A multi agent system framework for value focused interactions between buildings and electrical grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aduda, K.O.; Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical smart grid connection requires also services from the buildings. The performance demanded during the interactions between buildings and smart electrical grids are multifaceted, involve attainment of various objectives which are sometimes in conflict with each other and require dynamic

  9. Positive Social Interactions in a Lifespan Perspective with a Focus on Opioidergic and Oxytocinergic Systems: Implications for Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnello, Valentina; Petrocchi, Nicola; Farinelli, Marina; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has emerged in the beneficial effects of positive social interactions on health. The present work aims to review animal and human studies linking social interactions and health throughout the lifespan, with a focus on current knowledge of the possible mediating role of opioids and oxytocin. During the prenatal period, a positive social environment contributes to regulating maternal stress response and protecting the fetus from exposure to maternal active glucocorticoids. Throughout development, positive social contact with the caregiver acts as a “hidden regulator” and promotes infant neuroaffective development. Postnatal social neuroprotection interventions involving caregiver–infant physical contact seem to be crucial for rescuing preterm infants at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Attachment figures and friendships in adulthood continue to have a protective role for health and brain functioning, counteracting brain aging. In humans, implementation of meditative practices that promote compassionate motivation and prosocial behavior appears beneficial for health in adolescents and adults. Human and animal studies suggest the oxytocinergic and opioidergic systems are important mediators of the effects of social interactions. However, most of the studies focus on a specific phase of life (i.e., adulthood). Future studies should focus on the role of opioids and oxytocin in positive social interactions adopting a lifespan perspective. PMID:27538784

  10. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  11. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; (c) Development of elliptic beam theory; and (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX)

  12. Effects of final-state interaction and screening on strange and heavy quark production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India)

    1996-10-01

    Final-state interaction and screening have a great influence on {ital q{anti q}} production cross sections, which are important quantities in many problems in quark-gluon plasma physics. They lead to an enhancement of the cross section for a {ital q{anti q}} color-singlet state and a suppression for a color-octet state. The effects are large near the production threshold. The presence of screening gives rise to resonances for {ital q{anti q}} production just above the threshold at specific plasma temperatures. These resonances, especially {ital c{anti c}} and {ital b{anti b}} resonances, may be utilized to search for the quark-gluon plasma by studying the temperature dependence of heavy-quark pair production just above the threshold.

  13. Studies related to plasma-wall interactions in ITER - Final scientific report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.

    2009-09-01

    In this final scientific report made by the University of Basel, Switzerland, on-going work on plasma-wall interactions in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER is reported on. The growing interest concerning the use of rhodium (Rh) as a material for the first mirrors in ITER and the necessity of using it as a thin film deposited on a polished substrate has necessitated the development of a robust deposition technique for the preparation of high-reflectivity mirrors. The realisation and tests of high-quality rhodium coated mirrors using magnetron sputtering is reported on. Also, the exposure of the rhodium and molybdenum coated mirrors in the Tokamak fusion reactor system is reported on and the role of carbon and tungsten impurities in the optical degradation of metallic mirrors is looked at. Optical measurements made at the Joint European Torus (JET) are also reported on

  14. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1979-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel, and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress, and reactive fission products during reactor service. This is the final report for PHASE 1 of this program. Support tests have shown that the barrier fuel resists PCI far better than does the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Power ramp tests thus far have shown good PCI resistance for Cu-barrier fuel at burnup > 12 MWd/kg-U and for Zr-liner fuel > 16 MWd/kg-U. The program calls for continued testing to still higher burnup levels in PHASE 2

  15. Initial and Final State Interaction Effects in Small-x Quark Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2010-08-30

    We study the initial and final state interaction effects in the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the small-x saturation region. In particular, we discuss the quark distributions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan lepton pair production and dijet-correlation processes in pA collisions. We calculate the quark distributions in the scalar-QED model and then extend to the color glass condensate formalism in QCD. The quark distributions are found universal between the DIS and Drell-Yan processes. On the other hand, the quark distribution from the qq'-->qq' channel contribution to the dijet-correlation process is not universal. However, we find that it can be related to the quark distribution in DIS process by a convolution with the normalized unintegrated gluon distribution in the CGC formalism in the large Nc limit.

  16. A treatment of the final-state interaction for photonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eden, J.A.; Thompson, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    The final state interaction is considered for the Gottfried factorized cross section. Numerical examples are presented for the 40 Ca(γ,pn) and 40 Ca(γ,n) reactions. The surface refraction process, allowing photonucleons to refract as they emerge from the nuclear potential well, cannot change the magnitude of the total cross section, but may redistribute the strength in the angular dependence of the differential cross section. The absorption process accounts for the loss of photonucleons as a result of inelastic collisions while escaping the nucleus. The surface refraction correction is calculated in a plane-wave Born approximation and the absorption correction is presented as a simple development of earlier phenomenological treatments. 12 refs., 7 figs

  17. Health Care Professionals' Understandings of Cross-Cultural Interaction in End-of-Life Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milberg, Anna; Torres, Sandra; Ågård, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals' understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care. Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-of-life care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, 'unusual' emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients' families would be 'different' and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting "the unknown". In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients. The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as "the unknown" since they anticipate a variety of challenges

  18. Health Care Professionals’ Understandings of Cross-Cultural Interaction in End-of-Life Care: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sandra; Ågård, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals’ understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care. Methods Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-of-life care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, ‘unusual’ emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients’ families would be ‘different’ and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting “the unknown”. In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients. Conclusions The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as

  19. Health Care Professionals' Understandings of Cross-Cultural Interaction in End-of-Life Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milberg

    Full Text Available The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals' understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care.Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-of-life care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, 'unusual' emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients' families would be 'different' and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting "the unknown". In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients.The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as "the unknown" since they anticipate a variety

  20. Methylxanthines and drug dependence: a focus on interactions with substances of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Micaela; Simola, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This chapter examines the psychostimulant actions of methylxanthines, with a focus on the consequences of their excessive use. Consumption of methylxanthines is pervasive and their use is often associated with that of substances known to produce dependence and to have abuse potential. Therefore, the consequences of this combined use are taken into consideration in order to evaluate whether, and to what extent, methylxanthines could influence dependence on or abuse of other centrally active substances, leading to either amplification or attenuation of their effects. Since the methylxanthine that mostly influences mental processes and readily induces psychostimulation is caffeine, this review mainly focuses on caffeine as a prototype of methylxanthine-produced dependence, examining, at the same time, the risks related to caffeine use.

  1. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chernyshova, M.; Gribkov, V. A.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E.; Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Maslyaev, S. A.; Bondarenko, G.G.; Vilémová, Monika; Matějíček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 113, December (2016), s. 109-118 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Radiation damageability * Materials tests * Plasma focus * Plasma streams * Ion beams * Laser interferometrya Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379616306858

  2. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is ...

  3. Bragging on Facebook: The Interaction of Content Source and Focus in Online Impression Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham G; Ravenscroft, Kirsty

    2017-01-01

    Warranting Theory proposes that third-party testimonials are more influential in online impression formation than target-authored statements. Individuals posting content on social media accurately convey their offline personality while endeavoring to present themselves in a positive light. In doing so, they may misjudge the psychological distance of the majority of viewers, who could view this positive self-presentation as bragging and form resultant negative impressions. In this study, we asked 136 participants to view the Facebook timelines of four female targets. Timeline content varied by source (owner- vs. friend-authored) and focus (generally positive vs. personally positive). Participants were tasked with forming impressions of targets and rating them based on attractiveness, confidence, modesty, and popularity. We found that source and focus played distinct roles in impression formation. More positive impressions were formed when owner-authored content was general, and when friend-authored content was personal. This highlights the role played by content focus in impression formation, and the potentially damaging effect of perceived bragging. These results are discussed in relation to the application of the Warranting Theory of impression formation online, and discrepancies between these results and those from related articles are examined.

  4. Focusing the EarthScope for a broader audience: Advancing geoscience education with interactive kiosks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Solis, T.

    2012-12-01

    A primary objective of the EarthScope Education and Outreach program is to transform technical science into teachable products for a technologically thriving generation. One of the most challenging milestones of scientific research, however, is often the translation of a technical result into a clear teachable moment that is accessible to a broader audience. As 4D multimedia now dominate most aspects of our social environment, science "teaching" now also requires intervention of visualization technology and animation to portray research results in an inviting and stimulating manner. Following the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)'s lead in developing interactive Earth science kiosk multimedia (bundled in a free product called Active Earth), we have made a major effort to construct and install customized EarthScope-themed touch screen kiosks in local communities. These kiosks are helping to educate a broader audience about EarthScope's unique instrumentation and observations using interactive animations, games, and virtual field trips. We are also developing new kiosk content that reflect career stories showcasing the personal journeys of EarthScope scientists. To truly bring the interactive aspect of our EarthScope kiosk media into the classroom, we have collaborated with local teachers to develop a one-page EarthScope TerraMap activity worksheet that guides students through kiosk content. These activities are shaping a new pathway for how teachers teach and students learn about planet Earth and its fantastic EarthScope - one click (and touch) at a time.

  5. Final-state interaction in semi-inclusive DIS off nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ciofi degli Atti, C

    2003-01-01

    The Final-State Interaction (FSI) in Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of leptons off a nucleus A, due to the propagation of the struck nucleon debris and its hadronization in the nuclear environment is considered. The effective cross-section of such a partonic system with the nucleons of the medium and its time dependence are estimated, for different values of the Bjorken scaling variable, on the basis of a model which takes into account both the production of hadrons due to the breaking of the color string, which is formed after a quark is knocked out off a bound nucleon, as well as the production of hadrons originating from gluon radiation. It is shown that the interaction, the evolution and the hadronization of the partonic system in the nuclear environment can be thoroughly investigated by a new type of semi-inclusive process, denoted A(e,e'(A-1))X, in which the scattered lepton is detected in coincidence with a heavy nuclear fragment, namely a nucleus (A-1) in low energy and momentum states. As a matter o...

  6. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research: A FOCUS ON TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE RESEARCH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism's overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This

  7. Extracellular vesicles in Alzheimer's disease: friends or foes? Focus on aβ-vesicle interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pooja; Benussi, Luisa; Furlan, Roberto; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-03-03

    The intercellular transfer of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins has received increasing attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among other transfer modes, Aβ and tau dissemination has been suggested to occur through release of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs), which may facilitate delivery of pathogenic proteins over large distances. Recent evidence indicates that EVs carry on their surface, specific molecules which bind to extracellular Aβ, opening the possibility that EVs may also influence Aβ assembly and synaptotoxicity. In this review we focus on studies which investigated the impact of EVs in Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration and showed either detrimental or protective role for EVs in the pathology.

  8. Review--Interactions between diatoms and stainless steel: focus on biofouling and biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoulsi, J; Cooksey, K E; Dupres, V

    2011-11-01

    There is a considerable body of information regarding bacterially enhanced corrosion, however, this review focuses on diatoms (unicellular algae) whose contribution to biocorrosion is less well studied. The reasons why diatoms have been neglected in studies of biocorrosion in natural waters are discussed and the question whether diatoms should be considered as inert with respect of electrochemical processes is considered. A particular focus is given to the case of stainless steels (SS), which are widely used in variety of applications in natural waters. Basic information on the cell biology of diatoms is included in the review, particularly with respect to their ability to 'sense' and adhere to surfaces. Investigations at the nanoscale are reviewed as these studies provide information about the behavior of cells at interfaces. Recent advances include the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), although only a few studies have been applied to diatoms. Regarding the electrochemical behavior of SS, the mechanisms by which diatoms influence the potential ennoblement process is discussed. Such studies reveal the association of diatoms, in addition to bacteria, with biocorrosion processes.

  9. Amphibian chytridiomycosis: a review with focus on fungus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooij, Pascale; Martel, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-11-25

    Amphibian declines and extinctions are emblematic for the current sixth mass extinction event. Infectious drivers of these declines include the recently emerged fungal pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Chytridiomycota). The skin disease caused by these fungi is named chytridiomycosis and affects the vital function of amphibian skin. Not all amphibians respond equally to infection and host responses might range from resistant, over tolerant to susceptible. The clinical outcome of infection is highly dependent on the amphibian host, the fungal virulence and environmental determinants. B. dendrobatidis infects the skin of a large range of anurans, urodeles and caecilians, whereas to date the host range of B. salamandrivorans seems limited to urodeles. So far, the epidemic of B. dendrobatidis is mainly limited to Australian, neotropical, South European and West American amphibians, while for B. salamandrivorans it is limited to European salamanders. Other striking differences between both fungi include gross pathology and thermal preferences. With this review we aim to provide the reader with a state-of-the art of host-pathogen interactions for both fungi, in which new data pertaining to the interaction of B. dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans with the host's skin are integrated. Furthermore, we pinpoint areas in which more detailed studies are necessary or which have not received the attention they merit.

  10. The influence of final state interaction on two-particle correlations in multiple production of particles and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of pair correlations of interacting particles moving with nearby velocities is analysed. A general formalism of the two-particle space-time density matrix, taking into account the space-time coherence of the production process, is developed. The influence of strong final state interaction on two-particle correlations in the case of the production of a system resonance + particle is investigated in detail. It is shown that in the limit of small distances between the resonance and particle production points the effect of final state interaction is enhanced due to logarithmic singularity of the triangle diagram. Numerical estimates indicate that, in this limit, the effect of strong final state interaction becomes important even for two-pion correlations. (author)

  11. Final report: Mapping Interactions in Hybrid Systems with Active Scanning Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezovsky, Jesse [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This project aimed to study and map interactions between components of hybrid nanodevices using a novel scanning probe approach. To enable this work, we initially constructed a flexible experimental apparatus allowing for simultaneous scanning probe and confocal optical microscopy measurements. This setup was first used for all-optical measurements of nanostructures, with the focus then shifting to hybrid devices in which single coherent electron spins are coupled to micron-scale ferromagnetic elements, which may prove useful for addressing single spins, enhanced sensing, or spin-wave-mediated coupling of spins for quantum information applications. A significant breakthrough was the realization that it is not necessary to fabricate a magnetic structure on a scanning probe – instead a ferromagnetic vortex core can act as an integrated, solid state, scanning probe. The core of the vortex produces a very strong, localized fringe field which can be used analogously to an MFM tip. Unlike a traditional MFM tip, however, the vortex core is scanned within an integrated device (eliminating drift), and can be moved on vastly faster timescales. This approach allows the detailed investigation of interactions between single spins and complex driven ferromagnetic dynamics.

  12. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO 2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures

  13. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-07-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating ( SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the “classical” spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive “tip detectors” of electronically excited nanostructures.

  14. Characterization of Final State Interaction Strength in Plastic Scintillator by Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberly, Brandon M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is increasingly important as neutrino oscillation measurements transition into the systematics-limited era. In addition to modifying the initial interaction, the nuclear medium can scatter and absorb the interaction by-products through final state interactions, changing the types and kinematic distributions of particles seen by the detector. Recent neutrino pion production data from MiniBooNE is inconsistent with the final state interaction strength predicted by models and theoretical calculations, and some models fit best to the MiniBooNE data only after removing final state interactions entirely. This thesis presents a measurement of dσ/dTπ and dσ/dθπ for muon-neutrino charged current charged pion production in the MINER A scintillator tracker. MINER A is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The analysis is limited to neutrino energies between 1.5-10 GeV. Dependence on invariant hadronic mass W is studied through two versions of the analysis that impose the limits W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV. The lower limit on W increases compatibility with the MiniBooNE pion data. The shapes of the differential cross sections, which depend strongly on the nature of final state interactions, are compared to Monte Carlo and theoretical predictions. It is shown that the measurements presented in this thesis favor models that contain final state interactions. Additionally, a variety of neutrino-nucleus interaction models are shown to successfully reproduce the thesis measurements, while simultaneously failing to describe the shape of the MiniBooNE data.

  15. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  16. Interactive effects of the affect quality and directional focus of mental imagery on pain analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, A L; Dale, J A; DeGood, D E

    2001-06-01

    College students (25 men and 25 women) were randomly assigned (within sex) to each of the 4 factorial groups, based on manipulation of affect quality (positive vs. negative) and directional focus (internal vs. external) of mental imagery, and to a control group receiving no manipulation. Both imagery variables had a significant impact on pain tolerance and ratings during a cold-pressor test with positive affect and external imagery producing greater analgesia than their counterpart conditions. Positive affect imagery combined with external imagery resulted in the lowest reported pain amongst the groups. However, self-reported mood descriptors did not consistently parallel the pain tolerance and rating data. Likewise, although heart rate and skin potential responses increased during the cold pressor for the group as a whole, the only significant difference amongst the experimental groups was the relatively higher skin potential reactivity of the positive affect-external imagery group--possibly reflecting greater task engagement for this group. Seemingly, imagery in this situation operates primarily via cognitive, rather than via physiological mediators of the pain experience.

  17. Interactions of diffuse and focused allogenic recharge in an eogenetic karst aquifer (Florida, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Abigail L.; Screaton, Elizabeth J.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Bailly-Comte, Vincent

    2012-06-01

    The karstic upper Floridan aquifer in north-central Florida (USA) is recharged by both diffuse and allogenic recharge. To understand how recharged water moves within the aquifer, water levels and specific conductivities were monitored and slug tests were conducted in wells installed in the aquifer surrounding the Santa Fe River Sink and Rise. Results indicate that diffuse recharge does not mix rapidly within the aquifer but instead flows horizontally. Stratification may be aided by the high matrix porosity of the eogenetic karst aquifer. Purging wells for sample collection perturbed conductivity for several days, reflecting mixing of the stratified water and rendering collection of representative samples difficult. Interpretive numerical simulations suggest that diffuse recharge impacts the intrusion of allogenic water from the conduit by increasing hydraulic head in the surrounding aquifer and thereby reducing influx to the aquifer from the conduit. In turn, the increase of head within the conduits affects flow paths of diffuse recharge by moving newly recharged water vertically as the water table rises and falls. This movement may result in a broad vertical zone of dissolution at the water table above the conduit system, with thinner and more focused water-table dissolution at greater distance from the conduit.

  18. Situational analysis of the Canadian renewable energy sector with a focus on human resource issues : 2007 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Several factors are steering world energy supplies away from traditional fossil fuel sources and toward renewable energy technologies. As a result, renewable energy markets are experiencing significant growth, and experts predict this trend will continue. As of 2004, 2 per cent of Canada's total electricity generation capacity was provided from emerging renewable technologies, excluding large scale hydro which represents 56 per cent of Canada's electricity generation capacity. The development of renewable energy sources in Canada is expected to contribute to Canada's economic prosperity by providing diversified energy supply to industrial buyers, generating direct economic advantages and employment to local communities, as well as direct benefits such as improved air quality and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Human Resources and Social Development Canada contracted the Delphi Group to provide information on the labour market for the renewable energy sector in Canada in order to identify the steps needed to help the sector in developing a human resource strategy. This report provided an overview of key characteristics defining the renewable energy subsectors in Canada along with anticipated changes in the near term. The study focused on the following technologies: wind turbines; photovoltaics; active solar thermal; geoexchange/earth energy; small scale hydropower; bioenergy; and, ocean energy. A reliable estimate of the labour demands in the subsectors over the next 5 to 10 year was presented along with a review of the human resource issues affecting the sector. This project was guided by an advisory committee of members from 4 sector councils; 3 government agencies including Environment Canada, Industry Canada and Natural Resources Canada; 4 industry associations representing bioenergy, geothermal energy, solar energy and wind energy; and other organizations including the Association of Canadian Community Colleges, the Canadian Council of Technicians and

  19. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Prostanoids: Focus on the Interactions between Electrophile Signaling and Resolution of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Díez-Dacal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids are products of cyclooxygenase biosynthetic pathways and constitute a family of lipidic mediators of widely diverse structures and biological actions. Besides their known proinflammatory role, numerous works have revealed the anti-inflammatory effects of various prostanoids and established their role in the resolution of inflammation. Among these, prostaglandins with cyclopentenone structure (cyPG are electrophilic lipids that may act through various mechanisms, including the activation of nuclear and membrane receptors and, importantly, direct addition to protein cysteine residues and modification of protein function. Due to their ability to influence cysteine modification–mediated signaling, cyPG may play a critical role in the interplay between redox and inflammatory signaling pathways. Moreover, cellular redox status modulates cyPG addition to proteins; thus, a reciprocal regulation exists between these two factors. After initial controversy, it is becoming clear that endogenous cyPG are generated at concentrations sufficient to promote inflammatory resolution. As for other prostanoids, cyPG effects are highly dependent on context factors and they may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory actions in a cell type–dependent manner, or even biphasic or dual actions in a given cell type or tissue. In light of the growing number of cyPG protein targets identified, cyPG resemble other pleiotropic mediators acting through protein modification. However, their complex structure results in an inter- and intramolecular selectivity of the residues being modified, thus opening the way for structure-activity and drug discovery studies. Detailed characterization of cyPG interactions with cellular proteins will help us to understand their mechanism of action fully and establish their therapeutic potential in inflammation.

  1. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  2. Final State Interaction on non Mesonic Hyperon Weak Decay Spectra of Λ12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, I.; Rodriguez, O.; Deppman, A.; Duarte, S.; Krmpotic, F.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we study the one nucleon induced non mesonic hyperon weak decay (NMWD)(ΛΝ → ηΝ) on the Λ 12 C hypernuclei with corresponding transition rates given by Γ ρ ≡ Γ (Λρ → ηρ) and Γ η ≡ Γ (Λη → ηη) respectively. The whole nuclear process is described by using a connection of two models, one to describe the primary non mesonic weak decay in the nuclear environment and another one to follows the time evolution of the outgoing of nucleons from nuclear system, to consider the Final State Interaction (FSI). The Independent-Particle Shell-Model (IPSM) is used to depict the dynamic of the primary decay by mean of the exchange of π and + Κ mesons with usual parameterization. A time dependent multicolisional intranuclear cascade approach implemented on the CRISP (Collaboration Rio-Sao Paulo) code incorporates the FSI to the Γ η /Γ ρ ratio calculation and the behaviour of these value with the coulomb barrier as well as to the observable nucleon kinetic energy spectra and also to angular correlation determinations. Recent KEK and FINUDA experiments on one- and two-nucleon non mesonic weak decay (NMWD) spectra in Λ 12 C hypernuclei are analyzed theoretically and the effect of FSI is determined within our model scenery. (Author)

  3. Final State Interaction Effects on the B + → J / ψ ρ + Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Mohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive decay of B + → J / ψ ρ + is studied in the framework of the QCD factorization (QCDF method and final state interaction (FSI. A direct B + → J / ψ ρ + decay is only occurred via a tree and a penguin based on the quark diagram analysis. The result that is found by using the QCDF method is less than the experimental result, so, the role of FSI is considered. The intermediate states D + D ̅ 0 , D + * D ̅ 0 * , D + * D ̅ 0 , and D + D ̅ 0 * via the exchange of D - and D - * are contributed to the B + → J / ψ ρ + decay. The above intermediate states is calculated by using the QCDF method. In the FSI effects the results of our calculations depend on “η” as the phenomenological parameter. The range of this parameter are selected from 1 to 2. For the exchanged particles D - and D - * , it is found that if η = 1.58 ~ 1.83 is selected the numbers of the branching ratio are placed in the experimental range. The experimental branching ratio of B + → J / ψ ρ + decay is ( 5 ± 0.8 × 1 0 - 5 , and our prediction number is ( 1.42 ± 0.36 × 1 0 - 5 in the absence of FSI effects, and it becomes ( 4.2 ~ 5.8 × 1 0 - 5 when FSI contributions are taken into account.

  4. A novel microfluidic mixer based on dual-hydrodynamic focusing for interrogating the kinetics of DNA-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Xu, Fei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Youzhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-08-21

    Kinetic measurement of biomacromolecular interaction plays a significant role in revealing the underlying mechanisms of cellular activities. Due to the small diffusion coefficient of biomacromolecules, it is difficult to resolve the rapid kinetic process with traditional analytical methods such as stopped-flow or laminar mixers. Here, we demonstrated a unique continuous-flow laminar mixer based on microfluidic dual-hydrodynamic focusing to characterize the kinetics of DNA-protein interactions. The time window of this mixer for kinetics observation could cover from sub-milliseconds to seconds, which made it possible to capture the folding process with a wide dynamic range. Moreover, the sample consumption was remarkably reduced to <0.55 μL min⁻¹, over 1000-fold saving in comparison to those reported previously. We further interrogated the interaction kinetics of G-quadruplex and the single-stranded DNA binding protein, indicating that this novel micromixer would be a useful approach for analyzing the interaction kinetics of biomacromolecules.

  5. Formation of resonances with final state photons in two photon interactions, and development of calorimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, R.

    1986-07-01

    In this thesis, resonances produced in two photon interactions were investigated with the TASSO detector at PETRA. The η ' and A 2 resonances were studied in a final state of charged pions and low energy photons. The couplings of these resonances to γγ were measured: Γ γγ (η ' (958)) 5.1±0.4(stat.)±0.65(syst.) Kev, Γ γγ (A 2 (1320)) 0.90±0.27(stat.)±0.16(syst.) Kev. A search for ι(1460) and η c (2980) was initiated. Upper limits on the γγ widths of these resonances times their branching ratio to the decay channel were obtained: Γ γγ (ι→γγ) x B(ι→ρ 0 γ) γγ (η c →γγ) x B(η c →η ' π + π - ) < 2.6 keV (95% C.L.). A proportional tubes electromagnetic calorimeter operating in the proportional mode was constructed. Tower readout was incorporated. The calorimeter gave an energy resolution of σ/E = 19%/√E. Large surface, thin Gap Chambers (TGC), were developed and constructed for the OPAL hadron pole-tip-calorimeter. The TGC operate in a high gain mode. They provide large signals for both pad and strip readout, without the need for amplification. To form a hadron calorimeter, ten chambers were interlaced with 8 cm thick iron slabs between them. An energy resolution of: σ/E = 105%/√E was obtained

  6. Revisiting final state interaction in charmless Bq→P P decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2018-05-01

    Various new measurements in charmless Bu ,d ,s→P P modes, where P is a low lying pseudoscalar meson, are reported by Belle and LHCb. These include the rates of B0→π0π0, η π0, Bs→η'η', B0→K+K- and Bs0→π+π- decays. Some of these modes are highly suppressed and are among the rarest B decays. Direct C P asymmetries on various modes are constantly updated. It is well known that direct C P asymmetries and rates of suppressed modes are sensitive to final state interaction (FSI). As new measurements are reported and more data will be collected, it is interesting and timely to revisit the rescattering effects in Bu ,d ,s→P P states. We perform a χ2 analysis with all available data on C P -averaged rates and C P asymmetries in B¯u ,d ,s→P P decays. Our numerical results are compared to data and those from factorization approach. The quality of the fit is improved significantly from the factorization results in the presence of rescattering. The relations on topological amplitudes and rescattering are explored and they help to provide a better understanding of the effects of FSI. As suggested by U(3) symmetry on topological amplitudes and FSI, a vanishing exchange rescattering scenario is considered. The exchange, annihilation, u -penguin, u -penguin annihilation, and some electroweak penguin amplitudes are enhanced significantly via annihilation and total annihilation rescatterings. In particular, the u -penguin annihilation amplitude is sizably enhanced by the tree amplitude via total annihilation rescattering. These enhancements affect rates and C P asymmetries. Predictions can be checked in the near future.

  7. Final report of experiments with rock blocks interacting hydraulically with smectitic pellet fills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Sweco Infrastructure AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [El-Tekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden); Hedin, Mikael [AaF, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the the project 'SU5 08.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKBdoc id 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-014 and AP TD SU50820-09-031. A problem in backfilling of KBS-3V tunnels with smectitic pellets surrounding highly compacted clay blocks is that water entering the fill have a very substantial effect on the manner in which water moves into or through a pellet-filled region in the period immediately following pellet placement. Channels will be formed that lead much water to the sloping front of the fill in the course of placing it. This can soften the fill and turn it into mud where the water is discharged as demonstrated by large-scale tests. The nature of such channels was investigated in the present study that comprised experiments with rock blocks equipped with nozzles for injecting water into contacting pellet fills at constant flow rates. The purpose was to identify the basic mechanisms in the first phase of hydration of pellet fills and to find out if there is a threshold flow rate for 'piping'. The question if channelling at breakthrough takes place along the contact with the confinement, as indicated by preceding tests with steel and plexiglass instead of rock, was in focus. While the mechanisms of water entering a fill from separate local spots in contacting rock are well understood, prediction of the entire wetting process of a larger pellet volume requires consideration of the interactive function of several inflow spots, representing single or networks of rock fractures. Experiments with pellet fills on a larger scale with simultaneous inflow from a number of fractures would provide further information on the wetting process. Such a test is outlined in the report.

  8. Validation of the verbal and social interaction questionnaire: nurses' focus in the nurse-patient relationship in forensic nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, M; Brunt, D; Fridlund, B

    2008-11-01

    There is a need to develop a questionnaire that measures nurses' verbal and social interactions (VSI) with their patients from the nurses' perspective as well as from the patients' perspective in the psychiatric and especially in the forensic psychiatric field. The major aim of the present study was to determine the construct validity and the internal consistency reliability of the VSI questionnaire. The study had a methodological and developmental design and was carried out in four steps: construction of the items, face validity, data collection and data analysis. The number of items was reduced from 50 to 21. The factor analysis of the final 21 items resulted in three quite distinct factors, namely, 'inviting the patient to establish a relationship', 'showing interest in the patients' feelings, experiences and behaviour' and 'helping the patients to establish structure and routines in their everyday life'. The results showed satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of content validity, construct validity and the internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire.

  9. How Do a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder Interact with Typically Developing Children in Preschool? : Focusing on Intervention of Artifacts in Imitation

    OpenAIRE

    山下, 愛実

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to explore the interaction between a child with autism spectrum\\disorder and typically developing children among three-year-old-children. For this purpose, we observed two\\situations focusing on 1) how interactions between a child with autism spectrum disorder and typically\\developing children initiated; 2) whether the situation of interactions are influenced by who initiated the\\interactions and the presence of intervention of artifacts. The results of this ...

  10. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L J M; Embregts, P J C M; Gerits, L; Bosman, A M T; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions between staff and clients. The effects of the training on emotional intelligence, coping style and emotions of support staff were investigated. Participants were 214 support staff working within residential settings for individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. The experimental group consisted of 76 staff members, 138 staff members participated in two different control groups. A pre-test, post-test, follow-up control group design was used. Effectiveness was assessed using questionnaires addressing emotional intelligence, coping and emotions. Emotional intelligence of the experimental group changed significantly more than that of the two control groups. The experimental group showed an increase in task-oriented coping, whereas one control group did not. The results with regard to emotions were mixed. Follow-up data revealed that effects within the experimental group were still present four months after the training ended. A staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and staff-client interactions is effective in improving emotional intelligence and coping styles of support staff. However, the need for more research aiming at the relationship between staff characteristics, organisational factors and their mediating role in the effectiveness of staff training is emphasised. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Interactions between mobilized radionuclides and secondary phases in final repository-relevant formation aquifers. Final report; Wechselwirkung mobilisierter Radionuklide mit sekundaeren Phasen in endlagerrelevanten Formationswaessern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Paparigas, Z.; Hansen, B.; Neumann, A.; Klinkenberg, M.; Mueller, E.; Bruecher, H.; Bosbach, D.

    2010-10-15

    The report on interactions between mobilized radionuclides and secondary phases in final repository-relevant formation aquifers covers the following issues: scope of study, leaching experiments, secondary phases, incorporation and sorption studies, summary and prospects. The results show that the investigated spent fuels dissolve instantaneously in contact with the repository-relevant aquifers in presence of iron ions. For the elements Cs and Sr no re-immobilization was observed. These elements have to be considered as mobile species in the radionuclide source term. The secondary phases due to corrosion processes are radionuclide sinks, i.e. actinides are re-immobilized, the retention mechanisms were clarified. The studies with irradiated nuclear fuel show that the uranium/silicon containing phases effect the molar solubility of actinides.

  12. Final-state interactions and superscaling in the semi-relativistic approach to quasielastic electron and neutrino scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.; Udias, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The semi-relativistic approach to electron and neutrino quasielastic scattering from nuclei is extended to include final-state interactions. Starting with the usual nonrelativistic continuum shell model, the problem is relativized by using the semi-relativistic expansion of the current in powers of the initial nucleon momentum and relativistic kinematics. Two different approaches are considered for the final-state interactions: the Smith-Wambach 2p-2h damping model and the Dirac-equation-based potential extracted from a relativistic mean-field plus the Darwin factor. Using the latter, the scaling properties of (e,e ' ) and (ν μ ,μ - ) cross sections for intermediate momentum transfers are investigated

  13. ODICIS (One Display for a Cockpit Interactive Solution) - Final public progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bécouarn, Loïc; Dominici, Johanna; Bader, Joachim

    The ODICIS project aims at developing a single display cockpit associated with adequate means of interaction. This addresses three current major aeronautics needs: the system architecture flexibility, the useful surface optimisation and the information continuity. Therefore the project will improve...

  14. Investigation of the hadronic final state in electron-proton interactions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dake, A.

    1995-01-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the study of the hardronic final state in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering. Theexperiment described in this thesis is performed with such a high resolution that the substructure of the proton is probed by the electron beam with a resolution of less than 10 -15 cm. (orig./HSI)

  15. Investigation of the hadronic final state in electron-proton interactions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dake, A

    1995-09-18

    The main subject of this thesis is the study of the hardronic final state in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering. Theexperiment described in this thesis is performed with such a high resolution that the substructure of the proton is probed by the electron beam with a resolution of less than 10{sup -15} cm. (orig./HSI).

  16. Simquake 3: Seismic interactions between building structures and rock-socketed foundations: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, G.E.; Chitty, D.E.; Oleck, R.F.

    1988-04-01

    It has long been recognized that soil-structure interaction can significantly influence the earthquake response of massive structures such as nuclear power plant reactor buildings. The linear analysis methods that are widely used to model interaction phenomena can result in often unrecognized safety margins in design for earthquake excitation. Use of improved interaction models which capture nonlinear characteristics of interaction---such as energy dissipation and significant changes in stiffness---can provide realistic predictions of the earthquake loads imposed on nuclear power plant structures and equipment, supplying an improved basis for seismic design review. This report documents the results of a research effort investigating the soil-structure (or structure-media) interaction of reinforced concrete structures founded in backfilled rock sockets. The objectives of the research, which included field testing with semi-scale structural models, were: to examine the influence of the backfilled socket on structural dynamic response; and to develop an experimental data base for the benchmarking of computer simulation procedures

  17. Meson dynamics beyond the quark model: a study of final state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, K.L.; Pennington, M.R.; Morgan, D.

    1986-09-01

    A scalar glueball is predicted in the 1 GeV mass region. The present analysis is concerned with experimental evidence for such a state. Recent high statistics results on central dimeson production at the ISR enable the authors to perform an extensive new coupled channel analysis of I = O S-wave ππ and KK-bar final states. This unambiguously reveals three resonances in the 1 GeV region - S 1 (991), S 2 (988) and epsilon(900) - where the naive quark model expects just two. These new features are discussed including how they may be confirmed experimentally and their present interpretation. The S 1 (991) is a plausible candidate for the scalar glueball. Other production reactions are examined (heavy flavour decays and γγ reactions) which lead to the same final states. (author)

  18. On final-state interaction in d - NN reaction in the (1236) - resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Nagorskaya, I.A.

    1975-01-01

    The spectator model is corrected due to scattering of particles in the final state. It is shown that the discrepancies between the data for γd→u 0 π + uu and γd→u 0 pn and the predictions from the spectator model are mainly due to the nucleon-nucleon scattering in the final state. By means of a generally used evaluation procedure for the experimental data it is shown that the reaction cross sections of γu→π 0 u and γu→ - p, which are obtained from the experiments with deuterons, are not very sensitive to these corrections will have no influence on conclusions concerning the exotic properties of the electromagnetic current

  19. Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS): Final report, November 1994--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS) is a software tool for complex three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and modeling. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the use of robotic and telerobotic systems in remote and/or hazardous environments, where spatial information is provided by 3-D mapping sensors. ICERVS provides a robust, interactive system for viewing sensor data in 3-D and combines this with interactive geometric modeling capabilities that allow an operator to construct CAD models to match the remote environment. Part I of this report traces the development of ICERVS through three evolutionary phases: (1) development of first-generation software to render orthogonal view displays and wireframe models; (2) expansion of this software to include interactive viewpoint control, surface-shaded graphics, material (scalar and nonscalar) property data, cut/slice planes, color and visibility mapping, and generalized object models; (3) demonstration of ICERVS as a tool for the remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) and the dismantlement of contaminated processing facilities. Part II of this report details the software design of ICERVS, with particular emphasis on its object-oriented architecture and user interface.

  20. EZLP: An Interactive Computer Program for Solving Linear Programming Problems. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, John J.; And Others

    Designed for student use in solving linear programming problems, the interactive computer program described (EZLP) permits the student to input the linear programming model in exactly the same manner in which it would be written on paper. This report includes a brief review of the development of EZLP; narrative descriptions of program features,…

  1. Relationship of Sibling Structure and Interaction to Categorization Ability. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Victor G.; And Others

    This study identified behaviors of sibling pairs interacting on a cognitive task and related these behaviors to sibling structure variables (age and sex of each sibling and age spacing between them) and to measure of cognitive abilities of the younger sibling. Subjects were 160 sibling pairs randomly selected from appropriate subpopulations of…

  2. Ion beam-plasma interactions. Final report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroot, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design experiments that model the fast ion plasma interaction region in a heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF) pellet. The effort consisted of (1) construction and testing of the experimental device and (2) preliminary experiments. The results of this work are reported

  3. Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS): Final report, November 1994--September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS) is a software tool for complex three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and modeling. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the use of robotic and telerobotic systems in remote and/or hazardous environments, where spatial information is provided by 3-D mapping sensors. ICERVS provides a robust, interactive system for viewing sensor data in 3-D and combines this with interactive geometric modeling capabilities that allow an operator to construct CAD models to match the remote environment. Part I of this report traces the development of ICERVS through three evolutionary phases: (1) development of first-generation software to render orthogonal view displays and wireframe models; (2) expansion of this software to include interactive viewpoint control, surface-shaded graphics, material (scalar and nonscalar) property data, cut/slice planes, color and visibility mapping, and generalized object models; (3) demonstration of ICERVS as a tool for the remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) and the dismantlement of contaminated processing facilities. Part II of this report details the software design of ICERVS, with particular emphasis on its object-oriented architecture and user interface

  4. Interactions of aquaculture, marine coastal ecosystems, and near-shore waters: A bibliography. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanfman, D.T.; Coleman, D.E.; Tibbitt, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The bibliography contains selected literature citations on the interactions of aquaculture and marine coastal ecosystems. The focus is on aquaculture effluents and their impact on marine coastal ecosystems and waterways as well as the impact of pollutants on aquaculture development. Factors affecting these issues include domestic and industrial wastes, thermal discharges, acid rain, heavy metals, oil spills, and microbial contamination of marine waters and aquatic species. Coastal zone management, environmenal impact of aquaculture, and water quality issues are also included in the bibliography

  5. Functional interactions between endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems: focus on alcohol, genetics and drug-addicted behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, J A; López-Jiménez, A; Gorriti, M A; de Fonseca, F Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Although the first studies regarding the endogenous opioid system and addiction were published during the 1940s, addiction and cannabinoids were not addressed until the 1970s. Currently, the number of opioid addiction studies indexed in PubMed-Medline is 16 times greater than the number of cannabinoid addiction reports. More recently, functional interactions have been demonstrated between the endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems. For example, the cannabinoid brain receptor type 1 (CB1) and mu opioid receptor type 1 (MOR1) co-localize in the same presynaptic nerve terminals and signal through a common receptor-mediated G-protein pathway. Here, we review a great variety of behavioral models of drug addiction and alcohol-related behaviors. We also include data providing clear evidence that activation of the cannabinoid and opioid endogenous systems via WIN 55,512-2 (0.4-10 mg/kg) and morphine (1.0-10 mg/kg), respectively, produces similar levels of relapse to alcohol in operant alcohol self-administration tasks. Finally, we discuss genetic studies that reveal significant associations between polymorphisms in MOR1 and CB1 receptors and drug addiction. For example, the SNP A118G, which changes the amino acid aspartate to asparagine in the MOR1 gene, is highly associated with altered opioid system function. The presence of a microsatellite polymorphism of an (AAT)n triplet near the CB1 gene is associated with drug addiction phenotypes. But, studies exploring haplotypes with regard to both systems, however, are lacking.

  6. Final Report. Coupled simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/ocean interactions using POP and CISM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potdam (Germany)

    2015-12-30

    The project performed under this award, referred to from here on as CLARION (CoupLed simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/Ocean iNteractions), included important advances in two models of ice sheet and ocean interactions. Despite its short duration (one year), the project made significant progress on its three major foci. First, together with collaborator Daniel Martin at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), I developed the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model to the point where it could perform a number of pan-Antarctic simulations under various forcing conditions. The results were presented at a number of major conferences and workshops worldwide, and are currently being incorporated into two manuscripts in preparation.

  7. Final Report - Composite Fermion Approach to Strongly Interacting Quasi Two Dimensional Electron Gas Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, John

    2009-11-30

    Work related to this project introduced the idea of an effective monopole strength Q* that acted as the effective angular momentum of the lowest shell of composite Fermions (CF). This allowed us to predict the angular momentum of the lowest band of energy states for any value of the applied magnetic field simply by determining N{sub QP} the number of quasielectrons (QE) or quasiholes (QH) in a partially filled CF shell and adding angular momenta of the N{sub QP} Fermions excitations. The approach reported treated the filled CF level as a vacuum state which could support QE and QH excitations. Numerical diagonalization of small systems allowed us to determine the angular momenta, the energy, and the pair interaction energies of these elementary excitations. The spectra of low energy states could then be evaluated in a Fermi liquid-like picture, treating the much smaller number of quasiparticles and their interactions instead of the larger system of N electrons with Coulomb interactions.

  8. A randomized trial of family focused therapy with populations at clinical high risk for psychosis: effects on interactional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Mary P; Miklowitz, David J; Candan, Kristin A; Marshall, Catherine; Domingues, Isabel; Walsh, Barbara C; Zinberg, Jamie L; De Silva, Sandra D; Woodberry, Kristen A; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated whether family focused therapy (FFT-CHR), an 18-session intervention that consisted of psychoeducation and training in communication and problem solving, brought about greater improvements in family communication than enhanced care (EC), a 3-session psychoeducational intervention, among individuals at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. This study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial across 8 sites. We examined 10-min problem-solving discussions at baseline and 6-month reassessment among 66 adolescents and young adults and their parents. Trained coders who were blind to treatment and time of assessment achieved high levels of interrater reliability when evaluating family discussions on categories of calm-constructive and critical-conflictual behavior. Individuals at high risk and their family members who participated in FFT-CHR demonstrated greater improvement from baseline to 6-month reassessment in constructive communication and decreases in conflictual behaviors during family interactions than those in EC. Participants in FFT-CHR showed greater increases from baseline to 6 months in active listening and calm communication and greater decreases in irritability and anger, complaints and criticism, and off-task comments compared to participants in EC. These changes occurred equally in high-risk participants and their family members. A 6-month family skills training treatment can bring about significant improvement in family communication among individuals at high risk for psychosis and their parents. Future studies should examine the association between enhancements in family communication and reduced risk for the onset of psychosis among individuals at high risk. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. The utility of point count surveys to predict wildlife interactions with wind energy facilities: An example focused on golden eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Maitreyi; Belthoff, James R.; Bjerre, Emily R.; Millsap, Brian A.; Katzner, Todd

    2018-01-01

    Wind energy development is rapidly expanding in North America, often accompanied by requirements to survey potential facility locations for existing wildlife. Within the USA, golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) are among the most high-profile species of birds that are at risk from wind turbines. To minimize golden eagle fatalities in areas proposed for wind development, modified point count surveys are usually conducted to estimate use by these birds. However, it is not always clear what drives variation in the relationship between on-site point count data and actual use by eagles of a wind energy project footprint. We used existing GPS-GSM telemetry data, collected at 15 min intervals from 13 golden eagles in 2012 and 2013, to explore the relationship between point count data and eagle use of an entire project footprint. To do this, we overlaid the telemetry data on hypothetical project footprints and simulated a variety of point count sampling strategies for those footprints. We compared the time an eagle was found in the sample plots with the time it was found in the project footprint using a metric we called “error due to sampling”. Error due to sampling for individual eagles appeared to be influenced by interactions between the size of the project footprint (20, 40, 90 or 180 km2) and the sampling type (random, systematic or stratified) and was greatest on 90 km2 plots. However, use of random sampling resulted in lowest error due to sampling within intermediate sized plots. In addition sampling intensity and sampling frequency both influenced the effectiveness of point count sampling. Although our work focuses on individual eagles (not the eagle populations typically surveyed in the field), our analysis shows both the utility of simulations to identify specific influences on error and also potential improvements to sampling that consider the context-specific manner that point counts are laid out on the landscape.

  10. One meson π0 final state study in neutral current neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comtet, Alain.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral pion production by weak neutral currents was observed in the CERN-GARGAMELLE neutrino experiment. The aim of the analysis was the measurement of the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) of neutral-current to charged-current cross sections. The background due to neutron interactions was computed. A lower and an upper limit of the background was obtained. Bounds on the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) are given using these limits: 0.11 [fr

  11. Final-state interaction in spin asymmetry and GDH sum rule for incoherent pion production on the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, E.M.; Arenhoevel, H.; Schwamb, M.

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of incoherent single-pion photoproduction to the spin response of the deuteron, i.e., the asymmetry of the total photoabsorption cross-section with respect to parallel and antiparallel spins of photon and deuteron, is calculated over the region of the Δ-resonance with inclusion of final-state NN and πN rescattering. Sizeable effects, mainly from NN rescattering, are found leading to an appreciable reduction of the spin asymmetry. Furthermore, the contribution to the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral is explicitly evaluated by integration up to a photon energy of 550 MeV. Final-state interaction reduces the value of the integral to about half of the value obtained for the pure impulse approximation. (orig.)

  12. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis of SIMQUAKE II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.K.; Isenberg, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an analytic method for modeling of soil-structure interaction (SSI) for nuclear power plants in earthquakes and discusses its application to SSI analyses of SIMQUAKE II. The method is general and can be used to simulate a three-dimensional structural geometry, nonlinear site characteristics and arbitrary input ground shaking. The analytic approach uses the soil island concept to reduce SSI models to manageable size and cost. Nonlinear constitutive behavior of the soil is represented by the nonlinear, kinematic cap model. In addition, a debonding-rebonding soil-structure interface model is utilized to represent nonlinear effects which singificantly alter structural response in the SIMQUAKE tests. STEALTH, an explicit finite difference code, is used to perform the dynamic, soil-structure interaction analyses. Several two-dimensional posttest SSI analyses of model containment structures in SIMQUAKE II are performed and results compared with measured data. These analyses qualify the analytic method. They also show the importance of including debonding-rebonding at the soil-structure interface. Sensitivity of structural response to compaction characteristics of backfill material is indicated

  13. Measuring the coherence properties of light emission from laser-plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Several detrimental instabilities can be excited when a high-intensity laser interacts with plasma. The temporal evolution and spectra of the scattered light emitted by many of these instabilities are used to characterize the instabilities and to benchmark theories. It has been difficult to image the emission region with sufficient resolution to make quantitative comparisons with theory. Direct measurement of the emission region would yield information on ponderomotive steepening phenomena, the true emission zone of convective instabilities, and on the saturation of absolute instabilities. The increase in laser intensity caused by the filamentation instability is conjectured to elevate the levels of parametric instabilities found in high-energy laser-plasma interactions. Because the diameter of the filaments is very small (on the order of 10 microm), it is impossible to image the emission sites directly and either to prove or to disprove this conjecture. The research reported here examines an alternate method of measuring the emission region of scattered light from parametric instabilities. This report provides a brief background of coherence theory by defining the relevant parameters in Section 2. A concrete example of the effect that multiple scattering sites would have on the proposed measurement is provided in Section 3. The following section briefly describes experiments that might be able to demonstrate the proposed technique. The conclusion raises the issue of coherence and its effect on the expected angular distribution of scattering light from parametric instabilities

  14. Interactive fundamental physics. [Final report], April 15, 1992--November 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton`s first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered ``hypermedia`` structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have ``declined`` to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  15. Evaluation of potential interactions between forest biomass production and Canadian wildlife. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulombe, R.; Lemay, A.B.

    1983-06-01

    Forest management for biomass production can be undertaken in all provinces of Canada. Raw material can be extracted either from sawmills, logged areas, silvicultural treatments or short-rotation intensive culture. All forests are suitable habitats for wildlife. However, some species (e.g. woodland caribou, lynx, marten, owl) are extremely dependant on mature forests. Logging these forests generally contributes to reduction of habitats and thus populations. Management of second growth forests should take into consideration these species by extending rotations so part of the forests will serve the species. Removal of snags and downed logs to increase amount of raw material will contribute to reduced habitats of, for instance, tree-nesting birds. As these aspects have not been intensively studied within the Canadian forest regions, interactions can hardly be specified. Studies are recommended to analyse the overall problems and define measures to prevent detrimental effects. Other species (rare, threatened or endangered) will need specific attention and precaution while managing forests. Some are highly sensitive to noise and human disturbance (e.g. whooping crane, white pelican, peregrine falcon), others are very sensitive to harassment. Increased human presence within managed forests will necessitate more educational programs to prevent detrimental effects. Some species of reptiles, amphibians and fish are so poorly documented that only basic studies of the biology, ecology and distribution will permit to identify and evaluate interactions with these new forestry concepts. 289 refs., 19 figs., 36 tabs.

  16. New Perspectives for Hadron Phenomenology:The Effects of Final-State Interactions and Near-Conformal Effective QCD Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-10-24

    The effective QCD charge extracted from {tau} decay is remarkably constant at small momenta, implying the near-conformal behavior of hadronic interactions at small momentum transfer. The correspondence of large-N{sub c} supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter spaces with gauge theory in physical space-time also has interesting implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, such as constituent counting rules for hard exclusive processes. The utility of light-front quantization and lightfront Fock wavefunctions for analyzing such phenomena and representing the dynamics of QCD bound states is reviewed. I also discuss the novel effects of initial- and final-state interactions in hard QCD inclusive processes, including Bjorken-scaling single-spin asymmetries and the leading-twist diffractive and shadowing contributions to deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering.

  17. Natural gas storage - end user interaction. Final report, September 1992--May 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of the market for natural gas storage that will provide for rigorous evaluation of federal research and development opportunities in storage technologies. The project objectives are: (1) to identify market areas and end use sectors where new natural gas underground storage capacity can be economically employed; (2) to develop a storage evaluation system that will provide the analytical tool to evaluate storage requirements under alternate economic, technology, and market conditions; and (3) to analyze the economic and technical feasibility of alternatives to conventional gas storage. An analytical approach was designed to examine storage need and economics on a total U.S. gas system basis, focusing on technical and market issues. Major findings of each subtask are reported in detail. 79 figs.

  18. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a 'primer' on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a 'bench-scale' laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the 'primer,' a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

  19. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    We are applying for a three-year grant from the US Department of Energy to New Mexico State University to continue its support of our work on experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies, which has been carried out in collaboration with groups from various laboratories and universities. The nucleon-nucleon work is aimed at making measurements that will contribute to a determination of the isospin-zero amplitudes, as well as continuing our investigations of evidence for dibaryon resonances. It is based at the LAMPF accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Current and planned experiments include measurements of total cross-section differences in pure spin states and of spin parameters in neutron-proton scattering. The pion-nucleus work is aimed at improving our understanding both of the nature of the pion-nucleus interaction and of nuclear structure. It consists of two programs, one based at LAMPF and one based principally at the SIN laboratory in Switzerland. The LAMPF-based work involves studies of large-angle scattering, double-charge-exchange scattering, including measurements at a new energy range above 300 MeV, and a new program of experiments with polarized nuclear targets. The SIN-based work involves studies of quasielastic scattering and absorption, including experiments with a new large-acceptance detector system planned for construction there. We are requesting support to continue the LAMPF-based work at its current level and to expand the SIN-based work to allow for increased involvement in experiments with the new detector system. 57 refs

  20. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  1. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation

  2. Development of a compact HTS lead unit for the SC correction coils of the SuperKEKB final focusing magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, Zhanguo, E-mail: zhanguo.zong@kek.jp; Ohuchi, Norihito; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Arimoto, Yasushi

    2016-09-11

    Forty-three superconducting (SC) correction coils with maximum currents of about 60 A are installed in the SuperKEKB final focusing magnet system. Current leads to energize the SC correction coils should have an affordable heat load and fit the spatial constraints in the service cryostat where the current leads are installed. To address the requirements, design optimization of individual lead was performed with vapor cooled current lead made of a brass material, and a compact unit was designed to accommodate eight current leads together in order to be installed with one port in the service cryostat. The 2nd generation high temperature SC (HTS) tape was adopted and soldered at the cold end of the brass current lead to form a hybrid HTS lead structure. A prototype of the compact lead unit with HTS tape was constructed and tested with liquid helium (LHe) environment. This paper presents a cryogenic measurement system to simulate the real operation conditions in the service cryostat, and analysis of the experimental results. The measured results showed excellent agreement with the theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. In total, 11 sets of the compact HTS lead units were constructed for the 43 SC correction coils at KEK. One set from the mass production was tested in cryogenic conditions, and exhibited the same performance as the prototype. The compact HTS lead unit can feed currents to four SC correction coils simultaneously with the simple requirement of controlling and monitoring helium vapor flow, and has a heat load of about 0.762 L/h in terms of LHe consumption. - Highlights: • The requirements of the SC correction coils on current leads are introduced. • The optimum design of the brass vapor cooled current lead is described. • The compact structure of eight leads with HTS tape is presented. • The theoretical, numerical, and experimental results are compared. • The current lead heat load is evaluated for cryogenic system.

  3. Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Hsu, Juno [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nicolau, Alex [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Veidenbaum, Alex [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Philip Cameron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergmann, Dan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  4. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  5. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis on the interaction between a metal block and a radially polarized focused beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kyoko; Sakai, Kyosuke; Noda, Susumu

    2011-07-18

    Radially polarized focused beams have attracted a great deal of attention because of their unique properties characterized by the longitudinal field. Although this longitudinal field is strongly confined to the beam axis, the energy flow, i.e., the Poynting vector, has null intensity on the axis. Hence, the interaction of the focused beam and matter has thus far been unclear. We analyzed the interactions between the focused beam and a subwavelength metal block placed at the center of the focus using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculation. We found that most of the Poynting energy propagates through to the far-field, and that a strong enhancement of the electric field appeared on the metal surface. This enhancement is attributed to the constructive interference of the symmetric electric field and the coupling to the surface plasmon mode.

  6. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.J.; Longworth, G.; Hasler, S.E.; Gardiner, M.; Fritz, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.; Wolf, M.; Geyer, S.; Alexander, J.L.; Read, D.; Thomas, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ( 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 14 C, 18 O, 34 S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  7. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ivanovich, M. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ({sup 2}H, {sup 3}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 18}O, {sup 34}S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Projectile fragmentation experiments have been conducted at the LBL Bevalac accelerator, utilizing both the B40 and the HISS facilities, to produce a dataset of 36 beam/energy combinations covering projectiles from 4 He to 58 Ni and various energies from 170--2100 MeV/nucleon. While some runs were subject to beam instabilities, magnet problems or low statistics, there remains a large dataset which is still being analyzed. The results will be used to investigate the physics of the intermediate energy fragmentation process and will find application in the astrophysics of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. An overview of the science goals and rationale is followed by presentation of the experimental techniques and apparatus that has been employed. Data analysis, including both detector subsystem and accelerator calibration, is discussed with emphasis on the unique features of the dataset and the analysis problems being addressed. Results from the experiments are presented throughout to illustrate the status of the analysis, e.g., momentum distribution widths. Total, Elemental and Isotopic cross sections from various beam/energy combinations are presented, including the first data on 32 S fragmentation and the complete isotopic fragmentation cross sections for 28 Si interacting in both Carbon and Hydrogen targets. The new results are compared to any existing data and to formulae used to predict unmeasured cross sections. The size and complexity of the dataset and the required detail of the analysis precluded finishing the full analysis under the subject grant. Plans for additional analysis are presented, and these will be carried out in coming years as time and resources permit

  9. Quantifying Microbe-Mineral Interactions Leading to Remotely Detectable Induced Polarization Signals (Final Project Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moysey, Stephen [Clemson University; Dean, Delphine [Clemson University; Dimitrios, Ntarlagiannis [Rutgers University

    2013-11-13

    The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column-scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain-scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high-quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process-based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for

  10. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  11. Influence of the Coulomb interaction in the final state on the cross section of single-electron capture by fast ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Teplova, Ya.A.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the Coulomb interaction of ions in the final state must be taken into account in the estimation of the cross section of electron capture by fast ions. The cross section of electron capture decreases considerably, and the dependence of the cross section on the collision energy becomes close to the experimental one if the interaction of charged particles after collision is taken into account. -- Highlights: → Coulomb interaction of ions in the final state must be taken into account. → This interaction leads to a considerable decrease in the cross section. → The dependence on energy close to the experimental one.

  12. Self-focusing and its related interactions at very high laser intensities for fast ignition at Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.A.; Kodama, R.; Izumi, N.; Takahashi, K.; Heya, M.; Fujita, H.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mima, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Sunahara, A.; Takabe, H.; Yamanaka, T.; Koase, T.; Iwatani, T.; Ohtani, F.; Miyakoshi, T.; Habara, H.; Tanpo, M.; Tohyama, S.; Weber, F.A.; Barbee, T.W.; Dasilva, L.B.; Dasilva, L.B.

    2000-01-01

    At the Institute of Laser Engineering, various type of experiments related to fast ignition were performed with the 12-beam laser system GEKKO XII and the newly added 100 TW beams line. Using both X-ray and UV laser probes, drilling via ponderomotive laser light self-focusing was studied to show drilling well into the overdense plasma over a distance of 100 μm at a self-focused laser intensity of 10 18 W/cm 2 . This type of self-focusing accelerated electrons up to 0.1 to 1 MeV and was also applied to an imploding shell. (authors)

  13. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  14. Final state interactions in the Ds+→ωπ+ and Ds+→ρ0π+ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajfer, S.; Prapotnik, A.; Singer, P.; Zupan, J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the decay mechanisms in the D s + →ωπ + and D s + →ρ 0 π + transitions. The naive factorization ansatz predicts a vanishing amplitude for the D s + →ωπ + decay, while the D s + →ρ 0 π + decay amplitude does have an annihilation contribution also in this limit. Both decays can proceed through intermediate states of hidden strangeness, e.g. K,K*, which we estimate in this paper. These contributions can explain the experimental value for the D s + →ωπ + decay rate, which no longer can be viewed as a clean signature of the annihilation decay of D s + . The combination of the π(1300) pole dominated annihilation contribution and the internal K,K* exchange can saturate the present experimental upper bound on the D s + →ρ 0 π + decay rate, which is therefore expected to be within experimental reach. Finally, the proposed mechanism of hidden strangeness final state interactions constitutes only a small correction to the Cabibbo allowed decay rates D s →KK*,φπ, which are well described already in the factorization approximation

  15. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography with a focus on the drug-phosphate interaction in drug screening to determine the phospholipidosis induction risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Haruka; Hamaguchi, Ryohei; Kuroda, Yukihiro

    2017-04-15

    Cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) can induce the hyperaccumulation of phospholipids in cells and tissues. This side effect, which is known as drug-induced phospholipidosis, is sometimes problematic in the development and clinical use of CADs. It is known that CADs generally interact with phospholipids via both hydrophobic and acid-base interactions, and CADs with the larger affinity to phospholipid exhibit the larger induction risk. To develop a chromatographic assay system to predict the phospholipidosis-inducing potential with considering the acid-base interaction between CAD and phosphate group of phospholipid, hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) methods were tested in this study. First, a PC HILIC column with phosphocholine groups on a packed material was used. The acid-base or other hydrophilic interactions to the stationary phase differed among basic drugs, and retention to the PC HILIC column did not accurately reflect the induction potential of phospholipidosis. As an alternative HILIC approach, the elution of CADs with the phosphate buffer from an amide column was tested. The elution effect, which is expressed as ratio of retention factors between different phosphate content in the mobile phase, closely correlated with the induction potential. Using the elution effect and retention factor to a reversed-phase HPLC column, the phospholipidosis-inducing drugs were clearly discriminated from the non-inducers. These results suggest that the proposed chromatographic approach can screen phospholipidosis-inducing drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stimulated Brillouin scattering reduction induced by self-focusing for a single laser speckle interacting with an expanding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Depierreux, S.; Loiseau, P.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Labaune, Ch.; Bandulet, H.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the low level of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) observed in laser-plasma experiments carried out with a single laser speckle is investigated by means of three-dimensional simulations and modeling in the limit when the laser beam power P is well above the critical power for ponderomotive self-focusing We find that the order of magnitude of the time averaged reflectivities, together with the temporal and spatial SBS localization observed in our simulations, are correctly reproduced by our modeling. It is observed that, after a short transient stage, SBS reaches a significant level only (i) as long as the incident laser pulse is increasing in amplitude and (ii) in a single self-focused speckle located in the low-density front part of the plasma. In order to describe self-focusing in an inhomogeneous expanding plasma, we have derived a new Lagrangian density describing this process. Using then a variational approach, our model reproduces the position and the peak intensity of the self-focusing hot spot in the front part of the plasma density profile as well as the local density depletion in this hot spot. The knowledge of these parameters then makes it possible to estimate the spatial amplification of SBS as a function of the laser beam power and consequently to explain the experimentally observed SBS reflectivity, considerably reduced with respect to standard theory in the regime of large laser beam power

  17. Game of Words: Prototype of a Digital Game Focusing on Oral Production (and Comprehension) through Asynchronous Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Mathieu; Hallal, Racha; Ballot, Pauline; Gazidedja, Ada

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a learning game designed according to a strategy focusing on favouring the learners' "playful attitude". The game's modalities pertain to what we might call "guessing games". The chosen avatar of such guessing games both exists as learning and Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) board games. We explain in…

  18. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  19. Focusing on Interactions between Content and Cognition: A New Perspective on Gender Differences in Mathematical Sub-Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ann Cathrice; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a new perspective on measuring gender differences in the large-scale assessment study Trends in International Science Study (TIMSS). The suggested empirical model is directly based on the theoretical competence model of the domain mathematics and thus includes the interaction between content and cognitive sub-competencies.…

  20. The emergence of a partner-focused question in aided interaction. A case study of participation in conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilesjö, Maja Sigurd; Norén, Niklas

    To ask a question can be highly challenging for a person with severe communication impairment, but questions have not received much attention in research in the field of atypical interaction and Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). In the current paper, the principles and practices...

  1. Attenuation of laser power of a focused Gaussian beam during interaction between a laser and powder in coaxial laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jichang; Li Lijun; Zhang Yuanzhong; Xie Xiaozhu

    2005-01-01

    The power of a focused laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile attenuated by powder in coaxial laser cladding is investigated experimentally and theoretically, and its resolution model is developed. With some assumptions, it is concluded that the attenuation of laser power is an exponential function and is determined by the powder feed rate, particle moving speed, spraying angles and waist positions and diameters of the laser beam and powder flow, grain diameter and run of the laser beam through the powder flow. The attenuation of laser power increases with powder feed rate or run of laser beam through the powder flow. In the experiment presented, 300 W laser power from a focused Gaussian beam is attenuated by a coaxial powder flow. The experimental results agree well with the values calculated with the developed model

  2. Far-field interaction of focused relativistic electron beams in electron energy loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing a new excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets...

  3. The Influence of Using Electronic Communication System on Employee's Mental Health : Focusing on the interactive operation type

    OpenAIRE

    石津, 和子

    2008-01-01

    Today more and more people use computers in occupational settings. One of the purposes of introducing Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) into the office is to promote the efficiency and acceleration of work. But it is pointed out that office worker using CMC has some problems on their mental health. Considering the original characteristic of CMC, to research about the effect of using CMC in the office is thought to be quite important. This research focused on the effect of CMC against ment...

  4. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  5. Electron-deuteron deep-inelastic scattering with spectator nucleon tagging and final-state interactions at intermediate x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2018-03-01

    We consider electron-deuteron deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) with detection of a proton in the nuclear fragmentation region ("spectator tagging") as a method for extracting the free neutron structure functions and studying their nuclear modifications. Such measurements could be performed at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with suitable forward detectors. The measured proton recoil momentum (≲100 MeV in the deuteron rest frame) specifies the deuteron configuration during the high-energy process and permits a controlled theoretical treatment of nuclear effects. Nuclear and nucleonic structure are separated using methods of light-front quantum mechanics. The impulse approximation to the tagged DIS cross section contains the free neutron pole, which can be reached by on-shell extrapolation in the recoil momentum. Final-state interactions (FSIs) distort the recoil momentum distribution away from the pole. In the intermediate-x region 0.1 rest frame momenta ≲1 GeV , target fragmentation region). We construct a schematic model describing this effect, using final-state hadron distributions measured in nucleon DIS experiments and low-energy hadron scattering amplitudes. We investigate the magnitude of FSIs, their dependence on the recoil momentum (angular dependence, forward/backward regions), their analytic properties, and their effect on the on-shell extrapolation. We comment on the prospects for neutron structure extraction in tagged DIS with an EIC. We discuss possible extensions of the FSI model to other kinematic regions (large/small x ). In tagged DIS at x ≪0.1 FSIs resulting from diffractive scattering on the nucleons become important and require separate treatment.

  6. Determination of nn scattering length from data on nn final state interaction in nd-breakup reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konobeevski, E.S.; Mordovskoy, M.V.; Sergeev, V.A.; Potashev, S.I.; Zuev, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: An experiment is proposed for the high-precision determination of the neutron-neutron scattering length investigating the nn final state interaction in the nd breakup reaction. The singlet pp and nn scattering lengths are very sensitive probes of the NN-interaction, and their difference is a direct measure of charge-symmetry breaking (CSB) of the nuclear force. However CSB is a small effect, and accurate values of the scattering lengths are needed for a theoretical analysis. The proton-proton scattering length is well known from pp-scattering data (a pp = -17.3± 0.4 fm), and its uncertainty is mainly due to a model-dependent procedure of removing Coulomb effects. The neutron-neutron scattering length is determined from the following processes n+d→p+n+n, π - + d → γ +n+n, d+d→ 2 He+n+n by investigating the kinematic region of the nn final-state interaction (FSI) where two neutrons fly with low relative energy. The results obtained by now are characterized by a significant uncertainty in values of a nn ; they are grouped near -16 and -19 fm [1,2], so even the sign of the difference a nn - a pp is uncertain. In this experiment neutron-neutron scattering length is determined by measuring the yield of the nd breakup reaction as a function of the relative energy ε nn =(E 1 +E 2 -2(E 1 E 2 ) 1/2 cosθ)/2 of two neutrons in the FSI region (two neutrons fly in a narrow angular cone) where nn-interaction is strongly revealed. The theory of reactions in 3N system predicts the ε nn dependence of the FSI cross section being sensitive to the value of a nn . The measurements will be made using the neutron channel RADEX at Moscow meson factory of the Institute for Nuclear Research. The momenta and angles of the two emitted neutrons and the energy of the proton will be measured for each breakup event. The measured dependence of the reaction yield on the relative energy of the two neutrons will be compared to results of the Monte Carlo simulation that includes

  7. Focusing and non-focusing modulation strategies for the improvement of on-line two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography × reversed phase profiling of complex food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Lidia; Ibáñez, Elena; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Herrero, Miguel

    2017-09-08

    Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC × LC) is ever gaining interest in food analysis, as often, food-related samples are too complex to be analyzed through one-dimensional approaches. The use of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) combined with reversed phase (RP) separations has already been demonstrated as a very orthogonal combination, which allows attaining increased resolving power. However, this coupling encompasses different analytical challenges, mainly related to the important solvent strength mismatch between the two dimensions, besides those common to every LC × LC method. In the present contribution, different strategies are proposed and compared to further increase HILIC × RP method performance for the analysis of complex food samples, using licorice as a model sample. The influence of different parameters in non-focusing modulation methods based on sampling loops, as well as under focusing modulation, through the use of trapping columns in the interface and through active modulation procedures are studied in order to produce resolving power and sensitivity gains. Although the use of a dilution strategy using sampling loops as well as the highest possible first dimension sampling rate allowed significant improvements on resolution, focusing modulation produced significant gains also in peak capacity and sensitivity. Overall, the obtained results demonstrate the great applicability and potential that active modulation may have for the analysis of complex food samples, such as licorice, by HILIC × RP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Creating Learning Experiences that Promote Informal Science Education: Designing Conservation-Focused Interactive Zoo Exhibits through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenda, Peter

    Research on exhibit design over the past twenty years has started to identify many different methods to increase the learning that occurs in informal education environments. This study utilized relevant research on exhibit design to create and study the effectiveness of a mobile interactive exhibit at the Seneca Park Zoo that promotes socialization, engagement in science, and conservation-related practices among guests. This study will serve as one component of a major redesign project at the Seneca Park Zoo for their Rocky Coasts exhibit. This action research study targeted the following question, "How can interactive exhibits be designed to promote socialization, engagement in science, and real-world conservation-related practices (RCPs) among zoo guests?" Specific research questions included: 1. In what ways did guests engage with the exhibit? 2. In what ways were guests impacted by the exhibit? a) What evidence exists, if any, of guests learning science content from the exhibit? b) What evidence exists, if any, of guests being emotionally affected by the exhibit? c) What evidence exists, if any, of guests changing their RCPs after visiting the exhibit? Data were collected through zoo guest surveys completed by zoo guests comparing multiple exhibits, interviews with guests before and after they used the prototype exhibit, observations and audio recordings of guests using the prototype exhibit, and follow-up phone interviews with guests who volunteered to participate. Data were analyzed collaboratively with members of the zoo's exhibit Redesign Team using grounded theory qualitative data analysis techniques to find patterns and trends among data. Initial findings from data analysis were used to develop shifts in the exhibit in order to increase visitor engagement and learning. This process continued for two full action research spirals, which resulted in three iterations of the prototype exhibit. The overall findings of this study highlight the ways in which

  9. Evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet on glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings: focusing on the final stage of thin droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya; Shonina, Anna M; Safonov, Alexey I; Sulyaeva, Veronica S; Kabov, Oleg A

    2018-03-07

    The evaporation dynamics of a water droplet with an initial volume of 2 μl from glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings are investigated using the shadow technique and an optical microscope. The droplet profile for a contact angle of less than 5° is constructed using an image-analyzing interference technique, and evaporation dynamics are investigated at the final stage. We coated the glass slides with a thin film of a fluoropolymer by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method at different deposition modes depending on the deposition pressure and the temperature of the activating wire. The resulting surfaces have different structures affecting the wetting properties. Droplet evaporation from a constant contact radius mode in the early stage of evaporation was found followed by the mode where both contact angle and contact radius simultaneously vary in time (final stage) regardless of wettability of the coated surfaces. We found that depinning occurs at small contact angles of 2.2-4.7° for all samples, which are smaller than the measured receding contact angles. This is explained by imbibition of the liquid into the developed surface of the "soft" coating that leads to formation of thin droplets completely wetting the surface. The final stage, which is little discussed in the literature, is also recorded. We have singled out a substage where the contact line velocity is abruptly increasing for all coated and uncoated surfaces. The critical droplet height corresponding to the transition to this substage is about 2 μm with R/h = 107. The duration of this substage is the same for all coated and uncoated surfaces. Droplets observed at this substage for all the tested surfaces are axisymmetric. The specific evaporation rate clearly demonstrates an abrupt increase at the final substage of the droplet evaporation. The classical R 2 law is justified for the complete wetting situation where the droplet is disappearing in an axisymmetric manner.

  10. Line-focus solar central power system, Phase I. Final report, 29 September 1978 to 30 April 1980. Volume II. Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slemmons, A J

    1980-04-01

    The conceptual design, parametric analysis, cost and performance analysis, and a commercial assessment of a 100-MWe high-temperature line-focus central power system are presented. Parametric analyses and conceptual design of the heliostat subsystem, receiver subsystem, heat transport subsystem, energy storage subsystem, electrical power generating subsystem, and master control subsystem are included. A market analysis and development plan are given. (WHK)

  11. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture: final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of

  12. FROM THE MOUTHS OF BABES. . . AND MOMS - An Analysis of Mother-Child Interaction: Focus on the Mothers’ Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corazon Aspeli-Castro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This study revealed the important role of adult input in the development of children’s communicative competence. The results of the investigation showed that mothers asked more questions that were meant to gauge the children’s linguistic and cognitive development. The mothers also used a variety of verbal and nonverbal communication strategies and techniques (i.e.,repetition, extension, expansion, preformulation, reformulation, gestural support, use of deixis, and contingent queries that help the children develop their pragmatic skills such as turn-taking, initiating, maintaining and closing conversations, noticing and responding to nonverbal features of the interaction, observing conversational principles and knowing how to respond to questions. In addition, this study also showed that the mothers’ discourse styles strongly influenced the quality of responses from children. Variation in speech style often signaled to the children important aspects of the context which needed to be considered before formulating a response.

  13. Focus on focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery and impact of the principle of strong focusing was celebrated at a history Symposium at Stanford on 25 July in the course of the 1985 US Summer School on Particle Accelerators. Burt Richter, Stanford Linac Director, who introduced all the speakers with well chosen reminders about their various contributions related to the theme of the symposium, remarked that it was an appropriate time to be lauding the great contributions of accelerator physicists following the Nobel Prize award to Simon van der Meer for outstanding achievements in accelerator physics

  14. Focus on focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1985-10-15

    The discovery and impact of the principle of strong focusing was celebrated at a history Symposium at Stanford on 25 July in the course of the 1985 US Summer School on Particle Accelerators. Burt Richter, Stanford Linac Director, who introduced all the speakers with well chosen reminders about their various contributions related to the theme of the symposium, remarked that it was an appropriate time to be lauding the great contributions of accelerator physicists following the Nobel Prize award to Simon van der Meer for outstanding achievements in accelerator physics.

  15. Neuroimmune Interactions in Schizophrenia: Focus on Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Activation of the Alpha-7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Maria das Graças Corsi-Zuelli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating mental disorders and is aggravated by the lack of efficacious treatment. Although its etiology is unclear, epidemiological studies indicate that infection and inflammation during development induces behavioral, morphological, neurochemical, and cognitive impairments, increasing the risk of developing schizophrenia. The inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia is also supported by clinical studies demonstrating systemic inflammation and microglia activation in schizophrenic patients. Although elucidating the mechanism that induces this inflammatory profile remains a challenge, mounting evidence suggests that neuroimmune interactions may provide therapeutic advantages to control inflammation and hence schizophrenia. Recent studies have indicated that vagus nerve stimulation controls both peripheral and central inflammation via alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. Other findings have indicated that vagal stimulation and α7nAChR-agonists can provide therapeutic advantages for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression and epilepsy. This review analyzes the latest results regarding: (I the immune-to-brain pathogenesis of schizophrenia; (II the regulation of inflammation by the autonomic nervous system in psychiatric disorders; and (III the role of the vagus nerve and α7nAChR in schizophrenia.

  16. Neuroimmune Interactions in Schizophrenia: Focus on Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Activation of the Alpha-7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi-Zuelli, Fabiana Maria das Graças; Brognara, Fernanda; Quirino, Gustavo Fernando da Silva; Hiroki, Carlos Hiroji; Fais, Rafael Sobrano; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Ulloa, Luis; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Loureiro, Camila Marcelino

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating mental disorders and is aggravated by the lack of efficacious treatment. Although its etiology is unclear, epidemiological studies indicate that infection and inflammation during development induces behavioral, morphological, neurochemical, and cognitive impairments, increasing the risk of developing schizophrenia. The inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia is also supported by clinical studies demonstrating systemic inflammation and microglia activation in schizophrenic patients. Although elucidating the mechanism that induces this inflammatory profile remains a challenge, mounting evidence suggests that neuroimmune interactions may provide therapeutic advantages to control inflammation and hence schizophrenia. Recent studies have indicated that vagus nerve stimulation controls both peripheral and central inflammation via alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Other findings have indicated that vagal stimulation and α7nAChR-agonists can provide therapeutic advantages for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression and epilepsy. This review analyzes the latest results regarding: (I) the immune-to-brain pathogenesis of schizophrenia; (II) the regulation of inflammation by the autonomic nervous system in psychiatric disorders; and (III) the role of the vagus nerve and α7nAChR in schizophrenia. PMID:28620379

  17. Potential for social learning in sustainable regional development: analysis of stakeholder interaction with a focus on the role of scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dlouhá

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with regional development and its dimension of (unsustainability: it analyses conditions for the success or failure of environmental or SD strategies from a social point of view. The authors share their experience acquired within the process of compiling a database of case studies from different regions of the Czech Republic and from abroad, and subsequently provide a brief analytical overview of cases in this special issue. The analytical perspective focuses on the roles of actors in a dialogue about regional sustainability issues within cooperative or conflict situations, and a description of the communication processes at play, especially within the science – policy interface. An analytical tool (actor analysis is employed to explore network characteristics, the relationships of the actors involved and the process of deliberation itself where different approaches to “nature”, “environment”, and/or “sustainable development” were conceived but often not agreed upon. A comparative meta-analysis of different cases helped to formulate several hypotheses: for a successful sustainability transition on a regional level, future visions are necessary and should be discussed and shared by stakeholders. Necessary innovation is often the result of the involvement of experts and might be provided from outside the region. Dialogue should be based on respect for actor diversity and their viewpoints (this is a condition for social learning, as well as a commitment to contribute to the “common good”. Where local actors had only to choose between controversial extant solutions, a deadlock in communication often resulted. The establishment of a communication framework for actor involvement appeared to be beneficial, which is also an opportunity for facilitation of these processes in practice.

  18. Magnetoencephalographic alpha band connectivity reveals differential default mode network interactions during focused attention and open monitoring meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Laura; Di Lanzo, Claudia; Zappasodi, Filippo; Chella, Federico; Raffone, Antonino; Pizzella, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    According to several conceptualizations of meditation, the interplay between brain systems associated to self-related processing, attention and executive control is crucial for meditative states and related traits. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate such interplay in a highly selected group of “virtuoso” meditators (Theravada Buddhist monks), with long-term training in the two main meditation styles: focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) meditation. Specifically, we investigated the differences between FA meditation, OM meditation and resting state in the coupling between the posterior cingulate cortex, core node of the Default Mode Network (DMN) implicated in mind wandering and self-related processing, and the whole brain, with a recently developed phase coherence approach. Our findings showed a state dependent coupling of posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to nodes of the DMN and of the executive control brain network in the alpha frequency band (8–12 Hz), related to different attentional and cognitive control processes in FA and OM meditation, consistently with the putative role of alpha band synchronization in the functional mechanisms for attention and consciousness. The coupling of PCC with left medial prefrontal cortex (lmPFC) and superior frontal gyrus characterized the contrast between the two meditation styles in a way that correlated with meditation expertise. These correlations may be related to a higher mindful observing ability and a reduced identification with ongoing mental activity in more expert meditators. Notably, different styles of meditation and different meditation expertise appeared to modulate the dynamic balance between fronto-parietal (FP) and DMN networks. Our results support the idea that the interplay between the DMN and the FP network in the alpha band is crucial for the transition from resting state to different meditative states. PMID:25360102

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in early and late hepatocarcinogenesis with focus on the role of linoleic acid and its hydroperoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagmeister, S.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas are devastating cancers with high mortality rates. Major risk factors are chronic hepatitis and associated cirrhosis as consequence of viral hepatitis infections, chronically ethanol consumption or metabolic disorders. While the stepwise development of liver cancer is well investigated, the role of mesenchymal cells in this process is largely unknown. To analyse epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in advanced stages of hepatocarcinogenesis, we established new cell lines from human hepatocellular carcinomas and obtained several hepatocarcinoma (HCC)-, B-lymphoblastoid (BLC)- and myofibroblastoid (MF)-lines. BLC- and MF-supernatants were able to increase DNA replication of premalignant hepatocytes. Supernatants of MF-lines enhanced angiogenesis and increased migration of HCC-lines. Besides these pro-tumourigenic effects we could also observe tumouricidal properties of mesenchymal cells, as BLC-supernatants induced cell death of HCC-lines. Linoleic acid is an important source for hydroperoxides, which may be generated either endogenously in the course of inflammation or exogenously during food processing. We found that linoleic acid hydroperoxides (=LOOH) were able to activate mesenchymal cells of the liver resulting in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors including TNF-alpha (=tumour necrosis factor alpha) and HB-EGF (=heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor), which turned out to be a growth factor for premalignant hepatocytes. Furthermore LOOH enhanced the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells via upregulation of the antiapoptotic enzyme heme oxygenase 1 and stimulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, the results of our studies confirm the crucial role of different mesenchymal cells in early and late hepatocarcinogenesis and propose a tumour-promoting effect of LOOH. (author) [de

  20. Development of miniaturized proximity focused streak tubes for visible light and x-ray applications. Final report and progress, April-September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuny, J.J.; Knight, A.J.

    1978-02-01

    Research performed to develop miniaturized proximity focused streak camera tubes (PFST) for application in the visible and the x-ray modes of operation is described. The objective of this research was to provide an engineering design and to fabricate a visible and an x-ray prototype tube to be provided to LASL for test and evaluation. Materials selection and fabrication procedures, particularly the joining of beryllium to a suitable support ring for use as the x-ray window, are described in detail. The visible and x-ray PFST's were successfully fabricated

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in early and late hepatocarcinogenesis with focus on the role of linoleic acid and its hydroperoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagmeister, S

    2009-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas are devastating cancers with high mortality rates. Major risk factors are chronic hepatitis and associated cirrhosis as consequence of viral hepatitis infections, chronically ethanol consumption or metabolic disorders. While the stepwise development of liver cancer is well investigated, the role of mesenchymal cells in this process is largely unknown. To analyse epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in advanced stages of hepatocarcinogenesis, we established new cell lines from human hepatocellular carcinomas and obtained several hepatocarcinoma (HCC)-, B-lymphoblastoid (BLC)- and myofibroblastoid (MF)-lines. BLC- and MF-supernatants were able to increase DNA replication of premalignant hepatocytes. Supernatants of MF-lines enhanced angiogenesis and increased migration of HCC-lines. Besides these pro-tumourigenic effects we could also observe tumouricidal properties of mesenchymal cells, as BLC-supernatants induced cell death of HCC-lines. Linoleic acid is an important source for hydroperoxides, which may be generated either endogenously in the course of inflammation or exogenously during food processing. We found that linoleic acid hydroperoxides (=LOOH) were able to activate mesenchymal cells of the liver resulting in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors including TNF-alpha (=tumour necrosis factor alpha) and HB-EGF (=heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor), which turned out to be a growth factor for premalignant hepatocytes. Furthermore LOOH enhanced the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells via upregulation of the antiapoptotic enzyme heme oxygenase 1 and stimulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, the results of our studies confirm the crucial role of different mesenchymal cells in early and late hepatocarcinogenesis and propose a tumour-promoting effect of LOOH. (author) [German] Bei hepatozellulaeren Karzinomen handelt es sich um Krebserkrankungen mit einer ausserordentlich hohen

  2. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens. Final subcontract report, 31 January 1991--6 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  3. Course workshop for teachers Nuclear energy in education: A didactic focus, an interactive approach with contributions from the new communications and information technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Matzen, Claudio; Herrera Carmona, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A teacher education activity is describes, a course-workshop with a mixed interactive approach, N uclear Energy in Education: A Didactic Focus , which was undertaken from July to October 2000 from Region III to X in Chile, in university rooms with video-conferencing and with Internet communications support. It is a course-workshop that uses the new information and communications (NTIC) technologies to present and discuss the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, as crossover curricular content that exemplifies the relationships between science, technology and society, while presenting methodological proposals for transferring the contents and activities to the Educational System's primary and secondary levels

  4. Sensor-based assessment of the in-situ quality of human computer interaction in the cars : final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Human attention is a finite resource. When interrupted while performing a task, this : resource is split between two interactive tasks. People have to decide whether the benefits : from the interruptive interaction will be enough to offset the loss o...

  5. Investigations of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) interactions in Southeast Washington streams. Final report 1992; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, K.D.; Martin, S.W.; Schuck, M.L.; Scholz, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed

  6. Medicare Program; Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Alternative Payment Model (APM) Incentive Under the Physician Fee Schedule, and Criteria for Physician-Focused Payment Models. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) repeals the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) methodology for updates to the physician fee schedule (PFS) and replaces it with a new approach to payment called the Quality Payment Program that rewards the delivery of high-quality patient care through two avenues: Advanced Alternative Payment Models (Advanced APMs) and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) for eligible clinicians or groups under the PFS. This final rule with comment period establishes incentives for participation in certain alternative payment models (APMs) and includes the criteria for use by the Physician-Focused Payment Model Technical Advisory Committee (PTAC) in making comments and recommendations on physician-focused payment models (PFPMs). Alternative Payment Models are payment approaches, developed in partnership with the clinician community, that provide added incentives to deliver high-quality and cost-efficient care. APMs can apply to a specific clinical condition, a care episode, or a population. This final rule with comment period also establishes the MIPS, a new program for certain Medicare-enrolled practitioners. MIPS will consolidate components of three existing programs, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), the Physician Value-based Payment Modifier (VM), and the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program for Eligible Professionals (EPs), and will continue the focus on quality, cost, and use of certified EHR technology (CEHRT) in a cohesive program that avoids redundancies. In this final rule with comment period we have rebranded key terminology based on feedback from stakeholders, with the goal of selecting terms that will be more easily identified and understood by our stakeholders.

  7. Nursing documentation in inpatient psychiatry: The relevance of nurse-patient interactions in progress notes-A focus group study with mental health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Kjellaug K; Bjørkly, Stål; Råheim, Målfrid

    2018-02-01

    To gain insight into mental health staff's perception of writing progress notes in an acute and subacute psychiatric ward context. The nursing process structures nursing documentation. Progress notes are intended to be an evaluation of a patient's nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. Within this template, a patient's status and the care provided are to be recorded. The therapeutic nurse-patient relationship is recognised as a key component of psychiatric care today. At the same time, the biomedical model remains strong. Research literature exploring nursing staff's experiences with writing progress notes in psychiatric contexts, and especially the space given to staff-patient relations, is sparse. Qualitative design. Focus group interviews with mental health staff working in one acute and one subacute psychiatric ward were conducted. Systematic text condensation, a method for transverse thematic analysis, was used. Two main categories emerged from the analysis: the position of the professional as an expert and distant observer in the progress notes, and the weak position of professional-patient interactions in progress notes. The participants did not perceive that the current recording model, which is based on the nursing process, supported a focus on patients' resources or reporting professional-patient interactions. This model appeared to put ward staff in an expert position in relation to patients, which made it challenging to involve patients in the recording process. Essential aspects of nursing care related to recovery and person-centred care were not prioritised for documentation. This study contributes to the critical examination of the documentation praxis, as well as to the critical examination of the documentation tool as to what is considered important to document. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  9. The role of the final state interaction in the ionization of the K- shell during the β-decay of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, E.G.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have calculated the contribution of the final state interaction to the ionization of the K-shell during the β - and β + decays. The contributions to the spectra of the β particles and to the total probability of the K shell ionization are obtained. The disagreement between the calculated values and the experimental data for the latter is shown to diminish strongly. The influence of the secondary electrons on the distribution is also determined. 27 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Model-Independent Analysis of the Neutron-Proton Final-State Interaction Region in the $\\pi\\pi \\to pn\\pi^+$ Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Uzikov, Yu N

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the \\pi\\pi\\to pn\\pi^+ reaction measured in an exclusive two-arm experiment at 800 MeV show a narrow peak arising from the strong proton-neutron final-state interaction. It was claimed, within the framework of a certain model, that this peak contained up to a 25 % spin-singlet final-state contribution. By comparing the data with those of \\pi\\pi\\to d\\pi^+ in a largely model-independent way, it is here demonstrated that at all the angles measured the whole of the peak could be explained as being due to spin-triplet final states, with the spin-singlet being at most a few percent. Good qualitative agreement with the measured proton analysing power is also found within this approach.

  11. Turkish Final Year Medical Students' Exposure to and Attitudes Concerning Drug Company Interactions: A Perspective from a Minimally Regulated Environment for Medical Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazim Ercument Beyhun

    Full Text Available Interactions between drug companies and medical students may affect evidence-based medical practice and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess drug company-medical student interactions in a medical faculty where limited specific national or institutional regulations apply between drug companies and medical students. The objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and attitudes of final year medical students in terms of drug company-medical student and physician interactions, to identify factors affecting those attitudes and to provide data for policymakers working on the regulation of interactions between drug companies and medical students. This anonymous questionnaire-based study of 154 medical final year medical students at the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Trabzon, Turkey, in April and May 2015 attracted a response rate of 92.2% (n/N, 154/164. Exposure to interaction with a pharmaceutical representative was reported by 90.3% (139/154 of students, and 68.8% (106/154 reported experiencing such interaction alongside a resident. In addition, 83.7% (128/153 of students reported an interaction during internship. Furthermore, 69.9% (107/153 of students agreed that interactions influence physicians' prescription preferences, while 33.1% (51/154 thought that a medical student should never accept a gift from a drug company and 24.7% (38/154 agreed with the proposition that "drug companies should not hold activities in medical faculties". Students with rational prescription training expressed greater agreement with the statement "I am skeptical concerning the information provided by drug companies during interactions" than those who had not received such training, and this finding was supported by logistic regression [O.R.(C.I, p -3.7(1.2-11.5, p = 0.022]. Acceptance of advertisement brochures was found to significantly reduce the level of agreement with the proposition that "A physician should not accept any

  12. Turkish Final Year Medical Students' Exposure to and Attitudes Concerning Drug Company Interactions: A Perspective from a Minimally Regulated Environment for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhun, Nazim Ercument; Kolayli, Cevriye Ceyda; Can, Gamze; Topbas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between drug companies and medical students may affect evidence-based medical practice and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess drug company-medical student interactions in a medical faculty where limited specific national or institutional regulations apply between drug companies and medical students. The objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and attitudes of final year medical students in terms of drug company-medical student and physician interactions, to identify factors affecting those attitudes and to provide data for policymakers working on the regulation of interactions between drug companies and medical students. This anonymous questionnaire-based study of 154 medical final year medical students at the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Trabzon, Turkey, in April and May 2015 attracted a response rate of 92.2% (n/N, 154/164). Exposure to interaction with a pharmaceutical representative was reported by 90.3% (139/154) of students, and 68.8% (106/154) reported experiencing such interaction alongside a resident. In addition, 83.7% (128/153) of students reported an interaction during internship. Furthermore, 69.9% (107/153) of students agreed that interactions influence physicians' prescription preferences, while 33.1% (51/154) thought that a medical student should never accept a gift from a drug company and 24.7% (38/154) agreed with the proposition that "drug companies should not hold activities in medical faculties". Students with rational prescription training expressed greater agreement with the statement "I am skeptical concerning the information provided by drug companies during interactions" than those who had not received such training, and this finding was supported by logistic regression [O.R.(C.I), p -3.7(1.2-11.5), p = 0.022]. Acceptance of advertisement brochures was found to significantly reduce the level of agreement with the proposition that "A physician should not accept any gift from a

  13. An Interaction of Economy and Environment in Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Modelling with a Focus on Climate Change Issues in Korea : A Proto-type Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Seung Hun; Dellink, Rob; Nam, Yunmi; Kim, Yong Gun; Song, Yang Hoon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the beginning of the 21st century, climate change is one of hottest issues in arena of both international environment and domestic one. During the COP6 meeting held in The Hague, over 10,000 people got together from the world. This report is a series of policy study on climate change in context of Korea. This study addresses on interactions of economy and environment in a perfect foresight dynamic computable general equilibrium with a focus on greenhouse gas mitigation strategy in Korea. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate greenhouse gas mitigation portfolios of changes in timing and magnitude with a particular focus on developing a methodology to integrate the bottom-up information on technical measures to reduce pollution into a top-down multi-sectoral computable general equilibrium framework. As a non-Annex I country Korea has been under strong pressure to declare GHG reduction commitment. Of particular concern is economic consequences GHG mitigation would accrue to the society. Various economic assessment have been carried out to address on the issue including analyses on cost, ancillary benefit, emission trading, so far. In this vein, this study on GHG mitigation commitment is a timely answer to climate change policy field. Empirical results available next year would be highly demanded in the situation. 62 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Dale Robert; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting)

  15. Effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime: the case of the 4s-hole lifetime of Sn metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The first theoretical study of the effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime is presented. The 4s-hole lifetime width of Sn metal is calculated by an ab-initio atomic many-body theory (Green's function method). When the final-state interaction in the 4p4d two-hole state, created by the 4s -1 -4p -1 4d -1 εf super Coster-Kronig (CK) transition of the initial 4s hole, is explicitly taken into account, the ab-initio atomic many-body calculation of the 4s-hole X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of Sn atom can provide excellent agreement with experiment in both the 4s-hole energy and the 4s-hole lifetime width. Otherwise, the many-body calculation underestimates considerably the 4s-hole lifetime width. The 4p4d two-hole state interacts strongly with the 4d triple-hole state by the 4p -1 4d -1 -4d -3 εf super CK transition. The interaction affects greatly the initial 4s-hole lifetime width

  16. Turkish Final Year Medical Students’ Exposure to and Attitudes Concerning Drug Company Interactions: A Perspective from a Minimally Regulated Environment for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhun, Nazim Ercument; Kolayli, Cevriye Ceyda; Can, Gamze; Topbas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between drug companies and medical students may affect evidence-based medical practice and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess drug company–medical student interactions in a medical faculty where limited specific national or institutional regulations apply between drug companies and medical students. The objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and attitudes of final year medical students in terms of drug company–medical student and physician interactions, to identify factors affecting those attitudes and to provide data for policymakers working on the regulation of interactions between drug companies and medical students. This anonymous questionnaire-based study of 154 medical final year medical students at the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Trabzon, Turkey, in April and May 2015 attracted a response rate of 92.2% (n/N, 154/164). Exposure to interaction with a pharmaceutical representative was reported by 90.3% (139/154) of students, and 68.8% (106/154) reported experiencing such interaction alongside a resident. In addition, 83.7% (128/153) of students reported an interaction during internship. Furthermore, 69.9% (107/153) of students agreed that interactions influence physicians’ prescription preferences, while 33.1% (51/154) thought that a medical student should never accept a gift from a drug company and 24.7% (38/154) agreed with the proposition that “drug companies should not hold activities in medical faculties”. Students with rational prescription training expressed greater agreement with the statement “I am skeptical concerning the information provided by drug companies during interactions” than those who had not received such training, and this finding was supported by logistic regression [O.R.(C.I), p -3.7(1.2–11.5), p = 0.022]. Acceptance of advertisement brochures was found to significantly reduce the level of agreement with the proposition that “A physician should not

  17. X-ray M4,5 Resonant Raman Scattering from La metal with final 4p hole: Calculations with 4p-4d-4f configuration interaction in the final state and comparison with the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, M.; Braicovich, L.; Tagliaferri, A.; Dallera, C.; Giarda, K.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Brookes, N.B.; Borgatti, F.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering (RRS) in La in the whole M 4,5 region ending with a state with a 4p hole, along the sequence 3d 10 4f 0 →3d 9 4f 1 →3d 10 4p 5 4f 1 . The final state configuration mixes with that with two 4d holes i.e. 3d 10 4d 8 4f n+2 having almost the same energy. Thus RRS must be described by introducing final state Configuration Interaction (CI) between states with one 4p hole and with two 4d holes. This approach allows detailed experimental data on La-metal to be interpreted on the basis of a purely ionic approach. It is shown that the inclusion of CI is crucial and has very clear effects. The calculations with the Kramers-Heisenberg formula describe all measured spectral features appearing in the strict Raman regime i.e. dispersing with the incident photon energy. In the experiment also a nondispersive component is present when the excitation energy is greater than about 2 eV above the M 5 peak. The shape and position of this component is well accounted for by a model based on all possible partitions of the excitation energy between localised and extended states. However, the intensity of the nondispersive component is greater in the measurements, suggesting a rearrangement in the intermediate excited state. The comparison of ionic calculations with the metal measurements is legitimate, as shown by the comparison between the measurements on La-metal and on LaF 3 with M 5 excitation, giving the same spectrum within the experimental accuracy. Moreover, the experiment shows that the final lifetime broadening is much greater in the final states corresponding to lower outgoing photon energies than in the states corresponding to higher outgoing photon energies. (author)

  18. Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: response of vegetation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipling, E.B.

    1995-02-28

    The overall objectives of this project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change. To meet these objectives, controlled-environment studies were conducted on cotton, lemon, rice, and soybean and a long-term open-top chamber study was continued on orange. Much progress was made on development of plant growth models for cotton, wheat, rice, and soybean. In addition, there were two special modeling efforts which have the potential for contributing to all of the crop models. These efforts are concerned with modeling root growth and physical and chemical processes in soil and with modeling the effect of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates as a function of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and vapor pressure deficit. The root growth and soil process modeling is important because it enables us to estimate the water available to the plant. The modeling of effects of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates enables them to estimate dry weight gain and water use by the plant. These are both important components of the interaction of CO{sub 2} concentration with temperature and water availability. The work on stomatal aperture, photosynthesis, and transpiration has the added benefit of allowing us to improve predictions of energy partitioning by the terrestrial biosphere. The lack of realistic energy partitioning is a serious deficiency of the present general circulation models which are used to predict how climate will change. An additional important aspect of the rice experiments is a study of methane emissions of paddy-grown (i.e., flooded) rice grown under two levels of CO{sub 2} and three

  19. Carcinogen-DNA interaction study by base sequence footprinting. Final report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies on acetylaminofluorene (AAF) modified DNA demonstrated three kinds of structural changes in DNA of defined base sequence. For example, adduct formation by N-Aco-AAF was found at each guanine. We studied the interaction of IgG specific for AAF guanosine in an in vitro system using AAF modified phi X-174 rf DNA. We had expected to find protection against DNAase I digestion. Instead, when the DNA was immunobound to an inert matrix via the IgG, DNAase I digestion was enhanced 20 fold without changing the base sequence pattern of digestion. DNAase I hypersensitive sites are a necessary but not a sufficient condition for transcription. Moreover, some hypersensitive sites are stably propagated, independent of the continued presence of the inducer. Stability of these hypersensitive sites in the absence of their inducer suggests that they can be propagated. It appeared likely that distortion of DNA by a carcinogen adduct such as AAF, and the interaction of this modified DNA with a specific protein such as IgG or cellular proteins might inappropriately enhance the transcription of specific genes. That hypothesis will be tested; surprisingly, little is known about the early action of carcinogens on expression of specific genes. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Simulation of the geochemical interactions in a natural CO2 deposit: the example of Springerville - Saint-Johns (USA). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guern, C.; Gaus, I.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study is a better understanding of the geochemical operating of natural analogues by the simulation of scenario representative of the evolution of site since the arrival of CO 2 still today. This exercise concerns the Springerville site. Simulation tests with the PHREEQC code have been realized. This final report presents in the first part how the data are collected on a natural CO 2 , then a bibliographic synthesis on the observed impacts of the CO 2 on a deposit. The fourth part is the simulation of the geochemical interactions in the natural CO 2 deposit of Springerville. (A.L.B.)

  1. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  2. Focusing ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woermann, Niklas

    2018-01-01

    underpinnings of focusing ethnographic research by comparing different schools of thought and suggesting a practice theory-based approach. It argues that many research projects are focused but do not reflect on the process of focusing, describes how to identify focal settings or practices, and introduces......Building theory with ethnography and filmic research increasingly requires focussing on key practices or settings, instead of painting a broad panorama of a culture. But few authors discuss why and how to focus. This article provides a systematic discussion of the theoretical and methodological...

  3. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R γ) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth

  4. Study of topological properties of point-shaped photon interactions by means of energy flows in hadronic final states at large transverse momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapp, C.

    1990-03-01

    The pointlike γ-parton interactions in γ-proton reactions are evaluated in terms of energy-flows. Only charged particles in the forward hemisphere of the overall CM-system (i.e. χ F >> 0) are used. The pointlike processes should exhibit '2-jetlike' structures. To disentangle the pointlike component from hadronlike photon interactions hadron and photon induced interactions have been studied. The experiment was carried out by the WA69 collaboration using the facilities of the CERN-Ω spectrometer. Both datasets were recorded with identical detector setups in order to minimize systematic effects. A tagged photon beam with energies between 65 and 175 GeV and mixed hadron beams (π + /K + , π - /K - ) at fixed energies of 80 and 140 GeV were used. For high transverse momenta the pointlike interactions are calculable in QCD at lowest order (α.α s ). Since energy-flows depend on all final state particles a collective measure for the hardness of an event has been introduced (Σip 2 perpendicular to in eventplane ). Only the energy-flows from photoproduction give evidence for the presence of 2-jetlike processes. The hadron induced distributions are scaled in order to emulate the behaviour of a hadronlike photon. The difference between the photon and scaled hadroninduced distributions is compared to a Monte Carlo calculation of the pointlike processes. (orig.) [de

  5. Focused Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Knoblauch

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I focus on a distinctive kind of sociological ethnography which is particularly, though not exclusively, adopted in applied research. It has been proposed that this branch of ethno­graphy be referred to as focused ethnography. Focused ethnography shall be delineated within the context of other common conceptions of what may be called conventional ethnography. However, rather than being opposed to it, focused ethno­graphy is rather complementary to conventional ethnography, particularly in fields that are charac­teristic of socially and functionally differentiated contemporary society. The paper outlines the back­ground as well as the major methodological features of focused ethnography, such as short-term field visits, data intensity and time intensity, so as to provide a background for future studies in this area. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503440

  6. Dialogicality in Focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The phenomenon which dialogism addresses is human interaction. It enables us to conceptualise human interaction as intersubjective, symbolic, cultural, transformative and conflictual, in short, as complex. The complexity of human interaction is evident in all domains of human life, for example, i......, because rather than applying dialogism to this or that domain, the present volume focuses on dialogicality itself to interrogate the concepts and methods which are taken for granted in the burgeoning literature. (Imprint: Nova Press)...

  7. Study of four-lepton final states in electron-positron interactions at 29 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petradza, A.

    1989-08-01

    This thesis presents a study of electron-positron scattering to four light leptons. The motivations behind it are twofold. Firstly, the study is a test of the theory of electron-positron interactions to 4th order in the fine structure constant α. A deviation from the theory could indicate the existence of a heavy new particle. Secondly, a measurement of these processes may prove useful in the understanding of other QED-type reactions. The method for simulating the four-lepton processes by the Monte Carlo event generator of Berends, Daverveldt and Kleiss is described. Theoretical predictions are compared to data from the Mark II and HRS experiments at the PEP storage ring. The observed events consist of four leptons at large angles. Data for all three e + e - e + e - , e + e - μ + μ - and μ + μ - μ + μ - processes are well described by the QED Monte Carlo calculation. The various kinematical distributions are in good agreement with QED to order α 4 . 18 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs

  8. Final report for Fundamental study of long-short interfacial wave interactions with application for flow regime development

    CERN Document Server

    McCready, M

    2000-01-01

    The long waves that cause slugs almost always form more slowly than short waves, and linear stability always predicts that the growth rate for long waves is much less than that for short waves. However, at many conditions above neutral stability, long waves dominate the wave field. Three different studies were undertaken as part of the funded work: (1) linear interaction for unsteady flows; (2) wave evolution in oil-water channel flows; (3) retrograde stability and subcritical bifurcations. The oil-water system was used as a surrogate for gas-liquid systems because the gas phase is usually turbulent, and this complication is thus avoided although the phenomena involved are similar. The following overall conclusions about flow regime development were reached: (a) Oscillations in pressure and flow rate, due to interfacial waves or a malfunctioning pump, can cause significant growth rate changes in short waves within narrow FR-equency ranges, but probably do not have a large effect on long waves and thus regime ...

  9. Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: Response of vegetation. Final report, September 1, 1988--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acock, B.; Kimball, B.A.

    1995-02-01

    The current project was initiated in 1991, and full details of the scope of the project are contained in the original proposal. that original proposal was reviewed and approved for three years funding. Progress made in 1991-92 and 1992-93 was described in annual Progress Reports and Statements of Work. This document summarizes progress made over the duration of the project, but with an emphasis on the final year`s (1993-94) results. Several of the important experiments are ongoing, to the extent that alternative funding could be arranged, and analyses of data from several of the earlier completed experiments is continuing. Therefore, this Final Report is also intermediary in nature, and additional results from this project will be reported in the open literature in the future. The overall objectives of the project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change.

  10. A model-independent analysis of final-state interactions in B̄{sub d/s}{sup 0}→J/ψππ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daub, J.T. [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) andBethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn,D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hanhart, C. [Institut für Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics,Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kubis, B. [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) andBethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn,D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Exploiting B-meson decays for Standard Model tests and beyond requires a precise understanding of the strong final-state interactions that can be provided model-independently by means of dispersion theory. This formalism allows one to deduce the universal pion-pion final-state interactions from the accurately known ππ phase shifts and, in the scalar sector, a coupled-channel treatment with the kaon-antikaon system. In this work an analysis of the decays B̄{sub d}{sup 0}→J/ψπ{sup +}π{sup −} and B̄{sub s}{sup 0}→J/ψπ{sup +}π{sup −} is presented. We find very good agreement with the data up to 1.05 GeV in the ππ invariant mass, with a number of parameters reduced significantly compared to a phenomenological analysis. In addition, the phases of the amplitudes are correct by construction, a crucial feature for many CP violation measurements in heavy-meson decays.

  11. A model-independent analysis of final-state interactions in {overline{B}}_{d/s}^0to J/ψ π π

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, J. T.; Hanhart, C.; Kubis, B.

    2016-02-01

    Exploiting B-meson decays for Standard Model tests and beyond requires a precise understanding of the strong final-state interactions that can be provided model-independently by means of dispersion theory. This formalism allows one to deduce the universal pion-pion final-state interactions from the accurately known ππ phase shifts and, in the scalar sector, a coupled-channel treatment with the kaon-antikaon system. In this work an analysis of the decays {overline{B}}_d^0to J/ψ {π}+{π}- and {overline{B}}_s^0to J/ψ {π}+{π}- is presented. We find very good agreement with the data up to 1.05 GeV in the ππ invariant mass, with a number of parameters reduced significantly compared to a phenomenological analysis. In addition, the phases of the amplitudes are correct by construction, a crucial feature for many CP violation measurements in heavy-meson decays.

  12. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  13. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  14. Without 'Focus'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Sevi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that a notion of 'focus', more or less as conceived of in Jackendoff (1972, must be incorporated into our theory of grammar, as a means of accounting for certain observed correlations between prosodic facts and semantic/pragmatic facts. In this paper, we put forth the somewhat radical idea that the time has come to give up this customary view, and eliminate 'focus' from our theory of grammar. We argue that such a move is both economical and fruitful.Research over the years has revealed that the correlations between prosody, 'focus', and the alleged semantic/pragmatic effects of focus are much less clear and systematic than we may have initially hoped. First we argue that this state of affairs detracts significantly from the utility of our notion of 'focus', to the point of calling into question the very motivation for including it in the grammar. Then we look at some of the central data, and show how they might be analyzed without recourse to a notion of 'focus'. We concentrate on (i the effect of pitch accent placement on discourse congruence, and (ii the choice of 'associate' for the so-called 'focus sensitive' adverb only. We argue that our focus-free approach to the data improves empirical coverage, and begins to reveal patterns that have previously been obscured by preconceptions about 'focus'.ReferencesBeaver, D. & Clark, B. 2008. Sense and Sensitivity: How Focus Determines Meaning. Blackwell.Beaver, D., Clark, B., Flemming, E., Jaeger, T. F. & Wolters, M. 2007. ‘When semantics meets phonetics: Acoustical studies of second occurrence focus’. Language 83.2: 245–76.http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lan.2007.0053Beckman, M. & Hirschberg, J. 1994. ‘The ToBI Annotation Conventions’. Ms.,http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~julia/files/conv.pdf.Bolinger, D. 1972. ‘Accent is predictable (if you are a mind-reader’. Language 48.3: 633–44.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/412039Büring, D. 2006. ‘Focus projection and default

  15. Material focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we build on the notion of computational composites, which hold a material perspective on computational technology. We argue that a focus on the material aspects of the technology could be a fruitful approach to achieve new expressions and to gain a new view on the technology's role...... in design. We study two of the computer's material properties: computed causality and connectability and through developing two computational composites that utilize these properties we begin to explore their potential expressions....

  16. Plasma Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Alain; Jolas, Alain; Garconnet, J.-P.; Mascureau, J. de; Nazet, Christian; Coudeville, Alain; Bekiarian, Andre.

    1977-01-01

    The present report is the edition of the lectures given in a conference on the Focus experiment held at the Centre d'etudes de Limeil, on Oct. 1975. After a survey of the early laboratories one will find the main results obtained in Limeil concerning interferometry, laser scattering, electric and magnetic-measurements, X-ray and neutron emission and also the possible use of explosive current generators instead of capacitor banks at high energy levels. The principal lines of future research are given in the conclusion [fr

  17. Focus: Digital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Technology has been an all-important and defining element within the arts throughout the 20th century, and it has fundamentally changed the ways in which we produce and consume music. With this Focus we investigate the latest developments in the digital domain – and their pervasiveness and rapid...... production and reception of contemporary music and sound art. With ‘Digital’ we present four composers' very different answers to how technology impact their work. To Juliana Hodkinson it has become an integral part of her sonic writing. Rudiger Meyer analyses the relationships between art and design and how...

  18. High efficiency focus neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, H.; Amrollahi, R.; Zare, M.; Fazelpour, S.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, the new idea to increase the neutron yield of plasma focus devices is investigated and the results are presented. Based on many studies, more than 90% of neutrons in plasma focus devices were produced by beam target interactions and only 10% of them were due to thermonuclear reactions. While propounding the new idea, the number of collisions between deuteron ions and deuterium gas atoms were increased remarkably well. The COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2 was used to study the given idea in the known 28 plasma focus devices. In this circumstance, the neutron yield of this system was also obtained and reported. Finally, it was found that in the ENEA device with 1 Hz working frequency, 1.1 × 109 and 1.1 × 1011 neutrons per second were produced by D-D and D-T reactions, respectively. In addition, in the NX2 device with 16 Hz working frequency, 1.34 × 1010 and 1.34 × 1012 neutrons per second were produced by D-D and D-T reactions, respectively. The results show that with regards to the sizes and energy of these devices, they can be used as the efficient neutron generators.

  19. Using an in Silico Approach to Teach 3D Pharmacodynamics of the Drug-Target Interaction Process Focusing on Selective COX2 Inhibition by Celecoxib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Maurício T.; Primi, Marina C.; Silva, Nuno A. T. F.; Carvalho, Camila F.; Cunha, Micael R.; Parise-Filho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Teaching the molecular aspects of drug-target interactions and selectivity is not always an easy task. In this context, the use of alternative and engaging approaches could help pharmacy and chemistry students better understand this important topic of medicinal chemistry. Herein a 4 h practical exercise that uses freely available software as a…

  20. Focus Article: Oscillatory and long-range monotonic exponential decays of electrostatic interactions in ionic liquids and other electrolytes: The significance of dielectric permittivity and renormalized charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellander, Roland

    2018-05-01

    A unified treatment of oscillatory and monotonic exponential decays of interactions in electrolytes is displayed, which highlights the role of dielectric response of the fluid in terms of renormalized (effective) dielectric permittivity and charges. An exact, but physically transparent statistical mechanical formalism is thereby used, which is presented in a systematic, pedagogical manner. Both the oscillatory and monotonic behaviors are given by an equation for the decay length of screened electrostatic interactions that is very similar to the classical expression for the Debye length. The renormalized dielectric permittivities, which have similar roles for electrolytes as the dielectric constant has for pure polar fluids, consist in general of several entities with different physical meanings. They are connected to dielectric response of the fluid on the same length scale as the decay length of the screened interactions. Only in cases where the decay length is very long, these permittivities correspond approximately to a dielectric response in the long-wavelength limit, like the dielectric constant for polar fluids. Experimentally observed long-range exponentially decaying surface forces are analyzed as well as the oscillatory forces observed for short to intermediate surface separations. Both occur in some ionic liquids and in concentrated as well as very dilute electrolyte solutions. The coexisting modes of decay are in general determined by the bulk properties of the fluid and not by the solvation of the surfaces; in the present cases, they are given by the behavior of the screened Coulomb interaction of the bulk fluid. The surface-fluid interactions influence the amplitudes and signs or phases of the different modes of the decay, but not their decay lengths and wavelengths. The similarities between some ionic liquids and very dilute electrolyte solutions as regards both the long-range monotonic and the oscillatory decays are analyzed.

  1. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant]/SRL in situ tests: Part 2, Pictorial history of MIIT [Materials Interface Interactions Tests] and final MIIT matrices, assemblies, and sample listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Weinle, M.E.; Molecke, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    In situ testing of Savannah River Plant [SRP] waste glass is an important component in ensuring technical and public confidence in the safety and effective performance of the wasteforms. Savannah River Laboratory [SRL] is currently involved in joint programs involving field testing of SRP waste in Sweden, Belgium, and the United Kingdom. Most recently, this in situ effort has been expanded to include the first field tests to be conducted in the United States, involving burial of a variety of simulated nuclear waste systems. This new effort, called the Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT, is a program jointly conducted by Sandia National Laboratory/Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] and SRL. Over 1800 samples, supplied by the United States, France, West Germany, Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the United Kingdom, were buried approximately 650m below the earth's surface in the salt geology at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The MIIT program is one of the largest cooperative efforts ever undertaken in the waste management field; the data produced from these tests are designed to benefit a wide cross-section of the waste management community. An earlier document provided an overview of the WIPP MIIT program and described its place in the waste glass assessment program at Savannah River. This document represents the second in this series and its objectives include: (1) providing a pictorial history of assembly and installation of wasteforms, metals, and geologic samples in WIPP; (2) providing 'finalized and completed' sample matrices for the entire 7-part MIIT program; (3) documenting final sample assemblies by the use of schematic drawings, including each sample, its orientation, and its environment; and (4) providing a complete listing of all samples and the means for managing analyses and resulting data

  2. Focusing horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    This was the first magnetic horn developed by Simon Van der Meer to collect antiprotons in the AD complex. It was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV/c (protons at 26GeV/c, antiprotons at 3.6GeV/c) in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet. For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons. The development of this technology was a key step to the functioning of CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron as a proton - antiproton collider.

  3. Two- and quasi-two-body strange particle final state production in π+p interactions at low to intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, P.

    1982-10-01

    The two and quasi-two body final states Σ + K + , Σ + K* (892) + , Σ*(1385) + K + , Σ(1385) + K*(892) + produced by neutral strangeness exchange in π + p interactions are studied using our own 1-3 GeV/c data, comprising the 14 incident momenta of a two million picture bubble chamber experiment, in combination with the world data on the same and related channels. Because low energy resonance formation is not strongly coupled to the Σ,Σ* production channels, at very modest incident momenta their dominant features are seen to be understandable in terms of high energy hypercharge exchange phenomenology. We find that Regge models fitted to data in the 10 to 20 GeV/c range adequately describe the Σ and Σ* channels down to within a few hundred MeV/c of threshold and out to large center of mass scattering angles, and that over the range of the available world data weak exchange degeneracy expectations for these reactions are at least qualitatively successful. We observe that the SU(2), SU(3) flavor symmetries successfully describe these hypercharge exchange processes and relate them to charge exchange via sum rules and equalities expressing flavor independence of the strong interaction; in particular, we derive and test on the available world data a mass broken SU(3) sum rule for π + p → K + Σ + , π - p → K 0 Λ, K - p → anti K 0 n and test over a wider range of momenta than before an earlier expression relating Σ* and Δ production. We also find at least qualitative agreement between quark model predictions for forward hypercharge exchange and the data, and we find that 90 0 hypercharge exchange cross sections also conform to the expectations of the quark constituent picture for hadrons

  4. Dual-beam focused ion beam/electron microscopy processing and metrology of redeposition during ion-surface 3D interactions, from micromachining to self-organized picostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberlychan, Warren J

    2009-06-03

    Focused ion beam (FIB) tools have become a mainstay for processing and metrology of small structures. In order to expand the understanding of an ion impinging a surface (Sigmund sputtering theory) to our processing of small structures, the significance of 3D boundary conditions must be realized. We consider ion erosion for patterning/lithography, and optimize yields using the angle of incidence and chemical enhancement, but we find that the critical 3D parameters are aspect ratio and redeposition. We consider focused ion beam sputtering for micromachining small holes through membranes, but we find that the critical 3D considerations are implantation and redeposition. We consider ion beam self-assembly of nanostructures, but we find that control of the redeposition by ion and/or electron beams enables the growth of nanostructures and picostructures.

  5. Report on New Methods for Representing and Interacting with Qualitative Geographic Information, Stage 2: Task Group 3: Social-focused Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    interface. While browsing the web, John discovers that a number of freelance reporters tweeting about the recent events are not represented in the...his first write -up for the day, using the place tag cloud and co-occurrence matrix to focus on specific topics and their intersections. When reporting...worked until the early AM hours, John writes a summary piece of the events that occurred so far and heads to bed. Human-guided construction of

  6. Report on Integration of Existing Grid Models for N-R HES Interaction Focused on Balancing Authorities for Sub-hour Penalties and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJunkin, Timothy; Epiney, Aaron; Rabiti, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the effort in the Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy System (N-R HES) project on the level 4 milestone to consider integration of existing grid models into the factors for optimization on shorter time intervals than the existing electric grid models with the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) and Modelica [1] optimizations and economic analysis that are the focus of the project to date.

  7. Report on Integration of Existing Grid Models for N-R HES Interaction Focused on Balancing Authorities for Sub-hour Penalties and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJunkin, Timothy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This report provides a summary of the effort in the Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy System (N-R HES) project on the level 4 milestone to consider integration of existing grid models into the factors for optimization on shorter time intervals than the existing electric grid models with the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) and Modelica [1] optimizations and economic analysis that are the focus of the project to date.

  8. Validation of the Verbal and Social Interaction questionnaire: carers' focus in the carer-resident relationship in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities (VSI-SH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, D; Rask, M

    2013-04-01

    A questionnaire to measure the verbal and social interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities has been developed. It is an adaptation of a questionnaire originally used in a forensic psychiatric setting. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate the construct validity and the reliability of this new version of the Verbal and Social Interactions questionnaire for use in supported housing facilities (VSI-SH). Two hundred and twenty-three carers from municipal and privately run housing facilities completed the questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed, which resulted in six factors. The number of items was reduced from the original 47 to 30 in order to minimize factorial complexity and multiple loadings. The reliability was tested with Cronbach's alpha and good internal consistency for the questionnaire and five of the six factors was found. The resulting six factors and the items were compared to the conceptual model and four of the six factors corresponded well with the categories in this original theoretical model. The questionnaire can be a useful contribution to the study of interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  9. Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social…

  10. Final state interactions in K → ππ decays: ΔI = 1/2 rule vs. ε{sup '}/ε

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buras, Andrzej J. [TUM Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); TU Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); Gerard, Jean-Marc [Universite catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2017-01-15

    Dispersive effects from strong ππ rescattering in the final state interaction (FSI) of weak K → ππ decays are revisited with the goal to have a global view on their relative importance for the ΔI = 1/2 rule and the ratio ε{sup '}/ε in the standard model (SM). We point out that this goal cannot be reached within a pure effective (meson) field approach like chiral perturbation theory in which the dominant current-current operators governing the ΔI = 1/2 rule and the dominant density-density (four-quark) operators governing ε{sup '}/ε cannot be disentangled from each other. But in the context of a dual QCD approach, which includes both long-distance dynamics and the UV completion, that is, QCD at short-distance scales, such a distinction is possible. We find then that beyond the strict large N limit, N being the number of colours, FSIs are likely to be important for the ΔI = 1/2 rule but much less relevant for ε{sup '}/ε. The latter finding diminishes significantly hopes that improved calculations of ε{sup '}/ε would bring its SM prediction to agree with the experimental data, opening thereby an arena for important new physics contributions to this ratio. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of shape and spatial interaction of synaptic vesicles using data from focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Sporring, Jon

    2015-01-01

    deviations from spherical shape and systematic trends in their orientation. We studied three-dimensional representations of synapses obtained by manual annotation of focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) images of male mouse brain. The configurations of synaptic vesicles were regarded...... in excitatory synapses appeared to be of oblate ellipsoid shape and in inhibitory synapses appeared to be of cigar ellipsoid shape, and followed a systematic pattern regarding their orientation towards the active zone. Moreover, there was strong evidence of spatial alignment in the orientations of pairs...

  12. Genetics, mental illness, and complex disease: development and distribution of an interactive CD-ROM for genetic counselors. Final report for period 15 August 2000 - 31 December 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    2003-03-31

    "Genetics and Major Psychiatric Disorders: A Program for Genetic Counselors" provides an introduction to psychiatric genetics, with a focus on the genetics of common complex disease, for genetics professionals. The program is available as a CD-ROM and an online educational resource. The on-line version requires a direct internet connection. Each educational module begins with an interactive case study that raises significant issues addressed in each module. In addition, case studies provided throughout the educational materials support teaching of major concepts. Incorporated throughout the content are expert video clips, video clips from individuals affected by psychiatric illness, and optional "learn more" materials that offer greater depth about a particular topic. The structure of the CD-ROM permits self-navigation, but we have suggested a sequence that allows materials to build upon each other. At any point in the materials, users may pause and look up terms in the glossary or review the DSM-IV criteria for selected psychiatric disorders. A detailed site map is available for those who choose to self navigate through the content.

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  14. Introduction of Aureobasidium pullulans to the Phyllosphere of Organically Grown Strawberries with Focus on Its Establishment and Interactions with the Resident Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Reineke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is little knowledge of the establishment of repeatedly applied biological control agents (BCAs in the phyllosphere of plants and, in particular, their interactions with the resident microbiome. Under field conditions, the BCA Aureobasidium pullulans was applied as a model organism to organically grown strawberries during two subsequent years (2011, 2012, either as single strain treatment or with the co-application of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Fungal and bacterial communities of strawberry leaves were investigated by means of plate counts and 454 pyrosequencing. The establishment of the introduced A. pullulans strains considerably differed between the two years, presumably due to distinct environmental conditions. Short-term and long-term effects of BCA applications on the composition and diversity of fungal communities could be observed as a result of successful establishment of A. pullulans, in 2011, showing, for instance, reduced diversity of fungal communities by competitive displacement shortly after BCA introduction. Due to considerable dynamics in untreated resident microbial communities in the phyllosphere in general, however, we suggest that even the effects caused by the applied BCA preparations in 2011 are negligible under practical conditions.

  15. Factors affecting the potential of direct load control for non-generating utilities. Final report. [Distribution and wholesale power supply interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-04-01

    Several alternatives are available for achieving load management, including direct or voluntary control of customer loads, customer or utility energy storage systems for diurnal load shifting, and expanded interconnection and operation of electric power systems. All of these alternatives are available to the fully integrated (generating, transmitting and distributing) electric utility and the analysis of their effects encompasses the power supply and delivery system. However, the costs and benefits of the alternatives to the fully integrated electric utility are perhaps not so obvious. Therefore, by considering a non-generating utility, this analysis focuses upon the distribution system and wholesale power supply interaction as a step toward an analysis including the power supply and delivery system. This report develops an analysis procedure and discusses some of the relevant factors to be consdered in the application of direct load control for a non-generating utility system. The analysis concentrates on the distribution system only to determine the effect of rates and payback as a result of direct load control. Thus, the study is responsive to the specific needs of the non-generating utility. This analysis of direct load control encompasses the determination of those loads amenable to control, the selection of a suitable one-way communications system to rend control and the estimation of expected benefits and costs. The complementary functions to the application of direct load control such as automatic meter reading via the addition of a bi-directional communications system and voltage control are not included in the analysis but are detailed for future consideration.

  16. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, Scott [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The overall objectives of this research effort were to expand the capabilities of spectroscopic and ion chemistry tools for the structural characterization of polyatomic ions of relevance to the broad mission of the Department of Energy. Mass spectrometry currently plays an important role in virtually all of the molecular sciences by virtue of the value of the accurate measurement of mass and the structural information that can be derived from various structural probes based on, for example, ion chemistry, ion mobility, and ion spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry has long played important roles in supporting the missions of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies, particularly in the area of isotopic analysis of nuclides. Molecular mass spectrometry has played increasingly important roles is many aspects of the production and use of energy as the nation has diversified its energy portfolio. There is an ongoing need for the expansion of the measurement capabilities associated with molecular mass spectrometry that involves both technological developments as well as improved understanding of the chemical and physical processes that take place upon ionization and ion analysis in a mass spectrometer. Advances in mass spectrometry have impacted science broadly and further advances will be required to meet the needs of current energy and environmental research. This program has historically focused on the structural characterization of polyatomic ions, usually within the context of a tandem mass spectrometry experiment. A wide variety of physical and chemical processes can take place within a mass spectrometer and advantage can be taken of such processes to enhance the quality and quantity of information that can be derived for a given chemical system of interest. For example, ions can undergo interactions with neutral molecules/atoms, light, surfaces, electrons, or oppositely charged ions. The outcomes of all such interactions can be sensitive to the structures

  17. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  18. Plasma devices for focusing extreme light pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, J.; Gonoskov, A.A.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nazarov, W.; Quere, F.; Sergeev, A.M.; Yan, X.Q.

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of the laser, there has been a constant push toward increasing the laser peak intensity, as this has lead to opening the exploration of new territories, and the production of compact sources of particles and radiation with unprecedented characteristics. However, increasing the peak laser intensity is usually performed by enhancing the produced laser properties, either by lowering its duration or increasing its energy, which involves a great level of complexity for the laser chain, or comes at great cost. Focusing tightly is another possibility to increase the laser intensity, but this comes at the risk of damaging the optics with target debris, as it requires their placement in close proximity to the interaction region. Plasma devices are an attractive, compact alternative to tightly focus extreme light pulses and further increase the final laser intensity. (authors)

  19. Stay Focused! The Effects of Internal and External Focus of Attention on Movement Automaticity in Patients with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, E. C.; van der Kamp, J.; Houdijk, H.; Groet, E.; van Bennekom, C. A. M.; Scherder, E. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-task performance is often impaired after stroke. This may be resolved by enhancing patients’ automaticity of movement. This study sets out to test the constrained action hypothesis, which holds that automaticity of movement is enhanced by triggering an external focus (on movement effects), rather than an internal focus (on movement execution). Thirty-nine individuals with chronic, unilateral stroke performed a one-leg-stepping task with both legs in single- and dual-task conditions. Attentional focus was manipulated with instructions. Motor performance (movement speed), movement automaticity (fluency of movement), and dual-task performance (dual-task costs) were assessed. The effects of focus on movement speed, single- and dual-task movement fluency, and dual-task costs were analysed with generalized estimating equations. Results showed that, overall, single-task performance was unaffected by focus (p = .341). Regarding movement fluency, no main effects of focus were found in single- or dual-task conditions (p’s ≥ .13). However, focus by leg interactions suggested that an external focus reduced movement fluency of the paretic leg compared to an internal focus (single-task conditions: p = .068; dual-task conditions: p = .084). An external focus also tended to result in inferior dual-task performance (β = -2.38, p = .065). Finally, a near-significant interaction (β = 2.36, p = .055) suggested that dual-task performance was more constrained by patients’ attentional capacity in external focus conditions. We conclude that, compared to an internal focus, an external focus did not result in more automated movements in chronic stroke patients. Contrary to expectations, trends were found for enhanced automaticity with an internal focus. These findings might be due to patients’ strong preference to use an internal focus in daily life. Future work needs to establish the more permanent effects of learning with different attentional foci on re-automating motor

  20. Stay Focused! The Effects of Internal and External Focus of Attention on Movement Automaticity in Patients with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, E C; van der Kamp, J; Houdijk, H; Groet, E; van Bennekom, C A M; Scherder, E J A

    2015-01-01

    Dual-task performance is often impaired after stroke. This may be resolved by enhancing patients' automaticity of movement. This study sets out to test the constrained action hypothesis, which holds that automaticity of movement is enhanced by triggering an external focus (on movement effects), rather than an internal focus (on movement execution). Thirty-nine individuals with chronic, unilateral stroke performed a one-leg-stepping task with both legs in single- and dual-task conditions. Attentional focus was manipulated with instructions. Motor performance (movement speed), movement automaticity (fluency of movement), and dual-task performance (dual-task costs) were assessed. The effects of focus on movement speed, single- and dual-task movement fluency, and dual-task costs were analysed with generalized estimating equations. Results showed that, overall, single-task performance was unaffected by focus (p = .341). Regarding movement fluency, no main effects of focus were found in single- or dual-task conditions (p's ≥ .13). However, focus by leg interactions suggested that an external focus reduced movement fluency of the paretic leg compared to an internal focus (single-task conditions: p = .068; dual-task conditions: p = .084). An external focus also tended to result in inferior dual-task performance (β = -2.38, p = .065). Finally, a near-significant interaction (β = 2.36, p = .055) suggested that dual-task performance was more constrained by patients' attentional capacity in external focus conditions. We conclude that, compared to an internal focus, an external focus did not result in more automated movements in chronic stroke patients. Contrary to expectations, trends were found for enhanced automaticity with an internal focus. These findings might be due to patients' strong preference to use an internal focus in daily life. Future work needs to establish the more permanent effects of learning with different attentional foci on re-automating motor control

  1. SLC Final Performance and Lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, Nan

    2000-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was the first prototype of a new type of accelerator, the electron-positron linear collider. Many years of dedicated effort were required to understand the physics of this new technology and to develop the techniques for maximizing performance. Key issues were emittance dilution, stability, final beam optimization and background control. Precision, non-invasive diagnostics were required to measure and monitor the beams throughout the machine. Beam-based feedback systems were needed to stabilize energy, trajectory, intensity and the final beam size at the interaction point. variety of new tuning techniques were developed to correct for residual optical or alignment errors. The final focus system underwent a series of refinements in order to deliver sub-micron size beams. It also took many iterations to understand the sources of backgrounds and develop the methods to control them. The benefit from this accumulated experience was seen in the performance of the SLC during its final run in 1997-98. The luminosity increased by a factor of three to 3*10 30 and the 350,000 Z data sample delivered was nearly double that from all previous runs combined

  2. Collective focusing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this dissertation is the trapping confinement of pure electron plasmas in bumpy toroidal magnetic fields, with particular attention given to the trapping procedure and the behavior of the plasma during the final equilibrium. The most important aspects of the equilibrium studied were the qualitative nature of the plasma configuration and motion and its density, distribution and stability. The motivation for this study was that an unneutralized cloud of electrons contained in a toroidal system, sufficiently dense and stable, may serve to electrostatically focus ions (against centrifugal and self space charge forces) in a cyclic ion accelerator. Such an accelerator, known as a Collective Focusing Ion Accelerator (CFIA) could be far smaller than conventional designs (which use external magnetic fields directly to focus the ions) due to the smaller gyro-radium of an electron in a magnetic field of given strength. The electron cloud generally drifted poloidally at a finite radius from the toroidal minor axis. As this would preclude focusing ions with such clouds, damping this motion was investigated. Finite resistance in the normally perfectly conductive vessel wall did this. In further preparation for a working CFIA, additional experiments studied the effect of ions on the stability of the electron cloud

  3. Gassmaks. Study of requirement for national focus on research for increased value-added industrial process of natural gas. Final report; Gassmaks. Utredning av behov for nasjonal satsing paa forskning for oekt verdiskaping fra naturgass gjennom industriell foredling. Endelig rapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-08-15

    Final report concludes the importance of establishing the Research and Development program called 'Gassmaks'. The target of this program is increased value added to the natural gas loop. Strengthened know-how, industrial development and international competition force shall contribute to higher value added to community through industrial refining of natural gas. Gassmaks will by research based foundation exploit Norwegian natural gas resources environmental friendly. Highly prioritised are converting and use of natural gas to plastic raw materials, synthesis gas, synthetical fuel, energy processes, carbon materials, metallurgical processes and nutrients as proteins and fat. (AG). 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Regulatory focus and generalized trust: the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on trusting others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Johannes; Mayo, Ruth; Greifeneder, Rainer; Pfattheicher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals' responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals' habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1), and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3). Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4). Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (versus control condition) in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5). In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  5. Regulatory Focus and Generalized Trust: The Impact of Prevention-focused Self-regulation on Trusting Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eKeller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals’ responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals’ habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1, and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3. Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4. Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (vs. control condition in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5. In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Doing focus group research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge...... that interview data can be of some use if the distinction between natural and contrived data is given up and replaced with a distinction between interview data as topic or as resource. In greater detail, such scholars argue that interview data are perfectly adequate if the researcher wants to study the topic...... of interview interaction, but inadequate as data for studying phenomena that go beyond the phenomenon of interview interaction. Neither of these more and less sceptical positions are, on the face of it, surprising due to the ethnomethodological commitment to study social order as accomplished in situ...

  7. Low-wave number analysis of observations and ensemble forecasts to develop metrics for the selection of most realistic members to study multi-scale interactions between the environment and the convective organization of hurricanes: Focus on Rapid Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Chen, H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Haddad, Z. S.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are the product of complex multi-scale processes and interactions. The role of the environment has long been recognized. However, recent research has shown that convective-scale processes in the hurricane core might also play a crucial role in determining TCs intensity and size. Several studies have linked Rapid Intensification to the characteristics of the convective clouds (shallow versus deep), their organization (isolated versus wide-spread) and their location with respect to dynamical controls (the vertical shear, the radius of maximum wind). Yet a third set of controls signifies the interaction between the storm-scale and large-scale processes. Our goal is to use observations and models to advance the still-lacking understanding of these processes. Recently, hurricane models have improved significantly. However, deterministic forecasts have limitations due to the uncertainty in the representation of the physical processes and initial conditions. A crucial step forward is the use of high-resolution ensembles. We adopt the following approach: i) generate a high resolution ensemble forecast using HWRF; ii) produce synthetic data (e.g. brightness temperature) from the model fields for direct comparison to satellite observations; iii) develop metrics to allow us to sub-select the realistic members of the ensemble, based on objective measures of the similarity between observed and forecasted structures; iv) for these most-realistic members, determine the skill in forecasting TCs to provide"guidance on guidance"; v) use the members with the best predictive skill to untangle the complex multi-scale interactions. We will report on the first three goals of our research, using forecasts and observations of hurricane Edouard (2014), focusing on RI. We will focus on describing the metrics for the selection of the most appropriate ensemble members, based on applying low-wave number analysis (WNA - Hristova-Veleva et al., 2016) to the observed and

  8. Why most flavor-dependence predictions for nonleptonic charm decays are wrong: flavor symmetry and final-state interactions in nonleptonic decays of charmed hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-09-01

    Nonleptonic weak decays of strange hadrons are complicated by the interplay of weak and strong interactions. Models based either on symmetry properties or on the selection of certain types of diagrams are both open to criticism. The symmetries used are all broken in strong interactions, and the selection of some diagrams and neglect of others is never seriously justified. Furthermore, the number of related decays of strange hadrons is small, so that experimental data are insufficient for singificant tests of phenomenological models with a few free parameters. The discovery of charmed particles with many open channels for nonleptonic decays has provided a new impetus for a theoretical understanding of these processes. The GIM current provides a well defined weak hamiltonian, which can justifiably be used to first order. The QCD approach to strong interactions gives flavor-indpendent couplings and flavor symmetry broken only by quark masses. In a model with n generations of quarks and 2n flavors, a flavor symmetry group SU(2n) can be defined which is broken only by H/sub weak/ and the quark masses.Here again, the same two approaches by symmetry and dynamics have been used. But both types of treatment tend to consider only the symmetry properties or dominant diagrams of the weak interaction, including some subtle effects, while overlooking rather obvious effects of strong interactions

  9. Focused detection logging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus is disclosed for determining a characteristic of the media surrounding a borehole by emitting gamma radiation in at least one tightly collimated beam toward an earth formation adjacent a borehole, by detecting from a plurality of tightly collimated paths that are focused at a zone of intersection with and aligned to intersect with each emitted beam the gamma radiation scattered by the interaction of the emitted gamma radiation and the media at the zones of intersection, by misaligning the emitted beams and the tightly collimated paths to prevent their intersection, by detecting gamma radiation scattered by the interaction of the emitted gamma radiation and the media with the emitted beams and the tightly collimated paths misaligned and by determining from the detected gamma radiation a media characteristic. In one embodiment, the detection collimater used is formed of a material that is essentially opaque to gamma radiation at the energies of interest and includes a plurality of passageways that are spherically focused at a zone of intersection with one of the emitted beams of gamma radiation and that are arranged in a number of surfaces that are curved to be azimuthally symmetrical about the axis of the intersected beam. 14 figures

  10. Study of the K-barπ system in the 3 bodies final states, produced by 3 GeV/c K-p interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verglas, A.

    1966-01-01

    The K - p → K * (891) π reaction is a good example of a quasi two-body phenomenon, exhibiting the characteristics of 'peripherism'. The predictions of the 'one meson exchange', and 'absorption' models are compared with the experimental results. Conclusions are drawn concerning the production mechanism of the Kp → K * π reaction, as well as on the validity of the models. Finally, the K * (1400) resonance is studied and its isospin determined. (author) [fr

  11. Natural language query system design for interactive information storage and retrieval systems. Presentation visuals. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Liu, I-Hsiung

    1985-01-01

    This Working Paper Series entry represents a collection of presentation visuals associated with the companion report entitled Natural Language Query System Design for Interactive Information Storage and Retrieval Systems, USL/DBMS NASA/RECON Working Paper Series report number DBMS.NASA/RECON-17.

  12. A measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic-like cross section on a hydrocarbon target and final state interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Tammy [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Presented is the analysis of the μ charged-current quasielastic-like interaction with a polystyrene (CH or hydrocarbon) target in the MINER A experiment, which was exposed to a neutrino beam that peaked at 3.5 GeV.

  13. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Blasie; W.F. DeGrado; J.G. Saven; M.J. Therien

    2012-05-24

    The overall objective is to create robust artificial protein modules as scaffolds to control both (a) the conformation of novel cofactors incorporated into the modules thereby making the modules possess a desired functionality and (b) the organization of these functional modules into ordered macroscopic ensembles, whose macroscopic materials properties derive from the designed microscopic function of the modules. We focus on two specific types of cofactors for imparting functionality in this project; primarily nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores designed to exhibit extraordinary molecular hyperpolarizabilities, as well as donor-bridge-acceptor cofactors designed to exhibit highly efficient, 'through-bonds' light-induced electron transfer (LIET) over nano-scale distances. The ensembles range from 2-D to 3-D, designed to possess the degree of orientational and positional order necessary to optimize their macroscopic response, the latter ranging from liquid-crystalline or glass-like to long-range periodic. Computational techniques, firmly based in statistical thermodynamics, are utilized for the design the artificial protein modules, based on robust {alpha}-helical bundle motifs, necessarily incorporating the desired conformation, location, and environment of the cofactor. Importantly, this design approach also includes optimization of the interactions between the modules to promote their organization into ordered macroscopic ensembles in 2-D and 3-D via either directed-assembly or self-assembly. When long-range periodic order is required, the design can be optimized to result a specified lattice symmetry. The structure and functionality of the individual modules are fully characterized at the microscopic level, as well as that of the ensembles at the macroscopic level, employing modern experimental physical-chemical and computational techniques. These include, for example, multi-dimensional NMR, various pump-probe transient spectroscopies to ultrafast time

  14. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  15. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  16. An innovative, multidisciplinary educational program in interactive information storage and retrieval. Presentation visuals. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Gallagher, Mary C.

    1985-01-01

    This Working Paper Series entry represents a collection of presentation visuals associated with the companion report entitled An Innovative, Multidisciplinary Educational Program in Interactive Information Storage and Retrieval, USL/DBMS NASA/RECON Working Paper Series report number DBMS.NASA/RECON-12. The project objectives are to develop a set of transportable, hands-on, data base management courses for science and engineering students to facilitate their utilization of information storage and retrieval programs.

  17. The 'final order' problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, RH; Haneveld, WKK

    1998-01-01

    When the service department of a company selling machines stops producing and supplying spare parts for certain machines, customers are offered an opportunity to place a so-called final order for these spare parts. We focus on one customer with one machine. The customer plans to use this machine up

  18. The heating of plasma focus electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, E; Frignani, M; Mannucci, S; Rocchi, F; Sumini, M; Tartari, A

    2006-01-01

    Plasma focus (PF) technology development today is strictly related to the possibility of a high frequency repetitive working regime. One of the more relevant obstacles to this goal is the heating of structural components due to direct interaction with plasma. In this paper, temperature decay measurements of the inner electrode of a 7 kJ Mather type PF are presented. Data from several series of shots at different bank energies are analysed and compared with theoretical and numerical models. Two possible scale laws are derived from the experimental data to correlate thermal deposition with bank energy. It is found that a fraction of about 10% of total energy is released to the inner electrode. Finally, after some considerations about the cooling and heating mechanisms, an analysis on maximum temperature sustained by materials is presented

  19. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  20. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  1. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics. Final technical report, 1 September 1979-30 April 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, V.A.; Landau, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Final technical report on a contract supporting theoretical studies in nuclear physics at Oregon State University is presented. The research was led by Professors Landau and Madsen and carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis and scientists at LLNL-Livermore, KFA-Julich, Purdue University-West Lafayette, University of Oregon-Eugene, Florida State University-Talahasie, and TRIUMF-Vancouver. The studies included meson exchange current effects, quark effects,and relativistic/Dirac effects deduced from spin observables in p- 3 He scattering, coupled bound and continuum eigenstates in momentum space for kaons and antiprotons, and charge symmetry violation in π scattering from trinucleons. Additional studies included microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step processes, and differences in neutron and proton multipole matrix elements in low lying collective states and in giant resonances. 45 refs

  2. Search for strongly interacting supersymmetric particles decaying to final states with an isolated lepton with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Jeanette Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Two analyses searching for squarks and gluinos which decay into final states with multiple jets, an isolated electron or muon and a large missing transverse energy are presented. Both rely on data taken by the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC during 2012. The first analysis uses a subset of 5.8 fb -1 of this dataset, the other analysis uses the full statistics of 20.3 fb -1 . Both analysis share the same methods regarding the triggers and the background estimation techniques. The two dominant backgrounds are t anti t and W+jets production. The t anti t and the W+jets backgrounds are estimated in a semi-data-driven method. The minor QCD multi-jet background is estimated in an entirely data-driven method. The final background estimates in the analyses are derived in a profile-log-likelihood fit. None of the analyses sees an excess beyond Standard Model expectations. The analysis of the partial dataset derives limits in a MSUGRA/CMSSM model with parameters A 0 =0, tanβ=10 and μ>0 and excludes squarks and gluinos with masses below 1.2 TeV for equal squark and gluino masses. The analysis of the full dataset derives limits in simplified models and in a MSUGRA/CMSSM model with parameters A 0 =-2m 0 , tanβ=30 and μ>0. Gluinos (squarks) with masses below 1.2 TeV (750 GeV) can be excluded for vanishing χ 0 1 masses in simplified models. Gluino masses below 1.2 TeV can be excluded for every m 0 value in the MSUGRA/CMSSM model.

  3. Final Report for Project "A high-throughput pipeline for mapping inter-species interactions and metabolic synergy relevant to next-generation biofuel production"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Marx, Christopher J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Northen, Trent [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-01-03

    The goal of our project was to implement a pipeline for the systematic, computationally-driven study and optimization of microbial interactions and their effect on lignocellulose degradation and biofuel production. We specifically sought to design and construct artificial microbial consortia that could collectively degrade lignocellulose from plant biomass, and produce precursors of energy-rich biofuels. This project fits into the bigger picture goal of helping identify a sustainable strategy for the production of energy-rich biofuels that would satisfy the existing energy constraints and demand of our society. Based on the observation that complex natural microbial communities tend to be metabolically efficient and ecologically robust, we pursued the study of a microbial system in which the desired engineering function is achieved through division of labor across multiple microbial species. Our approach was aimed at bypassing the complexity of natural communities by establishing a rational approach to design small synthetic microbial consortia. Towards this goal, we combined multiple approaches, including computer modeling of ecosystem-level microbial metabolism, mass spectrometry of metabolites, genetic engineering, and experimental evolution. The microbial production of biofuels from lignocellulose is a complex, multi-step process. Microbial consortia are an ideal approach to consolidated bioprocessing: a community of microorganisms performs a wide variety of functions more efficiently and is more resilient to environmental perturbations than a microbial monoculture. Each organism we chose for this project addresses a specific challenge: lignin degradation (Pseudomonas putida); (hemi)cellulose degradation (Cellulomonas fimi); lignin degradation product demethoxylation (Methylobacterium spp); generation of biofuel lipid precursors (Yarrowia lipolytica). These organisms are genetically tractable, aerobic, and have been used in biotechnological applications

  4. Final Report: Development of a Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2, Fluid and Rock in EGS Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Brian J. [University of Utah; Pan, Feng [University of Utah

    2014-09-24

    This report summarizes development of a coupled-process reservoir model for simulating enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that utilize supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid. Specifically, the project team developed an advanced chemical kinetic model for evaluating important processes in EGS reservoirs, such as mineral precipitation and dissolution at elevated temperature and pressure, and for evaluating potential impacts on EGS surface facilities by related chemical processes. We assembled a new database for better-calibrated simulation of water/brine/ rock/CO2 interactions in EGS reservoirs. This database utilizes existing kinetic and other chemical data, and we updated those data to reflect corrections for elevated temperature and pressure conditions of EGS reservoirs.

  5. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  6. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  7. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996-Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeul, Vince R; Cole, Charles R; Bergeron, Marcel P; Thorne, Paul D; Wurstner, Signe K

    2001-01-01

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty

  8. White phosphorus pits focused feasibility study final July 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.; Martino, L.

    2007-08-21

    The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland (Figure 1.1). Considerable information about the WPP exists as a result of efforts to characterize the hazards associated with J-Field. Contamination in the J-Field Study Area was first detected during an environmental survey of the APG Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 (Nemeth et al. 1983) by the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA; predecessor to the U.S. Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field (three of them at the WPP) (Nemeth 1989). Contamination was also detected in 1983 during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science (1984). The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved installing and sampling nine wells (four at the WPP) and collecting and analyzing surficial and deep composite soil samples (including samples from the WPP area). In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a post-wide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field. In 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phase hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil-gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed (four at the WPP), a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today. The results of the USGS study were published by Hughes (1993).

  9. Identifying customer-focused performance measures : final report 655.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    The Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) completed a comprehensive customer satisfaction : assessment in July 2009. ADOT commissioned the assessment to acquire statistically valid data from residents : and community leaders to help it identify...

  10. Vibrational Stability of NLC Linac and Final Focus Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-09-25

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structure and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. Design to properly decouple the structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles is being pursued.

  11. Characterization of the Italian glasses and their interaction with clay Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) No 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantale, C.; Castelli, S.; Donato, A.; Traverso, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research work was the selection of a borosilicate glass composition suitable for the solidification of the HLW stream coming from the treatment of all the high-level wastes stored in Italy (MTR, Candu and Elk River) and the characterization of this glass with reference to the geological disposal. This research work was part of an Italian research project named 'Ulisse project', whose goal was the development and the demonstration of an integrated treatment of all the HLW stored in Italy, after their mixing (resulting waste: MCE waste). The main concept is to carry out a pre-treatment of the wastes, in order to concentrate the HLW fraction and to simplify the vitrification process, separating the most part of the inert salts. The research work concerning the separation process and pilot plant demonstration of the pre-treatment process were carried out in the framework of the CEC R and D programme (Contract No Fl1W-0011-lS). The laboratory studies concerning the vitrification of the resulting HLW streams and the vitrification demonstration in the Italian full-scale, inactive IVET plant complete the 'Ulisse project'. Some glass compositions were prepared and preliminarily characterized. The glass named BAZ was finally selected. A complete characterization of this glass was carried out in order to evaluate its mechanical, physical and physico-chemical properties. The chemical durability was evaluated by the MCC-1 static leach test at 90 0 C, using three different leachants and two surface-area to leachant-volume ratios. The same characterization programme was applied to the BAZ glass produced in the IVET plant during the plant vitrification demonstration programme. A comparison between the two glasses and a critical evaluation of their performances with respect to other nuclear waste glasses' durability was performed. 25 refs.; 46 figs.; 20 tabs

  12. Final Report for Project 13-4791: New Mechanistic Models of Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth Interactions for Advanced High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruzic, Jamie J [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Siegmund, Thomas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2018-03-20

    This project developed and validated a novel, multi-scale, mechanism-based model to quantitatively predict creep-fatigue crack growth and failure for Ni-based Alloy 617 at 800°C. Alloy 617 is a target material for intermediate heat exchangers in Generation IV very high temperature reactor designs, and it is envisioned that this model will aid in the design of safe, long lasting nuclear power plants. The technical effectiveness of the model was shown by demonstrating that experimentally observed crack growth rates can be predicted under both steady state and overload crack growth conditions. Feasibility was considered by incorporating our model into a commercially available finite element method code, ABAQUS, that is commonly used by design engineers. While the focus of the project was specifically on an alloy targeted for Generation IV nuclear reactors, the benefits to the public are expected to be wide reaching. Indeed, creep-fatigue failure is a design consideration for a wide range of high temperature mechanical systems that rely on Ni-based alloys, including industrial gas power turbines, advanced ultra-super critical steam turbines, and aerospace turbine engines. It is envisioned that this new model can be adapted to a wide range of engineering applications.

  13. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  14. Study of isospin correlation in high energy S + Pb and Pb + Pb interactions with a magnetic-interferometric-emulsion-chamber. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research results of the study of high energy heavy-ion interactions and multi-cluster correlations at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). This study has been performed as the CERN experiments, EMU05, EMU09 and EMU16, and a part of the RHIC PHENIX and its MVD Collaboration work. Physics objectives and methods are described in chapters 1, 2, 3 and Appendices A1 and A2. The experimental set-up, measurements, an the data analyses at UAH are described in chapters 4 through 10 and Appendices. The UAH research was a quest for high density state of nuclear matter, in terms of finding analysis methods of multi-isospin correlations. The present work emphasized a study of the fluctuation of the particle density, discriminating the isospin for exploring the Disoriented Chiral Condensate (DCC). The analysis methods developed are: (1) Chi-square density test; (2) Run-test; (3) G-test; (4) Fourier analysis; and (5) Lomb's Periodogram. The application of these methods for central collision events in 2,000 GeV/n S + Pb and 167 GeV/n Pb + Pb produced interesting DCC correlations for a few events. However, further investigation of fluctuations with Monte Carlo method guided them to understand various hidden degree of freedoms in such analyses. The results of the analysis of the experimental data in comparison with the Monte Carlo data did not support the DCC process as compelling. The developed methods evolved for a plan to investigate the DCC in the PHENIX. The study has obtained several mathematical analysis methods from the CERN EMU05/16 experiments for a possible use in RHIC experiments

  15. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Keith D.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

  16. Investigations of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) interactions in Southeast Washington streams. Final report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, K.D.; Martin, S.W.; Schuck, M.L.; Scholz, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed

  17. Improved focusing-and-deflection columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mui, P.H.; Szilagyi, M.

    1995-01-01

    Our earlier design procedures for constructing quadrupole columns are further expanded to include octupole corrector units and ''octupole'' deflectors with no third-order harmonics. The additional complications are finer partitioning of the plates and increased number of voltage controllers. Two sample designs, one having only the additional octupole deflectors and one having both the deflectors and the correctors, are presented and compared to our previous quadrupole system. The additional octupole components are shown to be capable of increasing the current density from 30% to more than 300% for a four-plate system, designed to focus and scan the electron beam over a circular area of 0.25 mm radius. The electron beam is assumed to have an initial divergence of ±2.3 mrad, an initial energy of 6 kV, a total energy spread of 1 eV, and a final acceleration of 30 keV. These systems are then slightly reoptimized for a superficial comparison with the commercially available column by Micrion Corporation. The numerical results indicate a potential for substantial improvements, demonstrating the power of this design procedure. Finally, a discussion is presented on how the individual components can interact with each other to reduce the various aberrations. copyright 1995 American Vacuum Society

  18. Neanderthal and Anatomically Modern Human interaction with Abrupt Late Pleistocene Environments - the data is finally good enough to talk about climate change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, Simon; Schreve, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The timing and nature of the appearance of Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH) in Europe, their interaction with, and eventual morphological replacement of Neanderthals (despite some shared genetic heritage) has been a matter of intense debate within archaeology for a generation. This period, often termed the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition occurs in the latter part of Marine Isotope Stage Three and in recent decades archaeological interest has been complemented by the input of palaeoclimate scientists, over the role of abrupt climate change in this process. This was due to the recognition from ice core and marine proxy archives, in particular, of periods if intense cooling, correlated to the marine record of Heinrich ice rafted debris layers from the Atlantic. As a result of these collaborations between the archaeological and palaeoenvironmental communities various drivers have been proposed for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic Transition that include: (1) resource competition between two species occupying similar niches; (2) the impact of repeated cycles of Heinrich event cooling, leading to the decline and eventual disappearance of the Neanderthal populations, leaving a new region open for AMH exploitation; and (3) catastrophic impacts of large volcanic eruptions on Neanderthal populations. Attempts to address the above hypotheses have been dogged by the chronological precision available for a number of key archives. The accuracy of many of the radiocarbon ages that underpin the chronology for both Neanderthal and AMH archaeological sites has been questioned1. This has been exacerbated by uncertainties over the influence of variability in the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect on marine palaeoclimate records and a marine dominated radiocarbon calibration curve. Additionally, the counting uncertainties of the master Greenland palaeoclimate archives are also large by this time, meaning palaeoclimate interpretation can be equivocal. However, several research

  19. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham (Principal Investigator)

    2011-03-11

    Hydrogen storage systems based on the readily reversible adsorption of H{sub 2} in porous materials have a number of very attractive properties with the potential to provide superior performance among candidate materials currently being investigated were it not for the fact that the interaction of H{sub 2} with the host material is too weak to permit viable operation at room temperature. Our study has delineated in quantitative detail the structural elements which we believe to be the essential ingredients for the future synthesis of porous materials, where guest-host interactions are intermediate between those found in the carbons and the metal hydrides, i.e. between physisorption and chemisorption, which will result in H{sub 2} binding energies required for room temperature operation. The ability to produce porous materials with much improved hydrogen binding energies depends critically on detailed molecular level analysis of hydrogen binding in such materials. However, characterization of H{sub 2} sorption is almost exclusively carried by thermodynamic measurements, which give average properties for all the sites occupied by H{sub 2} molecules at a particular loading. We have therefore extensively utilized the most powerful of the few molecular level experimental probes available to probe the interactions of hydrogen with porous materials, namely inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the hindered rotations of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at various sites, which in turn can be interpreted in a very direct way in by computational studies. This technique can relate spectral signatures of various H{sub 2} molecules adsorbed at binding sites with different degrees of interaction. In the course of this project we have synthesized a rather large number of entirely new hybrid materials, which include structural modifications for improved interactions with adsorbed hydrogen. The results of our systematic studies on many porous materials provide detailed

  20. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  1. Plasma focus breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1981-09-01

    Instead of using linear accelerators, it is possible to breed fissile fuels with the help of high current plasma focus device. A mechanism of accelerating proton beam in plasma focus device to high energy would be a change of inductance in plasma column because of rapid growth of plasma instability. A possible scheme of plasma focus breeder is also proposed. (author)

  2. Final Report of Strongly Interacting Fermion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    There has been significant progress in three broad areas: (A) Optical properties, (B) Large-scale computations, and (C) Many-body systems. In this summary the emphasis is primarily on those papers that point to the research plans. At the same time, some important analytic work is not neglected, some of it even appearing in the description of large-scale Computations. Indeed one of the aims of such computations is to give new insights which lead to development of models capable of simple analytic or nearly analytic analysis

  3. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  4. Analysis and modeling of "focus" in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovy, Dirk; Anumanchipalli, Gopala; Parlikar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses a crowd-sourced definition of a speech phenomenon we have called focus. Given sentences, text and speech, in isolation and in context, we asked annotators to identify what we term the focus word. We present their consistency in identifying the focused word, when presented with text...... or speech stimuli. We then build models to show how well we predict that focus word from lexical (and higher) level features. Also, using spectral and prosodic information, we show the differences in these focus words when spoken with and without context. Finally, we show how we can improve speech synthesis...

  5. Inertial particle focusing in serpentine channels on a centrifugal platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Mashhadian, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Inertial particle focusing as a powerful passive method is widely used in diagnostic test devices. It is common to use a curved channel in this approach to achieve particle focusing through balancing of the secondary flow drag force and the inertial lift force. Here, we present a focusing device on a disk based on the interaction of secondary flow drag force, inertial lift force, and centrifugal forces to focus particles. By choosing a channel whose cross section has a low aspect ratio, the mixing effect of the secondary flow becomes negligible. To calculate inertial lift force, which is exerted on the particle from the fluid, the interaction between the fluid and particle is investigated accurately through implementation of 3D Direct Numerical Solution (DNS) method. The particle focusing in three serpentine channels with different corner angles of 75°, 85°, and 90° is investigated for three polystyrene particles with diameters of 8 μm, 9.9 μm, and 13 μm. To show the simulation reliability, the results obtained from the simulations of two examples, namely, particle focusing and centrifugal platform, are verified against experimental counterparts. The effects of angular velocity of disk on the fluid velocity and on the focusing parameters are studied. Fluid velocity in a channel with corner angle of 75° is greater than two other channels. Furthermore, the particle equilibrium positions at the cross section of channel are obtained at the outlet. There are two equilibrium positions located at the centers of the long walls. Finally, the effect of particle density on the focusing length is investigated. A particle with a higher density and larger diameter is focused in a shorter length of the channel compared to its counterpart with a lower density and shorter diameter. The channel with a corner angle of 90° has better focusing efficiency compared to other channels. This design focuses particles without using any pump or sheath flow. Inertial particle focusing

  6. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    This report summarizes our research activities. In the award period, we have made significant progress on the first aim, with new discoveries reported in one published paper (1) and in one submitted manuscript (2) currently under review. The published manuscript reports on our discovery of plant ribokinase and the metabolic pathway in which it functions; the submitted manuscript is identification and characterization of the plant fructokinase family of enzymes from expression studies, sequence comparisons, subcellular localizations and enzymatic activities of recombinant proteins. Our study of loss-of-function mutants in the fructokinase family members (2) revealed that there were no phenotypic differences observed for the five genes analyzed, so we have adopted the Crispr/Cas9 system to isolate mutants in the two genes for which there are no currently available insertion mutants, and we are generating higher order mutants (double, triples, etc) to discern the relative roles and significance for each fructokinase. These mutants will be an important resource to understand regulation of carbohydrate movement and catabolism in plants. As studies from others indicate, alteration of fructokinases results in changes in cell walls and vasculatures, which have importance relative to biofuel yield and quality. In the second aim, we have characterized the protein-protein interactions for the pkfB proteins FLN1 and FLN2 that are localized to chloroplast transcriptional complexes and have proposed a new model for how chloroplast transcription is regulated. This work has been submitted for publication, been revised and will be re-submitted in December 2016

  7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, Jon B

    2006-04-30

    High performance computational science and engineering simulations have become an increasingly important part of the scientist's problem solving toolset. A key reason is the development of widely used codes and libraries that support these applications, for example, Netlib, a collection of numerical libraries [33]. The term community codes refers to those libraries or applications that have achieved some critical level of acceptance by a user community. Many of these applications are on the high-end in terms of required resources: computation, storage, and communication. Recently, there has been considerable interest in putting such applications on-line and packaging them as network services to make them available to a wider user base. Applications such as data mining [22], theorem proving and logic [14], parallel numerical computation [8][32] are example services that are all going on-line. Transforming applications into services has been made possible by advances in packaging and interface technologies including component systems [2][6][13][28][37], proposed communication standards [34], and newer Web technologies such as Web Services [38]. Network services allow the user to focus on their application and obtain remote service when needed by simply invoking the service across the network. The user can be assured that the most recent version of the code or service is always provided and they do not need to install, maintain, and manage significant infrastructure to access the service. For high performance applications in particular, the user is still often required to install a code base (e.g. MPI), and therefore become involved with the tedious details of infrastructure management. In the network service model, the service provider is responsible for all of these activities and not the user. The user need not become an expert in high performance computing. An additional advantage of high-end network services is that the user need not have specialized

  8. Instabilities in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    1975-03-01

    The plasma focus was studied by many research teams in view of a possible approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Though it is questionable whether the plasma focus will ever lead to a fusion reactor, it nevertheless constitutes a strong source of neutron, X- and gamma radiation for simulating fusion reactor conditions. Furthermore, the plasma focus yields very high temperatures (10 7 K) and densities (> 10 19 cm -3 ) and thus provides interesting conditions for the study of high density plasmas. This review paper starts with a description of the compression stage of the focussing plasma, using a snow-plough model. It is shown that sophisticated MHD calculations substantiate the snowplough theory, but are not suited to describe the phenomena in the final compressed stage. For this purpose, a particle-in-cell calculation is employed, yielding a beam-beam collision model for the neutron production. Experimental evidence indicates that neutron production is associated with the appearence of m = O instabilities and is the direct result of collisions between anomalously accelerated ions. One of the mechanisms of ion acceleration are strong local electric fields. Another possible mechanism can bee seen in beam-plasma instabilities caused by runaway electrons. The analytical derivation of the dispersion relation for plasma focus conditions including runaway effect is discussed (orig.) [de

  9. Final technical report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...... cutting nozzle which can be adjusted independently to the laser beam has been developed. The position of the focus relative the workpiece can be adjusted to cutting applications with relatively large processing windows, i.e. both mild and stainless steels, and of a broad thickness range. A build-in auto......This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial...

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  11. Study of the K-bar{pi} system in the 3 bodies final states, produced by 3 GeV/c K{sup -}p interactions; Etude du systeme K-bar{pi} dans les etats finals a 3 corps, produits par les interactions K{sup -}p a 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verglas, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The K{sup -}p {yields} K{sup *} (891) {pi} reaction is a good example of a quasi two-body phenomenon, exhibiting the characteristics of 'peripherism'. The predictions of the 'one meson exchange', and 'absorption' models are compared with the experimental results. Conclusions are drawn concerning the production mechanism of the Kp {yields} K{sup *} {pi} reaction, as well as on the validity of the models. Finally, the K{sup *} (1400) resonance is studied and its isospin determined. (author) [French] La reaction K{sup p} {yields} K{sup *} (891) {pi} est un bon exemple de phenomene 'quasi deux corps' presentant les caracteristiques du 'peripherisme'. Les predictions des modeles theoriques d'un meson echange et de l'absorption sont compares aux resultats experimentaux; des conclusions sont tirees, tant sur le mecanisme de production de la reaction Kp {yields} K{sup *} {pi} que sur la validite des modeles. Enfin, la resonance K{sup *} (1400) est etudiee et son isospin determine. (auteur)

  12. Study of the K-bar{pi} system in the 3 bodies final states, produced by 3 GeV/c K{sup -}p interactions; Etude du systeme K-bar{pi} dans les etats finals a 3 corps, produits par les interactions K{sup -}p a 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verglas, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The K{sup -}p {yields} K{sup *} (891) {pi} reaction is a good example of a quasi two-body phenomenon, exhibiting the characteristics of 'peripherism'. The predictions of the 'one meson exchange', and 'absorption' models are compared with the experimental results. Conclusions are drawn concerning the production mechanism of the Kp {yields} K{sup *} {pi} reaction, as well as on the validity of the models. Finally, the K{sup *} (1400) resonance is studied and its isospin determined. (author) [French] La reaction K{sup p} {yields} K{sup *} (891) {pi} est un bon exemple de phenomene 'quasi deux corps' presentant les caracteristiques du 'peripherisme'. Les predictions des modeles theoriques d'un meson echange et de l'absorption sont compares aux resultats experimentaux; des conclusions sont tirees, tant sur le mecanisme de production de la reaction Kp {yields} K{sup *} {pi} que sur la validite des modeles. Enfin, la resonance K{sup *} (1400) est etudiee et son isospin determine. (auteur)

  13. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  14. Space Focus Lead Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The Space Focus team is tasked with the definition of the Space Focused Science Topics, and with the review and ranking of the CSES proposals received in all the program areas. This is achieved by dedicated meetings or a series of informal discussions and/or e-mail reviews.

  15. BrightFocus Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About BrightFocus Foundation Featured Content BrightFocus: Investing in Science to Save Mind and Sight We're here to help. Explore ... recognition is very important. Monday, November 6, 2017 New Diagnosis? Managing a mind and sight disease is a journey. And you’ ...

  16. Flocs in Focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard

    Suspended particle dynamics are important drivers for land-sea interactions. This has been examined in two coastal/marine environments, influenced by recently eroded particles from land. The main study region is an Arctic fjord, Disko Fjord on West Greenland. The rates of warming due to climate......, organic particles, and zooplankton. The study shows that the suspended particle dynamics are highly influenced by zooplankton grazing, and at the same time are influenced by the supply of inorganic particles from land, and we highlight that the interaction can have a large impact on the vertical flux......, and their relevance for earth system interactions....

  17. Thermodynamical Interactions: Subtleties of Heat and Work Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Anacleto, Joaquim Alberto C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the determination of the final equilibrium state when two ideal gases, isolated from the exterior and starting from preset initial conditions, interact with each other through a piston. Depending on the piston properties, different processes take place and also different sets of equilibrium conditions must be satisfied. Three…

  18. Machine constraints for experiments in an intermediate luminosity interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, D.

    1989-05-01

    We summarize existing information about the luminosity as a function of clear space between the interaction point and the front of the final-focus triplet, and about the minimum beam pipe dimensions (stay-clear dimensions) in the region. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Hawthorn Court Community Center at Iowa State University, Ames, and the HUB-Robeson Center at Pennsylvania State University. Focuses on the food service offered in these new student-life buildings. Includes photographs. (EV)

  20. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  1. High harmonics focusing undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Hairetdinov, A.H.; Smirnov, A.V.; Khlebnikov, A.S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    It was shown in our previous work that there exist a possibility to enhance significantly the {open_quote}natural{close_quote} focusing properties of the hybrid undulator. Here we analyze the actual undulator configurations which could provide such field structure. Numerical simulations using 2D code PANDIRA were carried out and the enhanced focusing properties of the undulator were demonstrated. The obtained results provide the solution for the beam transport in a very long (short wavelength) undulator schemes.

  2. The Individually Focused Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Aksel Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    relatively “strong” interviewees (interview persons: IPs) with diverse backgrounds; (2) thorough planning of the interview with well-focused themes; and (3) a thorough and repeated introduction to the interview. The omission of audio transcriptions is an obvious solution to the researcher who wants a breadth...... of range of statements stemming from the use of many more interviewees than is often possible. The Individually Focused Interview (TIFI) also provides more time for involvement in the field and further analysis....

  3. Plutonium focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure

  4. Plasma focus matching conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.; Elkhalafawy, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A snow-plough and slug models have been used to obtain the optimum matching conditions of the plasma in the focus. The dimensions of the plasma focus device are, inner electrode radius = 2 cm, outer electrode radius = 5.5 cm, and its length = 8 cm. It was found that the maximum magnetic energy of 12.26 kJ has to be delivered to plasma focus whose density is 10 19 /cm 3 at focusing time of 2.55 μs and with total external inductance of 24.2 n H. The same method is used to evaluate the optimum matching conditions for the previous coaxial discharge system which had inner electrode radius = 1.6 cm, outer electrode radius = 3.3 cm and its length = 31.5 cm. These conditions are charging voltage = 12 kV, capacity of the condenser bank = 430 μf, plasma focus density = 10 19 /cm 3 focusing time = 8 μs and total external inductance = 60.32 n H.3 fig., 2 tab

  5. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Sebastian; Büchler, Hans Peter; Tresp, Christoph; Urvoy, Alban; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Menke, Henri; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole–dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source. (tutorial)

  6. The focus factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We present a new bibliometric indicator to measure journal specialisation over time, named the focus factor. This new indicator is based on bibliographic coupling and counts the percentage of re-citations given in subsequent years. Method. The applicability of the new indicator....... To validate re-citations as caused by specialisation, other possible causes were measured and correlated (obsolescence, journal self-citations and number of references). Results. The results indicate that the focus factor is capable of distinguishing between general and specialised journals and thus...... effectively measures the intended phenomenon (i.e., journal specialisation). Only weak correlations were found between journal re-citations and obsolescence, journal self-citations, and number of references. Conclusions. The focus factor successfully measures journal specialisation over time. Measures based...

  7. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  8. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  9. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri

    2017-01-01

    for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up...... to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source....

  10. New focus on forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine Unger; Divya Abhat.; Constance Millar; Greg [featured scientists] McPherson

    2010-01-01

    It would appear that forests are finally having their day—and not a moment too soon. Around the world, trees are dying at an alarming rate, besieged by illegal logging, agricultural conversion, wildfire, and drought. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, 13 million  hectares of the world’s forests are now lost to deforestation every year....

  11. Order Management - Today's focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Ari

    1996-01-01

    Small and mid-range companies throughout the world have moved towards customer-specific production during the last few years, but often, the order flow has not changed to meet new demands. Customer orders pass through a laarge number of departments, such as sales, construction, pre...... to the final product.In the paper, a new method for improving order flow is presented, including an extended use of activity chain models....

  12. Designing for mobile interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The theme of this PhD project is designing for mobile interaction with devices and services, for the accessing, making, and sharing of information, taking into account the dynamic physical and social settings that embrace this interaction. To narrow down this theme, the whole project focuses...... on the exploitation of social interaction --- in particular among senior citizens --- to enhance and support mobile interaction....

  13. Recent developments: Washington focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Congress has made progress on key legislation this summer. The House of Representatives passed an appropriations bill which authorizes spending for DOE and the NRC for FY91. The Senate has yet to consider an energy appropriations bill, but as the House bill exceeds the administration request for funding by $575 million, it will likely experience substantial cuts before its final passage. At the end of the month, the Senate Energy ampersand Natural Resources Committee held a hearing on the Smith Barney report on the Uranium Enrichment Enterprise. Since the Senate has already passed a uranium enrichment restructuring bill, attention has shifted to the House where some Representatives have expressed interest in holding a hearing on the report. After almost a month's delay, the House has named its representatives to the Clean Air Act Conference Committee. The Senate will have nine committee members, and the House will have 142 conferees from seven committees. Final action on the clean air bill is likely before November's Congressional elections. Finally, although it appeared the utilities had a chance to hold their payment of NRC user fees at 45 percent of the NRC's budget level, President Bush's decision to discuss taxes as part of the budget negotiations increases the likelihood of higher user fees-possibly as high as 100 percent of the NRC budget. The American Nuclear Energy Council (ANEC) estimates that the President's proposal to recover 100 percent of the NRC's budget through user fees is the second largest revenue item among the user fees proposed

  14. Plasma focus project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlin, H.L.

    1975-12-01

    The primary objective of this project is to provide a relatively simple pulsed power source for high density pulsed fusion studies with a variety of DT and other fusion microexplosion targets. The plasma focus operated on DT at 1 MJ should produce greater than or equal to 10 15 DT neutrons per pulse corresponding to 2800 J of nuclear energy release and for low pressure operation and appropriately configured high Z anode center should yield an x-ray burst of about 1000 J with a substantial fraction of this x-ray energy concentrated in the 5-100 kV range. Because of its x-ray and neutron production potential, the operation of the focus as an x-ray source is also under study and an initial design study for a repetitively pulsed 1 MJ plasma focus as a pulsed neutron materials testing source has been completed. The plasma focus seems particularly appropriate for application as a materials testing source for pulsed fusion reactors, for example, based on laser driven fusion microexplosions. The construction status of the device is described

  15. Multimuon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, J.-M.

    1980-04-01

    Multimuon final states have been detected by 3 experiments in the interactions of the muon beams of CERN (280 GeV) and FNAL (210 GeV) with heavy targets. For the first time production of J/PSI (3100) by space-like photons has been observed and its dependence on ν, Q 2 and t compared to Vector Dominance and photon-gluon fusion models. Also a clear signal has been seen for 3μ above QED tridents (outside J/PSI mass range) and 2μ events which are well described by charm production. An upper limit for the production of the T by high energy muons has been set

  16. Thermal self-focusing at oblique incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.; McCrory, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    Thermal self-focusing at oblique incidence has been investigated in two-dimensional line-focus geometry using the Eulerian hydrodynamics simulation code SAGE. The laser beam interacts with a long-scale-length preformed plasma with an expontial density profiele. Questions to be addressed include: (1) What happens when a self-focusing channel reaches the turning point of the incident rays, and (2) Does the unabsorbed light return in the specular direction or back along the channel. A comparison is also made between thermal self-focusing at normal incidence in cylindrical and line-focus geometries: in cylindrical geometry the self-focusing mechanism is enhanced by the relative ease with which plasma may be expelled from a small cylindrical channel

  17. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevic, Ina [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-06-14

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  18. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcevic, Ina

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  19. Focusing of electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhayalan, V.

    1996-01-01

    The focusing of electromagnetic waves inside a slab has been examined together with two special cases in which the slab is reduced to a single interface or a single medium. To that end the exact solutions for the fields inside a layered medium have been used, given in terms of the outside current source in order to obtain the solutions for the focused electric field inside a slab. Both exact and asymptotic solutions of the problem have been considered, and the validity of the latter has been discussed. The author has developed a numerical algorithm for evaluation of the diffraction integral with special emphasis on reducing the computing time. The numerical techniques in the paper can be readily applied to evaluate similar diffraction integrals occurring e.g. in microstrip antennas. 46 refs

  20. Magnetic Focusing Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This magnetic focusing horn was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Its development was an important step towards using CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron as a proton - antiproton collider. This eventually led to the discovery of the W and Z particles in 1983. Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet. For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  1. An adiabatic focuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Oide, K.; Sessler, A.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1989-08-01

    Theoretical analysis is made of an intense relativistic electron beam, such as would be available from a linear collider, moving through a plasma of increasing density, but density always less than that of the beam (underdense). In this situation, the plasma electrons are expelled from the beam channel and the electrons are subject to an ever-increasing focusing force provided by the channel ions. Analysis is made on the beam radiation energy loss in the classical, the transition, and the quantum regimes. It is shown that the focuser is insensitive to the beam energy spread behaviors in the nonclassical regimes, the radiation limit on lenses (the Oide limit) can be exceeded. The sensitivity of the system to the topic mismatch and the nonlinearity is also analyzed. Examples are given with SLC-type and TLC-type parameters. 9 refs., 1 tab

  2. Line broadening by focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, A.L. de; Jabs, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the spectral width of a quasi-monochromatic light beam broadens when the beam is focused. A quantitative formula for this broadening is derived from classical wave theory. The effect is shown to explain some experiments on laser beams done by E. Panarella which that author has explained under the ad-hoc hypothesis that the frequency of the photons changes along with the intensity of the light beam. The line broadening by focusing might also contribute to gas ionization by incident light when the ionization potential is well above the mean photon energy. Some remarks are made on some direct applications of the Heisenberg relations in comparison with our treatment. (Author) [pt

  3. Focus on Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Kirsten; Barfoed, Anne

    Background: Compared to other Nordic countries, Denmark has a high incidence of anal sphincter injury. Recent studies indicate that a strict focus on prevention of severe perineal trauma has decreased the incidence (1). This has resulted in changed clinical procedures in several Danish labour wards...... (2). It is, however, not clarified which of the multifaceted aspects of preventing perineal injury that might explain the decrease (3). Aims: We hypothesized that the use of structured reflection on a clinical practice by midwives and midwifery students would increase both parts’ knowledge on how...... attended the delivery, facilitated the midwife’s and the student’s structured reflection. Further, the project midwife held daily simulation workshops with midwives and students. Two focus group interviews with students and midwives were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Results and conclusion...

  4. Focus Group Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    home for the arrival of school- aged children. TIP: Do not conduct focus groups in a command conference room in the command group area. Doing so...organizational effectiveness and equal opportunity/equal employment opportunity/fair treatment and sexual assault and response factors (which are listed on the... Sexual Harassment (C) Sex Harassment Retaliation (D) Discrimination - Sex (E) Discrimination - Race (F) Discrimination - Disability (G

  5. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  6. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites

  7. Particle Accelerator Focus Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, José; Rocha, Jorge; Redondo, Luís; Cruz, João

    2017-08-01

    The Laboratório de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiação (LATR) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) has a horizontal electrostatic particle accelerator based on the Van de Graaff machine which is used for research in the area of material characterization. This machine produces alfa (He+) and proton (H+) beams of some μA currents up to 2 MeV/q energies. Beam focusing is obtained using a cylindrical lens of the Einzel type, assembled near the high voltage terminal. This paper describes the developed system that automatically focuses the ion beam, using a personal computer running the LabVIEW software, a multifunction input/output board and signal conditioning circuits. The focusing procedure consists of a scanning method to find the lens bias voltage which maximizes the beam current measured on a beam stopper target, which is used as feedback for the scanning cycle. This system, as part of a wider start up and shut down automation system built for this particle accelerator, brings great advantages to the operation of the accelerator by turning it faster and easier to operate, requiring less human presence, and adding the possibility of total remote control in safe conditions.

  8. Particle Accelerator Focus Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes José

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Laboratório de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiação (LATR at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST has a horizontal electrostatic particle accelerator based on the Van de Graaff machine which is used for research in the area of material characterization. This machine produces alfa (He+ and proton (H+ beams of some μA currents up to 2 MeV/q energies. Beam focusing is obtained using a cylindrical lens of the Einzel type, assembled near the high voltage terminal. This paper describes the developed system that automatically focuses the ion beam, using a personal computer running the LabVIEW software, a multifunction input/output board and signal conditioning circuits. The focusing procedure consists of a scanning method to find the lens bias voltage which maximizes the beam current measured on a beam stopper target, which is used as feedback for the scanning cycle. This system, as part of a wider start up and shut down automation system built for this particle accelerator, brings great advantages to the operation of the accelerator by turning it faster and easier to operate, requiring less human presence, and adding the possibility of total remote control in safe conditions.

  9. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  10. Nonverbal synchrony and affect in dyadic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eTschacher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In an experiment on dyadic social interaction, we invited participants to verbal interactions in cooperative, competitive, and 'fun task' conditions. We focused on the link between interactants' affectivity and their nonverbal synchrony, and explored which further variables contributed to affectivity: interactants' personality traits, sex, and the prescribed interaction tasks. Nonverbal synchrony was quantified by the coordination of interactants' body movement, using an automated video-analysis algorithm (Motion Energy Analysis, MEA. Traits were assessed with standard questionnaires of personality, attachment, interactional style, psychopathology and interpersonal reactivity. We included 168 previously unacquainted individuals who were randomly allocated to same-sex dyads (84 females, 84 males, mean age 27.3 years. Dyads discussed four topics of general interest drawn from an urn of eight topics, and finally engaged in a fun interaction. Each interaction lasted five minutes. In between interactions, participants repeatedly assessed their affect. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we found moderate to strong effect sizes for synchrony to occur, especially in competitive and fun task conditions. Positive affect was associated positively with synchrony, negative affect was associated negatively. As for causal direction, data supported the interpretation that synchrony entailed affect rather than vice versa. The link between nonverbal synchrony and affect was strongest in female dyads. The findings extend previous reports of synchrony and mimicry associated with emotion in relationships and suggest a possible mechanism of the synchrony-affect correlation.

  11. Nova frequency conversion and focusing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, M.A.; Seppala, L.G.; Williams, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    New developments in crystal array technology provided significant improvements in the mechanical design and optical performance of the Nova 2 omega/3 omega array hardware. The final Nova array configuration was tested on the Novette laser and on the first arm of Nova. Ten Nova 2 omega/3 omega crystal arrays were assembled and tested for crystal alignment and wave front distortion before installation on the Nova target chamber. Ten Nova focus lens positioners were assembled and tested last year. The positioning accuracy and repeatability of each assembly were evaluated before installation on the target chamber. A cylindrical focusing system was also developed for installation in the Nova lens positioner assembly. Finally, 10 completed frequency conversion and focusing systems were activated

  12. Numerical experimentation on focusing time and neutron yield in GN1 plasma focus machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Arwinder; Lee, Sing; Saw, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have shown how we have fitted Lee's six phase model code to analyze the current waveform of the GN1 plasma focus machine working in deuterium gas. The Lee's 6-phase model codes was later configured to work between 0.5 to 6 Torr and the results of both focusing time and neutron yield was then compared with the published experimental results. The final results indicate that Lee's code, gives realistic plasma dynamics and focus properties together with a realistic neutron yield for GN1 plasma focus, without the need of any adjustable parameters, needing only to fit the computed current trace to a measured current trace. (author)

  13. Focus on Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Koningsbrugge, H.

    2008-01-01

    A few articles in this magazine focus on the developments and policies in Russia. The titles of some of the articles are 'Between state power and liberal reform' on the task of the new Russian president to find a new balance between government interference and market economy; 'Green light for green energy' on the willingness of the Russian government to stimulate renewable energy; 'Russian power play' on the role of Gazprom in the liberalization of the Russian power market; 'Gazprom's risky strategy' on it's pricing strategy

  14. Focus on Organic Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Uji, Takehiko Mori and Toshihiro Takahashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic materials are usually thought of as electrical insulators. Progress in chemical synthesis, however, has brought us a rich variety of conducting organic materials, which can be classified into conducting polymers and molecular crystals. Researchers can realize highly conducting molecular crystals in charge-transfer complexes, where suitable combinations of organic electron donor or acceptor molecules with counter ions or other organic molecules provide charge carriers. By means of a kind of chemical doping, the charge-transfer complexes exhibit high electrical conductivity and, thanks to their highly crystalline nature, even superconductivity has been observed. This focus issue of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is devoted to the research into such 'organic conductors'The first organic metal was (TTF(TCNQ, which was found in 1973 to have high conductivity at room temperature and a metal–insulator transition at low temperatures. The first organic superconductor was (TMTSF2PF6, whose superconductivity under high pressures was reported by J´erome in 1980. After these findings, the research on organic conductors exploded. Hundreds of organic conductors have been reported, among which more than one hundred exhibit superconductivity. Recently, a single-component organic conductor has been found with metallic conductivity down to low temperatures.In these organic conductors, in spite of their simple electronic structures, much new physics has arisen from the low dimensionality. Examples are charge and spin density waves, characteristic metal–insulator transitions, charge order, unconventional superconductivity, superconductor–insulator transitions, and zero-gap conductors with Dirac cones. The discovery of this new physics is undoubtedly derived from the development of many intriguing novel organic conductors. High quality single crystals are indispensable to the precise measurement of electronic states.This focus issue

  15. Rheological phenomena in focus

    CERN Document Server

    Boger, DV

    1993-01-01

    More than possibly any other scientific discipline, rheology is easily visualized and the relevant literature contains many excellent photographs of unusual and often bizarre phenomena. The present book brings together these photographs for the first time. They are supported by a full explanatory text. Rheological Phenomena in Focus will be an indispensable support manual to all those who teach rheology or have to convince colleagues of the practical relevance of the subject within an industrial setting. For those who teach fluid mechanics, the book clearly illustrates the difference be

  16. Application of Regulatory Focus Theory to Search Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowle, Elyse N.; Georgia, Emily J.; Doss, Brian D.; Updegraff, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect of compatibility of the ad text with the regulatory focus of the consumer was examined. Design/methodology/approach Advertisements were created using Google AdWords. Data were collected for the number of views and clicks each ad received. Effect of regulatory fit was measured using logistic regression. Findings Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that there was a strong main effect for keyword, such that users were almost six times as likely to click on a promotion advertisement as a prevention advertisement, as well as a main effect for compatibility, such that users were twice as likely to click on an advertisement with content that was consistent with their keyword. Finally, there was a strong interaction of these two variables, such that the effect of consistent advertisements was stronger for promotion searches than for prevention searches. Research limitations/implications The effect of ad compatibility had medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that individuals’ state may have more influence on advertising response than do individuals’ traits (e.g. personality traits). Measurement of regulatory fit was limited by the constraints of Google AdWords. Practical implications The results of this study provide a possible framework for ad creation for Internet advertisers. Originality/value This paper is the first study to demonstrate the utility of regulatory focus theory in online advertising. PMID:26430293

  17. Application of Regulatory Focus Theory to Search Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowle, Elyse N; Georgia, Emily J; Doss, Brian D; Updegraff, John A

    The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect of compatibility of the ad text with the regulatory focus of the consumer was examined. Advertisements were created using Google AdWords. Data were collected for the number of views and clicks each ad received. Effect of regulatory fit was measured using logistic regression. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that there was a strong main effect for keyword, such that users were almost six times as likely to click on a promotion advertisement as a prevention advertisement, as well as a main effect for compatibility, such that users were twice as likely to click on an advertisement with content that was consistent with their keyword. Finally, there was a strong interaction of these two variables, such that the effect of consistent advertisements was stronger for promotion searches than for prevention searches. The effect of ad compatibility had medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that individuals' state may have more influence on advertising response than do individuals' traits (e.g. personality traits). Measurement of regulatory fit was limited by the constraints of Google AdWords. The results of this study provide a possible framework for ad creation for Internet advertisers. This paper is the first study to demonstrate the utility of regulatory focus theory in online advertising.

  18. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Our BES supported program integrates molecular beam epitaxy growth with in situ atomic scale imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Aided by density functional theory calculations, we explore enhanced functionalities emerging from the interplay of strain, proximity, and spin-orbit interactions in heterostructures of wide band gap semiconductors, graphene, and Dirac materials, focusing on three thrusts: 1) doping wide bandgap semiconductors and graphene; 2) graphene nanoribbons and graphene-semiconductor heterostructures; and 3) Dirac materials. Our findings and discoveries have led to the publication of one book chapter and twenty-three refereed journal articles, including several in high impact journals such as Nature Communications, Physical Review Letters, and Nano Letters. Highlights of each thrust are provided in the report.

  19. Induced seismicity. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models

  20. Focus on the Rashba effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihlmayer, G.; Rader, O.; Winkler, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Rashba effect, discovered in 1959, continues to supply fertile ground for fundamental research and applications. It provided the basis for the proposal of the spin transistor by Datta and Das in 1990, which has largely inspired the broad and dynamic field of spintronics. More recent developments include new materials for the Rashba effect such as metal surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. It has also given rise to new phenomena such as spin currents and the spin Hall effect, including its quantized version, which has led to the very active field of topological insulators. The Rashba effect plays a crucial role in yet more exotic fields of physics such as the search for Majorana fermions at semiconductor-superconductor interfaces and the interaction of ultracold atomic Bose and Fermi gases. Advances in our understanding of Rashba-type spin-orbit couplings, both qualitatively and quantitatively, can be obtained in many different ways. This focus issue brings together the wide range of research activities on Rashba physics to further promote the development of our physical pictures and concepts in this field. The present Editorial gives a brief account on the history of the Rashba effect including material that was previously not easily accessible before summarizing the key results of the present focus issue as a guidance to the reader.

  1. The quest for customer focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line.

  2. Technology of focus detection for 193nm projection lithographic tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chengliang; Yan, Wei; Hu, Song; Xu, Feng; Li, Jinglong

    2012-10-01

    With the shortening printing wavelength and increasing numerical aperture of lithographic tool, the depth of focus(DOF) sees a rapidly drop down trend, reach a scale of several hundred nanometers while the repeatable accuracy of focusing and leveling must be one-tenth of DOF, approximately several dozen nanometers. For this feature, this article first introduces several focusing technology, Obtained the advantages and disadvantages of various methods by comparing. Then get the accuracy of dual-grating focusing method through theoretical calculation. And the dual-grating focusing method based on photoelastic modulation is divided into coarse focusing and precise focusing method to analyze, establishing image processing model of coarse focusing and photoelastic modulation model of accurate focusing. Finally, focusing algorithm is simulated with MATLAB. In conclusion dual-grating focusing method shows high precision, high efficiency and non-contact measurement of the focal plane, meeting the demands of focusing in 193nm projection lithography.

  3. Designing for Interactional Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Ståhl, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis further defines how to reach Interactional Empowerment through design for users. Interactional Empowerment is an interaction design program within the general area of affective interaction, focusing on the users’ abil­ity to reflect, express themselves and engage in profound meaning-making. This has been explored through design of three systems eMoto, Affective Di­ary and Affective Health, which all mirror users’ emotions or bodily reactions in interaction in some way. From these ...

  4. Attentional Focusing Instructions and Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Marchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research progress assessing the role of attentional focusing instructions on skill acquisition and performance has lead researchers to apply this approach to force production tasks. Initial converging evidence indicates that force production tasks are sensitive to verbal instruction; externally focused instructions (onto movement outcomes, or onto the object force is being exerted against are shown to be more beneficial than internally focused instructions (focusing attention onto the movements being executed. These benefits are observed for maximal and accurate force production, as well as the maintenance of force production in prolonged tasks. A range of mechanisms are identified supporting the proposal that an external focus promotes movement efficiency in line with energy and effort conservation. Future research is required to assess how this developing body of work interacts with the broader understanding of psychological and physiological factors implicated in the effective production, maintenance and limitation of maximal or sub-maximal forces.

  5. Focus on Succes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Slimák

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Editor wishes to present the need and form of turning the focus of individuals and organisations to success, based on evaluating understanding of the situation, on complex improving the quality of work, production and life, and on awareness of accountability for consequences of one’s actions in the given environment and time. Understood by success is sustained financial and non-financial prosperity, whilst decisive is the evaluating process, the key element is loyalty of natural and physical persons, and the priority is loyalty of external customers. The address is targeted to would-be authors and readers of our Journal interested in engineering and management of quality of mutually correlate entities.

  6. The FOCUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Louise B; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Randers, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits are a distinct feature among people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis and pose a barrier to functional recovery. Insufficient evidence exists on how to ameliorate these cognitive deficits in patients at UHR for psychosis and hence improve daily living and quality...... of life. The aim of the trial is to investigate whether cognitive remediation can improve cognitive and psychosocial function in patients at UHR for psychosis. METHODS: The FOCUS trial (Function and Overall Cognition in Ultra-high risk States) is a randomised, parallel group, observer-blinded clinical...... trial enrolling 126 patients meeting the standardised criteria of being at UHR for psychosis. Patients are recruited from psychiatric in- and outpatient facilities in the Copenhagen catchment area. Patients are randomised to one of the two treatment arms: cognitive remediation plus standard treatment...

  7. Focusing on customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  8. The Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience, University of North Carolina, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Robert [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2018-01-20

    This is the final report for the UNC component of the SciDAD Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience. In this report, we describe activities on the SUPER project at RENCI at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While we focus particularly on UNC, we touch on project-wide activities as well as, on interactions with, and impacts on, other projects.

  9. [Focus on electronic cigarettes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinghino, Biagio; Pacifici, Roberta; Di Pucchio, Alessandra; Palmi, Ilaria; Solimini, Renata; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    There is no clear regulation on electronic cigarettes (e-cig); their health effects are not yet fully investigated and there is insufficient standardisation and quality control of the product. Moreover, the e-cig could be a gateway for young people to nicotine addiction and traditional cigarette smoking. In Italy, the Ministry of Health banned the sale of e-cig with nicotine firstly to adolescents aged marketing of e-cigs, to make them less attractive, to forbid their use in enclosed areas, and prevent them from being promoted. E-cigs, however, seem to be much less dangerous than traditional cigarettes, although the few studies conducted are not sufficient to demonstrate either a clear therapeutic efficacy of e-cig or their total harmlessness. If e-cig had a known content, were made according to clear rules and in certified laboratories, without toxic substances, it could be used to help heavy smokers to quit, or at least to reduce smoking habits. There is a large proportion of smokers who are unable to quit. The revision of the European Directive (the proposal is being evaluated and we are waiting for its final approval) on tobacco recommends free sale for a minority of e-cigs only, those with a nicotine content e-cig and the much more dangerous tobacco cigarettes are still sold without any restriction.

  10. Recent developments: Washington focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Congress reconvened on January 23, but most of Washington's January new involves the Administration. DOE sent two letters to USEC customers, awarded a contract for the independent financial review of the enrichment program, and released a plan for demonstrating AVLIS by 1992. A General Accounting Office (GAO) report investigating the impact of imports of Soviet EUP into the US was made public. Both Congress and the administration are reportedly considering a full-scope US-Soviet Agreement for Nuclear Cooperation. Finally, published reports indicate Congress may consider ending the customs user fee which levies a charge of 0.17% on the value of all imported goods. The fee is felt to violate the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and is not based on recovering actual Customs costs for processing a good. The fee brings the Treasury over $700 million per year, but the business community plans to lobby hard for its outright elimination or a change in authority to collect the fee based on actual costs

  11. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    , but the approach always yields point spread functions better or equal to a traditional dynamically focused image. Finally, the process was applied to in-vivo clinical images of the liver and right kidney from a 28 years old male. The data was obtained with a single element transducer focused at 100 mm....... A new method for making spatial matched filter focusing of RF ultrasound data is proposed based on the spatial impulse response description of the imaging. The response from a scatterer at any given point in space relative to the transducer can be calculated, and this gives the spatial matched filter...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  12. PREFACE: Focus section on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Swanson, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Hadronic physics is the study of strongly interacting matter and its underlying theory, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The field had its beginnings after World War Two, when hadrons were discovered in ever increasing numbers. Today, it encompasses topics like the quark-gluon structure of hadrons at varying scales, the quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density; it also underpins nuclear physics and has significant impact on particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Among the goals of hadronic physics are to determine the parameters of QCD, understand the origin and characteristics of confinement, understand the dynamics and consequences of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, explore the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei and in matter under extreme conditions and understand the quark and gluon structure of hadrons. In general, the process is one of discerning the relevant degrees of freedom and relating these to the fundamental fields of QCD. The emphasis is on understanding QCD, rather than testing it. The papers gathered in this special focus section of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics attempt to cover this broad range of subjects. Alkofer and Greensite examine the issue of quark and gluon confinement with the focus on models of the QCD vacuum, lattice gauge theory investigations, and the relationship to the AdS/CFT correspondence postulate. Arrington et al. review nucleon form factors and their role in determining quark orbital momentum, the strangeness content of the nucleon, meson cloud effects, and the transition from nonperturbative to perturbative QCD dynamics. The physics associated with hadronic matter at high temperature and density and at low Bjorken-x at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the SPS at CERN, and at the future LHC is summarized by d'Enterria. The article of Lee and Smith examines experiment and theory associated with electromagnetic meson production from nucleons and

  13. Correctional officers' perceptions of a solution-focused training program: potential implications for working with offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peter Jen Der; Deng, Liang-Yu F; Chang, Shona Shih Hua; Jiang, Karen Jye-Ru

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to explore correctional officers' perceptions and experiences during a solution-focused training program and to initiate development of a modified pattern for correctional officers to use in jails. The study uses grounded theory procedures combined with a follow-up survey. The findings identified six emergent themes: obstacles to doing counseling work in prisons, offenders' amenability to change, correctional officers' self-image, advantages of a solution-focused approach (SFA), potential advantages of applying SFA to offenders, and the need for the consolidation of learning and transformation. Participants perceived the use of solution-focused techniques as appropriate, important, functional, and of only moderate difficulty in interacting with offenders. Finally, a modified pattern was developed for officers to use when working with offenders in jails. Suggestions and recommendations are made for correctional interventions and future studies.

  14. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bittleston, Leonora Sophia; Pierce, Naomi E.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Pringle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent inter...

  15. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roman; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Cerutti, Francesco; Langner, Andy; Tomás, Rogelio; Cruz-Alaniz, Emilia; Dalena, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  16. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Martin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  17. FOCUS ON GRAPHENE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, N M R; Ribeiro, Ricardo M

    2009-01-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fuerst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P Lopez-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J Gonzalez and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square lattice models and quantum spin chains Mahdi Zarea and Nancy Sandler On the universal ac optical background in graphene V P Gusynin, S G Sharapov and J P Carbotte Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation S Ghosh, D L Nika, E P Pokatilov and A A

  18. Stress wave focusing transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  19. Focus on Quantum Cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiat, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    implemented a totally new protocol, using polarization-entangled photons, which in some circumstances can tolerate higher error rates than the traditional one of Bennett and Brassard; moreover, the use of entanglement provides a means of 'automatic source verification'. Finally, looking to the future, Elliott gives a provocative view of how these technologies may be merged into network operation, and Shapiro describes a method to combine a novel source of entangled photons with a means to transfer the photons' quantum state to trapped-atom quantum memories. If realized, these systems could presage the world's first quantum network. (author)

  20. Ethical aspects of final disposal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltes, B.; Leder, W.; Achenbach, G.B.; Spaemann, R.; Gerhardt, V.

    2003-01-01

    In fulfilment of this task the Federal Environmental Ministry has commissioned GRS to summarise the current national and international status of ethical aspects of the final disposal of radioactive wastes as part of the project titled ''Final disposal of radioactive wastes as seen from the viewpoint of ethical objectives''. The questions arising from the opinions, positions and publications presented in the report by GRS were to serve as a basis for an expert discussion or an interdisciplinary discussion forum for all concerned with the ethical aspects of an answerable approach to the final disposal of radioactive wastes. In April 2001 GRS held a one-day seminar at which leading ethicists and philosophers offered statements on the questions referred to above and joined in a discussion with experts on issues of final disposal. This report documents the questions that arose ahead of the workshop, the specialist lectures held there and a summary of the discussion results [de

  1. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, Mayda [Northwestern University

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  2. Staging Urban Interactions with Media Facades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Martin; Dalsgaard, Peter; Ebsen, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Using media façades as a subcategory of urban computing, this paper contributes to the understanding of spatial interaction, sense-making, and social mediation as part of identifying key characteristics of interaction with media façades. Our research addresses in particular the open-ended but fra......Using media façades as a subcategory of urban computing, this paper contributes to the understanding of spatial interaction, sense-making, and social mediation as part of identifying key characteristics of interaction with media façades. Our research addresses in particular the open......-ended but framed nature of interaction, which in conjunction with varying interpretations enables individual sense-making. Moreover, we contribute to the understanding of flexible social interaction by addressing urban interaction in relation to distributed attention, shared focus, dialogue and collective action....... Finally we address challenges for interaction designers encountered in a complex spatial setting calling for a need to take into account multiple viewing and action positions. Our research-through-design approach has included a real-life design intervention in terms of the design, implementation...

  3. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    Massive stars are thought to end their lives with spectacular explosions triggered by the gravitational collapse of their cores. Interacting supernovae are generally attributed to supernova explosions occurring in dense circumstellar media, generated through mass-loss which characterisie the late phases of the life of their progenitors. In the last two decades, several observational evidences revealed that mass-loss in massive stars may be related to violent eruptions involving their outer layers, such as the luminous blue variables. Giant eruptions of extragalactic luminous blue variables, similar to that observed in Eta Car in the 19th century, are usually labelled 'SN impostors', since they mimic the behaviour of genuine SNe, but are not the final act of the life of the progenitor stars. The mechanisms producing these outbursts are still not understood, although the increasing number of observed cases triggered the efforts of the astronomical community to find possible theoretical interpretations. More recently, a number of observational evidences suggested that also lower-mass stars can experience pre-supernova outbursts, hence becoming supernova impostors. Even more interestingly, there is growing evidence of a connection among massive stars, their outbursts and interacting supernovae. All of this inspired this research, which has been focused in particular on the characterisation of supernova impostors and the observational criteria that may allow us to safely discriminate them from interacting supernovae. Moreover, the discovery of peculiar transients, motivated us to explore the lowest range of stellar masses that may experience violent outbursts. Finally, the quest for the link among massive stars, their giant eruptions and interacting supernovae, led us to study the interacting supernova LSQ13zm, which possibly exploded a very short time after an LBV-like major outburst.

  4. Final Technical Report for Award DESC0011912, "Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy: Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-22

    The final project report covering the period 7/1/14-6/30/17 provides an overview of the technical accomplishments in the areas of (i) fundamental viscoelasticity, (ii) multifrequency atomic force microscopy, and (iii) characterization of energy-relevant materials with atomic force microscopy. A list of publications supported by the project is also provided.

  5. Responding to Expert Arguments. Emerging Lay Topoi in Focus Group Interviews on GM-Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    interaction (Myers 2004), in casu in focus groups interviews with both GM-experts and lay persons without specific knowledge on GM-crops. The paper analyses the lay persons' responses to persuasive expert utterances as inventive contributions to the discussion, not just as reactions showing either support...... or rejection. That is, the paper analyses the topoi, the argumentative ‘places', realized by the lay persons in dealing with and making sense of the new knowledge presented by the experts. Finally, the paper identifies the social identities as participants in a public debate, which are enacted by the lay...

  6. Self-organisation phenomena in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, R.; Grauf, W.; Herold, H.; Schmidt, H.

    1982-06-01

    The structure of the final minimum-energy state of the focus plasma was studied, using Taylor's relaxation theory. A superposition of the reversed pinch field and the field of eddies was obtained. Similar structures could be observed experimentally. (orig.)

  7. Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing: a route towards confined nonlinear materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammel, Robert; Bergner, Klaus; Thomas, Jens; Ackermann, Roland; Skupin, Stefan; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers enable reliable and versatile high precision ablation and surface processing of various materials such as metals, polymers and semiconductors. However, when modifications deep inside the bulk of transparent media are required, nonlinear pulse material interactions can decrease the precision, since weak focusing and the long propagation of the intense pulses within the nonlinear media may induce Kerr self-focusing, filamentation and white light generation. In order to improve the precision of those modifications, simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF) allows to reduce detrimental nonlinear interactions, because the ultrashort pulse duration is only obtained at the focus, while outside of the focal region the continuously increasing pulse duration strongly reduces the pulse intensity. In this paper, we review the fundamental concepts of this technology and provide an overview of its applications for purposes of multiphoton microscopy and laser materials processing. Moreover, numerical simulations on the nonlinear pulse propagation within transparent media illustrate the linear and nonlinear pulse propagation, highlighting the differences between conventional focusing and SSTF. Finally, fs-laser induced modifications in gelatine are presented to compare nonlinear side-effects caused by conventional focusing and SSTF. With conventional focusing the complex interplay of self-focusing and filamentation induces strongly inhomogeneous, elongated disruptions. In contrast, disruptions induced by SSTF are homogeneously located at the focal plane and reduced in length by a factor >2, which is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations of the nonlinear pulse propagation and might favor SSTF for demanding applications such as intraocular fs-laser surgery.

  8. Myths about autism: An exploratory study using focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Rachael Ps; Knott, Fiona J; Harvey, Kate N

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with autism are often stigmatised and isolated by their typically developing peers according to parental, teacher and self-reports. While quantitative studies often report negative attitudes towards individuals with autism, it is still unclear how understandings of autism influence attitudes. In this exploratory study, misconceptions or myths about autism, that is, the cognitive component of attitudes, were examined using focus groups. Purposive sampling was used to recruit undergraduate and postgraduate students, and adults with and without experience of autism, to one of the five focus groups (n = 37). Content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. The data identified seven commonly held beliefs about individuals with autism. The first four were related to social interaction, such as that people with autism do not like to be touched. The fifth reflected the view that all individuals with autism have a special talent, and the final two concerned beliefs that people with autism are dangerous. The findings from this study demonstrate that people with varying experience or knowledge of autism often hold inaccurate beliefs about autism. These findings improve our understandings of lay beliefs about autism and will aid the development and implementation of interventions designed to improve lay knowledge of autism.

  9. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  10. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

    2008-11-12

    The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

  11. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy D. Wall

    2009-02-27

    Bioremediation of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface necessitate an understanding of the metabolic capacities and interactions of the anaerobic microorganisms that are found there, including members of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Genetic investigation into the pathway of reductant flow to U(VI) in the SRB belonging to the genus Desulfovibrio has been the focus of this project. In Dv. desulfuricans strain G20, we confirmed the importance of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 by disruption of the gene encoding that cytochrome, cycA, and demonstrated a decrease in the ability of the mutant (I2) to reduce U(VI). We found that the cytochrome c3 was necessary for electrons from pyruvate to reach sulfate or fumarate as terminal electron acceptors. It was not needed for electrons from lactate to reach sulfate, from which we infer that a different pathway is used for the electrons from these two substrates. Cyrstal structure of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 was obtained and site-directed mutations of the protein indicated a binding site for metals at heme 4 of the structure. Kinetic studies for oxidation of reduced cytochrome c3 with U(VI) or molybdate revealed a preference for U(VI) as a substrate. Evidence for a role for sodium gradients in the energetic scheme for this soil organism was obtained.

  12. Focusing Resources on Effective School Health: A FRESH Start to Enhancing the Quality and Equity of Education. World Education Forum 2000. Final Report = Accorder la priorite a un programme efficace de sante scolaire: Une maniere FRAICHE (FRESH) d'aneliorer la qualite et d'accroitre l'equite dans le domaine de l'education. Forum mondial 2000 sur l'education. Rapport final = Recursos efectivos en salud escolar: Un enfogue NUEVO para mejorar la calidad y la equidad educativa. Foro Mundial par la educacion 2000. Informe final.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This booklet, written in English, Spanish, and French, describes the foundation and reasoning behind the partnership to Focus on Resources on Effective School Health (FRESH), making the case that an effective school health program: responds to the greater number of school-age children and the greater proportion of those children attending school;…

  13. The FCC-ee Interaction Region Magnet Design

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, Michael; Blondel, Alain; Bogomyagkov, Anton; Holzer, Bernhard; Oide, Katsunobu; Sinyatkin, Sergey; Zimmermann, Frank; van Nugteren, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The design of the region close to the interaction point of the FCC-ee experiments is especially challenging. The beams collide at an angle (+-15 mrad) in the high-field region of the detector solenoid. Moreover, the very low vertical beta_y* of the machine necessitates that the final focusing quadrupoles have a distance from the IP (L*) of around 2 m and therefore are inside the main detector solenoid. The beams should be screened from the effect of the detector magnetic field, and the emittance blow-up due to vertical dispersion in the interaction region should be minimized, while leaving enough space for detector components. Crosstalk between the two final focus quadrupoles, only about 6 cm apart at the tip, should also be minimized.

  14. Evaluation of the energy efficiency of alternative processes and technology chains (BEAT). Research for the production of tomorrow. Focus: Simulation and evaluation. Final report for the research project; Bewertung der Energieeffizienz alternativer Prozesse und Technologieketten (BEAT). Forschung fuer die Produktion von morgen. Schwerpunkt: Simulation und Bewertung. Abschlussbericht fuer das Verbundprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Satisfying the needs of people in a globalized world requires a sustainable development. The production of goods is a key role in the development of this sustainable development. The sustainable development of manufacturing companies requires the implementation of new lifecycle assessment methods for manufacturing processes and manufacturing technology chains. This final report under consideration describes the development of a methodology for the evaluation and assessment of technology chains using the production of a gear wheel and an injector.

  15. Focusators for laser-branding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskolovich, L. L.; Kazanskiy, N. L.; Kharitonov, S. I.; Uspleniev, G. V.

    A new method is investigated for synthesis of computer-generated optical elements: focusators that are able to focus the radial-symmetrical laser beam into complex focal contours, in particular into alphanumeric symbols. The method is based on decomposition of the focal contour into segments of straight lines and semi-circles, following corresponding spacing out of the focusator on elementary segments (concentric rings or sectors) and solution of the inverse task of focusing from focusator segments into corresponding elements of the focal contour. The results of numerical computing of the field from synthesized focusators into the letters are presented. The theoretical efficiency of the focusators discussed is no less than 85%. The amplitude masks and the results of operational studies of synthesized focusators are presented.

  16. A program of data synthesis from the ALSEP/CPLEE ALSEP/SIDE, and Explorer 35 magnetometer to investigate lunar terminator and nightside particle fluxes and surface interactions. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reasoner, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar nightside electron fluxes were studied with the aid of the ALSEP/CPLEE and other instruments. The flux events were shown to be due to (a) electrons propagating upstream from the earth's bow shock, (b) electrons thermalized and scattered to the lunar surface by disturbances along the boundary of the lunar solarwind cavity, and (c) solar wind electrons scattered to the lunar surface by lunar limb shocks and/or compressional disturbances. These electrons were identified as a cause of the high night surface negative potentials observed in tha ALSEP/SIDE ion data. A study was also made of the shadowing of magnetotail plasma sheet electrons by interactions between the lunar body and the ambient magnetic field and by interactions between charged particles and lunar remnant magnetic fields. These shadowing effects were shown to modify lunar surface and near-lunar potential distributions. (Author)

  17. The Influence of Social Interaction on the Perception of Emotional Expression: A Case Study with a Robot Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John C.; Cañamero, Lola; Bard, Kim A.; Ross, Marina Davila; Thorsteinsson, Kate

    In this paper we focus primarily on the influence that socio-emotional interaction has on the perception of emotional expression by a robot. We also investigate and discuss the importance of emotion expression in socially interactive situations involving human robot interaction (HRI), and show the importance of utilising emotion expression when dealing with interactive robots, that are to learn and develop in socially situated environments. We discuss early expressional development and the function of emotion in communication in humans and how this can improve HRI communications. Finally we provide experimental results showing how emotion-rich interaction via emotion expression can affect the HRI process by providing additional information.

  18. Prosodic Focus Marking in Bai.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Zenghui; Chen, A.; Van de Velde, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates prosodic marking of focus in Bai, a Sino-Tibetan language spoken in the Southwest of China, by adopting a semi-spontaneous experimental approach. Our data show that Bai speakers increase the duration of the focused constituent and reduce the duration of the post-focus

  19. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs

  20. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.