WorldWideScience

Sample records for field radionuclide analysis

  1. Statistical analysis of fallout radionuclides transfer to paddy-field rice

    Takahashi, T.; Morisawa, S.; Inoue, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Radionuclides released from nuclear facilities to atmosphere are transported through various pathways in biosphere and cause human exposure. Among these radionuclides transfer pathways, an ingestion of crops containing radionuclides is one of the dominant pathway for human exposure. For the safety assessment of nuclear facilities, it is important to understand the behavior of radionuclides in agricultural environment and to describe them in a mathematical model. In this paper, a statistical model is proposed for estimating the concentration of fallout radionuclides in paddy-field rice, the staple food for Japanese people. For describing behavior of fallout radionuclides in a paddy-field, a dynamic model and a statistical model have been proposed respectively. The model used in this study has been developed assuming that the amount of radionuclides transfer to brown rice (hulled rice) or polished rice through direct deposition of airborne radionuclides (the direct deposition pathway) and root uptake from a paddy soil (the root uptake pathway) are proportional to the deposition flux of radionuclides and concentration of radionuclides in paddy soil respectively. That is, the model has two independent variables; the deposition flux of radionuclides and the concentration of radionuclides in the paddy soil, and has single dependent variable; the concentration of radionuclides in brown rice or polished rice. The regression analysis is applied by using environmental monitoring data. Then the distribution of radionuclides between rice-bran (skin part of rice crop) and polished rice (core part) through both the direct deposition pathway and the root uptake pathway are evaluated by the model. (author)

  2. MARFA user's manual: Migration analysis of radionuclides in the far field

    Painter, S.; Mancillas, J.

    2013-12-01

    The computer code Migration Analysis of Radionuclides in the Far Field (MARFA) uses a particle-based Monte Carlo method to simulate the transport of radionuclides in a sparsely fractured geological medium. The algorithm uses non-interacting particles to represent packets of radionuclide mass. These particles are moved through the system according to rules that mimic the underlying physical transport and retention processes. The physical processes represented in MARFA include advection, longitudinal dispersion, Fickian diffusion into an infinite or finite rock matrix, equilibrium sorption, decay, and in-growth. Because the algorithm uses non-interacting particles, the transport and retention processes are limited to those that depend linearly on radionuclide concentration. Multiple non-branching decay chains of arbitrary length are supported, as is full heterogeneity in the transport and retention properties. Two variants of the code are provided. These two versions differ in how particles are routed through the computational domain. In MARFA 3.2.3, transport is assumed to occur along a set of trajectories or pathways that originate at radionuclide source locations. The trajectories are intended to represent the movement of hypothetical, advectively transported groundwater tracers and are typically calculated by pathline tracing in a discrete fracture network flow code. The groundwater speed and retention properties along each pathway may change in time, but the pathway trajectories are fixed. MARFA 3.3.1 allows the transport effects of changing flow directions to be represented by abandoning the fixed pathways and performing node routing within MARFA. (orig.)

  3. MARFA version 3.2.2 user's manual: migration analysis of radionuclides in the far field

    Painter, Scott; Mancillas, James

    2009-12-01

    The computer code Migration Analysis of Radionuclides in the Far Field (MARFA) uses a particle-based Monte Carlo method to simulate the transport of radionuclides in a sparsely fractured geological medium. Transport in sparsely fractured rock is of interest because this medium may serve as a barrier to migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The physical processes represented in MARFA include advection, longitudinal dispersion, Fickian diffusion into an infinite or finite rock matrix, equilibrium sorption, decay, and in-growth. Multiple non-branching decay chains of arbitrary length are supported. This document describes the technical basis and input requirements for MARFA Version 3.2.2. MARFA Version 3.2 included new capabilities to accommodate transient flow velocities and sorption parameters, which are assumed to be piecewise constant in time. Version 3.2.1 was a minor change from Version 3.2 to allow a more convenient input format for sorption information. New capabilities in Version 3.2.2 include an option to specify a non-zero start time for the simulation, an optional input parameter that decreases the amount of retention within a single fracture because of flow channeling, and an alternative method for sampling the radionuclide source. MARFA uses the particle on random streamline segment algorithm /Painter et al. 2006/, a Monte Carlo algorithm combining time-domain random walk methods with pathway stochastic simulation. The algorithm uses non-interacting particles to represent packets of radionuclide mass. These particles are moved through the system according to rules that mimic the underlying physical transport and retention processes. The set of times required for particles to pass through the geological barrier are then used to reconstruct discharge rates (mass or activity basis). Because the algorithm uses non-interacting particles, the transport and retention processes are limited to those that depend linearly on radionuclide

  4. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  5. MARFA version 3.2.2 user's manual: migration analysis of radionuclides in the far field

    Painter, Scott; Mancillas, James (Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States))

    2009-12-15

    The computer code Migration Analysis of Radionuclides in the Far Field (MARFA) uses a particle-based Monte Carlo method to simulate the transport of radionuclides in a sparsely fractured geological medium. Transport in sparsely fractured rock is of interest because this medium may serve as a barrier to migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The physical processes represented in MARFA include advection, longitudinal dispersion, Fickian diffusion into an infinite or finite rock matrix, equilibrium sorption, decay, and in-growth. Multiple non-branching decay chains of arbitrary length are supported. This document describes the technical basis and input requirements for MARFA Version 3.2.2. MARFA Version 3.2 included new capabilities to accommodate transient flow velocities and sorption parameters, which are assumed to be piecewise constant in time. Version 3.2.1 was a minor change from Version 3.2 to allow a more convenient input format for sorption information. New capabilities in Version 3.2.2 include an option to specify a non-zero start time for the simulation, an optional input parameter that decreases the amount of retention within a single fracture because of flow channeling, and an alternative method for sampling the radionuclide source. MARFA uses the particle on random streamline segment algorithm/Painter et al. 2006/, a Monte Carlo algorithm combining time-domain random walk methods with pathway stochastic simulation. The algorithm uses non-interacting particles to represent packets of radionuclide mass. These particles are moved through the system according to rules that mimic the underlying physical transport and retention processes. The set of times required for particles to pass through the geological barrier are then used to reconstruct discharge rates (mass or activity basis). Because the algorithm uses non-interacting particles, the transport and retention processes are limited to those that depend linearly on radionuclide

  6. Field surveying of radionuclide contamination in forests

    Turunen, J.; Rantavaara, A.; Ammann, M.

    2009-01-01

    Field measurements of radionuclides after an accidental contamination of forests assume the capacity for identification of a number of nuclides in varying source geometries. The continuous redistribution of radionuclides in forests through natural processes implies a decrease of prevailing surface contamination of trees and an increase in activity density on the ground. Portable gamma spectrometers have long been based on Na(I) detectors which, due to their low energy resolution, are not the tool for analysis of contamination from accidental releases of fission and activation products in the first days or weeks after a deposition. Data of airborne radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 were used for demonstration of initial and later distribution of radionuclides as sources of air Kerma in forests. Forest model (FDMF, PV. 6.0) of the RODOS system was used for the assessment of time-dependent Kerma rate from different forest compartments. The results show the fast reduction of activities of short-lived nuclides and their contributions to the Kerma rate in the first weeks and months. The results also give an estimate for the time needed until a gamma spectrometer with a low energy resolution would give useful information about long-lived radioactivity on the forest floor. An example is given on a portable high resolution semiconductor spectrometer that has suitable characteristics for field surveying also during occurrence of a great number of radionuclides contributing to the gamma spectrum. The needs for further research of a recently deposited radionuclide contamination on forest vegetation and soil, and the efforts for improvement of portable radiation meters and their use in management planning and radioecological research on contaminated forests are discussed. (au)

  7. Structural-genetic approach to analysis and mapping of Chernobyl's radionuclide contamination field

    Proskura, N.I.; Bujkov, M.; Nagorsky, V.A.; Tepikin, V.; Poletaev, V.; Solyanke, E.G.; Shkvorets, O.Y.; Shestopalov, V.M.; Skvortsov, V.

    1997-01-01

    As a main tool for revealing and interpreting the internal structure of radionuclide contamination field, around the Chernobyl NPP the reliable and validated detailed scale maps of contamination densities could serve. Such maps should have, on the one hand, a high enough density of initial observation points (not less than 1 to 10 points per 1 sq.cm. of final map) and, on the other hand, a high representativeness of each observation point, i.e. reliability of presentation of its vicinity (0.1 to 1 sq.km). The available analytical data files of soil sampling in the exclusion zone conform neither to the first requirement, nor to the second one: real density of sampling does not exceed 0-2 to 0.5 points per 1 sq.m, and the representativeness of obtained results has a typical variation from medium values (in the neighbourhood of 0.1 to 1 sq.km) to 3 to 5 times

  8. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  9. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Cechak, T.

    1994-01-01

    The author's achievements in the title field are summarized and discussed. The following topics are dealt with: (i) principles of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis; (ii) mathematical methods in X-ray fluorescence analysis; (iii) Ross differential filters; (iv) application of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis in the coal industry (with emphasis on the determination of the ash content, sulfur content, and arsenic content of coal); and (v) evaluation of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer from the radiological safety point of view. (P.A.)

  10. Radionuclide analysis of environmental field trial samples at STUK. Report on Task FIN A 847 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    Rantavaara, A.; Klemola, S.; Saxen, R.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Moring, M.

    1994-12-01

    Radionuclide determinations on seventeen field trial test samples were carried out for the International Atomic Energy Agency by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). All the samples, i.e., samples of sea water, grass and biota were analysed for gamma emitting nuclides. 3 H was determined in water, 90 Sr in grass and 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu and 241 Am in biota samples. To avoid losses of radionuclides before gamma activity measurements, the sequence of treatments was adjusted considering the unknown radionuclide composition. The radionuclide contents found in the samples were roughly the same or lower than contents in same types of environmental samples in the Northern hemisphere. The ratios of Pu and Am nuclides in two of the biota samples referred to an origin other than the global atmospheric fallout. The work was carried out under Task FIN A 847 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards. (orig.) (21 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.)

  11. Radionuclide transfer from contaminated field to crops

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Giichiro

    1987-03-01

    Since the policy for land disposal of radioactive wastes were proposed, the importance of terrestrial radioecology has been re-recognized in Japan. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) held a Two-Day Seminar concerning terrestrial transfer of radionuclides. This is a compilation of papers presented at the seminar. The purpose of the seminar is twofold: firstly, to raise basic problems concerning transfer of not only radionuclides but also elements into crops, as well as to present NIRS's studies on radionuclide transfer; and secondly, to discuss in depth the topics about possible transfer of I-129 into rice plant arising from the commercial fuel reprocessing plant, the construction of which is under planning. Finally, general discussion of further issues on radioecology is given. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Radionuclide release from low-level waste in field lysimeters

    Oblath, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    A field program has been in operation for 8 years at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to determine the leaching/migration behavior of low-level radioactive waste using lysimeters. The lysimeters are soil-filled caissons containing well characterized wastes, with each lysimeter serving as a model of a shallow land burial trench. Sampling and analysis of percolate water and vegetation from the lysimeters provide a determination of the release rates of the radionuclides from the waste/soil system. Vegetative uptake appears to be a major pathway for migration. Fractional release rates from the waste/soil system are less than 0.01% per year. Waste-to-soil leach rates up to 10% per year have been determined by coring several of the lysimeters. The leaching of solidified wasteforms under unsaturated field conditions has agreed well with static, immersion leaching of the same type waste in the laboratory. However, releases from the waste/soil system in the lysimeter may be greater than predicted based on leaching alone, due to complexation of the radionuclides by other components leached from the wastes to form mobile, anionic species

  13. Radionuclide analysis of bush food

    Koperski, J.; Bywater, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model diet for an Aboriginal adult living entirely on bush foods collected from the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory has been established. Results of investigations of the specific activities of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in 123 samples of bush foods collected by Ranger Uranium Mines Pty Ltd during pre-production and production periods are presented. For all the investigated bush food items, excluding freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi), no systematic differences were found between the specific activities of the radionuclides monitored in food items sampled during preproduction and production periods. Preliminary estimates of annual effective dose equivalent (DE) rates for stochastic effects on an adult living entirely on the model bush diet are presented. Of the four radionuclides monitored the major contributor to the effective DE rates appears to be lead-210 followed by radium-226. Among the selected nine components of the diet the major contributor to the effective DE rates appear to be mussels, water lilies and fish

  14. Radionuclide analysis of bush food

    Koperski, J; Bywater, J [Ranger Uranium Mines Proprietary Ltd., Chatswood (Australia)

    1985-04-01

    A model diet for an Aboriginal adult living entirely on bush foods collected from the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory has been established. Results of investigations of the specific activities of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 in 123 samples of bush foods collected by Ranger Uranium Mines Pty. Ltd. during pre-production and production periods are presented. For all the investigated bush food items, excluding freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi), no systematic differences were found between the specific activities of the radionuclides monitored in food items sampled during preproduction and production periods. Preliminary estimates of annual effective dose equivalent (DE) rates for stochastic effects on an adult living entirely on the model bush diet are presented. Of the four radionuclides monitored the major contributor to the effective DE rates appears to be lead-210 followed by radium-226. Among the selected nine components of the diet the major contributor to the effective DE rates appear to be mussels, water lilies and fish.

  15. Granulometric analysis of sediments containing transuranic radionuclides

    Smith, R.M.; Additon, M.K.

    1980-11-01

    A dry sieving technique using a sonic sifter was selected for the granulometric analysis of sediment samples containing radionuclide contamination. A sieve facility was established in the 234-5Z building for this purpose. Fifty-two contaminated sediment samples from the 216-Z-1A crib were sieved in the facility at a rate of two to four samples per day with no major problems. A comparison of particle size and radionuclide concentration indicated that there is no obvious benefit to particle size separation as a means of sediment decontamination, though an economic analysis will have to be conducted before a final decision can be made

  16. Compilation of data for radionuclide transport analysis

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This report is one of the supporting documents to the updated safety assessment (project SAFE) of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste, SFR 1. A number of calculation cases for quantitative analysis of radionuclide release and dose to man are defined based on the expected evolution of the repository, geosphere and biosphere in the Base Scenario and other scenarios selected. The data required by the selected near field, geosphere and biosphere models are given and the values selected for the calculations are compiled in tables. The main sources for the selected values of the migration parameters in the repository and geosphere models are the safety assessment of a deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, and the preliminary safety assessment of a repository for long-lived, low- and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5. For the biosphere models, both site-specific data and generic values of the parameters are selected. The applicability of the selected parameter values is discussed and the uncertainty is qualitatively addressed for data to the repository and geosphere migration models. Parameter values selected for these models are in general pessimistic in order not to underestimate the radionuclide release rates. It is judged that this approach combined with the selected calculation cases will illustrate the effects of uncertainties in processes and events that affects the evolution of the system as well as in quantitative data that describes this. The biosphere model allows for probabilistic calculations and the uncertainty in input data are quantified by giving minimum, maximum and mean values as well as the type of probability distribution function.

  17. Compilation of data for radionuclide transport analysis

    2001-11-01

    This report is one of the supporting documents to the updated safety assessment (project SAFE) of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste, SFR 1. A number of calculation cases for quantitative analysis of radionuclide release and dose to man are defined based on the expected evolution of the repository, geosphere and biosphere in the Base Scenario and other scenarios selected. The data required by the selected near field, geosphere and biosphere models are given and the values selected for the calculations are compiled in tables. The main sources for the selected values of the migration parameters in the repository and geosphere models are the safety assessment of a deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, and the preliminary safety assessment of a repository for long-lived, low- and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5. For the biosphere models, both site-specific data and generic values of the parameters are selected. The applicability of the selected parameter values is discussed and the uncertainty is qualitatively addressed for data to the repository and geosphere migration models. Parameter values selected for these models are in general pessimistic in order not to underestimate the radionuclide release rates. It is judged that this approach combined with the selected calculation cases will illustrate the effects of uncertainties in processes and events that affects the evolution of the system as well as in quantitative data that describes this. The biosphere model allows for probabilistic calculations and the uncertainty in input data are quantified by giving minimum, maximum and mean values as well as the type of probability distribution function

  18. Radionuclide transport in the repository near-field and far-field

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Smith, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a background report of the TURVA-2012 safety case report 'Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System'. This report gives a comprehensive account of the modelling of radionuclide release from a defective canister and the subsequent migration to the surface groundwater system. The focus of this report is in the radionuclide migration both in the repository near-field and in the repository far-field. Radionuclide releases from the canister and migration through the repository near-field and far-field have also been analysed in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. Those simulations are discussed in a separate report by Cormenzana. Calculation cases are derived from three different types of scenarios: (i) The base scenario that assumes a single initially defective canister located in a cautiously selected canister position, i.e. selecting the failed canister location such that radionuclide release and transport properties are conservative compared to the statistics over all canister locations. Migration processes and parameter values follow the most likely lines of evolution. Repository safety functions are assumed to perform according to the design basis. Calculation cases defined in the Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios report are also supplemented by additional calculation cases that are aimed to study variability between different DFN realisations (additional BS-ALL cases), longitudinal dispersion (BS-RC-ld cases) and alternative realisations of the transport classes along the release paths (BS-RC-tc cases), (ii) Variant scenarios that study declined performance of the repository safety functions. These include enhanced corrosion failure and degradation of the buffer under variant geochemical conditions (iii) Disturbance scenarios that analyse influences of unlikely events on the radionuclide release and migration. Analysis of the variant and disturbance scenarios

  19. Parameter-sensitivity analysis of near-field radionuclide transport in buffer material and rock for an underground nuclear fuel waste vault

    Cheung, S.C.H.; Chan, T.

    1983-08-01

    An analytical model has been developed for radionuclide transport in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel waste container emplaced in a borehole. The model considers diffusion in the buffer surrounding the waste container, and both diffusion and groundwater convection in the rock around the borehole. A parameter-sensitivity analysis has been done to study the effects on radionuclide flux of (a) Darcian velocity of groundwater in the rock, (b) effective porosity of the buffer, (c) porosity of the rock, (d) radial buffer thickness, and (e) radius and length of the container. It is found that the radionuclide flux, Fsub(R), and the total integrated flux, Fsub(T), are greater for horizontal flow than for vertical flow; Fsub(R) decreases with increasing radial buffer thickness for all Darcian velocities, whereas Fsub(T) decreases at high velocities but increases at low velocities. The rate of change of Fsub(R) and of Fsub(T) decreases with decreasing flow velocity and increasing buffer thickness; Fsub(R) is greater for higher effective porosity of buffer or rock; and Fsub(R) increases and Fsub(T) decreases with decreasing container radius or length

  20. Optimization of mobile analysis of radionuclides

    Labaska, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is focused on optimization of separation and determination of radionuclides which can be used in mobile or field analysis. Mentioned methods are part of procedures and methods of mobile radiometric laboratory which is being developed for Slovak Armed forces. The main principle of these methods is the separation of analytes using high performance liquid chromatography using both reverse phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Chromatography columns such as Dionex IonPack"("R") CS5A, Dionex IonPack"("R") CS3 and Hypersil"("R") BDS C18 have been used. For detection of stabile nuclides, conductivity detection and UV/VIS detection have been employed. Separation of alkali and alkali earth metals. transition metals and lanthanides has been optimized. Combination of chromatographic separation and flow scintillation analysis has been also studied. Radioactive isotopes "5"5Fe, "2"1"0Pb, "6"0Co, "8"5Sr and "1"3"4Cs have been chosen as analytes for nuclear detection techniques. Utilization of well-type and planar NaI(Tl) detector has been investigated together with cloud point extraction. For micelle mediated extraction two possible ligands have been studied - 8-hydroxyquinoline and ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate. Recoveries of cloud point extraction were in range between 80 to 90%. This thesis is also focused on possible application of liquid scintillation analysis with cloud point extraction of analytes. Radioactive standard containing "5"5Fe, "2"1"0Pb, "6"0Co, "8"5Sr and "1"3"4Cs has been separated using liquid chromatography and fractions of individual isotopes have been collected, extracted using cloud point extraction and measured using liquid scintillation analysis. Finally, cloud point extraction coupled with ICP-MS have been studied. (author)

  1. Field studies of radionuclide transport at the Chalk River Laboratories

    Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors summarize the results of: in situ field column experiments to study the transport behaviour of several long-lived radionuclides, 4 natural gradient non-reactive radiotracer injection experiments at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) Twin Lake Tracer Test Site, and a model validation study that used data for 90 Sr from two well-defined contaminated groundwater flow systems at CRL. The paper also describes a current re-evaluation of radionuclide release and transport from a 1960 experimental burial (in a CRL sand aquifer) of glass blocks containing fission and activation products. (J.P.N.)

  2. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-03-15

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

  3. Experimental analysis of plastic materials containing radionuclides for decontamination viability

    Tazaki, Kazue; Nakano, Mikio; Takehara, Teruaki; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 11 March, 2011, the high radioactive dosage was found in polluted water for agriculture use at Baba, Haramachi, Minami-Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Field experiment for decontamination of water had been studied by using commercial plastic materials. The agricultural water comes from Tetsuzan dam is full of radioactive-contaminated water. Experimental analysis showed that the plastic materials can take up radioactive elements for several months soaked in the polluted agricultural water. The quantitative analyses using X-ray fluorescence analysis, Ge semiconductor and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS), revealed the detection of the radionuclides on the plastic materials with diatom and clays. The results suggest the adsorption of radionuclides on the surface of plastic materials due to FDNPP accident. The plastic materials associated with clays and diatoms could be stronger carriers of radionuclides in the polluted water. Adherence of diatoms to the plastic fiber in the water for 7 months suggested that some plastic materials were taking up heavy metals (Zn, Ba, Pb, Sb) with radioactive elements (Cs etc.). Mechanisms by which radioactive pollutants and microorganisms are adsorbed onto and desorbed from clays at aqueous interface can be understood by combining chemical analysis with electron microscopy observation. (author)

  4. Computerized radionuclidic analysis in production facilities

    Gibbs, A.

    1978-03-01

    The Savannah River Plant Laboratories Department has been using a dual computer system to control all radionuclidic pulse height analyses since 1971. This computerized system analyzes 7000 to 8000 samples per month and has allowed the counting room staff to be reduced from three persons to one person. More reliable process information is being returned to the production facilities and for environmental evaluations and being returned faster, even though the sample load has more than tripled. This information is now more easily retrievable for other evaluations. The computer is also used for mass spectrometer data reduction and for quality control data analysis. The basic system is being expanded by interfacing microcomputers which provide data input from all of the laboratory modules for quality assurance programs

  5. Overview of CEA research in the field of radionuclides migration

    Poinssot, Ch.; Trotignon, L.; Tevissen, E.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a synthetic status of the researches conducted within the Nuclear Energy Division (CEA/DEN) in the field of radionuclides migration in three specific areas which have been chosen for their representativeness and potential impact: the migration of RN in PWR reactors, the migration of RN from a deep geological repository and the migration processes in the surface environments. In addition, some status is given about more generic research which is conducted in the field of RN speciation in the aqueous phase and at the interfaces and regarding chemistry / transport couplings. Additional information about the human and technical means involved in these fields of research in CEA/DEN is finally given in the Appendix. (authors)

  6. Development of a transportable system for radionuclide analysis

    Cunningham, W.C.; Anderson, D.L.; Lamont, W.H.; South, P.K.; Rury, M.A.; Beachley, G.M.; Ondov, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Transportable radioanalytical systems were assembled and tested for quantitative determination of γ-emitting radionuclides and screening of β- emitting radionuclides. Standard operating procedures (SOPs), including instructions for assembly, disassembly, operation, sample collection and analysis, and all other procedures needed, were developed. Foods, as well as National Institute of Standards and Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, and in-house Reference Materials were analyzed. An SOP for γ-emitting radionuclides was successfully tested at 3 locations. (author)

  7. VKTA Rossendorf: Laboratory for Environmental and Radionuclide Analysis

    Koehler, M.; Knappik, R.; Fiola, K.

    2015-01-01

    The VKTA (Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Inc.) is charged by the Free State of Saxony with the decommissioning and waste management of the nuclear installations at the research site Dresden-Rossendorf. This task includes the safe management and disposal of fissile material and radioactive wastes. The acquired expertise and our solution-oriented way of working are the basis for a varied range of services especially the environmental and radionuclide analyzes. The Laboratory for Environmental and Radionuclide Analysis is accredited according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025 and provides a sound range of analytical and metrological services including their coordination and management. The personnel and the rooms, measuring and technical equipment are particularly designed for our special field, the measuring of radioactivity. We are focussed on measuring artificial and natural radionuclides in a wide range of activity and in different sample matrices (e.g., urine, faeces, metals, soil, concrete, food, liquids). With the flexible accreditation of the radionuclide analytics the Laboratory is able to react shortly to changing requirements in decommissioning, environmental monitoring and radiation protection. Essential chemical and radiochemical methods are e.g.: · Alpha particle spectrometry, · Liquid scintillation counting, · gamma ray spectrometry, including Ultra-Low-Level, · High-resolution ICP-MS, · Chromatographic methods such as ion chromatography, gas chromatography, HPLC, · Electrochemical measuring methods such as potentiometry, voltammetry. The Laboratory offers analytical services to the research site Dresden-Rossendorf and national and international customers adapting its analytical procedures to the special needs of customers. The presentation demonstrates on the basis of examples the work of Laboratory within the scope of decommissioning of nuclear facilities, especially at a research site, from radiological preliminary investigation to declaration of

  8. Factor analysis for exercise stress radionuclide ventriculography

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Yasuda, Mitsutaka; Oku, Hisao; Ikuno, Yoshiyasu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Tadanao; Ochi, Hironobu

    1987-01-01

    Using factor analysis, a new image processing in exercise stress radionuclide ventriculography, changes in factors associated with exercise were evaluated in 14 patients with angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction. The patients were imaged in the left anterior oblique projection, and three factor images were presented on a color coded scale. Abnormal factors (AF) were observed in 6 patients before exercise, 13 during exercise, and 4 after exercise. In 7 patients, the occurrence of AF was associated with exercise. Five of them became free from AF after exercise. Three patients showing AF before exercise had aggravation of AF during exercise. Overall, the occurrence or aggravation of AF was associated with exercise in ten (71 %) of the patients. The other three patients, however, had disappearance of AF during exercise. In the last patient, none of the AF was observed throughout the study. In view of a high incidence of AF associated with exercise, the factor analysis may have the potential in evaluating cardiac reverse from the viewpoint of left ventricular wall motion abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Radionuclide analysis of environmental field trial samples at STUK/II. Second report on task FIN A 847 of the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M.; Klemola, S.

    1995-06-01

    Radionuclide determinations of 35 environmental samples of eight different materials were carried out for the International Atomic Energy Agency by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). All the samples were analysed for gamma emitting nuclides, 90 Sr, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu. In most of the samples the found radionuclide contents were roughly at the same levels as in the same types of environmental samples in the northern hemisphere. However, some samples of grass, moss, lichen and sheep faeces showed exceptionally great contents of radionuclides measured. The maximum contents of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu were found in the sam individual samples. The ratios of nuclide concentrations in these samples also deviated from ratios in other samples. This referred to an origin of these nuclides other than the global fallout. The work was a continuation to the study carried out under the Task FIN A 847 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguard. (orig.) (1 ref., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  10. Stochastic analysis of radionuclide migration in saturated-unsaturated soils

    Kawanishi, Moto

    1988-01-01

    In Japan, LLRW (low level radioactive wastes) generated from nuclear power plants shall be started to store concentrically in the Shimokita site from 1990, and those could be transformed into land disposal if the positive safety is confirmed. Therefore, it is hoped that the safety assessment method shall be successed for the land disposal of LLRW. In this study, a stochastic model to analyze the radionuclide migration in saturated-unsaturated soils was constructed. The principal results are summarized as follows. 1) We presented a generalized idea for the modeling of the radionuclide migration in saturated-unsaturated soils as an advective-dispersion phenomena followed by the decay of radionuclides and those adsorption/desorption in soils. 2) Based on the radionuclide migration model mentioned above, we developed a stochastic analysis model on radionuclide migration in saturated-unsaturated soils. 3) From the comparison between the simulated results and the exact solution on a few simple one-dimensional advective-dispersion problems of radionuclides, the good validity of this model was confirmed. 4) From the comparison between the simulated results by this model and the experimental results of radionuclide migration in a one-dimensional unsaturated soil column with rainfall, the good applicability was shown. 5) As the stochastic model such as this has several advantages that it is easily able to represent the image of physical phenomena and has basically no numerical dissipation, this model should be more applicable to the analysis of the complicated radionuclide migration in saturated-unsaturated soils. (author)

  11. Program Plan: field radionuclide migration studies in Climax granite

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Coles, D.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01

    This Program Plan describes the field radionuclide migration studies we plan to conduct in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. Laboratory support studies are included to help us understand the geochemical and hydrologic processes involved in the field. The Program Plan begins with background information (Section 1) on how this program fits into the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Plan and discusses the needs for field studies of this type. The objectives stated in Section 2 are in direct response to these needs, particularly the need to determine whether laboratory studies accurately reflect actual field conditions and the need for field testing to provide a data base for verification of hydrologic and mass transport models. The technical scope (Section 3) provides a work breakdown structure that integrates the various activities and establishes a base for the technical approach described in Section 4. Our approach combines an interactive system of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of hydrologic models for pre-test predictions and data interpretation. Section 5 on program interfaces identifies how information will be transferred to other related DOE projects. A schedule of activities and major milestones (Section 6) and the budget necessary to meet the project objectives (Section 7) are included in the Program Plan. Sections 8 and 9 contain brief descriptions of how the technical and program controls will be established and maintained and an outline of our quality assurance program. This program plan is an initial planning document and provides a general description of activities. An Engineering Test Plan containing detailed experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan and equipment design drawings will be published as a separate document

  12. Radionuclide getters in the near-field chemistry of repositories

    Holland, T.R.; Lee, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    The solubility of many radionuclides in a radwaste repository will be limited by the high pH of the cement based system. However, the inclusion of specific sorbing media, within the cement backfill, offers the ability to improve the retention of the more mobile radionuclides, such as caesium and iodine; thereby further reducing their environmental impact. This programme of work is intended to assess the radionuclide sorption efficiency of selected inorganic getters incorporated in cement. (author)

  13. The determination of long life radionuclides by means of sector field ICP mass spectrometry

    Kerl, W.; Becker, J.S.; Dietze, H.J.; Dannecker, W.

    1996-01-01

    Different analytical processes for determining long life radionuclides by means of double-focussing sector field ICP mass spectrometry are described. In determining long life radionuclides by means of ICP-MS, on the one hand the analytical problem areas are in the interference of isobaric atom or molecule ions (eg: 151 Eu + - 151 Sm + , 79 Se + - 39 Ar 40 ArH + ) and on the other hand in the high detection limits when using commercial sample introduction systems (eg: For 129 I). An online coupling of HPLC and ICP-MS was built up for the separation of isobaric atom ions and was tested for the separation of isobaric atom ions and was tested for its efficiency in the separation of lanthanides. Special sample introduction systems for ICP-MS were developed for the analysis of 129 I, by which the sensitivity of detection can be appreciably improved compared to commercial sample introduction systems. (orig.) [de

  14. Determination of correlation and scaling factors of radionuclides in the contaminated soils from experimental lysimetric field

    Dulanska, S.

    2009-04-01

    Correlation and regression analyses are often confused in evaluations of experimental results. However, the correlation analysis describes the influence of one variable level changes to changes of the other variable levels and holds for the variables measured quantitatively. It detects the existence and nature of dependencies, measures the goodness-of-fit of an actual model and tests the hypotheses of statistical significance of the model proposed. The y variable does not depend on the x variable but two random variables, x and y, vary jointly. The regression model, however, takes the independent variable x as a non-random variable and the dependent variable y as a random one, in contrast to the correlation model. There are a number of common difficulties associated with real datasets. The first involves the detection and elimination of outliers in the original data. We think of data as being divided into two classes (1) good observations (the majority of data) reflecting population scatter of data and (2) the outliers (if any) being a part of the so-called influential fatal points or noise. The goal of any outlier detection is to find this true partition and, thus, separate good from outlying observations. Regression diagnostics represent procedures for an examination of the regression triplet (data, model, method) for identification of (a) the data quality for a proposed model; (b) the model quality for a given set of data; (c) a fulfillment of all least-squares assumptions. Scheme and statistical evaluation of suitable scaling models for the monitoring of observed radionuclides 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu in real contaminated soils of experimental lysimetric field on the basis of experimental results were the objectives. Suitable scaling models for 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu radionuclide monitoring in contaminated soil samples placed in an experimental lysimeter have been proven by a regression triplet analysis. Estimates of and parameters for all

  15. Development of dynamic compartment models for prediction of radionuclide behaviors in rice paddy fields

    Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Tomita, Ken'ichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Uchida, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    We are developing dynamic compartment models for prediction of behaviors of some important radionuclides in rice paddy fields for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. For a verification of these models, we report calculations for several different deposition patterns of radionuclides. (author)

  16. Radionuclide getters in the near-field chemistry of repositories

    Holland, T.R.; Lee, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate release of radionuclides from a radioactive waste repository will depend upon the natural and man-made barriers surrounding the site. An opportunity exists to enhance natural radionuclide retention through improved sorption, by the use of suitable additives applied to the repository backfill material. This programme of work was designed to identify problem isotopes, to search for suitable materials to enhance their retention and ultimately to provide, through experimental studies, an understanding of their effectiveness under repository conditions. (Author)

  17. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  18. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Aro, Lasse; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve; Straelberg, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  19. Cluster analysis of radionuclide concentrations in beach sand

    de Meijer, R.J.; James, I.; Jennings, P.J.; Keoyers, J.E.

    This paper presents a method in which natural radionuclide concentrations of beach sand minerals are traced along a stretch of coast by cluster analysis. This analysis yields two groups of mineral deposit with different origins. The method deviates from standard methods of following dispersal of

  20. Preliminary investigation on determination of radionuclide distribution in field tracing test site

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Guo Zede; Li Shushen; Kamiyama, Hideo.

    1993-12-01

    Field tracing tests for radionuclide migration have been conducted by using 3 H, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 134 Cs, in the natural unsaturated loess zone at field test site of China Institute for Radiation Protection. It is necessary to obtain confidable distribution data of the radionuclides in the test site, in order to evaluate exactly the migration behavior of the radionuclides in situ. An available method to determine the distribution was proposed on the basis of preliminary discussing results on sampling method of soils from the test site and analytical method of radioactivity in the soils. (author)

  1. Radionuclides in Bayer process residues: previous analysis for radiological protection

    Cuccia, Valeria; Rocha, Zildete; Oliveira, Arno H. de

    2011-01-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in the main residues of Bayer process for alumina production: red mud and sand samples. Usually, the residues of Bayer process are named red mud, in their totality. However, in the industry where the samples were collected, there is an additional residues separation: sand and red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of radionuclides are higher in the red mud than in the sand. These solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. Further uses for the residues as building material must be more evaluated from the radiological point of view, due to its potential of radiological exposure enhancement, specially caused by radon emission. (author)

  2. Activation analysis with neutron generators using short-lived radionuclides

    Salma, I.

    1993-01-01

    The short half-life involves a number of important differences in production, transportation and measurement of radionuclides, and in counting statistics as compared with those in traditional activation analysis. Experiments were performed to investigate the analytical possibilities and prospective utilization of short-lived radionuclides produced by 14-MeV neutron irradiation. A rapid pneumatic transfer system for use with neutron generators was installed and applied for detecting radionuclides with a half-life from 300 ms to 30 s. The transport time for samples with a total mass of 1-4 g is between 130 and 160 ms for pressurized air of 0.1-0.4 MPa. 11 elements were studied by the conventional activation method using both a typical pneumatic transport system (run time 3 s) and the fast pneumatic transport facility. The effect of the cyclic activation technique on the elemental sensitivities was also investigated. (orig.)

  3. Grimsel Test Site: modelling radionuclide migration field experiments

    Heer, W.; Hadermann, J.

    1994-09-01

    In the migration field experiments at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site, the processes of nuclide transport through a well defined fractured shear-zone in crystalline rock are being investigated. For these experiments, model calculations have been performed to obtain indications on validity and limitation of the model applied and the data deduced under field conditions. The model consists of a hydrological part, where the dipole flow fields of the experiments are determined, and a nuclide transport part, where the flow field driven nuclide propagation through the shear-zone is calculated. In addition to the description of the model, analytical expressions are given to guide the interpretation of experimental results. From the analysis of experimental breakthrough curves for conservative uranine, weakly sorbing sodium and more stronger sorbing strontium tracers, the following main results can be derived: i) The model is able to represent the breakthrough curves of the migration field experiments to a high degree of accuracy, ii) The process of matrix diffusion is manifest through the tails of the breakthrough curves decreasing with time as t -3/2 and through the special shape of the tail ends, both confirmed by the experiments, iii) For nuclide sorbing rapidly, not too strongly, linearly, and exhibiting a reversible cation exchange process on fault gouge, the laboratory sorption coefficient can reasonably well be extrapolated to field conditions. Adequate care in selecting and preparing the rock samples is, of course, a necessary requirement. Using the parameters determined in the previous analysis, predictions are made for experiments in a smaller an faster flow field. For conservative uranine and weakly sorbing sodium, the agreement of predicted and measured breakthrough curves is good, for the more stronger sorbing strontium reasonable, confirming that the model describes the main nuclide transport processes adequately. (author) figs., tabs., 29 refs

  4. Radionuclide analysis of drinking water in selected secondary ...

    Radionuclide analysis of drinking water in selected secondary schools of Epe ... obtained were in the ranges of (38.3 – 292.8) Bq/L with mean value of 13.4 + 10.8 ... and within the tolerance level indicating minimal radiological health burden.

  5. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-01-01

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had many field tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recent years. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metals and radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies can be generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation, bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization, treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applications there are ...

  6. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the PATHWAY radionuclide transport model

    Otis, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Procedures were developed for the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a dynamic model of radionuclide transport through human food chains. Uncertainty in model predictions was estimated by propagation of parameter uncertainties using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Sensitivity of model predictions to individual parameters was investigated using the partial correlation coefficient of each parameter with model output. Random values produced for the uncertainty analysis were used in the correlation analysis for sensitivity. These procedures were applied to the PATHWAY model which predicts concentrations of radionuclides in foods grown in Nevada and Utah and exposed to fallout during the period of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in Nevada. Concentrations and time-integrated concentrations of iodine-131, cesium-136, and cesium-137 in milk and other foods were investigated. 9 figs., 13 tabs

  7. Near-field geologic environment as an effective barrier against radionuclide transport

    Umeki, H.; Sakuma, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Naito, M.

    1993-01-01

    A generic performance assessment of the geologic disposal system of HLW in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission. A massive engineered barrier system, consisting of vitrified waste, carbon-steel overpack and thick bentonite buffer, is introduced to ensure a long-term performance of the disposal system considering a wide range of geologic environment. A major part of the total performance of the disposal system is borne by the engineered barrier system given a geologic environment that assures and complements the performance of such engineered barrier system. The performance of the natural barrier system coupled with the strong engineered barrier system was investigated by sensitivity analyses. Two types of conceptual model were considered for the analysis to describe radionuclide transport in geologic media and the range of relevant parameters was given by taking the variation of the geologic environment in Japan into account. The results show that the degree of retardation of radionuclide transport chosen in the geologic media varies significantly depending on the parameter values chosen. However, it is indicated that there are realistic combinations of those geologic parameter values which could provide a sufficient degree of retardation within a range of only a few tens of meters from the engineered barrier system. The relative importance of the near-field geologic environment is also discussed

  8. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Jannik, T.

    2011-08-30

    This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

  10. Quantitative aspects of transuranic and other radionuclide field studies

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to identify, develop, and communicate statistical methodology for environmental actinide studies. Significant accomplishments for FY 1981 included continued publication of TRAN-STAT (a periodical specializing in the statistical aspects of environmental contaminant studies), continued work on our computer simulation study for evaluating ratios, and review of statistical methodology applicable to environmental radionuclides. Related work for the DOE Division Office of Operational Safety included writing the statistical portion of a decommissioning and decontamination guide, expanding our expertise in Kriging and other spatial pattern statistical methodology applicable to the evaluation of potential environmental hazards, continuing statistical support for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), and providing statistical assistance to PNL's environmental radiological monitoring effort

  11. Radionuclide getters in the near-field chemistry of repositories

    Holland, T.R.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-08-01

    This programme of work has assessed the radionuclide sorption efficiency of selected inorganic 'getters' incorporated into cement as a means of enhancing the retention of radioactive species by the proposed repository backfill. The study has shown that most of the materials tested retained considerable sorptive properties for radium and caesium after incorporation into cement. However, poor retention of iodine prompted a search for a specific iodine getter. Apart from encapsulated activated carbon, the specific getters tested showed no improved sorption above that of the cement matrix. A study of factors influencing sorption, showed that the getter concentration was the only factor causing a major change in sorption efficiency. Retesting of samples after 12 months sorption indicated that, in general, a slight degree of desorption had taken place. An engineering assessment, examining the physical characteristics of a selected backfill formulation, was carried out, demonstrating the practicability of the process. (author)

  12. Judgment on the presence of radionuclides in sample analysis: A case study

    Muhamat Omar; Zalina Laili; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples require good judgment from the analysts. These two aspects in gamma spectrometric analysis of Proficiency Test and solid radioactive waste samples for the determination of radionuclides are discussed. It is vital to judge and decide what energy peaks belong to which radionuclides prior to the creation of customized radionuclide library for the analysis of specific samples. Corrections due to radionuclide decay and growth, and the half-life assigned to a particular radionuclide in the uranium and thorium series are also discussed. Discussion on judgment to confirm the presence of thorium in food samples based on gamma spectrometry and neutron activation analysis is also provided. (author)

  13. Preliminary rate expressions for analysis of radionuclide migration resulting from fluid flow through jointed media

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental basis is being developed for analysis of radionuclide transport in jointed geologic media. Batch equilibration and rate experiments involving samples of Eleana argillite and tertiary silicic tuffs in contact with solutions containing Cs, Sr, or Pm indicated that most radionuclide sorption was associated with the surfaces of very small intergranular regions and that the rate of sorption was controlled by diffusion of the nuclides into such regions. Based on these experimental results, the continuity equations for radionuclides in the mobile and immobile phases were reduced to a model analogous to Rosen's equations for packed beds and were solved similarly. Using the model and experimental data, limited radionuclide transport analyses were made which indicated that important parameters controlling transport include the intergranular porosity and nuclide penetration depth, fracture plate spacing and length, fluid velocity and sorption distribution coefficient. Many of these parameters represent physical quantities or processes which can be quantified in the laboratory. However, fluid velocities and fracture plate spacings and lengths must be obtained from the field, and methods must be developed to establish reliable bounds for such field-determined parameters.

  14. Preliminary rate expressions for analysis of radionuclide migration resulting from fluid flow through jointed media

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental basis is being developed for analysis of radionuclide transport in jointed geologic media. Batch equilibration and rate experiments involving samples of Eleana argillite and tertiary silicic tuffs in contact with solutions containing Cs, Sr, or Pm indicated that most radionuclide sorption was associated with the surfaces of very small intergranular regions and that the rate of sorption was controlled by diffusion of the nuclides into such regions. Based on these experimental results, the continuity equations for radionuclides in the mobile and immobile phases were reduced to a model analogous to Rosen's equations for packed beds and were solved similarly. Using the model and experimental data, limited radionuclide transport analyses were made which indicated that important parameters controlling transport include the intergranular porosity and nuclide penetration depth, fracture plate spacing and length, fluid velocity and sorption distribution coefficient. Many of these parameters represent physical quantities or processes which can be quantified in the laboratory. However, fluid velocities and fracture plate spacings and lengths must be obtained from the field, and methods must be developed to establish reliable bounds for such field-determined parameters

  15. Radionuclides in analytical chemistry

    Tousset, J.

    1984-01-01

    Applications of radionuclides in analytical chemistry are reviewed in this article: tracers, radioactive sources and activation analysis. Examples are given in all these fields and it is concluded that these methods should be used more widely [fr

  16. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 3. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-08-01

    A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during April 1979 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Bed sediment, suspended sediment and water samples were collected during unsteady flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, Cs-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. This field sampling effort was the last of a three phase program to collect hydrologic and radiologic data at different flow conditions

  17. Review of speciation and solubility of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 2

    Smith-Briggs, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents Part 2 in a series of three reports which review the speciation and solubility of radionuclides in the near and far field. Part 2 is a general bibliography from 1978 to 1991. This report contains the bibliography for the review of speciation and solubility radionuclides in the near and far field from 1978 to 1991. The importance of the solubility and speciation of radionuclides in relation to the safety assessment of the repository is discussed. Solubility is defined, both theoretically and pragmatically, and the factors which influence solubility and speciation are discussed. The literature search was performed using the INIS database. The UKAEA RECAP database, the NIREX report bibliography and a list of DOE reports provided by the DOE were also used. The bibliography is divided into five sections, solubility and speciation experimental data, basic thermodynamic data, solubility limiting solid phases, experimental design and review and overview articles. Some references appear in more than one section. (Author)

  18. Radionuclides release possibility analysis of MSR at various accident conditions

    Lee, Choong Wie; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are some accidents which go beyond our expectation such as Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and amounts of radionuclides release to environment, so more effort and research are conducted to prevent it. MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) is one of GEN-IV reactor types, and its coolant and fuel are mixtures of molten salt. MSR has a schematic like figure 1 and it has different features with the solid fuel reactor, but most important and interesting feature of MSR is its many safety systems. For example, MSR has a large negative void coefficient. Even though power increases, the reactor slows down soon. Radionuclides release possibility of MSR was analyzed at various accident conditions including Chernobyl and Fukushima ones. The MSR was understood to prevent the severe accident by the negative reactivity coefficient and the absence of explosive material such as water at the Chernobyl disaster condition. It was expected to contain fuel salts in the reactor building and not to release radionuclides into environment even if the primary system could be ruptured or broken and fuel salts would be leaked at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster condition of earthquake and tsunami. The MSR, which would not lead to the severe accident and therefore prevents the fuel release to the environment at many expected scenarios, was thought to have priority in the aspect of accidents. A quantitative analysis and a further research are needed to evaluate the possibility of radionuclide release to the environment at the various accident conditions based on the simple comparison of the safety feature between MSR and solid fuel reactor.

  19. Radionuclide inventory and heat generation analysis in disposal of radioactive waste

    Suryanto

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclide inventory and heat generation analysis on spent nuclear fuel were done in order to study the potential radionuclides contributing radiological impact to human being caused by spent fuel disposal. The study was carried out using the Bateman equation of radionuclide decay chains for fission products and actinides. the results showed that Cs-137, Sr-90 and Pu-239 dominated inventory of spent fuel, in which Pu-238 and Pu-240 dominated heat generation during disposal. Accordingly, the above radionuclides could be considered as the reference radionuclides for safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel disposal (author)

  20. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Summary report, field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Walters, W.H.; Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-11-01

    A three-phase field sampling program was conducted on the Buttermilk-Cattaraugus Creek system to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Phase 1 of the sampling program was conducted during November and December 1977; Phase 2 during September 1978; and Phase 3 during April 1979. Bed sediment, suspended sediment, and water samples were collected over a 45-mile reach of the creek system. Bed sediment samples were also collected at the mouth of Cattaraugus Creek in Lake Erie. A fourth sampling trip was conducted during May 1980 to obtain supplementary channel geometry data and flood plain sediment samples. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, CS-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239,240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks

  1. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-01-01

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  2. Critical Radionuclide and Pathway Analysis for the Savannah River Site, 2016 Update

    Jannik, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hartman, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-08

    During the operational history of Savannah River Site, many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, as shown in this analysis, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses to the offsite public. This report is an update to the 2011 analysis, Critical Radionuclide and Pathway Analysis for the Savannah River Site. SRS-based Performance Assessments for E-Area, Saltstone, F-Tank Farm, H-Tank Farm, and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis have been completed. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in those extensive reports are also detailed and included in this analysis.

  3. Advanced chemical analysis service for elements, radionuclides and phases

    Sansoni, B.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given on the structure, organisation and performance of the chemical analysis service of the Central Department for Chemical Analysis at the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH. The research and development programs together with the infrastructure of the Centre afford to analyse almost all stable elements of the periodical table in almost any material. The corresponding chemical analysis service has been organized according to a new modular system of analytical steps. According to this, the most complicated and, therefore, most general case of an analytical scheme for element and radionuclide analysis in any type of material can be differentiated into about 14 different steps, the modules. They are more or less independent of the special problem. The laboratory is designed and organized according to these steps. (orig./PW) [de

  4. Analysis gives sensibility two models gives migration and transport gives radionuclides in the geosphere

    Torres Berdeguez, M. B.; Gil Castillo, R.; Peralta Vidal, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    An sensibility analysis it was applied two models, the first one, a model compressible for the near field (I finish source) The second, a simple model gives migration and transport radionuclides in the geosphere. The study was developed varying the securities ed simultaneously at the same time each parameter and observing the results in changes in the output and input. The intention in analysis it is to determine the parameter that but it influences in the variation the concentration. The statistical technique Regression it was employee in the study. This statistical method is used to analyze the dependence between a dependent variable and an or but independent variables

  5. Present status and perspective of radiochemical analysis of radionuclides in Nordic countries

    Hou, Xiaolin; Olsson, Mattias; Togneri, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis plays a critical role in the determination of pure beta and alpha emitting radionuclides for environmental monitoring, radioecology, decommissioning, nuclear forensics and geological dating. A remarkable development on radiochemical analysis has been achieved in the past...... of radionuclides, especially in Nordic countries; some requirements from nuclear industries and research organizations, as well as perspectives on the development of radiochemical analysis are discussed....

  6. Remanent radiation fields around medical linear accelerators due to the induced radionuclides

    Sabol, J.; Khalifa, O.; Berka, Z.; Stankus, P.; Frencl, L.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation fields around two linear accelerators, Saturn 43 and a Saturn 2 Plus, installed at radiotherapy department is Prague, were measured and interpreted. The measurements included the determination of the dose equivalent rate resulting from photons emitted by induced radionuclides produced in reactions of high-energy photons with certain elements present in air and accelerator components as well as in the shielding and building materials in the treatment rooms, which are irradiated by high-energy X-rays, and due to radionuclides formed by capture of photoneutrons. While scattered photons and photoneutrons are only present during the accelerator operation, residual radioactivity creates a remanent radiation field persisting for some time after the instrument shutdown. The activity induced in the accessories is also an important source of exposure. (P.A.)

  7. Review of speciation and solubility of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 1

    Smith-Briggs, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents Part 1 in a series of three reports which review the speciation and solubility of radionuclides in the near and far field. Part 1 reviews the research funded by UK Nirex Ltd (NIREX) and the Department of the Environment into the solubility and speciation of radionuclides in the near and far fields of a radioactive waste repository. The review is focused on the particular situation prevailing in the UK. UK Nirex Limited are currently planning the development of a deep geological repository for low and intermediate level wastes. In the basic design it is envisaged that the waste material would be immobilised and packed into steel or concrete containers. These containers would be placed in vaults and then backfilled with a cemetitious grout. (Author)

  8. Analysis of natural radionuclides and lead in foods and diets

    Bueno, Luciana

    1999-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to determine the lead-210, polonium-210 and lead concentrations in foods and diets. Consumption of food is generally the main route by which radionuclides can enter the human organism. Precision and accuracy of the methods developed were verifies by the analysis of reference materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The method for polonium-210 analysis consisted of sample dissolution by using a microwave digester (open system) employing concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, evaporation almost dryness, addition of hydrochloric acid, polonium deposition onto silver disc for six hours and counting by alpha spectrometry. Lead was analysed by atomic absorption technique. After sample dissolution in a microwave digester (using concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and dilution to 50 ml, 20μl of the sample was injected in a pyrolytic graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with Zeeman background correction. The assessment of the contaminants in foods and diets allowed to estimate the intake of these elements and for the radionuclides were also evaluated the radiation doses that the individuals selected were exposed by the food consumption. The effective dose for lead-210 by diets intake ranged from 1.3 to 4.3 μSv/year, corresponding to 25% of the resulting from polonium-210 intake. The dose due to the both natural radionuclides varied from 6.8 to 23.0 μSv/year. These values are in good agreement with the literature data. The value estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 1993) that is 60 μSv and lower than the dose of 0.02 Sv, limit established by ICRP, 1980. The lead levels found in the majority of the Brazilian foods are in good agreement with the values published by CONAT and FAO/WHO. However, some foods such as bean, potato, papaya, apple and rice present levels above of the recommended values by the Public

  9. A field study of physico-chemical states of artificial radionuclides in seawater

    Nagaya, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kiyoshi

    1974-01-01

    The physico-chemical states of artificial radionuclides, 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 144 Ce in seawater were investigated by radiochemical analysis of filtered and unfiltered seawater. The difference of radionuclide concentrations between unfiltered and filtered seawaters was defined as the ''particulate form'' radioisotope and its ''particle ratio'' was discussed. Practically no particulate 90 Sr, greater than 0.22 μ in size, was observed in both coastal and open seawaters, but some of 137 Cs seemed to be insoluble in some circumstances, especially in coastal waters. A considerable amount of 144 Ce was found to be particulate. An estimation of the radionuclides in particulate form was made for Kashima-nada seawaters collected in 1970 to 1972, and it was shown that the possible occurrence of particulate radionuclides, greater than 0.22 μ in size, were 1% or less for 90 Sr and 6% for 137 Cs. In the coastal water, 80% of 144 Ce were seemed to be in particulate form, but in the open seawater only a few %. The influences of suspended materials to 137 Cs and 144 Ce concentration levels in seawater were not negligible and further investigations are desirable. (auth.)

  10. Criteria of reference radionuclides for safety analysis of spent fuel waste disposal

    Suryanto

    1998-01-01

    Study on the criteria for reference radionuclides selection for assessment on spent fuel disposal have done. The reference radionuclides in this study means radionuclides are predicted to contribute of the most radiological effect for man if spent fuel waste are discharged on deep geology formation. The research was done by investigate critically of parameters were used on evaluation a kind of radionuclide. Especially, this research study of parameter which relevant disposal case and or spent fuel waste on deep geology formation . The research assumed that spent fuel discharged on deep geology by depth 500-1000 meters from surface of the land. The migration scenario Radionuclides from waste form to man was assumed particularly for normal release in which Radionuclides discharge from waste form in a series thorough container, buffer, geological, rock, to fracture(fault) and move together with ground water go to biosphere and than go into human body. On this scenario, the parameter such as radionuclides inventory, half life, heat generation, hazard index based on maximum permissible concentration (MPC) or annual limit on intake (ALI) was developed as criteria of reference radionuclides selection. The research concluded that radionuclides inventory, half live, heat generated, hazard index base on MPC or ALI can be used as criteria for selection of reference Radionuclide. The research obtained that the main radionuclides are predicted give the most radiological effect to human are as Cs-137, Sr-90, I-129, Am-243, Cm-244, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240. The radionuclides reasonable to be used as reference radionuclides in safety analysis at spent fuel disposal. (author)

  11. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-12-08

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model

  12. Speciation Analysis of Radionuclides in the Environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    . Speciation of radionuclides in soils and sediments includes: Sequential extraction of radionuclides in sediments and of trace elements in soil samples. Sequential extraction of radionuclides in aerosols and particles has also been performed. Further-more, sorption experiments have been performed......, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionu-clides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners’ laboratories, Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation...... analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes...

  13. Global ejection fraction and phase analysis assessed by radionuclide angiography during exercise and after isoproterenol infusion

    Righetti, A.; Ratib, O.; Merier, G.; Widmann, T.; Donath, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography obtained during and following Isoproterenol infusion is a new approach for detecting latent myocardial ischemia. It is very sensitive and could be considered as an alternative to conventional exercice radionuclide angiography. The data presented show that phase analysis assessment of regional systolic wall motion is a better indicator than global ejection fraction for quantifying left ventricular dysfunction

  14. Research work in the field of lubricants with the aid of radionuclide techniques

    Ruediger, V.

    1975-01-01

    The application of radionuclide technique to research tasks in the field of lubricants in the laboratorium fuer Isotopentechnik for the last three years is dealt with. In addition, oil foaming, operational oil testing, friction bearing investigations, motor examinations by means of the course of wear, as well as the grain size distribution of the abrasion, the bearing loadability of newtonian and non-newtonian oils, the cylinder wear (according to the principle of density measurement by absorption of characteristic X-rays), are described. (HK/LH) [de

  15. A dynamic compartment model for assessing the transfer of radionuclide deposited onto flooded rice-fields

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Han-Soo; Choi, Heui-Ju; Kang, Hee-Seok; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Young-Ho; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic compartment model has been studied to estimate the transfer of radionuclides deposited onto flooded rice-fields after an accidental release. In the model, a surface water compartment and a direct shoot-base absorption from the surface water to the rice-plant, which are major features discriminating the present model from the existing model, has been introduced to account for the flooded condition of rice-fields. The model has been applied to the deposition experiments of 137 Cs on rice-fields that were performed at three different times to simulate the deposition before transplanting (May 2) and during the growth of the rice (June 1 and August 12), respectively. In the case of the deposition of May 2, the root-uptake is the most predominant process for transferring 137 Cs to the rice-body and grain. When the radionuclide is applied just after transplanting (June 1), the activity of the body is controlled by the shoot-base absorption and the activity of the grain by the root-uptake. The deposition just before ear-emergence (August 12) shows that the shoot-base absorption contributes entirely to the increase of both the activities of the body and grain. The model prediction agrees within one or two factors with the experimental results obtained for a respective deposition experiment

  16. A field-deployable, aircraft-mounted sensor for the environmental survey of radionuclides

    Lepel, E.A.; Geelhood, B.D.; Hensley, W.K.; Quam, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Radionuclide Sensor System (ERSS) 3 is an extremely sensitive sensor, which has been cooperatively developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for environmental surveys of radionuclides. The ERSS sensors fit in an airborne pod and include twenty High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors for the high-resolution measurement of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, twenty-four 3 He detectors for possible neutron measurements, and two video cameras for visual correlation. These aerial HPGe sensors provide much better gamma-ray energy resolution than can be obtained with NaI(Tl) detectors. The associated electronics fit into three racks. The system can be powered by the 28 V DC electrical supply of typical aircraft or 120 V AC. The data acquisition hardware is controlled by customized software and a real-time display is provided. Each gamma-ray event is time stamped and stored for later analysis. This paper will present the physical design, discuss the software used to control the system, and provide some examples of its use. (author)

  17. Fast neutron activation analysis using short-lived radionuclides

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1993-01-01

    Fast neutron activation analysis experiments were performed to investigate the analytical possibilities and prospective utilization of short-lived activation products. A rapid pneumatic transfer system for use with neutron generators has been installed and applied for detecting radionuclides with a half-life from ∼300 ms to 20 s. The transport time for samples of total mass of 1-4 g is between 130 and 160 ms for pressurized air of 0.1-0.4 MPa. The reproducibility of transport times is less than 2%. The employed method of correcting time-dependent counting losses is based on the virtual pulse generator principle. The measuring equipment consists of CAMAC modules and a special gating circuit. Typical time distributions of counting losses are presented. The same 14 elements were studied by the conventional activation method (single irradiation and single counting) by both a typical pneumatic transport system (run time 3 s) and the fast pneumatic transport facility. Furthermore, the influence of the cyclic activation technique on the elemental sensitivities was investigated. (author) 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Rapid determination of long-lived artificial alpha radionuclides using time interval analysis

    Uezu, Yasuhiro; Koarashi, Jun; Sanada, Yukihisa; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    It is important to monitor long lived alpha radionuclides as plutonium ( 238 Pu, 239+240 Pu) in the field of working area and environment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, because it is well known that potential risks of cancer-causing from alpha radiation is higher than gamma radiations. Thus, these monitoring are required high sensitivity, high resolution and rapid determination in order to measure a very low-level concentration of plutonium isotopes. In such high sensitive monitoring, natural radionuclides, including radon ( 222 Rn or 220 Rn) and their progenies, should be eliminated as low as possible. In this situation, a sophisticated discrimination method between Pu and progenies of 222 Rn or 220 Rn using time interval analysis (TIA), which was able to subtract short-lived radionuclides using the time interval distributions calculation of successive alpha and beta decay events within millisecond or microsecond orders, was designed and developed. In this system, alpha rays from 214 Po, 216 Po and 212 Po are extractable. TIA measuring system composes of Silicon Surface Barrier Detector (SSD), an amplifier, an Analog to Digital Converter (ADC), a Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA), a high-resolution timer (TIMER), a multi-parameter collector and a personal computer. In ADC, incidental alpha and beta pulses are sent to the MCA and the TIMER simultaneously. Pulses from them are synthesized by the multi-parameter collector. After measurement, natural radionuclides are subtracted. Airborne particles were collected on membrane filter for 60 minutes at 100 L/min. Small Pu particles were added on the surface of it. Alpha and beta rays were measured and natural radionuclides were subtracted within 5 times of 145 msec. by TIA. As a result of it, the hidden Pu in natural background could be recognized clearly. The lower limit of determination of 239 Pu is calculated as 6x10 -9 Bq/cm 3 . This level is satisfied with the derived air concentration (DAC) of 239 Pu (8x10 -9 Bq/cm 3

  19. Field verification of advanced transport models of radionuclides in heterogeneous soils

    Visser, W.; Meurs, G.A.M.; Weststrate, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with a verification study of advanced transport models of radionuclides in heterogeneous soils. The study reported here is the third phase of a research program carried out by Delft Geotechnics concerning the influence of soil heterogeneities on the migration of radionuclides in the soil and soil-water system. Phases 1 and 2 have been reported earlier in the EC Nuclear Science and technology series (EUR 12111 EN, 1989). The verification study involves the predictive modelling of a field tracer experiment carried out by the British Geological Survey (BGS) at Drigg, Cumbria (UK). Conservative (I 131 , Cl-, H 3 ) as well as non-conservative (Co-EDTA) tracers were used. The inverse modelling shows that micro dispersion may be considered as a soil constant related to grainsize. Micro dispersion shows a slow increase with distance from the source. This increase is caused by mass transfer between adjacent layers of different permeability. Macro dispersion is observed when sampling over a larger interval then permitted by the detail with which the heterogeneity is described in the model. The prediction of the migration of radionuclides through heterogeneous soils is possible. The advection dispersion equation seems to be an adequate description of the migration of conservative tracers. The models based on this equation give comparable results on a small field test scale (3.5 m). The prediction of the migration of adsorbing species is more difficult. The mathematical descriptions seem appropriate, but the heterogeneity in soils seems to create a higher order of uncertainty which can not be described as yet with calculation strategies available at this moment

  20. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis of components of the environment

    Toelgyessy, J.; Havranek, E.; Dejmkova, E.

    1983-12-01

    The physical foundations and methodology are described of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis. The sources are listed of air, water and soil pollution, and the transfer of impurities into biological materials is described. A detailed description is presented of the sampling of air, soil and biological materials and their preparation for analysis. Greatest attention is devoted to radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis of the components of the environment. (ES)

  1. State of radionuclide diagnosis in the USSR (according to the data of science analysis)

    Arnautov, A.K.; Artamonova, N.O.; Busygina, N.A.; Kornienko, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Comparison of the results analysing dynamics of publications by radionuclide diagnosis for the late 10-12 years in the occupational magazine ''Medical radiology'', ''Medical abstract magazine'', ''Radiology, roentgenology, oncology'' has been carried out. When comparing publications in ''Medical radiology'', ''Medical abstract magazine'', the expansion of fields for application of radionuclide methods for examination and increase of a number of papers on this subject in allied magazines is detected. According to the specialists' opinion, the further development of radionuclide diagnosis should take the road of development and wide provision of specialized medical institutions with high-sensitive radiometric and dosimetric equipment, short- and ultrashort-living radiopharmaceuticals

  2. MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) code description and User's Manual

    Avci, H.I.; Raghuram, S.; Baybutt, P.

    1985-04-01

    A new computer code called MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) has been developed to replace the CORRAL-2 computer code which was written for the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). This report is a User's Manual for MATADOR. MATADOR is intended for use in system risk studies to analyze radionuclide transport and deposition in reactor containments. The principal output of the code is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containment and their removal by natural deposition and by engineered safety systems such as sprays. It is capable of analyzing the behavior of radionuclides existing either as vapors or aerosols in the containment. The code requires input data on the source terms into the containment, the geometry of the containment, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the containment

  3. Performance assessment model development and parameter acquisition for analysis of the transport of natural radionuclides in a Mediterranean watershed

    Agueero, Almudena

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed to construct a model for predicting the behaviour of the natural radioisotopes of U, Th and Ra in a Mediterranean watershed. The methodology includes the development of the performance assessment model, obtaining water flow and radiological parameters based on experimental data and analysis of results. The model, which accounts for both water flows and mass balances of the radionuclides in a semi-natural environment, provides assessments of radionuclide behaviour in grassland and agricultural soils, rivers and reservoirs, including the processes of radionuclide migration through land and water and interactions between both. From field and laboratory data, it has been possible to obtain parameters for the driving processes considered in the model, water fluxes, source term definition, soil to plant transfer factors and distribution coefficient values. Ranges of parameter values obtained have shown good agreement with published literature data. This general methodological approach was developed to be extended to other radionuclides for the modelling of a biosphere watershed in the context of performance assessment of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository under Mediterranean climate conditions, as well as for forecasting radionuclide transport under similar Mediterranean conditions that will occur in the future in other areas. The application of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was intended to identify key uncertainties with the aim of setting priorities for future research. The model results for the activity concentration in the reservoir indicate that for 238 U and 230 Th the most relevant parameter is the initial concentrations of the radionuclides in the reservoir sediments. However, for 226 Ra the most important parameter is the precipitation rate over the whole watershed

  4. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Miley, Harry S.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5–2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. - Highlights: • The 2014 Integrated Field Exercise occurred in Jordan. • The detection sensitivity for two On-site Inspection techniques was evaluated. • The techniques search for 17 particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. • Laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples was the optimum technique.

  5. Receiver operating characteristic analysis improves diagnosis by radionuclide ventriculography

    Dickinson, C.Z.; Forman, M.B.; Vaugh, W.K.; Sandler, M.P.; Kronenberg, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) evaluates continuous variables to define diagnostic criteria for the optimal sensitivity (SENS) and specificity (SPEC) of a test. The authors studied exercise-induced chest pain (CP), ST-changes on electrocardiography (ECG) and rest-exercise gated radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) using ROC to clarify the optimal criteria for detecting myocardial ischemia due to coronary artherosclerosis (CAD). The data of 95 consecutive patients studied with coronary angiography, rest-exercise RVG and ECG were reviewed. 77 patients had ''significant'' CAD (≥50% lesions). Exercise-induced CP, ECG abnormalities (ST-T shifts) and RVG abnormalities (change in ejection fraction, 2-view regional wall motion change and relative end-systolic volume) were evaluated to define optimal SENS/SPEC of each and for the combined data. ROC curves were constructed by multiple logistic regression (MLR). By MLR, RVG alone was superior to ECG and CP. The combination of all three produced the best ROC curve for the entire group and for clinical subsets based on the number of diseased vessels and the presence or absence of prior myocardial infarction. When CP, ECG and RVG were combined, the optimal SENS/SPEC for detection of single vessel disease was 88/86. The SENS/SPEC for 3 vessel disease was 93/95. Thus, the application of RVG for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is improved with the inclusion of ECG and CP data by the use of a multiple logistic regression model. ROC analysis allows clinical application of multiple data for diagnosing CAD at desired SENS/SPEC rather than by arbitrary single-standard criteria

  6. Performance analysis of numeric solutions applied to biokinetics of radionuclides

    Mingatos, Danielle dos Santos; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Biokinetics models for radionuclides applied to dosimetry problems are constantly reviewed by ICRP. The radionuclide trajectory could be represented by compartmental models, assuming constant transfer rates between compartments. A better understanding of physiological or biochemical phenomena, improve the comprehension of radionuclide behavior in the human body and, in general, more complex compartmental models are proposed, increasing the difficulty of obtaining the analytical solution for the system of first order differential equations. Even with constant transfer rates numerical solutions must be carefully implemented because of almost singular characteristic of the matrix of coefficients. In this work we compare numerical methods with different strategies for ICRP-78 models for Thorium-228 and Uranium-234. The impact of uncertainty in the parameters of the equations is also estimated for local and global truncation errors. (author)

  7. Preparation of proton rich radionuclides in support of radiochemical analysis

    Jerome, Simon; Larijani, Cyrus; Parker, David

    2012-01-01

    The production of proton rich radionuclides supports a wide range of radiochemical analyses via radioactive yield tracers ( 95m Tc and 236 Pu). In recent years, NPL and the University of Birmingham cyclotron have collaborated to produce these, and other, radionuclides. - Highlights: ► In this paper we options for the production of Tc and Pu tracers. ► The irradiation and measurement of targets producing Tc-95 m and Pu-236 are described. ► Options for production are discussed. ► The results of this study and future work needed are described.

  8. The computer model development for radionuclide migration analysis in geosphere

    Mulyanto

    1998-01-01

    1-D numerical model for safety assessment of spent fuel disposal have been developed. The numerical solution with planar geometric was developed in order to solve mass transport in heterogenous geological media. In this paper, Crank-Nicolson method was discussed for solving of radionuclide migration equation. Demonstration was done for calculation of concentration distribution of several radionuclides in the exclusion zone. It was concluded that the exclusion zone was an important concept should be adopted in determination of disposal site. Site should be selected as far as possible from fracture or as long as possible exclusion zone. (author)

  9. Transient simulation and sensitivity analysis for transport of radionuclides in a saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow system

    Chen, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide transport by groundwater flow is an important pathway in the assessment of the environmental impact of radioactive waste disposal to the biosphere. A numerical model was developed to simulate radionuclide transport by groundwater flow and predict the radionuclide discharge rate to the biosphere. A sensitivity analysis methodology was developed to address the sensitivity of the input parameters of the radionuclide transport equation to the specified response of interest

  10. Radionuclide field lysimeter experiment (RadFLEx): geochemical and hydrological data for SRS performance assessments

    Kaplan, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Powell, B. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Barber, K. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Devol, T. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Dixon, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Erdmann, B. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Maloubier, M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Martinez, N. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Montgomery, D. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Peruski, K. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Witmer, M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2017-12-12

    The SRNL Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment (RadFLEx) is a one-of-a-kind test bed facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes in the Savannah River Site (SRS) vadose zone at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms of sediment) and temporal scale (from months to decade) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. RadFLEx is a decade-long project that was initiated on July 5, 2012 and is funded by six different sources. The objective of this status report is as follows: 1) to report findings to date that have an impact on SRS performance assessment (PA) calculations, and 2) to provide performance metrics of the RadFLEx program. The PA results are focused on measurements of transport parameters, such as distribution coefficients (Kd values), solubility, and unsaturated flow values. As this is an interim report, additional information from subsequent research may influence our interpretation of current results. Research related to basic understanding of radionuclide geochemistry in these vadose zone soils and other source terms are not described here but are referenced for the interested reader.

  11. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    Hou, X.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Lujaniene, G.; Lehto, J.; Skipperud, L.; Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.

    2009-10-01

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionuclides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners' laboratories. Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes: Speciation of 129I and 127I in time-series precipitation samples collected in Denmark 2001-2006 and its application for the investigation of geochemistry and atmospheric chemistry of iodine, Speciation of radionuclides in Ob and Yenisey Rivers, and Speciation of 129I and 127I in Lake Heimdalen water. Speciation of radionuclides in soils and sediments includes: Sequential extraction of radionuclides in sediments and of trace elements in soil samples. Sequential extraction of radionuclides in aerosols and particles has also been performed. Furthermore, sorption experiments have been performed to investigate the association of Pu, Am and Cs with different geological materials. The intercomparison exercises included sequential extraction of Pu, 137Cs, U, Th, and 129I in one soil and one sediment standard reference materials (NIST-4354, IAEA-375) and Pu in sediment collected from the Lake Heimdalen, Norway. (author)

  12. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aldahan, A. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Science (Sweden)); Possnert, G. (Uppsala Univ., Tandem Lab. (Sweden)); Lujaniene, G. (Univ. of Helsinki, Lab. of Radiochemistry (Finland)); Lehto, J. (Institute of Physics (Lithuania)); Skipperud, L.; Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences, Isotope Lab., AAs (Norway))

    2009-10-15

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionuclides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners' laboratories. Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes: Speciation of 129I and 127I in time-series precipitation samples collected in Denmark 2001-2006 and its application for the investigation of geochemistry and atmospheric chemistry of iodine, Speciation of radionuclides in Ob and Yenisey Rivers, and Speciation of 129I and 127I in Lake Heimdalen water. Speciation of radionuclides in soils and sediments includes: Sequential extraction of radionuclides in sediments and of trace elements in soil samples. Sequential extraction of radionuclides in aerosols and particles has also been performed. Furthermore, sorption experiments have been performed to investigate the association of Pu, Am and Cs with different geological materials. The intercomparison exercises included sequential extraction of Pu, 137Cs, U, Th, and 129I in one soil and one sediment standard reference materials (NIST-4354, IAEA-375) and Pu in sediment collected from the Lake Heimdalen, Norway. (author)

  13. Development of a separatif microsystem for radionuclides analysis in nitric acid media

    Losno , Marion

    2017-01-01

    Radionuclides analysis is a key point for nuclear waste management and nuclear material control. Several steps of sample modification have to be carried out before measurements in order to avoid any interferences and improve measurement precision. However those different steps are long, irradiant and difficult to achieve in gloveboxes. Moreover they produce liquid and solid waste. The goal of the study is to offer a new alternative to the use of solid phase extraction column for radionuclides...

  14. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

    Burnett, Jonathan L; Miley, Harry S; Milbrath, Brian D

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5-2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Field studies of the atmospheric processing of radionuclides released at Chernobyl

    Slinn, W.G.N.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Busness, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    This report gives a summary description of the goals and execution of field studies to characterize the radionuclides released from Chernobyl and to examine their long-range atmospheric transport and processing. Starting on April 28, 1986, an intensive planning and preparation effort was mounted over a very short time intercept and characterize the Chernobyl plume on its arrival over the western US. During the execution of these studies, they had very little firm information (beyond their own measurements and trajectory estimates) to confirm the location of the Chernobyl plume. On May 20, 1986, the studies were terminated, after extensive airborne sampling of air, cloud water, precipitation, soil, and vegetation as the plume traversed the western and central US and moved into Canada

  16. Analysis of 137Cs radionuclides activities in Cs-zeolite using gamma spectrometry

    Noviarty; Ginting, Aslina Br; Anggraini, Dian; Rosika K

    2013-01-01

    137 Cs Radionuclide activity analysis has been carried out. The objective is to determine the activity of the 137 Cs radionuclide in Cs-zeolite are packaged in the form of point source. Analysis of 137 Cs Radionuclide activities in Cs zeolite samples was determined by measuring intensity of the isotope 137 Cs gamma energy at 661.7 keV use-y spectrometer. Before measurement the sample, was first carried out measurements of 137 Cs radionuclide in certified point standards from Amersham, to determine the efficiency value. Result the standard sample measurement obtained the efficiency value of 43.98%. Efficiency values obtained are used in the calculation of sample activity. On the measurement of the intensity of the sample obtained results dose rate 196.4537 cps with a standard deviation of 0.5274. By using standard measurement efficiency values obtained by the calculation of the average activity of the radionuclide 137 Cs in Cs-zeolite 524.9082 Bq. Deviation measurements were below 5% (0.27% ) so that the analysis of the activity of radionuclide 137 Cs in Cs-zeolite samples using gamma spectrometer can be accepted with a 95% confidence level. (author)

  17. Collection and preparation of marine samples for radionuclide analysis

    Holm, E.

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of research in radioecology is to be able to predict the pathways of radioactive material in the environment and hence estimate possible doses to the population in various regions. Knowledge of levels of contamination are necessary to maintain control of operations of nuclear facilities. Correct methods of sample collection, handling and preparation are among the most important parts for a correct assessment. On basis of the final results of radionuclide concentrations, scientific, medical and political decisions are taken. (author)

  18. Radionuclide partitioning in environmental systems: a critical analysis

    Cremers, A.; Maes, A.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of some of the important processes involved in the solid-liquid distribution behaviour of radionuclides in both well-defined adsorbents and multicomponent natural systems. The thermodynamic significance of distribution coefficients is analyzed and the various parameters affecting partition behaviour are discussed in relation to possible retention mechanisms. Attention is being given to factors such as solid/liquid ratio, pH-Eh, reversibility, liquid phase composition and speciation effects. Various processes are discussed such as ion exchange and complex formation involving clays, oxides, humic acids. It is shown that, only in rare cases, Ksub(D) values can be rationalized in terms of process mechanistics. In addition, it is indicated that, in general, radionuclide distribution coefficients cannot be considered as constants unless the conditions are restricted to very small loading intervals. It is furthermore suggested that, in order to produce meaningful data on radionuclide partitioning behaviour, efforts should be made to operate under conditions which are representative for the 'in situ' situation. (author)

  19. Fundamental approach to the analysis of radionuclide transport resulting from fluid flow through jointed media

    Erickson, K.L.

    1981-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental basis is being developed for analysis of radionuclide transport in jointed geologic media. Batch equilibration and rate experiments involving samples of Eleana argillite and Tertiary silicic tuffs in contact with solutions containing Cs, Sr or Pm indicated that most radionuclide sorption is associated with the surfaces of very small intergranular regions and that the rate of sorption is controlled by diffusion of the nuclides into such regions. Based on these experimental results, the continuity equations for radionuclides in the mobile and immobile phases were reduced to a model analogous to Rosen's equations for packed beds and were solved similarly to Rosen's solutions. Using the model and experimental data, limited radionuclide transport analyses were made which indicated that important parameters controlling transport include the intergranular porosity and nuclide penetration depth, fracture plate spacing and length, fluid velocity, and sorption distribution coefficient

  20. Modelling the behaviour of long-lived radionuclides in the Irish Sea - comparison of model predictions with field observations

    Kershaw, P.J.; Pentreath, R.J.; Gurbutt, P.A.; Woodhead, D.S.; Durance, J.A.; Camplin, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-compartmental box model of the Irish Sea has been developed to predict the distribution and radiological consequences of radionuclides discharged from the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The box structure was based on observations of radionuclide distributions in the sea bed and the water circulation was generated from extensive time-series data on 137 Cs concentrations in seawater. Measurements of naturally-occurring nuclides provided both data on the extent and rate of these processes and a means to validate the model assumptions. The model structure is briefly outlined, comparisons are made between model predictions and field observation, and some of the difficulties in making such comparisons are discussed. (author)

  1. Field studies about radionuclide migration natural analogues and faults in clays

    Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.; Brightman, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This report puts together final reports of CEC contracts about the following topics: in situ determination of the effects of organics on the mobility of radionuclides in controlled conditions of groundwater flow (Drigg site); natural analogue studies of radionuclide migration (Loch Lomond, Broubster, Needle's Eye); faults in clays: their detection and characterization (Down Ampney site)

  2. Radionuclide migration in ground water at a low-level waste disposal site: a comparison of predicted radionuclide transport modeling versus field observations

    Bergeron, M.P.; Robertson, D.E.; Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    At the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), in Ontario, Canada, a number of LLW shallow-land burial facilities have existed for 25-30 years. These facilities are useful for testing the concept of site modelability. In 1984, CRNL and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) established a cooperative research program to examine two disposal sites having plumes of slightly contaminated ground water for study. This report addresses the LLW Nitrate Disposal Pit site, which received liquid wastes containing approximately 1000-1500 curies of mixed fission products during 1953-54. The objective of this study is to test the regulatory requirement that a site be modeled and to use the Nitrate Disposal Pit site as a field site for testing the reliability of models in predicting radionuclide movement in ground water. The study plan was to approach this site as though it were to be licensed under the requirements of 10 CFR 61. Under the assumption that little was known about this site, a characterization plan was prepared describing the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical information needed to assess site performance. After completion of the plan, site data generated by CRNL were selected to fill the plan data requirements. This paper describes the site hydrogeology, modeling of ground water flow, the comparison of observed and predicted radionuclide movement, and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations. 3 references, 10 figures

  3. Field testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: spent fuel test and radionuclide migration experiments

    Ballou, L.B.; Isherwood, D.J.; Patrick, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Two field tests in the Climax Stock are being conducted. The Climax Stock, a granitic instrusive, has been administratively excluded from consideration as a full-scale repository site. However, it provides a readily available facility for field testing with high-level radioactive materials at a depth (420 m) approaching that of a repository. The major test activity in the 1980 fiscal year has been initiation of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). This test, which was authorized in June 1978, is designed to evaluate the generic feasibility of geologic storage and retrievability of commercial power reactor spent fuel assemblies in a granitic medium. In addition, the test is configured and instrumented to provide thermal and thermomechanical response data that will be relevant to the design of a repository in hard crystalline rock. The other field activity in the Climax Stock is a radionuclide migration test. It combines a series of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of existing hydrologic models for pretest predictions and data interpretation. Goals of this project are to develop: (1) field measurement techniques for radionuclide migration studies in a hydrologic regime where the controlling mechanism is fracture permeability; (2) field test data on radionuclide migration; and (3) a comparison of laboratory- and field-measured retardation factors. This radionuclide migration test, which was authorized in the middle of the 1980 fiscal year, is in the preliminary design phase. The detailed program plan was prepared and subjected to formal peer review in August. In September/October researchers conducted preliminary flow tests with water in selected near-vertical fractures intersected by small horizontal boreholes. These tests were needed to establish the range of pressures, flow rates, and other operating parameters to be used in conducting the nuclide migration tests. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  4. High resolution analysis of temporal variation of airborne radionuclides

    Komura, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Manikandan, M.; Murata, Y.; Iida, T.; Moriizumi, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the application of ultra low-background gamma spectrometry, we tried to measure temporal variation of airborne radionuclides at intervals of 1 to few hours in extreme case. Airborne radionuclides were collected on a filter paper made of quartz fiber at the Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory (LLRL), Kanazawa Univ. in Tatsunokuchi (since Nov. 2002), Hegra Island located 50 km from Noto peninsula (since Apr. 2003) to investigate influence of Asian continent and Shishiku plateau at 640 m above sea to know vertical difference (since Sep., 2003). Pb-210, Pb-212 and Be-7 were measured nondestructively by ultra low background Ge detectors in Ogoya Underground Laboratory (270 meter water Concentration of Rn-222 was monitored 1 hour intervals and wind direction and speed were recorded 10 min or 2 min intervals (Hegra Is.) as support data in data analyses. In the regular monitoring, sampling was made at 1-2 day (LLRL and Shishiku) or 1 week intervals (Hegra) to know daily and seasonal variations and similarity or difference between sampling locations. When drastic meteorological change, such as passage of front or typhoon, occurrence of inversion layer and snow fall etc., short sampling at 1-2 hours of intervals was conducted to find the corrlation with meteorological factors at single point or 2 points simultaneously. As a results, it was found that concentrations of Pb-210, Po-210, Pb-212 and Be-7 were found to vary very quickly in a short time (see Figure below) due mainly to horizontal or vertical mixing of air-masses. (authors)

  5. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  6. Numerical modeling of radionuclide migration in water-saturated planar fracture: study of performance of bentonite in the far-field region

    Silveira, Claudia S. da; Alvim, Antonio C.M., E-mail: csilveira@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The analysis of radionuclide migration in fractured porous media is an important part of the safety assessment of a deep geologic disposal for high level radioactive wastes. In this work, numerical solution for simple geometry was developed to study radionuclide migration, including decay chain from a hypothetical repository, whereas the initial region of fracture is filled with bentonite which expanded from EBS (Engineered Barrier System). The following cases were considered: convective transport with constant velocity along the fracture, longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion in the fracture along the fracture axis, molecular diffusion from fracture into rock matrix, sorption within rock matrix, sorption onto the surface of the fracture, radioactive decay, decay chain, and diffusion in bentonite extrusion region. For conservative analysis, the porous matrix adjacent to the fracture was subdivided into two different subdomains, each with different set of parameters and considering that the radionuclides were available for migration in the solubility limit, at fracture inlet, from the initial time. The partial differential equations that govern the physical system were discretized by finite differences, by using the Implicit Euler Method with forward scheme in the convective term. In this study, numerical simulation was performed for 100, 1000 and 10000 years, with and without bentonite extrusion, in order to compare the migration retardation obtained by bentonite located at the beginning of the fracture in saturated environment. The numerical simulation results showed the importance of extruded area in the far field region of the fractured host rock. (author)

  7. Numerical modeling of radionuclide migration in water-saturated planar fracture: study of performance of bentonite in the far-field region

    Silveira, Claudia S. da; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of radionuclide migration in fractured porous media is an important part of the safety assessment of a deep geologic disposal for high level radioactive wastes. In this work, numerical solution for simple geometry was developed to study radionuclide migration, including decay chain from a hypothetical repository, whereas the initial region of fracture is filled with bentonite which expanded from EBS (Engineered Barrier System). The following cases were considered: convective transport with constant velocity along the fracture, longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion in the fracture along the fracture axis, molecular diffusion from fracture into rock matrix, sorption within rock matrix, sorption onto the surface of the fracture, radioactive decay, decay chain, and diffusion in bentonite extrusion region. For conservative analysis, the porous matrix adjacent to the fracture was subdivided into two different subdomains, each with different set of parameters and considering that the radionuclides were available for migration in the solubility limit, at fracture inlet, from the initial time. The partial differential equations that govern the physical system were discretized by finite differences, by using the Implicit Euler Method with forward scheme in the convective term. In this study, numerical simulation was performed for 100, 1000 and 10000 years, with and without bentonite extrusion, in order to compare the migration retardation obtained by bentonite located at the beginning of the fracture in saturated environment. The numerical simulation results showed the importance of extruded area in the far field region of the fractured host rock. (author)

  8. Analysis of radionuclide dispersion at normal condition for AEC 1000 MW reactor power

    Sri Kuntjoro

    2010-01-01

    Analysis for radionuclide dispersion for the Atomic Energy Agency (AEC) 3,568 MWth Power Reactor, equal to the 1,000 MWe at normal condition has been done. Analysis was done for two piles that is separated by 500 m distance and angle of 90° one to other. Initial pace in doing the analysis is to determine reactors source term using ORIGEN2 and EMERALD NORMAL. computer code program. ORIGEN2 applied to determine radionuclide inventory emerged in the reactor. Hereinafter, by using Emerald Normal Computer code is calculated source term reaching the reactor stack. To analyze dose received by population is done by using PC-CREAM computer code. Calculation done for one and two PLTN attached in site candidate of plants. The result showed is that the highest radionuclide release for one PLTN is at 1 km distance and to 9 th zone toward ( 19.25° ) and for two PLTN is at 1 km distance and to 10 th zone toward (21.75° ). Radionuclide which up to population through two pathways that are foodstuff and inhalation. To foodstuff comes from radionuclide I 131 , and the biggest passed from milk product with 53.40 % for one and also two PLTN For inhalation pathway the highest radionuclide contribution come from Kr 85m is about 53.80 %. The highest total dose received by population is at 1 Km distance received by baby that is 4.10 µSi and 11.26 µSi for one and two PLTN respectively. Those result are very small compared to the maximum permission dose to population issued by regulatory body that is equal to 1 mSi. (author)

  9. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide in the system of geological disposal-CRP-GEORC model

    Su Rui; Wang Ju; Chen Weiming; Zong Zihua; Zhao Honggang

    2008-01-01

    CRP-GEORC concept model is an artificial system of geological disposal for High-Level radioactive waste. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide Se-79 and I-129 in the far field of this system by using GoldSim Code have been conducted. It can be seen from the simulation results that variables used to describe the geological features and characterization of groundwater flow are sensitive variables of whole geological disposal system. The uncertainties of parameters have remarkable influence on the simulation results. (authors)

  10. Quantitative analysis of Esophageal Transit of Radionuclide in Patients with Dermatomyositis-Polymyositis

    Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Myung Hae

    1989-01-01

    Esophageal transit of radionuclide was quantitatively analyzed in 29 patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed retention of tracer in oropharynx. The mean value of percent retention of oropharynx was 15.5+16.6%. Esophageal dysfunction was found in 19 patients (65.5%). Among them 4 showed mild, 12 showed moderate and 3 showed severe esophageal dysfunction. Dysphagia was found in 11 patients (37.9%), which was closely related to percent retention of oropharynx. Quantitative analysis of esophageal transit of radionuclide seemed to be a useful technique for evaluation of dysphagia in patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis.

  11. Stochastic analysis of contaminant transport in porous media: analysis of a two-member radionuclide chain

    Bonano, E.J.; Shipers, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the authors extend previous stochastic analyses of contaminant transport in geologic media for a single species to a chain of two species. The authors particular application is the quantification of uncertainties due to lack of characterization of the spatial variability of hydrologic parameters on transport of radionuclides from a high-level waste repository to the biosphere. Radionuclide chains can have a significant impact on demonstrating compliance (or violation) of standards regulating the release to the environment accessible to humans. Two approaches for determining the cross-covariance terms in the mean concentration equations are presented. One uses a Taylor expansion to obtain the cross-covariance between the velocity and concentration fluctuations, while the other is based on a Fourier-Laplace double transform method. For the conditions of interest here, the difference between these two approaches are expected to be small. In addition, the variances are calculated in a unique way by solving another associated partial differential equation. A parametric study is carried out to examine the sensitivity of the mean concentration of the two species and their corresponding variances and cross-covariance on the parameters associated with the structure of the stochastic velocity field. It is found that the dependent variables are most sensitive to the intensity and correlation length of the velocity fluctuations. The magnitude of the variances and cross-covariance of the concentrations are proportional to the magnitude of the mean concentrations which depend on inlet concentration boundary conditions

  12. Nominal Range Sensitivity Analysis of peak radionuclide concentrations in randomly heterogeneous aquifers

    Cadini, F.; De Sanctis, J.; Cherubini, A.; Zio, E.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Uncertainty quantification problem associated with the radionuclide migration. ► Groundwater transport processes simulated within a randomly heterogeneous aquifer. ► Development of an automatic sensitivity analysis for flow and transport parameters. ► Proposal of a Nominal Range Sensitivity Analysis approach. ► Analysis applied to the performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository. - Abstract: We consider the problem of quantification of uncertainty associated with radionuclide transport processes within a randomly heterogeneous aquifer system in the context of performance assessment of a near-surface radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide migration is simulated at the repository scale through a Monte Carlo scheme. The saturated groundwater flow and transport equations are then solved at the aquifer scale for the assessment of the expected radionuclide peak concentration at a location of interest. A procedure is presented to perform the sensitivity analysis of this target environmental variable to key parameters that characterize flow and transport processes in the subsurface. The proposed procedure is exemplified through an application to a realistic case study.

  13. Development of the k0-based cyclic neutron activation analysis for short-lived radionuclides

    Dung, H.M.; Blaauw, M.; Beasley, D.; Freitas, M.D.C.

    2011-01-01

    The k0-based cyclic neutron activation analysis (k0-CNAA) technique has been studied to explore the applicability at the Portuguese research reactor (RPI). In particular, for the determination of elements which form short-lived radionuclides, particularly fluorine (20F, 11.16 s half-life) and

  14. Analysis of radionuclide transport through fracture networks by percolation theory

    Ahn, Joonhong; Furuhama, Yutaka; Li, Yadong; Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Presented are results of numerical simulations for radionuclide diffusion through fracture networks in geologic layers. Actual fracture networks are expressed as two-dimensional honeycomb percolation lattices. Random-walk simulations of diffusion on percolation lattices are made by the exact-enumeration method, and compared with those from Fickian diffusion with constant and decreasing diffusion coefficients. Mean-square displacement of a random-walker on percolation lattices increases more slowly with time than that for Fickian diffusion with the constant diffusion coefficient. Though the same relation of mean-square displacement vs. time as for the percolation lattices can be obtained for a continuum with decreasing diffusion coefficients, spatial distribution of probability densities of finding the random-walker on the percolation lattice differs from that on a continuum with the decreasing diffusion coefficient. The percolation model results in slow spreading near the origin and fast spreading in the outer region, whereas the decreasing-diffusion coefficient model shows the reverse because of smaller diffusion coefficient in the outer region. We could derive a general formula that can include both Fickian and anomalous diffusion in terms of fractal and fracton dimensionalities and the anomalous diffusion exponent. (author)

  15. Quantitative analysis of soil chromatography. I. Water and radionuclide transport

    Reeves, M.; Francis, C.W.; Duguid, J.O.

    1977-12-01

    Soil chromatography has been used successfully to evaluate relative mobilities of pesticides and nuclides in soils. Its major advantage over the commonly used suspension technique is that it more accurately simulates field conditions. Under such conditions the number of potential exchange sites is limited both by the structure of the soil matrix and by the manner in which the carrier fluid moves through this structure. The major limitation of the chromatographic method, however, has been its qualitative nature. This document represents an effort to counter this objection. A theoretical basis is specified for the transport both of the carrier eluting fluid and of the dissolved constituent. A computer program based on this theory is developed which optimizes the fit of theoretical data to experimental data by automatically adjusting the transport parameters, one of which is the distribution coefficient k/sub d/. This analysis procedure thus constitutes an integral part of the soil chromatographic method, by means of which mobilities of nuclides and other dissolved constituents in soils may be quantified.

  16. Quantitative analysis of soil chromatography. I. Water and radionuclide transport

    Reeves, M.; Francis, C.W.; Duguid, J.O.

    1977-12-01

    Soil chromatography has been used successfully to evaluate relative mobilities of pesticides and nuclides in soils. Its major advantage over the commonly used suspension technique is that it more accurately simulates field conditions. Under such conditions the number of potential exchange sites is limited both by the structure of the soil matrix and by the manner in which the carrier fluid moves through this structure. The major limitation of the chromatographic method, however, has been its qualitative nature. This document represents an effort to counter this objection. A theoretical basis is specified for the transport both of the carrier eluting fluid and of the dissolved constituent. A computer program based on this theory is developed which optimizes the fit of theoretical data to experimental data by automatically adjusting the transport parameters, one of which is the distribution coefficient k/sub d/. This analysis procedure thus constitutes an integral part of the soil chromatographic method, by means of which mobilities of nuclides and other dissolved constituents in soils may be quantified

  17. The concentrations of radionuclides, heavy metals, and poloychlorinated biphenyls in field mice collected from regional background areas. Revision 3

    Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-01-21

    Field mice are effective indicators of contaminant presence. This paper reports the concentrations of various radionuclides, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, high explosives, perchlorate, and dioxin/furans in field mice (mostly deer mice) collected from regional background areas in northern New Mexico. These data, represented as the regional statistical reference level (the mean plus three standard deviations = 99% confidence level), are used to compare with data from field mice collected from areas potentially impacted by Laboratory operations, as per the Environmental Surveillance Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. In-field analysis

    Stewart, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A new technology for in-field measurement of hydrocarbons in soil promises rapid results. Standard industry practice in Australia for measuring hydrocarbons in soil is to send a soil sample to an off-site accredited laboratory for analysis. This typically costs $25-50 per sample and takes 5-7 days to turnaround the results. While there are in-field hydrocarbon measurement technologies available in the US, most involve extracting the hydrocarbons from the soil and analysing the resulting liquid. These methods are time- consuming and often involve toxic solvents and clumsy equipment. A new technology developed by Ziltek and CSIRO allows for real-time me as-urement in the field. The user simply pulls the trigger on a hand-held infrared spectrometer and within a few seconds gets a digital read-out of the hydrocarbon concentration. The technology requires no toxic solvents or consumables, and sampling positions can also be logged automatically using GPS coordinates. A new technology developed by Ziltek and CSIRO allows for real-time measurement in the field. The user simply pulls the trigger on a hand-held infrared spectrometer and within a few seconds gets a digital read-out of the hydrocarbon concentration. The technology requires no toxic solvents or consumables, and sampling positions can also be logged automatically using GPS coordinates. The technology is essentially a software application that can be used with any third-party supplied hand-held infrared device. A working prototype has been tested at several contaminated sites across Australia, with very promising results. The site trials involved taking in-situ measurements using an infrared instrument before sending the soil to an external laboratory for conventional analysis - and comparing the results. Ziltek technical director Dr Ben Dearman noted at some sites the variation between the infrared results and lab results was less than 10 per cent.The technology gives a single concentration value in

  19. The far field migration of radionuclides in two dimensional groundwater flows though geologic media

    Ting, D.K.S.; Chambre, P.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical method to model the radionuclides migration in a two dimensional groundwater flor through geologic media has been developed and implemented into the computer code UCBNE21. Using this method, the potential hazard to the biosphere posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a candidate repository site (WIPP) is determined. I-129 and Ra-226 are potentially the most hazardous nuclides in these sites but their discharge into the biosphere will not result in concentrations larger than their maximum permissible concentrations. (Author) [pt

  20. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional fields of Chernobyl's radionuclides in the Kiev water reservoir

    Zheleznyak, M.I.; Margvelashvili, N.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    On the base of the three-dimensional numerical model of water circulation and radionuclide transport, the high flood water influence on the radionuclide dispersion in the Kiev water reservoir is studied. The model was verified on the base of data of the measurements of moderate flood phenomena in April-May 1987. Redistribution of the bottom sediment contamination is demonstrated. It is shown that even an extremely high flood water discharge does not change drastically the 137 Cs concentration in the water body of the Kiev water reservoir

  1. Applications of neutron activation analysis in determination of natural and man-made radionuclides

    Byrne, A. R.; Benedik, L.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), being essentially an isotopic and not an elemental method of analysis, is capable of determining a number of important radionuclides of radioecological interest with good precision and accuracy, by transformation into another, more easily quantifiable radionuclide. The nuclear characteristics which favour this technique may be summarized in an advantage factor relative to radiometric analysis of the original radioanalyte. Well known or hardly known examples include 235 U, 238 U, 232 Th, 230 Th, 129 I, 99 Tc, 237 Np and 231 Pa; a number of these are discussed and illustrated in analysis of real samples of environmental and biological origin. The advantages and drawbacks of this technique relative to conventional radiometric analysis and newer, mass spectrometric methods is also discussed. The value of NAA as an independent method in certification of radionuclide reference materials (where much remains to be done) is stressed. Where direct sample analysis is possible, NAA retains the important advantage of being essentially blank-free. Where pre-separation of the analyte is necessary, some suggestions for improving the reliability of pre-separation yields using internal, activable tracers are proposed. The use of NAA to allow 238 U and 232 Th to be used as endogenous (internal) radiotracers in alpha spectrometric analyses of uranium and thorium radioisotopes in radioecological studies is described, also allowing independent data sets to be obtained, of great value in quality control. (author)

  2. Clean laboratories and clean rooms for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    2003-01-01

    requirements are summarized of clean laboratory environments, for construction materials as well as for materials used during routine analysis, maintenance, and pitfalls in the analysis of radionuclides and elements at trace- and ultra trace levels. Current methodologies and practices are described for planning the installation of a clean environment as well as protocols for maximizing the benefit-to-cost ratio and for achieving QA/QC. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of radionuclides, and measurement of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA and XRF. Also included are papers contributed by experts from India, the Netherlands, the United States of America and the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf

  3. Collection and preparation of bottom sediment samples for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    2003-07-01

    The publication is the first in a series of TECDOCs on sampling and sample handling as part of the IAEA support to improve reliability of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Member State laboratories. The purpose of the document is to provide information on the methods for collecting sediments, the equipment used, and the sample preparation techniques for radionuclide and elemental analysis. The most appropriate procedures for defining the strategies and criteria for selecting sampling locations, for sample storage and transportation are also given. Elements of QA/QC and documentation needs for sampling and sediment analysis are discussed. Collection and preparation of stream and river bottom sediments, lake bottom sediments, estuary bottom sediments, and marine (shallow) bottom sediments are covered. The document is intended to be a comprehensive manual for the collection and preparation of bottom sediments as a prerequisite to obtain representative and meaningful results using NATs. Quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) is emphasized as an important aspect to ensure proper collection, transportation, preservation, and analysis since it forms the basis for interpretation and legislation. Although there are many approaches and methods available for sediment analyses, the scope of the report is limited to sample preparation for (1) analysis of radionuclides (including sediment dating using radionuclides such as Pb-210 and Cs-137) and (2) analysis of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA, XRF and PIXE

  4. Collection and preparation of bottom sediment samples for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The publication is the first in a series of TECDOCs on sampling and sample handling as part of the IAEA support to improve reliability of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Member State laboratories. The purpose of the document is to provide information on the methods for collecting sediments, the equipment used, and the sample preparation techniques for radionuclide and elemental analysis. The most appropriate procedures for defining the strategies and criteria for selecting sampling locations, for sample storage and transportation are also given. Elements of QA/QC and documentation needs for sampling and sediment analysis are discussed. Collection and preparation of stream and river bottom sediments, lake bottom sediments, estuary bottom sediments, and marine (shallow) bottom sediments are covered. The document is intended to be a comprehensive manual for the collection and preparation of bottom sediments as a prerequisite to obtain representative and meaningful results using NATs. Quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) is emphasized as an important aspect to ensure proper collection, transportation, preservation, and analysis since it forms the basis for interpretation and legislation. Although there are many approaches and methods available for sediment analyses, the scope of the report is limited to sample preparation for (1) analysis of radionuclides (including sediment dating using radionuclides such as Pb-210 and Cs-137) and (2) analysis of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA, XRF and PIXE.

  5. Quality assurance in the analysis of natural radionuclides - measures and results

    Bothe, M [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In the Laboratory for Environmental and Radionuclide Analytics we analyze several natural and also some artificial radionuclides in different materials. For the determination of radionuclides we use various analytical methods. (orig./DG)

  6. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  7. Probabilistic calculations and sensitivity analysis of parameters for a reference biosphere model assessing the potential exposure of a population to radionuclides from a deep geological repository

    Staudt, Christian; Kaiser, Jan Christian [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, Munich (Germany); Proehl, Gerhard [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, Wagramerstrasse 5, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Radioecological models are used to assess the exposure of hypothetical populations to radionuclides. Potential radionuclide sources are deep geological repositories for high level radioactive waste. Assessment time frames are long since releases from those repositories are only expected in the far future, and radionuclide migration to the geosphere biosphere interface will take additional time. Due to the long time frames, climate conditions at the repository site will change, leading to changing exposure pathways and model parameters. To identify climate dependent changes in exposure in the far field of a deep geological repository a range of reference biosphere models representing climate analogues for potential future climate states at a German site were developed. In this approach, model scenarios are developed for different contemporary climate states. It is assumed that the exposure pathways and parameters of the contemporary biosphere in the far field of the repository will change to be similar to those at the analogue sites. Since current climate models cannot predict climate developments over the assessment time frame of 1 million years, analogues for a range of realistically possible future climate conditions were selected. These climate states range from steppe to permafrost climate. As model endpoint Biosphere Dose conversion factors (BDCF) are calculated. The radionuclide specific BDCF describe the exposure of a population to radionuclides entering the biosphere in near surface ground water. The BDCF are subject to uncertainties in the exposure pathways and model parameters. In the presented work, probabilistic and sensitivity analysis was used to assess the influence of model parameter uncertainties on the BDCF and the relevance of individual parameters for the model result. This was done for the long half-live radionuclides Cs-135, I-129 and U-238. In addition to this, BDCF distributions for nine climate reference regions and several scenarios were

  8. Summary of the data which is used for radionuclide transport analysis in the groundwater

    Koga, Osamu; Nagara, Shuichi; Matsumura, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Akira; Takeda, Shinji; Sato, Kazuhiko; Tokizawa, Takayuki

    2004-03-01

    To analyze high precision in groundwater flow and radionuclide transport around Yotsugi open-pit mining place site and around Yotsugi mill tailing yard, besides the topic in past analysis is extracted, following it did examination of the corresponding method and arrangement of physical properties value. It investigated concerning the 3-dimensional flow and transport analysis code which can handle the chain-radionuclide selected. The range of the analytical area examined that become the object of groundwater flow and transport analysis, the wide area, Yotsugi open-pit mining place site and Yotsugi mill tailing yard selected the analytical model area, concerning the range which is surrounded with the divide. Receiving the influence of the alteration zone and the crush zone concerning the coefficient of permeability of the granite, it re-appraised excluding the value which is supposed that water permeability is high. The weathered granite from the lithofacies divided in the high weathered granite and the low weathered granite. As for the geometrical mean of coefficient of permeability of the former 10 -6 m/s order, the later 10 -8 m/s order, there is a difference of 2 orders in both. In addition, the data which is obtained to this year concerning physical properties value for analysis, groundwater level, precipitation and radionuclide density etc. rearranged and data set drew up. (author)

  9. Laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project: Progress report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    Thompson, J.L.

    1988-02-01

    In this report we describe the research done by personnel of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of the Radionuclide Migration project during FY 1987. We are engaged in collecting data concerning the movement of radionuclides at three locations on the Nevada Test Site. We continue to monitor the elution of tritium and krypton from the RNM-2S well at the Cambric site and have described in detail the elution of 36 Cl from the same well. The data from this field study provide us with the opportunity to test the validity of several models of solute transport through geologic media. We have detected tritium and fission products in a water sample from the hole UE20n number1, which was drilled this year at the Cheshire site on Pahute Mesa. We are also continuing our efforts to learn how radionuclides have moved in test areas 3 and 4 near the Aleman site. Our laboratory work this year includes (1) a characterization of the size and density of two stable plutonium(IV) colloid suspensions prepared by different techniques and (2) a study of the transmission of colloidal-size polystyrene beads through crushed-rock columns. 18 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  10. ICP-MS analysis for long-lived radionuclides

    Roos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is an attractive alternative for the analysis of radioisotopes having a half-life in the order of several hundred years and above. The technique should not be considered a replacement for radiometric measurements of these isotopes but merely an alternative. Similarly to radiometric techniques like alpha and beta spectrometry most analysis of 'low-level' concentrations by ICP-MS requires chemical isolation of the element in question. For 'ultra-low-level' concentrations this clean-up of the sample is usually even more necessary than for the alternative radiometric techniques. The presentation gives an overview of advantages and disadvantages in using ICP-MS and compares it to relevant radiometric alternatives. (author)

  11. Field investigations of the uptake of radionuclides by a dairy herd

    Dodd, N J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1983-11-01

    A brief outline is given of a current study of the transfer of radionuclides in the pasture-cow-milk pathway at a farm situated close to the Sellafield nuclear installation. Samples collected include airborne dust, rainwater, herbage, supplementary feed, milk and tissue, bone and organs from slaughtered cows. Data collected so far have been used to derive coefficients that quantify the transfer of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am to meat and milk.

  12. Field investigations of the uptake of radionuclides by a dairy herd

    Dodd, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief outline is given of a current study of the transfer of radionuclides in the pasture-cow-milk pathway at a farm situated close to the Sellafield nuclear installation. Samples collected include airborne dust, rainwater, herbage, supplementary feed, milk and tissue, bone and organs from slaughtered cows. Data collected so far have been used to derive coefficients that quantify the transfer of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and 241 Am to meat and milk. (U.K.)

  13. Laboratory and field studies related to the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project

    Thompson, J.L.

    1991-05-01

    This annual report describes research conducted in FY 1990 by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project. This multi-agency project measures the underground movement of radionuclides related to nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. This project continues the long-term experiment at the site of the Cambric nuclear test. Water pumped from a well adjacent to the explosion cavity continues to show decreasing amounts of tritium and Krypton 85 but no Cesium 139. Analyses of drillback debris shows a distinction between refractory and volatile materials in respect to both their location in the test cavity and their leachability with groundwater. We surveyed materials used during nuclear testing to evaluate any post-test hazard; we concluded that most such materials pose a minimal hazard. The Los Alamos drilling program provided an opportunity for us to sample a collapsed zone above the cavity of a test, which was fired 2 years ago. We continue our research in colloid characterization and in detection of low levels of Technetium 99 in Nevada Test Site water. During FY 1990, we drilled a new hole in the Yucca Flat area to study radionuclide migration. This report also describes Los Alamos management and planning activities in support of this project. 20 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs

  14. Laboratory and field studies related to the radionuclide migration project. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Daniels, W.R.; Thompson, J.L.

    1984-04-01

    The FY 1983 laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project are described. Results are presented for radiochemical analyses of water samples collected from the RNM-1 well and the RNM-2S satellite well at the Cambric site. Data are included for tritium, 36 Cl, 85 Kr, 90 Sr, 129 I, and 137 Cs. Preliminary results from water collection at the Cheshire site are reported. Laboratory studies emphasize the sorptive behavior of tuff and its dependence on mineralogy. 18 references, 7 figures, 13 tables

  15. Extension of Studies with 3M Empore TM and Selentec MAG *SEP SM Technologies for Improved Radionuclide Field Sampling

    Beals, D.M.; Bibler, J.P.; Brooks, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center is evaluating new field sampling methodologies to more easily determine concentrations of radionuclides in aqueous systems. One methodology studied makes use of 3M EmporeTM disks. The disks are composed of selective resins embedded in a Teflon support. The disks remove the ion of interest from aqueous solutions when the solution is passed through the disk. The disk can then be counted directly to quantify the isotope of interest. Four types of disks were studied during this work: for the extraction of technetium (two types), cesium, plutonium, and strontium. A sampler has been developed for automated, unattended, in situ use of the EmporeTM disks

  16. SKB WP-cave project. Radionuclide release from the near-field in a WP-cave repository

    Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.

    1989-04-01

    The release of radionuclides from the bentonite-sand barrier (near-field) in a WP-cave repository for high level radioactive waste has been studied. Calculations were made for two cases; a Low Flow Through Case and a High Flow Through Case. The difference between the two cases lies in the assumed hydraulic properties of the bentonite-sand barrier and the system inside the barrier. The effect on the nuclide release of solubility limitations, sorption capacity of the barriers, radiolytic fuel oxidation rate as well as the thickness of the bentonite-sand barrier, were also investigated for the Low Flow Through Case. (authors)

  17. Extension of Studies with 3M Empore TM and Selentec MAG *SEP SM Technologies for Improved Radionuclide Field Sampling

    Beals, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bibler, J.P.; Brooks, D.A.

    1996-07-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center is evaluating new field sampling methodologies to more easily determine concentrations of radionuclides in aqueous systems. One methodology studied makes use of 3M EmporeTM disks. The disks are composed of selective resins embedded in a Teflon support. The disks remove the ion of interest from aqueous solutions when the solution is passed through the disk. The disk can then be counted directly to quantify the isotope of interest. Four types of disks were studied during this work: for the extraction of technetium (two types), cesium, plutonium, and strontium. A sampler has been developed for automated, unattended, in situ use of the EmporeTM disks.

  18. Towards automatic analysis of dynamic radionuclide studies using principal-components factor analysis

    Nigran, K.S.; Barber, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    A method is proposed for automatic analysis of dynamic radionuclide studies using the mathematical technique of principal-components factor analysis. This method is considered as a possible alternative to the conventional manual regions-of-interest method widely used. The method emphasises the importance of introducing a priori information into the analysis about the physiology of at least one of the functional structures in a study. Information is added by using suitable mathematical models to describe the underlying physiological processes. A single physiological factor is extracted representing the particular dynamic structure of interest. Two spaces 'study space, S' and 'theory space, T' are defined in the formation of the concept of intersection of spaces. A one-dimensional intersection space is computed. An example from a dynamic 99 Tcsup(m) DTPA kidney study is used to demonstrate the principle inherent in the method proposed. The method requires no correction for the blood background activity, necessary when processing by the manual method. The careful isolation of the kidney by means of region of interest is not required. The method is therefore less prone to operator influence and can be automated. (author)

  19. An analysis of domestic experimental results for soil-to-crops transfer factors of radionuclides

    Jun, In; Choi, Young Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon; Kang, Hee Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Lee, Chang Woo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. This paper analyzed results of last about 10 year's studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, comparing with the published international data, and consequently suggested the proper parameters to use. The trends of transfer parameter shows normal distributions if we have a lot of experimental data, but some radionuclides showed enormous variations with the environment of experimental, crops and soils. These transfer factors can be used to assess realistic radiation doses or to predict the doses in crops for normal operation or accidental release. Some kinds of parameter can be produced as conservatives or fragmentary results because soil-to-plant transfer factors were measured through greenhouse experiments which sometimes showed improper field situations. But these parameters mentioned in this paper can be representative of the status of Korean food chain than that of foreign country.

  20. An analysis of domestic experimental results for soil-to-crops transfer factors of radionuclides

    Jun, In; Choi, Young Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon; Kang, Hee Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Lee, Chang Woo

    2006-01-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. This paper analyzed results of last about 10 year's studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, comparing with the published international data, and consequently suggested the proper parameters to use. The trends of transfer parameter shows normal distributions if we have a lot of experimental data, but some radionuclides showed enormous variations with the environment of experimental, crops and soils. These transfer factors can be used to assess realistic radiation doses or to predict the doses in crops for normal operation or accidental release. Some kinds of parameter can be produced as conservatives or fragmentary results because soil-to-plant transfer factors were measured through greenhouse experiments which sometimes showed improper field situations. But these parameters mentioned in this paper can be representative of the status of Korean food chain than that of foreign country

  1. Field test facility for monitoring water/radionuclide transport through partially saturated geologic media: design, construction, and preliminary description

    Phillips, S.J.; Campbell, A.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Hoober, H.H.; Schwarzmiller, K.O.

    1979-11-01

    Shallow land burial has been a common practice for disposing radioactive waste materials since the beginning of plutonium production operations. Accurate monitoring of radionuclide transport and factors causing transport within the burial sites is essential to minimizing risks associated with disposal. However, monitoring has not always been adequate. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun a program aimed at better assuring and evaluating containment of radioactive wastes at shallow land burial sites. This program includes a technological base for monitoring transport. As part of the DOE program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing geohydrologic monitoring systems to evaluate burial sites located in arid regions. For this project, a field test facility was designed and constructed to assess monitoring systems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste and to provide information for evaluating site containment performance. The facility is an integrated network of monitoring devices and data collection instruments. This facility is used to measure water and radionuclide migration under field conditions typical of arid regions. Monitoring systems were developed to allow for measurement of both mass and energy balance. Work on the facility is ongoing. Continuing work includes emplacement of prototype monitoring instruments, data collection, and data synthesis. At least 2 years of field data are needed to fully evaluate monitoring information

  2. Radionuclide analysis and scaling factors verification for LLRW of Taipower Reactor

    King, J.-Y.; Liu, K.-T.; Chen, S.-C.; Chang, T.-M.; Pung, T.-C.; Men, L.-C.; Wang, S.-J.

    2004-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Council of the Republic of China (CAEC) final disposal policy for Low Level Radwaste (LLRW) will be carried on in 1996. Institute of Nuclear Energy Research has the contract to develop the Radionuclide analysis method and to establish the scaling factors for LLRW of Taipower reactors. The radionuclides analyzed including: Co-60, Cs-137, Ce-144, γ-nuclides; H-3, C-14, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, Tc-99, I-129, Pu-238, Pu-239/240, Pu-241, Am-241, Cm-242, Cm-244 α, β and low energy γ nuclides. 120 samples taken from 21 waste streams were analyzed and the database was collected within 2 years. The scaling factors for different kind of waste streams were computed with weighted log-mean average method. In 1993, the scaling factors for each waste stream has been verified through actual station samples. (author)

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Radionuclide for the Used Resin of the Primary Purification System in HANARO

    Lee, Mun; Kim, Myong Seop; Park, Se Il; Kim, Tae Whan; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Chil

    2005-01-01

    In HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor, the ion exchange resin has been used for the purification of the primary coolant system. The resin used in the primary coolant purification system is replaced with new one once every 3 months during 30 MW reactor operation. The extracted resin from the primary coolant purification system is temporarily stored in a shielding treatment of the reactor hall for radiation cooling. After the radiation level of resin decreases enough to be handled for the waste disposal, it is put into the waste drum, and delivered to the waste facility in KAERI. Recently, in this procedure, the quantitative analysis of radionuclide which is contained in resin is required to have more quantitative data for the disposal. Therefore, in this work, a preliminary study was performed to find a sampling method for the representation of the characteristics of radionuclide in the spent resin

  4. The BIDAS: bioassay data analysis software for evaluating radionuclide intake and dose

    Lee, Tae Young; Lee, Jong Il; Chang, Si Young

    2003-01-01

    The BIDAS (BIoassay Data Analysis Software) computer code was developed for the interpretation of bioassay measurements in terms of the intake and dose using the International Commission on Radiological Protection's(ICRP's) currently recommended respiratory tract, GI-tract and biokinetic models to describe the behavior of the radioactive materials within the body. The code consists of a data base module to the manage bioassay data, a data base module containing the predicted bioassay quantities of each radionuclide, and a computational module to the estimate radionuclide intake and dose from either an acute or a chronic exposure based on the measured bioassay quantities. This paper describes the features of the code as well as the results of the BIDAS validation

  5. Modelling and analysis of radionuclide dispersion from PWR on abnormal condition in Bojanegara Serang site

    Sri Kuntjoro

    2010-01-01

    Additional of electrical power especially Nuclear Power Plant will give radiological consequence sto population and environment due to radioactive release in normal and abnormal condition. In consequence the management of nuclear power plant must supply data and strong argumentation to clarify the safety of nuclear power plant to environment. For that purpose it needs to be carried out an analysis of abnormal condition in nuclear power plant and its radiological consequences to the environment. That analysis is done using abnormal condition simulation model postulated on 1000 MWe nuclear power plant.That simulation model is used also to evaluate environmental potential as site capability in supporting the radiological consequences. Radionuclide transport modeling from reactor core to containment uses EMERALD computer code. Other computer codes are Wind rose, PC-COSYMA and Arc View are used to simulate meteorology condition, radionuclide release to population distribution of food production and consumption and distribution of radiation dose received to population around nuclear power plant. Application of that simulation is carried out to NPP candidate site in Bojanegara-Kramatwatu, Serang Banten peninsula. Using source term data, meteorology data, dispersion data and pathways modeling are resulting radionuclide dispersion model and radiation pathway acceptance at the surrounding nuclear power plant site (Bojanegara-Serang peninsula). The result shows that maximum radiation dose received is lower than dose permitted in accordance with regulatory body (BAPETEN). (author)

  6. The encounter and analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides in gas and oil production and processing

    Hartog, F.A.; Jonkers, G.; Knaepen, W.A.I.

    1996-01-01

    As a result of oil and gas production, radioactive daughter elements from the uranium and thorium decay series can be mobilized and transported away from the reservoir. Due to changes in flow regime, temperature, pressure or chemical environment NORs (Naturally Occurring Radionuclides) may build up in products, by-products or waste streams from gas and oil production and processing facilities. Products containing NORs are commonly denoted by the acronym NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). Main topics of this paper are: E and P (Exploration and Production) NORM characteristics; incentives for NORM analysis; NORM analysis; interlaboratory test programme; analysis techniques; results and conclusions of the test programme. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea geothermal field, southeastern California

    Zukin, J.G.; Hammond, D.E.; Ku, Tehlung; Elders, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Naturally occurring U and Th series radionuclides have been analyzed in high temperature brines (∼ 300 degree C, 25 wt% dissolved solids) and associated rocks from two deep geothermal wells located on the northeastern margin of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). These data are part of a study of the SSGF as a natural analog of possible radionuclide behavior near a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt beds, and permit evaluation of some characteristics of water-rock interaction in the SSGF

  8. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  9. Radionuclide getters in the near-field chemistry of repositories. Annual report - February 1989

    Holland, T.R.; Lee, D.J.

    1989-02-01

    A programme of work has commenced to assess the radionuclide sorption efficiency of selected inorganic 'getters' incorporated into sulphate resisting Portland cement; as a means of enhancing the retention of radioactive species by the proposed repository backfill. For this initial study, a limited number of radioisotopes have been selected, with particular reference to those likely to be mobile in an alkaline environment, ie. Ra-266, Cs-134 and I-125. The getters chosen for this stage of the programme were Clinoptilolite, Molecular Sieve 5a, Tobermorite and Ferric Floc. (author)

  10. Fracture hydrology relevant to radionuclide transport. Field work in a granite formation in Cornwall

    Bourke, P.J.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Durrance, E.M.; Heath, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Separation, orientation, apertures and intersections of water-bearing fractures are the variables which control water flow and affect radionuclide transport through fractured rocks. The need is discussed for information on the distribution of these variables in statistical treatments of flow and transport, because of the inadequacy of permeability and porosity data in continuum treatments. Satisfactory methods of measuring distributions of separation, orientation and apetures have been developed and data for Cornish granite are presented. An estimate of the average distance between fracture intersections is made

  11. Intercomparison of γ-spectrometry analysis of radionuclides between China and Japan in 2012–2013

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Tuo, Fei; Han, Yanqing; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Yang, Jia; Xu, Cuihua; Zhang, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Qing; Su, Xu

    2015-01-01

    An intercomparison of γ-spectrometry measurement and analysis was organized by the Japan Chemical Analysis Center (JCAC), the National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NIRP, China CDC), and the Radiation Monitoring Technical Center of Ministry of Environmental Protection, Chinese (RMTC). The main objective of this study was to assess the γ-spectrometry measurement and analysis technology. The JCAC completed the collection and preparation of soil and powdered rice samples. Three laboratories compared the measurement of seven radionuclides that included two samples of 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 208 Tl, 228 Ac, 40 K, 137 Cs, and 134 Cs with γ-spectrometry. During the studies conducted at the laboratory, the calculated value E n was found to be the total uncertainty data of the reported activity. Except 134 Cs in powdered rice sample, the calculated E n between each of the two laboratories was <1. The measurement results are acceptable except 134 Cs; therefore, measurement results in the three laboratories were consistent within a certain range except in the case of 134 Cs. Although there is a need to improve the accuracy of measurements and analysis of 134 Cs, an intercomparison was conducted of the tested levels on radionuclide analyzed in the three laboratories. - Highlights: • An intercomparison of γ-spectrometry measurement and analysis was organized. • Three laboratories compared the measurement of seven radionuclides. • Results for 40 K, 208 Tl, 214 Bi, 214 Pb, 228 Ac, and 137 Cs were well matched between two participants. • The results in the powder of the rice sample belonging to 134 Cs were the only ones assigned “not acceptable”.

  12. A review of sorption of radionuclides under the near- and far-field conditions of an underground radioactive waste repository. Pt. 3

    Berry, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarises work funded by the Department of the Environment and UK Nirex Ltd in the area of sorption of radionuclides under the near-field and far-field conditions pertaining to the underground disposal of radioactive waste in the UK that was presented and discussed in Part I. The report also summarises comparable research undertaken overseas (presented in Part II). (author)

  13. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    Howard, B.J.; Kennedy, V.H.; Nelson, A.

    1983-06-01

    A bibliographical database has been developed to provide quick access to research and background literature in the field of radioecology. This is a development of an earlier database described by Nelson (Bocock 1981). ITE's particular fields of interest have led to a subject bias in the bibliography towards studies in Cumbria, especially those concerned with radionuclides originating from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and towards ecological research studies that are complementary to radionuclide studies. Other subjects covered, include the chemistry of radionuclides, budgets and transfers within ecosystems and techniques for the analysis of environmental samples. ITE's research objectives have led to the establishment of a specialized database which is intended to complement rather than compete with the large international databases made available by suppliers such as IRS-DIALTECH or DIALOG. Currently the database holds about 1900 references which are stored on a 2 1/2 megabyte hard disk on a Digital PDP11/34 computer operating under a time shared system. The references follow a standard format. (author)

  14. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site

    B. A. Martinez; D. L. Finnegan; Joseph L. Thompson; K. S. Kung

    1999-03-01

    In this report, we describe the work done in FY 1998 at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMA) funded by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE/NV). The major part of our research effort was to measure radionuclides present in water or soil samples collected from near nuclear tests. We report our measurements for materials collected in both saturated and unsaturated horizons adjacent to nuclear test cavities or collapse chimneys and from within several cavities. Soil samples collected from above the cavities formed by the Halfbeak, Jerboa, and Bobac tests contained no radioactivity, although a test similar to Bobac in the same area had been contaminated with {sup 137}Cs. Water samples from near the Shoal test contained no measurable radionuclides, whereas those from near Faultless and Aleman had concentrations similar to previous measurements. Water from the Tybo-Benham site was similar to earlier collections at that site; this year, we added {sup 241}Am to the list of radionuclides measured at this location. Two Bennett pumps in tandem were used to extract water from the piezometer tube in the cavity of the Dalhart event. This extraction is a significant achievement in that it opens the possibility of purging similar tubes at other locations on the NTS. The Cheshire post shot hole was reconfigured and pumped from two horizons for the first time since mid-1980. We are especially interested in examining water from the level of the working point to determine the hydrologic source term in a cavity filled with groundwater for over 20 years. We devoted much time this year to examining the colloid content of NTS groundwater. After developing protocols for collecting, handling, and storing groundwater samples without altering their colloid content, we analyzed water from the Tybo-Benham and from the Cheshire sites. Whereas the colloid concentration did not vary much with depth at Tybo

  15. Application of nuclear analysis technique to determine radionuclide contents in critical food stuff

    Sri Murniasih; Sukirno; Agus Taftazani

    2010-01-01

    Rice, cassava, grist, corn and salt are Indonesian critical food stuff. The analysis of nature radionuclide in rice, cassava, grist, corn and salt measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry with Germanium Lithium (GeLi) detector equipped by MESTROTM software and Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA) to analysis radionuclide and gamma gross. Analysis beta gross have been done using Low Background Counter (LBC) with Geiger Muller (GM) detector and Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Activity of K-40 on all samples range from 28.40 ± 2.06 to 4.22 ± 1.67 mBq/g; Th-232 range from 0.92 ± 0.57 to 6.63 ± 0.98 mBq/g; Pb-212 range from 0.38 ± 0.18 to 0.81 ± 0.10 mBq/g; Pb-214 range from 1.92 ± 1.28 - 5.17 ± 0.14 mBq/g. While beta gross and gamma gross activities range from 0.12 ± 0.09 to 0.31 ± 0.13 mBq/g and 101.73 ± 13.35 to 199.81 ± 9.21 mBq/g. Comparing with reference data from various countries, it can be concluded that radionuclide activity content in all of rice, cassava, grist, corn and salt samples doesn't difference significantly so that they are safe to be consumed. Using statistic test of ANOVA (α = 0.05) method, it found that the difference of sample has influence significant on the activity of TI-208, Pb-212, Pb-214 , gross beta and gamma gross radioactivity while on K-40 there is no significant influence on sample difference. (author)

  16. [The assessment of radionuclide contamination and toxicity of soils sampled from "experimental field" site of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site].

    Evseeva, T I; Maĭstrenko, T A; Belykh, E S; Geras'kin, S A; Kriazheva, E Iu

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale maps (1:25000) of soil contamination with radionuclides, lateral distribution of 137Cs, 90Sr, Fe and Mn water-soluble compounds and soil toxicity in "Experimental field" site of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site were charted. At present soils from studied site (4 km2) according to basic sanitary standards of radiation safety adopted in Russian Federation (OSPORB) do not attributed to radioactive wastes with respect to data on artificial radionuclide concentration, but they do in compliance with IAEA safety guide. The soils studied can not be released from regulatory control due to radioactive decay of 137Cs and 90Sr and accumulation-decay of 241Am up to 2106 year according to IAEA concept of exclusion, exemption and clearance. Data on bioassay "increase of Chlorella vulgaris Beijer biomass production in aqueous extract from soils" show that the largest part of soils from the studied site (74%) belongs to stimulating or insignificantly influencing on the algae reproduction due to water-soluble compounds effect. Toxic soils occupy 26% of the territory. The main factors effecting the algae reproduction in the aqueous extracts from soil are Fe concentration and 90Sr specific activity: 90Sr inhibits but Fe stimulates algae biomass production.

  17. Absorption of selected radionuclides. Analysis of a literature study. Resorption ausgewaehlter Radionuklide. Analyse einer Literaturstudie

    Roedler, H D; Kraus, H M

    1979-12-01

    In October 1978, the Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung Heidelberg e.V. published a contribution to part 26 of the model study of radio-ecology at Biblis under the title 'Estimation of the absorption of radionuclides from the gastrointestinal tract in the blood'. Using the example of this contribution, a critical analysis is made to show how a selection of the information contained in various scientific publications and other items of literature can give uncritical readers the impression that all statements made are scientifically well founded.

  18. RAMM: a system of computer programs for radionuclide pathway analysis calculations

    Lyon, R.B.

    1976-09-01

    A generalized system of computer programs, designated RAMM (Radioactive Materials Management) system, has been developed to assist in the analysis of the movement of radionuclides through the environment to man. RAMM incorporates the GASP IV continuous/discrete simulation system. A nodal approach is used whereby the system to be analyzed is split up into parts small enough that the distribution of nuclides within the node may be taken to be homogeneous. Pathways are defined between nodes, and appropriate transfer coefficients are input or generated. Output includes the time dependent contents of the nodes and dose rates, integrated doses and dose commitments of selected nodes. (author)

  19. Comparison of radionuclide data analysis results of the CTBTO/IDC and the Finnish NDC

    Ansaranta, T.; Ala-Heikkilae, J.; Aarnio, P. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-06-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is to operate a world-wide radionuclide monitoring network consisting of 80 measuring stations that transmit daily gamma-ray spectra measured from air filter samples to the International Data Centre (IDC). All spectra are analysed automatically and the results are reviewed interactively by an analyst. Quality of the automated analysis has a substantial impact on the reliability and efficiency of the analysis operation. The Finnish National Data Centre (FiNDC) receives the analysis results and raw spectral data from the IDC and performs radionuclide analysis of the spectra using dedicated Finnish software packages. This work evaluates the differences between the analysis results of the IDC and the FiNDC. The results are studied with respect to the spectrum peak finding, fitting and explaining performance. Furthermore, nuclides associated with the peaks are considered, and an effort is made to approximate the number of spurious nuclide identifications. The material of this work consists of representative sets containing 500 to 1500 spectra and their respective analysis result pairs. The spectra were measured by the five certified radionuclide stations and three prototype stations that were operating between August 1, 2000 and March 26, 2001. In the set of 1500 spectra from eight stations, the FiNDC analysis software package was found to detect 4.2 more peaks per spectrum and to explain 5.6 more peaks per spectrum than the IDC software package, which, in turn, left 1.4 more peaks per spectrum unexplained. The median peak explanation percentages of the FiNDC and IDC were 96.7 and 92.3, respectively. The FiNDC analysis software package was found to report 0.7 more spurious nuclides than the IDC analysis software package. When only the CTBTO relevant nuclides were considered, the difference decreased to 0.05. The throughput times involved with the IDC raw measuring data transfer and automatic analysis result

  20. Benchmarking LWR codes capability to model radionuclide deposition within SFR containments: An analysis of the Na ABCOVE tests

    Herranz, Luis E., E-mail: luisen.herranz@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Monica, E-mail: monica.gmartin@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: sonia.morandi@rse-web.it [Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Department, RSE, via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Assessment of LWR codes capability to model aerosol deposition within SFR containments. • Original hypotheses proposed to partially accommodate drawbacks from Na oxidation reactions. • A defined methodology to derive a more accurate characterization of Na-based particles. • Key missing models in LWR codes for SFR applications are identified. - Abstract: Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide transport, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide deposition, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. The present paper is aimed at assessing the current capability of LWR codes to model aerosol deposition within a SFR containment under BDBA conditions. Through a systematic application of the ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR codes to relevant ABCOVE tests, insights have been gained into drawbacks and capabilities of these computation tools. Hypotheses and approximations have

  1. Benchmarking LWR codes capability to model radionuclide deposition within SFR containments: An analysis of the Na ABCOVE tests

    Herranz, Luis E.; Garcia, Monica; Morandi, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of LWR codes capability to model aerosol deposition within SFR containments. • Original hypotheses proposed to partially accommodate drawbacks from Na oxidation reactions. • A defined methodology to derive a more accurate characterization of Na-based particles. • Key missing models in LWR codes for SFR applications are identified. - Abstract: Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide transport, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide deposition, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. The present paper is aimed at assessing the current capability of LWR codes to model aerosol deposition within a SFR containment under BDBA conditions. Through a systematic application of the ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR codes to relevant ABCOVE tests, insights have been gained into drawbacks and capabilities of these computation tools. Hypotheses and approximations have been adopted so that

  2. Proficiency testing for radionuclides

    Faanhof, A.; Kotze, O.; Louw, I.

    2010-01-01

    Proficiency testing in general is only useful when it suites a certain purpose. With regards to radionuclides basically three fields of interest can be identified: (I)Foodstuffs-Introduced in the early 1960's to monitor the fall-out of nuclear tests and eventually the pathway to foodstuffs fit for human consumption. The demand for analysis increased substantially after the Chernobyl accident. (II) Natural radioactivity-Associated with mining and mineral processing of uranium and thorium baring mineral resources throughout the world where the radionuclides from the natural uranium and thorium decay series are found to pose concern for professional and public exposure. (III) Artificial radioactivity-This category covers mostly the long-lived nuclides generated by nuclear fission of the fuel used in nuclear power plants, research reactors and nuclear bomb tests. All three categories require a specific approach for laboratories to test their ability to analyze specific radio nuclides of interest in a variety of matrices. In this lecture I will give a compiled overview of the required radioanalytical skills, analysis sensitivity needed and radionuclides of interest, with more specific emphasis on QAQC of water sources and the recommended monitoring approach. And provide information on available reference materials and organizations/institutes that provide regular exercises for participating laboratories. I will also briefly communicate on the advantages and disadvantages of ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation for test laboratories, which is these days a prerequisite in national and international trade especially where foodstuffs and mineral products are concerned.

  3. Decision analysis of countermeasures for the milk pathway after an accidental release of radionuclides

    Ammann, M.; Sinkko, K.; Kostiainen, E.; Salo, E.; Liskola, K.; Haemaelaeinen, R.P.; Mustajoki, J

    2001-12-01

    A facilitated workshop was arranged to plan countermeasures that could reduce the dose arising from the consumption of radionuclide-contaminated milk products. It was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear facility had led to the release of considerable amounts of radionuclides, which subsequently spread across one of Finland's most important agricultural regions and contaminated the milk produced there. The participants in the workshop, interest groups on food issues, considered all the factors influencing the countermeasure decision, not only radiological or monetary ones but less tangible psychosocial effects as well. The participants preferred the countermeasures provision of uncontaminated fodder and production control to banning and disposal. The analysis showed that these countermeasures could be implemented even if the radionuclide concentrations in foodstuffs were below internationally recommended intervention levels. Banning and withdrawal of milk products from sale was not a favourable option, because of the high costs and disadvantages to producers and the industry, and because the disposal of enormous amounts of milk causes a considerable environmental problem. The study revealed the need to further develop methods to realistically assess the radiological and cost implications of food countermeasures. The feasibility and constraints of actions also need further investigation. The experience gained strongly supports the format of a facilitated workshop to tackle a decision problem that concerns different stakeholders. The participants considered the workshop and the decision analysis very useful in exercises. They also expected a similar approach to be applicable in a real situation, although the suitability was not rated as high as for exercises. It is concluded that a facilitated workshop is a valuable instrument for emergency management and in exercises, when revising emergency plans or in order to identify issues that need to be

  4. Development of a chromatographic micro-system for radionuclides analysis in nitric acid media

    Losno, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Radionuclides analysis is a key point for nuclear waste management and nuclear material control. Several steps of sample modification have to be carried out before measurements in order to avoid any interferences and improve measurement precision. However those different steps are long, irradiating and difficult to achieve in gloveboxes. Moreover they produce liquid and solid waste. The goal of the study is to offer a new alternative to the use of solid phase extraction column for radionuclides separation in hard nitric acid medium. The system will decrease the amount of nuclear waste due to the analysis and automatize the different steps of the analysis. A plastic device made of COC containing a micro solid phase extraction column is first designed. Stationary phase is a poly(AMA-co-EDMA) monolith synthesized in situ. Its structure is adjustable and its functionalization versatile with a high resistance to nitric acid medium. Exchange capacity is 150 mg/g of monolith for TBP and TBP/CMPO column and up to 280 mg/g of monolith in case of DAAP. Exchange coefficients are determined for U(VI), Th(IV), Eu(III) and Nd(III) for 3 different extractants (and Pu(IV) in case of TBP column). Monolith synthesis is transferred in centrifugal device and hydrodynamic behavior studied. U,Th/Eu separation was finally carried out in both classic and centrifugal micro-system on TBP column. (author) [fr

  5. Radionuclide radiology

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  6. Analysis of radionuclide migration through fractures using the stream tube approach

    Jong Soon Song; Kun Jai Lee

    1988-01-01

    An analytical solution for the radionuclide migration in the heterogeneous geologic media is developed by using the Green's function techniques. To take into account the non-homogeneous geologic formation and non-uniform groundwater flow field effectively, a combined fracture/porous media model (in series network) is introduced. The stream tube approach is suggested as an efficient method to analyze groundwater hydrology occurring primarily along the fractures. With this approach, three-dimensional heterogeneous media may be approximated as a network of one-dimensional flow paths (fractures) and the corresponding subsurface transport equations can be solved more easily and efficiently by using the Green's function technique within each unit stream tubes. Also a method of combining the corresponding separate Green's functions to derive an overall Green's function for the flow path network is developed. Analytical solutions with various time-dependent radionuclide release modes for heterogeneous geologic media are obtained and sample calculations are performed for the parametric studies. Comparison with other model shows the validity of the present model. 22 refs.; 11 figs.; 5 tabs

  7. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Cementitious Near-Field of an ILW Repository

    Berner, U.

    2003-05-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from ILW wastes, disposed of in a chemically reducing, cementitious environment. From a chemical point of view, the pore waters of hydrated cement matrices provide an exceptional environment. Compared with usual ground waters exhibiting pH-values of around 8, cement pore waters are strongly alkaline with pH-values from 12.5 to 13.5 and contain nearly no carbonate and only little sulfate. Oxides and hydroxides mainly determine solubility and speciation of the elements. Solubility and speciation calculations in cementitious pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 36 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Wherever possible, maximum concentrations compiled in this report were based on geochemical calculations. In order to ensure full traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the TDB are explicitly specified in the document. For similar reasons the compilation of results (Table 1) clearly distinguishes between calculated and recommended items. The heading 'CALCULATED' lists maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the TDB; results under the heading 'RECOMMENDED' include data from other sources. The pH sensitivity of the results was examined by performing calculations at pH 13.4, in accordance with the pH of non-altered cement pore water. Solubility increases predominantly for elements that tend to form anionic hydroxide complexes (Sn, Pd, Zr, Ni, Eu, Cd, Mo, Co). Oxidizing conditions around +350 mV might be expected in the environment of nitrate-containing wastes. In this case, significant

  8. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Cementitious Near-Field of an ILW Repository

    Berner, U

    2003-05-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from ILW wastes, disposed of in a chemically reducing, cementitious environment. From a chemical point of view, the pore waters of hydrated cement matrices provide an exceptional environment. Compared with usual ground waters exhibiting pH-values of around 8, cement pore waters are strongly alkaline with pH-values from 12.5 to 13.5 and contain nearly no carbonate and only little sulfate. Oxides and hydroxides mainly determine solubility and speciation of the elements. Solubility and speciation calculations in cementitious pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 36 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Wherever possible, maximum concentrations compiled in this report were based on geochemical calculations. In order to ensure full traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the TDB are explicitly specified in the document. For similar reasons the compilation of results (Table 1) clearly distinguishes between calculated and recommended items. The heading 'CALCULATED' lists maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the TDB; results under the heading 'RECOMMENDED' include data from other sources. The pH sensitivity of the results was examined by performing calculations at pH 13.4, in accordance with the pH of non-altered cement pore water. Solubility increases predominantly for elements that tend to form anionic hydroxide complexes (Sn, Pd, Zr, Ni, Eu, Cd, Mo, Co). Oxidizing conditions around +350 mV might be expected in the environment of nitrate-containing wastes. In

  9. Automated multi-radionuclide separation and analysis with combined detection capability

    Plionis, Alexander Asterios

    The radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a weapon of great concern to those agencies responsible for protecting the public from the modern age of terrorism. In order to effectively respond to an RDD event, these agencies need to possess the capability to rapidly identify the radiological agents involved in the incident and assess the uptake of each individual victim. Since medical treatment for internal radiation poisoning is radionuclide-specific, it is critical to identify and quantify the radiological uptake of each individual victim. This dissertation describes the development of automated analytical components that could be used to determine and quantify multiple radionuclides in human urine bioassays. This is accomplished through the use of extraction chromatography that is plumbed in-line with one of a variety of detection instruments. Flow scintillation analysis is used for 90Sr and 210Po determination, flow gamma analysis is used assess 60 Co and 137Cs, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is used to determine actinides. Detection limits for these analytes were determined for the appropriate technique and related to their implications for health physics.

  10. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  11. Allowable residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil from pathway analysis

    Nyquist, J.E.; Baes, C.F. III

    1987-01-01

    The Remedial Action Program (RAP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will include well drilling, facility upgrades, and other waste management operations likely to involve soils contaminated with radionuclides. A preliminary protocol and generalized criteria for handling contaminated soils is needed to coordinate and plan RAP activities, but there exists only limited information on contaminate nature and distribution at ORNL RAP sites. Furthermore, projections of long-term decommissioning and closure options for these sites are preliminary. They have adapted a pathway analysis model, DECOM, to quantify risks to human health from radionuclides in soil and used it to outline preliminary criteria for determining the fate of contaminated soil produced during RAP activities. They assumed that the site could be available for unrestricted use immediately upon decontamination. The pathways considered are consumption of food grown on the contaminated soil, including direct ingestion of soil from poorly washed vegetables, direct radiation from the ground surface, inhalation of resuspended radioactive soil, and drinking water from a well drilled through or near the contaminated soil. We will discuss the assumptions and simplifications implicit in DECOM, the site-specific data required, and the results of initial calculations for the Oak Ridge Reservation

  12. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Vukov, T.; Pajic, J.; Milacic, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Stevanovic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Bukvic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the presence of correlation between the frequency of premature centromere division (PCD) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in metaphases in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Biological dosimetry was performed by conventional cytogenetic technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C) (the average age of 45.24 ± 1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96 ± 1.15) and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40 ± 0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of CA and PCD were statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P [sr

  13. Allowable residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil from pathway analysis

    Nyquist, J.E.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1987-01-01

    The uncertainty regarding radionuclide distributions among Remedial Action Program (RAP) sites and long-term decommissioning and closure options for these sites requires a flexible approach capable of handling different levels of contamination, dose limits, and closure scenarios. We identified a commercially available pathway analysis model, DECOM, which had been used previously in support of remedial activities involving contaminated soil at the Savannah River Plant. The DECOM computer code, which estimates concentrations of radionuclides uniformly distributed in soil that correspond to an annual effective dose equivalent, is written in BASIC and runs on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer. We obtained the latest version of DECOM and modified it to make it more user friendly and applicable to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RAP. Some modifications involved changes in default parameters or changes in models based on approaches used by the EPA in regulating remedial actions for hazardous substances. We created a version of DECOM as a LOTUS spreadsheet, using the same models as the BASIC version of DECOM. We discuss the specific modeling approaches taken, the regulatory framework that guided our efforts, the strengths and limitations of each approach, and areas for improvement. We also demonstrate how the LOTUS version of DECOM can be applied to specific problems that may be encountered during ORNL RAP activities. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Performance evaluation of spectral deconvolution analysis tool (SDAT) software used for nuclear explosion radionuclide measurements

    Foltz Biegalski, K.M.; Biegalski, S.R.; Haas, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Spectral Deconvolution Analysis Tool (SDAT) software was developed to improve counting statistics and detection limits for nuclear explosion radionuclide measurements. SDAT utilizes spectral deconvolution spectroscopy techniques and can analyze both β-γ coincidence spectra for radioxenon isotopes and high-resolution HPGe spectra from aerosol monitors. Spectral deconvolution spectroscopy is an analysis method that utilizes the entire signal deposited in a gamma-ray detector rather than the small portion of the signal that is present in one gamma-ray peak. This method shows promise to improve detection limits over classical gamma-ray spectroscopy analytical techniques; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. To address this issue, we performed three tests to compare the detection ability and variance of SDAT results to those of commercial off- the-shelf (COTS) software which utilizes a standard peak search algorithm. (author)

  15. Technique for radionuclide composition analysis of snow cover in the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone using fiber sorbents

    Kham'yanov, L.P.; Rau, D.F.; Amosov, M.M.; Strel'nikova, A.E.; Tereshchenko, V.I.; Veber, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    The high-sensitivity, simple and fast technique for analysis of large-dispersive and ionic components of snow cover radioactivity is suggested. It is based on separation of a sample by fractions, concentration of the dispersive fraction on mechanical filters and the dissolved one on ion-exchange sorbents and separated fraction spectrometry. The minimum measured contamination level is 3.7 Bq/dm 3 for each radionuclide analyzed. The conclusion is made that the technique suggested is the reliable method for radionuclide content analysis is snow cover samples of the Chernobyl' NPP zone. 1 tab

  16. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of stable elements and naturally occurring radionuclides. (1) Upland field crops collected in Japan

    Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko; Hirai, Ikuko

    2007-01-01

    In long-term dose assessment models for radioactive waste disposal, an important exposure pathway to humans is via ingestion of contaminated foods. In order to obtain soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of radionuclides under equilibrium conditions, naturally existing elements were measured as analogues of radionuclides. Crops grown in upland fields and associated soil samples were collected from 62 sampling sites throughout Japan. The total concentrations of 52 elements in the crops and 54 elements in the soil samples were measured. The TFs of 40 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Pb, Th and U) were calculated on a dry weight basis. Among all the TF data, K showed the highest TF with a geometric mean (GM) of 2.1, followed by P. The GMs of TFs for rare earth elements, Th and U were on the order of 10 -4 . Most of the TF-GMs for green vegetables were higher than GMs of all crops for the elements. The obtained TFs of some elements for green vegetables and potatoes were compared with those in the technical report series-364 (TRS-364) compiled by IAEA in 1994. The TF-GMs were usually lower than the best estimates (expected values) listed in TRS-364; however, the GMs of TF for La and TF for Th observed for potatoes were slightly higher than the expected values. (author)

  17. A review of a field study of radionuclide migration from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site

    Hoffman, D.C.; Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Fraser, S.L.; Daniels, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Results from a long-term (9 year) field study of the distribution of radionuclides around an underground nuclear explosion cavity at the Nevada Test Site are reviewed. The goals of this Radionuclide Migration project are to examine the rates of migration underground in various media and to determine the potential for movement, both on and off the Nevada Test Site, of radioactivity from such explosions, with particular interest in possible contamination of water supplies. Initial studies were undertaken near the site of the low-yield test Cambric, which was detonated 73 m beneath the water table in tuffaceous alluvium. Solid samples were obtained from just below ground surface to 50 m below the detonation point, and water was sampled from five different regions in the vicinity of the explosion. Ten years after the test, most of the radioactivity was found to be retained in the fused debris in the cavity region and no activity above background was found 50 m below. Only tritium and 90 Sr were present in water in the cavity at levels greater than recommended concentration guides for water in uncontrolled areas. A satellite well is being used to remove water 91 m from the detonation point. During seven years (7x10 6 m 3 ) of pumping, tritium, 85 Kr, 36 Cl and 129 I have been detected in the water. Approximately 40% of the total tritium from the cavity region has been removed by pumping at the satellite well, and the maximum in the tritium concentration is clearly defined. Use of sensitive analytical techniques has permitted measurement of the very low concentrations of 36 Cl and 129 I present in the water. The 36 Cl peak precedes the tritiated water, possibly as a result of anion exclusion. Additional analyses are in progress to better define the shape of the 129 I concentration curve. (author)

  18. Review of a field study of radionuclide migration from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site

    Hoffman, D.C.; Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Fraser, S.L.; Daniels, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    Results from a long-term (9 year) field study of the distribution of radionuclides around an underground nuclear explosion cavity at the Nevada Test Site are reviewed. The goals of this Radionuclide Migration project are to examine the rates of migration underground in various media and to determine the potential for movement, both on and off the Nevada Test Site, of radioactivity from such explosions, with particular interest in possible contamination of water supplies. Initial studies were undertaken near the site of the low-yield test Cambric, which was detonated 73 m beneath the water table in tuffaceous alluvium. Solid samples were obtained from just below ground surface to 50 m below the detonation point, and water was sampled from five different regions in the vicinity of the explosion. Ten years after the test, most of the radioactivity was found to be retained in the fused debris in the cavity region and no activity above background was found 50 m below. Only tritium and 90 Sr were presented in water in the cavity at levels greater than recommended concentration guides for water in uncontrolled areas. A satellite well is being used to remove water 91 m from the detonation point. During seven years (7 x 10 6 m 3 ) of pumping, tritium, 85 Kr, 36 Cl, and 129 I have been detected in the water. Approximately 40% of the total tritium from the cavity region has been removed by pumping at the satellite well, and the maximum in the tritium concentration is clearly defined. Use of sensitive analytical techniques has permitted measurement of the very low concentrations of 36 Cl and 129 I present in the water. The 36 Cl peak precedes the tritiated water, possibly as a result of anion exclusion. Additional analyses are in progress to better define the shape of the 129 I concentration curve

  19. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  20. Development of a technique of the rapid analysis for forecasting of possible radionuclides accumulation in the harvest of agricultural crops

    Yadgarov, Kh.T.; Pugachev, V.V.; Kim, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the main ways of pollution of plants by radionuclides is the receipt of radionuclides in plants from ground through root system and direct uptake of radionuclides by underground parts of plants. Therefore receipt of radioisotopes in rhizosphere of plants plays the main role in radionuclides accumulation in the plants. For plants cultivation in conditions of radioactive pollution of region it is necessary to estimate the value of possible radionuclides accumulation in a harvest of plants. Such forecasts are necessary at planning of growing of agricultural crops for the food, forage or technical purposes depending on a degree of their pollution by radionuclides. We investigated correlation between the content of strontium - 90 in plants in early phases of their development (20 days time) and in a harvest of plants at a soil way of radionuclide receipt. Our results of study of dependence of strontium - 90 accumulation in a harvest from its content in 20 days time sprouts show, that with reduction of the content of strontium - 90 in 20 days time sprouts, its quantity in a harvest of agriculture cultures is reduced. The correlation analysis of the received data has confirmed positive connection between accumulation of radionuclide in young and adult plants. So, correlation coefficients for a cotton, wheat and barley are 0,89; 0,91 and 0,91 correspondingly. Thus, the direct connection between the contents of strontium - 90 in plants of young age and its accumulation in a harvest of adult plants is established. It enables to predict pollution of' harvest by strontium - 90 under its contents in young plants. Using the received data, with the help of the least- squares method, we have calculated coefficients of the regression equation of a kind: y = a + bx, Where: y - the predicted contents of radionuclide in the harvest; x - the content of radionuclide in 20 days time sprouts; a, b - the empirical coefficients. Rather good coincidence of theoretical calculations and

  1. Sensitivity analysis of biospheric behaviour of radionuclides released from nuclear waste repositories

    Korhonen, R.; Savolainen, I.; Suolanen, V.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitivity studies of biospheric behaviour of radionuclides released from a planned spent nuclear fuel repository are performed. Sensitivity of radionuclide concentrations in biosphere and that of radiation doses to solubility of nuclides, to sedimentation rate and to intercompartmental water exchange are studied. Solubility has pronounced effect on the sedimentation on the local scale, and in general, sediment sinks were found to be of major importance in the biospheric behaviour of radionuclides. (author)

  2. Radionuclide trap

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  3. Radionuclide Angiocardiographic Evaluation of Left-to-Right Cardiac Shunts: Analysis of Time-Active Curves

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Chi Kyung

    1987-01-01

    The noninvasive nature of the radionuclide angiocardiography provided a useful approach for the evaluation of left-to-right cardiac shunts (LRCS). While the qualitative information can be obtained by inspection of serial radionuclide angiocardiograms, the quantitative information of radionuclide angiocardiography can be obtained by the analysis of time-activity curves using advanced computer system. The count ratios method and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (QP/QS) by gamma variate fit method were used to evaluate the accuracy of detection and localization of LRCS. One hundred and ten time-activity curves were analyzed. There were 46 LRCS (atrial septal defects 11, ventricular septal defects 22, patent ductus arteriosus 13) and 64 normal subjects. By computer analysis of time-activity curves of the right atriurn, ventricle and the lungs separately, the count ratios modified by adding the mean cardiac transit time were calculated in each anatomic site. In normal subjects the mean count ratios in the right atrium, ventricle and lungs were 0.24 on average. In atrial septal defects, the count ratios were high in the right atrium, ventricle and lungs, whereas in ventricular septal defects the count ratios were higher only in the right ventricle and lungs. Patent ductus arteriosus showed normal count ratios in the heart but high count ratios were obtained in the lungs. Thus, this count ratios method could be separated normal from those with intracardiac or extracardiac shunts, and moreover, with this method the localization of the shunt level was possible in LRCS. Another method that could differentiate the intracardiac shunts from extracardiac shunts was measuring QP/QS in the left and right lungs. In patent ductus arteriosus, the left lung QP/QS was higher than those of the right lung, whereas in atrial septal defects and ventricular septal defects QP/ QS ratios were equal in both lungs. From this study, it was found that by measuring QP/QS separately in the lungs

  4. Automated processing of first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography by factor analysis of dynamic structures

    Cavailloles, F.; Valette, H.; Hebert, J.-L.; Bazin, J.-P.; Di Paola, R.; Capderou, A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for automatic processing of cardiac first-pass radionuclide study is presented. This technique, factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) provides an automatic separation of anatomical structures according to their different temporal behaviour, even if they are superimposed. FADS has been applied to 76 studies. A description of factor patterns obtained in various pathological categories is presented. FADS provides easy diagnosis of shunts and tricuspid insufficiency. Quantitative information derived from the factors (cardiac output and mean transit time) were compared to those obtained by the region of interest method. Using FADS, a higher correlation with cardiac catheterization was found for cardiac output calculation. Thus compared to the ROI method, FADS presents obvious advantages: a good separation of overlapping cardiac chambers is obtained; this operator independent method provides more objective and reproducible results. (author)

  5. Automated sensitivity analysis of the radionuclide migration code UCB-NE-10.2

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) of the U.S. Department of Energy is performing ongoing performance assessment analyses for the eventual licensing of an underground high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. As part of these studies, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses play a major role in the identification of important parameters, and in the identification of specific data needs for site characterization. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has supported the SRP in this effort resulting in thee development of an automated procedure for performing large scale sensitivity analysis using computer calculus. GRESS, GRadient Enhanced Software System, is a pre-compiler that can process FORTRAN computer codes and add derivative taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. The GRESS code is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2 which simulates the migration through a sorption medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain

  6. The Spectroscopy Analysis of Natural Radionuclide in Some Agriculture Regions Homs City

    Soufan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma Spectroscopy was utilized for assessment the radionuclide concentration ( K 40 , Ra 226 , Th 232 ..) in some agricultures regions in Homs City. The spectroscopy analysis carried on different samples from agricultures soil, black soil, red soil and........ and White soil chosen from different regions in Homs area. The study shows that all samples contain K 40 in large quantities, and Ra 226 , Th 232 in small quantities. The measurements showed that the dose varies between 942μSv/y for black soil and 524μSv/y for white soil. These results of the measurements have indicated that natural radioactivity in agricultures soils in Homs area are relatively normal and less than that estimated by another country in the world. (author)

  7. Automated processing of first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography by factor analysis of dynamic structures

    Cavailloles, F.; Valette, H.; Hebert, J.-L.; Bazin, J.-P.; Di Paola, R.; Capderou, A.

    1987-05-01

    A method for automatic processing of cardiac first-pass radionuclide study is presented. This technique, factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) provides an automatic separation of anatomical structures according to their different temporal behaviour, even if they are superimposed. FADS has been applied to 76 studies. A description of factor patterns obtained in various pathological categories is presented. FADS provides easy diagnosis of shunts and tricuspid insufficiency. Quantitative information derived from the factors (cardiac output and mean transit time) were compared to those obtained by the region of interest method. Using FADS, a higher correlation with cardiac catheterization was found for cardiac output calculation. Thus compared to the ROI method, FADS presents obvious advantages: a good separation of overlapping cardiac chambers is obtained; this operator independent method provides more objective and reproducible results.

  8. Analysis of cardiac images of radionuclide ventriculography in AT-Type personal computer

    Lillo, R.; Gonzalez, P.; Ehijo, A.; Otarola, T.M.S.; Ortiz, M.; Silva, A.M.; Ortiz, M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research was to produce software for the processing of Cardiac Phase images in personal computers. The results of standard radionuclide Ventriculography and Fourier analysis, got on gamma camera Ohio Nuclear 410 Sygma and Digital PDP 11/34 computer were coded into ASCII file and then transfered via Smarterm 220/Kermit to an Accel 900 AT PC. After decoding the images they were processed with a program develope in C Lenguaje obtaining the values of Phase Angles in the whole phase images and in regions of interest drawn around the cardiac chambers. The images and values were the same as those obtained by conventional processing in the PDP 11/34 computer. This is considered a first stage for the use of PC to Nuclear Medicine imaging studies. (author)

  9. Comparative Studies on the Bioretention of Radionuclides under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    Heyraud, M.; Fowler, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of different sea water treatments on radio-isotope flux rates was tested in three species. For any one species no significant differences in 65 Zn loss rate were noted between organisms held in sea water collected in situ and in those maintained in sea water from the laboratory system. Increased sea water zinc concentration accelerated 65 Zn flux rates; however, the more rapid 65 Zn loss compared to that measured in control sea water was only significant when the concentration was increased by 100μg zinc/liter. Simultaneous laboratory and field experiments indicated that loss rates in clams and mussels were similar whether animals were held in the field or in the laboratory. Experiments in which crabs were monitored for 65 Zn loss gave conflicting results. One experiment performed during the summer indicated that crabs lost 65 Zn significantly faster in the laboratory than in the field. Another experiment performed during the winter when water temperatures were lower indicated no differences in loss rates between the two systems. Differences in radioisotope flux rate may have been related to the intermolt cycle; nevertheless, it was concluded that for certain organisms care should be exercised when applying results of laboratory experiments to the field situation. (author)

  10. Sensitivity analysis of an experimental methodology to determine radionuclide diffusion coefficients in granite

    Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.; Rigato, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The long-term quantitative analysis of the migration behaviour of the relevant radionuclides (RN) within the geological barrier of a radioactive waste repository requires, amongst other data, the introduction of reliable transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients. Since the determination of diffusion coefficients within crystalline rocks is complex and requires long experimental times even for non-sorbing radionuclides, the data available in the literature are very scarce. The nuclear ion beam technique RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) that is successfully used to determine diffusion profiles in thin film science is here examined as possible suitable technique to determine the diffusion coefficients of different RN within granite. As first step, the technique sensitivity and limitations to analyse diffusion coefficients in granite samples is evaluated, considering that the technique is especially sensitive to heavy elements. The required experimental conditions in terms of experimental times, concentration and methodology of analysis are discussed. The diffusants were selected accounting the RBS sensitivity but also trying to cover different behaviours of critical RN and a wide range of possible oxidation states. In particular, Cs(I) was chosen as representative fission product, while as relevant actinides or homologues, the diffusion of Th(IV), U(IV) and Eu (III) was studied. The diffusion of these above-mentioned cations is compared to the diffusion of Re, and I as representative of anionic species. The methodology allowed evaluating diffusion coefficients in the granite samples and, for most of the elements, the values obtained are in agreement with the values found in the literature. The diffusion coefficients calculated ranged from 10 -13 to 10 -16 m 2 /s. It is remarkable that the RBS technique is especially promising to determine diffusion coefficients of high-sorbing RN and it is applicable to a wide range

  11. Reproducibility in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction

    Gjorup, T.; Kelbaek, H.; Vestergaard, B.; Fogh, J.; Munck, O.; Jensen, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors determined the reproducibility (the standard deviation [SD]) in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Radionuclide studies from a consecutive series of 38 patients suspected of ischemic heart disease were analyzed independently by four nuclear medicine physiologists and four laboratory technicians. Each study was analyzed three times by each of the observers. Based on the analyses of the eight observers, the SD could be estimated by the use of a variance component model for LVEF determinations calculated as the average of the analyses of an arbitrary number of observers making an arbitrary number of analyses. This study presents the SDs for LVEF determinations based on the analyses of one to five observers making one to five analyses each. The SD of a LVEF determination decreased from 3.96% to 2.98% when an observer increased his number of analyses from one to five. A more pronounced decrease in the SD from 3.96% to 1.77% was obtained when the LVEF determinations were based on the average of a single analysis made by one to five observers. However, when dealing with the difference between LVEF determinations from two studies, the highest reproducibility was obtained if the LVEF determinations at both studies were based on the analyses made by the same observer. No significant difference was found in the reproducibility of analyses made by nuclear medicine physicians and laboratory technicians. Our study revealed that to increase the reproducibility of LVEF determinations, special efforts should be made to standardize the outlining of the end-systolic region interest

  12. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    Sudowe, Ralf; Roman, Audrey; Dailey, Ashlee; Go, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular, new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time- and labor-intensive, and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is required and/or large number of samples need to be analyzed. To address this issue we are currently investigating radiochemical separation methods based on extraction chromatography that have been specifically optimized for the analysis of process stream samples. The influence of potential interferences present in the process samples as well as mass loading, flow rate and resin performance is being studied. In addition, the potential to automate these procedures utilizing a robotic platform is evaluated. Initial studies have been carried out using the commercially available DGA resin. This resin shows an affinity for Am, Pu, U, and Th and is also exhibiting signs of a possible synergistic effects in the presence of iron.

  13. Accuracy Analysis of a Robotic Radionuclide Inspection and Mapping System for Surface Contamination

    Mauer, Georg F.; Kawa, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The mapping of localized regions of radionuclide contamination in a building can be a time consuming and costly task. Humans moving hand-held radiation detectors over the target areas are subject to fatigue. A contamination map based on manual surveys can contain significant operator-induced inaccuracies. A Fanuc M16i light industrial robot has been configured for installation on a mobile aerial work platform, such as a tall forklift. When positioned in front of a wall or floor surface, the robot can map the radiation levels over a surface area of up to 3 m by 3 m. The robot's end effector is a commercial alpha-beta radiation sensor, augmented with range and collision avoidance sensors to ensure operational safety as well as to maintain a constant gap between surface and radiation sensors. The accuracy and repeatability of the robotically conducted contamination surveys is directly influenced by the sensors and other hardware employed. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of various non-contact sensors for gap measurement, and the means to compensate for predicted systematic errors that arise during the area survey scans. The range sensor should maintain a constant gap between the radiation counter and the surface being inspected. The inspection robot scans the wall surface horizontally, moving down at predefined vertical intervals after each scan in a meandering pattern. A number of non-contact range sensors can be employed for the measurement of the gap between the robot end effector and the wall. The nominal gap width was specified as 10 mm, with variations during a single scan not to exceed ± 2 mm. Unfinished masonry or concrete walls typically exhibit irregularities, such as holes, gaps, or indentations in mortar joints. These irregularities can be sufficiently large to indicate a change of the wall contour. The responses of different sensor types to the wall irregularities vary, depending on their underlying principles of operation. We explored

  14. Ambient Field Analysis at Groningen Gas Field

    Spica, Z.; Nakata, N.; Beroza, G. C.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze continuous ambient-field data at Groningen gas field (Netherlands) through cross-correlation processing. The Groningen array is composed of 75 shallow boreholes with 6 km spacing, which contain a 3C surface accelerometer and four 5-Hz 3C borehole geophones spaced at 50 m depth intervals. We successfully retrieve coherent waves from ambient seismic field on the 9 components between stations. Results show high SNR signal in the frequency range of 0.125-1 Hz, and the ZZ, ZR, RZ, RR and TT components show much stronger wave energy than other components as expected. This poster discuss the different type of waves retrieved, the utility of the combination of borehole and surface observations, future development as well as the importance to compute the 9 components of the Green's tensor to better understand the wave field propriety with ambient noise.

  15. The Navruz Project: Transboundary Monitoring for Radionuclides and Metals in Central Asia Rivers. Sampling and Analysis Plan and Operational Manual

    Passell, Howard D.; Barber, David S.; Betsill, J. David; Littlfield, Adriane C.; Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Shanks, Sonoya T.; Yuldashev, Bekhzad; Salikhbaev, Umar; Radyuk, Raisa; Djuraev, Akram; Djuraev, Amwar; Vasilev, Ivan; Tolongutov, Bajgabyl; Valentina, Alekhina; Solodukhin, Vladimir; Pozniak, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The transboundary nature of water resources demands a transboundary approach to their monitoring and management. However, transboundary water projects raise a challenging set of problems related to communication issues, and standardization of sampling, analysis and data management methods. This manual addresses those challenges and provides the information and guidance needed to perform the Navruz Project, a cooperative, transboundary, river monitoring project involving rivers and institutions in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan facilitated by Sandia National Laboratories in the U.S. The Navruz Project focuses on waterborne radionuclides and metals because of their importance to public health and nuclear materials proliferation concerns in the region. This manual provides guidelines for participants on sample and data collection, field equipment operations and procedures, sample handling, laboratory analysis, and data management. Also included are descriptions of rivers, sampling sites and parameters on which data are collected. Data obtained in this project are shared among all participating countries and the public through an internet web site, and are available for use in further studies and in regional transboundary water resource management efforts. Overall, the project addresses three main goals: to help increase capabilities in Central Asian nations for sustainable water resources management; to provide a scientific basis for supporting nuclear transparency and non-proliferation in the region; and to help reduce the threat of conflict in Central Asia over water resources, proliferation concerns, or other factors.

  16. The Navruz Project: Transboundary Monitoring for Radionuclides and Metals in Central Asia Rivers. Sampling and Analysis Plan and Operational Manual

    Passell, Howard D.; Barber, David S.; Betsill, J. David; Littlfield, Adriane C.; Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Shanks, Sonoya T.; Yuldashev, Bekhzad; Salikhbaev, Umar; Radyuk, Raisa; Djuraev, Akram; Djuraev, Amwar; Vasilev, Ivan; Tolongutov, Bajgabyl; Valentina, Alekhina; Solodukhin, Vladimir; Pozniak, Victor

    2002-04-02

    The transboundary nature of water resources demands a transboundary approach to their monitoring and management. However, transboundary water projects raise a challenging set of problems related to communication issues, and standardization of sampling, analysis and data management methods. This manual addresses those challenges and provides the information and guidance needed to perform the Navruz Project, a cooperative, transboundary, river monitoring project involving rivers and institutions in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan facilitated by Sandia National Laboratories in the U.S. The Navruz Project focuses on waterborne radionuclides and metals because of their importance to public health and nuclear materials proliferation concerns in the region. This manual provides guidelines for participants on sample and data collection, field equipment operations and procedures, sample handling, laboratory analysis, and data management. Also included are descriptions of rivers, sampling sites and parameters on which data are collected. Data obtained in this project are shared among all participating countries and the public through an internet web site, and are available for use in further studies and in regional transboundary water resource management efforts. Overall, the project addresses three main goals: to help increase capabilities in Central Asian nations for sustainable water resources management; to provide a scientific basis for supporting nuclear transparency and non-proliferation in the region; and to help reduce the threat of conflict in Central Asia over water resources, proliferation concerns, or other factors.

  17. Analysis of the processes defining radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium

    Brazauskaite, A.; Poskas, P.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the danger of exposure arising from long-lived radionuclides to humans and environment, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are not allowed to be disposed of in near surface repositories. There exists an international consensus that such high level and long-lived radioactive wastes are best disposed of in geological repositories using a system of engineered and natural barriers. At present, the geological repository of SNF and HLW has not been realized yet in any country but there is a lot of experience in the assessment of radionuclide migration from deep repositories, investigations of different processes related to the safety of a disposal system. The aim of this study was to analyze the processes related to the radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium such as SNF matrix dissolution, release mechanism of radionuclides from SNF matrix, radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusive, advective transport of radionuclides from the canister and through the engineered and natural barriers. It has been indicated that SNF matrix dissolution, radionuclide solubility and sorption are sensitive to ambient conditions prevailing in the repository. The approaches that could be used for modeling the radionuclide migration from deep repositories in porous medium are also presented. (author)

  18. GENERATION OF GROUND ATMOSPHERE α-, β- AND γ-FIELDS BY NATURAL ATMOSPHERIC RADIONUCLIDES

    V.S. Yakovleva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical investigation of influence of atmospheric turbulence, wind speed and direction as well as radon and thoron flux density from the soil on characteristics of atmospheric α-, β- and γ-radiation fields, which created by atmospheric radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products, are represented and analyzed in the work. It was showed that variation of radon and thoron flux densities from the earth surface changes yields and flux densities of α-, β- and γ-radiation in the ground atmosphere proportionally but does not change a form of their vertical profile.

  19. Criteria for requesting specific radionuclide analysis through gross α and gross β concentration measurements in environmental samples

    Ferreira, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper suggests some criteria for the decision to proceed with the analysis of specific radionuclides based on results of the determination of gross α and β concentrations in environmental samples of aerosols, water, dairy and agricultural products, soil and sediments. The samples considered are provenient from the environmental surveillance of uranium mining and milling facilities as well as the mining and processing plants of monazite sands. The radionuclides to be analysed are those considered to be the most critical to human health, that is: U-nat; Th-nat; Th-230; Ra-228; Ra-226; Po-210; Pb-210. The measured gross α and β concentrations will be compared with the Maximum Allowable Concentrations for some defined radionuclides. Radiochemical analysis of specific radionuclides may then become necessary, depending upon the results of this comparison. The main goal of the proposed guide is to simplify and to discipline the execution of environmental surveillance programs in a safe and economical way, avoiding unnecessary analysis. (author) [pt

  20. Dimensional analysis in field theory

    Stevenson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Dimensional Transmutation (the breakdown of scale invariance in field theories) is reconciled with the commonsense notions of Dimensional Analysis. This makes possible a discussion of the meaning of the Renormalisation Group equations, completely divorced from the technicalities of renormalisation. As illustrations, I describe some very farmiliar QCD results in these terms

  1. Automated system for ST segment and arrhythmia analysis in exercise radionuclide ventriculography

    Hsia, P.W.; Jenkins, J.M.; Shimoni, Y.; Gage, K.P.; Santinga, J.T.; Pitt, B.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-based system for interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in the diagnosis of arrhythmia and ST segment abnormality in an exercise system is presented. The system was designed for inclusion in a gamma camera so the ECG diagnosis could be combined with the diagnostic capability of radionuclide ventriculography. Digitized data are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is provided. Each beat is assigned a beat code based on a combination of waveform analysis and RR interval measurement. The waveform analysis employs a new correlation coefficient formula which corrects for baseline wander. Selective signal averaging, in which only normal beats are included, is done for an improved signal-to-noise ratio prior to ST segment analysis. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate have all been automated. ST level and slope measurements are computed on signal-averaged data. Arrhythmia analysis of 13 passages of abnormal rhythm by computer was found to be correct in 98.4 percent of all beats. 25 passages of exercise data, 1-5 min in length, were evaluated by the cardiologist and found to be in agreement in 95.8 percent in measurements of ST level and 91.7 percent in measurements of ST slope

  2. Sensitivity analysis on retardation effect of natural barriers against radionuclide transport

    Hatanaka, K.

    1994-01-01

    The generic performance assessment of the geological disposal system for high level waste (HLW) in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. The Japanese concept of the geological disposal system is based on a multi-barrier system which is composed of vitrified waste, carbon steel overpack, thick bentonite buffer and a variety of realistic geological conditions. The main objectives of the study are the detailed analysis of the performance of engineered barrier system (EBS) and the analysis of the performance of natural barrier system (NBS) and the evaluation of its compliance with the required overall system performance. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the objectives to investigate the way and extent of the retardation in the release to biosphere by the effect of NBS, and to clarify the conditions which is sufficient to ensure that the overall system meets safety requirement. The radionuclide transport model in geological media, the sensitivity analysis, and the calculated results of the retardation effect of NBS in terms of the sensitivity parameters are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Radionuclide body function imager

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scan field imaging apparatus is claimed. It comprises: a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array which surrounds a scan field, each collimator being moveable relative to its adjacent collimator; means for rotating the array about the scan field and means for imparting travel to the collimators

  4. The analysis of results of comparison test for radionuclides measurement through γ spectrum analysis from 2007 to 2012

    Wu Jialong; He Jian; Sun Wei; Wang Yun

    2013-01-01

    In order to test the capability of radionuclides measurement through γ spectrum analysis and improve the ability of the technicians by inter-laboratory comparison test, Gansu Center for Disease Prevention and Control participated in the comparison test organized by China Center for Disease Prevention and Control continuously from 2007 to 2012. All of the measured values are within the scope of qualified, and the relative deviation of measured value in the entire comparison tests is range from -16.31% to 11.83%.The results show that the equipment for γ spectrum measurement works normally, the analysis methods used for radioactive nuclide measuring is correct and the data in issued test report is accurate and reliable. The ability of the γ spectrum analysis satisfies the requirements of China Metrology Accreditation and the occupational health technical service. (authors)

  5. A BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS FOR FIVE RADIONUCLIDE VADOSE ZONE MODELS (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, AND CHAIN 2D) IN SOIL SCREENING LEVEL CALCULATIONS

    Five radionuclide vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide (99Tc) rele...

  6. Laboratory and field tests for radionuclide migration and high flow paths in clay

    Bourke, P.J.; Jefferies, N.L.; Lineham, T.R.; Nesirky, P.

    1991-01-01

    Two investigations have been undertaken in this programme. The principal investigation was at Culham Laboratory, England, where water flow within the Kimmeridge clay was measured. A subsidiary investigation at SCK/CEN was undertaken at the Underground Research Laboratory SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, where an in situ measurement of solute transport by diffusion was attempted. The in situ migration experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory at SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, was unsuccessful, due to problems with the engineering installation. These difficulties caused significant disturbance to the Boom clay which was to be tested. Nevertheless the laboratory test proved the feasibility of the experiment. The field measurements at Culham Laboratory, Oxfordshire, were completed with the flow testing of a very silty clay horizon in the Kimmeridge clay. This layer was proved to be laterally continuous after drilling three exploratory boreholes. The hydraulic conductivity of the layer was ≥ 10 -8 ms -1 and comparative tests in the clay showed the conductivity of the clay to be at least 50 times less. 12 figs

  7. Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.; Piepkho, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner

  8. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall number-sign 051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring

  9. Radionuclide toxicity

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  10. Applications of neutron activation analysis in determination of natural and man-made radionuclides, including PA-231

    Byrne, A. R.; Benedik, L.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), being essentially an isotopic and not an elemental method of analysis, is capable of determining a number of important radionuclides of radioecological interest by transformation into another, more easily quantifiable radionuclide. The nuclear characteristics which favour this technique may be summarized in an advantage factor relative to radiometric analysis of the original radioanalyte. Well known or hardly known examples include235U,238U,232Th,230Th,129I,99Tc,237Np and231Pa; a number of these are discussed and illustrated in analysis of real samples of environmental and biological origin. In particular, determination of231Pa by RNAA was performed using both postirradiation and preseparation methods. Application of INAA to enable the use of238U and232Th as endogenous (internal) radiotracers in alpha spectrometric analyses of uranium and thorium radioisotopes in radioecological studies is described, also allowing independent data sets to be obtained for quality control.

  11. Compilation of data for the analysis of radionuclide migration from SFL 3-5

    Skagius, K.; Pettersson, Michael; Wiborgh, M.; Albinsson, Yngve; Holgersson, Stellan

    1999-12-01

    A preliminary safety assessment of the deep repository for long-lived, low and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5, has been made. This report contains a compilation of data selected for the calculations of the migration of radionuclides and toxic metals from the waste to the biosphere. It also contains the data needed for the next step, which is to calculate dose to man from the far-field release figures. In the preliminary safety assessment it is assumed that SFL 3-5 is located in connection to the deep repository for spent fuel. This makes it possible to utilise site-specific information derived within the safety assessment of the deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, for the sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. When information from SR 97 is utilised, the values selected are as far as possible those proposed as a 'reasonable estimate' for the migration calculations in SR 97. The selection of values for parameters specific for the calculation of migration from the SFL 3-5 repository is in general on the pessimistic side. The uncertainty in the selected values is discussed and if possible also quantified

  12. Compilation of data for the analysis of radionuclide migration from SFL 3-5

    Skagius, K.; Pettersson, Michael; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Albinsson, Yngve; Holgersson, Stellan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry

    1999-12-01

    A preliminary safety assessment of the deep repository for long-lived, low and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5, has been made. This report contains a compilation of data selected for the calculations of the migration of radionuclides and toxic metals from the waste to the biosphere. It also contains the data needed for the next step, which is to calculate dose to man from the far-field release figures. In the preliminary safety assessment it is assumed that SFL 3-5 is located in connection to the deep repository for spent fuel. This makes it possible to utilise site-specific information derived within the safety assessment of the deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, for the sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. When information from SR 97 is utilised, the values selected are as far as possible those proposed as a 'reasonable estimate' for the migration calculations in SR 97. The selection of values for parameters specific for the calculation of migration from the SFL 3-5 repository is in general on the pessimistic side. The uncertainty in the selected values is discussed and if possible also quantified.

  13. Analysis of radionuclide transport through fissured porous media with a perturbation method

    Banat, M [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents a specific procedure for obtaining solutions for the transport of radionuclides in a fissured porous media. The concentration profiles are deduced for a wide range of Peclet numbers using a perturbation method with a multiscale of time. Results show clearly that because of an increase of longitudinal dispersion, the radionuclide moves faster with respect to the case of zero dispersion (i.e. an infinite Peclet number). The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the practical advantage of the present calculation method with respect to the classical numerical and analytical methods used for radionuclide transport. (author).

  14. Numerical analysis of electromagnetic fields

    Zhou Pei Bai

    1993-01-01

    Numerical methods for solving boundary value problems have developed rapidly. Knowledge of these methods is important both for engineers and scientists. There are many books published that deal with various approximate methods such as the finite element method, the boundary element method and so on. However, there is no textbook that includes all of these methods. This book is intended to fill this gap. The book is designed to be suitable for graduate students in engineering science, for senior undergraduate students as well as for scientists and engineers who are interested in electromagnetic fields. Objective Numerical calculation is the combination of mathematical methods and field theory. A great number of mathematical concepts, principles and techniques are discussed and many computational techniques are considered in dealing with practical problems. The purpose of this book is to provide students with a solid background in numerical analysis of the field problems. The book emphasizes the basic theories ...

  15. Automated sensitivity analysis of the radionuclide migration code UCBNE10.2

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) of the US Department of Energy is performing ongoing performance assessment analyses for the eventual licensing of an underground high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. As part of these studies, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis play a major role in the identification of important parameters, and in the identification of specific data needs for site characterization. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has supported the SRP in this effort resulting in the development of an automated procedure for performing large-scale sensitivity analysis using computer calculus. GRESS, Gradient Enhanced Software System, is a pre-compiler that can process FORTRAN computer codes and add derivative taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. The GRESS code is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2 which simulates the migration through an adsorptive medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain. Conclusions are drawn relative to the applicability of GRESS for more general large-scale modeling sensitivity studies, and the role of such techniques in the overall SRP sensitivity/uncertainty program is detailed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. A review of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 3

    Tipping, E.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field is discussed and DOE and Nirex funded work is compared with relevant studies by other workers. Gaps in the DOE and Nirex programmes are identified and suggestions for further research are made. This is Part 3 of a three-part review. Part 1 reviews fundamental theory and DOE and Nirex funded work and Part 2 is a comprehensive bibliography (with abstracts). (Author)

  17. Automated processing of first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography by factor analysis of dynamic structures.

    Cavailloles, F; Bazin, J P; Capderou, A; Valette, H; Herbert, J L; Di Paola, R

    1987-05-01

    A method for automatic processing of cardiac first-pass radionuclide study is presented. This technique, factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) provides an automatic separation of anatomical structures according to their different temporal behaviour, even if they are superimposed. FADS has been applied to 76 studies. A description of factor patterns obtained in various pathological categories is presented. FADS provides easy diagnosis of shunts and tricuspid insufficiency. Quantitative information derived from the factors (cardiac output and mean transit time) were compared to those obtained by the region of interest method. Using FADS, a higher correlation with cardiac catheterization was found for cardiac output calculation. Thus compared to the ROI method, FADS presents obvious advantages: a good separation of overlapping cardiac chambers is obtained; this operator independant method provides more objective and reproducible results. A number of parameters of the cardio-pulmonary function can be assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) [1,2]. Usually, they are calculated using time-activity curves (TAC) from regions of interest (ROI) drawn on the cardiac chambers and the lungs. This method has two main drawbacks: (1) the lack of inter and intra-observers reproducibility; (2) the problem of crosstalk which affects the evaluation of the cardio-pulmonary performance. The crosstalk on planar imaging is due to anatomical superimposition of the cardiac chambers and lungs. The activity measured in any ROI is the sum of the activity in several organs and 'decontamination' of the TAC cannot easily be performed using the ROI method [3]. Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) [4,5] can solve the two problems mentioned above. It provides an automatic separation of anatomical structures according to their different temporal behaviour, even if they are superimposed. The resulting factors are estimates of the time evolution of the activity in each

  18. Comparative analysis of the mobility of uranium and artificial radionuclides in the ecosystem of the Yenisei River

    Bolsunovsky, Alexander; Medvedeva, Marina [Institute of Biophysics SB Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The Yenisei River is one of the largest rivers in the world, which had been subjected to radioactive contamination for over 50 years, due to operation of the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (MCC) of Rosatom at Zheleznogorsk, which had been producing weapons-grade plutonium. Bottom sediments and flood plain of the Yenisei River are contaminated by artificial radionuclides, including transuranium ones, both close to the MCC and at a considerable distance downstream. The MCC is also a source of uranium isotopes in the Yenisei. Thus, the Yenisei River basin is a unique environment for studying the mobility of both uranium isotopes and artificial radionuclides in all components of the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to compare the mobility of uranium and artificial radionuclides in the ecosystem of the Yenisei River. Samples of water, sediments, and aquatic organisms were used as study material. Aquatic organisms were represented by submerged plants, benthic-feeding fish, and zoo-benthos. The submerged plants (macrophytes) analyzed were of five species: Fontinalis antipyretica, Potamogeton lucens, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Elodea canadensis. Grayling (Timalus arcticus) represented benthic-feeding fish, and zoo-benthos species were represented by Philolimnogammarus viridis, which forms the major part of the grayling's diet. Samples were collected at positions in the vicinity of the MCC discharge point, at a distance of 110 km downstream of Krasnoyarsk, and upstream of the MCC, during sampling campaigns in 2008-2012. Radionuclide measurements were performed using a wide range of instrumental methods: gamma-spectrometry with a 'Canberra' spectrometer (U.S.), mass spectrometry with an 'Agilent' spectrometer (U.S.), neutron activation analysis, and beta-alpha radiometry. The results obtained in this study suggest that the part of the Yenisei River ecosystem contaminated due to MCC radioactive discharges contains

  19. Normal left ventricular emptying in coronary artery disease at rest: analysis by radiographic and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    Denenberg, B.S.; Makler, P.T.; Bove, A.A.; Spann, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The volume ejected early in systole has been proposed as an indicator of abnormal left ventricular function that is present at rest in patients with coronary artery disease with a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion. The volume ejected in systole was examined by calculating the percent change in ventricular volume using both computer-assisted analysis of biplane radiographic ventriculograms at 60 frames/s and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculograms. Ventricular emptying was examined with radiographic ventriculography in 33 normal patients and 23 patients with coronary artery disease and normal ejection fraction. Eight normal subjects and six patients with coronary artery disease had both radiographic ventriculography and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. In all patients, there was excellent correlation between the radiographic and radionuclide ventricular emptying curves (r . 0.971). There were no difference in the ventricular emptying curves of normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease whether volumes were measured by radiographic or equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. It is concluded that the resting ventricular emptying curves are identical in normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease who have a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion

  20. An analysis of nature and mechanisms of the Lira objects territories' radionuclide contamination

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K; Tuleushev, A.Zh.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Solodukhin, V.P.; Kazachevskij, I.V.; Reznikov, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of study of radioactive contamination of 'Lira' objects territories are presented. Obtained data are evidencing, that existing radiation situation does not presents a threat for operating personnel of both the occupied on the deposit and its objects furthermore for inhabitants of the closest localities. Therewith a radionuclides concentration in the soils on the examined areas is slightly exceeds the background values characteristic for this region. Two hypothesises for reveled radionuclide contamination have been considered: yield on the surface and distribution by territory immediately after explosion 137 Xe and 90 Kr inert gases - they are genetical predecessors of 137 Cs and 90 Sr, relatively; existence of a constant effluence of these radionuclides on a surface from a 'ditch cavities' of the 'Lira' objects by the zones of dis-consolidation and crack propagations in the earth crust. With purpose for these hypothesis correctness clarification the distribution of radionuclides by soil layer depth in the vicinities of militant wells (TK-2 and TK-5), as well as in the case and riverbed of the Berezovka river. There are not data confirm the hypothesis about possible constant radionuclides influent from a 'ditch cavities'. So, the hypothesis of the 'Lira' objects territories radionuclide contamination due to inert gases yield on the surface is a more rightful

  1. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  2. Laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration Project: Progress report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    Thompson, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    In this report we describe the work done at Los Alamos in support of the Radionuclide Migration project during fiscal year 1986. We have continued to monitor the transport of tritium and 85 Kr from the Cambric explosion zone to the satellite well, which is pumped at 600 gal/min. Corresponding movement of cationic radionuclides such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr has not yet been observed after 12 yr of pumping, nor have we seen evidence that these strongly sorbing ions move in conjunction with colloids. We have analyzed more data from the Cheshire study site but have not resolved the uncertainties regarding the distribution and movement of radioactive materials at this location. Our attempts to improve our analytical capability for 36 Cl and 99 Tc have resulted in some progress. Similarly, we have increased our understanding of radionuclide transport phenomena such as channeling in fracture flow and anion exclusion in zeolites and clays. A sample exchange with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has helped us identify critical steps in our procedures for collecting and analyzing large-volume water samples. We have surveyed potential sites on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site for future radionuclide migration studies and conclude that there are none other than Cheshire presently available, and none are likely to be created in the near future. The Laboratory has engaged recently in radionuclide migration studies sponsored by our weapons program; we reviewed this work in an appendix to the annual report

  3. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Final report

    Roth, P.; Aubineau-Laniece, I.; Bailly-Despiney, I.

    2000-01-01

    The final report 'Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Incorporated Radionuclides' presented here is one part of the 5 individual reports. The work to be carried out within this project is structured into four Work Packages: Workpackage 1 concentrates on ingested radionuclides, considering doses to the GI tract and radionuclide absorption. A major objective is the development of a new dosimetric model of the GI tract, taking account of most recent data on gut transit and dose to sensitive cells. Workpackage 2 seeks to improve and extend biokinetic and dosimetric models for systemic radionuclides. Existing models for adults and children will be extended to other elements and new models will be developed for the embryo and fetus. Workpackage 3 is to improve assessment of localised distribution of dose within tissues at the cellular level for specific examples of Auger emitters and alpha emitting isotopes, in relation to observed effects. The work will include experimental studies of dose/effect relationship and the development of localisation methods. Workpackage 4 concerns the development of computer codes for the new dosimetric models, quality assurance of the models and the calculation of dose coefficients. Formal sensitivity analysis will be used to identify critical areas of model development and to investigate the effects of variability and incertainty in biokinetic parameters. (orig.)

  4. Radionuclide cisternography

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  5. Modelling of near-field radionuclide transport phenomena in a KBS-3V type of repository for nuclear waste with Goldsim Code - and verification against previous methods

    Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Nordman, H.

    2010-03-01

    Traditional radionuclide transport models overestimate significantly some phenomena, or completely ignore them. This motivates the development of new more precise models. As a result, this work is a description of commissioning of a new KBS-3V near-field radionuclide transport model, which has been done with a commercial software called GoldSim. According to earlier models, GoldSim model uses rz coordinates, but the solubilities of radionuclides have been treated more precisely. To begin with, the physical phenomena concerning near-field transport have been introduced according to GoldSim way of thinking. Also, the computational methods of GoldSim have been introduced and compared to methods used earlier. The actual verification of GoldSim model has been carried out by comparing the GoldSim results from simple cases to the corresponding results obtained with REPCOM, a software developed by VTT and used in several safety assessments. The results agree well. Finally, a few complicated cases were studied. In these cases, the REPCOM's limitations in handling of some phenomena become evident. The differences in the results are caused especially by the extension of the solubility limit to the whole computational domain, and the element-wise treatment of the solubilities which was used instead of nuclide-wise treatment. This work has been carried out as a special assignment to the former laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems in Helsinki University of Technology. The work was done at VTT. (orig.)

  6. Radionuclide migration in groundwater at a low-level waste disposal site: a comparison of predictive performance modeling versus field observations

    Robertson, D.E.; Myers, D.A.; Bergeron, M.P.; Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.; Young, J.L.

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes a project which is structured to test the concept of modeling a shallow land low-level waste burial site. The project involves a comparison of the actual observed radionuclide migration in groundwaters at a 30-year-old well-monitored field site with the results of predictive transport modeling. The comparison is being conducted as a cooperative program with the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) at the low-level waste management area at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada. A joint PNL-AECL field inviestigation was conducted in 1983 and 1984 to complement the existing extensive data base on actual radionuclide migration. Predictive transport modeling is currently being conducted for this site; first, as if it were a new location being considered for a low-level waste shallow-land burial site and only minimal information about the site were available, and second, utilizing the extensive data base available for the site. The modeling results will then be compared with the empirical observations to provide insight into the level of effort needed to reasonably predict the spacial and temporal movement of radionuclides in the groundwater enviroment. 8 refs., 5 figs.,

  7. Radionuclide migration in groundwater at a low-level waste disposal site: a comparison of predictive performance modeling versus field observations

    Robertson, D.E.; Myers, D.A.; Abel, K.H.; Bergeron, M.P.; Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.; Young, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a project which is structured to test the concept of modeling a shallow land low-level waste burial site. The project involves a comparison of the actual observed radionuclide migration in groundwaters at a 30-year old well-monitored field site with the results of predictive transport modeling. The comparison is being conducted as a cooperative program with the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) at the low-level waste management area at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada. A joint PNL-AECL field investigation was conducted in 1983 and 1984 to compliment the existing extensive data base on actual radionuclide migration. Predictive transport modeling is currently being conducted for this site; first, as if it were a new location being considered for a low-level waste shallow-land burial site and only minimal information about the site were available, and second, utilizing the extensive data base available for the site. The modeling results will then be compared with the level of effort needed to reasonably predict the spacial and temporal movement of radionuclides in the groundwater environment

  8. Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with biventricular device

    Muxi, Africa; Setoain, Francisco J.; Pons, Francisca; Paredes, Pilar; Duch, Joan; Fuertes, Silvia; Ortin, Jaime; Mont, Lluis; Diaz-Infante, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA). Fifty patients were studied. An ERNA was made 72 h and 6 months after the implant. Two acquisitions were performed: with the CRT device connected and after disconnecting it. In the follow-up, responders were defined as those who had improved in accordance with various clinical variables. Quantitative changes in LVEF and visual changes in synchronisation (phase analysis) were studied comparing the two studies and also comparing the connected and disconnected modes. At 6 months, 30 patients were defined as responders. LVEF increased significantly at 6 months compared with the 72-h study only in responders. At 72 h, the number of patients showing a decrease in LVEF (p < 0.05) or a synchronisation worsening after disconnecting the device was higher in responders than in nonresponders. At 6 months, 57% of responders had no synchronisation changes between the connected and disconnected modes, suggesting a resynchronisation process. ERNA permits the study of resynchronisation patients, showing a statistical LVEF improvement at 6 months. Moreover, visual phase analysis permits the study of the mechanism involved in the response, with an important number of responders with no changes between the two modes at 6 months. In the 72-h study, after disconnection of the device, LVEF and resynchronisation worsening can predict patient improvement at 6 months. (orig.)

  9. Elemental Analysis and Radionuclides Monitoring of Beach Black Sand at North of Nile Delta, Egypt

    Ali, Abdallah; Fayez-Hassan, M.; Mansour, N. A.; Mubarak, Fawzia; Ahmed, Talaat Salah; Hassanin, W. F.

    2017-12-01

    A study was carried out on the concentrations of elements presented in beach black sand samples collected from North of Nile Delta along Mediterranean Coast using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as an effective analysis technique, especially for monitoring elements. The Egyptian Research Reactor-2 (ETRR-2) as a facility was used for the samples irradiation in the thermal mode of a neutron flux 3 × 1011 n/cm2 s. Natural radioactive elements, rare element and heavy elements as U, Th, La, Lu, Sm, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, Sc, Tb, Yb, As, Br, Na, Sb, Ba, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Hf, Sr, Ta, Zn and Zr were determined with concentrations average values 16.3, 78.8, 195.4, 3.3, 31.3, 445.1, 223, 7.2, 8.5, 97.1, 3.6, 31.1, 6.1, 24.5, 27,236.8, 1.42, 1327.7, 81.1, 1814.3, 263,735, 0.1, 237.3, 878.7, 20.8, 671.1 and 6225.9 (mg/kg), respectively. The experimental data results were analyzed to evidence any correlations of these elements as well as to know the geological formation in the study area. The elements concentrations in the black sand samples were found higher than the world average crustal soil values except for As and Sb. Results were compared with similar beach black sand in previous studies. The enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index (I geo) for heavy elements were presented to evaluate the contamination rate. We can summarize that exposure for natural radionuclides (U and Th) in this area were still within the acceptable limits due to little time of exposure. Therefore, the black sands from North of Nile Delta are not recommended for use in building constructions due to high radioactive doses.

  10. Radionuclide analysis in the soil of Kumaun Himalaya, India, using gamma ray spectrometry

    Ramola, R.C.; Prasad, Ganesh; Gusain, G.S.; Choubey, V.M.; Tosheva, Z.; Kies, A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental release of low levels of radioactivity can occur as a consequence of normal radionuclides present in the earth's crust. We present here the results of a survey undertaken in 2003 on the radionuclide concentration in different rock formations in the eastern part of Kumaun Himalaya. The activity concentration and gamma-absorbed dose rates of the terrestrial radionuclides caused by 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were determined in the soil samples collected from the eastern part of Kumaun Himalaya. The mean concentration of 238 U and 232 Th in the earth's crust varied from 0.5 to 5 ppm (6 to 60 Bq/kg) and 2 to 20 ppm (8 to 80 Bq/kg) respectively. The reported activity concentration for the different rock formations varied from 32.6 to 1305.5 Bq/kg for 238 U, 16.3 to 136.3 Bq/kg for 232 Th and 124.6 to 1758.0 Bq/kg for 40 K. The distribution of the radionuclides varied with rock type due to different chemical properties of the measured radionuclides and the rocks. The result shows that high activity levels were found in Saryu Formation consisting of augen-gneiss, granite interbedded with schists and flaggy quartzite. The total air-absorbed dose rate in air above 1 m height was calculated from the three radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K), which varied from 39.1 to 226.8 nGy h -1 . The internal and external health-hazard indices were calculated based on the concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Strong positive correlations were observed between 235 U and 226 Ra, 232 Th and 226 Ra, 40 K and 232 Th as well as 40 K and 226 Ra. However, no significant correlation was observed between 238 U and 226 Ra because of radioactive disequilibrium between them. (author)

  11. In situ gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of radionuclide distributions at a commercial shallow land burial site

    Kirby, L.J.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis conducted at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky (USA) shallow land burial site confirmed that the waste radionuclides have been retained largely within the restricted area of the burial site. Concentrations of 137 Cs and 60 Co were comparable with those originating from global fallout and lower than concentrations measured in several other areas having similar rainfall. In-situ spectrometric analyses, corroborated by soil sample and vegetation analyses, indicate that the site has influenced 60 Co levels slightly in the west drainage channel, but 137 Cs did not originate from the site. Concentrations of 60 Co, 90 Sr and 137 Cs determined in subsurface soils by well logging techniques confirmed that subsurface migration of waste-derived radionuclides to points outside the restricted area has not been a significant source of contamination of the environs adjacent to the site. 8 references, 8 figures

  12. Impurity radionuclide analysis for the radiopharmaceutical Na[123I] using gamma spectrometry

    Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Silva, Ronaldo Lins da; Poledna, Roberto; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Andrade, Erica de Araujo Lima de; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de; Laranjeiras, Adilson Silva; Braghirolli, Ana Maria Silveira

    2014-01-01

    During the process of manufacturing a radiopharmaceutical radionuclide impurities nature can be generated. With the need to meet the standards of ANVISA recommends that applications of doses as low as feasible in patients, the concern comes with a 'boost' that can come from these radionuclidic impurities generated in the production process and or manipulation. For Na[¹²³I] provided by IEN is important to quantify its major impurity, ¹²¹Te as well as gaining a better understanding of the parameters related to the decay scheme, since the data in the literature show discrepancies. (author)

  13. Radionuclide carrier

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  14. Analysis of the behavior of radionuclides migration in fractured medium in different types of rocks matrices

    Sá, Ludimila Silva Salles de; Silveira, Cláudia Siqueira da; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de

    2017-01-01

    In management of radioactive wastes, the current trend is to dispose the radioactive waste for long life and high activity in permanent repositories of depth, geologically stable and low permeability. Thus, it is relevant to analyze the groundwater movement process, because the mechanism by which the radionuclides in a repository with fractures could return to the surface would be through the groundwater circulation system. A common problem encountered is the modeling of the migration of radionuclides in a fractured medium. The objective of this work is to evaluate the behavior of the migration of radionuclides in two types of rock matrix, considering the following properties: volumetric density, porosity, distribution coefficient and molecular diffusion coefficient. The physical system adopted consists of the matrix rock containing a discrete fracture in a porous medium saturated with water. The partial differential equations that describe the radionuclide movement were discretized by finite differences, and the Implicit Euler method was adopted. While for the convective term the numerical scheme of progressive differences was used

  15. Determination of Fe and Zn in healing plants by radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Harangozo, M.; Toelgyessy, J.; Tomecek, O.; Ruzicka, I.; Cejpek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence method was used for the determination of Fe and Zn in healing plants (Sage, Peppermint, Stinging, Common Agrimony, Milfoil, Ribwort, Tansy, White Dead-Nettle). 238 Pu exciting source and Si/Li semiconductor detector were used for the determination. (author)

  16. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, Technical Area 54, 1996 (with cumulative summary for 1994--1996)

    Biggs, J.R.; Bennett, K.D.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-07-01

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites at Area G, Technical Area (TA) 54 and a control site within the proposed Area G expansion area in 1996 to (1) identify radionuclides that are present within rodent tissues at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of approximately five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, total U, 137 Cs, and 3 H. Higher levels of total U, 241 Am, 238 Pu, and 239 Pu were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Due to low sample sizes in total number of animals captured, statistical analysis to compare site to site could not be conducted. However, mean concentrations of total U, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 137 Cs in rodent carcasses were higher at Site 1 than site 2 or the Control Site and 241 Am was higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or the Control Site

  17. Preconcentration of traces of radionuclides and elements with foamed polyurethane sorbents in the analysis of environmental samples

    Palagyi, S.; Braun, T.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of preconcentration and the permanent need of efficient preconcentrating agents in environmental analysis are pointed out. Foamed polyurethane sorbents draw attention as novel agents in separation chemistry. A survey is presented of recent applications of unloaded and reagent-loaded open-cell type resilient polyurethane foams in the separation and preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, and of the latest uses of these foams in the preconcentration and detection of traces of some, mainly inorganic materials in environmental samples, using radioanalytical techniques. Possible future uses of polyurethane foams in trace element detection in environmental analysis are outlined. (author)

  18. A review of sorption of radionuclides under the near- and far-field conditions of an underground radioactive waste repository. Pt. 2

    Berry, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report, a bibliography, has been prepared, presenting work carried out world-wide since 1970 on the sorption of radionuclides under near- and far-field conditions. Work has been included where the results are relevant to the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in a cementitious repository in the UK. The bibliography has been prepared using the INIS database and includes eight hundred references, listed both by subject and by country. In addition to these indexes, full abstracts are presented in reverse chronological order. A brief description of the relevance and measurement of sorption parameters is included. (author)

  19. Radionuclide data

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  20. Overview of CEA research in the field of radionuclides migration; Syntheses des recherches menees par le CEA sur la migration des radionucleides

    Poinssot, Ch; Trotignon, L; Tevissen, E

    2006-07-01

    This report presents a synthetic status of the researches conducted within the Nuclear Energy Division (CEA/DEN) in the field of radionuclides migration in three specific areas which have been chosen for their representativeness and potential impact: the migration of RN in PWR reactors, the migration of RN from a deep geological repository and the migration processes in the surface environments. In addition, some status is given about more generic research which is conducted in the field of RN speciation in the aqueous phase and at the interfaces and regarding chemistry / transport couplings. Additional information about the human and technical means involved in these fields of research in CEA/DEN is finally given in the Appendix. (authors)

  1. Analysis of the Research Status and Topics on the Radionuclide Migration and Retardation in Natural Barriers

    Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Kim, Seung Soo; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang

    2008-12-01

    In this report, recent research status for major developed countries in the high-level radioactive waste disposal including international organizations was investigated and analyzed in research topics for the radionuclide migration and retardation in natural barriers. Besides, recent research trends and future prospects were investigated for selected major 10 topics about the radionuclide migration and retardation processes. Based upon these investigations and analyses, future research goals and topics to be concentrated were presented. This report will be helpful for understanding our current research status and technical position and establishing future research direction and topics by analyzing domestic and foreign research status and trends. The results will also be utilized as basic information for establishing future policy and plans of the government for the high-level radioactive waste disposal

  2. Analysis of NSPP experiment with ART code for analyzing transport behavior of Aerosol and radionuclides

    Ishigami, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The ART code calculates transport behavior of aerosols and radionuclides during core meltdown accidents in the light water reactors. Since aerosols play an important role in carrying fission products from the core region to the environment, the ART code includes detailed models of aerosol behavior. Aerosols including several radionuclides are classified into many groups according to the aerosol mass. The models of aerosol behavior include agglomeration processes caused by Brownian motion, aerosol settling velocity difference and turbulent flow, and natural deposition processes due to diffusion, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, gravitational settling and forced convection. In order to examine validity of the ART models, the NSPP aerosol experiment was analyzed. The ART calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was ascertained that aerosol growth due to agglomeration, gravitational settling, thermophoresis in an air atmosphere, and diffusiophoresis in an air-steam atmosphere were important physical phenomena in the aerosol behavior. (author)

  3. Analysis of radionuclides in airborne effluents from coal-fired power plants

    Rosner, G.; Chatterjee, B.; Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the level of radioactivity emitted by coal-fired power plants in detail, specific activities of several radionuclides have been measured in samples from a coal-fired and a brown coal-fired plant in the Federal Republic of Germany. Samples measured included coal, brown coal, bottom ash, collected fly ash from the various electrostatic precipitator stages and sieve fractions of collected fly ash as well as samples of escaping fly ash taken from the exhaust stream, all taken simultaneously on three operating days. Nuclides measured were U-238, U-234, Th-232, Th-230, Th-228, Ra-226, Pb-210, Po-210 and K-40. Methods applied included (i) direct gamma spectrometry, (ii) radiochemical separation with subsequent alpha spectrometry and (iii) direct alpha spectrometry. Methods are described and discussed. Finally, annual emission rates of airborne radionuclides are calculated for both plants.

  4. Analysis of radionuclides in airborne effluents from coal-fired power plants

    Rosner, G.; Chatterjee, B.; Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the level of radioactivity emitted by coal-fired power plants in detail, specific activities of several radionuclides have been measured in samples from a coal-fired and a brown coal-fired plant in the Federal Republic of Germany. Samples measured included coal, brown coal, bottom ash, collected fly ash from the various electrostatic precipitator stages and sieve fractions of collected fly ash as well as samples of escaping fly ash taken from the exhaust stream, all taken simultaneously on three operating days. Nuclides measured were U-238, U-234, Th-232, Th-230, Th-228, Ra-226, Pb-210, Po-210 and K-40. Methods applied included (i) direct gamma spectrometry, (ii) radiochemical separation with subsequent alpha spectrometry and (iii) direct alpha spectrometry. Methods are described and discussed. Finally, annual emission rates of airborne radionuclides are calculated for both plants. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of the Research Status and Topics on the Radionuclide Migration and Retardation in Natural Barriers

    Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Kim, Seung Soo; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    In this report, recent research status for major developed countries in the high-level radioactive waste disposal including international organizations was investigated and analyzed in research topics for the radionuclide migration and retardation in natural barriers. Besides, recent research trends and future prospects were investigated for selected major 10 topics about the radionuclide migration and retardation processes. Based upon these investigations and analyses, future research goals and topics to be concentrated were presented. This report will be helpful for understanding our current research status and technical position and establishing future research direction and topics by analyzing domestic and foreign research status and trends. The results will also be utilized as basic information for establishing future policy and plans of the government for the high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  6. Performance of the Brazilian laboratories on radionuclide analysis in environmental samples

    Vianna, Maria Elizabeth; Tauhata, Luiz; Oliveira, Josue P.; Oliveira, Antonio E.; Clain, Almir F.; Garcia, Luiz Carlos; Conceicao, Cirilo C. da

    1995-01-01

    The performance of fifteen Brazilian environmental radioanalytical laboratories was evaluated after their participation in nine intercomparison runs of the National Intercomparison Program, PNI, offered by the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, CNEN. A total of 549 radionuclide determinations in environmental samples were evaluated. The results classified as Good ranged from 56.4% for Alpha and Beta Gross determinations up to 84.9% for Gamma spectrometry determinations. These results shows that the best performance in radionuclide determination is reached in gamma spectrometry analyses and the worst in Alpha and Beta Gross determinations. This general behavior is similar to the one reached by other laboratories in international intercomparison programs. (author). 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. New developments in radiometrics and mass spectrometry methods for radionuclide analysis of environmental samples

    Povinec, P.P.; LaRosa, J.J.; Lee, S.H.; Wyse, E.

    2002-01-01

    The radionuclide levels observed at present in the environment are very low, therefore high sensitive analytical systems are required for carrying out environmental investigations. One very important recent development in analytical techniques for low-level activity measurements is the production of large volume HPGe detectors (up to 200% relative efficiency to 75 mm diameter x 75 mm long NaI (Tl) crystals). Their high efficiency and excellent energy resolution permit the analyses of various gamma-emitters in composite samples selectively and very often non-destructively (e.g. in sea sediments). However, this technique is restricted to gamma-emitters only (e.g. for 7 Be, 40 K, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 210 Pb, etc.). Other radionuclides frequently found in the marine environment are the pure beta-emitters, like 3 H, 14 C, 32 Si, 32 P, 90 Sr, 241 Pu, etc., where mainly liquid scintillation counting has made great improvements in recent years. However, for some of these radionuclides mass spectrometry methods represent a real breakthrough in low-level counting, e.g. 3 He in-growth mass spectrometry for 3 H, or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 14 C

  8. Radionuclide data analysis in connection of DPRK event in May 2009

    Nikkinen, Mika; Becker, Andreas; Zähringer, Matthias; Polphong, Pornsri; Pires, Carla; Assef, Thierry; Han, Dongmei

    2010-05-01

    The seismic event detected in DPRK on 25.5.2009 was triggering a series of actions within CTBTO/PTS to ensure its preparedness to detect any radionuclide emissions possibly linked with the event. Despite meticulous work to detect and verify, traces linked to the DPRK event were not found. After three weeks of high alert the PTS resumed back to normal operational routine. This case illuminates the importance of objectivity and procedural approach in the data evaluation. All the data coming from particulate and noble gas stations were evaluated daily, some of the samples even outside of office hours and during the weekends. Standard procedures were used to determine the network detection thresholds of the key (CTBT relevant) radionuclides achieved across the DPRK event area and for the assessment of radionuclides typically occurring at IMS stations (background history). Noble gas system has sometimes detections that are typical for the sites due to legitimate non-nuclear test related activities. Therefore, set of hypothesis were used to see if the detection is consistent with event time and location through atmospheric transport modelling. Also the consistency of event timing and isotopic ratios was used in the evaluation work. As a result it was concluded that if even 1/1000 of noble gasses from a nuclear detonation would had leaked, the IMS system would not had problems to detect it. This case also showed the importance of on-site inspections to verify the nuclear traces of possible tests.

  9. Decomposition for the analysis of radionuclides in solidified cement radioactive waste

    Lee, Jeong Jin; Pyo, Hyung Yeal; Jee, Kwang Yung; Jeon, Jong Seon

    2004-01-01

    Spent ion exchange resins make solid radioactive wastes when mixed with cement as solidifying material that was widely used in securing human environment from radionuclides for at least hundreds years. The cumulative increase of low and medium level radioactive wastes results in capacity problem of temporary storage in some NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants) of Korea around 2008. Radioactive wastes are scheduled to be disposed in a permanent disposal facility in accordance with the Korean Radioactive Wastes Management Program. It is mandatory to identify kinds and concentration of radionuclides immobilized for transporting them from temporary storage in NPPs to disposal facility. Accordingly, the effective sample decomposition prior to radiochemical separation is prerequisite to obtain the analytical data about radionuclides in cement waste forms. The closed-vessel microwave digestion technology among several sample preparation methods is taken into account to decompose cement waste forms. In this study, SRM 1880a (Portland cement) which is known for its certified values was used to optimize decomposition condition of cement waste forms containing nonradioactive ion exchange resins from NPP. With such variables as reagents, time, and power, the variation of the transparency and the color of the solution after closed-vessel microwave digestion can be examine. SRM 1880a is decomposed by suggested digestion procedure and the recoveries of constituents were investigated by ICP-AES and AAS

  10. Radionuclide generators

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  11. The value of radionuclide phase analysis and parameters of cardial function for diagnosis CAD at rest and during exercise

    Huang Gang

    1990-01-01

    27 patients and 5 normal were studied with ECG-gated cardial blood pool images and radionuclide phase analysis at rest and during exercise. The results showed that the sensitivity of LVEF in CAD at rest and during exercise were 57% and 71% respectively, and the sensitivity of the ventricular phase in CAD were 79% at rest and 90% during exercise, and the sensitivity of phase angle in CAD were higher than of LVEF. This suggested that the ventricular phase angle was important for diagnosing early CAD. In addition, regional EF, phase image and ventricular wall motion were useful to detect the lesion of ischemia in CAD

  12. Radionuclide detection and differential diagnosis of left-to-right cardiac shunts by analysis of time-activity curves

    Kim, Ok-Hwa

    1986-01-01

    The noninvasive nature of the radionuclide angiocardiography provided a useful approach for the evaluation of left-to-right cardiac shunts (LRCS). While the qualitative information can be obtained by inspection of serial radionuclide angiocardiograms, the quantitative information of radionuclide angiocardiography can be obtained by the analysis of time-activity curves using advanced computer system. The count ratios method and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (QP/QS) by gamma variate fit method were used to evaluate the accuracy of detection and localization of LRCS. One hundred and ten time-activity curves were analyzed. There were 46 LRCS (atrial septal defects 11, ventricular septal defects 22, patent ductus arteriosus 13) and 64 normal subjects. By computer analysis of time-activity histograms of the right atrium, ventricle and the lungs separately, the count ratios modified by adding the mean cardiac transit time were calculated in each anatomic site. In normal subjects the mean count ratios in the right atrium, ventricle and lungs were 0.24 on average. In atrial septal defects, the count ratios were high in the right atrium, ventricle and lungs, whereas in ventricular septal defects the count ratios were higher only in the right ventricle and lungs. Patent ductus arteriosus showed normal count ratios in the heart but high count ratios were obtained in the lungs. Thus, this count ratios method could be separated normal from those with intracardiac or extracardiac shunts, and moreover, with this method the localization of the shunts level was possible in LRCS. Another method that could differentiate the intracardiac shunts from extracardiac shunts was measuring QP/QS in the left and right lungs. In patent ductus arteriosus, the left lung QP/QS was hight than those of the right lung, whereas in atrial septal defects and ventricular septal defects QP/QS ratios were equal in both lungs. (J.P.N.)

  13. Radionuclide co-precipitation

    Bruno, J.; Sandino, A.

    1987-12-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the minor components of the spent fuel matrix has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two different situations have been studied: Part I, the near field scenario, where the release and migration of the minor components is dependent on the solubility behaviour of UO 2 (s); Part II, the far field, where the solubility and transport of the radionuclides is related to the major geochemical processes occurring. (orig.)

  14. Radionuclide generators

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  15. Radionuclide scanning

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  16. A review of sorption of radionuclides under the near- and far-field conditions of an underground radioactive waste repository. Pt. 1

    Berry, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents and discusses work funded by the Department of the Environment and UK Nirex Ltd in the area of sorption of radionuclides under near-field and far-field conditions as related to the underground disposal of radioactive waste in the UK. It is intended as a basis for comparison with work undertaken world-wide in the sorption area, presented in Part II of this review. The UK and overseas work are compared in Part III. From lists of reports and papers supplied by DOE (HMIP) and Nirex, those publications believed to be relevant were selected and are listed here by subject. Summaries of all these reports are included in the form of abstracts, or where available, executive summaries. The work presented is further summarised and discussed. Sections on sorption and laboratory experimental methods are included, along with a section on the level of understanding and outstanding issues. (Author)

  17. Analysis of end-systolic pressure-volume relation by gated radionuclide angiocardiography

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Horoki; Katsume, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Hamao; Miyanaga, Hajime

    1982-01-01

    Left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relation has been proved experimentally to b e an useful index of left ventricular contractility relatively independent of preload or afterload. But less clinical application has been reported because of its invasive nature, and we evaluated this relationship non-invasively using gated radionuclide angiocardiography as volume determination and cuff sphyngomanometer in the arm as pressure measurement. Gated equilibrium blood pool scintigrams were obtained at rest and during intravenous infusion of angiotensin or nitrate. Ventricular volumes were derived from ventricular activity and peripheral blood volume and activity. The peak systolic pressure (PSP) by cuff method to end-systolic volume index (ESVI) relations showed good linearity (r gt .930 in 84% of consecutive 50 cases) and were gentler in the groups with more impaired left ventricular function. Emax was related exponentially to ejection fraction (EF) and hyperbolically to end-diastolic volume index. The dead volume (VoI) was unfixed and fell into positive or negative value, and was not related to EF under control condition. PSP/ESVI in each loading condition was less variable with the alteration of blood pressure than EF. The linear relation was found between PSP/ESVI under control condition and Emax (PSP/ESVI = 0.651.Emax + 0.958, r = 0.841, p lt .001). Thus in measuring ventricular volume, gated radionuclide angiocardiography is a non-invasive method less affected by the geometry of the left ventricle. Non-invasive determination of end-systolic pressure-volume relation using the volume by radionuclide and the blood pressure by cuff method is clinically useful in the assessment of left ventricular contractility. (author)

  18. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of rodents at a waste burial site, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Biggs, J.R.; Bennett, K.D.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Sites 1 and 2) at Area G, TA-54, and a control site outside Area G (Site 3) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for americium ( 241 Am), strontium ( 90 Sr), plutonium ( 238 Pu and 239 Pu), total uranium (U), and examined by gamma spectroscopy (including cesium [ 137 Cs]). Significantly higher (parametric t-test at p = 0.05) levels of total U, 241 Am, 238 Pu, and potassium ( 40 K) were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. The results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, P = 0.0095) total U concentrations in carcasses than Sites 2 and 3. Site 2 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, P = 0.0195) 239 Pu concentrations in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 3

  19. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, TA-54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

    1997-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Site 1-recently disturbed and Site 2-partially disturbed) at Area G, Technical Area 54 and a control site on Frijoles Mesa (Site 4) in 1995. Our objectives were (1) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify if the primary mode of contamination to small mammals is by surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least rive animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr , 238 Pu, 239 Pu, total U, 137 Cs, and 3 H. Significantly higher (parametric West at p=0.05) levels of total U, 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 Pu were detected in pelts than in carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Our results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses, which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0125) mean tritium concentration in carcasses than Site 2 or Site 4. In addition Site 1 also had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, p=0.0024) mean tritium concentration in pelts than Site 2 or Site 4. Site 2 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0499) mean 239 Pu concentration in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 4

  20. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, TA-54, 1994

    Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Fresquez, P.

    1995-09-01

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (1 and 2) at Area G, TA-54 and a control site outside Area G (Site 3) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241 Am, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, total U, and gamma spectroscopy (including 137 Cs). Significantly higher (parametric t-test at p = 0.05) levels of total U, 241 Am, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 40 K were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. The authors results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, F = 0.0095) total U concentrations in carcasses than Sites 2 and 3. Site 2 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, F = 0.0195) 239 Pu concentrations in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 3. A significant difference in 90 Sr concentration existed between Sites 1 and 2 (alpha = 0.05, F = 0.0681) and concentrations of 40 K at Site 1 were significantly different from Site 3

  1. The European programme boris (bioavailability of radionuclides in soils): a global analysis of results

    Tamponnet, C.; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonzr, M.A.; Parekh, N.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras, T.; Casadesus, J.; Plassard, C.; Staunton, S.; Norden, M.; Avila, R.; Shaw, G.; Wells, C.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radioactive nuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radioactive nuclides interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalization into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases about contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from an incomplete knowledge about radioactive nuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In this project, we investigated mainly the role of the biological elements (plants, mycorrhizas, microbes) in: radioactive nuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radioactive nuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of the chemical nature of the involved radioactive nuclides, we followed the bioavailability of three radioactive nuclides: caesium, strontium, and technetium. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised. Role of microorganisms (K d for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants), have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST (a soil Column Heuristic Model of radionuclide Fixation and Solution Transport) and BIORUR specifically modelling radioactive nuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radioactive nuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance its prediction

  2. Radioactivity: radionuclides in foods

    Simpson, R.E.; Baratta, E.J.; Jelinek, C.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are summarized of the analysis for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, ruthenium-106, and potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, in samples of total diet and selected import commodities in the foods compliance program of the Food and Drug Administration. On the basis of the radionuclide intake guidelines established by the Federal Radiation Council (FRC), the low content of radionuclides found in the total diet samples for fiscal years 1973 and 1974 demonstrates the need for surveillance only at the present level. The low levels of radionuclides found in a limited number of edible imported commodities indicate that their contribution to the total diet would not increase the levels of these radionuclides above those recommended for only periodic surveillance by the FRC. The potassium levels, determined from potassium-40 activity, found in meats and fish agree with the value for normal muscle tissue for the reference man reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. Of the other commodities, nuts contained the highest levels, while sugar, beverages, and processed foods contained the lowest levels of potassium. Although cesium and potassium are chemical analogs with similar metabolic properties, because of their variable content in some leafy samples as a result of surface contamination, a correlation between cesium-137 levels and the cesium-137-to-potassium ratio was inconclusive

  3. Development of an open source software of quantitative analysis for radionuclide determination by gamma-ray spectrometry using semiconductor detectors

    Maduar, Marcelo Francis

    2010-01-01

    Radioactivity quantification of gamma-ray emitter radionuclides in samples measured by HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry relies on the analysis of the photopeaks present in the spectra, especially on the accurate determination of their net areas. Such a task is usually performed with the aid of proprietary software tools. This work presents a methodology, algorithm descriptions and an open source application, called OpenGamma, for the peak search and analysis in order to obtain the relevant peaks parameters and radionuclides activities. The computational implementation is released entirely in open-source license for the main code and with the use of open software packages for interface design and mathematical libraries. The procedure for the peak search is performed on a three step approach. Firstly a preliminary search is done by using the second-difference method, consisting in the generation of a derived spectrum in order to find candidate peaks. In the second step, the experimental peaks widths are assessed and well formed and isolated ones are chosen to obtain a FWHM vs. channel relationship, by application of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method for non-linear fitting. Lastly, regions of the spectrum with grouped peaks are marked and a non-linear fit is again applied to each region to obtain baseline and photopeaks terms; from these terms, peaks net areas are then assessed. (author)

  4. Study of radionuclide and element characterization of Angola marine sediment using low background gamma spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques

    Teixeira, M.C.P.; Vuong Huu Tan; Truong Y; Ho Manh Dung; Le Nhu Sieu; Cao Dong Vu; Nguyen Thanh Binh

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of radionuclides and chemical elements in Angola marine sediment samples were determined by using low background gamma (LBG) spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The combination of radionuclide and elemental concentration values yielded synergy in the validation of analytical data and identification of sediment sources modeled by multivariate factor analysis. Varimax rotation factor analysis based on the elemental concentrations revealed five sources contributed to the sediment composition, i.e. crustal, sea-salt, industrial, coal-related and Se-related sources. (author)

  5. Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13

    Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2007-01-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

  6. User Guide ECOREA-RICE (version 1.0). Program for assessing the transfer of radionuclides released accidentally onto flooded rice-fields

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Hei Hu; Kang, Hee Seok; Lee, Chang Woo

    2004-05-01

    The computer code ECOREA-RICE is a dynamic compartment model that is specially designed for estimating the transfer of radionuclides deposited onto flooded rice-fields after an accidental release. The model consists of six independent compartments including rice-body, grain, surface water, root-zone soil, fixed soil and deep soil, and takes into account the transfer processes including radioactive decay, percolation, leaching, shoot-base absorption, root-uptake, weathering, translocation, fixation in soil by adsorption and desorption, and soil-mixing by plowing. The rate of the change of radioactivity in compartments is expressed by a set of the first order ordinary differential equations, which are solved by the fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Input to the program includes the deposition date, transplanting date, ear emergence date, harvest date, soil data, the biomass data of rice-plant, and rate constants associated with transfer processes. Output includes the list of input data, the activity of radionuclides in compartment, the rate constant, and the transfer factor of rice-body and grain with time

  7. Analysis of hepatoportal hemodynamics by hepatic radionuclide angiography on patients with portal hypertension

    Mitarai, Y; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, T; Nagamine, K; Kanashima, R; Kobayashi, M; Nakashima, A; Kato, Y; Maeda, H

    1987-04-01

    Hepatoportal circulation was measured using radionuclide angiography with /sup 99m/Tc-fibrinogen in 40 patients with or without portal hypertension ; 20 cirrhotics with esophageal varices(LC with varices), 5 cirrhotics without esophageal varices(LC without varices), 5 patients with idiopathic portal hypertension(IPH) and 10 controls. In 8 cases among LC with varices, the hemodynamics was determined before and after left gastric vena caval shunt(LGCS). The radioactivity count and PA ratio(blood flow proportion of the portal vein to the hepatic artery) at the hepatic hilus were lower in the patients with liver cirrhosis(LC with and without varices) than those of the cases without liver cirrhosis(IPH and control). The comparison of hemodynamics before and during 6 weeks after LGCS demonstrated the radioactivity count well-preserved but on the contrary the PA ratio reduced at the hepatic hilus after surgery. The present results could indicate that the total hepatic inflow was maintained following LGCS, by compensatory increase of hepatic arterial flow in response to reduced portal flow. The implication of hepatic radionuclide angiography is discussed on patients with portal hypertension.

  8. Analysis of hepatoportal hemodynamics by hepatic radionuclide angiography on patients with portal hypertension

    Mitarai, Yoshinobu; Yoshida, Takanori; Yoshimura, Takahisa; Nagamine, Kenji; Kanashima, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Michio; Nakashima, Akihisa; Kato, Yukio; Maeda, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Hepatoportal circulation was measured using radionuclide angiography with 99m Tc-fibrinogen in 40 patients with or without portal hypertension ; 20 cirrhotics with esophageal varices(LC with varices), 5 cirrhotics without esophageal varices(LC without varices), 5 patients with idiopathic portal hypertension(IPH) and 10 controls. In 8 cases among LC with varices, the hemodynamics was determined before and after left gastric vena caval shunt(LGCS). The radioactivity count and PA ratio(blood flow proportion of the portal vein to the hepatic artery) at the hepatic hilus were lower in the patients with liver cirrhosis(LC with and without varices) than those of the cases without liver cirrhosis(IPH and control). The comparison of hemodynamics before and during 6 weeks after LGCS demonstrated the radioactivity count well-preserved but on the contrary the PA ratio reduced at the hepatic hilus after surgery. The present results could indicate that the total hepatic inflow was maintained following LGCS, by compensatory increase of hepatic arterial flow in response to reduced portal flow. The implication of hepatic radionuclide angiography is discussed on patients with portal hypertension. (author)

  9. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment. NKS-B speciation project report 2007

    Xiaolin Hou (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aldahan, A. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Science, Uppsala (Sweden)); Possnert, G. (Uppsala Univ., Tandem Lab., Uppsala (Sweden)); Lujaniene, G. (Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)); Lehto, J. (Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Chemistry, Helsinki (Finland)); Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences (UMB), AAs (Norway))

    2008-07-15

    This report describes the work carried out under the NUK-B project SPECIATION 2007. In 2007, the project partners had two meeting in April and November, organized a NUK seminar on speciation and hot particles. SPECIATION 2007 t mainly focused on two issues on speciation (1) further development of speciation methods for radionuclides, and (2) investigation of speciation of radionuclides in environment. The report summarized the work done in partners labs, which includes: (1) Further development on the speciation of 129I and 127I in water samples; (2) Speciation method for 129I and 127I in air; (3) Dynamic system for fractionation of Pu and Am in soil and sediment; (4) Investigation on Re-absorption of Pu during the fractionation of Pu in soil and sediment; (5) Speciation of 129I in North Sea surface water; (6) Partition of 137Cs and 129I in the Nordic lake sediment, pore-water and lake water; (7) Sequential extraction of Pu in soil, sediment and concrete samples, (8) Pu sorption to Mn and Fe oxides in the geological materials, (10) Investigation of the adsorbed species of lanthanides and actinides on clays surfaces. In addition, two review articles on the speciation of plutonium and iodine in environmental are planned to be submitted to an international journal for publication. (au)

  10. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment. NKS-B speciation project report 2007

    Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Lujaniene, G.; Lehto, J.; Salbu, B.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes the work carried out under the NUK-B project SPECIATION 2007. In 2007, the project partners had two meeting in April and November, organized a NUK seminar on speciation and hot particles. SPECIATION 2007 t mainly focused on two issues on speciation (1) further development of speciation methods for radionuclides, and (2) investigation of speciation of radionuclides in environment. The report summarized the work done in partners labs, which includes: (1) Further development on the speciation of 129I and 127I in water samples; (2) Speciation method for 129I and 127I in air; (3) Dynamic system for fractionation of Pu and Am in soil and sediment; (4) Investigation on Re-absorption of Pu during the fractionation of Pu in soil and sediment; (5) Speciation of 129I in North Sea surface water; (6) Partition of 137Cs and 129I in the Nordic lake sediment, pore-water and lake water; (7) Sequential extraction of Pu in soil, sediment and concrete samples, (8) Pu sorption to Mn and Fe oxides in the geological materials, (10) Investigation of the adsorbed species of lanthanides and actinides on clays surfaces. In addition, two review articles on the speciation of plutonium and iodine in environmental are planned to be submitted to an international journal for publication. (au)

  11. Geochemistry and behavior of Natural radionuclides in the Layers Exploitable Phosphate field MerahLahrachOuladAbdoun's Basin - Morocco

    Fait, E.; Fakhi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is part of research developed on the behavior and the exchange of metals in solid-liquid's interface. It is about clarifying the distribution of stable metals especially radioactive, in this context radiometric analyzes and elementary has been done on all layers exploitable phosphate aged Maastrichtian (-70.6 million years) - Lutetian (-40.4 My) in the center of OuladAbdoun's basin, MerahLahrach's area. The specific activities of 238U, 235U and 232Th and their respective descendants were determined directly by spectrometry gamma and radio-chemically by spectrometry alpha. The results found show an enrichment of radionuclides in the deeper layers who came from the leaching of upper layers. The maximum specific activity of uranium is stored in the deeper layers (layer 3 aged Maastrichtian) who aren't very rich on phosphorus (22.4% P), however the 238U was reached up to 2066144 Bq/kg, equivalent of 16 11 ppm, the layer 1's median presents the low concentrations with 857 39Bq/Kg, equivalent of 703 ppm. The average specific activity of radionuclides identified in the series of exploited phosphates (238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 214Pb and 40K) are respectively (125572Bq/Kg; 309 Bq/Kg; 1285207 Bq/Kg; 102252 Bq/kg and 207 Bq/Kg). The study of mobility and / or accumulation accomplished by exploiting the variation of isotopic ratios 230Th/238U, 234U/238U and 232Th/238U as a function on the depth of phosphate's layers and the lithology of these samples, has allowed to identify the phenomena of exchanging between the layers of the system studied.

  12. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  13. Radionuclide examinations

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  14. Preconcentration of traces of radionuclides with sorbents based on spherical polyurethane membrane systems in the analysis of environmental samples

    Palagyi, S.; Braun, T.

    1986-01-01

    In the paper the importance of preconcentration and a permanent need for efficient preconcentrating agents in environmental analysis are pointed out. The increased attention is devoted to the foamed polyurethane sorbents as a novel advance in the separation chemistry. The paper has two main aims. The first is to present a survey of recent applications of unloaded and reagent loaded open-cell type resilient polyurethane foams to the separation and preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples. The second is to show the newest results in the use of these foams for the preconcentration and determination of traces of some mainly inorganic species in environmental samples by radioanalytical techniques. Some future possibilities of the use of polyurethane foams in trace elemental determinations in environmental analysis are also outlined. (author)

  15. Radionuclide transfer

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  16. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Factor analysis of radionuclide ejection fraction response during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    Yamamuro, Masashi

    1986-01-01

    In 204 patients with ischemic heart disease and 25 normal subjects who underwent exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), multivariate analyses and other statistical methods were employed to study factors affecting changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (ΔEF). Twenty one variables were obtained from clinical diagnosis, cardiac catheterization, and RNV. Multivariate analyses showed that coronary score for the severity of coronary artery lesions was the most significant factor, followed by exercise duration, resting heart rate, the number of diseased vessels, and exercise heart rate. Statistically significant decrease in ΔEF was associated with regional wall motion abnormality, ECG changes, and chest pain. Lesions in the left main trunk and the proximal area of left anterior descending artery were greatly involved in the decrease of ΔEF. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. A review of flow analysis methods for determination of radionuclides in nuclear wastes and nuclear reactor coolants.

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kołacińska, Kamila; Grate, Jay W

    2018-06-01

    The safety and security of nuclear power plant operations depend on the application of the most appropriate techniques and methods of chemical analysis, where modern flow analysis methods prevail. Nevertheless, the current status of the development of these methods is more limited than it might be expected based on their genuine advantages. The main aim of this paper is to review the automated flow analysis procedures developed with various detection methods for the nuclear energy industry. The flow analysis methods for the determination of radionuclides, that have been reported to date, are primarily focused on their environmental applications. The benefits of the application of flow methods in both monitoring of the nuclear wastes and process analysis of the primary circuit coolants of light water nuclear reactors will also be discussed. The application of either continuous flow methods (CFA) or injection methods (FIA, SIA) of the flow analysis with the β-radiometric detection shortens the analysis time and improves the precision of determination due to mechanization of certain time-consuming operations of the sample processing. Compared to the radiometric detection, the mass spectrometry (MS) detection enables one to perform multicomponent analyses as well as the determination of transuranic isotopes with much better limits of detection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Methodology of ABNT ISO/IEC GUIA 25 implantation in the laboratories of radionuclides analysis in environmental samples of the Analysis Division/CNEN

    Oliveira, Josue Peter de

    1997-07-01

    The ISO/EEC Guide 25: 1993 Standard G eneral requirements for the competence of calibration and testing laboratories . Is published in Brazil by Brazilian Association for Technical Standards (ABNT) as ABNT ISO/DEC GUIA 25 and establishes general requirements a laboratory must demonstrate to meet, in order to be recognized as having technical competence (accreditation) to carry out specifics calibration or testing. Therefore, the accredited laboratory starts, respectively, taking part from the Brazilian Calibration Network (RBC) or from the Brazilian Testing Laboratories Network (RBLE) . The Environmental Radioanalysis Division (DIAMB) from Environmental Radiological Protection Department (DEPRA) from Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) from Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is a laboratory responsible for analyzing radionuclides deriving for the samples from DEPRA's Surveillance Program, research and servings, due to an eventual radionuclide contamination in environment, foods and others raw materials for human consumption; including for importation and exportation products certification purposes. For all these reasons, DIAMB needs its formal recognition for carrying out radionuclides analysis in environmental samples. This work aims to provide a methodology in order to guide a laboratory which has the intention to implement a accreditation process. It also describes policies to meet the requirements related to the Standard, guidance needed to specification of some steps and also comments some points from the Standard in order to become easier all the accreditation process comprehension. (author)

  20. Application of radionuclide ventriculography phase analysis in patients with atrial or ventricular pacing for detecting ventricular abnormal excitation

    Shi Rongfang; Wang Zhonggan; Li Shengting

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to increase the accuracy of detecting ventricular abnormal excitation. During atrial or ventricular pacing, radionuclide ventriculography phase analysis (RNV-PA) was performed in 17 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (W-P-W) syndrome and paroxysmal supra ventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and ventricular tachycardia (PVT). During pacing, detection rate of abnormal excitation by RNV-PA was 95.5%, compared with 68.2% during basic conduction. Atrial or ventricular pacing can significantly increase the detection rate of abnormal excitation by RNV-PA in patients with W-P-W syndrome. It may be a valuable method for identifying the abnormal excitation and estimating the therapeutic effect of ablation

  1. Determination of Cr2O3 in chrome-tanned leather by radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Melich, M.; Palagyi, S.; Kern, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results on the determination of Cr 2 O 3 in chrome-tanned leather by measuring the content of Cr by means of radionuclide-excited XRF analysis are reported. For excitation a 3.7 GBq 238 Pu source was used and the characteristic K X-rays of Cr were detected with a planar Si(Li) detector. Both smooth and rough sides of the leather were analyzed directly or with a pair of V/Ti balanced filters. A fairly good correlation was found between Cr Kx counts of the rough side and the Cr 2 O 3 concentrations determined chemically in the range of 3.5 to 6.0% Cr 2 O 3 . The method renders possible a rapid and non-destructive determination of Cr 2 O 3 in various leather samples. (author)

  2. Segmental wall-motion analysis in the right anterior oblique projection: comparison of exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography and exercise contrast ventriculography

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Brymer, J.F.; Walton, J.A.; Pitt, B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease were studied at rest and during supine bicycle exercise with radionuclide and contrast left ventriculography. Analysis of regional wall motion was made by visual evaluation of the five standard 30 0 right anterior oblique (RAO) wall segments in the contrast images and the corresponding 10 0 RAO radionuclide segments. The radionuclide studies were evaluated independently by three observers using a five-point grading system. The interobserver wall-motion grading agreed completely in more than 80% of segments at rest and exercise, and agreed within one wall-motion grade in more than 95% of segments. The comparison of wall-motion grades between radionuclide and contrast ventriculograms showed complete agreement in 86% of segments at rest and in 78% during exercise, and agreement within one wall-motion grade in 97% of rest and 96% of exercise segments. Visual evaluation of 10 0 RAO rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms compares favorably with rest and exercise 30 0 RAO contrast ventriculograms and demonstrates satisfactory interobserver agreement

  3. Radionuclide migration pathways analysis for the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge site

    Pin, F.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Lee, D.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    A dose-to-man pathways analysis is performed for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge Site. Both shallow land burial (trench) and aboveground (tumulus) disposal methods are considered. The waste volumes, characteristics, and radionuclide concentrations are those of waste streams anticipated from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The site capacity for the waste streams is determined on the basis of the pathways analysis. The exposure pathways examined include (1) migration and transport of leachate from the waste disposal units to the Clinch River (via the groundwater medium for trench disposal and Ish Creek for tumulus disposal) and (2) those potentially associated with inadvertent intrusion following a 100-year period of institutional control: an individual resides on the site, inhales suspended particles of contaminated dust, ingests vegetables grown on the plot, consumes contaminated water from either an on-site well or from a nearby surface stream, and receives direct exposure from the contaminated soil. It is found that either disposal method would provide effective containment and isolation for the anticipated waste inventory. However, the proposed trench disposal method would provide more effective containment than tumuli because of sorption of some radionuclides in the soil. Persons outside the site boundary would receive radiation doses well below regulatory limits if they were to ingest water from the Clinch River. An inadvertent intruder could receive doses that approach regulatory limits; however, the likelihood of such intrusions and subsequent exposures is remote. 33 references, 31 figures, 28 tables

  4. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  5. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  6. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  7. Determination of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb contents in samples in samples of apple trees by radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Bumbalova, A.; Havranek, E.; Harangozo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The applicability of the radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis (RXFA) for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental plant samples is discussed and examples of determination of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb in samples of apple trees are given. The instrumentation, the standard and sample preparation are also presented. (author)

  8. Application of partition chromatography method for separation and analysis of actinium radionuclides

    Sinitsina, G.S.; Shestakova, I.A.; Shestakov, B.I.; Plyushcheva, N.A.; Malyshev, N.A.; Belyatskij, A.F.; Tsirlin, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The method of partition chromatography is considered with the use of different extractants for the extraction of actinium-227, actinium-225 and actinium-228. It is advisable to extract actinium-227 from the irradiated radium with the help of D2FGFK. The use of 2DEGFK allows us to separate actinium-227 from alkaline and alkaline-earth elements. Amines have a higher radiative stability. An express-method has been developed for the identification of actinium-227 with TOA by its intrinsic α-emission in nonequilibrium preparations of irradiated radium-226 of small activity. Actinium-225 is extracted from uranium-233 with due regard for the fact that U, Th, and Ac are extracted differently by TBP from HNO 3 solutions. With the help of the given procedure one can reach the purifying coefficient of 10 4 . Actinium-228 is extracted from the radiummesothorium preparations by a deposition of decay products, including polonium-210 on the iron hydroxyde. Actinium-228 extraction from the mixture of radium radionuclides is performed by the partition chromatography method on D2EGFK. All the procedures for separation of actinium isotopes by the above methods are described

  9. Analysis of natural radionuclides in soil samples of Purola area of Garhwal Himalaya, India.

    Yadav, Manjulata; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Prasad, Mukesh; Gusain, G S; Ramola, R C

    2015-11-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are widely spread in the earth's environment, being distributed in soil, rocks, water, air, plants and even within the human body. All of these sources have contributed to an increase in the levels of environmental radioactivity and population radiation doses. This paper presents the activity level due to the presence of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in soil samples of Purola area in Garhwal Himalaya region. The measured activity of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in collected soil samples of Purola was found to vary from 13±10 to 55±10 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 31±2 Bq kg(-1), 13±10 to 101±13 Bq kg(-1) with an average 30±3 Bq kg(-1) and 150±81 to 1310±154 Bq kg(-1) with an average 583±30 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radium equivalent activity in collected soil samples was found to vary from 47 to 221 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 115 Bq kg(-1). The total absorbed gamma dose rate in this area was found to vary from 22 to 93 nGy h(-1) with an average of 55 nGy h(-1). The distribution of these radionuclides in the soil of study area is discussed in details. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. National intercomparison programme for radionuclide analysis in environmental samples: Aramar radioecological laboratory performance

    Arine, Bruno Burini Robles, E-mail: bruno.arine@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/ARAMAR), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Lab. Radioecologico; Moraes, Marco Antonio P.V., E-mail: marco.proenca@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radioecological laboratory is concerned with the measurements of background radiation (mainly uranium and thorium natural series) and present effluents in the Aramar Experimental Centre, as well as in its surroundings. The laboratory is directly subordinated to the Navy Technological Centre in Sao Paulo (CTMSP - Sao Paulo - Brazil), a military research organization whose goal is to develop nuclear and energy systems for the Brazilian naval ship propulsion. The measurements were performed in addition to the Environmental Monitoring Programme carried out in the same region. For this endeavour, the laboratory has attended to the National Intercomparison Programme conducted by the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) by analyzing several kinds of solid and liquid samples containing specific radionuclides through gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta total counting and fluorimetry techniques, since December 1995. In the last 15 years, our results were compared to another 19 laboratories and rated as 'very good' and 'acceptable' in at least 90% of the results. (author)

  11. Analysis on fractal-like behaviour expected for migration of radionuclides in geologic sorbing media

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Harada, Makoto; Tsubata, Kyoichi; Sato, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    In earlier work, we showed that within nonhomogeneous sorbing media the desorption process becomes fractal-like. In migration of radionuclides in geologic media, the adsorption is an essential factor retardating the migration. Moreover, geologic media is inherently nonhomogeneous. It is therefore probable that the migration is significantly influenced by the fractal-like feature. Based on this idea, we have analyzed migration behaviours by employing a new model and compared the results with those obtained using conventional models. The nuclides migrate in the media with the flow of ground water being continually trapped on adsorption sites and released (desorbed) to the flow. The concept of the overall residence-time distribution function for nuclides on the adsorption sites is introduced in the new model. This function obeys the power form, ∼t -1-α (α > 0), for sufficiently large t (t denotes time). The migration behaviours predicted by our theory are qualitatively different from those by conventional theories, and the details of the differences are greatly dependent on the exponent α. In particular, the migration behaviour in cases of 0 < α < 1 is characterized by far larger retardation effects. (author)

  12. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    Mahadev, V.

    1980-01-01

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  13. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  14. Mathematical modelling and radionuclide behaviour analysis in system Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Industrial Complex - Yenisei - Kara Sea

    Platovskikh, Yu.A.; Sergeev, I.V.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Legin, V.K.; Shishlov, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    Equations describing radioisotope transfers in the suspension river water-bottom sediments based on radionuclide migration from industrial wastes and washing off reservoir are formulated. Coefficients of the equations were determined by means of measured data processing. On this base floodplaine sediments were estimated, dependence of radionuclide waste from time for all period of functioning of the plant was determined and their concentrations in water and bottom sediments were calculated. Balances between wastes, washing off the reservoir and radionuclide migration in bottom sediments, bottom land and the Kara Sea were formulated for the past. Procedure for the estimation of the migration of radionuclide exchange forms from bottom sediments following sharp decrease of waste in 1992 was developed. On the base of this effect and redistribution of radionuclides between bottom sediments and floodplaine sediments the rate of self-purification of the river in the future was evaluated [ru

  15. Assessment of left ventricular function: comparison between radionuclide angiography and semiquantitative two-dimensional echocardiographic analysis

    Gottsauner-Wolf, M.; Schedlmayer-Duit, J.; Porenta, G.; Gwechenberger, M.; Huber, K.; Glogar, D.; Probst, P.; Sochor, H.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of global left ventricular function is important in the follow-up of cardiac patients and is a good prognostic indicator in acute cardiac situations. We compared quantitative measurements of global left ventricular function made with radionuclide angiography (RNA) and contrast cardiac ventriculography (CVG) to visual semiquantitative estimates from two-dimensional echocardiographic images (2D-echo). Three hundred and thirty-nine consecutive patients who underwent RNA were assessed with 2D-echo within 3 months. In addition, 92 of these patients also underwent CVG (correlation of ejection fraction between CVG and RNA: r=0.82; P<0.0001). The RNA mean ejection fractions in the four 2D-echo groups (0=normal, 1=slightly, 2=moderate, or 3=severe reduced left ventricular function) differed markedly (P<0.0001); however, there was overlapping among the groups (2D-echo score/RNA ejection fraction: 0=57.3%±12.8%; 1=46.0%±12.9%; 2=29.6%± 12.2%; and 3=24.6%±11.5%) and the difference between 2D-echo scores 2 and 3 was not significant. 2D-echo showed a good concordance in RNA classes (0=≥505; 1=35%-49%; 2=21%-34%; and 3=≤20% ejection fraction) 0 (133/166; 80%) and 3 (18/30; 60%) but low concordance in classes 1 (27/82; 33%) and 2 (21/61; 34%). For accurate assessment of global left ventricular ejection fraction, visual semiquantitative judgement of a 2D echocardiographic image is limited in comparison to CVG or RNA, especially in patients with a slight or moderate reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Analysis of radionuclide concentrations and movement patterns of Hanford-site mule deer

    Eberhardt, L.E.; Hanson, E.E.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-10-01

    From 1980 through 1982, the movements of 37 radio-collared mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were monitored for periods of 3 to 17 months on the Handord Site in southcentral Washington. The objectives were to compare radionuclide concentrations in deer residing near the 200 Area waste management sites with concentrations in deer occupying areas remote from waste management sites and to document movement patterns of Hanford Site deer with particular emphasis on offsite movements. Cesium-137 in deer muscle and liver and 90 Sr concentrations in deer bone were statistically higher in deer living near the 200 Area than in control animals. During this study, the highest concentrations of 137 Cs and 90 Sr in 200 Area deer were in those individuals residing in or immediately adjacent to radiation zones. Cesium-137 and 90 Sr concentrations were more variable in deer residing near the 200 Area than in control animals, where only background (fallout) levels were observed. Movement patterns of Hanford site deer were analyzed to determine home range size and usage. The average home range was 0.39 +- 27 km 2 . In addition, ten (27%) of the monitored deer made offsite movements during the study period. While most of these movements were made in the spring and summer, some fall and winter movements were noted. It was estimated that approximately 8% (95% confidence interval is from 0 to 21%) of the Hanford deer herd is harvested each year. As a result of the low harvest rate, the Hanford deer herd appears to have a disproportionate number of older animals, with 24% of the 17 examined deer older than 10.5 years

  17. A multielement analysis of natural radionuclides in an area of Pernambuco - Brazil

    Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar

    2007-01-01

    Levels of natural radioactivity are the major cause of external exposure to gamma radiation. Based on this parameter, natural radioactivity of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were evaluated in a semiarid region of Pernambuco, Brazil, with the aim of obtaining radiometric monitoring of agricultural soils. For the analyses, the gamma spectrometry was utilized with a hyperpure germanium detector with an intrinsic efficiency of 27.7%. Seventy eight samples of soil that were collected in an area of approximately 55,500 m 2 , around an anomaly of uranium in rock, were analyzed. The activities of 238 U were evaluated by the 63 keV photopeak of 234 Th, that of 232 Th by the 338, 911 and 969 keV peak of 228 Ac, and that of 40 K by its 1,461 keV peak. The mean of the activities for these radionuclides were 91 Bq.kg -1 (median 88 Bq.kg -1 ) for the 238 U, 228 Bq.kg -1 (median 215 Bq.kg -1 ) for the 232 Th and 1,827 Bq.kg -1 (median 1,662 Bq.kg -1 ) for the 40 K. The anomalous rock did not present neither associated thorium nor potassium (values below the limit of detection: -1 of 232 Th and - '1 of 40 K), thus giving the characteristic of another natural radioactivity source. The obtained data allow to take important conclusions about the distribution of the radioactivity levels, to establish radioecological parameters. (author)

  18. Radionuclide transport in running waters, sensitivity analysis of bed-load, channel geometry and model discretisation

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2006-08-01

    In this report, further investigations of the model concept for radionuclide transport in stream, developed in the SKB report TR-05-03 is presented. Especially three issues have been the focus of the model investigations. The first issue was to investigate the influence of assumed channel geometry on the simulation results. The second issue was to reconsider the applicability of the equation for the bed-load transport in the stream model, and finally the last issue was to investigate how the model discretisation will influence the simulation results. The simulations showed that there were relatively small differences in results when applying different cross-sections in the model. The inclusion of the exact shape of the cross-section in the model is therefore not crucial, however, if cross-sectional data exist, the overall shape of the cross-section should be used in the model formulation. This could e.g. be accomplished by using measured values of the stream width and depth in the middle of the stream and by assuming a triangular shape. The bed-load transport was in this study determined for different sediment characteristics which can be used as an order of magnitude estimation if no exact determinations of the bed-load are available. The difference in the calculated bed-load transport for the different materials was, however, found to be limited. The investigation of model discretisation showed that a fine model discretisation to account for numerical effects is probably not important for the performed simulations. However, it can be necessary for being able to account for different conditions along a stream. For example, the application of mean slopes instead of individual values in the different stream reaches can result in very different predicted concentrations

  19. The dynamics of radionuclide behaviour in soil solution with special reference to the application of countermeasures

    Nisbet, A.F.; Lembrechts, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Any investigations into the effect of countermeasures on radionuclide transfer to plants should include a comprehensive chemical analysis of soil solution. This is because of the disturbances that soil-based countermeasures cause on soil:solution equilibria and radionuclide distribution between solid and liquid phases. As it is difficult to determine directly the effects of countermeasures under field conditions, it is recommended that laboratory-based studies be done first. These should include batch equilibrium experiments for soil:solution interactions, and hydroponic studies for solution:plant relationships. Speciation of radionuclides should form a fundamental part of both studies. (author)

  20. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  2. Review of neutron activation analysis in the standardization and study of reference materials, including its application to radionuclide reference materials

    Byrne, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) plays a very important role in the certification of reference materials (RMs) and their characterization, including homogeneity testing. The features of the method are briefly reviewed, particularly aspects relating to its completely independent nuclear basis, its virtual freedom from blank problems, and its capacity for self-verification. This last aspect, arising from the essentially isotopic character of NAA, can be exploited by using different nuclear reactions and induced nuclides, and the possibility of employing two modes, one instrumental (nondestructive), the other radiochemical (destructive). This enables the derivation of essentially independent analytical information and the unique capacity of NAA for selfvalidation. The application of NAA to quantify natural or man-made radionuclides such as uranium, thorium, 237 Np, 129 I and 230 Th is discussed, including its advantages over conventional radiometric methods and its usefulness in providing independent data for nuclides where other confirmatory analyses are impossible, or are only recently becoming available through newer 'atom counting' techniques. Certain additional, prospective uses of NAA in the study of RMs and potential RMs are mentioned, including transmutation reactions, creation of endogenously radiolabelled matrices for production and study of RMs (such as dissolution and leaching tests, use as incorporated radiotracers for chemical recovery correction), and the possibility of molecular activation analysis for specification. (orig.)

  3. Radionuclides in the food chain

    Harley, J.H.; Schmidt, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclides in the Food Chain reviews past experience in meeting the challenge of radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs and water sources and, in the wake of the reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, presents current concepts and programs relating to measurement, surveillance, effects, risk management, evaluation guidelines, and control and regulatory activities. This volume, based on a symposium sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute in association with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, which brought together both radiation experts and food industry policymakers, examines such vital topics as structural problems in large-scale crisis-managment systems; dose assessment from man-made sources; international recommendations on radiation protection; airborne contamination, as well as aquatic and soilborne radionuclides; food-chain contamination from testing nuclear devices; long-term health effects of radionuclides in food and water supplies; and use of mathematical models in risk assessment and management. (orig.)

  4. Modelling of water-flow, barrier degradation, chemistry and radionuclide transport in the near-field of a repository for L/ILW

    1989-11-01

    Performance assessment has been carried out for the near-field of a potential LLW/ILW repository in marl in Switzerland. The host rock is assumed to be characterised by a system with 'small fractures' and one with 'large fractures', the hydraulic conductivity ranges from 4.10 -10 -4.10 -9 [m.s -1 ] and the hydraulic gradient is 1 [m.m -1 ]. In the repository, low-and intermediate-level waste will be disposed. Waste in drums and concrete containers will be placed in concrete-lined caverns which will be filled with a porous backfill material. One option is to include an additional engineered hydraulic barrier in the repository system. Its effects on repository performance have been studied. The changes in physical and chemical properties of the barriers have been included in the assessment by calculating the leaching of mainly calcium from the concrete barriers. The hydraulic conductivities of the engineered barriers are assumed to vary between 10 -11 -10 -8 [m.s -1 ] after degradation. Radionuclide transport can be determined by both advection and diffusion, depending on the hydraulic conductivities in the near-field. The water flow rates within the barriers have been calculated. The results show that the water flow rates within the porous backfill may increase by more than one order of magnitude compared to the water flow rate in the undisturbed host rock. The water flow rate through the waste matrix is never significantly larger than that in the host rock because it has been assumed that the porous backfill always has higher hydraulic conductivity than the waste matrix. The water flow rates within the near-field have been used to calculate the fractional release rates of species with different sorption properties. (author) figs., tabs., 90 refs

  5. Comparative analysis of radionuclide inhalation and perfusion lung imaging with X ray pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    Zhang Yanyan; Chen Man; Shao Maogang; Zhang Songlin; Mao Jieming; Guo Jingxuan

    1993-01-01

    The result of radionuclide lung imaging was compared in 18 patients of pulmonary embolism (PE) and 2 normal persons. The discovered perfusion defects correlated well with the location of angiographic obstruction. The positive angiographic and radionuclide finding was in 141 and 104 emboli arteries respectively. The sensitivity of total emboli pulmonary segments of lung imaging was 73.8%, the specificity was 82.7 and the accuracy was 79%. The techniques correlated quite well (r = 0.83, P<0.001)

  6. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., 60 Co and 106 Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters

  7. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    Enßlin, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented

  8. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    Enßlin, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented.

  9. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    Enßlin, Torsten, E-mail: ensslin@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 München (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented.

  10. Software Process Improvement Using Force Field Analysis ...

    An improvement plan is then drawn and implemented. This paper studied the state of Nigerian software development organizations based on selected attributes. Force field analysis is used to partition the factors obtained into driving and restraining forces. An attempt was made to improve the software development process ...

  11. String Analysis for Dynamic Field Access

    Madsen, Magnus; Andreasen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    domains to reason about dynamic field access in a static analysis tool. A key feature of the domains is that the equal, concatenate and join operations take Ο(1) time. Experimental evaluation on four common JavaScript libraries, including jQuery and Prototype, shows that traditional string domains...

  12. Preconcentration and Speciation of Trace Elements and Trace-Element Analogues of Radionuclides by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Chatt, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a number of preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) methods in our laboratory for the determination of trace elements in a variety of complex sample matrices. We developed a number of cocrystallization and coprecipitation methods for the determination of trace elements in water samples. We developed several methods for the determination of I in foods and diets. We have developed a number of PNAA methods in our laboratory We determined As and Sb in geological materials and natural waters by coprecipitation with Se and Au in silicate rocks and ores by coprecipitation with Te followed by NAA. We developed an indirect NAA method for the determination of B in leachates of borosilicate glass. We have been interested in studying the speciation of Am, Tc, and Np in simulated vitrified groundwater leachates of high-level wastes under oxid and anoxic conditions using a number of techniques. We then used PNAA methods to study speciation of trace-element analogues of radionuclides. We have been able to apply biochemical techniques and NAA for the separation, preconcentration, and characterization of metalloprotein and protein-bound trace-element species in subcellular fractions of bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop chemical and biochemical methods in conjunction with NAA, NMR, and MS for the separation and identification of extractable organohalogens (EOX) in tissues of beluga whales, cod, and northern pink shrimp

  13. Use of multivariate analysis to improve the accuracy of radionuclide angiography with stress in detecting coronary artery disease in men

    Greenberg, P.S.; Bible, M.; Ellestad, M.H.; Berge, R.; Johnson, K.; Hayes, M.

    1983-01-01

    A multivariate analysis (MVA) system was derived retrospectively from a population of 76 males with coronary artery disease and 18 control subjects. Posterior probabilities were then derived from such a system prospectively in a new male population of 11 subjects with normal coronary arteries and hemodynamics and 63 patients with coronary artery disease. The sensitivity was 84% compared to that for change in ejection fraction (delta EF) greater than or equal to 5 criterion of 71% (p less than 0.01), the specificity was 91% compared to 73% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p greater than 0.05), and the correct classification rate was 85% compared to 72% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p less than 0.01). The significant variables were: change in EF with exercise, percent maximal heart rate, change in end-diastolic volume (delta EDV) with exercise, change in R wave, and exercise duration. Application of the multivariate approach to radionuclide imaging with stress, including both exercise and nuclear parameters, significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy of the test and allowed for a probability statement concerning the likelihood of disease

  14. Field test facility for monitoring water/radionuclide transport through partially saturated geologic media: design, construction, and preliminary description. Appendix I. Engineering drawings

    Phillips, S.J.; Campbell, A.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Hoober, H.H.; Schwarzmiller, K.O.

    1979-11-01

    The engineering plans for a test facility to monitor radionuclide transport in water through partially saturated geological media are included. Drawings for the experimental set-up excavation plan and details, lysimeter, pad, access caisson, and caisson details are presented

  15. Study of Validity Criteria for Radionuclide-Analysis of Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste

    Kim, Ji Uk; Baek, Hyun Suk; Jeong, Sung Yeop [Sungwoo E and T Co., Hanam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seung Kyu [Korea Radioactive waste Management Corporation, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Literature survey on the deviation of the measuring equipment and statistical analysis on the measured data of domestic LILW were performed in order to set evaluation criteria quantitatively when comparing the result of each test and inspections. This study provided opportunity to increase credibility and re-assure validity of Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Through the statistical analysis for deviation of measurement by comparing repository inspection with generator self-test, the quantitative acceptance criteria were set depending on specific activity of Co-60 and Cs-137. The acceptance criteria is a relative bias of KRMC result to generator result and set from low 50 % to high 150 % for Co-60, from low 30 % to 250 % for Cs-137. In this study, because the statistical analysis results of the waste drum assay are not enough representing whole range specified at WAC, an additional research that include characteristic analysis of LILW generated other birthplace should be done.

  16. Analysis of Base-Case Particle Tracking Results of the Base-Case Flow Fields (ID:U0160)

    C.K. Ho

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into the unsaturated-zone (UZ) subsystem performance through particle tracking analyses of the base-case flow fields. The particle tracking analyses will not be used directly in total-system performance-assessment (TSPA) calculations per se. The objective of this activity is to evaluate the transport of radionuclides through the unsaturated zone and to determine how different system parameters such as matrix diffusion, sorption, water-table rise, and perched water influence the transport to the water table. Plots will be generated to determine normalized cumulative breakthrough curves for selected radionuclides. The scope of this work is limited to the particle tracking analyses of ''base-case'' flow fields that are to be used by the code FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass; Zyvoloski 1997) for particle tracking simulations in ''Total System Performance Assessment-Site Recommendation Report'' (TSPA-SR)

  17. Application of decision tree technique to sensitivity analysis for results of radionuclide migration calculations. Research documents

    Nakajima, Kunihiko; Makino, Hitoshi

    2005-03-01

    Uncertainties are always present in the parameters used for the nuclide migration analysis in the geological disposal system. These uncertainties affect the result of such analyses, e.g., and the identification of dominant nuclides. It is very important to identify the parameters causing the significant impact on the results, and to investigate the influence of identified parameters in order to recognize R and D items with respect to the development of geological disposal system and understanding of the system performance. In our study, the decision tree analysis technique was examined in the sensitivity analysis as a method for investigation of the influences of the parameters and for complement existing sensitivity analysis. As a result, results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation with parameter uncertainties could be distinguished with not only important parameters but also with their quantitative conditions (e.g., ranges of parameter values). Furthermore, information obtained from the decision tree analysis could be used 1) to categorize the results obtained from the nuclide migration analysis for a given parameter set, 2) to show prospective effect of reduction to parameter uncertainties on the results. (author)

  18. Analysis of the Nevada-Applied-Ecology-Group model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the inhalation pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The inhalation pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of the dose to liver, bone, kidney and total body. The GI tract receives 99% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5% ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph nodes. (author)

  19. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  20. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose FR-om /sup 239/Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose FR-om the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  1. Multibarrier system preventing migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repository

    Olszewska Wioleta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety of radioactive waste repositories operation is associated with a multibarrier system designed and constructed to isolate and contain the waste from the biosphere. Each of radioactive waste repositories is equipped with system of barriers, which reduces the possibility of release of radionuclides from the storage site. Safety systems may differ from each other depending on the type of repository. They consist of the natural geological barrier provided by host rocks of the repository and its surroundings, and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The EBS may itself comprise a variety of sub-systems or components, such as waste forms, canisters, buffers, backfills, seals and plugs. The EBS plays a major role in providing the required disposal system performance. It is assumed that the metal canisters and system of barriers adequately isolate waste from the biosphere. The evaluation of the multibarrier system is carried out after detailed tests to determine its parameters, and after analysis including mathematical modeling of migration of contaminants. To provide an assurance of safety of radioactive waste repository multibarrier system, detailed long term safety assessments are developed. Usually they comprise modeling of EBS stability, corrosion rate and radionuclide migration in near field in geosphere and biosphere. The principal goal of radionuclide migration modeling is assessment of the radionuclides release paths and rate from the repository, radionuclides concentration in geosphere in time and human exposure to ionizing radiation

  2. Automation of a gamma spectrometric analysis method for naturally occuring radionuclides in different materials (NORM)

    Marzocchi, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    This work presents an improvement over the standard analysis routine used in the Physikalisches Messlabor to detect gamma peaks in spectra from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The new routine introduces the use of custom libraries of known gamma peaks, in order to ease the work of the software than can therefore detect more peaks. As final result, the user performing the analysis has less chances of making errors and can also analyse more spectra in the same amount of time. A new software, with an optimised interface able to further enhance the productivity of the user, is developed and validated. (orig.)

  3. Extraction and analysis of left ventricular contours in cardiac radionuclide angiographies

    Jouan, A.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of cardiac scintigraphic sequences is commonly realized with the help of functional or parametric images. The decomposition of the original sequence into a linear combination of the main temporal behaviors yields, after orthogonalization, a set of parametric images representing the pure temporal behaviors present in the original data. The properties of these images are used to extract automatically the left ventricular boundary. The Fourier Descriptors method is then used to get a quantified analysis of the shape of the ventricle. Because of their property of invariance by change of scale, the Fourier descriptors method applied on a sequence of left ventricular contours yields a quantified assessment of the cardiac contraction

  4. Interaction between water, sediments and radionuclides

    Snodgrass, W.J.; McKee, P.; Garnett, J.; Stieff, L.

    1988-08-01

    A model-based measurements program was carried out to evaluate the primary mechanisms controlling transport of uranium 238 and thorium 232 decay chain radionuclides in Quirke Lake, a water body draining much of the uranium mining and milling district near Elliot Lake, Ontario. This program included studies of radionuclide accumulation in sediments, particle settling and lake mass-balance studies. Also, sediment studies were undertaken to evaluate chemical fractionation, mineralogical associations, and sediment-water adsorption and release. A limnocorral experiment was conducted in an isolated portion of a lake to measure radium 226 removal from the water column and diffusion from the sediments back to the water. Modelling studies were made to assess the data. Substantial agreement was obtained using the model originally developed for the AECB between model predictions and observations for Quirke Lake and for the limnocorrals. Further work is required to complete the studies undertaken in this project to assess the significance of the efflux of radionuclides from the sediments. These studies include a laboratory program to measure kinetics of adsorption, sediment-water modelling studies of the results and a field measurement program to develop a mass-balance analysis for thorium. (numerous refs)

  5. Fourier phase analysis on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography: range of phase spread and cut-off limits in normal individuals

    Ramaiah, Vijayaraghavan L.; Harish, B.; Sunil, H.V.; Selvakumar, Job; Ravi Kishore, A.G.; Nair, Gopinathan

    2011-01-01

    To define the range of phase spread on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography (ERNV) in normal individuals and derive the cut-off limit for the parameters to detect cardiac dyssynchrony. ERNV was carried out in 30 individuals (age 53±23 years, 25 males and 5 females) who had no history of cardiovascular disease. They all had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 55-70%) as determined by echocardiography, were in sinus rhythm, with normal QRS duration (≤120 msec) and normal coronary angiography. First harmonic phase analysis was performed on scintigraphic data acquired in best septal view. Left and right ventricular standard deviation (LVSD and RVSD, respectively) and interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), the absolute difference of mean phase angles of right and left ventricle, were computed and expressed in milliseconds. Mean + 3 standard deviation (SD) was used to derive the cut-off limits. Average LVEF and duration of cardiac cycle in the study group were 62.5%±5.44% and 868.9±114.5 msec, respectively. The observations of LVSD, RVSD and right and left ventricular mean phase angles were shown to be normally distributed by Shapiro-Wilk test. Cut-off limits for LVSD, RVSD and IVMD were calculated to be 80 msec, 85 msec and 75 msec, respectively. Fourier phase analysis on ERNV is an effective tool for the evaluation of synchronicity of cardiac contraction. The cut-off limits of parameters of dyssynchrony can be used to separate heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony from those without. ERNV can be used to select patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy. (author)

  6. Development of radiochemical property analysis and handling technology of long-lived radionuclide

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I.; Woo, M. S.; Hwang, D. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Choi, Y. D.; Jung, K. C.; Kim, B. H.; Jung, J. Y.

    1997-08-01

    The goals of this research are completion of detail design of wet type lead cell for radioactive test of partitioning process, and possession of technologies to operate and handle safely process equipments in hot cells. The main contents in this research are as follows: 1) For analysis of radiolysis property of extractants in high level radioactive atmosphere, three extractants (DEHPA, DIDPA, TBP) were irradiated, and degradation phenomena was investigated. 2) For development of radioactive analysis technologies of sample solution, property tests of ion chromatography (NovaPac C-18) and activity measuring tests of Cs-137 with collimator, and design/application tests of collimator were performed. 3) Wet type lead cells (α-γ cell, 2 sets) and auxiliary facilities were designed, and tong manipulator and special tools were designed and fabricated, performed test operation. 4) For getting of MA fuel basic data, a review on process technologies for MA fuel production was performed. (author). 55 refs., 10 tabs., 46 figs

  7. An attempt to evaluate pulmonary hypertension by phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography

    Masuoka, Takeshi; Toyama, Hinako; Ajisaka, Ryuuichi

    1988-01-01

    Using phase analysis derived from the gated blood pool imaging, the pattern of right ventricular regional contraction was examined in 5 patients with pulmonary hypertension who showed 30 mmHg of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure and 20 mmHg or more of mean pulmonary arterial pressure. All of the patients had markedly delayed phase in contraction of right ventricular outflow tract. Pulmonary arterial pressure positively correlated with both the proportion of delayed phase area to the whole right ventricle and mean phase difference between the right and left ventricles. The results suggest the usefulness of phase analysis in the non-invasive evaluation of incease in overloading of right ventricular pressure. (Namekawa, K)

  8. Automatic analysis algorithm for radionuclide pulse-height data from beta-gamma coincidence systems

    Foltz Biegalski, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    There are two acceptable noble gas monitoring measurement modes for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) verification purposes defined in CTBT/PC/II/WG.B/1. These include beta-gamma coincidence and high-resolution gamma-spectrometry. There are at present no commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) applications for the analysis of β-γ coincidence data. Development of such software is in progress at the Prototype International Data Centre (PIDC) for eventual deployment at the International Data Centre (IDC). Flowcharts detailing the automatic analysis algorithm for β-γ coincidence data to be coded at the PIDC is included. The program is being written in C with Oracle databasing capabilities. (author)

  9. Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables

  10. Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables.

  11. The need for standardisation in the analysis, sampling and measurement of deposited radionuclides

    Tsaturov, Y.S.; De-Cort, M.; Dubois, G.; Izrael, Yu.A.; Stukin, E.D.; Fridman, D.F.; Tabachnyi, L.Ya.; Matveenko, I.I.; Guermenchuk, M.G.; Sitak, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, diverse sampling and measurement methods for radioactivity deposition have been applied by the various European institutes. When compiling these datasets together on the same data platform, in view of preparing the atlas on cesium contamination in Europe, data quality analysis has shown a lack of harmonisation between these various methods. Because of the necessity to dispose of compatible and representative measurements for further analysis, e.g. time series analysis, and the need for better Standardization methods in the event of a future accident with large transboundary release, several suggestions are made of how such harmonization might be achieved. Also in view of taking appropriate decisions in case of accidental releases by gaining experience in data Standardization, the variety of the sampling and measurement methods of radioactivity currently used are briefly summarized and the results intercompared. In order to improve the quality of datasets, GIS, amongst other methods, can be applied as a useful tool to highlight the lack of harmonisation between the various sampling methodologies by indicating the data uncertainty

  12. Raid on sanity: Policy and economic analysis of radionuclide removal from drinking water

    Schnare, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of risk-management data is given. The basic techniques by which the analyst manipulates the data, the decision maker, and therefore, reality are presented. A few rules are given that can be used to distort or focus available data. These rules also underlie analysis of data and the selection of analytical methods. These rules are split into two groups: those dealing with the news media and those dealing directly with data presentation. To get a story onto the evening news or the front page of the newspaper empirically-derived press rules apply. The story should include as many of the following as possible: (1) harm, pain, suffering, or death; (2) big names, (3) big money; (4) sex; and (5) controversy. The second set of rules applies to the frame of reference used in analysis of risk and cost. The common approaches followed are (1) the Bounding Box Problem - the problem of the appropriateness of the boundaries within which risk and cost analysis is done or presented; (2) data comparisons; (3) theoretical integrity; (4) accuracy and precision. 3 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  13. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for loW--level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements

  14. Automatic alignment of radionuclide images

    Barber, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The variability of the position, dimensions and orientation of a radionuclide image within the field of view of a gamma camera hampers attempts to analyse the image numerically. This paper describes a method of using a set of training images of a particular type, in this case right lateral brain images, to define the likely variations in the position, dimensions and orientation for that type of image and to provide alignment data for a program that automatically aligns new images of the specified type to a standard position, size and orientation. Examples are given of the use of this method on three types of radionuclide image. (author)

  15. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindstroem, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10{sup -5} per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10{sup -5} per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10{sup -5} Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10{sup -7} Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable

  16. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Lindgren, Maria; Lindstroem, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10 -8 Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10 -5 per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10 -5 per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10 -5 Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10 -7 Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable values. In that case almost all

  17. Development of a methodology for radionuclide impurity analysis in radiopharmaceuticals using gamma spectrometry

    Paula, Eduardo Bonfim de; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Poledna, Roberto; Lins, Ronaldo; Leiras, Anderson; Silva, Carlos Jose da; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de

    2016-01-01

    The LNMRI has sought to develop a methodology for the identification and accurate detection of gamma radiation impurities stations in metrological level, aiming to meet the recommendations not only of international pharmacopoeia, as well as the CNEN and ANVISA regarding the quality control can ensure patients the doses received by the practices are as low as feasible. As an initial target, it was possible to obtain an efficiency curve with uncertainty around 1% necessary to initiate future measurements of interest applied to nuclear medicine and to start the development of impurities analysis technique. (author)

  18. Hanford Site Composite Analysis Technical Approach Description: Radionuclide Inventory and Waste Site Selection Process.

    Nichols, Will E.; Mehta, Sunil

    2017-09-13

    The updated Hanford Site Composite Analysis will provide an all-pathways dose projection to a hypothetical future member of the public from all planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities and potential contributions from all other projected end-state sources of radioactive material left at Hanford following site closure. Its primary purpose is to support the decision-making process of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE O 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management (DOE, 2001), related to managing low-level waste disposal facilities at the Hanford Site.

  19. Application of Laplace transform to analysis of the excretory organs radionuclide study

    Knigavko, V.G.; Pilipenko, M.Yi.; Pakhomov, V.Yi.; Lyisovij, V.M.; Nesterov, V.G.; Bondarenko, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper is devoted to application of Laplace transform to solving equations at performing stochastic mathematical modelling of radiopharmaceuticals (RP) transportation in the studied organs. Application of this method allows to derive a formula for transformation of the curves of RP excretion from the body at intravenous administration, i.e. provides the possibility to calculate traditional values at extravascular administration of the preparations. Application of Laplace transform with bioexponencial approximation of the blood clearance curve also allows to develop a new algorithm of radionephrogram deconvolution analysis

  20. Radiochemical analysis of radio-nuclides in sea water collected near Bikini Atoll

    Miyake, Y; Sugiura, Y

    1955-01-01

    A radiochemical analysis of sea water containing fission materials collected near Bikini Atoll in June, 1954, was performed. The sea water was boiled with hydrochloric acid, iron and lanthanum salts each 5 mg as Fe and La were added to it. They were precipitated as hydroxide, which was dissolved in hydrochloric acid and ferric chloride was extracted with ethyl ether. The remaining solution was evaporated to dryness and the residue was dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Using the latter solution the group separation was done with cation exchanger resins.

  1. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring. Final report

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitored in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program. Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media

  2. Calculation method in activation analysis for determination of two different radionuclides with almost the same γ-energy

    Szabo, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The method is based on the difference of the half-lives of two dififerent radionuclides, having similar γ-energies. Using the method it is possible to determine the two components in the peaks also in that cases, if the difference between the energies is less, than the energy resolution of the de......The method is based on the difference of the half-lives of two dififerent radionuclides, having similar γ-energies. Using the method it is possible to determine the two components in the peaks also in that cases, if the difference between the energies is less, than the energy resolution...... of the detector. The main point is the perform only one irradiation, but use two different clock times before counting. The criterion of the method can be used when there is significant difference between the half-lives of the radionuclides....

  3. Local area distribution of fallout radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant determined by autoradiography analysis

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Igarashi, Shosuke; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yoshida, Zenko; Tanaka, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    The environmental behavior of radioactive Cs in the fallout from the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has been studied by measuring its spatial distribution on/in trees, plants, and surface soil beneath the plants using autoradiography analysis. The results of autoradiography analysis showed that radioactive Cs was distributed on the branches and leaves of trees that were present during the accident and that only a small fraction of radioactive Cs was transported to new branches and leaves grown after the accident. Radioactive Cs was present on the grass and rice stubble on the soils, but not in the soils beneath the grass and rice stubble, indicating that the radioactive Cs was deposited on the grass and the rice plant. In addition, the ratio of the radioactive Cs that penetrated into the soil layer by weathering was very small two months after the accident. These results indicate that trees and other plants are the reservoir of the fallout Cs and function to retard the fallout Cs migration with rain water. (author)

  4. Risk-based screening analysis of ground water contaminated by radionuclides introduced at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in the southwestern part of Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. Underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962 and ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. This concern prompted this examination of the potential health risk to these individuals from drinking the contaminated ground water either at a location on the NTS (assuming loss of institutional control after 100 y) or at one offsite (considering groundwater migration). For the purpose of this assessment, a representative mix of the radionuclides of importance and their concentrations in ground water beneath the NTS were identified from measurements of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater samples-of-opportunity collected at the NTS. Transport of radionuclide-contaminated ground water offsite was evaluated using a travel-time-transport approach. At both locations of interest, potential human-health risk was calculated for an individual ingesting radionuclide-contaminated ground water over the course of a 70-y lifetime. Uncertainties about human physiological attributes, as well as about estimates of physical detriment per unit of radioactive material, were quantified and incorporated into the estimates of risk. The maximum potential excess lifetime risk of cancer mortality estimated for an individual at the offsite location ranges from 7 x 10 -7 to 1 x 10 -5 , and at the onsite location ranges from 3 x 10 -3 to 2 x 10 -2 . Both the offsite and the onsite estimates of risk are dominated by the lifetime doses from tritium. For the assessment of radionuclides in ground water, the critical uncertainty is their concentration today under the entire NTS

  5. Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood

    Voitsekhovitch, O.V.; Zheleznyak, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ''Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,'' of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising 90 Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum 90 Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak 90 Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, 90 Sr concentrations in Kiev's drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike 90 Sr, 137 Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated 137 Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for 137 Cs

  6. The SSI TOOLBOX Source Term Model SOSIM - Screening for important radionuclides and parameter sensitivity analysis

    Avila Moreno, R.; Barrdahl, R.; Haegg, C.

    1995-05-01

    The main objective of the present study was to carry out a screening and a sensitivity analysis of the SSI TOOLBOX source term model SOSIM. This model is a part of the SSI TOOLBOX for radiological impact assessment of the Swedish disposal concept for high-level waste KBS-3. The outputs of interest for this purpose were: the total released fraction, the time of total release, the time and value of maximum release rate, the dose rates after direct releases of the biosphere. The source term equations were derived and simple equations and methods were proposed for calculation of these. A literature survey has been performed in order to determine a characteristic variation range and a nominal value for each model parameter. In order to reduce the model uncertainties the authors recommend a change in the initial boundary condition for solution of the diffusion equation for highly soluble nuclides. 13 refs.

  7. Speciation, analysis and ion exchange behavior of polonium and other natural radionuclides in drinking water

    Katzlberger, C.J.

    2000-09-01

    In the first chapter of this work, the hydrolysis reaction of trace amounts of polonium was studied with a cation exchange method. In a 1 M (H,Na)ClO4 solution with p[H] > 0.3, polonium occurred in the form of univalent cation Po(OH)3+ and a neutral species Po(OH)4. The former is predominant in strongly acidic media (0.3 90 % determined via lead recovery with AAS. Minimum detectable activities of 0.4 mBq/l and 1.0 mBq/l could be achieved for 210Po and 210Bi (210Pb) respectively. Results ranged from 1.5-20 mBq/l and more in cases of extremely high 222Rn concentrations. Post sampling radon decay during the period between sampling and analysis plays an important role and strongly influences the obtained results. (author)

  8. Application of ICP-MS radionuclide analysis to open-quotes real worldclose quotes samples of Department of Energy Radioactive Waste

    Meeks, A.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste into repositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires characterization to ensure regulatory and transportation requirements are met. Characterization is also used to collect information regarding chemistry of the waste for processing concerns. The range of characterization typically includes radio nuclide activity, RCRA metals and organic compounds, process metals, and risk assessment. Recent addition of an inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer in a radioactive contaminated laboratory at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has provided cost savings, time savings, reduced personnel exposure to radiation, and in some cases, improved accuracy over the traditional techniques for radionuclides, risk assessment and metals analysis. Application of ICP-MS to ORNL waste tank characterization has also provided the opportunity to estimate never-before-measured radionuclides and metals without increased cost. Data from analyses of ORNL waste tank sludges and supernates indicate the benefit of using this technique over counting techniques and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for analysis of fission products and U isotopics as well as the ability to estimate certain radionuclides and metals for the first time in these tanks

  9. Quantitative analysis on dose to humans as a result of consuming tuna fish contaminated by cesium radionuclides

    Khani, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative empirical data is presented on the dose exposure to North Americans consuming tuna fish that have accumulated concentrations of radioactive isotopes. The two particular radioactive isotopes of interest are cesium-137 and cesium-134. Though biological effects of radiation are a widely debatable topic, the consumption of tuna fish does not support significant increased risk of cancer to humans. An important comparison is made between the elevated levels of radioactive cesium concentrations to naturally occurring radionuclides, namely potassium-40 and polonium-210. It is calculated that naturally occurring radioactive isotopes are in the orders of magnitude greater than the cesium radionuclides in tuna fish. (author)

  10. Quantitative analysis on dose to humans as a result of consuming tuna fish contaminated by cesium radionuclides

    Khani, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jykhani@ucalgary.ca, E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative empirical data is presented on the dose exposure to North Americans consuming tuna fish that have accumulated concentrations of radioactive isotopes. The two particular radioactive isotopes of interest are cesium-137 and cesium-134. Though biological effects of radiation are a widely debatable topic, the consumption of tuna fish does not support significant increased risk of cancer to humans. An important comparison is made between the elevated levels of radioactive cesium concentrations to naturally occurring radionuclides, namely potassium-40 and polonium-210. It is calculated that naturally occurring radioactive isotopes are in the orders of magnitude greater than the cesium radionuclides in tuna fish. (author)

  11. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

  12. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail

  13. LA-ICP-MS for Trace Analysis of Long-Lived Radionuclides in Solid Non-conducting Radioactive Waste Samples

    Becker, J.S.; Gastel, M.; Tenzler, D.; Dietze, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The characterization of radioactive waste materials from nuclear reactors for recycling and final storage requires fast, sensitive and precise analytical methods, which are able to determine long-lived radionuclidic ultra traces in a short time. For the determination of long-lived α and β ray-emitting nuclides besides the classical radiochemical methods which are mostly include time-consuming radiochemical separation procedures, to an increasing extent inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been used successfully as a powerful trace, ultra trace and isotopic analytical method for the determination of long-lived radionuclides in aqueous solutions [1-3

  14. Simultaneous determination of radionuclides separable into natural decay series by use of time-interval analysis

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Uezu, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    A delayed coincidence method, time-interval analysis (TIA), has been applied to successive α-α decay events on the millisecond time-scale. Such decay events are part of the 220 Rn→ 216 Po (T 1/2 145 ms) (Th-series) and 219 Rn→ 215 Po (T 1/2 1.78 ms) (Ac-series). By using TIA in addition to measurement of 226 Ra (U-series) from α-spectrometry by liquid scintillation counting (LSC), two natural decay series could be identified and separated. The TIA detection efficiency was improved by using the pulse-shape discrimination technique (PSD) to reject β-pulses, by solvent extraction of Ra combined with simple chemical separation, and by purging the scintillation solution with dry N 2 gas. The U- and Th-series together with the Ac-series were determined, respectively, from alpha spectra and TIA carried out immediately after Ra-extraction. Using the 221 Fr→ 217 At (T 1/2 32.3 ms) decay process as a tracer, overall yields were estimated from application of TIA to the 225 Ra (Np-decay series) at the time of maximum growth. The present method has proven useful for simultaneous determination of three radioactive decay series in environmental samples. (orig.)

  15. Radionuclide contaminated soil: Laboratory study and economic analysis of soil washing. Final report

    Fuhrmann, M.; Zhou, H.; Patel, B.; Bowerman, B.; Brower, J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the work discussed in this report is to determine if soil washing is a feasible method to remediate contaminated soils from the Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The contaminants are predominantly Cs-137 and Sr-90. The authors have assumed that the target activity for Cs-137 is 50 pCi/g and that remediation is required for soils having greater activities. Cs-137 is the limiting contaminant because it is present in much greater quantities than Sr-90. This work was done in three parts, in which they: estimated the volume of contaminated soil as a function of Cs-137 content, determined if simple removal of the fine grained fraction of the soil (the material that is less than 0.063 mm) would effectively reduce the activity of the remaining soil to levels below the 50 pCi/g target, assessed the effectiveness of chemical and mechanical (as well as combinations of the two) methods of soil decontamination. From this analysis the authors were then able to develop a cost estimate for soil washing and for a baseline against which soil washing was compared

  16. Measurements for modeling radionuclide transfer in the aquatic environment

    Kahn, B.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical methods for measuring radionuclides in the aquatic environment are discussed for samples of fresh water and seawater, fish and shellfish, biota such as algae, plankton, seaweed, and aquatic plants, and sediment. Consideration is given to radionuclide collection and concentration, sample preservation, radiochemical and instrumental analysis, and quality assurance. Major problems are the very low environmental levels of the radionuclides of interest, simultaneous occurrence of radionuclides in several chemical and physical forms and the numerous factors that affect radionuclide levels in and transfers among media. Some radionuclides of importance in liquid effluents from nuclear power stations are listed, and sources of radiochemical analytical methods are recommended

  17. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, southeastern California

    Zukin, Jeffrey G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Teh-Lung, Ku; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1987-10-01

    Naturally occurring U and Th series radionuclides have been analyzed in high temperature brines (~300°C, 25 wt% dissolved solids) and associated rocks from two deep geothermal wells located on the northeastern margin of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). These data are part of a study of the SSGF as a natural analog of possible radionuclide behavior near a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt beds, and permit evaluation of some characteristics of water-rock interaction in the SSGF. Rock/Brine concentration ratios ( Rc = (dpm/ g) rock/(dpm/ g) brine) were found to vary from near unity for isotopes of Ra, Pb and Rn to about 5 × 10 5 for 232Th. The high sorptivity of 232Th is closely followed by that of 238U and 234U ( Rc ~ 5 × 10 4), suggesting that U is retained in the +4 oxidation state by the reducing conditions in the brines. The relatively high solubility of 210Pb and 212Pb is attributed to formation of chloride complexes, while the high Ra solubility is attributed to chloride complexing, a lack of suitable adsorption sites due to the high brine salinity and temperature, and the reducing conditions that prevent MnO 2 and RaSO 4 from forming. The 228Ra /226Ra ratios in the brines are approximately equal to those of their parents ( 232Th /230Th ) in associated rocks, indicating that Ra equilibration in the brine-rock system is achieved within the mean life of 228Ra (8.3 years). The 224Ra /228Ra ratios in these brines are about 0.7, indicating that either (1) brine composition is not homogeneous and 224Ra decays in fracture zones deficient in Ra and Th as the brine travels to the wellhead or (2) Ra equilibration in the brine-host rock system is not complete within the mean life of 224Ra (5.2 days) because the desorption of 224Ra from the solid phase is impeded. The 228Ac /228Ra activity ratio in the SSGF brines studied is <0.1, and from this ratio the residence time of 228Ac in the brine before sorption onto solid surfaces is estimated to be <70

  18. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  19. Convergence analysis in near-field imaging

    Bao, Gang; Li, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of the direct and inverse modeling of the diffraction by a perfectly conducting grating surface in the near-field regime. It is motivated by our effort to analyze recent significant numerical results, in order to solve a class of inverse rough surface scattering problems in near-field imaging. In a model problem, the diffractive grating surface is assumed to be a small and smooth deformation of a plane surface. On the basis of the variational method, the direct problem is shown to have a unique weak solution. An analytical solution is introduced as a convergent power series in the deformation parameter by using the transformed field and Fourier series expansions. A local uniqueness result is proved for the inverse problem where only a single incident field is needed. On the basis of the analytic solution of the direct problem, an explicit reconstruction formula is presented for recovering the grating surface function with resolution beyond the Rayleigh criterion. Error estimates for the reconstructed grating surface are established with fully revealed dependence on such quantities as the surface deformation parameter, measurement distance, noise level of the scattering data, and regularity of the exact grating surface function. (paper)

  20. Silver content determination in mining and ore dressing using radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Koerner, B.; George, R.; Ratnikow, W.

    1989-01-01

    A laborsaving method based on radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence is described for the determination of silver in mining and ore dressing. Detection limits reached under operation conditions and measuring errors are discussed and compared with results from chemical analyses

  1. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    Haas, J.W. III; Forney, R.W.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The enormous cost for chemical analysis at DOE facilities predicates that cost-saving measures be implemented. Many approaches, ranging from increasing laboratory sample throughput by reducing preparation time to the development of field instrumentation, are being explored to meet this need. Because of the presence of radioactive materials at many DOE sites, there is also a need for methods that are safer for site personnel and analysts. This project entails the development of a compact Raman spectrograph for field screening and monitoring of a wide variety of wastes, pollutants, and corrosion products in storage tanks, soils, and ground and surface waters. Analytical advantages of the Raman technique include its ability to produce a unique, spectral fingerprint for each contaminant and its ability to analyze both solids and liquids directly, without the need for isolation or cleanup

  2. Computer analysis of the exercise electrocardiogram and control of radionuclide ventriculography: an optimal statistical decision model for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    Hsia, P.W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A new automated technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) by stress electrocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) has been developed. The method employs digital signal processing of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for recognition of ischemic and arrhythmic events. On-line detection of abnormal beats is used for control image acquisition by the gamma camera resulting in improved image quality since only identical beats are included in the composite images of the cardiac cycle. A combined stress ECG analysis which measures ST changes indicative of ischemia, and radionuclide results, which reveal corresponding ejection fraction abnormalities yields greater sensitivity and specificity than either test alone. Digitized data from the electrocardiogram are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is given. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate are completely automated. A statistical model base on computerized ST segment measurements combined with radionuclide ventriculography data has been developed by using a logistic model with stepwise regression fitting. A previously acquired database of similar measurements was used for designing the model. The most significant parameters were found to be (1) ejection fraction of exercise RNV; (2) difference of ST level between exercise and resting test (stdif); and (3) ejection fraction difference between exercise and resting test. The new parameter stdif, not previously used in ECG interpretation, was found to be of great diagnostic significance

  3. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  4. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  5. Information pertinent to the migration of radionuclides in ground water at the Nevada Test Site. Part 1. Review and analysis of existing information

    Borg, I.Y.; Stone, R.; Levy, H.B.; Ramspott, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    A history of NTS is given, the geologic and hydrologic setting is described, and the amount of radioactivity deposited within and near the main aquifers is estimated. The conclusions include: information currently available is insufficient to state categorically that radioactivity will never be carried off the Nevada Test Site by ground water movement; nonetheless, such a migration at levels above the maximum permissible concentration to existing wells and springs is considered unlikely; if offsite migration occurs, it will probably be from the southwestern margins of Pahute Mesa, where there is only a small chance of contaminating existing public water supplies; tritium is the most mobile radionuclide and may be the only long-lived isotope of concern. Highest priority is assigned to measurement of tritium and other radionuclides in large water samples taken from nuclear chimneys that water has re-entered after an explosion; expansion of the existing groundwater monitoring program at NTS to include wells with a higher probability of intersecting flow of contaminated water; measurement of groundwater flow velocities and other associated hydrologic parameters. High priority is assigned to production of an inventory of radionuclides deposited near NTS borders, especially beneath Pahute Mesa; determination of amounts of radioactivity deposited directly into the Lower Carbonate Aquifer; a sensitivity analysis of the many parameters that enter into transport calculations; a study of the many unplugged holes that penetrate the Tuff Aquitard; testing of the assumption that radionuclides deposited in the unsaturated zone are isolated from the saturated zone because of limited precipitation and downward movement of moisture; and determination of distribution coefficients for NTS alluvium, carbonate, and rhyolitic rocks, which are lacking or poorly represented in the literature. Twelve other recommendations of lesser priority are also given

  6. Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2003-01-01

    The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less

  7. Non standard analysis, polymer models, quantum fields

    Albeverio, S.

    1984-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to non standard analysis and its applications to the theory of stochastic processes. This is based on a joint book with J.E. Fenstad, R. Hoeegh-Krohn and T. Lindstroeem. In particular we give a discussion of an hyperfinite theory of Dirichlet forms with applications to the study of the Hamiltonian for a quantum mechanical particle in the potential created by a polymer. We also discuss new results on the existence of attractive polymer measures in dimension d 1 2 phi 2 2 )sub(d)-model of interacting quantum fields. (orig.)

  8. Hand geometry field application data analysis

    Ruehle, M.; Ahrens, J.

    1997-03-01

    Over the last fifteen years, Sandia National Laboratories Security Systems and Technology Center, Department 5800, has been involved in several laboratory tests of various biometric identification devices. These laboratory tests were conducted to verify the manufacturer's performance claims, to determine strengths and weaknesses of particular devices, and to evaluate which devices meet the US Department of Energy's unique needs for high-security devices. However, during a recent field installation of one of these devices, significantly different performance was observed than had been predicted by these laboratory tests. This report documents the data analysis performed in the search for an explanation of these differences

  9. Analysis of field errors in existing undulators

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) and other third generation synchrotron light sources have been designed for optimum performance with undulator insertion devices. The performance requirements for these new undulators are explored, with emphasis on the effects of errors on source spectral brightness. Analysis of magnetic field data for several existing hybrid undulators is presented, decomposing errors into systematic and random components. An attempts is made to identify the sources of these errors, and recommendations are made for designing future insertion devices. 12 refs., 16 figs

  10. Electromagnetic field and mechanical stress analysis code

    1978-01-01

    Analysis TEXMAGST is a two stage linear finite element code for the analysis of static magnetic fields in three dimensional structures and associated mechanical stresses produced by the anti J x anti B forces within these structures. The electromagnetic problem is solved in terms of magnetic vector potential A for a given current density anti J as curl 1/μ curl anti A = anti J considering the magnetic permeability as constant. The Coulombian gauge (div anti A = o) was chosen and was implemented through the use of Lagrange multipliers. The second stage of the problem - the calculation of mechanical stresses in the same three dimensional structure is solved by using the same code with few modifications - through a restart card. Body forces anti J x anti B within each element are calculated from the solution of the first stage run and represent the input to the second stage run which will give the solution for the stress problem

  11. Geotechnical field data and analysis report

    1990-09-01

    The geotechnical Field Data and Analysis Report documents the geomechanical data collected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant up to June 30, 1989 and describes the conditions of underground openings from July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. The data is required to understand performance during operations and does not include data from tests performed to support performance assessment. In summary, the underground openings have performed in a satisfactory manner during the reporting period. This analysis is based primarily on the evaluation of instrumentation data, in particular the comparison of measured convergence with predictions, and the observations of exposed rock surfaces. The main concerns during this period have been the deterioration found in Site Preliminary Design Validation Test Rooms 1 and 2 and some spalling found in Panel 1. 14 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs

  12. Distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in chernozem soil/crop system from stationary experiments.

    Sarap, Nataša B; Rajačić, Milica M; Đalović, Ivica G; Šeremešić, Srđan I; Đorđević, Aleksandar R; Janković, Marija M; Daković, Marko Z

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the determination of radiological characteristics of cultivated chernozem soil and crops from long-term field experiments, taking into account the importance of distribution and transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system, especially in agricultural cropland. The investigation was performed on the experimental fields where maize, winter wheat, and rapeseed were cultivated. Analysis of radioactivity included determination of the gross alpha and beta activity as a screening method, as well as the activities of the following radionuclides: natural ((210)Pb, (235)U, (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (7)Be) and artificial ((90)Sr and (137)Cs). The activities of natural and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides were determined by gamma spectrometry, while the artificial radionuclide (90)Sr was determined by a radiochemical analytical method. Based on the obtained results for the specific activity of (40)K, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr, accumulation factors for these radionuclides were calculated in order to estimate transfer of radionuclides from soil to crops. The results of performed analyses showed that there is no increase of radioactivity that could endanger the food production through the grown crops.

  13. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-03

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  14. Field Raman Spectrograph for Environmental Analysis

    Sylvia, J.M.; Haas, J.W.; Spencer, K.M.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.; Forney, R.W.; Johnston, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread contamination found across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex has received considerable attention from the government and public alike. A massive site characterization and cleanup effort has been underway for several years and is expected to continue for several decades more. The scope of the cleanup effort ranges from soil excavation and treatment to complete dismantling and decontamination of whole buildings. To its credit, DOE has supported research and development of new technologies to speed up and reduce the cost of this effort. One area in particular has been the development of portable instrumentation that can be used to perform analytical measurements in the field. This approach provides timely data to decision makers and eliminates the expense, delays, and uncertainties of sample preservation, transport, storage, and laboratory analysis. In this program, we have developed and demonstrated in the field a transportable, high performance Raman spectrograph that can be used to detect and identify contaminants in a variety of scenarios. With no moving parts, the spectrograph is rugged and can perform many Raman measurements in situ with flexible fiber optic sampling probes. The instrument operates under computer control and a software package has been developed to collect and process spectral data. A collection of Raman spectra for 200 contaminants of DOE importance has been compiled in a searchable format to assist in the identification of unknown contaminants in the field

  15. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area Project and the Hydrologic Resources Management Program, October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003

    D.L.Finnegan; J.L. Thompson; B.A. Martinez

    2004-01-01

    This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2003 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Cheshire, RNM-2s, Camembert and Almendro where radionuclides have been measured in the past. We collected samples from monitoring wells in Yucca Flat (ER-12-2, ER-6-1 No.2 and ER-7-1) and Frenchman Flat (ER-5-4 No.2) to obtain baseline radiochemistry data in those areas. We, in collaboration with LLNL, assembled all of the hot well data that have been collected over the past 30 years and submitted the data to Shaw for future inclusion in the geochemistry database. We have again used a field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We begin the report with a

  16. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. The model is based on available experimental data and describes the basic reactions between bentonite and groundwater by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. It is found that sodium bentonite will slowly be converted to calcium bentonite. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite is used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. The elements considered are: uranium, neptunium, plutonium, thorium, americium, and technetium. The redox potential in the near-field is assumed to be controlled by the corrosion products of the iron canister. Except for uranium and neptunium, radionuclide solubilities turn out to be lower under the modelled near-field conditions than in the groundwater of the surrounding granitic host rock. Uranium and neptunium solubility might be higher by orders of magnitude in the near-field than in the far-field. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. The use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  17. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  18. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    Laul, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs

  19. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    Laul, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The 234 U and 230 Th radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas, and geothermal brine form the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions, and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. 210 Pb is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The 234 U/ 230 Th ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  20. A meshless approach to radionuclide transport calculations

    Perko, J.; Sarler, B.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past thirty years numerical modelling has emerged as an interdisciplinary scientific discipline which has a significant impact in engineering and design. In the field of numerical modelling of transport phenomena in porous media, many commercial codes exist, based on different numerical methods. Some of them are widely used for performance assessment and safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories and groundwater modelling. Although they proved to be an accurate and reliable tool, they have certain limitations and drawbacks. Realistic problems often involve complex geometry which is difficult and time consuming to discretize. In recent years, meshless methods have attracted much attention due to their flexibility in solving engineering and scientific problems. In meshless methods the cumbersome polygonization of calculation domain is not necessary. By this the discretization time is reduced. In addition, the simulation is not as discretization density dependent as in traditional methods because of the lack of polygon interfaces. In this work fully meshless Diffuse Approximate Method (DAM) is used for calculation of radionuclide transport. Two cases are considered; First 1D comparison of 226 Ra transport and decay solved by the commercial Finite Volume Method (FVM) and Finite Element Method (FEM) based packages and DAM. This case shows the level of discretization density dependence. And second realistic 2D case of near-field modelling of radionuclide transport from the radioactive waste repository. Comparison is made again between FVM based code and DAM simulation for two radionuclides: Long-lived 14 C and short-lived 3 H. Comparisons indicate great capability of meshless methods to simulate complex transport problems and show that they should be seriously considered in future commercial simulation tools. (author)

  1. Analysis of structure-tectonic pattern within the 'Degelen' massif conformably to conditions of radionuclide migration in ground water

    Gorbunova, Eh.M.; Ivanchenko, G.N.; Godunova, L.D.

    2005-01-01

    Major orientation of radiation monitoring on the Semipalatinsk test site lies in direction of common regularities for formation and distribution of radioactive contamination. Zones, within the 'Degelen' technical area. of hydrogeological active faults are patly subjected to impact of underground explosions. Data of computer-aided decryption of a stellite image by means of program package LESSA allow specification of para-genesis structures standing as probabilistic pathways of radionuclide migration. (author)

  2. Identification and analysis of main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose for workers at radiopharmacy facilities

    Sanches, Matias Puga

    2004-01-01

    The optimization principle in radiation protection means that there is a reasonable balance between resources used to monitor exposures and the benefits due to the monitoring program. Programs for the monitoring of workers handling radioactive materials are influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of internal doses due to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive materials is often based on measurements of the activity in the tissues of the body and in excreta, following a given intake. In order to enable dose estimations using the biokinetic models recommended by the ICRP and laboratory data, it is proposed to carry out comprehensive study to identify the main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose of workers at radiopharmacy facilities. The applied methodology for identification of these radionuclides takes into account criteria set out by the ICRP and IAEA. The practical purpose to set up this study was to establish a consistent approach to ensure that the dose assessments are as simple as possible and guarantee the necessary quality standards. The result of this study has indicated the requirement of routine measurements for seven radionuclides over all range of radioactive material compounds, handled at the radiopharmacy plant of IPEN, avoiding unjustifiable work concerning activity levels that are not relevant for the health of the occupationally exposed persons. The main intake pathways, the appropriate monitoring frequencies and derived reference level have also been identified. (author)

  3. Selection of optimum ROI for dual radionuclide analysis of 55Fe-63Ni and 63Ni-60Co

    Priya, S.; Prabhath Ravi, K.; Yadav, R.K.B.; Rao, D.D.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    Dual label counting in liquid scintillation counting (LSC) enables simultaneous activity determination of two radionuclides. Dual counting procedure for 3 H and 14 C has been well established. There are several other nuclides like 63 Ni (E β- =67keV), 55 Fe (6 keV X-ray and auger electron) which are often chemically separated using detailed procedures with high decontamination factors (DF) and quantified using LSC. Despite the laborious separations, traces of these nuclides in the chemically separated fractions can mutually make their quantification difficult due to overlap of counts from both radionuclides in the spectrum, which gets further complicated in presence of traces of 60 Co. For dual label counting technique, it is essential to establish the discriminator setting at which there will be spillover of counts from both radionuclides in the two counting regions required for the inclusion method. The objective of the current work is to establish two counting ROI's for dual counting of (i) 63 Ni- 55 Fe and (ii) 63 Ni- 60 Co in a TDCR based LSC system

  4. Analysis of radionuclide behavior in a BWR Mark-II containment under severe accident management condition in low pressure sequence

    Funayama, Kyoko; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Tanaka, Nobuo

    1999-01-01

    In the Level 2 PSA program at INS/NUPEC, MELCOR1.8.3 is extensively applied to analyze radionuclide behavior of dominant sequences. In addition, the revised source terms provided in the NUREG-1465 report have been also discussed to examine the potential of the radionuclides release to the environment in the conventional siting criteria. In the present study, characteristics of source terms to the environment were examined comparing with results by the Hypothetical Accident (LOCA), NUREG-1465 and MELCOR1.8.3. calculation for a typical BWR with a Mark-II containment in order to assure conservatives of the Hypothetical Accident in Japan. Release fractions of iodine to the environment for the Hypothetical Accident and NUREG-1465, which used engineering models for predicting radionuclide behaviors, were about 10 -4 and 10 -6 of core inventory, respectively, while the best estimate MELCOR1.8.3 code predicted 10 -9 of iodine to the environment. The present study showed that the engineering models in the Hypothetical Accident or NUREG-1465 have large conservatives to estimate source term of iodine to the environment. (author)

  5. An evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of phase analysis of data from radionuclide ventriculograms in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Dormehl, I.C.; Bitter, F.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Weismueller, P.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculograms may be of value for detecting and localising the abnormal sequence of ventricular contraction secondary to Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) symdrome. The present study was undertaken to test this hypothesis. The space - time sequences of right- and left-ventricular action obtained from radionuclide ventriculograms obtained during rest studies were evaluated in 8 patients with WPW syndrome (confirmed by 12-lead surface electrocardiography) and compared to those of 14 normal subjects. All of the latter showed a consistent ventricular activation pattern, i.e. the first site of ventricular activity in the upper septal region followed by a second site either at the base of the left ventricle or located apically. It was possible to diagnose 11 of the 14 normal subjects (specificity, 79%) and 7 of the 8 patients (sensitivity, 88%). The 4 patients who had been classified as having a left-sided accessory bundle by surface electrocardiography were likewise diagnosed by phase analysis, as were the 2 patients with a confirmed right-sided bypass tract. Two patients with septal posterior accessory pathways could not be identified by phase analysis. Furthermore, cases with an activation pattern which closely resembled that of the 2 patients with right-sided accessory bundles were found to be normal from their ECGs. It is now necessary to evaluate phase analysis against invasive electrophysiological methods in such patients. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of phase analysis of data from radionuclide ventriculograms in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Dormehl, I.C.; Bitter, F.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Weismueller, P.

    1985-10-01

    It has been suggested that phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculograms may be of value for detecting and localising the abnormal sequence of ventricular contraction secondary to Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) symdrome. The present study was undertaken to test this hypothesis. The space-time sequences of right- and left-ventricular action obtained from radionuclide ventriculograms obtained during rest studies were evaluated in 8 patients with WPW syndrome (confirmed by 12-lead surface electrocardiography) and compared to those of 14 normal subjects. All of the latter showed a consistent ventricular activation pattern, i.e. the first site of ventricular activity in the upper septal region followed by a second site either at the base of the left ventricle or located apically. It was possible to diagnose 11 of the 14 normal subjects (specificity, 79%) and 7 of the 8 patients (sensitivity, 88%). The 4 patients who had been classified as having a left-sided accessory bundle by surface electrocardiography were likewise diagnosed by phase analysis, as were the 2 patients with a confirmed right-sided bypass tract. Two patients with septal posterior accessory pathways could not be identified by phase analysis. Furthermore, cases with an activation pattern which closely resembled that of the 2 patients with right-sided accessory bundles were found to be normal from their ECGs. It is now necessary to evaluate phase analysis against invasive electrophysiological methods in such patients.

  7. Status report on radionuclide transfer

    1980-01-01

    At the suggestion of the Federal Minstry of the Interior, in June 1978, a group of scientists from several institutions who are active in the field of radionuclide transfer or are interested in these problems got together. During the discussions of the work team, especially the transfer soil/plants was emphasized. Then the work team set up a status report on the transfer of the radionuclides relevant in the sense of the radiation protection act. The nuclides H 3 and C14, the isotopes of the Sr, J, and Cs, Tc99, the so-called corrosion nuclides Mn54, Fe59, co-isotopes and Zn65, and isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm were regarded as important for a possible radiation exposition. Recent investigations revealed that also the natural radionuclides Ra226, Po210, and Pb210 should be covered by the investigations. The goal of this status report is to present the level of knowledge on the transfer of these radionuclides to man in a brief form, giving hints at the most important literature. It was requested by the Federal Ministry of the Interior, as fas as possible, to indicate transfer factors which are necessary for the radio-occology act to be decreed according to Para. 45 of the radiation protection act. Another goal of the report was to show the gap in the knowledge on the radio nuclide transfer. This was thought to help to create a basis for the decisions of the Federal Ministry concerning the support of other investigation projects in the field of transfer of radionuclides. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Dissipation element analysis of turbulent scalar fields

    Wang Lipo; Peters, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Dissipation element analysis is a new approach for studying turbulent scalar fields. Gradient trajectories starting from each material point in a scalar field Φ'(x-vector,t) in ascending directions will inevitably reach a maximal and a minimal point. The ensemble of material points sharing the same pair ending points is named a dissipation element. Dissipation elements can be parameterized by the length scale l and the scalar difference Δφ ', which are defined as the straight line connecting the two extremal points and the scalar difference at these points, respectively. The decomposition of a turbulent field into dissipation elements is space-filling. This allows us to reconstruct certain statistical quantities of fine scale turbulence which cannot be obtained otherwise. The marginal probability density function (PDF) of the length scale distribution based on a Poisson random cutting-reconnection process shows satisfactory agreement with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. In order to obtain the further information that is needed for the modeling of scalar mixing in turbulence, such as the marginal PDF of the length of elements and all conditional moments as well as their scaling exponents, there is a need to model the joint PDF of l and Δφ ' as well. A compensation-defect model is put forward in this work to show the dependence of Δφ ' on l. The agreement between the model prediction and DNS results is satisfactory, which may provide another explanation of the Kolmogorov scaling and help to improve turbulent mixing models. Furthermore, intermittency and cliff structure can also be related to and explained from the joint PDF.

  9. Study of radionuclides distribution mechanism at the territory of ''Qum Adasi'' OGPD and in layers

    Mahmudov, H.M; Musayeva, Sh.Z.; Asgarova, V.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Its for several yeras that Inistitute of Radiation Problems ANAS has already started fundamental researches of radiation background state and radionuclide composition at the territories of oil and gas production departments. Base labaratories equipped with modern measurement units were established and strong specialists group was trained for fulfillment of these works and also for comprehensive analysis of obtained results. Over a long perios of time oil and gas production is realized at the territory of Q um Adasi O PGD. This territory with 3000 ha covers B ahar , h ovsan a nd Q um Adasi o il near the trestle and H ovsan o il-fields wells are located on-shore. These wells take their sources from different dephts and layers, thats why study of these layers radionuclide composition excites great interest. It has mainly two reasons: Study of dependence of produced crude oils radionuclide composition on oil layers;Dependence of oil-polluted areas and local radionuclide centers on natural layers.In order to protect environment and provide radiation safety of people working in oil-gas industry and the population living there, radiation background of these areas must be regularly kept under monitoring and the dependence of radionuclides creating this background on layers must be studied on the level of researches and practical result must be obtained. According to analysis results of the samples taken from local areas of oil-gas producing departments having high radiation background, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are the main natural radionuclides that create radiation background at the territory of Q um Adasi O GPD. According to the results of the conducted analysis, though in the areas having 5-8 mkR/h radiation background the effective activity of natural radionuclides is 38-40 Bk/kg, at the areas having 50-200 mkR/h radiation background effective activity increases to 1000-6500. And it shows that effective activity of radionuclides exceeds the norm for several

  10. Gravity field of Venus - A preliminary analysis

    Phillips, R. J.; Sjogren, W. L.; Abbott, E. A.; Smith, J. C.; Wimberly, R. N.; Wagner, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The gravitational field of Venus obtained by tracking the Pioneer Venus Orbiter is examined. For each spacecraft orbit, two hours of Doppler data centered around periapsis were used to estimate spacecraft position and velocity and the velocity residuals obtained were spline fit and differentiated to produce line of sight gravitational accelerations. Consistent variations in line of sight accelerations from orbit to orbit reveal the presence of gravitational anomalies. A simulation of isostatic compensation for an elevated region on the surface of Venus indicates that the mean depth of compensation is no greater than about 100 km. Gravitational spectra obtained from a Fourier analysis of line of sight accelerations from selected Venus orbits are compared to the earth's gravitational spectrum and spherical harmonic gravitational potential power spectra of the earth, the moon and Mars. The Venus power spectrum is found to be remarkably similar to that of the earth, however systematic variations in the harmonics suggest differences in dynamic processes or lithospheric behavior.

  11. 100 Years of radionuclide metrology

    Judge, S.M.; Arnold, D.; Chauvenet, B.; Collé, R.; De Felice, P.; García-Toraño, E.; Wätjen, U.

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics. - Highlights: • The driving forces for the development of radionuclide metrology. • Radium standards to facilitate trade of this valuable commodity in the early years. • After 1950, focus changes to healthcare and industrial applications. • National Measurement Institutes develop new techniques, standards, and disseminate the best practice in measurement. • Challenges in nuclear medicine, radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics

  12. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    . Therefore, transport calculations by a model with the appropriate exchange processes included are important. To be able to make certain statements about the transport of radionuclides in the current streams, further investigations are recommended in the report where field measurements of site-specific parameters is an important component. An updated more complete sensitivity analysis of the model is also suggested to be performed after the inclusion of site-specific information.

  13. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2005-11-01

    . Therefore, transport calculations by a model with the appropriate exchange processes included are important. To be able to make certain statements about the transport of radionuclides in the current streams, further investigations are recommended in the report where field measurements of site-specific parameters is an important component. An updated more complete sensitivity analysis of the model is also suggested to be performed after the inclusion of site-specific information

  14. GIS Modelling of Radionuclide Transport from the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    Balakay, L.; Zakarin, E.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the software complex GIS-project MigRad (Migration of Radionuclide) was developed, tested and applied for the territory of the Semipalatinsk test site/ polygon (Republic of Kazakhstan), where since 1961, in total 348 underground nuclear explosions were conducted. The MigRad is oriented on integration of large volumes of different information (mapping, ground-based, and satellite-based survey): and also includes modeling on its base local redistribution of radionuclides by precipitation and surface waters and by long-range transport of radioactive aerosols. The existing thermal anomaly on territory of the polygon was investigated in details, and the object-oriented analysis was applied for the studied area. Employing the RUNOFF model, the simulation of radionuclides migration with surface waters was performed. Employing the DERMA model, the simulation of long-term atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition patterns for cesium was conducted from 3 selected locations (Balapan, Delegen, and Experimental Field). Employing geoinformation technology, the mapping of the of the high temperature zones and epicenters of radioactive aerosols transport for the territory of the test site was carried out with post-processing and integration of modelling results into GIS environment. Contamination levels of pollution due to former nuclear explosions for population and environment of the surrounding polygon territories of Kazakhstan as well as adjacent countries were analyzed and evaluated. The MigRad was designed as instrument for comprehensive analysis of complex territorial processes influenced by former nuclear explosions on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. It provides possibilities in detailed analyses for (i) extensive cartographic material, remote sensing, and field measurements data collected in different level databases; (ii) radionuclide migration with flows using accumulation and redistribution of soil particles; (iii) thermal anomalies

  15. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  16. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    Seetharam, S.C., E-mail: suresh.seetharam@sckcen.be [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Perko, J.; Jacques, D. [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mallants, D. [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road – Gate 4, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry. • Time of peak radionuclide fluxes is sensitive to the fracture networks. • Uniform flow model mimics a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures. • Effect of fracture width on radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity. • Effect of increased dispersivity in fractured media does not always result in a lower peak flux for specific fracture networks due to higher concentrations adjacent to the fracture plane. - Abstract: Analysis of the effect of fractures in porous media on fluid flow and mass transport is of great interest in many fields including geotechnical, petroleum, hydrogeology and waste management. This paper presents sensitivity analyses examining the effect of various hypothetical fracture networks on the performance of a planned near surface disposal facility in terms of radionuclide transport behaviour. As it is impossible to predict the initiation and evolution of fracture networks and their characteristics in concrete structures over time scales of interest, several fracture networks have been postulated to test the sensitivity of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Fluid flow through concrete matrix and fracture networks are modelled via Darcy's law. A single species radionuclide transport equation is employed for both matrix and fracture networks, which include the processes advection, diffusion, dispersion, sorption/desorption and radioactive decay. The sensitivity study evaluates variations in fracture network configuration and fracture width together with different sorption/desorption characteristics of radionuclides in a cement matrix, radioactive decay constants and matrix dispersivity. The effect of the fractures is illustrated via radionuclide breakthrough curves, magnitude and time of peak mass flux, cumulative mass flux and concentration profiles. For the

  17. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    Seetharam, S.C.; Perko, J.; Jacques, D.; Mallants, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry. • Time of peak radionuclide fluxes is sensitive to the fracture networks. • Uniform flow model mimics a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures. • Effect of fracture width on radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity. • Effect of increased dispersivity in fractured media does not always result in a lower peak flux for specific fracture networks due to higher concentrations adjacent to the fracture plane. - Abstract: Analysis of the effect of fractures in porous media on fluid flow and mass transport is of great interest in many fields including geotechnical, petroleum, hydrogeology and waste management. This paper presents sensitivity analyses examining the effect of various hypothetical fracture networks on the performance of a planned near surface disposal facility in terms of radionuclide transport behaviour. As it is impossible to predict the initiation and evolution of fracture networks and their characteristics in concrete structures over time scales of interest, several fracture networks have been postulated to test the sensitivity of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Fluid flow through concrete matrix and fracture networks are modelled via Darcy's law. A single species radionuclide transport equation is employed for both matrix and fracture networks, which include the processes advection, diffusion, dispersion, sorption/desorption and radioactive decay. The sensitivity study evaluates variations in fracture network configuration and fracture width together with different sorption/desorption characteristics of radionuclides in a cement matrix, radioactive decay constants and matrix dispersivity. The effect of the fractures is illustrated via radionuclide breakthrough curves, magnitude and time of peak mass flux, cumulative mass flux and concentration profiles. For the

  18. Radionuclide calibrators performance evaluation

    Mora Ramirez, E.; Zeledon Fonseca, P.; Jimenez Cordero, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide calibrators are used to estimate accurately activity prior to administration to a patient, so it is very important that this equipment meets its performance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to compare the commercially available 'Calicheck' (Calcorp. Inc), used to assess linearity, versus the well-known source decay method, and also to show our results after performing several recommended quality control tests. The parameters that we wanted to evaluate were carried on using the Capintec CRC-15R and CRC-15 β radionuclide calibrators. The evaluated tests were: high voltage, display, zero adjust, background, reproducibility, source constancy, accuracy, precision and linearity. The first six tests were evaluated on the daily practice, here we analyzed the 2007 recorded data; and the last three were evaluated once a year. During the daily evaluation both calibrators performance were satisfactory comparing with the manufacture's requirements. The accuracy test show result within the ± 10% allowed for a field instrument. Precision performance is within the ± 1 % allowed. On the other hand, the linearity test shows that using the source decay method the relative coefficient is 0.9998, for both equipment and using the Calicheck the relative coefficient is 0.997. However, looking the percentage of error, during the 'Calicheck' test, its range goes from 0.0 % up to -25.35%, and using the source decay method, the range goes from 0.0 % up to -31.05 %, taking into account both instruments. Checking the 'Calicheck' results we can see that the results varying randomly, but using the source decay method the percentage of error increase as the source activity decrease. We conclude that both devices meet its manufactures requirements, in the case of the linearity using the decay method, decreasing the activity source, increasing the percentage of error, this may happen because of the equipment age. (author)

  19. Stochastic analysis of radionuclides travel times at the waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP), in New Mexico (U.S.A.)

    Capilla Roma, J. E.; Gomez-Hernandez, J. J.; Sahuquillo Herraiz, A.

    1999-01-01

    Multiple equally likely transmissivity fields that honor piezo metric head measurements are generated as input to a Monte-Carlo exercise, for the stochastic analysis of travel times in the Culebra dolomite overlaying the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico, USA. Results of the analysis show the importance of modeling variable-density flow as accurately as possible, and of including as much information as possible in the simulations of alternative scenarios. Results also unveil a channel of high transmissivity when transmissivity fields are conditioned to piezo metric data. This channel leads to important reductions of travel time from the WIPP area to the south boundary. The uncertainty of the boundary conditions is analyzed searching for alternative boundary conditions can be obtained that improve the reproduction of piezo metric data and yield a reduction of the minimum travel times to the south boundary. Results of the Monte-Carlo exercise are compared with those from a deterministic analysis showing the limitations of the latter method when trying to estimate extreme values or characterizing the uncertainty of their predictions. The report ends with a brief study on the impact of the small transmissivity measurements at location P-18, showing that its value is not consistent with the model of spatial variability inferred from the data and that it has an important effect on model predictions. (Author)

  20. Stochastic analysis of radionuclides travel times at the waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP), in New Mexico (U. S. A. )

    Capilla Roma, J E; Gomez-Hernandez, J J; Sahuquillo Herraiz, A [Universidad Politecnia de Valencia (Spain)

    1999-12-15

    Multiple equally likely transmissivity fields that honor piezo metric head measurements are generated as input to a Monte-Carlo exercise, for the stochastic analysis of travel times in the Culebra dolomite overlaying the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico, USA. Results of the analysis show the importance of modeling variable-density flow as accurately as possible, and of including as much information as possible in the simulations of alternative scenarios. Results also unveil a channel of high transmissivity when transmissivity fields are conditioned to piezo metric data. This channel leads to important reductions of travel time from the WIPP area to the south boundary. The uncertainty of the boundary conditions is analyzed searching for alternative boundary conditions can be obtained that improve the reproduction of piezo metric data and yield a reduction of the minimum travel times to the south boundary. Results of the Monte-Carlo exercise are compared with those from a deterministic analysis showing the limitations of the latter method when trying to estimate extreme values or characterizing the uncertainty of their predictions. The report ends with a brief study on the impact of the small transmissivity measurements at location P-18, showing that its value is not consistent with the model of spatial variability inferred from the data and that it has an important effect on model predictions. (Author)

  1. radioactivity analysis in food-stuffs and evaluation of annual effective doses from intakes of radionuclides through daily diets

    Alam, M.N.; Chowdhury, M. I.; Kamal, M.; Ghose, S.; Islam, M. N.; Mustafa, M. N.; Islam, Al Amin S.

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of natural and anthropogenic gamma emitting radionuclides in different vegetables, grains,fishes, sugar and common salt samples were measured by using high purity germanium ( HPGe ) detector coupled with Personal Computer Analyzer ( PCA ) and thereby the effective doses from the consumption of these diet were evaluated. The activities of 232 Th in vegetable, grains, salt, sugar and fish samples ranged from 0.13±0.02 to 1.49±0.32 Bq. kg -1 . The concentration of 238 U in these food-stuffs ranged from 0.07±0.01 to 0.95±0.26 Bq Kg -1 . The observed activity of 40 K ranged between 5.04±1.05 and 196.60±41.0 Bq Kg -1 . Caesium was not detected in any of the samples, Assessment of annual intake of these radionuclides has been made on the basis of the average annual intake of these food-stuffs by the population of Bangladesh.The annual effective dose equivalent due to ingestion of different naturally occurring radionuclides ( 232 Th, 238 U, and 40 K) by intake food-stuffs ranged from 0.2 to 113.62 μ Sv. y'-1. The annual effective doses observed in the present study for various types of food-stuffs were less than the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendation, which is 1 m Sv. y -1 for the members of the public. The result and knowledge of this study, would be helpful in making a yardstick comparing with which an appropriate radiation control limit may be imposed on food materials for public consumption in Bangladesh. 1 fig., 2 tables, 13 refs. (Author)

  2. Uncertainty analysis in an accidental situation. Radionuclide transfer in environment and assessment of human exposure by food

    Sy, Mouhamadou Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Major nuclear accidents of Chernobyl (April, 1986) and Fukushima (March, 2011) have led to a huge environmental contamination with important amounts of radionuclides released in the atmosphere. Risk assessment, in case of nuclear emergency, is confronted to uncertainties on the transfer of radioactive substances in terrestrial ecosystems and to human population through the food chain, which could affect the reliability of decisions. The extent of the repercussions of Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents highlighted the difficulty of managing the consequences of such disasters and specifically to accommodate the different sources of uncertainty within decision-making processes. The objective of this research project is to develop a methodology to take into account uncertainties within environmental and food risk assessment models in order to improve decision support tools used for accidental situations. In this regard, different hierarchical Bayesian models aiming at capturing, within a unique modelling framework, uncertainty and variability about radioecological parameters of great important for accidental situation (dry and wet interception fractions and weathering loss parameter) were developed. Models parameters were estimated by Bayesian inference applied on databases obtained by an extended literature review. The impact on the risk assessment models of uncertainty and variability about these radioecological parameters was then assessed by stochastic simulations and sensitivity analyses applied on two case-studies: a hypothetical accident simulating a standardized deposition of radionuclides and the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant. The works developed in this project contribute to enhance knowledge on key processes governing environmental transfer of radionuclides and to improve the parameterization of the radioecological risk assessment models with respect to the research lines outlined by the scientific community in radioecology. (author)

  3. The detailed analysis of natural radionuclides dissolved in spa waters of the Kłodzko Valley, Sudety Mountains, Poland

    Walencik-Łata, A.; Kozłowska, B.; Dorda, J.; Przylibski, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    A survey was conducted to measure natural radioactivity in spa waters from the Kłodzko Valley. The main goal of this study was to determine the activity concentration of uranium, radium and radon isotopes in the investigated groundwaters. Samples were collected several times from 35 water intakes from 5 spas and 2 mineral water bottling plants. The authors examined whether the increased gamma radiation background, as well as the elevated values of radium and uranium content in reservoir rocks, have a significant impact on the natural radioactivity of these waters. The second objective of this research was to provide information about geochemistry of U, Ra, Rn radionuclides and the radiological and chemical risks incurred by ingestion of isotopes with drinking water. On the basis of results obtained, it is feasible to assess the health hazard posed by ingestion of natural radioactivity with drinking waters. Moreover, the data yielded by this research may be helpful in the process of verification of the application of these waters in balneotherapy. In addition, annual effective radiation doses resulting from the isotopes consumption were calculated on the basis of the evaluated activity concentrations. In dose assessment for uranium and radium isotopes, the authors provided values for different human age groups. The obtained uranium content in the investigated waters was compared with the currently valid regulations concerning the quality of drinking water. Based on the activity concentrations data, the activity isotopic ratios 234 U/ 238 U, 226 Ra/ 238 U, 222 Rn/ 238 U, 222 Rn/ 226 Ra and the correlations between radionuclides content were then examined. In brief, it may be concluded on the basis of the obtained results that radon solubility is inversely proportional to radium and uranium dissolution in environmental water circulation. The presented study allows conclusions to be drawn on the radionuclide circulation among different environmental biota: from

  4. The detailed analysis of natural radionuclides dissolved in spa waters of the Kłodzko Valley, Sudety Mountains, Poland

    Walencik-Łata, A., E-mail: agata.walencik@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Uniwersytecka 4 St., 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Kozłowska, B.; Dorda, J. [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Uniwersytecka 4 St., 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Przylibski, T.A. [Wrocław University of Technology, Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Division of Geology and Mineral Waters, Wybrzeże S. Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    A survey was conducted to measure natural radioactivity in spa waters from the Kłodzko Valley. The main goal of this study was to determine the activity concentration of uranium, radium and radon isotopes in the investigated groundwaters. Samples were collected several times from 35 water intakes from 5 spas and 2 mineral water bottling plants. The authors examined whether the increased gamma radiation background, as well as the elevated values of radium and uranium content in reservoir rocks, have a significant impact on the natural radioactivity of these waters. The second objective of this research was to provide information about geochemistry of U, Ra, Rn radionuclides and the radiological and chemical risks incurred by ingestion of isotopes with drinking water. On the basis of results obtained, it is feasible to assess the health hazard posed by ingestion of natural radioactivity with drinking waters. Moreover, the data yielded by this research may be helpful in the process of verification of the application of these waters in balneotherapy. In addition, annual effective radiation doses resulting from the isotopes consumption were calculated on the basis of the evaluated activity concentrations. In dose assessment for uranium and radium isotopes, the authors provided values for different human age groups. The obtained uranium content in the investigated waters was compared with the currently valid regulations concerning the quality of drinking water. Based on the activity concentrations data, the activity isotopic ratios {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra/{sup 238}U, {sup 222}Rn/{sup 238}U, {sup 222}Rn/{sup 226}Ra and the correlations between radionuclides content were then examined. In brief, it may be concluded on the basis of the obtained results that radon solubility is inversely proportional to radium and uranium dissolution in environmental water circulation. The presented study allows conclusions to be drawn on the radionuclide circulation among

  5. Being prepared to verify the CTBT-Atmospheric Transport modeling and radionuclide analysis at the Austrian National Data Centre during the NDC Preparedness Exercise 2009

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Schraick, Irene

    2010-05-01

    An explosion in the Kara-Zhyra mine in Eastern Kazakhstan on 28 November 2009 around 07:20 UTC was recorded by both the CTBTO seismic and infrasound networks. This event triggered a world-wide preparedness exercise among the CTBTO National Data Centres. Within an hour after the event was selected by the German NDC, a computer program developed by NDC Austria based on weather forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and from the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) was started to analyse what Radionuclide Stations of the CTBTO International Monitoring System (IMS) would be potentially affected by the release from a nuclear explosion at this place in the course of the following 3-10 days. These calculations were daily updated to consider the observed state of the atmosphere instead of the predicted one. Based on these calculations, automated and reviewed radionuclide reports from the potentially affected stations as produced by the CTBTO International Data Centre (IDC) were looked at. An additional analysis of interesting spectra was provided by the Seibersdorf Laboratories. Based on all the results coming in, no evidence whatsoever was found that the explosion in Kazakhstan was nuclear. This is in accordance with ground truth information saying that the event was caused by the detonation of more than 53 Tons of explosives as part of mining operations. A number of conclusions can be drawn from this exercise. First, the international, bilateral as well as national mechanisms and procedures in place for such an event worked smoothly. Second, the products and services from the CTBTO IDC proved to be very useful to assist the member states in their verification efforts. Last but not least, issues with the availability of data from IMS radionuclide stations do remain.

  6. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  7. Estimating cloud field coverage using morphological analysis

    Bar-Or, Rotem Z; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit

    2010-01-01

    The apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds ('the twilight zone') is often affected by undetectable weak signature clouds and humidified aerosols. It is suggested here to classify the atmosphere into two classes: cloud fields, and cloud-free (away from a cloud field), while detectable clouds are included in the cloud field class as a subset. Since the definition of cloud fields is ambiguous, a robust cloud field masking algorithm is presented here, based on the cloud spatial distribution. The cloud field boundaries are calculated then on the basis of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask products and the total cloud field area is estimated for the Atlantic Ocean (50 deg. S-50 deg. N). The findings show that while the monthly averaged cloud fraction over the Atlantic Ocean during July is 53%, the cloud field fraction may reach 97%, suggesting that cloud field properties should be considered in climate studies. A comparison between aerosol optical depth values inside and outside cloud fields reveals differences in the retrieved radiative properties of aerosols depending on their location. The observed mean aerosol optical depth inside the cloud fields is more than 10% higher than outside it, indicating that such convenient cloud field masking may contribute to better estimations of aerosol direct and indirect forcing.

  8. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite, as well as the various compositions resulting from the long-term extrapolation, are used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. Since the effect of calcium bentonite on the groundwater chemical composition will be considerably less marked than that of sodium bentonite, especially with respect to key parameters for the nuclide speciation like carbonate concentration and pH, the use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  9. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  10. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    Meyers-Schoene, L.; Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T.

    1993-01-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants

  11. Systems analysis, long-term radionuclide transport, and dose assessments, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico, September 1989

    Lappin, A.R.; Hunter, R.L.; Davies, P.B.; Borns, D.J.; Reeves, M.; Pickens, J.; Iuzzolino, H.J.

    1990-12-01

    This study supports the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and has two main objectives. First, it describes current ideas about the characteristics and potential impacts of the disturbed-rock zone (DRZ) known to develop with time around excavations at the WIPP horizon. Second, it presents new calculations of radionuclide migration within and from the WIPP repository for steady-state undisturbed conditions and for two cases that consider human intrusion into the repository. At the WIPP, the presence of a DRZ has been confirmed by geophysical studies, gas-flow tests, and direct observations. The DRZ will allow gas or brine from waste-emplacement panels to bypass panel seals and flow into adjacent portions of the underground workings unless preventive measures are taken. Revised calculations of the undisturbed performance of the repository indicate that no radionuclides will be released into the Culebra Dolomite within the regulatory period of 10,000 years. The human-intrusion calculations included here assume a connection between the WIPP repository, an occurrence of pressurized brine within the underlying Castile Formation, and the overlying Culebra Dolomite. 61 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs

  12. Impact assessment of shallow land burial for low-level waste: modelling of the water flow and transport of radionuclides in the near-field

    Walravens, J; Volckaert, G

    1996-09-18

    The Belgian concept for disposal of low-level waste consists of storage of waste drums into a concrete vault backfilled with a cementitious grout. The vault is placed above the water table and will be covered with a multilayer cap of clay, gravel, and sandy materials. The SCK/CEN is charged with the long-term performance assessment of the disposal site. The main processes and parameters determining the radioactivity release from the site are identified. The principal processes are the infiltration through the top cover and the sorption of waste on the backfill. The release of radionuclides from the site was modelled with the PORFLOW numerical code.

  13. A review of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides in the near and far field. Pt. 2

    Tipping, E.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The role of colloids in the release/transport of radionuclides covers a range of scientific disciplines and there is a need for a comprehensive review that pulls together all the relevant research. A literature review has, therefore, been carried out and a bibliography prepared. Entries are in alphabetical (first author) order and abstracts are provided. This is part 2 of a three-part review. Part 1 reviews fundamental theory and DOE and NIREX funded work while Part 3 compares DOE and NIREX-funded work with the other published work and identifies gaps in the DOE and NIREX programmes. (Author)

  14. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  15. Transfer of radionuclides into human milk

    Steiner, M.; Wirth, E.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now the potential radiation exposure to breast-fed babies due to contaminated human milk has not been taken into account, when deriving international limit values and reference levels for radionuclides in foodstuffs, in air at monitored work places or for exposures in the medical field. It was the aim of the research project 'Transfer of radionuclides into human milk' to quantify the transfer of incorporated radionuclides into mother's milk, and develop simple models to estimate the radiation exposure of babies through the ingestion of human milk. The study focused on considerations of the radiation exposure due to the ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs by the mother, the inhalation of radionuclides at monitored work places, and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals to breast-feeding mothers. The blocking of infant thyroid glands by stable iodine in the case of accidental releases of radioiodine was considered as well. (orig.) [de

  16. Right ventricular functional analysis utilizing first pass radionuclide angiography for pre-operative ventricular assist device planning: a multi-modality comparison.

    Avery, Ryan; Day, Kevin; Jokerst, Clinton; Kazui, Toshinobu; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Khalpey, Zain

    2017-10-10

    Advanced heart failure treated with a left ventricular assist device is associated with a higher risk of right heart failure. Many advanced heart failures patients are treated with an ICD, a relative contraindication to MRI, prior to assist device placement. Given this limitation, left and right ventricular function for patients with an ICD is calculated using radionuclide angiography utilizing planar multigated acquisition (MUGA) and first pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA), respectively. Given the availability of MRI protocols that can accommodate patients with ICDs, we have correlated the findings of ventricular functional analysis using radionuclide angiography to cardiac MRI, the reference standard for ventricle function calculation, to directly correlate calculated ejection fractions between these modalities, and to also assess agreement between available echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters of right ventricular function. A retrospective review from January 2012 through May 2014 was performed to identify advanced heart failure patients who underwent both cardiac MRI and radionuclide angiography for ventricular functional analysis. Nine heart failure patients (8 men, 1 woman; mean age of 57.0 years) were identified. The average time between the cardiac MRI and radionuclide angiography exams was 38.9 days (range: 1 - 119 days). All patients undergoing cardiac MRI were scanned using an institutionally approved protocol for ICD with no device-related complications identified. A retrospective chart review of each patient for cardiomyopathy diagnosis, clinical follow-up, and echocardiogram and right heart catheterization performed during evaluation was also performed. The 9 patients demonstrated a mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using cardiac MRI of 20.7% (12 - 40%). Mean LVEF using MUGA was 22.6% (12 - 49%). The mean right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) utilizing cardiac MRI was 28.3% (16 - 43%), and the mean RVEF calculated by

  17. /sup 99m/Tc radionuclide angioscintigraphic perfusion analysis in the assessment and follow-up of peripheral vascular diseases of the lower limbs

    Bencini, C.; Mazzuca, N.; Bertelli, P.; Pulera, N.; Mariani, G.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral arterial diseases (PADs) of the lower limbs such as thromboangitis obliterans (TAO) (Buerger's disease), arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) and diabetes mellitus, produce trophic disturbances occurring most often in the toes. Perfusion analysis of the foot and toes was previously reported. The analysis utilized radionuclide arteriography (RNA) during reactive hyperaemia to obtain peak activity in RNA time-activity curves (TACs). RNA was also used to assess healing capability of skin ulcers of the calf and ankle, which depends on localized enhancement of capillary blood flow. On these bases, detection of capillary blood flow assumes primary importance in the assessment of peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The purpose of this study was to determine whether RNA of the toes at rest could provide adequate assessment of microcirculation in PVD and of microcirculatory changes induced by lumbar sympathectomy (LS)

  18. Transfer of fallout radionuclides derived from Fukushima NPP accident: 1 year study on transfer of radionuclides through hydrological processes

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Patin, Jeremy; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tsujimura, Maki; Wakahara, Taeko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    Previous experiences such as Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident have confirmed that fallout radionuclides on the ground surface migrate through natural environment including soils and rivers. Therefore, in order to estimate future changes in radionuclide deposition, migration process of radionuclides in forests, soils, ground water, rivers should be monitored. However, such comprehensive studies on migration through forests, soils, ground water and rivers have not been conducted so far. Here, we present the following comprehensive investigation was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. 1)Study on depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland 2)Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests 3)Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use 4)Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils 5)Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use 6)Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments 7)Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments 8)Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs

  19. Relating β+ radionuclides' properties by order theory

    Quintero, N.Y.; Guillermo Restrepo; Cohen, I.M.; Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires

    2013-01-01

    We studied 27 β + radionuclides taking into account some of their variants encoding information of their production, such as integral yield, threshold energy and energy of projectiles used to generate them; these radionuclides are of current use in clinical diagnostic imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). The study was conducted based on physical, physico-chemical, nuclear, dosimetric and quantum properties, which characterise the β + radionuclides selected, with the aim of finding meaningful relationships among them. In order to accomplish this objective the mathematical methodology known as formal concept analysis was employed. We obtained a set of logical assertions (rules) classified as implications and associations, for the set of β + radionuclides considered. Some of them show that low mass defect is related to high and medium values of maximum β + energy, and with even parity and low mean lives; all these parameters are associated to the dose received by a patient subjected to a PET analysis. (author)

  20. Radionuclide mobility in the shallow portion of an active high-temperature geothermal system

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the behavior of radionuclides in natural rock-water systems is crucial for the prediction of the consequences of failure of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in progress at Argonne National Laboratory involves the detailed geochemical analysis of rock, mineral, and water samples from shallow drill holes in a thermal area of Yellowstone National Park. This study is designed to provide data that will increase our understanding of the behavior of a group of radionuclides in an environment similar to that of the near field of a high-level nuclear waste repository

  1. Least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields

    Griffin, P.J.; Williams, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields has been performed using the latest dosimetry cross sections. Discrepant nuclear data are identified and adjusted spectra for 252 Cf spontaneous fission and 235 U thermal fission fields are presented

  2. Radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere

    Moura Neto, C. de; Amorim, E.S. do; Panetta, J.

    1979-05-01

    The instantaneous liberation of radionuclides in the atmosphere is studied in three dimensions, according to the formalism of the diffusion theory. The analytical solution, expose to gravitational and an atmospherical effects, is combined with the discretization of space and time in the calculation of levels of exposure. A typical inventory (for a PWR) was considered in the calculation of immersion doses, and the results permitted a comparative analysis among the different existing models. (Author) [pt

  3. Choice of radionuclide for antibody labelling: new perspectives

    Hazra, D.K.; Dass, S.

    1983-01-01

    The expanding horizons of labelled antibody techniques in diagnostic imaging or assay, therapy and research and the availabilities of monoclonal antibodies is resulting in a demand for suitable radionuclides as antibody labels. An outline is given of the different criteria for choosing an appropriate radionuclide for labelling an antibody depending on its particular field of use. The requirements of procedures for firmly linking radionuclides to antibodies are also given. (U.K.)

  4. Symmetry analysis for anisotropic field theories

    Parra, Lorena; Vergara, J. David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study with the help of Noether's theorem the symmetries of anisotropic actions for arbitrary fields which generally depend on higher order spatial derivatives, and to find the corresponding current densities and the Noether charges. We study in particular scale invariance and consider the cases of higher derivative extensions of the scalar field, electrodynamics and Chern-Simons theory.

  5. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  6. Process and research method of radionuclide migration in high level radioactive waste geological disposal system

    Chen Rui; Zhang Zhanshi

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclides released from waste can migrate from the repository to the rock and soil outside. On the other hand, nuclides also are retarded by the backfill material. Radionuclide migration is the main geochemical process of the waste disposal. This paper introduces various methods for radionuclide migration research, and give a brief analysis of the geochemical process of radionuclide migration. Finally, two of the most important processes of the radionuclide migration have been instanced. (authors)

  7. Radio-sensitivity and 40K, 3H, 14C levels in dark-striped field mice, apodemus agrarius coreae, as a potential biological monitor for enviro-radiation and radionuclides

    Kim, Hee Sun; Song, Seung Yeon; Kim, Eun Joo; Choi, Hoon; Shin, Suk Chul; Kim, Chong Soon; Nishimura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To understand how environmental effects of radiation and radionuclides from radiation facilities relate to human beings, the development of an unmanned monitoring system is required. For the reasons of that, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests a method to evaluate the effects of radiation emitted from radiation facilities on marine water, freshwater, and habitats for land animals and plants on its Technical Report Series 190, 288, and 332. Recently, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication No. 91 (2003) was consecutively published to protect non-human animals and plants from environmental radiation and radioactive materials. This study examined the potential usefulness of dark-striped field mice as a biological indicator of enviro-radiation and radionuclides around nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage facilities. For the purpose, dark-striped mice were collected in regions of Korea where there are no radiation facilities. Their external morphological characters and isoenzyme patterns were observed. As a result, the most dark-striped mice scattered in Korea are Apodemus agrarius coreae

  8. Analysis of natural radionuclides and lead in foods and diets; Analise de radionuclideos naturais e chumbo em produtos alimenticios e dietas

    Bueno, Luciana

    1999-07-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to determine the lead-210, polonium-210 and lead concentrations in foods and diets. Consumption of food is generally the main route by which radionuclides can enter the human organism. Precision and accuracy of the methods developed were verifies by the analysis of reference materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The method for polonium-210 analysis consisted of sample dissolution by using a microwave digester (open system) employing concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, evaporation almost dryness, addition of hydrochloric acid, polonium deposition onto silver disc for six hours and counting by alpha spectrometry. Lead was analysed by atomic absorption technique. After sample dissolution in a microwave digester (using concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and dilution to 50 ml, 20{mu}l of the sample was injected in a pyrolytic graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with Zeeman background correction. The assessment of the contaminants in foods and diets allowed to estimate the intake of these elements and for the radionuclides were also evaluated the radiation doses that the individuals selected were exposed by the food consumption. The effective dose for lead-210 by diets intake ranged from 1.3 to 4.3 {mu}Sv/year, corresponding to 25% of the resulting from polonium-210 intake. The dose due to the both natural radionuclides varied from 6.8 to 23.0 {mu}Sv/year. These values are in good agreement with the literature data. The value estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 1993) that is 60 {mu}Sv and lower than the dose of 0.02 Sv, limit established by ICRP, 1980. The lead levels found in the majority of the Brazilian foods are in good agreement with the values published by CONAT and FAO/WHO. However, some foods such as bean, potato, papaya, apple and rice present levels above of the recommended values by the

  9. Radionuclides migration or isolation?

    Toulhoat, P.; Grambow, B.; Simoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    After 20 years of research, the chemical behaviour of actinides and fission products in nuclear waste disposal environments is much better understood. Consistent thermodynamic data have been gathered and allow much more accurate previsions. Through the considerable development of analytical spectroscopy, including time resolved laser fluorescence and X ray absorption, a better understanding of the chemical reactivity (complexation, sorption) of actinides and fission products at a molecular scale has been possible. Chemically reducing conditions are found in most selected disposal host rock formations, generally chosen for their high sorption capacity (clays); such conditions favour the chemical confinement of most radionuclides through precipitation or sorption. Low permeability host rocks participate to this confinement, as convective fluxes are lower than diffusive fluxes. The most recent performance assessment exercises have taken into account the recent progress of knowledge in the chemical evolution of the near field. They show that the dose rates at the outlet are far lower than existing recommendations for normal and most altered evolution scenarios. (authors)

  10. Generator for radionuclide

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  11. Status of subseabed repository design concepts and radionuclide

    Brush, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Various projects underway in support of the marine disposal of radioactive wastes are described. These include: geochemical studies on sediments; canister-related research and development activities; radionuclide transport studies through smectitic sediments; seawater-sediment interactions under near-field conditions; effects of a radiation field on high temperature, seawater-sediment interactions; sorption of fission products and actinides by deep-sea sediments under far-field (below 100 0 C) conditions; sorption experiments using column diffusion; development of a computer code, IONMIG, to model the migration of radionuclides through undisturbed deep-sea sediments; and planning for a field test of the laboratory measurements and computer models of radionuclide transport

  12. Natural uranium-series radionuclide inventories in coastal and oceanic waters of the south-western Pacific - insights into trace metal flux and removal pathway analysis

    Szymczak, R.; Jeffree, R.A.; Peck, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Participate scavenging of trace metals plays a major role in determining their ecosystem flux and incident dissolved concentrations. Differences in the half-lives and biogeochemical behaviour of natural uranium series radioisotope pairs (eg. 238 U/ 234 Th, 210 Pb/ 210 Po) allow their application as oceanic process tracers. Coincidental measurements of dissolved and particulate trace element concentrations and inventories of radionuclides in the Noumea coral lagoon and adjacent offshore waters were used to quantify water column flux rates and provide insights on removal pathway analysis. Understanding prevailing pathways and respective flux rates of pollutants in specific coastal and oceanic systems will assist to establish the fate and consequence of pollutants and allow sustainable management strategies to be developed. Both natural and pollutant chemical species introduced to the marine environment may either remain benign in solution or undergo physiological uptake by biota, but most often associate with colloids and fine particles, which subsequent undergo aggregation, sedimentation and removal to the sea floor

  13. Foundations of analysis over surreal number fields

    Alling, NL

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, a tower of surreal number fields is defined, each being a real-closed field having a canonical formal power series structure and many other higher order properties. Formal versions of such theorems as the Implicit Function Theorem hold over such fields. The Main Theorem states that every formal power series in a finite number of variables over a surreal field has a positive radius of hyper-convergence within which it may be evaluated. Analytic functions of several surreal and surcomplex variables can then be defined and studied. Some first results in the one variable case are derived. A primer on Conway''s field of surreal numbers is also given. Throughout the manuscript, great efforts have been made to make the volume fairly self-contained. Much exposition is given. Many references are cited. While experts may want to turn quickly to new results, students should be able to find the explanation of many elementary points of interest. On the other hand, many new results are given, and much mathe...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy approaches to the assessment of radionuclide migration for the geologic repository program

    Luik, A.E. van; Apted, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Potential radionuclide migration in geologic repositories is being addressed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management through its Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR). A diversity of geohydrologic settings is being investigated: unsaturated tuff, saturated basalt, and bedded salt. A number of approaches to assessing potential migration are being considered. Mass transfer is prominent among near-field approaches. For far-field analysis of migration in the geosphere, detailed characterizations of potential repository sites will lead to site-specific models describing radionuclide migration for a variety of postulated release scenarios. Finite-element and finite-difference codes are being used and developed to solve the mathematical equations pertinent to far-field assessments. Computational approaches presently in use generally require distribution coefficients to estimate the retardation of specific radionuclides with respect to the transport rate of water. 26 refs

  15. Inventories of selected radionuclides in the oceans

    1988-10-01

    In March 1984 an ad hoc Review Committee composed of senior experts in the marine radioactivity field made recommendations that ''the Monaco Laboratory should be engaged in compiling and evaluating the input of radionuclides into the marine environment''. The Committee recommended that work should commence on selected radionuclides, viz., 14 C, caesium isotopes, plutonium isotopes, 210 Po and 210 Pb followed by 226 Ra. Depending on the radionuclides involved the assistance of competent experts from outside as well as inside the IAEA was sought. The present document is a product of the work carried out within the framework of the above-mentioned task and contains reports on 14 C, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, 239+240 Pu, 210 Pb, 210 Po and 226 Ra. Although the estimation of the inventory in the marine environment and related input and output fluxes, is the same for all radionuclides concerned, different approaches were followed to achieve this objective. These approaches depended on the geochemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the availability of data for different times and locations. For regions where data were lacking, extrapolation on the basis of specific assumptions has often been necessary. As the work was initiated during the pre-Chernobyl period, the radionuclides derived from the Chernobyl incident were not, in general, considered. Since the work for preparing the forthcoming report of the UNSCEAR is scheduled to be completed by 1991, it is hoped that the information contained in this volume will be beneficial. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 240 Pu, and 3 H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay

  17. Radionuclide transfer in terrestrial animals

    DiGregorio, D.; Kitchings, T.; Van Voris, P.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of dispersion of radionuclides in terrestrial food chains, generally, is a series of equations identifying the fractional input and outflow rates from trophic level to trophic level. Data that are prerequisite inputs for these food chain transport models include: (1) identification of specific transport pathway, (2) assimilation at each pathway link, and (3) the turnover rate or retention function by successive receptor species in the appropriate food chain. In this report, assimilation coefficients, biological half-lives, and excretion rates for a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and radionuclides have been compiled from an extensive search of the available literature. Using the information accumulated from the literature, correlations of nuclide metabolism and body weight are also discussed. (author)

  18. Field distribution analysis in deflecting structures

    Paramonov, V.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Deflecting structures are used now manly for bunch rotation in emittance exchange concepts, bunch diagnostics and to increase the luminosity. The bunch rotation is a transformation of a particles distribution in the six dimensional phase space. Together with the expected transformations, deflecting structures introduce distortions due to particularities - aberrations - in the deflecting field distribution. The distributions of deflecting fields are considered with respect to non linear additions, which provide emittance deteriorations during a transformation. The deflecting field is treated as combination of hybrid waves HE{sub 1} and HM{sub 1}. The criteria for selection and formation of deflecting structures with minimized level of aberrations are formulated and applied to known structures. Results of the study are confirmed by comparison with results of numerical simulations.

  19. Field distribution analysis in deflecting structures

    Paramonov, V.V.

    2013-02-01

    Deflecting structures are used now manly for bunch rotation in emittance exchange concepts, bunch diagnostics and to increase the luminosity. The bunch rotation is a transformation of a particles distribution in the six dimensional phase space. Together with the expected transformations, deflecting structures introduce distortions due to particularities - aberrations - in the deflecting field distribution. The distributions of deflecting fields are considered with respect to non linear additions, which provide emittance deteriorations during a transformation. The deflecting field is treated as combination of hybrid waves HE 1 and HM 1 . The criteria for selection and formation of deflecting structures with minimized level of aberrations are formulated and applied to known structures. Results of the study are confirmed by comparison with results of numerical simulations.

  20. Airborne anthropogenic radioactivity measurements from an international radionuclide monitoring system

    Mason, L.R.; Bohner, J.D.; Williams, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Anthropogenic radioactivity is being measured in near-real time by an international monitoring system designed to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Airborne radioactivity measurements are conducted in-situ by stations that are linked to a central data processing and analysis facility. Aerosols are separated by high-volume air sampling with high-efficiency particulate filters. Radio-xenon is separated from other gases through cryogenic methods. Gamma-spectrometry is performed by high purity germanium detectors and the raw spectral data is immediately transmitted to the central facility via Internet, satellite, or modem. These highly sensitive sensors, combined with the automated data processing at the central facility, result in a system capable of measuring environmental radioactivity on the microbecquerel scale where the data is available to scientists within minutes of the field measurement. During the past year, anthropogenic radioactivity has been measured at approximately half of the stations in the current network. Sources of these measured radionuclides include nuclear power plant emissions, Chernobyl resuspension, and isotope production facilities. The ability to thoroughly characterize site-specific radionuclides, which contribute to the radioactivity of the ambient environment, will be necessary to reduce the number of false positive events. This is especially true of anthropogenic radionuclides that could lead to ambiguous analysis. (author)

  1. Development of uncertainty analyses for the transport of radionuclides from a repository for high-level radioactive waste. Stage one

    Sundstroem, B.

    1986-10-01

    The escape of radionuclides from a repository for high level waste is described by the near field model LCHCAL and the geosphere models GEO1/SU and NUCDIF. These models are used to calculate the radionuclide outflow to the biosphere. The uncertainties in the input parameters to the near field and geosphere models are handled by the uncertainty analysis models PARVAR and SYVAC/SU. The uncertainty analysis models have been tested on two nuclides, 14 C and 135 Cs, for cases with pure surface sorption and matrix diffusion. In the case of surface sorption five input parameters and for matrix diffusion six input parameters were varied. The results of the uncertainty analyses are presented in the form of histograms, scatter plots, isocontour plots and 3-dimensional plots of the radionuclide release to the biosphere. Also the ten highest maximum release rates and correlation coefficients are presented. (orig.)

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River

    Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

    1993-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) review and summarize historical data on radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River, (2) determine present-day radionuclide tissue burdens from different locations in the Columbia River, and (3) compare historical data with current data. We first reviewed and summarized the historical literature on radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Hanford Reach. Field studies were then conducted to evaluate the relationship among sample locations, age/length of white sturgeon, and present radionuclide tissue burdens. Results and comparisons are discussed in the remainder of this report

  3. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    ... Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  4. Natural and Synthetic Barriers to Immobilize Radionuclides

    Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    The experiments of weathering of glass waste form and the reacted sediments with simulated glass leachates show that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of secondary precipitates. In addition, synthetic phosphate-bearing nanoporous material exhibits high stability at temperature and has a very high K d value for U(VI) removal. Both natural and synthetic barrier materials can be used as additional efficient adsorbents for retarding transport of radionuclides for various contaminated waste streams and waste forms present at U. S. Department of Energy clean-up sites and the proposed geologic radioactive waste disposal facility. In the radioactive waste repository facility, natural or synthetic materials are planned to be used as a barrier material to immobilize and retard radionuclide release. The getter material can be used to selectively scavenge the radionuclide of interest from a liquid waste stream and subsequently incorporate the loaded getters in a cementitious or various monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides form monolithic waste forms by being emplaced as a backfill barrier material around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential hazard of leached radioactive wastes. The barrier material should be highly efficient to sequester radionuclides and possess physical and chemical stability for long-term exposure to severe weathering conditions. Because potential leaching of radionuclides depends on various environmental and weathering conditions of the near-field repository, the barrier materials must be durable and not disintegrate under a range of moisture, temperature, pressure, radiation, Eh, ph. and

  5. Harmonic analysis on local fields and adelic spaces. I

    Osipov, D V; Parshin, A N

    2008-01-01

    We develop harmonic analysis on the objects of a category C 2 of infinite-dimensional filtered vector spaces over a finite field. This category includes two-dimensional local fields and adelic spaces of algebraic surfaces defined over a finite field. As the main result, we construct the theory of the Fourier transform on these objects and obtain two-dimensional Poisson formulae

  6. UNDERWATER ANALYSIS OF IRRADIATED REACTOR SLUGS FOR Co-60 AND OTHER RADIONUCLIDES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    CASELLA, VITO

    2004-01-01

    Co-60 was produced in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors in the 1970s, and the irradiated cobalt reactor slugs were stored in a reactor basin at SRS. Since the activity rates of these slugs were not accurately known, assaying was required. A sodium iodide gamma detector was placed above a specially designed air collimator assembly, so that the slug was eight to nine feet from the detector and was shielded by the basin water. Also, 18 curium sampler slugs, used to produce Cm-244 from Pu-239, were to be disposed of with the cobalt slugs. The curium slugs were also analyzed with a High Purity Germanium (HPGE) detector in an attempt to identify any additional radionuclides produced from the irradiation. Co-60 concentrations were determined for reactor disassembly basin cobalt slugs and the 18 curium sampler slugs. The total Co-60 activity of all of the assayed slugs in this work summed to 31,783 curies on 9/15/03. From the Co-60 concentrations of the curium sampler slugs, the irradiation flux was determined for the known irradiation time. The amounts of Pu-238,-239,-240,-241,-242; Am-241,-243; and Cm-242,-244 produced were then obtained based on the original amount of Pu-239 irradiated

  7. Application of ICP-MS radionuclide analysis to 'Real World' samples of Department of Energy radioactive waste

    Meeks, A.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste into repositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires characterization to ensure regulatory and transportation requirements are met and to collect information regarding chemistry of the waste for processing concerns. Recent addition of an inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer in a radioactive contaminated laboratory at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has allowed the evaluation of advantages of using ICP-MS over traditional techniques for some of these characterization needs. The measurement of long-lived beta nuclides (i.e. 99 Tc) by ICP-MS has resulted in improved detection limits and accuracy than the traditional counting techniques as well as reducing the need for separation/purification techniques which increase personnel exposure to radiation. Using ICP-MS for the measurement of U isotopes versus the traditional Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) technique has reduced cost and time by more than half while still maintaining the needed accuracy to determine risk assessment of the waste tanks. In addition, the application of ICP-MS to ORNL waste tank characterization has provided the opportunity to estimate non-routine radionuclides (i.e. 135 Cs and 151 Sm) and non-routine metals (i.e. Li, Ti, rare earths, etc.) using a rapid low cost screening method. These application methodologies and proficiencies on ORNL waste samples are summarized throughout the paper. (author)

  8. Analysis of cobbly soils for cobbles-to-fines corrections to radionuclide concentrations at the New Rifle, Colorado, processing site

    1994-05-01

    A contamination depth and cobbly soil characterization study was performed in November and December 1993 at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Projects's New Rifle, Colorado, processing site. This study was initiated due to a concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) clarifying that the allowable residual contamination in soil should be averaged over the total mass of the soil volume, including cobbles and gravels (i.e., bulk concentration). The New Rifle processing site has a high percentage of cobbles and gravels underlying the pile and other contaminated areas, which preliminary excavation designs have identified for removal and disposal. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative mass percentage and radionuclide concentrations of cobbles and gravels in order to determine the bulk contamination concentrations, revise the underlying excavation design depths, and improve verification methods. Another important goal of the study was to acquire more accurate contamination depth data (profile) for the subpile material. In summary, this recharacterization study will probably reduce the volume of material for excavation/disposal by several hundred thousand cubic yards and significantly reduce the amount of ground water expected to be pumped out of the excavation during cleanup

  9. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  10. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  11. Radon-Wigner transform for optical field analysis

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.; Nijhawan, O.P.; Gupta, A.K.; Musla, A.K.; Singh, Kehar

    1998-01-01

    The Radon-Wigner transform, associated with the intensity distribution in the fractional Fourier transform system, is used for the analysis of complex structures of coherent as well as partially coherent optical fields. The application of the Radon-Wigner transform to the analysis of fractal fields

  12. Laboratory and field studies related to radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site. Progress report, October 1, 1996 - September 30, 1997

    Thompson, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    In this report the authors describe the work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 1997 for the Hydrologic Resources Management Program funded by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. A major part of their work is the study of the movement underground of radioactive material from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This year water samples from near the nuclear tests BULLION, BILBY, DALHART, CHESHIRE, and TYBO were analyzed for radionuclides. Data from the first four sites were consistent with expectations based on previous measurements; however, the water from TYBO contained unexpected amounts of plutonium. This plutonium was subsequently found to originate from the BENHAM test which was located 1.3 km distant. The low concentration of plutonium was associated with natural groundwater colloids and could be largely removed by filtration. The authors are attempting to identify the physical and chemical form of the plutonium and to assess the mechanism(s) of its movement over the observed distance. They report the successful testing of small diameter pumps in tandem to extract water form tubing too small to accommodate other means of pumping. And finally, they review this year's consultative and educational activities and list their publications

  13. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  14. Analytical evaluation of the radionuclide concentration through the aquifer for the Abadia de Goias Repository

    Alves, Antonio Sergio de Martin

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the radionuclide concentration though the aquifer has been determined by an analytical process considering that the radionuclide migration is influenced by two kinds of radionuclides releases from the repository during an overflow. In the first release it is assumed that when the radionuclides reach the aquifer there is no contamination in it and the release rate is a constant. For this case it is utilized the model of Reference. For the subsequent releases there will be a contamination in the aquifer provenient from the former releases; it is considered that the subsequent releases are a function of the time which, for the Abadia de Goias Repository, was determined in the Reference. The Laplace transform Method has been utilized to solve the Radionuclide Migration Transport Equation in the aquifer region for the subsequent releases and the resulting function is expressed in terms of exponential and complementary error functions. The improvement in the calculation model, presented in this paper, can be used in the safety analysis of repositories, contributing thus in the nuclear waste management field and particularly, being connecting also to the environmental protection concern. (author)

  15. Radionuclide assessment of vascular complications in renal transplant patients

    Chanard, J.; Clavel, P.; Loboguerreros, A.; Toupance, O.; Lepailleur, A.; Brandt, B.; Liehn, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear medicine can make an efficient contribution to the diagnosis and monitoring of renal disease and to the assessment of therapeutic interventions in the field of renal transplantation. The new radio pharmaceutical MAG 3 labelled with 99m Tc provides renal imaging of quality in patients with impaired renal function and enables quantitative evaluation of renal function. We report on radionuclide evaluation, with special emphasis on the analysis of the vascular component of the scintigram, in the different clinical situations (i.e. renal failure) that may compromise the outcome of a successful renal transplant. (authors)

  16. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  17. Effective field theory analysis of Higgs naturalness

    Bar-Shalom, Shaouly [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel); Soni, Amarjit [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wudka, Jose [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Assuming the presence of physics beyond the Standard Model ( SM) with a characteristic scale M ~ O (10) TeV, we investigate the naturalness of the Higgs sector at scales below M using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. We obtain the leading 1 -loop EFT contributions to the Higgs mass with a Wilsonian-like hard cutoff, and determine t he constraints on the corresponding operator coefficients for these effects to alleviate the little hierarchy problem up to the scale of the effective action Λ < M , a condition we denote by “EFT-naturalness”. We also determine the types of physics that can lead to EFT-naturalness and show that these types of new physics are best probed in vector-boson and multiple-Higgs production. The current experimental constraints on these coefficients are also discussed.

  18. Probabilistic Analysis of Gas Turbine Field Performance

    Gorla, Rama S. R.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine thermodynamic cycle was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of the several uncertainties in the performance parameters, which are indices of gas turbine health. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for the overall thermal efficiency and net specific power output due to the thermodynamic random variables. These results can be used to quickly identify the most critical design variables in order to optimize the design, enhance performance, increase system availability and make it cost effective. The analysis leads to the selection of the appropriate measurements to be used in the gas turbine health determination and to the identification of both the most critical measurements and parameters. Probabilistic analysis aims at unifying and improving the control and health monitoring of gas turbine aero-engines by increasing the quality and quantity of information available about the engine's health and performance.

  19. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Near-Field of a Repository for Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    Berner, U

    2002-10-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from SF/HLW wastes, disposed of in a reducing clay (Opalinus Clay, bentonite) environment. Solubility and speciation calculations in bentonite pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 37 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Particularly for the most relevant actinides, the straightforward applications with this updated TDB yielded results in contradiction to chemical analogy considerations. This was a consequence of incomplete data and called for problem specific TDB extensions, which were evaluated in a separate study. However, a summary of these problem specific extensions is provided in section 4.1. The results presented in this report solely depend on geochemical model calculations. Thus, it is of utmost importance that the underlying data and assumptions are made clear to the reader. In order to ensure traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the Nagra/PSI TDB are explicitly specified in the report, in order to provide complete documentation for quality assurance and for comprehensibility. In order to clearly distinguish between results derived from data carefully reviewed in the Nagra/PSI TDB and those calculated from 'other' data, the summary of expected maximum concentrations provided in Table 1 includes two columns. The heading CALCULATED provides maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the updated TDB, whereas maximum concentrations, which include additional problem specific data and/or data from other sources, are given under the heading RECOMMENDED. The

  20. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Near-Field of a Repository for Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    Berner, U.

    2002-10-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from SF/HLW wastes, disposed of in a reducing clay (Opalinus Clay, bentonite) environment. Solubility and speciation calculations in bentonite pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 37 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Particularly for the most relevant actinides, the straightforward applications with this updated TDB yielded results in contradiction to chemical analogy considerations. This was a consequence of incomplete data and called for problem specific TDB extensions, which were evaluated in a separate study. However, a summary of these problem specific extensions is provided in section 4.1. The results presented in this report solely depend on geochemical model calculations. Thus, it is of utmost importance that the underlying data and assumptions are made clear to the reader. In order to ensure traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the Nagra/PSI TDB are explicitly specified in the report, in order to provide complete documentation for quality assurance and for comprehensibility. In order to clearly distinguish between results derived from data carefully reviewed in the Nagra/PSI TDB and those calculated from 'other' data, the summary of expected maximum concentrations provided in Table 1 includes two columns. The heading CALCULATED provides maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the updated TDB, whereas maximum concentrations, which include additional problem specific data and/or data from other sources, are given under the heading RECOMMENDED. The present study also pays

  1. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Radionuclides in house dust

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  3. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237

  4. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  5. The collection and field chemical analysis of water samples

    Korte, N.E.; Ealey, D.T.; Hollenbach, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    A successful water sampling program requires a clear understanding of appropriate measurement and sampling procedures in order to obtain reliable field data and representative samples. It is imperative that the personnel involved have a thorough knowledge of the limitations of the techniques being used. Though this seems self-evident, many sampling and field-chemical-analysis programs are still not properly conducted. Recognizing these problems, the Department of Energy contracted with Bendix Field Engineering Corporation through the Technical Measurements Center to develop and select procedures for water sampling and field chemical analysis at waste sites. The fundamental causese of poor field programs are addressed in this paper, largely through discussion of specific field-measurement techniques and their limitations. Recommendations for improvement, including quality-assurance measures, are also presented

  6. Investigations of the corrosion behaviour of the Si-containing stainless steel 1.4361 with combined surface analysis, electrochemistry and radionuclide technique

    Maar-Stumm, M.

    1990-03-01

    The present work aimed at detailed information on the corrosion behaviour and particularly the corrosion mechanism of the steel 1.4361 in concentrated nitric acid by use of a combination of electrochemical methods, radionuclide technique and surface analysis. For comparison steel samples corroded by other methods were investigated by surface analysis, too. At the beginning of the corrosion in nitric acid Fe and Ni are dissolved preferentially. Cr and Si are enriched in the surface region. A primary corrosion layer is formed which is equivalent to the oxidic overlayer of atmospherically oxidized samples. It consists of the oxides of chromium and iron mixed up with glass-like SiO 2 . Ni does not contribute to the formation of the oxidic overlayer. On top of this primary corrosion layer there is an isolating gel-like SiO 2 -layer with a thickness depending on strength and duration of the corrosive attack. Its mechanical stability decreases with increasing layer thickness. At the boundary to the primary corrosion layer this gel-like SiO 2 -layer is closed, mechanically stable and conducting. Samples corroded under the standardized conditions of the Huey-test show a similar structure of the overlayer with the exception that the primary corrosion layer consists only of glass-like SiO 2 . The combination of several methods revealed detailed information about mass loss and structure of the overlayer at different electrode potentials. (orig./MM) [de

  7. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  8. Radionuclides in foods

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  9. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  10. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  11. Radionuclide deposition control

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the deposition, on to the surfaces of reactor components, of the radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from a liquid stream containing the radionuclides. The method consists of disposing a getter material (nickel) in the liquid stream, and a non-getter material (tantalum, tungsten or molybdenum) as a coating on the surfaces where deposition is not desired. The process is described with special reference to its use in the coolant circuit in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (U.K.)

  12. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  13. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  14. Estimating the diffuseness of sound fields: A wavenumber analysis method

    Nolan, Melanie; Davy, John L.; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a diffuse sound field is widely used in the analysis of sound in enclosures. The diffuse sound field is generally described as composed of plane waves with random phases, which wave number vectors are uniformly distributed over all angles of incidence. In this study, an interpretat...

  15. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    Kuhl, D.E.; Edwards, R.Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program. 5 claims, 11 figures

  16. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow Injection Solid-Phase Absorptiometry to Equilibration-Based Preconcentrating Minicolumn Sensors with Radiometric Detection

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Devol, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The development of in situ sensors for ultratrace detection applications in process control and environmental monitoring remains a significant challenge. Such sensors must meet difficult detection limit requirements while selectively detecting the analyte of interest in complex or otherwise challenging sample matrixes. Nowhere are these requirements more daunting than in the field of radionuclide sensing. The detection limit requirements can be extremely low. Nevertheless, a promising approach to radionuclide sensing based on preconcentrating minicolumn sensors has been developed. In addition, a method of operating such sensors, which we call equilibration-based sensing, has been developed that provides substantial preconcentration and a signal that is proportional to analyte concentration, while eliminating the need for reagents to regenerate the sorbent medium following each measurement. While this equilibration-based sensing method was developed for radionuclide sensing, it can be applied to nonradioactive species as well, given a suitable on-column detection system. By replacing costly sampling and laboratory analysis procedures, in situ sensors could have a significant impact on monitoring and long term stewardship applications. The aim of this review is to cover radionuclide sensors that combine some form of selective sorption with a radiometric detection method, and, as a primary aim, to comprehensively review preconcentrating minicolumn sensors for radionuclide detection. As a secondary aim, we will cover radionuclide sensors that combine sorption and scintillation in formats other than minicolumn sensors. We are particularly concerned with the detection of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides, which present particular challenges for measurements in liquid media

  17. Current technology in sampling for airborne radionuclides

    Schulte, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    Sampling for airborne radionuclides is an important part of assessing the occupational environment and that of the public or out-plant environment. Both of these are important to the operation of any nuclear facility. Most such facilities do not emit radionuclides continuously to any extent and hence both the occupational and environmental sampling system is designed to detect deviations from normal conditions or untoward events. Work with materials of a low degree of radioactivity or with nonradioactive materials may involve operations which are not enclosed and significant contaminating material may always exist in the air. In this case, the sampling is directed toward measuring this ambient level and assessing its continued impact on the worker and on the environment. Publication No. 12 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection specifies the types of operations where sampling is necessary for worker protection and the American National Standards Institute publication N 13.1-1969 is a guide to the methods used. Increasingly, this field is covered by various regulations which specify when sampling must be done and, in some cases, how it shall be done. These include requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Needless to say, where these have specified methods they must be followed although in most cases exact procedures are not detailed as requirements. Within the plant, needs for sampling are often suggested by surface monitoring results and by bioassay, and outside by analysis of plants, soils, and material from fallout trays. 15 references

  18. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of

  19. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  20. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    2010-04-01

    ... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... patient's body. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display equipment, patient and...

  1. Analysis of the temporal electric fields in lossy dielectric media

    McAllister, Iain Wilson; Crichton, George C

    1991-01-01

    The time-dependent electric fields associated with lossy dielectric media are examined. The analysis illustrates that, with respect to the basic time constant, these lossy media can take a considerable time to attain a steady-state condition. Time-dependent field enhancement factors are considered......, and inherent surface-charge densities quantified. The calculation of electrostatic forces on a free, lossy dielectric particle is illustrated. An extension to the basic analysis demonstrates that, on reversal of polarity, the resultant tangential field at the interface could play a decisive role...

  2. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  3. DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS OF LOW FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD

    PETRICA POPOV

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years more and more studies have shown that, the low frequency field strength (particularly magnetic, 50 / 60Hz are a major risk factor; according to some specialists - even more important as the radiation field. As a result, the personnel serving equipment and facilities such as: electric generators, synchronous, the motors, the inverters or power transformers is subjected continually to intense fields, in their vicinity, with possible harmful effects in the long term by affecting metabolism cell, espectively, the biological mechanisms.Therefore, finding new methods and tools for measurement and analysis of low frequency electromagnetic fields may lead to improved standards for exposure limits of the human body.

  4. Taking radionuclides to heart

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  5. Soil burden by radionuclides

    Blum, W.E.H.; Wenzel, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity - half-lifes and radiation type of man-made nuclides, radionuclide behaviour in soils, effects on soil condition and soil functions are described. The only mode of decontamination is by decay and thus primarily dependent on the half-life of nuclides

  6. Radionuclides in house dust

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  7. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    Shore, B; Anspaugh, L; Chertok, R; Gofman, J; Harrison, F; Heft, R; Koranda, J; Ng, Y; Phelps, P; Potter, G; Tamplin, A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  8. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    Shore, B.; Anspaugh, L.; Chertok, R.; Gofman, J.; Harrison, F.; Heft, R.; Koranda, J.; Ng, Y.; Phelps, P.; Potter, G.; Tamplin, A.

    1969-01-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  9. Natural radionuclides tracing in marine surface waters along the northern coast of Oman Sea by combining the radioactivity analysis, oceanic currents and the SWAN model results

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mostajaboddavati, Mojtaba; Kamali, Mahdi; Tari, Marziyeh; Mosayebi, Sanaz; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This study estimates radioactive pollution diffusion in coastline of the Oman Sea. • 36 high volume surface water samples were analyzed using a portable HPGe detector. • Oceanic currents in the northern coast of Oman Sea were investigated. • The spectral wave model SWAN was used for wave parameters simulation. • Currents and preferable wave directions were coupled with higher radioactivity. - Abstract: This study aims to establish a managed sampling plan for rapid estimate of natural radio-nuclides diffusion in the northern coast of the Oman Sea. First, the natural radioactivity analysis in 36 high volume surface water samples was carried out using a portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Second, the oceanic currents in the northern coast were investigated. Then, the third generation spectral SWAN model was utilized to simulate wave parameters. Direction of natural radioactivity propagation was coupled with the preferable wave vectors and oceanic currents direction that face to any marine pollution, these last two factors will contribute to increase or decrease of pollution in each grid. The results were indicated that the natural radioactivity concentration between the grids 8600 and 8604 is gathered in the grid 8600 and between the grids 8605 and 8608 is propagated toward middle part of Oman Sea

  10. Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report: Task kd.5b

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Legore, Virginia L.; Parker, Kent E.; Orr, Robert D.; McCready, David E.; )

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste-Performance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field environment of disposed vitrified wastes. The results of these experiments demonstrated that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of cage structured minerals such as sodalite from weathering glasses. These results have important implications regarding radionuclide sequestration/mobilization aspects that are not currently accounted for in the ILAW PA. Additional studies are required to confirm the results and to develop an improved understanding of the mechanisms of sequestration of radionuclides into the secondary and tertiary weathering products o f the ILAW glass to help refine how contaminants are released from the near-field disposal region out into the accessible environment. Of particular interest is to determine whether the contaminants remain sequestered in the glass weathering products for hundreds to thousands of years. If the sequestration can be shown to continue for long periods, another immobilization process can be added to the PA analysis and predicted risks should be lower than past predictions

  11. The results of artificial radionuclides monitoring in the Baltic sea

    Astrauskiene, N.; Lukinskiene, M; Zemaitiene, G.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term radionuclides volume activity (v.a.) monitoring (1976-1990) data showed that measurement results obtained in steady observation station give reliable information of the coastal area of the Baltic sea radioactive equilibrium between atmosphere and surface water was observed in the coastal zone. Chernobyl Power Plant accident influenced upon the Baltic sea coastal water by radionuclides 137 Cs and 144 Ce. Radionuclide 90 Sr volume activity was practically unchangerable. The mechanism of radionuclides fallout from atmosphere are various. lt can be illustrated by 137 Cs and 144 Ce a.v. structure field variations in open sea and coastal zone near Juodkrante. The Baltic sea inhomogeneous contamination by radionuclide 137 Cs in 1988-1990 leads to equalization of 137 Cs v.a. in the surface waters and it causes v.a. increase in coastal waters. (author)

  12. Nanoscaled biological gated field effect transistors for cytogenetic analysis

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Andersen, Karsten Brandt

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is the study of chromosome structure and function, and is often used in cancer diagnosis, as many chromosome abnormalities are linked to the onset of cancer. A novel label free detection method for chromosomal translocation analysis using nanoscaled field effect transistors...

  13. Practical experience in and improvements to aerosol sampling for trace analysis of airborne radionuclides in ground level air

    Arnold, D.; Jagielak, J.; Kolb, W.; Pietruszewski, A.; Wershofen, H.; Zarucki, R.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1989 the Polish government and the German government signed a bilateral agreement for scientific and technological co-operation. In the framework of this co-operation the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLRP), Warsaw, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, conducted a co-operation project in the field of monitoring the airborne radioactivity in ground level air. This progress report deals with the history of the project covering the period from July 1990 to December 1992, the scientific activities and their results. A proposal for future co-operation, which is planned for the near future, is made. (orig.)

  14. Neutron dosemeter responses in workplace fields and the implications of using realistic neutron calibration fields

    Thomas, D.J.; Horwood, N.; Taylor, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    The use of realistic neutron calibration fields to overcome some of the problems associated with the response functions of presently available dosemeters, both area survey instruments and personal dosemeters, has been investigated. Realistic calibration fields have spectra which, compared to conventional radionuclide source based calibration fields, more closely match those of the workplace fields in which dosemeters are used. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to identify laboratory systems which would produce appropriate workplace-like calibration fields. A detailed analysis was then undertaken of the predicted under- and over-responses of dosemeters in a wide selection of measured workplace field spectra assuming calibration in a selection of calibration fields. These included both conventional radionuclide source calibration fields, and also several proposed realistic calibration fields. The present state of the art for dosemeter performance, and the possibilities of improving accuracy by using realistic calibration fields are both presented. (author)

  15. Biological effect of radionuclides on plants

    Prister, B.S.; Khal'chenko, V.A.; Polyakova, V.Y.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Shejn, G.P.; Aleksakhin, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Stated are dosimetry principles and given is an analysis of biological radionuclide effect on plants in aerial and root intakes. A comparative barley radiosensitivity characteristic depending on plant development phases during irradiation is given using LD 50 criteria. Considered is a possibility for using generalized bioinformation parameters as sensitive indications for estimating biological effects due to the influence of low radiation doses. On the grounds of data obtained generalization are forecasted probable losses of crops when getting radionuclides into plants during various vegetation periods

  16. Radionuclide cardiography in medical practice

    Strangfeld, D.; Mohnike, W.; Schmidt, J.; Heine, H.; Correns, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compendium on all aspects of radionuclide diagnostics concerning cardiovascular system diseases. Starting with introductory remarks on the control of cardiovascular diseases the contribution of radionuclide cardiology to functional cardiovascular diagnostics as well as pathophysiological and pathobiochemical aspects of radiocardiography are outlined. Radiopharmaceuticals used in radiocardiography, physical and technical problems in application of radionuclides and their measuring techniques are discussed. In individual chapters radionuclide ventriculography, myocardial scintiscanning, circulatory diagnostics, radionuclide diagnostics of arterial hypertension, of thrombosis and in vitro diagnostics of thrombophilia are treated in the framework of clinical medicine

  17. The analysis of impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources

    N. A. Nerosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was analyzed. On engineering software MATHCAD the program for calculation of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was created. To verify this algorithm the calculation model for MCNP code was established and represented the area consisted of soft biological tissue or any other tissue in which the grid of microsources was incorporated. Using the developed system the value of possible systematic irregular coating of radioactivity on the microsource’s core was analyzed. The distribution of activity along the surface of microsource was simulated to create distribution of absorbed dose rate corresponding to experimental data on radiation injury. The obtained model of microsource with irregular distribution of activity was compared to conventional microsource with core coated regularly along the entire area of the silver stem by main dosimetry characteristics. The results showed that even for extremely irregular distribution of activity the distribution of dose rate produced by microsource in the tumor area was not substantially different from dose-rate field obtained for microsource with regularly coated activity. The differences in dose rates (up to 10% in areas which were the nearest to the center of the grid were significantly lower than its decline from center to periphery of the grid. For spatial distribution of absorbed dose for specific configuration of microsource set and tracing of curves of equal level by selected cut-off the program SEEDPLAN was developed. The developed program represents precisely enough the spatial distribution of selected configuration set of microsources using results of calculation data for absorbed dose around the single microsource as basic data and may be used for optimal planning of brachytherapy with microsources. 

  18. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    Hernández-Ceballos, M.A.; Hong, G.H.; Lozano, R.L.; Kim, Y.I.; Lee, H.M.; Kim, S.H.; Yeh, S.-W.; Bolívar, J.P.; Baskaran, M.

    2012-01-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: ► Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. ► Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. ► Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. ► Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. ► Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  19. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    Hernandez-Ceballos, M.A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lozano, R.L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Kim, Y.I. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Uljin 767-813 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.M.; Kim, S.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Yeh, S.-W. [Department of Environmental Marine Science, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolivar, J.P., E-mail: bolivar@uhu.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Baskaran, M. [Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  20. Standardization of methods of date processing of radionuclide investigations at SAPRI-01

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.; Ishchenko, V.P.; Zozulya, A.A.; Romanenko, V.A.; Dzhuzha, D.A.; Lazar', D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Series production of SAPRI-complex (system of automated processing of radionuclide information) intended for automatization of the process of data acquisition and processing of diagnostic radionuclide examination was set up. The features of SAPRI system having the wide possibilities for development and use of algorithms and programs for processing and analysis of radionuclide information were considered