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Sample records for field observations dixie

  1. Inversion of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferograms for Sources of Production-Related Subsidence at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, W; Vasco, D

    2003-02-07

    We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to image ground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal field during different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elastic inversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March, 1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this time period were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within the valley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence and subsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressure and volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localized upflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdown within the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our results also suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in the shallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont fault zones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears to be controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament of as yet unknown origin.

  2. Recency of Faulting and Neotechtonic Framework in the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field and Other Geothermal Fields of the Basin and Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Wesnousky; S. John Caskey; John W. Bell

    2003-02-20

    We studied the role that earthquake faults play in redistributing stresses within in the earths crust near geothermal fields. The geographic foci of our study were the sites of geothermal plants in Dixie Valley, Beowawe, and Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada. Our initial results show that the past history of earthquakes has redistributed stresses at these 3 sites in a manner to open and maintain fluid pathways critical for geothermal development. The approach developed here during our pilot study provides an inexpensive approach to (1) better define the best locations to site geothermal wells within known geothermal fields and (2) to define the location of yet discovered geothermal fields which are not manifest at the surface by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable conditions for hydrothermal activity in two ways. We conclude that an understanding of the spatial distribution of active faults and the past history of earthquakes on those faults be incorporated as a standard tool in geothermal exploration and in the siting of future boreholes in existing geothermal fields.

  3. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  4. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada; relations between surface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the later part of the 1990s, a large die-off of desert shrubs occurred over an approximately 1 km2 area in the northwestern section of the Dixie Valley (DV) geothermal field. This paper reports results from accumulation-chamber measurements of soil CO2 flux from locations in the dead zone and stable isotope and chemical data on fluids from fumaroles, shallow wells, and geothermal production wells within and adjacent to the dead zone. A cumulative probability plot shows three types of flux sites within the dead zone: Locations with a normal background CO2 flux (7 g m-2 day-1); moderate flux sites displaying "excess" geothermal flux; and high flux sites near young vents and fumaroles. A maximum CO2 flux of 570 g m-2 day-1 was measured at a location adjacent to a fumarole. Using statistical methods appropriate for lognormally distributed populations of data, estimates of the geothermal flux range from 7.5 t day-1 from a 0.14-km2 site near the Stillwater Fault to 0.1 t day-1 from a 0.01 -km2 location of steaming ground on the valley floor. Anomalous CO2 flux is positively correlated with shallow temperature anomalies. The anomalous flux associated with the entire dead zone area declined about 35% over a 6-month period. The decline was most notable at a hot zone located on an alluvial fan and in the SG located on the valley floor. Gas geochemistry indicates that older established fumaroles along the Stillwater Fault and a 2-year-old vent in the lower section of the dead zone discharge a mixture of geothermal gases and air or gases from air-saturated meteoric water (ASMW). Stable isotope data indicate that steam from the smaller fumaroles is produced by ??? 100??C boiling of these mixed fluids and reservoir fluid. Steam from the Senator fumarole (SF) and from shallow wells penetrating the dead zone are probably derived by 140??C to 160??C boiling of reservoir fluid. Carbon-13 isotope data suggest that the reservoir CO2 is produced mainly by thermal decarbonation of

  5. Inter-observer agreement of a multi-parameter campsite monitoring program on the Dixie National Forest, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. Glidden; Martha E. Lee

    2007-01-01

    Precision is crucial to campsite monitoring programs. Yet, little empirical research has ever been published on the level of precision of this type of monitoring programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of agreement between observers of campsite impacts using a multi-parameter campsite monitoring program. Thirteen trained observers assessed 16...

  6. 75 FR 75452 - Dixie Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    .... SUMMARY: The Dixie Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Panguitch, Utah and Santa Clara, Utah. The... Street, Panguitch, Utah. January 6, 2011 meeting will be held at the Santa Clara Town Hall, 2721 Santa Clara Drive, Santa Clara, Utah. The public is invited to attend both meetings. FOR FURTHER...

  7. 75 FR 1052 - Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC; TGP Dixie Development Company, LLC; New York Canyon, LLC; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC; TGP Dixie Development Company, LLC; New York Canyon, LLC; Notice of Filing December 30, 2009. Take notice that on December 24, 2009, Terra-Gen...

  8. Principal facts for gravity stations in Dixie; Fairview, and Stingaree valleys, Churchill and Pershing counties, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.; Duffrin, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    During March through July 1979, gravity measurements were made at 300 stations in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In December 1981, 45 additional stations were added--7 in Dixie Valley, 23 in Fairview Valley, and 15 in Stingaree Valley. Most altitudes were determined by using altimeters or topographic maps. The gravity observations were made with a Worden temperature-controlled gravimeter with an initial scale factor of 0.0965 milliGal/scale division. Principal facts for each of the 345 stations are tabulated; they consist of latitude, longitude, altitude, observed gravity, free-air anomaly, terrain correction, and Bouguer anomaly values at a bedrock density of 2.67 grams/cu cm. (Lantz-PTT)

  9. Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada, March 2009-September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Huntington, Jena M; Buto, Susan G.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue; Andraski, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    With increasing population growth and land-use change, urban communities in the desert Southwest are progressively looking toward remote basins to supplement existing water supplies. Pending applications by Churchill County for groundwater appropriations from Dixie Valley, Nevada, a primarily undeveloped basin east of the Carson Desert, have prompted a reevaluation of the quantity of naturally discharging groundwater. The objective of this study was to develop a revised, independent estimate of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (ETg) from Dixie Valley using a combination of eddy-covariance evapotranspiration (ET) measurements and multispectral satellite imagery. Mean annual ETg was estimated during water years 2010 and 2011 at four eddy-covariance sites. Two sites were in phreatophytic shrubland dominated by greasewood, and two sites were on a playa. Estimates of total ET and ETg were supported with vegetation cover mapping, soil physics considerations, water‑level measurements from wells, and isotopic water sourcing analyses to allow partitioning of ETg into evaporation and transpiration components. Site-based ETg estimates were scaled to the basin level by combining remotely sensed imagery with field reconnaissance. Enhanced vegetation index and brightness temperature data were compared with mapped vegetation cover to partition Dixie Valley into five discharging ET units and compute basin-scale ETg. Evapotranspiration units were defined within a delineated groundwater discharge area and were partitioned as (1) playa lake, (2) playa, (3) sparse shrubland, (4) moderate-to-dense shrubland, and (5) grassland.

  10. Seismicity related to geothermal development in Dixie Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryall, A.S.; Vetter, U.R.

    1982-07-08

    A ten-station seismic network was operated in and around the Dixie Valley area from January 1980 to November 1981; three of these stations are still in operation. Data from the Dixie Valley network were analyzed through 30 Jun 1981, and results of analysis were compared with analysis of somewhat larger events for the period 1970-1979. The seismic cycle in the Western Great Basic, the geologic structural setting, and the instrumentation are also described.

  11. Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    generally can be characterized as a sodium bicarbonate type, with greater proportions of chloride north of the Dixie Valley playa, and greater proportions of sulfate south of the playa. Analysis of major ion water chemistry data sampled during the study period indicates that groundwater north and south of Township 22N differ chemically. Dixie Valley groundwater quality is marginal when compared with national primary and secondary drinking-water standards. Arsenic and fluoride concentrations exceed primary drinking water standards, and total dissolved solids and manganese concentrations exceed secondary drinking water standards in samples collected during this study. High concentrations of boron and tungsten also were observed. Chemical comparisons between basin-fill and geothermal aquifer water indicate that most basin-fill groundwater sampled could contain 10–20 percent geothermal water. Geothermal indicators such as high temperature, lithium, boron, chloride, and silica suggest that mixing occurs in many wells that tap the basin-fill aquifer, particularly on the north, south, and west sides of the basin. Magnesium-lithium geothermometers indicate that some basin-fill aquifer water sampled for the current study likely originates from water that was heated above background mountain-block recharge temperatures (between 3 and 15 degrees Celsius), highlighting the influence of mixing with warm water that was possibly derived from geothermal sources.

  12. Leadership styles of elite Dixie youth baseball coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G; Maneval, M

    1998-12-01

    Chelladurai and Saleh's Leadership Scale for Sports was administered to 52 elite Dixie Youth baseball coaches. Analyses indicated that subjects scored high in positive feedback, training and instruction, and social support, moderate in democratic behavior, and low in autocratic behavior. These results seem to support the validity of using the scale to compare coaching behavior.

  13. Reservoir characteristics and control factors of Carboniferous volcanic gas reservoirs in the Dixi area of Junggar Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Field outcrop observation, drilling core description, thin-section analysis, SEM analysis, and geochemistry, indicate that Dixi area of Carboniferous volcanic rock gas reservoir belongs to the volcanic rock oil reservoir of the authigenic gas reservoir. The source rocks make contact with volcanic rock reservoir directly or by fault, and having the characteristics of near source accumulation. The volcanic rock reservoir rocks mainly consist of acidic rhyolite and dacite, intermediate andesite, basic basalt and volcanic breccia: (1 Acidic rhyolite and dacite reservoirs are developed in the middle-lower part of the structure, have suffered strong denudation effect, and the secondary pores have formed in the weathering and tectonic burial stages, but primary pores are not developed within the early diagenesis stage. Average porosity is only at 8%, and the maximum porosity is at 13.5%, with oil and gas accumulation showing poor performance. (2 Intermediate andesite and basic basalt reservoirs are mainly distributed near the crater, which resembles the size of and suggests a volcanic eruption. Primary pores are formed in the early diagenetic stage, secondary pores developed in weathering and erosion transformation stage, and secondary fractures formed in the tectonic burial stage. The average porosity is at 9.2%, and the maximum porosity is at 21.9%: it is of the high-quality reservoir types in Dixi area. (3 The volcanic breccia reservoir has the same diagenetic features with sedimentary rocks, but also has the same mineral composition with volcanic rock; rigid components can keep the primary porosity without being affected by compaction during the burial process. At the same time, the brittleness of volcanic breccia reservoir makes it easily fracture under the stress; internal fracture was developmental. Volcanic breccia developed in the structural high part and suffered a long-term leaching effect. The original pore-fracture combination also made

  14. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    in the Virgin River Gorge containing known fault zones accounted for about 48 percent of this total seepage loss. An additional seepage loss of 6.7 ft3/s was calculated for the reach of the Virgin River between Bloomington, Utah, and the Utah/Arizona State line. This loss in flow is small compared to total flow in the river and is comparable to the rated error in streamflow measurements in this reach; consequently, it should be used with caution. Littlefield Springs were studied to determine the fraction of its discharge that originates as upstream seepage from the Virgin River and residence time of this water in the subsurface. Geochemical and environmental tracer data from groundwater and surface-water sites in the Virgin River Gorge area suggest that discharge from Littlefield Springs is a mixture of modern (post-1950s) seepage from the Virgin River upstream of the springs and older groundwater from a regional carbonate aquifer. Concentrations of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) CFC-12 and CFC-113, chloride/fluoride and chloride/bromide ratios, and the stable isotope deuterium indicate that water discharging from Littlefield Springs is about 60 percent seepage from the Virgin River and about 40 percent discharge from the regional carbonate aquifer. The river seepage component was determined to have an average subsurface traveltime of about 26 ±1.6 years before discharging at Littlefield Springs. Radiocarbon data for Littlefield Springs suggest groundwater ages from 1,000 to 9,000 years. Because these are mixed waters, the component of discharge from the carbonate aquifer is likely much older than the groundwater ages suggested by the Littlefield Springs samples. If the dissolved-solids load from Dixie Hot Springs to the Virgin River were reduced, the irrigation water subsequently applied to agricultural fields in the St. George and Washington areas, which originates as water from the Virgin River downstream of Dixie Hot Springs, would have a lower dissolved

  15. Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-18

    Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

  16. Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. Wannamaker

    2007-11-30

    State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Dixie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Dixie County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Dixie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Dixie County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  19. Potentiometric water-level altitude contours of Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the potentiometric water-level altitude contours representing the 2009 potentiometric surface of the basin fill groundwater system of Dixie...

  20. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Garcia-Moral, L.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gomez, G. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Ruiz-Arbol, P. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scodellaro, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2007-04-21

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths.

  1. 75 FR 7440 - Oil and Gas Leasing on Lands Administered by the Dixie National Forest, Supplemental Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Forest Service Oil and Gas Leasing on Lands Administered by the Dixie National Forest, Supplemental... report to the Oil and Gas Leasing on Lands Administered by the Dixie National Forest Final Environmental... considered, the FS must receive written comments on the Oil and Gas Leasing on Lands Administered by...

  2. 76 FR 28973 - Terra-Gen Dixie Valley, LLC; Order on Rehearing and Accepting Tariff Filing, Subject to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Order). I. Background 2. Terra-Gen is the owner of a 60 MW geothermal plant (Plant), located in northern... the Plant to Southern California Edison (SoCal Edison) under a pre-existing power purchase agreement..., Dixie Valley QF). Both the Plant and the Dixie Valley Line were certified as a single QF under the...

  3. CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

  4. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sourcesof production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermalfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

    2006-07-01

    We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to imageground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal fieldduring different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elasticinversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March,1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this timeperiod were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within thevalley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence andsubsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressureand volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localizedupflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdownwithin the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our resultsalso suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in theshallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont faultzones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears tobe controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament ofas yet unknown origin.

  5. Observable currents in lattice field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, José A

    2016-01-01

    Observable currents are spacetime local objects that induce physical observables when integrated on an auxiliary codimension one surface. Since the resulting observables are independent of local deformations of the integration surface, the currents themselves carry most of the information about the induced physical observables. I study observable currents in a multisymplectic framework for Lagrangian field theory over discrete spacetime. A weak version of observable currents preserves many of their properties, while inducing a family of observables capable of separating points in the space of physically distinct solutions. A Poisson bracket gives the space of observable currents the structure of a Lie algebra. Peierls bracket for bulk observables gives an algebra homomorphism mapping equivalence classes of bulk observables to weak observable currents. The study covers scalar fields, nonlinear sigma models and gauge theories (including gauge theory formulations of general relativity) on the lattice. Even when ...

  6. Entropy of local smeared field observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satz, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    We re-conceptualize the usual entanglement entropy of quantum fields in a spatial region as a limiting case of a more general and well-defined quantity, the entropy of a subalgebra of smeared field observables. We introduce this notion, discuss various examples, and recover from it the area law for the entanglement entropy of a sphere in Minkowski space.

  7. 75 FR 6625 - Dixie National Forest, UT, Kitty Hawk Administrative Site Master Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Dixie National Forest, UT, Kitty Hawk Administrative Site Master Development Plan AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. SUMMARY:...

  8. 77 FR 68801 - Accreditation of Dixie Services, Inc., as a Commercial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation of Dixie Services, Inc., as a Commercial Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher Mocella, Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and...

  9. 75 FR 7513 - Accreditation of Dixie Services, Inc., as a Commercial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation of Dixie Services, Inc., as a Commercial Laboratory AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of..., Laboratories and Scientific Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.,...

  10. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. The observational results are reviewed for spiral, barred and flocculent galaxies, the Milky Way, halos and relics of galaxy clusters, and for the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields and will help to understand their origin. At low frequencies, LOFAR (10-250 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), as observed with the EVLA, ASKAP, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of nearby galaxies in unprecedented detail. Surveys of Faraday rotation measures of pulsars will map the Milky Way's magnetic field with high precision. All-sky sur...

  11. Magnetotail electric fields observed from lunar orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, J. E.; Lin, R. P.; Mcguire, R. E.; Chase, L. M.; Anderson, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    Direct observations of convection electric fields in the earth's magnetotail are reported. The electric fields have been measured from lunar orbit by detection of the E x B/B-squared drift displacement of low-energy electrons at the limb of the moon. It is found that electric fields range in magnitude from a value less than or equal to 0.02 mV/m, the limit of sensitivity of the method, to 2 mV/M. The typical value is 0.15 mV/M, and the corresponding convection velocity is 15 km/s. The sense of the electric field is almost always dawn to dusk. The electric field is often variable on a time scale of hours and sometimes minutes. The observations indicate that the electric field is not uniform across the magnetotail. If it is assumed that the typical measured electric-field value represents an average over the inhomogeneities, the potential drop across the entire tail is of the order of 40 kV.

  12. Precipitation properties observed during CHUVA Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, C.; Machado, L. A.; Angelis, C. F.; Silva Dias, M. A. F.; Fisch, G.; Carvalho, I. C.; Biscaro, T.; Sakuragi, J.; Neves, J. R.; Anselmo, E. M.; Lacerda, M.

    2012-04-01

    CHUVA is a Brazilian research program that seeks to depict the main precipitating systems observed in Brazil as a support for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. CHUVA is conducting a series of field campaigns in the time frame of 2010-2013 to sample raining systems that vary from maritime to continental regime and in polluted and clean environments. For this study, we will present initially the drop size distribution (DSD) variability observed in the field experiments of Alcantara (March/2010), Fortaleza (April/2011), Belém (June/2011) and Vale do Paraiba (November-December/2011). Secondly, with the help of the mobile X-Band and MRR-2, we will show the DSD differences observed on warm and cold phase clouds, and convective and stratiform precipitation. Finally, by employing the vertical electrical field and lightning measurements together with the weather radar, we will present the main vertical precipitation features observed in thunderstorms and non- thunderstorms, in addition to the different raining systems observed during the four field campaigns.

  13. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Al Asad, Manar M. H.; Slavin, James A.; Alexeev, Igor. I.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the innermost planet. The model, constructed under the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid of revolution, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field and allows for reconnection. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital Magnetometer data to estimate all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the paraboloid magnetospheric model, and the sole remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated as 190 nT RM3 from a grid search. We verify that the best fit dipole moment is insensitive to changes in the other parameters within their determined ranges. The model provides an excellent first-order fit to the MESSENGER observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The results show that the magnetopause field strength ranges from 10% to 50% of the dipole field strength at observation locations on the dayside and at nightside latitudes north of 60°N. Globally, the residual signatures observed to date are dominated by the results of magnetospheric processes, confirming the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  14. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the geomagnetic field have been made for more than 400 years, beginning with individual determinations of the angle between geographic and magnetic North. This was followed by the start of continuous time series of full vector measurements at geomagnetic observatories and t...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....... and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...

  15. LAMOST observations in the Kepler field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cat P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST at the Xinglong observatory in China is a new 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers. In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project. We requested to observe the full field-of-view of the nominal Kepler mission with the LAMOST to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC 10 catalogue as possible. So far, 12 of the 14 requested LAMOST fields have been observed resulting in more than 68,000 low-resolution spectra. Our preliminary results show that the stellar parameters derived from the LAMOST spectra are in good agreement with those found in the literature based on high-resolution spectroscopy. The LAMOST data allows to distinguish dwarfs from giants and can provide the projected rotational velocity for very fast rotators.

  16. Guerrilla War in Little Dixie: Understanding Conflict Escalation in Missouri during the American Civil War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    during the 1850s, the socio-demographic makeup of Missouri looked very little like other southern states. Even Little Dixie carried little resemblance...1992), 6–16; William C. Davis, Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour (New York: HarperCollins, 1991), 372; Michael A. Bonura, Under the Shadow of...Caudill. The Mosby Myth: A Confederate Hero in Life and Legend. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 2002. Asprey, Robert B. War in the Shadows : The

  17. Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, P. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gibson, J. P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The campaign “Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma” installed a ground-based magnetometer at Purcell’s U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility boundary installation at the Kessler Atmospheric and Ecological Field Station, University of Oklahoma, to measure local magnetic field variations. It is a part of the nine stations of the Mid-continent MAgnetoseismic Chain (McMAC) placed as close to the 330° magnetic longitude as possible. This is the meridian in the world where land covers the greatest continuous range in magnetic latitude. Figure 1 shows the map of the magnetometer stations along the 330th magnetic meridian, including the Purcell (PCEL) station. The main scientific objective of the campaign is to detect the field line resonance (FLR) frequencies of the magnetic field line connected to the Purcell station. This magnetic field line extends from Purcell to the outer space at distances as far as 2 Earth radii (RE). To accurately identify FLR frequencies, however, simultaneous measurements at slightly different latitudes along the same meridian are necessary to allow the use of the cross-phase technique. This consideration explains the arrangement to operate magnetometers at the Americus (AMER) and Richardson (RICH) stations nearby. The measured resonant frequency can infer the plasma mass density along the field line through the method of normal-mode magnetoseismology. The magnetometer at the Purcell station can detect many other types of magnetic field fluctuations associated with the changes in the electric currents in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, which by large are affected by the solar activity. In other words, the magnetic field data collected by this campaign are also useful for understanding space weather phenomena. The magnetometer was installed at Purcell’s ARM boundary facility in March 27, 2006. The construction of the triaxial fluxgate magnetometer used by the

  18. Egs Exploration Methodology Development Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield as a Calibration Site, a Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovenitti, J. L.; Blackwell, D. D.; Sainsbury, J.; Tibuleac, I. M.; Waibel, A.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Karlin, R. E.; Kennedy, B. M.; Isaaks, E.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Clyne, M.; Callahan, O.

    2011-12-01

    An Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) exploration methodology is being developed using the Dixie Valley geothermal system in Nevada as a field laboratory. This area was chosen as the test site because its has an extensive public domain database and deep geothermal wells allowing for calibration of the developed methodology. The calibration effort is focused on the Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield (DVGW), an area with 30 geothermal wells. Calibration will be based on cross-correlation of qualitative and quantitative results with known well conditions. This project is structured in the following manner (Task 1) review and assess existing public domain and other available data (baseline data); (Task 2) develop and populate a GIS-database; (Task 3) develop a baseline (existing public domain data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate the geostatistical relationships between the various data sets, and generate a Baseline EGS favorability map from the surface to a 5-km depth focused on identifying EGS drilling targets; (Task 4) collect new gravity, seismic, magneto-tellurics (MT), geologic, and geochemical data to fill in data gaps and improve model resolution; and (Task 5) update the GIS-database for the newly acquired data and repeating the elements of Task 3 incorporating the baseline and new data to generate an Enhanced EGS Favorability Map. Innovative aspects of this project include: (1) developing interdisciplinary method(s) for synthesizing, integrating, and evaluating geoscience data both qualitatively and quantitatively; (2) demonstrating new seismic techniques based on ambient noise which is a passive survey not requiring local earthquakes and is a relatively inexpensive method to image seismic velocity, attenuation, and density; (3) determining if seismic data can infer temperature and lithology at depth; (4) extending 2D MT modeling/mapping to 3D MT; (5) generating a MT derived temperature map; and (6) jointly analyzing gravity, magnetic, seismic, and MT

  19. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  20. Topological Observables in Semiclassical Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Nolasco, M

    1992-01-01

    We give a geometrical set up for the semiclassical approximation to euclidean field theories having families of minima (instantons) parametrized by suitable moduli spaces ${\\cal M}$. The standard examples are of course Yang-Mills theory and non-linear $\\sigma$-models. The relevant space here is a family of measure spaces $\\tilde {\\cal N} \\ra {\\cal M}$, with standard fibre a distribution space, given by a suitable extension of the normal bundle to ${\\cal M}$ in the space of smooth fields. Over $\\tilde {\\cal N}$ there is a probability measure $d\\mu$ given by the twisted product of the (normalized) volume element on ${\\cal M}$ and the family of gaussian measures with covariance given by the tree propagator $C_\\phi$ in the background of an instanton $\\phi \\in {\\cal M}$. The space of ``observables", i.e. measurable functions on ($\\tilde {\\cal N}, \\, d\\mu$), is studied and it is shown to contain a topological sector, corresponding to the intersection theory on ${\\cal M}$. The expectation value of these topological ...

  1. Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

    2002-08-01

    This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

  2. Dissolution of Gypsum from field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk A.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of field measurements of gypsum dissolution in various countries (Ukraine, Spain, Italy and others and in different environments (river waters, precipitation, vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, perched cave lakes, ephemeral streams in caves, confined aquifer, cave air.

  3. Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigor, Ignatius [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Johnson, Jim [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Motz, Emily [National Ice Center; Bisic, Aaron [National Ice Center

    2017-06-30

    Our ability to understand and predict weather and climate requires an accurate observing network. One of the pillars of this network is the observation of the fundamental meteorological parameters: temperature, air pressure, and wind. We plan to assess our ability to measure these parameters for the polar regions during the Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX, Figure 1) to support the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP), Arctic Observing Network (AON), International Program for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), and Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). Accurate temperature measurements are also necessary to validate and improve satellite measurements of surface temperature across the Arctic. Support for research associated with the campaign is provided by the National Science Foundation, and by other US agencies contributing to the US Interagency Arctic Buoy Program. In addition to the support provided by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow and the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. IABP is supported by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Ice Center (NIC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

  4. Observing the sun a pocket field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive solar observing guide for use at the telescope by amateur astronomers at all three levels: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Users will find invaluable information for identifying features through photos, charts, diagrams in a logical, orderly fashion and then interpreting the observations. Because the Sun is a dynamic celestial body in constant flux, astronomers rarely know for certain what awaits them at the eyepiece. All features of the Sun are transient and sometimes rather fleeting. Given the number of features and the complex life cycles of some solar features, it can be a challenging hobby, and this guide provides all of the guidance necessary to inform observers about the sights and events unfolding before their eyes on the most active and powerful member of our Solar System.

  5. Field observations of nearshore bar formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian;

    2008-01-01

      The formation of an inner nearshore bar was observed during a high-energy event at the sandy beach of Vejers, Denmark. The bar accreted in situ during surf zone conditions and the growth of the bar was associated with the development of a trough landward of the bar. Measurements of hydrodynamics...

  6. Field observations of nearshore bar formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

      The formation of an inner nearshore bar was observed during a high-energy event at the sandy beach of Vejers, Denmark. The bar accreted in situ during surf zone conditions and the growth of the bar was associated with the development of a trough landward of the bar. Measurements of hydrodynamics...... and sediment fluxes were obtained from electromagnetic current meters and optical backscatter sensors. These process measurements showed that a divergence in sediment transport occurred at the location of the developing trough, and observed gradients in cross-shore net sediment flux were consistent...... with the morphological development. The main cause for the flux gradients were cross-shore gradients in offshore-directed mean current (undertow) speed which depended upon local relative wave height and local bed slope....

  7. Field Research: Learning through the Process of Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the process of a participant observation. Its focus is its process, not on what was observed. This report provides the following: (1) an overview of this observation, (2) the purpose of this observation, (3) the site and situation of this observation, (4) two samples of reflective field notes from this observation, and (5) an…

  8. Regional gravity field modelling from GOCE observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss a regional recovery of gravity disturbances at the mean geocentric sphere approximating the Earth over the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients. For this purpose, we derive integral formulas which allow converting the gravity disturbances onto the disturbing gravitational gradients in the local north-oriented frame (LNOF). The derived formulas are free of singularities in case of r ≠ R . We then investigate three numerical approaches for solving their inverses. In the initial approach, the integral formulas are firstly modified for solving individually the near- and distant-zone contributions. While the effect of the near-zone gravitational gradients is solved as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant-zone gravitational gradients is computed by numerical integration from the global gravitational model (GGM) TIM-r4. In the second approach, we further elaborate the first scenario by reducing measured gravitational gradients for gravitational effects of topographic masses. In the third approach, we apply additional modification by reducing gravitational gradients for the reference GGM. In all approaches we determine the gravity disturbances from each of the four accurately measured gravitational gradients separately as well as from their combination. Our regional gravitational field solutions are based on the GOCE EGG_TRF_2 gravitational gradients collected within the period from November 1 2009 until January 11 2010. Obtained results are compared with EGM2008, DIR-r1, TIM-r1 and SPW-r1. The best fit, in terms of RMS (2.9 mGal), is achieved for EGM2008 while using the third approach which combine all four well-measured gravitational gradients. This is explained by the fact that a-priori information about the Earth's gravitational field up to the degree and order 180 was used.

  9. A High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Identify Buried Faults at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Richard Paul; Grauch, V. J. S.; Blackwell, David D.

    2002-09-01

    Preliminary results from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey (200m line spacing) acquired in Dixie Valley early in 2002 provide confirmation of intra-basin faulting based on subtle surface indications. In addition the data allow identification of the locations and trends of many faults that have not been recognized at the surface, and provide a picture of intrabasin faulting patterns not possible using other techniques. The data reveal a suite of northeasterly-trending curving and branching faults that surround a relatively coherent block in the area of Humboldt Salt Marsh, the deepest part of the basin. The producing reservoir occurs at the north end of this coherent block, where rampart faults from the northwest side of the valley merge with anthithetic faults from the central and southeast parts of the valley.

  10. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  11. Milestones in the Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed everywhere in the universe. In this review,we concentrate on the observational aspects of the magnetic fields of Galactic and extragalactic objects. Readers can follow the milestones in the observations of cosmic magnetic fields obtained from the most important tracers of magnetic fields,namely, the star-light polarization, the Zeeman effect, the rotation measures (RMs,hereafter) of extragalactic radio sources, the pulsar RMs, radio polarization observations, as well as the newly implemented sub-mm and mm polarization capabilities.The magnetic field of the Galaxy was first discovered in 1949 by optical polarization observations. The local magnetic fields within one or two kpc have been well delineated by starlight polarization data. The polarization observations of diffuse Galactic radio background emission in 1962 confirmed unequivocally the existence of a Galactic magnetic field. The bulk of the present information about the magnetic fields in the Galaxy comes from analysis of rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources and pulsars, which can be used to construct the 3-D magnetic field structure in the Galactic halo and Galactic disk. Radio synchrotron spurs in the Galactic center show a poloidal field, and the polarization mapping of dust emission and Zeeman observation in the central molecular zone reveal a toroidal magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. For nearby galaxies, both optical polarization and multifrequency radio polarization data clearly show the large-scale magnetic field following the spiral arms or dust lanes. For more distant objects, radio polarization is the only approach available to show the magnetic fields in the jets or lobes of radio galaxies or quasars. Clusters of galaxies also contain widely distributed magnetic fields, which are reflected by radio halos or the RM distribution of background objects. The intergalactic space could have been magnetized by outflows or galactic superwinds even in

  12. Synthetic Observations of Magnetic Fields in Protostellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Joyce W Y; Offner, Stella S R

    2016-01-01

    The role of magnetic fields in the early stages of star formation is not well constrained. In order to discriminate between different star formation models, we analyze 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low-mass cores and explore the correlation between magnetic field orientation and outflow orientation over time. We produce synthetic observations of dust polarization at resolutions comparable to millimeter-wave dust polarization maps observed by CARMA and compare these with 2D visualizations of projected magnetic field and column density. Cumulative distribution functions of the projected angle between the magnetic field and outflow show different degrees of alignment in simulations with differing mass-to-flux ratios. The distribution function for the less magnetized core agrees with observations finding random alignment between outflow and field orientations, while the more magnetized core exhibits stronger alignment. We find that fractional polarization increases when the system is viewed such that the ...

  13. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  14. WSRT observations of the Hubble Deep Field region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, MA; de Bruyn, AG; Giroletti, M; Baan, WA; Schilizzi, RT

    We present deep WSRT 1.4 GHz observations of the Hubble Deep Field region. At the 5 sigma level, the WSRT clearly detects 85 regions of radio emission in a 10' x 10' field centred on the HDF Eight of these regions fall within the HDF itself, four of these are sources that have not previously been

  15. Radio and Millimeter Observations of the COSMOS Field

    OpenAIRE

    Schinnerer, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.L.; Smolčić, V.; Scoville, N.; K. Menten; Voss, H.; Blain, A; Lutz, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) targets an equatorial two square degree field covering the full electromagnetic spectrum. Here we present first results from observations of the COSMOS field in the millimeter and centimeter regime done with the IRAM 30m/MAMBO array and NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA) at 250GHz and 1.4GHz, respectively.

  16. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields at Venus. Venus Express observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic field and plasma measurements carried out onboard Venus Express during solar minimum conditions suggest the existence of two kinds of magnetic field configuration in the Venusian ionosphere. We interpret these as the manifestation of two different types of generation mechanisms for the induced magnetosphere. A different magnetic field topology (toroidal and poloidal) arises if the induced currents are driven either by the solar wind motional electric field or by the Faraday electric field—a conducting ionosphere sees the magnetic field carried by solar wind as a time-varying field. At the dayside, both driving agents produce a similar draping pattern of the magnetic field. However, different magnetic field signatures inherent to both induction mechanisms appear at lower altitudes in the terminator region. The conditions at low solar EUV flux when the ionosphere of Venus becomes magnetized seem to be favorable to distinguish between two different types of the induced fields. We present cases of both types of the magnetic field topology. The cases when the effects of the Faraday induction become well noticeable are especially interesting since they provide us with an example of solar wind interaction with a tiny induced dipole field immersed into the ionosphere. Another interesting case when poloidal magnetic fields are evidently displayed is observed when the IMF vector is almost aligned with the solar wind velocity. In general case, both mechanisms of induction probably complement each other.

  17. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  18. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 6 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Khapli, Sachin D. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Saadiyat Island, PO Box 129 188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kumar, Sunil [Mechanical Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 6 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Saadiyat Island, PO Box 129 188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-03-14

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  19. Observation of a Turbulence-Generated Large Scale Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, E J; Kendrick, R D; Nornberg, M D

    2006-01-01

    A uniform magnetic field is applied to a spherical, turbulent flow of liquid sodium. An induced magnetic dipole moment is measured which cannot be generated by the interaction of the axisymmetric mean flow with the applied field, indicating the presence of a turbulent electromotive force. It is shown that the induced dipole moment should vanish for any axisymmetric laminar flow. Also observed is the production of toroidal magnetic field from applied poloidal magnetic field (the omega-effect). Its potential role in the production of the induced dipole is discussed.

  20. Evidence for Observation of Virtual Radio Cherenkov Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bean, Alice; Snow, James

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence for observation of virtual electromagnetic fields in the radio domain from experiment T926 at the Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility. Relativistic protons with 120 GeV energy traversed a sealed electromagnetic cavity and were observed in the radio regime of 200MHz-GHz. Closely related to ordinary Cherenkov radiation, which we also measured, the virtual fields require no acceleration for their existence. The experiment is also the first observation of fields from hadronic showers, an independent and new confirmation of coherent radio emission from ultra-relativistic particles. Conditions of very low signal to noise were overcome by a novel and unbiased filtering strategy that exploits exhaustive studies of correlations in the noise backgrounds. Linear scaling of the signal region with the number of beam particles provides evidence of coherence. Extrapolation to measurement of the field of a single relativistic proton charge is consistent within errors. Our study also illustrates new data pro...

  1. Radio Observations of the Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, M

    2003-01-01

    After a short introduction on how we get information of the magnetic fields from radio observations I discuss the results concerning the magnetic field structure in galaxies: Large-scale regular magnetic field pattern of spiral structure exist in grand-design spirals, flocculent and even irregular galaxies. The regular field in spirals is aligned along the optical spiral arms but strongest in the interarm region, sometimes forming 'magnetic arms'. The strongest total field is found in the optical arms, but mainly irregular. The large-scale regular field is best explained by some kind of dynamo action. Only a few galaxies show a dominant axisymmetric field pattern, most field structures seem to be a superposition of different dynamo modes or rather reveal more local effects related to density waves, bars or shocks. Observations of edge-on galaxies show that the magnetic fields are mainly parallel to the disk except in some galaxies with strong star formation and strong galactic winds as e.g. NGC 4631.

  2. Stellar magnetic fields from four Stokes parameter observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Piskunov, N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Doppler imaging from four Stokes parameter observations has uncovered a new level of complexity of stellar magnetic fields previously not known. This new information is of interest to the evolution and structure of magnetic fields of intermediate and high-mass stars. Recently, we performed magnetic Doppler imaging study of the chemically peculiar star HD 24712 using phase-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of line-profiles in all four Stokes parameters. The observations were obtained with the HARPSpol instrument on the 3.6-m ESO telescope. Our analysis shows that the magnetic field of HD 24712 has very strong dipolar component with weak small-scale contributions. The finding of dipole-like field for HD 24712 gives evidence for the hypothesis that old Ap stars have predominantly dipolar magnetic fields. We plan on performing magnetic Doppler imaging from four Stokes parameter observations for other Ap/Bp stars as well, which will help us understand the nature of magnetic fields in these stars.

  3. Magnetic Fields Around the Heliosphere: Theory vs Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Voyager in situ measurements of the magnetic field around the heliosphere are the source of invaluable information about the interface between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, they are quite challenging for theoretical analysis unless accompanied by remote observations of neutral atoms the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and Ulysses missions. Of particular interest is the fine structure of the heliopause due to its instability and possible magnetic reconnection. Both phenomena may have contributed to the remarkable changes in the galactic and anomalous cosmic ray fluxes observed by Voyager 1 within a one-month period of 2012 after which the spacecraft penetrated into the LISM. Draping of the heliopause by the interstellar magnetic field affects the position of the bright ribbon of enhanced ENA flux observed by IBEX on the celestial sphere and 2-3 kHz radio emission caused by shock propagation through the outer heliosheath observed by Voyager 1. Interstellar magnetic field determines the structure of the bow wave in front of the heliopause. Moreover, magnetic fields define the orientation and shape of the heliotail, the features of which have been observed by IBEX. Recent numerical simulations show that the details of the large-scale interstellar magnetic field modification caused by the presence of the heliotail may be the source of the observed 1-10 TeV cosmic ray anisotropy studied in detail in numerous air shower measurements around the world. In this paper, an overview will be given of the recent theoretical and simulations results describing the magnetic field distribution around the heliosphere. The objective of the talk is to connect observational and theoretical results, and outline challenges that are going to inspire the heliospheric community in the coming years.

  4. On radial heliospheric magnetic fields: Voyager 2 observation and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2003-05-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) direction, on average, conforms well to the Parker spiral. However, numerous examples of events where the HMF is oriented in near-radial directions for many hours have been reported on the basis of observations inside 5 AU from spacecraft such as ISEE-3 and Ulysses. The magnetic field data observed by Voyager 2 from launch in 1977 through the end of 1982 (i.e., between 1 and ˜10 AU) were searched for all instances of radial fields with durations of 6 hours or more. Radial fields of significant durations at large distances are unusual as the Parker spiral is very tightly wound. The radial HMF events in the inner heliosphere typically occur at times when the solar wind speed is declining gradually, while they tend to be associated with steady wind speeds at distances beyond ˜6 AU. The durations of these events appear to be independent of distance and solar cycle, with an average duration of ˜11 hours. They generally are not associated with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Possible generation mechanisms of the radial field events related to speed variations near the Sun are investigated by use of a MHD model. We find that a noticeable low-speed plateau of limited duration in solar wind speed near the Sun can produce radial field events having durations of the order of 10 hours in the heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2.

  5. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  6. Inferring effective field observables from a discrete model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bény, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    A spin system on a lattice can usually be modeled at large scales by an effective quantum field theory. A key mathematical result relating the two descriptions is the quantum central limit theorem, which shows that certain spin observables satisfy an algebra of bosonic fields under certain conditions. Here, we show that these particular observables and conditions are the relevant ones for an observer with certain limited abilities to resolve spatial locations as well as spin values. This is shown by computing the asymptotic behaviour of a quantum Fisher information metric as function of the resolution parameters. The relevant observables characterise the state perturbations whose distinguishability does not decay too fast as a function of spatial or spin resolution.

  7. Polar Magnetic Fields Observed During the Last Four Solar Minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Sun's polar fields during the current minimum are the weakest in at least four solar cycles. The field strengths are fairly symmetric, unlike at least the two previous minima. We compare data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to follow the polar field changes since 1976. The polar field is never observed well from Earth because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator, and each year the view of the north (south) is completely hidden for several months around March 7 (September 7). Analysis of the most favorably oriented MDI synoptic maps each year allows us to derive the fairly slowly evolving large-scale polar magnetic field pattern from 1996 to the present. We account for differential rotation and other geometric effects. The analysis allows us to provide a useful interpolated or extrapolated correction that can be smoothly incorporated into the global synoptic or synchronic maps above about 70 degrees latitude. The polar field is important in modeling the large-scale coronal and heliospheric field, particularly at minimum. Even though there has been extremely little solar activity over the last several months, at the current solar minimum the structure of the corona is much less equatorial than usual, in part because the polar fields are relatively weak.

  8. 3D Extended Logging for Geothermal Resources: Field Trials with the Geo-Bilt System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallan, R; Wilt, M; Kirkendall, B; Kasameyer, P

    2002-05-29

    Geo-BILT (Geothermal Borehole Induction Logging Tool) is an extended induction logging tool designed for 3D resistivity imaging around a single borehole. The tool was developed for deployment in high temperature geothermal wells under a joint program funded by the California Energy Commission, Electromagnetic Instruments (EMI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. EM1 was responsible for tool design and manufacture, and numerical modeling efforts were being addressed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) and other contractors. The field deployment was done by EM1 and LLNL. The tool operates at frequencies from 2 to 42 kHz, and its design features a series of three-component magnetic sensors offset at 2 and 5 meters from a three-component magnetic source. The combined package makes it possible to do 3D resistivity imaging, deep into the formation, from a single well. The manufacture and testing of the tool was completed in spring of 2001, and the initial deployment of Geo-BILT occurred in May 2001 at the Lost Hills oil field in southern California at leases operated by Chevron USA. This site was chosen for the initial field test because of the favorable geological conditions and the availability of a number of wells suitable for tool deployment. The second deployment occurred in April 2002 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, operated by Caithness Power LLC, in central Nevada. This constituted the first test in a high temperature environment. The Chevron site features a fiberglass-cased observation well in the vicinity of a water injector. The injected water, which is used for pressure maintenance and for secondary sweep of the heavy oil formation, has a much lower resistivity than the oil bearing formation. This, in addition to the non-uniform flow of this water, creates a 3D resistivity structure, which is analogous to conditions produced from flowing fractures adjacent to geothermal boreholes. Therefore, it is an excellent site for testing the 3D capability of

  9. WFPC2 Observations of the Hubble Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Casertano, S; Dickinson, M; Ferguson, H C; Fruchter, A S; González-Lopezlira, R A; Heyer, I; Hook, R N; Levay, Z G; Lucas, R A; Mack, J; Makidon, R B; Mutchler, M Y; Smith, T E; Stiavelli, M; Wiggs, M S; Williams, R E; Casertano, Stefano; Mello, Duilia de; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Heyer, Inge; Hook, Richard N; Levay, Zolt; Lucas, Ray A; Mack, Jennifer; Makidon, Russell B; Mutchler, Max; Stiavelli, Massimo; Wiggs, Michael S; Williams, Robert E

    2000-01-01

    The Hubble Deep Field-South observations targeted a high-galactic-latitude field near QSO J2233-606. We present WFPC2 observations of the field in four wide bandpasses centered at roughly 300, 450, 606, and 814 nm. Observations, data reduction procedures, and noise properties of the final images are discussed in detail. A catalog of sources is presented, and the number counts and color distributions of the galaxies are compared to a new catalog of the HDF-N that has been constructed in an identical manner. The two fields are qualitatively similar, with the galaxy number counts for the two fields agreeing to within 20%. The HDF-S has more candidate Lyman-break galaxies at z > 2 than the HDF-N. The star-formation rate per unit volume computed from the HDF-S, based on the UV luminosity of high-redshift candidates, is a factor of 1.9 higher than from the HDF-N at z ~ 2.7, and a factor of 1.3 higher at z ~ 4.

  10. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerburg, P. D.; Pajer, E.

    2013-02-01

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling phiFtilde F to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from μ-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced.

  11. The coronal magnetic field reversal observed by the SOLARC instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements for mapping coronal magnetic field have become possible since the recent development of infrared detection techniques. One urgent task that arises from the routine infrared observations is to interpret what the Stokes signals could indicate for coronal magnetic fields. It is the first time for us to successfully reveal the coronal field structure above a simple and stable sunspot on the photosphere using profiles of full Stokes parameters. In this paper, the author further points out the deficiency in any conclusions/judgements just based on incomplete polarization data. A magnetic flux reversal feature, observed from circular polarization data, may correspond to one or more coronal tubes with their front or farside arching apex there, more complicated than people imagined before. To exactly locate the infrared radiation sources, we need both circular and linear polarization data for an integrated analysis of them.

  12. Lorentz breaking Effective Field Theory and observational tests

    CERN Document Server

    Liberati, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Analogue models of gravity have provided an experimentally realizable test field for our ideas on quantum field theory in curved spacetimes but they have also inspired the investigation of possible departures from exact Lorentz invariance at microscopic scales. In this role they have joined, and sometime anticipated, several quantum gravity models characterized by Lorentz breaking phenomenology. A crucial difference between these speculations and other ones associated to quantum gravity scenarios, is the possibility to carry out observational and experimental tests which have nowadays led to a broad range of constraints on departures from Lorentz invariance. We shall review here the effective field theory approach to Lorentz breaking in the matter sector, present the constraints provided by the available observations and finally discuss the implications of the persisting uncertainty on the composition of the ultra high energy cosmic rays for the constraints on the higher order, analogue gravity inspired, Lore...

  13. The galloping chromosphere. [H alpha observation of oscillating velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, C.

    1974-01-01

    Oscillating velocity fields can be observed on H-alpha filtergrams as a shifting pattern of intensity fluctuations known as 'the galloping chromosphere'. The characteristics of this activity are those of horizontal running waves of typical period of about 300 sec and long wavelength (about 20,000 km) that can be interpreted as acoustic-gravity waves propagating in the acoustic domain. Periods are longer in dark, structured regions, and in fibrils, and the change is quantitatively consistent with the reduction of resonance frequency in a magnetic field of 1 to 10 gauss. These easily observed fluctuations thus offer a means of estimating magnetic-field strength at specific locations in the chromosphere. Phase velocities are high, ranging upward from typical values between 50 and 100 km per sec, and tending to be lower in active regions and toward the limb.

  14. The interplanetary magnetic field observed by Juno enroute to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-06-01

    The Juno spacecraft was launched on 5 August 2011 and spent nearly 5 years traveling through the inner heliosphere on its way to Jupiter. The Magnetic Field Investigation was powered on shortly after launch and obtained vector measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at sample rates from 1 to 64 samples/second. The evolution of the magnetic field with radial distance from the Sun is compared to similar observations obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 and the Ulysses spacecraft, allowing a comparison of the radial evolution between prior solar cycles and the current depressed one. During the current solar cycle, the strength of the IMF has decreased throughout the inner heliosphere. A comparison of the variance of the normal component of the magnetic field shows that near Earth the variability of the IMF is similar during all three solar cycles but may be less at greater radial distances.

  15. Local Ambient Seismic Noise Survey in Dixie Valley, NV for Engineered Geothermal System Favorability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibuleac, I. M.; Iovenitti, J. L.; von Seggern, D. H.; Sainsbury, J.

    2013-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop and test the seismic component of a calibrated exploration method that integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical data to identify potential drilling targets for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). In exploring for EGS sites, the selection criteria identified by the AltaRock Energy, Inc. (AltaRock) and University of Nevada, Reno teams are, in order of importance, (1) temperature greater than 200C at 1.5 km depth, (2) rock type at the depth of interest (porous rocks at 1-3 km); and (3) favorable stress regime (tensional environment). To improve spatial resolution, a dense seismic array (21 three-component, broadband sensors, with an overall array aperture of 45km) was installed in two deployments in Dixie Valley, NV, each deployment having a three-month duration Ambient seismic noise and signal were used to retrieve inter-station and same-station Green's Functions (GFs), to be used for subsurface imaging. We used ambient seismic noise interferometry to extract GFs from crosscorrelation of continuous records. An innovative aspect of the seismic work was estimating the receiver functions beneath the stations using noise auto-correlation which was used to image the substructure. We report results of applying the technique to estimate a P/S velocity model from the GF surface wave components and from the GF body-wave reflection component, retrieved from ambient noise and signal cross-correlation and auto-correlation beams. We interpret our results in terms of temperature, pressure and rock composition. The estimated seismic velocity model capability to infer temperature is statistically assessed, in combination with other geophysical technique results.

  16. Field effects and ictal synchronization: insights from in homine observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shennan A; McKhann, Guy; Goodman, Robert; Emerson, Ronald G; Trevelyan, Andrew; Bikson, Marom; Schevon, Catherine A

    2013-12-05

    It has been well established in animal models that electrical fields generated during inter-ictal and ictal discharges are strong enough in intensity to influence action potential firing threshold and synchronization. We discuss recently published data from microelectrode array recordings of human neocortical seizures and speculate about the possible role of field effects in neuronal synchronization. We have identified two distinct seizure territories that cannot be easily distinguished by traditional EEG analysis. The ictal core exhibits synchronized neuronal burst firing, while the surrounding ictal penumbra exhibits asynchronous and relatively sparse neuronal activity. In the ictal core large amplitude rhythmic ictal discharges produce large electric fields that correspond with highly synchronous neuronal firing. In the penumbra rhythmic ictal discharges are smaller in amplitude, but large enough to influence spike timing, yet neuronal synchrony is not observed. These in homine observations are in accord with decades of animal studies supporting a role of field effects in neuronal synchronization during seizures, yet also highlight how field effects may be negated in the presence of strong synaptic inhibition in the penumbra.

  17. Field effects and ictal synchronization: insights from in homine observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shennan Aibel Weiss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established in animal models that electrical fields generated during inter-ictal and ictal discharges are strong enough in intensity to influence action potential firing threshold and synchronization. We discuss recently published data from microelectrode array recordings of human neocortical seizures and what they imply about the possible role of field effects in neuronal synchronization. We have identified two distinct seizure territories that cannot be easily distinguished by traditional EEG analysis. The ictal core exhibits synchronized neuronal burst firing, while the surrounding ictal penumbra exhibits asynchronous and relatively sparse neuronal activity. In the ictal core large amplitude rhythmic ictal discharges produce large electric fields that correspond with relatively synchronous neuronal firing. In the penumbra rhythmic ictal discharges are smaller in amplitude, but large enough to influence spike timing, yet neuronal synchrony is not observed. These in homine observations are in accord with decades of animal studies supporting a role of field effects in neuronal synchronization during seizures, yet also highlight how field effects may be negated in the presence of strong synaptic inhibition in the penumbra.

  18. Near-field observation of light propagation in nanocoax waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-06-16

    We report the observation of propagating modes of visible and near infrared light in nanoscale coaxial (metal-dielectric-metal) structures, using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Together with numerical calculations, we show that the propagated modes have different nature depending on the excitation wavelength, i.e., plasmonic TE11 and TE21 modes in the near infrared and photonic TE31, TE41 and TM11 modes in the visible. Far field transmission out of the nanocoaxes is dominated by the superposition of Fabry-Perot cavity modes resonating in the structures, consistent with theory. Such coaxial optical waveguides may be useful for future nanoscale photonic systems.

  19. Observational Constraints on New Exact Inflationary Scalar-field Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2016-01-01

    An algorithm is used to generate new solutions of the scalar field equations in homogeneous and isotropic universes. Solutions can be found for pure scalar fields with various potentials in the absence and presence of spatial curvature and other perfect fluids. A series of generalisations of the Chaplygin gas and bulk viscous cosmological solutions for inflationary universes are found. We also show how the Hubble slow-roll parameters can be calculated using the solution algorithm and we compare these inflationary solutions with the observational data provided by the Planck 2015 collaboration in order to constraint and rule out some of these models.

  20. A course on quantum field theory and local observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Frankfurt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1997-03-01

    A monograph on Quantum Field Theory and Local Observables is presented, aiming to unify two presently largely disconnected branches of QFT, as follows: the standard (canonical, functional) approach which is mainly perturbative in the sense of an infinitesimal `deformation` of free fields; nonperturbative constructions of low-dimensional models as the form factor-bootstrap approach (which for the time being is limited to factorable models in d=1+1 spacetime dimensions) and the non-Lagrangian constructions of conformal chiral QFT`s

  1. Estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Evan; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Estimating thermal performance of organisms is critical for understanding population distributions and dynamics and predicting responses to climate change. Typically, performance curves are estimated using laboratory studies to isolate temperature effects, but other abiotic and biotic factors influence temperature-performance relationships in nature reducing these models' predictive ability. We present a model for estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations that includes environmental and individual variation. We fit the model in a Bayesian framework using MCMC sampling, which allowed for estimation of unobserved latent growth while propagating uncertainty. Fitting the model to simulated data varying in sampling design and parameter values demonstrated that the parameter estimates were accurate, precise, and unbiased. Fitting the model to individual growth data from wild trout revealed high out-of-sample predictive ability relative to laboratory-derived models, which produced more biased predictions for field performance. The field-based estimates of thermal maxima were lower than those based on laboratory studies. Under warming temperature scenarios, field-derived performance models predicted stronger declines in body size than laboratory-derived models, suggesting that laboratory-based models may underestimate climate change effects. The presented model estimates true, realized field performance, avoiding assumptions required for applying laboratory-based models to field performance, which should improve estimates of performance under climate change and advance thermal ecology.

  2. Estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Evan S; Letcher, Benjamin H

    2017-03-08

    Estimating thermal performance of organisms is critical for understanding population distributions and dynamics and predicting responses to climate change. Typically, performance curves are estimated using laboratory studies to isolate temperature effects, but other abiotic and biotic factors influence temperature-performance relationships in nature reducing these models' predictive ability. We present a model for estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations that includes environmental and individual variation. We fit the model in a Bayesian framework using MCMC sampling, which allowed for estimation of unobserved latent growth while propagating uncertainty. Fitting the model to simulated data varying in sampling design and parameter values demonstrated that the parameter estimates were accurate, precise, and unbiased. Fitting the model to individual growth data from wild trout revealed high out-of-sample predictive ability relative to laboratory-derived models, which produced more biased predictions for field performance. The field-based estimates of thermal maxima were lower than those based on laboratory studies. Under warming temperature scenarios, field-derived performance models predicted stronger declines in body size than laboratory-derived models, suggesting that laboratory-based models may underestimate climate change effects. The presented model estimates true, realized field performance, avoiding assumptions required for applying laboratory-based models to field performance, which should improve estimates of performance under climate change and advance thermal ecology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Observable Algebra in Field Algebra of G-spin Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋立宁

    2003-01-01

    Field algebra of G-spin models can provide the simplest examples of lattice field theory exhibiting quantum symmetry. Let D(G) be the double algebra of a finite group G and D(H), a sub-algebra of D(G) determined by subgroup H of G. This paper gives concrete generators and the structure of the observable algebra AH, which is a D(H)-invariant sub-algebra in the field algebra of G-spin models F, and shows that AH is a C*-algebra. The correspondence between H and AH is strictly monotonic. Finally, a duality between D(H) and AH is given via an irreducible vacuum C*-representation of F.

  4. Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J.; Wang, C.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Delva, M.; Baumjohann, W.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations within a planetary magnetosheath play an important role in the solar wind interaction with the planet, since they can reconfigure the plasma flow and the magnetic field and transfer energy from the bow shock to the lower boundary. Many studies have been presented on the fluctuations in the terrestrial magnetosheath; however, hardly any studies have so far been carried out for Venusian magnetosheath fluctuations, except for Luhmann et al. [1983] and Vörös et al. [2008] who performed some case studies on the magnetosheath fluctuations at Venus. It was shown that the fluctuations are probably convected from the vicinity of the quasi-parallel bow shock along the streamlines. Based on the Venus Express observations in 2006 and 2007, we investigate the spatial distributions of magnetic field fluctuations in the Venus magnetosheath statistically.

  5. Another Piece of the Elephant: Chromospheric Vector Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Metcalf, T. R.; Mickey, D. L.

    2005-05-01

    As with most solar observational questions, investigating the structure and role of the chromosphere is one of remote sensing: many investigations describing their "piece of the elephant". The goal is, of course, to form a coherent picture of the state of the magnetized plasma which resides there (or passes through). In this presentation, recent efforts to understand the chromospheric magnetic field structure via direct observation, i.e. chromospheric vector magnetograms, will be presented. Since late 2003, the U. Hawai`i/Mees Solar Observatory's Imaging Vector Magnetograph has routinely acquired spectropolarimetry measurements of active regions across the Na-I 589.6nm line; from the polarization at the line's near-wings approximately 0.007nm from line center we deduce the vector magnetic field. The data are specific to active regions, with the focus being the structure, free energy storage and evolution at that low-chromospheric layer. I will present salient aspects of the observed chromospheric magnetic field structure, to compare and contrast with the picture formed by the other methods in this session.

  6. Spitzer IRS 16 micron Observations of the GOODS Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Teplitz, Harry I; Elbaz, David; Dickinson, Mark; Bridge, Carrie; Colbert, James; Floc'h, Emeric Le; Frayer, David T; Howell, Justin H; Koo, David C; Papovich, Casey; Phillips, Andrew; Scarlata, Claudia; Siana, Brian; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer 16 micron imaging of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. We survey 150 square arcminutes in each of the two GOODS fields (North and South), to an average 3 sigma depth of 40 and 65 micro-Jy respectively. We detect about 1300 sources in both fields combined. We validate the photometry using the 3-24 micron spectral energy distribution of stars in the fields compared to Spitzer spectroscopic templates. Comparison with ISOCAM and AKARI observations in the same fields show reasonable agreement, though the uncertainties are large. We provide a catalog of photometry, with sources cross correlated with available Spitzer, Chandra, and HST data. Galaxy number counts show good agreement with previous results from ISOCAM and AKARI, with improved uncertainties. We examine the 16 to 24 micron flux ratio and find that for most sources it lies within the expected locus for starbursts and infrared luminous galaxies. A color cut of S_{16}/S_{24}>1.4 selects mostly sources which lie a...

  7. Zero magnetic field effect observed in human cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binhi, V N; Sarimov, R M

    2009-01-01

    In our previous works, we reported that compensation of the geomagnetic field to a level less than 0.4 microT ("zero magnetic field," or ZMF) affected human cognitive processes. ZMF exposure increased the number of errors and the task processing time by 2.4% in average. However, in the array of the magnetic effects calculated from the experimental data, some readings have been found to deviate from the mean magnetic effect by more than three standard deviations. This finding could give rise to doubt as to whether the magnetic effect observed was a mere sequence of the presence of such unlikely data values. In the present work we examine the results of the unlikely data elimination and show that the corrected magnetic effect in tested humans remains statistically significant, though at a reduced magnitude 1.5%.

  8. The NASA STORMS Sub-Payload electric field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Swenson, C. M.; Barjatya, A.; Sanderson, W.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA STORMS sounding rocket, 36.218, was launched at 00:10 LT on October 30, 2007 into a mid- latitude spread-F condition over Wallops Island. The rocket deployed instrumented main and sub-payloads. The sub payload instrument complement included a plasma impedance probe for measuring plasma density, a Langmuir probe for relative plasma density and temperature measurements and the daughter electric field experiment. Unfortunately the sub-payload coned badly upon deployment complicating the data reduction. Within this paper we present a description of our data reduction techniques which are based upon an all magnetic attitude solution for the sub-payload's complex motion. The attitude solution is used to present preliminary density and electric field observations within this mid-latitude spread-F event.

  9. Observational Constraints on Gauge Field Production in Axion Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Meerburg, P Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling $\\phi F\\tilde F$ to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from mu-distortion using TRIS plus COB...

  10. Chemical telemetry of OH observed to measure interstellar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Viti, S; Myers, P C

    2005-01-01

    We present models for the chemistry in gas moving towards the ionization front of an HII region. When it is far from the ionization front, the gas is highly depleted of elements more massive than helium. However, as it approaches the ionization front, ices are destroyed and species formed on the grain surfaces are injected into the gas phase. Photodissociation removes gas phase molecular species as the gas flows towards the ionization front. We identify models for which the OH column densities are comparable to those measured in observations undertaken to study the magnetic fields in star forming regions and give results for the column densities of other species that should be abundant if the observed OH arises through a combination of the liberation of H2O from surfaces and photodissociation. They include CH3OH, H2CO, and H2S. Observations of these other species may help establish the nature of the OH spatial distribution in the clouds, which is important for the interpretation of the magnetic field results.

  11. The 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF12): Observational Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Koekemoer, Anton M; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A; Ouchi, Masami; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V; Targett, T

    2012-01-01

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128-orbit Cycle 19 \\HST\\ program aimed at extending previous WFC3/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at $z$$\\,\\gtrsim\\,$8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at $z$$\\,\\sim\\,7\\,-\\,$8, facilitate the construction of new samples of $z$$\\,\\sim\\,9\\,-\\,$10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to $z$$\\,\\sim\\,$12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset, to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky currently achievable. In this paper we present the observational overview of the pr...

  12. Birotor dipole for Saturn's inner magnetic field from Cassini observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting around Saturn since July 2004, revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). These two periods were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. We suppose that the periodic time modulations present in the SKR are mainly due to the rotation of Saturn's inner magnetic field. The existence of a double period implies that the inner field is not only limited to a simple rotation dipole but displays more complex structures having the same time periodicities than the radio emission. In order to build a model of this complex magnetic field, it is absolutely necessary to know the accurate phases of rotation linked with the two periods. The radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of these rotation phases, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A continuous wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz between July 2004 and June 2012 was performed in order to calculate in the same time the different periodicities and phases. A dipole model was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to have North and South poles rotating around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; this dipole is tilted and not centered. 57 Cassini's revolutions, the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii, have been selected for this study. For each of these chosen orbits, it is possible to fit with high precision the measurements of the MAG data experiment given by the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini. A nonrotating external magnetic field completes the model. This study suggests that Saturn's inner magnetic field is neither stationary nor fully axisymmetric. These results can be used as a boundary condition for

  13. Newly velocity field of Sulawesi Island from GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsito, D. A.; Susilo, Simons, W. J. F.; Abidin, H. Z.; Sapiie, B.; Triyoso, W.; Andreas, H.

    2017-07-01

    Sulawesi microplate Island is located at famous triple junction area of the Eurasian, India-Australian, and Philippine Sea plates. Under the influence of the northward moving Australian plate and the westward motion of the Philippine plate, the island at Eastern part of Indonesia is collide and with the Eurasian plate and Sunda Block. Those recent microplate tectonic motions can be quantitatively determine by GNSS-GPS measurement. We use combine GNSS-GPS observation types (campaign type and continuous type) from 1997 to 2015 to derive newly velocity field of the area. Several strategies are applied and tested to get the optimum result, and finally we choose regional strategy to reduce error propagation contribution from global multi baseline processing using GAMIT/GLOBK 10.5. Velocity field are analyzed in global reference frame ITRF 2008 and local reference frame by fixing with respect alternatively to Eurasian plate - Sunda block, India-Australian plate and Philippine Sea plates. Newly results show dense distribution of velocity field. This information is useful for tectonic deformation studying in geospatial era.

  14. The gravity field observations and products at IGFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzaghi, Riccardo; Vergos, George; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Barthelmes, Franz; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Wziontek, Hartmut; Kelly, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    The International Gravity Field Service (IGFS) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) that was established in 2003 at the IAG/IUGG General Assembly in Sapporo (Japan). This service aims at coordinating the actions of the IAG services related to the Earth gravity field, i.e. the Bureau Gravimétrique International (BGI), the International Service for the Geoid (ISG), the International Geodynamics and Earth Tides Service (IGETS), the International Center for Global Earth Models (ICGEM) and the International Digital Elevation Model Service (IDEMS). Also, via its Central Bureau hosted at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece), IGFS provides a link to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) bureaus in order to communicate their requirements and recommendations to the IGFS-Centers. In this work, a presentation is given on the recent activities of the service, namely those related to the contributions to the implementation of: the International Height Reference System/Frame; the Global Geodetic Reference System/Frame; the new Global Absolute Gravity Reference System/Frame. Particularly, the impact that these activities have in improving the estimation of the Earth's gravity field, either at global and local scale, is highlighted also in the framework of GGOS.

  15. Morphology of the ring current derived from magnetic field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Our examination of the 20 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from ISEE, AMPTE/CCE and Polar missions has allowed us to quantify how the ring current flows and closes in the magnetosphere at a variety of disturbance levels. Using intercalibrated magnetic field data from the three spacecraft, we are able to construct the statistical magnetic field maps and derive 3-dimensional current density by the simple device of taking the curl of the statistically determined magnetic field. The results show that there are two ring currents, an inner one that flows eastward at ~3 RE and a main westward ring current at ~4–7 RE for all levels of geomagnetic disturbances. In general, the in-situ observations show that the ring current varies as the Dst index decreases, as we would expect it to change. An unexpected result is how asymmetric it is in local time. Some current clearly circles the magnetosphere but much of the energetic plasma stays in the night hemisphere. These energetic particles appear not to be able to readily convect into the dayside magnetosphere. During quiet times, the symmetric and partial ring currents are similar in strength (~0.5MA and the peak of the westward ring current is close to local midnight. It is the partial ring current that exhibits most drastic intensification as the level of disturbances increases. Under the condition of moderate magnetic storms, the total partial ring current reaches ~3MA, whereas the total symmetric ring current is ~1MA. Thus, the partial ring current contributes dominantly to the decrease in the Dst index. As the ring current strengthens the peak of the partial ring current shifts duskward to the pre-midnight sector. The partial ring current is closed by a meridional current system through the ionosphere, mainly the field-aligned current, which maximizes at local times near the dawn and dusk. The closure currents flow in

  16. Electric earthquake precursors: from laboratory results to field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, F.; Triantis, D.; Tzanis, A.; Anastasiadis, C.; Stavrakas, I.

    2003-04-01

    The possibility of electrical earthquake precursors (EEP) has long been appreciated, but it has proven difficult to construct a solid theory to describe their generation and expected characteristics, or proven techniques to identify and discriminate true precursors from noise. To this end, a large number of laboratory experiments have been conducted, which have demonstrated the generation of transient electric potential prior to rupture in both dry and wet rock specimens. The principal mechanisms proposed to explain these observations are the piezo-electric and electrokinetic effects. The often quoted in the literature piezoelectric effect, cannot explain why non-piezoelectric rock specimens can also generate precursory electric phenomena. Streaming potential can be generated in many kinds of saturated rocks, but the fracturing of dry rocks also produces transient electric effects. Therefore, these two mechanisms may not be the basic contributors to the precursory phenomena observed in the laboratory (and to possible EEP signals). Herein we present a series of laboratory experiments on the microfracturing electrification of dry marble samples under stress, and discuss their possible relationship to field observations of purported EEP. The marble samples were subjected to constant and variable stress-rate uniaxial compression, in both the elastic and the plastic region. During the experiment, pressure stimulated currents (PSC) were observed, which show a clear dependence on the stress rate and mechanical state of the material (the Young modulus), decreasing in frequency and intensity with increasing damage during repeated loading cycles. Explanation of these observations is attempted with a theoretical model involving microfracturing and the motion of charged edge dislocations (MCD) as the primary electrification mechanism, after Tzanis and Vallianatos (Seismo Electromagnetics: Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling, TERRAPUB, 2002). The PSC waveforms and mode

  17. C/NOFS Observations of AC Electric Field Fields Associated with Equatorial Spread-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set in which to acquire detailed knowledge of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations, primarily gathered within the ELF band (1 Hz to 250 Hz) on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The data will be used to explore the anisotropy/isotropy of the waves, their wavelength and phase velocity, as well as their spectral distributions. When analyzed in conjunction with the driving DC electric fields and detailed plasma number density measurements, the combined data reveal important information concerning the instability mechanisms themselves. We also present high resolution, vector measurements of intense lower hybrid waves that have been detected on numerous occasions by the VEFI burst memory VLF electric field channels.

  18. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  19. Observation of electromagnetically induced transparency in evanescent fields

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, R; Agarwal, G S; Lvovsky, A I

    2012-01-01

    We observe and investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, electromagnetically-induced transparency experienced by evanescent fields arising due to total internal reflection from an interface of glass and hot rubidium vapor. This phenomenon manifests itself as a non-Lorentzian peak in the reflectivity spectrum, which features a sharp cusp with a sub-natural width of about 1 MHz. The width of the peak is independent of the thickness of the interaction region, which indicates that the main source of decoherence is likely due to collisions with the cell walls rather than diffusion of atoms. With the inclusion of a coherence-preserving wall coating, this system could be used as an ultra-compact frequency reference.

  20. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  1. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object

  2. Generating the Observed Baryon Asymmetry from the Inflaton Field

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which the inflaton can generate baryogenesis, by taking the inflaton to be a complex scalar field with a weakly broken global symmetry and present a new version of the Affleck-Dine mechanism. The smallness of the breaking is motivated both by technical naturalness and a requirement for inflation. We study inflation driven by a quadratic potential for simplicity and discuss generalizations to other potentials. We compute the inflationary dynamics and find that a conserved particle number is obtained towards the end of inflation. We then explain in detail the later decay to baryons. We present two promising embeddings in particle physics: (i) using high dimension operators for a gauge singlet; we find this leads to the observed asymmetry for decay controlled by the ~GUT scale and this is precisely the regime where the EFT applies. (ii) using a colored inflaton, which requires small couplings. We also point out two observational consequences: a possible large scale dipole in the baryon ...

  3. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS OBSERVED BY VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) was beyond the heliopause between 2013.00 and 2014.41, where it was making in situ observations of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The average azimuthal angle and elevation angle of the magnetic field B were (λ) = 292.°5 ± 1.°4 and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°2, respectively. The angles λ and δ varied linearly at (1.°4 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1} and (–1.°1 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1}, respectively, suggesting that V1 was measuring the draped ISMF around the heliopause. The distributions of hourly averages of λ and δ were Gaussian distributions, with most probable values 292.°5 and 22.°1, and standard deviations (SDs) 1.°3 and 1.°1, respectively. The small SD indicates little or no turbulence transverse to B . An abrupt decrease in B from 0.50 nT on 2013/129.9 to 0.46 nT on 2013/130.6 was observed, possibly associated with a weak reverse shock or magnetoacoustic pressure wave following a burst of electron plasma oscillations. Between 2013/130.6 and 2013/365.3, (B) = 0.464 ± 0.009 nT, (λ) = 292.°6 ± 0.°8, and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°1. The corresponding distribution of hourly averages of B was Gaussian with the most probable value 0.464 nT and σ = 0.009 nT. Since the uncertainty σ corresponds to the instrument and digitization noise, these observations provided an upper limit to the turbulence in the ISMF. The distributions of the hourly increments of B were Gaussian distributions with σ = 0.05 nT, 0.°4, and 0.°4, respectively, indicating that the V1 did not detect evidence of ''intermittent bursts'' of interstellar turbulence.

  4. 克维尼亚食品机械系统有限公司(CFS)兼并迪西尤年公司(Dixie Union)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ 2000年5月3日,克维尼亚食品机械系统有限公司(CFS)正式宣布兼并SUIZA食品集团公司的迪西尤年公司(Dixie Union).Dixie公司主要生产切片机,深拉伸包装机和包装材料.

  5. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  6. Field-aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F region that are interpreted as being caused by the passage of the payload through a structured field-aligned current system. The field-aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of about 1 km. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of .001 A/sq m.

  7. Modeling the Jovian magnetic field and its secular variation using all available magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Victoria A.; Holme, Richard

    2016-03-01

    We present new models of Jupiter's internal magnetic field and secular variation from all available direct measurements from three decades of spacecraft observation. A regularized minimum norm approach allows the creation of smooth, numerically stable models displaying a high degree of structure. External field from the magnetodisk is modeled iteratively for each orbit. Jupiter's inner magnetosphere is highly stable with time, with no evidence for variation with solar activity. We compare two spherical harmonic models, one assuming a field constant in time and a second allowing for linear time variation. Including secular variation improves data fit with fewer additional parameters than increasing field complexity. Our favored solution indicates a ˜0.012% yr-1 increase in Jupiter's dipole magnetic moment from 1973 to 2003; this value is roughly one quarter of that for Earth. Inaccuracies in determination of the planetary reference frame cannot explain all the observed secular variation. Should more structure be allowed in the solutions, we find the northern hemispherical configuration resembles recent models based on satellite auroral footprint locations, and there is also evidence of a possible patch of reversed polar flux seen at the expected depth of the dynamo region, resembling that found at Earth and with implications for the Jovian interior. Finally, using our preferred model, we infer flow dynamics at the top of Jupiter's dynamo source. Though highly speculative, the results produce several gyres with some symmetry about the equator, similar to those seen at Earth's core-mantle boundary, suggesting motion on cylinders aligned with the rotation axis.

  8. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  9. Field Observations of Coastal Air-Sea Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Williams, N. J.; Graber, H. C.

    2016-12-01

    In the nearshore zone wind, waves, and currents generated from different forcing mechanisms converge in shallow water. This can profoundly affect the physical nature of the ocean surface, which can significantly modulate the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass across the air-sea interface. For decades, the focus of air-sea interaction research has been on the open ocean while the shallow water regime has been relatively under-explored. This bears implications for efforts to understand and model various coastal processes, such as mixing, surface transport, and air-sea gas flux. The results from a recent study conducted at the New River Inlet in North Carolina showed that directly measured air-sea flux parameters, such as the atmospheric drag coefficient, are strong functions of space as well as the ambient conditions (i.e. wind speed and direction). The drag is typically used to parameterize the wind stress magnitude. It is generally assumed that the wind direction is the direction of the atmospheric forcing (i.e. wind stress), however significant wind stress steering off of the azimuthal wind direction was observed and was found to be related to the horizontal surface current shear. The authors have just returned from a field campaign carried out within Monterey Bay in California. Surface observations made from two research vessels were complimented by an array of beach and inland flux stations, high-resolution wind forecasts, and satellite image acquisitions. This is a rich data set and several case studies will be analyzed to highlight the importance of various processes for understanding the air-sea fluxes. Preliminary findings show that interactions between the local wind-sea and the shoaling, incident swell can have a profound effect on the wind stress magnitude. The Monterey Bay coastline contains a variety of topographical features and the importance of land-air-sea interactions will also be investigated.

  10. Field Observations of the Effects of Explosives on Snow Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, R.; Hendrikx, J.; Miller, D. A.; Birkeland, K.

    2012-12-01

    Explosives are a critically important component of avalanche control programs. They are used to both initiate avalanches and to test snowpack instability by ski areas, highway departments and other avalanche programs around the world. Current understanding of the effects of explosives on snow is mainly limited to shock wave behavior demonstrated through stress wave velocities, pressures and attenuation. This study seeks to enhance current knowledge of how explosives physically alter snow by providing practical, field-based observations and analyses that quantify the effect of explosives on snow density, snow hardness and snow stability test results. Density, hardness and stability test results were evaluated both before and after the application of 0.9 kg cast pentolite boosters as air blasts. Changes in these properties were evaluated at specified distances up to 4 meters (m) from the blast center using a density gauge, hand hardness, Compression Tests (CTs), and Extended Column Tests (ECTs). Statistically significant density increases occurred out to a distance of 1.5 m from the blast center and down to a depth of 60 centimeters (cm). Statistically significant density increases were also observed at the surface (down to 20 cm) out to a distance of 4 m. Hardness increased slightly at the surface and at the bottom of the snowpack (depths of 80-100 cm), while decreasing slightly in the middle of the snowpack (depths of 30-60 cm). Results from CTs showed a decrease in the number of taps needed for column failure in the post explosive tests, while a smaller data set of ECT results showed no overall change in ECT score. The findings of this study provide a better understanding of the physical changes in snow following explosives, which may lead to more effective and efficient avalanche risk mitigation.

  11. High resolution geomagnetic field observations at Terra Nova bay, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palangio

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available he preliminary results obtained from the analysis in the micropulsation frequency range of high time resolution magnetic field data recorded at the Antarctic Italian geomagnetic observatory at Terra Nova Bay for 11 consecutive days in February 1994 are reported. The spectral index over the whole Pcl-Pc5 frequency range is of the order of 3.5 and its value significantly increases beyond about 50 mHz. Spectral peaks in the Pc3 frequency range are common, especially during the daytime hours, and are probably due to the direct penetration of upstream waves in the cusp region. From the local time distribution of the micro pulsation power, a signifi - cant activity enhancement around the local magnetic noon emerges, in agreement with previous observations. The analysis of the signal polarisation characteristics in the horizontal plane shows a predominant CW polarisation in the Pcl-Pc3 frequency ranges with the major axis of the polarisation ellipse in the first quadrant.

  12. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS DERIVED FROM SIMULTANEOUS MICROWAVE AND EUV OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH THE POTENTIAL FIELD MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Shun; Nozawa, Satoshi [Department of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Iwai, Kazumasa; Shibasaki, Kiyoto [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Shiota, Daikou, E-mail: shunmi089@gmail.com [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-02-10

    We estimated the accuracy of coronal magnetic fields derived from radio observations by comparing them to potential field calculations and the differential emission measure measurements using EUV observations. We derived line-of-sight components of the coronal magnetic field from polarization observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung in the NOAA active region 11150, observed around 3:00 UT on 2011 February 3 using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. Because the thermal bremsstrahlung intensity at 17 GHz includes both chromospheric and coronal components, we extracted only the coronal component by measuring the coronal emission measure in EUV observations. In addition, we derived only the radio polarization component of the corona by selecting the region of coronal loops and weak magnetic field strength in the chromosphere along the line of sight. The upper limits of the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields were determined as 100–210 G. We also calculated the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields from the potential field extrapolation using the photospheric magnetic field obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. However, the calculated potential fields were certainly smaller than the observed coronal longitudinal magnetic field. This discrepancy between the potential and the observed magnetic field strengths can be explained consistently by two reasons: (1) the underestimation of the coronal emission measure resulting from the limitation of the temperature range of the EUV observations, and (2) the underestimation of the coronal magnetic field resulting from the potential field assumption.

  13. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  14. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravita......A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes...

  15. A Case Study of Hogtown Creek: Justification for Field Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Felicia E.

    A case-study model of a field trip to a small creek was made to facilitate the use of field studies as a technique for involving students and teachers in studying the earth as it undergoes change. Methods and techniques of planning are presented which include familiarization with the area by the teacher, the development of goals and objectives,…

  16. Modified electron acoustic field and energy applied to observation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@yahoo.com, E-mail: hgomaa-eg@mans.edu.eg [College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul Aziz University, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Improved electrostatic acoustic field and energy have been debated in vortex trapped hot electrons and fluid of cold electrons with pressure term plasmas. The perturbed higher-order modified-Korteweg-de Vries equation (PhomKdV) has been worked out. The effect of trapping and electron temperatures on the electro-field and energy properties in auroral plasmas has been inspected.

  17. Field Science Ethnography: Methods For Systematic Observation on an Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Haughton-Mars expedition is a multidisciplinary project, exploring an impact crater in an extreme environment to determine how people might live and work on Mars. The expedition seeks to understand and field test Mars facilities, crew roles, operations, and computer tools. I combine an ethnographic approach to establish a baseline understanding of how scientists prefer to live and work when relatively unemcumbered, with a participatory design approach of experimenting with procedures and tools in the context of use. This paper focuses on field methods for systematically recording and analyzing the expedition's activities. Systematic photography and time-lapse video are combined with concept mapping to organize and present information. This hybrid approach is generally applicable to the study of modern field expeditions having a dozen or more multidisciplinary participants, spread over a large terrain during multiple field seasons.

  18. Correlation between atmospheric electric fields and cloud cover using a field mill and cloud observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Kota; Suzuki, Yasuki; Ohya, Hiroyo; Takano, Toshiaki; Kawamura, Yohei; Nakata, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kozo

    2017-04-01

    It is known that lightning and precipitations of rain droplets generated from thunderclouds are a generator of global atmospheric electric circuit. In the fair weather, the atmospheric electric fields (AEF) are downward (positive), while they are upward (negative) during lightning and precipitations. However, the correlations between the AEF, and the cloud parameters such as cloud cover, weather phenomenon, have been not revealed quantitatively yet. In this study, we investigate the correlations between the AEF and the cloud parameters, weather phenomenon using a field mill, the 95 GHz-FALCON (FMCW Radar for Cloud Observations)-I and all-sky camera observations. In this study, we installed a Boltek field mill on the roof of our building in Chiba University, Japan, (Geographic coordinate: 35.63 degree N, 140.10 degree E, the sea level: 55 m) on the first June, 2016. The sampling time of the AEF is 0.5 s. On the other hand, the FALCON-I has observed the cloud parameters far from about 76 m of the field mill throughout 24 hours every day. The vertical cloud profiles and the Doppler velocity of cloud particles can be derived by the FALCON-I with high distance resolutions (48.8 m) (Takano et al., 2010). In addition, the images of the clouds and precipitations are recorded with 30-s sampling by an all-sky camera using a CCD camera on the same roof during 05:00-22:00 LT every day. The distance between the field mill and the all-sky camera is 3.75 m. During 08:30 UT - 10:30 UT, on 4 July, 2016, we found the variation of the AEF due to the approach of thundercloud. The variation consisted of two patterns. One was slow variation due to the movement of thunderclouds, and the other was rapid variation associated with lightning discharges. As for the movement of thunderclouds, the AEF increased when the anvil was located over the field mill, which was opposite direction of the previous studies. This change might be due to the positive charges in the upper anvil more than 14 km

  19. The mean magnetic field of the sun - Method of observation and relation to the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.; Kotov, V.; Severnyi, A. B.; Howard, R.

    1977-01-01

    The mean solar magnetic field as measured in integrated light has been observed since 1968. Since 1970 it has been observed both at Hale Observatories and at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. The observing procedures at both observatories and their implications for mean field measurements are discussed. A comparison of the two sets of daily observations shows that similar results are obtained at both observatories. A comparison of the mean field with the interplanetary magnetic polarity shows that the IMF sector structure has the same pattern as the mean field polarity.

  20. The Magnetic Field of the Solar Corona from Pulsar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ord, S M; Sarkissian, J

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel experiment with the capacity to independently measure both the electron density and the magnetic field of the solar corona. We achieve this through measurement of the excess Faraday rotation due to propagation of the polarised emission from a number of pulsars through the magnetic field of the solar corona. This method yields independent measures of the integrated electron density, via dispersion of the pulsed signal and the magnetic field, via the amount of Faraday rotation. In principle this allows the determination of the integrated magnetic field through the solar corona along many lines of sight without any assumptions regarding the electron density distribution. We present a detection of an increase in the rotation measure of the pulsar J1801$-$2304 of approximately 160 \\rad at an elongation of 0.95$^\\circ$ from the centre of the solar disk. This corresponds to a lower limit of the magnetic field strength along this line of sight of $> 393\\mu\\mathrm{G}$. The lack of precision in the i...

  1. Practising infanticide, observing narrative: controversial texts in a field science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, A

    2001-08-01

    In recent recent years, social studies of science have developed a deep interest in the conduct of science in the field. However, studies of controversial field science remain relatively rare. This paper presents an analysis of a controversy about the origin of primate infanticide that began in the 1970s, and discusses the ways in which controversies in the field differ from those in the laboratory. Particularly important here is the inability of researchers to control the behaviour of their research subjects; to an important extent, the conduct of their research is dependent on the agency of their research subjects. Finally, it also points to the rôle played by the sciences of animal behaviour in the constructions of stories about the biological basis of human culture, a rôle that means that the investigation of controversy in these sciences is of paramount public importance.

  2. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  3. Criteria for the observation of strong-field photoelectron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, T. [UPMC Universite Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Huismans, Y. [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schafer, K. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Photoelectron holography is studied experimentally and computationally using the ionization of ground-state xenon atoms by intense near-infrared radiation. A strong dependence of the occurrence of the holographic pattern on the laser wavelength and intensity is observed, and it is shown that the observation of the hologram requires that the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} is substantially larger than the photon energy. The holographic interference is therefore favored by longer wavelengths and higher laser intensities. Our results indicate that the tunneling regime is not a necessary condition for the observation of the holographic pattern, which can be observed under the conditions formally attributed to the multiphoton regime.

  4. Reactivity to Systematic Observation with Film: A Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The reluctance to use film and video equipment for systematic observation and recording can be partially attributed to an assumption of reactivity and internal invalidity. The results of the study discuss placement of the observer and the use of film in data collection. (Author/DEP)

  5. Observational constraints on inflation models with nonminimal scalar field

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, H

    2001-01-01

    We present the power spectra of the scalar- and tensor-type structures generated in an inflation model based on the nonminimally coupled scalar field with a self coupling. By comparing the contributions of these structures to the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the four year COBE DMR data we derive strong constraints on model parameters and the inflation model.

  6. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T. P., E-mail: intrator@lanl.gov; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dorf, L. [Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Sun, X. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China)

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  7. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  8. Quantifying solar superactive regions with vector magnetic field observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, A Q

    2012-01-01

    The vector magnetic field characteristics of superactive regions (SARs) hold the key for understanding why SARs are extremely active and provide the guidance in space weather prediction. We aim to quantify the characteristics of SARs using the vector magnetograms taken by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observatory Station. The vector magnetic field characteristics of 14 SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23 were analyzed using the following four parameters: 1) the magnetic flux imbalance between opposite polarities, 2) the total photospheric free magnetic energy, 3) the length of the magnetic neutral line with its steep horizontal magnetic gradient, and 4) the area with strong magnetic shear. Furthermore, we selected another eight large and inactive active regions (ARs), which are called fallow ARs (FARs), to compare them with the SARs. We found that most of the SARs have a net magnetic flux higher than 7.0\\times10^21 Mx, a total photospheric free magnetic energy higher than 1.0\\times10^24 erg/c...

  9. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  10. FIELD OBSERVATIONS ON BED SEDIMENTS AND SANDWAVES IN CHANGJIANG ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiufa LI; Xinning WAN; Ming YING; Xiaohua CHEN

    2005-01-01

    A series of advanced instruments were applied to obtain the field data of bed, bed forms and relevant dynamic factors in the 150 km-long reach of the Changjiang River from Jiangyin to Hengsha Island in March 2002. We found that well-sorted fine sand was in the majority of the bed sediment, which had a median diameter of 2φ. Well-developed sandwaves were formed because the grains jumped together on the bed, which was related to the granularity and current velocity during the flood-ebb tidal cycles.

  11. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  12. Overhauser magnetometer sensor design for magnetic field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zan; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Cao, Qiong

    2016-10-01

    The Overhauser magnetometer, with its unique set of advantages, such as low power consumption, high precision and fast recording ability has been widely used in geophysical mineral and oil exploration, archeology, environmental survey, ordnance and weapons detection (UXO) and other earth science applications. Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, which suffers from high power consumption and low precision, the Overhauser magnetometer excite the free radical solution in a cavity with RF signal to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Thus, RF resonator plays a crucial role in reducing power consumption and improving the accuracy of Overhauser magnetometer. There are a wide variety of resonators, but only two of them are chosen for Overhauser magnetometer: birdcage coil and coaxial resonator. In order to get the best RF cavity for Overhauser magnetometer sensor, both resonators are investigated here. Firstly, parameters of two RF resonators are calculated theoretically and simulated with Ansoft HFSS. The results indicate that birdcage coil is characterized by linear polarization while coaxial resonator is characterized by circular polarization. Besides, all RF fields are limited inside of the coaxial resonator while distributed both inside and outside of the birdcage coil. Then, the two resonators are practically manufactured based on the theoretical design. And the S-parameter and Smith chart of these resonators are measured with Agilent 8712ES RF network analyzer. The measured results indicate that the coaxial resonator has a much higher Q value(875) than the birdcage coil(70). All these results reveal a better performance for coaxial resonator. Finally, field experimental shows 0.074nT sensitivity for Overhauser magnetometer with coaxial resonator.

  13. Observations of vector magnetic fields with a magneto-optic filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciani, Alessandro; Varsik, John; Zirin, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The use of the magnetooptic filter to observe solar magnetic fields in the potassium line at 7699 A is described. The filter has been used in the Big Bear videomagnetograph since October 23. It gives a high sensitivity and dynamic range for longitudnal magnetic fields and enables measurement of transverse magnetic fields using the sigma component. Examples of the observations are presented.

  14. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, H -Y; Luo, A -L; Huang, L -C; Ip, W -H; Fu, J -N; Zhang, Y; Hou, Y -H; Cao, Z -H; Wang, Y -F

    2016-01-01

    A sample of the LAMOST spectra of the early type M0-M3 dwarfs is compared with the Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in $H_{\\alpha}$ have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index and the equivalent widths of the $H_{\\alpha}$ emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods $<$ 20 day).

  15. Azimuthal field perturbations in the jovian magnetosphere: ulysses observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Edwards

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Las perturbaciones azimutales del campo magn etico observadas por el sat elite Ulysses durante la entrada y salida de la magnet osfera joviana son comparadas con los valores calculados con la tranferencia de momento angular de la ion osfera a la magnet osfera debido a plasma magnetosf erico que no est a corrotando. Durante la entrada se observ o una con guraci on \\retrasada" del campo, correspondiente a ujos con subcorrotaci on. Se encontr o que los valores m aximos del campo azimutal disminuyen con la distancia como r

  16. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-Y.; Song, Y.-H.; Luo, A.-L.; Huang, L.-C.; Ip, W.-H.; Fu, J.-N.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Cao, Z.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectra of early-type M0–M3 dwarfs is compared with Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in {{{H}}}α have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index, and the equivalent widths of the {{{H}}}α emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster-rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods < 20 days).

  17. Multicolor observations of the Hubble Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Vanzella, E; Saracco, P; Arnouts, S; Bianchi, S; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Grazian, A

    2001-01-01

    We present a deep multicolor (UBVIJsHKs) catalog of galaxies in the HDF-S, based on observations obtained with the HST WFPC2 in 1998 and VLT-ISAAC in 1999. The photometric procedures were tuned to derive a catalog optimized for the estimation of photometric redshifts. In particular we adopted a ``conservative'' detection threshold which resulted in a list of 1611 objects. The behavior of the observed source counts is in general agreement with the result of Casertano et al. (2000) in the HDF-S and Williams et al. (1996) in the HDF-N, while the corresponding counts in the HDF-N provided by Fernandez-Soto et al. (1999) are systematically lower by a factor 1.5 beyond I_AB=26. After correcting for the incompleteness of the source counts, the object surface density at I_AB2.7) were selected down to K_AB=24, plus 3 objects whose upper limit to the Ks flux is still compatible with the selection criterion. The corresponding surface density of EROs is (2.5+-0.8) per sq.arcmin ((3.2+-0.9) per sq.arcmin if we include the...

  18. Action video game players and deaf observers have larger Goldmann visual fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David; Codina, Charlotte; Bhardwaj, Palvi; Pascalis, Olivier

    2010-03-05

    We used Goldmann kinetic perimetry to compare how training and congenital auditory deprivation may affect the size of the visual field. We measured the ability of action video game players and deaf observers to detect small moving lights at various locations in the central (around 30 degrees from fixation) and peripheral (around 60 degrees ) visual fields. Experiment 1 found that 10 habitual video game players showed significantly larger central and peripheral field areas than 10 controls. In Experiment 2 we found that 13 congenitally deaf observers had significantly larger visual fields than 13 hearing controls for both the peripheral and central fields. Here the greatest differences were found in the lower parts of the fields. Comparison of the two groups showed that whereas VGP players have a more uniform increase in field size in both central and peripheral fields deaf observers show non-uniform increases with greatest increases in lower parts of the visual field.

  19. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields: comparing non-potential simulations and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, L T; Vidotto, A A; Mackay, D H; See, V; Donati, J -F; Folsom, C P; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; Petit, P

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes that are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal ...

  20. Observing and modelling the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields of the global dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert; Duvall, Thomas; Schüssler, Manfred; Schunker, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    The large scale solar dynamo is a cycle where poloidal flux is generated from toroidal flux, and toroidal flux is generated from poloidal flux. The toroidal and poloidal fields can be inferred from observations, and the Babcock-Leighton model shows how differential rotation and flux emergence explain the observed evolution of the fields.

  1. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    CERN Document Server

    Huntington, C M; Ross, J S; Zylstra, A B; Drake, R P; Froula, D H; Gregori, G; Kugland, N L; Kuranz, C C; Levy, M C; Li, C K; Meinecke, J; Morita, T; Petrasso, R; Plechaty, C; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Sakawa, Y; Spitkovsky, A; Takabe, H; Park, H -S

    2013-01-01

    As the ejecta from supernovae or other energetic astrophysical events stream through the interstellar media, this plasma is shaped by instabilities that generate electric and magnetic fields. Among these instabilities, the Weibel filamentation instability plays a particularly important role, as it can generate significant magnetic fields in an initially un-magnetized medium. It is theorized that these Weibel fields are responsible for the observed gamma-ray burst light curve, particle acceleration in shock waves, and for providing seed fields for larger-scale cosmological magnetic structures. While the presence of these instability-generated fields has been inferred from astrophysical observation and predicted in simulation, observation in experiments is challenging. Here we report direct observation of well-organized, large-amplitude, filamentary magnetic fields associated with the Weibel instability in a scaled laboratory experiment. The experimental images, captured with proton radiography, are shown to be...

  2. Field observations on Unimak Island, Alaska, 11-25 August 1975: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the observations of a two week reconnaissance of Unimak Island from 11 August-25 August, 1975. The primary objectives were to do a preliminary...

  3. On the occurrence and characteristics of intense low-altitude electric fields observed by Freja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Marklund

    Full Text Available High-resolution measurements by the double probe electric field instrument on the Freja satellite are presented. The observations show that extremely intense (up to 1 V m–1 and fine-structured (<1 km electric fields exist at auroral latitudes within the altitude regime explored by Freja (up to 1700 km. The intense field events typically occur within the early morning sector of the auroral oval (01–07 MLT during times of geomagnetic activity. In contrast to the observations within the auroral acceleration region characterized by intense converging electric fields associated with electron precipitation, upward ion beams and upward field-aligned currents, the intense electric fields observed by Freja are often found to be diverging and located within regions of downward field-aligned currents outside the electron aurora. Moreover, the intense fields are observed in conjunction with precipitating and transversely energized ions of energies 0.5–1 keV and may play an important role in the ion heating. The observations suggest that the intense electric field events are associated with small-scale low-conductivity ionospheric regions void of auroral emissions such as east-west aligned dark filaments or vortex streets of black auroral curls located between or adjacent to auroral arcs within the morningside diffuse auroral region. We suggest that these intense fields also exist at ionospheric altitudes although no such observations have yet been made. This is possible since the height-integrated conductivity associated with the dark filaments may be as low as 0.1 S or less. In addition, Freja electric field data collected outside the auroral region are discussed with particular emphasis on subauroral electric fields which are observed within the 19–01 MLT sector between the equatorward edge of the auroral oval and the inner edge of the ring current.

  4. The role of observers in the measurement of the Teleparallel Gravitoelectromagnetic fields in different geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Spaniol, Ednardo P; de Deus, Juliano A; de Andrade, Vanessa C

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity (TEGR) we have investigated the role of local observers, associated with tetrad fields, in description of the gravitational interaction through the concepts of the gravitoelectric (GE) and gravitomagnetic (GM) fields. We start by analyzing the gravitoelectromagnetic (GEM) fields obtained from an observer freely falling in the Schwarzschild space-time. Then, we investigated whether it is possible to distinguish between this situation and to be at rest in the Minkowski space-time. We conclude that, although there are non-zero components for the fields obtained for the case of free fall, its dynamical effect, measured by the gravitational Lorentz force, is null. Moreover, the gravitational field energy obtained from the GEM fields for an observer freely falling in the Schwarzschild spacetime is zero. These results are in complete agreement with the equivalence principle.

  5. B fields in OB stars (BOB): Concluding the FORS 2 observing campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöller, M.; Hubrig, S.; Fossati, L.; Carroll, T. A.; Briquet, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Järvinen, S.; Ilyin, I.; Castro, N.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M.-F.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Sana, H.; Herrero, A.; Barbá, R. H.; de Koter, A.; BOB Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The B fields in OB stars (BOB) Collaboration is based on an ESO Large Programme to study the occurrence rate, properties, and ultimately the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. Methods: In the framework of this program, we carried out low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a large sample of massive stars using FORS 2 installed at the ESO VLT 8 m telescope. Results: We determined the magnetic field values with two completely independent reduction and analysis pipelines. Our in-depth study of the magnetic field measurements shows that differences between our two pipelines are usually well within 3σ errors. From the 32 observations of 28 OB stars, we were able to monitor the magnetic fields in CPD -57° 3509 and HD 164492C, confirm the magnetic field in HD 54879, and detect a magnetic field in CPD -62° 2124. We obtain a magnetic field detection rate of 6 ± 3% for the full sample of 69 OB stars observed with FORS 2 within the BOB program. For the preselected objects with a v sin i below 60 km s-1, we obtain a magnetic field detection rate of 5 ± 5%. We also discuss X-ray properties and multiplicity of the objects in our FORS 2 sample with respect to the magnetic field detections. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 191.D-0255(E,G).

  6. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ivankov, Olexandr I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudniy 141700 (Russian Federation); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  7. High resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that efficiently combines the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 yr are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from satellite altimeter and sea surface temperature observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations, and salinity fields from altimeter observations, through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolutionary nature of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method, and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50% of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30% of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system essential for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method further reduce the differences between the gridded products and the observations by up to 20% for the temperature field in the mixed layer, and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30%. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the

  8. High Resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that combines efficiently the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 years are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from altimeter and sea surface temperature satellite observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and salinity fields from altimeter observations through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolution of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50 % of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30 % of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system mandatory for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method reduce additionally the error by up to 20 % for the temperature field in the mixed layer and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30 %. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the merged fields provide a better reconstruction of the high

  9. Magnetic fields in protoplanetary disks: from MHD simulations to ALMA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bertrang, Gesa H -M; Wolf, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields significantly influence the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of planets, following the predictions of numerous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. However, these predictions are yet observationally unconstrained. To validate the predictions on the influence of magnetic fields on protoplanetary disks, we apply 3D radiative transfer simulations of the polarized emission of aligned aspherical dust grains that directly link 3D global non-ideal MHD simulations to ALMA observations. Our simulations show that it is feasible to observe the predicted toroidal large-scale magnetic field structures, not only in the ideal observations but also with high-angular resolution ALMA observations. Our results show further that high angular resolution observations by ALMA are able to identify vortices embedded in outer magnetized disk regions.

  10. Magnetic fields in protoplanetary discs: from MHD simulations to ALMA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrang, G. H.-M.; Flock, M.; Wolf, S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields significantly influence the evolution of protoplanetary discs and the formation of planets, following the predictions of numerous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. However, these predictions are yet observationally unconstrained. To validate the predictions on the influence of magnetic fields on protoplanetary discs, we apply 3D radiative transfer simulations of the polarized emission of aligned aspherical dust grains that directly link 3D global non-ideal MHD simulations to Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations. Our simulations show that it is feasible to observe the predicted toroidal large-scale magnetic field structures, not only in the ideal observations but also with high-angular resolution ALMA observations. Our results show further that high-angular resolution observations by ALMA are able to identify vortices embedded in outer magnetized disc regions.

  11. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  12. Field Plot and Observation Points for Timpanogos Cave National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (13 plots points and 10 observations points, collected June 2007) for the vegetation mapping...

  13. The data platform of national special environment and disaster field observation stations based on grid environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Data Platform of Resource and Environment-whose data mainly come from field observation stations,spatial observations,and internet service institutions-is the base of data analysis and model simulation in geoscience research in China.Among this integrated data platform,the tasks of the data platform of field observation stations are principally data collection,management,assimilation,and share service.Taking into consideration the distributing characteristics of the data sources and the service objects,the authors formulated the framework of the field observation stations’ data platform based on the grid technology and designed its operating processes.The authors have further defined and analyzed the key functions and implementing techniques for each module.In a Linux operating system,validation tests for the data platform’s function on data replication,data synchronization,and unified data service have been conducted under an environment that of the simulating field stations.

  14. Golden Spike National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot and Observation Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (3 plots points and 46 observations points, collected June 2007) for the vegetation mapping...

  15. Field Plot and Observation Points for Colorado National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 525 field plot and observation locations visited in 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project for Colorado National...

  16. Field Plot and Observation Points for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 255 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Fossil Butte National...

  17. Field Plot and Observation Points for Natural Bridges National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 97 field plot and observation points visited in 2003 & 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Sample plots were located...

  18. Field Plot and Observation Points for Hovenweep National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (27 plots points and 32 observations points, collected April and May of 2003) for the...

  19. Field Plot and Observation Points for Pipe Spring National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (3 plots points and 4 observations points, collected August 2007 and September 2008) for the...

  20. Cedar Breaks National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot, Observation Points and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 282 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Cedar Breaks National...

  1. ESO Imaging Survey. Hubble Deep Field South Optical-Infrared Observations, Data Reduction and Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Da Costa, L N; Rengelink, R B; Zaggia, S R; Benoist, C; Erben, T; Wicenec, A; Scodeggio, M; Olsen, L F; Guarnieri, M D; Deul, E; D'Odorico, S; Hook, R N; Moorwood, A F M; Slijkhuis, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents ground-based data obtained from deep optical and infrared observations of the HST Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) field carried out at the ESO 3.5 New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, a public survey coordinated by ESO and member states, in preparation for the first year of operation of the VLT. Deep CCD images are available for five optical passbands, reaching 2 sigma limiting magnitudes of U_AB~27.0, B_AB~26.5, V_AB~26, R_AB~26, I_AB~25, covering a region of ~25 square arcmin, which includes the HST WPFC2 field. The infrared observations cover a total area of ~42 square arcmin and include both the HST WFPC2 and STIS fields. The observations of the WFPC2 region were conducted in JHKs passbands, reaching J_AB~25, and H_AB and K_AB~24.0. Due to time constraints, the adjacent field, covering the STIS field, has been observed only in R, I and JHKs, while no observations were conducted covering the NIC3 field. This paper describ...

  2. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, D., E-mail: dkaqua@kyudai.jp; Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Mozer, F. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cardoso, F. R. [School of Engineering - EEL, University of São Paulo, Lorena, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  3. Gamma-ray observations of blazars and the intergalactic magnetic field spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Very-high energy observations of blazars can be used to constrain the strength of the intergalactic magnetic field. A simplifying assumption which is often made is that of a magnetic field of constant strength composed by randomly oriented and identical cells. In this paper, we demonstrate that a more realistic description of the structure of the intergalactic magnetic field is indeed needed. If such a description is adopted, the observational bounds on the field strength are significantly affected in the limit of short field correlation lengths: in particular, they acquire a dependence on the magnetic field power spectrum. In the case of intergalactic magnetic fields which are generated causally, for which the magnetic field large scale spectral index is $n_B\\geq 2$ and even, the observational lower bound becomes more constraining by about a factor 3. If instead $-3fields with very red spectra can in principle be produced during inflatio...

  4. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  5. Bridging the terahertz near-field and far-field observations of liquid crystal based metamaterial absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ge, Shijun; Chen, Zhaoxian; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterial-based absorbers play a significant role in applications ranging from energy harvesting and thermal emitters to sensors and imaging devices. The middle dielectric layer of conventional metamaterial absorbers has always been solid. Researchers could not detect the near field distribution in this layer or utilize it effectively. Here, we use anisotropic liquid crystal as the dielectric layer to realize electrically fast tunable terahertz metamaterial absorbers. We demonstrate strong, position-dependent terahertz near-field enhancement with sub-wavelength resolution inside the metamaterial absorber. We measure the terahertz far-field absorption as the driving voltage increases. By combining experimental results with liquid crystal simulations, we verify the near-field distribution in the middle layer indirectly and bridge the near-field and far-field observations. Our work opens new opportunities for creating high-performance, fast, tunable, terahertz metamaterial devices that can be applied in biological imaging and sensing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61225026, 61490714, 11304151, and 61435008), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20150845 and 15KJB140004), the Open Foundation Project of National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, China (Grant No. M28003), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China.

  6. B fields in OB stars (BOB): Concluding the FORS2 observing campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Schoeller, M; Fossati, L; Carroll, T A; Briquet, M; Oskinova, L M; Jarvinen, S; Ilyin, I; Castro, N; Morel, T; Langer, N; Przybilla, N; Nieva, M F; Kholtygin, A F; Sana, H; Herrero, A; Barba, R H; de Koter, A

    2016-01-01

    The "B fields in OB stars" (BOB) collaboration is based on an ESO Large Programme, to study the occurrence rate, properties, and ultimately the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. In the framework of this programme, we carried out low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a large sample of massive stars using FORS2 installed at the ESO VLT 8-m telescope. We determined the magnetic field values with two completely independent reduction and analysis pipelines. Our in-depth study of the magnetic field measurements shows that differences between our two pipelines are usually well within 3sigma errors. From the 32 observations of 28 OB stars, we were able to monitor the magnetic fields in CPD-57 3509 and HD164492C, confirm the magnetic field in HD54879, and detect a magnetic field in CPD-62 2124. We obtain a magnetic field detection rate of 6+-3% for the full sample of 69 OB stars observed with FORS2 within the BOB programme. For the pre-selected objects with a v sin i below 60 km/s, we obtain a m...

  7. Coronal structure analysis based on the potential field source surface modeling and total solar eclipse observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Johan; Mumtahana, Farahhati; Sutastio, Heri; Imaduddin, Irfan; Putri, Gerhana P.

    2016-11-01

    We constructed global coronal magnetic fields of the Sun during the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) 9 March 2016 by using Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. Synoptic photospheric magnetogram data from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was used as a boundary condition to extrapolate the coronal magnetic fields of the Sun. This extrapolated structure was analyzed by comparing the alignment of the fields from the model with coronal structure from the observation. We also used observational data of coronal structure during the total solar eclipse to know how well the model agree with the observation. As a result, we could identify several coronal streamers which were produced by the large closed loops in the lower regime of the corona. This result verified that the PFSS extrapolation can be used as a tool to model the inner corona with several constraints. We also discussed how the coronal structure can be used to deduce the phase of the solar cycle.

  8. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  9. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  10. A new Observer for Speed Sensorless Field Oriented Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Using adaptive Lyapunov design a new approach for the design of an observer for speed sensorless field oriented control is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the motor states including the rotor speed. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves...

  11. Backstepping design of a Nonlinear Observer for the Rotor Field of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a new approach for the design of flux observers is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the amplitude and angle of the field. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability...... with guaranteed region of attraction. Rubustness due to variation of motor parameters is analysed by simulation. The result is compared to the flux estimate used in a conventional field oriented controller Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a new approach for the design of flux...... observers is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the amplitude and angle of the field. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability with guaranteed region of attraction. Rubustness due to variation of motor parameters is analysed by simulation...

  12. The alignment of galaxy spin with the shear field in observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pahwa, Isha; Tempel, Elmo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Helene M; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Sorce, Jenny G

    2016-01-01

    Tidal torque theory suggests that galaxies gain angular momentum in the linear stage of structure formation. Such a theory predicts alignments between the spin of haloes and tidal shear field. However, non-linear evolution and angular momentum acquisition may alter this prediction significantly. In this paper, we use a reconstruction of the cosmic shear field from observed peculiar velocities combined with spin axes extracted from galaxies within $115\\, \\mathrm{Mpc} $ ($\\sim8000 \\, {\\mathrm {km}}{\\mathrm s}^{-1}$) from 2MRS catalog, to test whether or not galaxies appear aligned with principal axes of shear field. Although linear reconstructions of the tidal field have looked at similar issues, this is the first such study to examine galaxy alignments with velocity-shear field. Ellipticals in the 2MRS sample, show a statistically significant alignment with two of the principal axes of the shear field. In general, elliptical galaxies have their short axis aligned with the axis of greatest compression and perpe...

  13. Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Sub-Solar Reconnection: MMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Robert; Goodrich, Katherine; Wilder, Frederick; Holmes, Justin; Stawarz, Julia; Sturner, Andrew; Eriksson, Stefan; Malaspina, David; Unsanova, Maria; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Burch, James; Strangeway, Robert; Russel, Christopher; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig

    2016-04-01

    We present MMS observations of parallel electric fields associated with sub-solar magnetic reconnection and provide an early interpretation of their implications on the reconnection processes. The MMS satellites have observed many instances of large-amplitude parallel electric fields (10's to greater than 100 mV/m) that appear to lie on or near the magnetic reconnection separatrix, in particular, near a strong current layer on the magnetospheric-side separatrix. These parallel electric field events are directly associated with magnetic reconnection and, on most occasions, are recorded by more than one of the MMS spacecraft. We see several types of parallel electric fields. We interpret purely parallel electrostatic waves and the evolved nonlinear states of these waves as mixing of cold plasma with warm magnetosheath plasma on a freshly reconnected field line. Large-amplitude spikes associated with tangled magnetic fields represent possible secondary reconnection events. Whistler waves and evolved non-linear whistler waves are associated with associated with mixing of plasmas. These observations suggest that (1) magnetic reconnection is often "patchy" and results in tangled magnetic field lines and that (2) cold plasma (<10 eV) is often present in sub-solar reconnection.

  14. Diagnosis of Magnetic and Electric Fields of Chromospheric Jets through Spectropolarimetric Observations of HI Paschen Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Anan, Tetsu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on May 5, 2012, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional ...

  15. Some problems in performing observations in the social sciences: Going to the field, sampling, issues in observation procedures, ethical issues and personal equation of the observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the problems of going to the field, sampling, some issues in observation procedures, ethical issues and personal equation of the observer. Problems related to the choice of some of the different possible roles of observers, like noting and recording their observations and comments, as well as classifying and processing of data and analysis of results, are omitted due to space limitations. In this paper, one strongly advocates the need to apply observation as an integrated process, with all its various forms arising within psychology, sociology, anthropology and ethology. Widespread division into participatory qualitative and quantitative systematic or structured observation to a large extent is challenged. The author tries to argue that the presentation of observations shows that emphasizing the difference between the above-mentioned methods of observation are largely due to the influence and interests which come from the wider social environment. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179035: Izazovi nove društvene integracije u Srbiji - koncepti i akteri

  16. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, D. G.; Fisher, R. R.; Mickey, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed.

  17. Magnetic fields of Ap stars from the full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Piskunov, N

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about stellar magnetic fields relies almost entirely on circular polarization observations. Few objects have been observed in all four Stokes parameters. The magnetic Ap star HD 24712 (DO Eri, HR 1217) was recently observed in the Stokes IQUV parameters with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope as part of our project at investigating Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters. The resulting spectra have dense phase coverage, resolving power > 10^5, and S/N ratio of 300-600. These are the highest quality full Stokes observations obtained for any star other than the Sun. We present preliminary results from magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 24712. This analysis is the first step towards obtaining detailed 3-D maps of magnetic fields and abundance structures for HD 24712 and other Ap stars that we currently observe with HARPSpol.

  18. Magnetic fields of Ap stars from full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Piskunov, N

    2013-01-01

    Our current knowledge about the stellar magnetic fields relies almost entirely on the circular polarization observations. Very few objects have been observed so far in all four Stokes parameters. The magnetic Ap star HD24712 (DO Eri, HR1217) was recently observed in the Stokes IQUV parameters with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope. The resulting spectra have dense rotational phase coverage, resolving power > 10^5, and a S/N ratio of 300-600. These are the highest quality full Stokes observations obtained for any star other than the Sun. Here we present preliminary results of the magnetic Doppler imaging of HD24712 using HARPSpol spectra. This analysis is the first step towards obtaining detailed 3-D maps of magnetic fields abundance structures for HD24712 and in other Ap stars that we currently observe with HARPSpol.

  19. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S; Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Schwartz, S J; Cassak, P A; Burch, J L; Chen, L-J; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Lavraud, B; Goodrich, K A; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Trattner, K J; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Lindqvist, P-A; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G T

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E_{∥}) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (∼300  km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E_{∥} is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  20. Spectral Inversion of Multi-Line Full-Disk Observations of Quiet Sun Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Balthasar, H

    2012-01-01

    Spectral inversion codes are powerful tools to analyze spectropolarimetric observations, and they provide important diagnostics of solar magnetic fields. Inversion codes differ by numerical procedures, approximations of the atmospheric model, and description of radiative transfer. Stokes Inversion based on Response functions (SIR) is an implementation widely used by the solar physics community. It allows to work with different atmospheric components, where gradients of different physical parameters are possible, e.g., magnetic field strength and velocities. The spectropolarimetric full-disk observations were carried out with the Stokesmeter of the Solar Telescope for Operative Predictions (STOP) at the Sayan Observatory on 3 February 2009, when neither an active region nor any other extended flux concentration was present on the Sun. In this study of quiet Sun magnetic fields, we apply the SIR code simultaneously to 15 spectral lines. A tendency is found that weaker magnetic field strengths occur closer to th...

  1. Magnetic field observations as Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath depletion region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F; Stone, E C

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic fields measured by Voyager 1 (V1) show that the spacecraft crossed the boundary of an unexpected region five times between days 210 and ~238 in 2012. The magnetic field strength B increased across this boundary from ≈0.2 to ≈0.4 nanotesla, and B remained near 0.4 nanotesla until at least day 270, 2012. The strong magnetic fields were associated with unusually low counting rates of >0.5 mega-electron volt per nuclear particle. The direction of B did not change significantly across any of the five boundary crossings; it was very uniform and very close to the spiral magnetic field direction, which was observed throughout the heliosheath. The observations indicate that V1 entered a region of the heliosheath (the heliosheath depletion region), rather than the interstellar medium.

  2. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Cassak, P. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, Li-Jen; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E(sub parallel lines) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (approximately 300 km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E(sub parallel lines) is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  3. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  4. High performance field emission and Nottingham effect observed from carbon nanotube yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Chul; Kang, Jun-Tae; Park, Sora; Go, Eunsol; Jeon, Hyojin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ho; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on a four inch wafer, followed by the preparation of a CNT yarn. The yarn emitter was found to have an extremely high field enhancement factor, which was confirmed to have originated from multi-stage effect. In addition to superb field emission characteristics, the energy exchange during field emission, called Nottingham effect, was observed from the CNT yarn emitter. A CNT yarn was attached to the thermistor whose resistance depends on temperature. Then, the change of resistance was monitored during the field emission, which enabled us to calculate the energy exchange. It was found that the observed heating originated from both Nottingham and Joule heating. Nottingham heating was dominant at low current region while Joule heating became larger contribution at high current region. Very large Nottingham region of up to 33.35 mA was obtained, which is due presumably to the high performance field emission characteristics of a CNT yarn. This is believed to be an important observation for developing reliable field emission devices with suppressed Joule heating effect.

  5. Interpolation of observed rainfall fields for flood forecasting in data poor areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogelis Prada, M. C.; Werner, M. G. F.

    2010-09-01

    Observed rainfall fields constitute a crucial input for operational flood forecasting, providing boundary conditions to hydrological models for prediction of flows and levels in relevant forecast points. Such observed fields are derived through interpolation from available observed data from rain gauges. The reliability of the derived rainfall field depends on the density of the gauge network within the basin, as well as on the variability of the rainfall itself, and the interpolation method. In this paper interpolation methods to estimate rainfall fields under data- poor environments are researched, with the derived rainfall fields being used in operational flood warnings. Methods are applied in a small catchment in Bogotá, Colombia. This catchment has a complex climatology, which is strongly influenced by the inter-tropical convergence zone and orographic enhancement. As is common in such catchments in developing countries, the rainfall gauging network is sparse, while the need for reliable rainfall in flood forecasting is high. The extensive high flood risk zones in the lower areas of the catchment, where urbanization processes are characterized by unplanned occupation of areas close to rivers, is common in developing countries. Results show the sensitivity of interpolated rainfall fields to the interpolation methods chosen, and the importance of the use of indicator variables for improving the spatial distribution of interpolated rainfall. The value of these methods in establishing optimal new gauging sites for augmenting the sparse gauge network is demonstrated.

  6. The Sun's Global Photospheric and Coronal Magnetic Fields: Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Mackay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, our present day understanding of the Sun’s global photospheric and coronal magnetic fields is discussed from both observational and theoretical viewpoints. Firstly, the large-scale properties of photospheric magnetic fields are described, along with recent advances in photospheric magnetic flux transport models. Following this, the wide variety of theoretical models used to simulate global coronal magnetic fields are described. From this, the combined application of both magnetic flux transport simulations and coronal modeling techniques to describe the phenomena of coronal holes, the Sun’s open magnetic flux and the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is discussed. Finally, recent advances in non-eruptive global MHD models are described. While the review focuses mainly on solar magnetic fields, recent advances in measuring and modeling stellar magnetic fields are described where appropriate. In the final section key areas of future research are identified.

  7. First Flare-related Rapid Change of Photospheric Magnetic Field Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuo; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, Haimin

    2011-01-01

    Photospheric magnetic field not only plays important roles in building up free energy and triggering solar eruptions, but also has been observed to change rapidly and permanently responding to the coronal magnetic field restructuring due to coronal transients. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare occurred at NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15 using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI. We obtained the first solid evidence of an enhancement in the transverse magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of 70%. This rapid and irreversible field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence, with the ...

  8. Electron scale nested quadrupole Hall field in Cluster observations of magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents the first evidence of a new and unique feature of spontaneous reconnection at multiple sites in electron current sheet, viz. nested quadrupole structure of Hall field at electron scales, in Cluster observations. The new nested quadrupole is a consequence of electron scale processes in reconnection. Whistler response of the upstream plasma to the interaction of electron flows from neighboring reconnection sites produces a large scale quadrupole Hall field enclosing the quadrupole fields of the multiple sites, thus forming a nested structure. Electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an electron current sheet yields mechanism of the formation of nested quadrupole.

  9. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lorente, Nuria P F

    2013-01-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its $13 \\times 61$ core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target position...

  10. The magnetic field of the earth - Performance considerations for space-based observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Taylor, P. T.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Langel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Basic problems inherent in carrying out observations of the earth magnetic field from space are reviewed. It is shown that while useful observations of the core and crustal fields are possible at the peak of the solar cycle, the greatest useful data volume is obtained during solar minimum. During the last three solar cycles, the proportion of data with a planetary disturbance index of less than 2 at solar maximum was in the range 0.4-0.8 in comparison with solar minimum. It is found that current state of the art orbit determination techniques should eliminate orbit error as a problem in gravitational field measurements from space. The spatial resolution obtained for crustal field anomalies during the major satellite observation programs of the last 30 years are compared in a table. The relationship between observing altitude and the spatial resolution of magnetic field structures is discussed. Reference is made to data obtained using the Magsat, the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), and instruments on board the Space Shuttle.

  11. Future Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields with LOFAR, SKA and Its Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission from the Milky Way, galaxies and galaxy clusters, observed with the new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA), traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons and allows us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in halos and relics of clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the SKA and its precursors Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the South African MeerKAT telescopes, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies and in cluster relics in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP (project POSSUM) and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields in intervening galaxies, clusters and intergalactic filaments, and will be used to model the overall structure and strength of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Cosmic magnetism is "key science" for LOFAR, ASKAP and the SKA.

  12. Future Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields with the SKA and its Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes, especially the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission, to be observed with LOFAR, MWA and the SKA, traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons and allows us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in halos and relics of galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the SKA and its precursors ASKAP and MeerKAT, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies and in cluster relics in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP (project POSSUM) and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields ...

  13. Future missions for observing Earth's changing gravity field: a closed-loop simulation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GRACE mission has successfully demonstrated the observation from space of the changing Earth's gravity field at length and time scales of typically 1000 km and 10-30 days, respectively. Many scientific communities strongly advertise the need for continuity of observing Earth's gravity field from space. Moreover, a strong interest is being expressed to have gravity missions that allow a more detailed sampling of the Earth's gravity field both in time and in space. Designing a gravity field mission for the future is a complicated process that involves making many trade-offs, such as trade-offs between spatial, temporal resolution and financial budget. Moreover, it involves the optimization of many parameters, such as orbital parameters (height, inclination), distinction between which gravity sources to observe or correct for (for example are gravity changes due to ocean currents a nuisance or a signal to be retrieved?), observation techniques (low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, accelerometers), and satellite control systems (drag-free?). A comprehensive tool has been developed and implemented that allows the closed-loop simulation of gravity field retrievals for different satellite mission scenarios. This paper provides a description of this tool. Moreover, its capabilities are demonstrated by a few case studies. Acknowledgments. The research that is being done with the closed-loop simulation tool is partially funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). An important component of the tool is the GEODYN software, kindly provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  14. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM(3), where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  15. Geology Structure Identification based on Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Data and Field Based Observation at Ciwidey Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, R. A.; Saepuloh, A.; Suryantini

    2016-09-01

    Geological structure observation is difficult to be conducted at Quaternary volcanic field due to the classical problem at tropical region such as intensive erosion, dense vegetation covers, and rough terrain. The problem hampers the field observation especially for geological structures mapping. In order to overcome the problems, an active remote sensing technology based on Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data was used in this study. The longer wavelength of microwave than optical region caused the SAR layer penetration higher than optics. The Ciwidey Geothermal Field, Indonesia was selected as study area because of the existence of surface manifestations with lack information about the control of geological structures to the geothermal system. Visual interpretation based on composite polarization modes was applied to identify geological structures at study area. The color composite Red-Green-Blue for HV-HH-VV polarizations provided highest texture and structural features among the other composite combination. The Linear Features Density (LFD) map was also used to interpret the fractures zones. The calculated LFD showed high anomaly about 3.6 km/km2 with two strike directions NW-SE and NE-SW. Interestingly, the surface geothermal manifestation agreed with the low anomaly of LFD. The geological structures consisted of ten faults were successfully detected and mapped. The faults type mainly are oblique-slip with strike directions NE-SW and NW-SE.

  16. A target detection model predicting field observer performance in maritime scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Wheaton, Vivienne C.

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Army's target acquisition models, the ACQUIRE and Target Task Performance (TTP) models, have been employed for many years to assess the performance of thermal infrared sensors. In recent years, ACQUIRE and the TTP models have been adapted to assess the performance of visible sensors. These adaptations have been primarily focused on the performance of an observer viewing a display device. This paper describes an implementation of the TTP model to predict field observer performance in maritime scenes. Predictions of the TTP model implementation were compared to observations of a small watercraft taken in a field trial. In this field trial 11 Australian Navy observers viewed a small watercraft in an open ocean scene. Comparisons of the observed probability of detection to predictions of the TTP model implementation showed the normalised RSS metric overestimated the probability of detection. The normalised Pixel Contrast using a literature value for V50 yielded a correlation of 0.58 between the predicted and observed probability of detection. With a measured value of N50 or V50 for the small watercraft used in this investigation, this implementation of the TTP model may yield stronger correlation with observed probability of detection.

  17. Magnetic fields around evolved stars: further observations of H$_2$O maser polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Ferreira, M L; Kemball, A; Amiri, N

    2013-01-01

    We aim to detect the magnetic field and infer its properties around four AGB stars using H$_2$O maser observations. The sample we observed consists of the following sources: the semi-regular variable RT Vir and the Mira variables AP Lyn, IK Tau, and IRC+60370. We observed the 6$_{1,6}-5_{2,3}$ H$_2$O maser rotational transition, in full-polarization mode, to determine its linear and circular polarization. Based on the Zeeman effect, one can infer the properties of the magnetic field from the maser polarization analysis. We detected a total of 238 maser features, in three of the four observed sources. No masers were found toward AP Lyn. The observed masers are all located between 2.4 and 53.0 AU from the stars. Linear and circular polarization was found in 18 and 11 maser features, respectively. We more than doubled the number of AGB stars in which magnetic field has been detected from H$_2$O maser polarization, as our results confirm the presence of fields around IK Tau, RT Vir and IRC+60370. The strength of ...

  18. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, M; Deng, N; Liu, C; Shimizu, T; Wang, H; Denker, C

    2011-01-01

    We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period from 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca II H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT Echelle H-alpha 656.28 nm spectra and Fe I 630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms as context for the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. We have performed a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observed moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumb...

  19. Observational Evidences for Multi-component Magnetic Field Structure in Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. G. Lozitsky; J. Staude

    2008-09-01

    Two solar flares of 25 July 1981 and 5 November 2004 of importance 2 and M4.1/1B, respectively, were investigated using observational data obtained with the Echelle spectrograph of the Kyiv University Astronomical Observatory. Stokes and profiles of the FeI lines 5233, 5247.1, 5250.2, 5250.6, 5576.1 and of CrI 5247.6 Å have been analyzed. We found several evidences for the existence of spatially unresolved magnetic field structures with kG strengths. In particular, the values of the measured average longitudinal field ∥ depend on the Lande factors of the lines: in general, ∥ increases with increasing factor . Analogously, the observed line ratio ∥ (5250.2)/∥(5247.1) is increasing with increasing distance from the line center. The observed Stokes profiles show some deviations from that of an assumed homogeneous field, presented by the Stokes gradient, /. A comparison with the non-split line FeI 5576.1 Å shows that some of these deviations are real and indicate the presence of subtelescopic magnetic elements with discrete field strengths of several kG. The lines with large Lande factors have considerable broadenings of the Stokes profiles, indicating a strong background magnetic field of mixed polarity. On the basis of all these data we conclude that a four-component magnetic field structure is a possible explanation. The field strengths are about ±1.05 kG in the background field, and 1.3–1.5, 3.9–4.0, and 7.4–7.8 kG at level of middle photosphere (ℎ ≈ 300 km) in the spatially unresolved, small-scale magnetic elements.

  20. Observation of low field microwave absorption in co-doped ZnO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahule, Tebogo S.; Srinivasu, Vijaya V.; Das, Jayashree

    2016-10-01

    Room temperature low field microwave absorption (LFMA) in magnetic materials find application in microwave absorbers and low field sensors. However not all the magnetic materials show LFMA and the phenomenon is not fully understood. We report on the observation of low field microwave absorption (LFMA) or the non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) in the transition metal (TM) co-doped ZnO samples of the composition Zn1-x(TM:TM)xO synthesized by solid state reaction technique. LFMA peaks and hysteresis matches very well with that of the magnetization hysteresis loop and the anisotropy fields at room temperature similar to the reports in the literature for other magnetic systems. However we show through our careful experiments that such a correlation between LFMA and the magnetization does not survive at low temperatures and particularly at 10 K the LFMA hysteresis collapses in our TM co-doped ZnO system; whereas the magnetization hysteresis loop becomes very big and anisotropy field becomes bigger in the range of kOe. We interpret the LFMA as field dependent surface impedance or eddy current losses, in terms of a possible role of anomalous hall resistivity that follows magnetization and the ordinary hall resistivity that only follows the applied field. We then argue that LFMA accordingly follows magnetization or applied field when AHE or OHE dominates respectively. Also we confirm the absence of LFMA signals in the rare earth co-doped ZnO system.

  1. Gauge invariant observables from Takahashi-Tanimoto scalar solutions in open string field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zeze, Syoji

    2014-01-01

    Using Maccaferri's formula, we derive new wedge based solutions of open string field theory. The solutions are gauge equivalent to the Takahashi-Tanimoto scalar solutions. The classical action and the gauge invariant overlap are evaluated analytically. We find a perturbative vacuum solution whose gauge invariant observables vanish. We also identify a tachyon vacuum solution whose gauge invariant observables are identical to those of the Erler-Schnabl solution.

  2. Lena Delta hydrology and geochemistry: long-term hydrological data and recent field observations

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorova, I.; Chetverova, A; Bolshiyanov, D.; A. Makarov; J. Boike; B. Heim; Morgenstern, A; Overduin, P. P.; C. Wegner; Kashina, V.; Eulenburg, A.; Dobrotina, E.; Sidorina, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Lena River forms one of the largest deltas in the Arctic. We compare two sets of data to reveal new insights into the hydrological, hydrochemical, and geochemical processes within the delta: (i) long-term hydrometric observations at the Khabarova station at the head of the delta from 1951 to 2005; (ii) field hydrological and geochemical observations carried out within the delta since 2002. Periods with differing relative discharge and intensity of fluvial processes were identified from th...

  3. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  4. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  5. First Observations of the Magnetic Field Geometry in Pre-stellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Ward-Thompson, D; Crutcher, R M; Greaves, J S; Holland, W S; André, P

    2000-01-01

    We present the first published maps of magnetic fields in pre-stellar cores, to test theoretical ideas about the way in which the magnetic field geometry affects the star formation process. The observations are JCMT-SCUBA maps of 850 micron thermal emission from dust. Linear polarizations at typically ten or more independent positions in each of three objects, L1544, L183 and L43 were measured, and the geometries of the magnetic fields in the plane of the sky were mapped from the polarization directions. The observed polarizations in all three objects appear smooth and fairly uniform. In L1544 and L183 the mean magnetic fields are at an angle of around 30 degrees to the minor axes of the cores. The L43 B-field appears to have been influenced in its southern half, such that it is parallel to the wall of a cavity produced by a CO outflow from a nearby T Tauri star, whilst in the northern half the field appears less disturbed and has an angle of 44 degrees to the core minor axis. We briefly compare our results w...

  6. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  7. Microwave observation of magnetic field penetration of high-T/sub c/ superconducting oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachaturyan, K.; Weber, E.R.; Tejedor, P.; Stacy, A.M.; Portis, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    Microwave methods, using a conventional EPR spectrometer, have been applied to a study of magnetic field penetration of the high-T/sub c/ superconducting oxides La/sub 1.85/Sr/sub 0.15/CuO/sub 4/, YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/, and EuBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/. Signals over 10/sup 5/ times the sensitivity limit of the EPR spectrometer were obtained. Huge low-field peaks were observed in the superconducting phase for magnetic fields below 10 G. The peak signal decreased exponentially with temperature just below T/sub c/. These observations are taken as evidence of the spin-glass features of these materials and of fluxoid penetration of intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  8. Observation of Landau levels in potassium-intercalated graphite under a zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Donghui; Kondo, Takahiro; Machida, Takahiro; Iwatake, Keigo; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The charge carriers in graphene are massless Dirac fermions and exhibit a relativistic Landau-level quantization in a magnetic field. Recently, it has been reported that, without any external magnetic field, quantized energy levels have been also observed from strained graphene nanobubbles on a platinum surface, which were attributed to the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions in graphene formed by a strain-induced pseudomagnetic field. Here we show the generation of the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions on a partially potassium-intercalated graphite surface without applying external magnetic field. Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions indicate the graphene character in partially potassium-intercalated graphite. The generation of the Landau levels is ascribed to a vector potential induced by the perturbation of nearest-neighbour hopping, which may originate from a strain or a gradient of on-site potentials at the perimeters of potassium-free domains. PMID:22990864

  9. Azimuthally fluctuating magnetic field and its impacts on observables in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloczynski, John [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Huang, Xu-Guang, E-mail: xuhuang@indiana.edu [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Zhang, Xilin [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Liao, Jinfeng [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2013-01-29

    The heavy-ion collisions can produce extremely strong transient magnetic and electric fields. We study the azimuthal fluctuation of these fields and their correlations with the also fluctuating matter geometry (characterized by the participant plane harmonics) using event-by-event simulations. A sizable suppression of the angular correlations between the magnetic field and the 2nd and 4th harmonic participant planes is found in very central and very peripheral collisions, while the magnitudes of these correlations peak around impact parameter b{approx}8-10 fm for RHIC collisions. This can lead to notable impacts on a number of observables related to various magnetic field induced effects, and our finding suggests that the optimal event class for measuring them should be that corresponding to b{approx}8-10 fm.

  10. High-frequency field observations of aeolian saltation interactions with turbulent boundary layer winds

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The wind-blown transport of sand is driven by turbulent winds that fluctuate over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Increasingly sophisticated models and wind tunnel experiments have attempted to capture these dynamics of aeolian saltation, yet model predictions often diverge substantially from field observations. To help fill this knowledge gap, we collected comprehensive high-frequency field measurements to characterize the dynamics of aeolian saltation under natural conditions. Here, we provide detailed description of our field deployments, including information about sites, instruments, and data processing methods. We then demonstrate how our field measurements can help to improve understanding of the mechanics of aeolian processes. We also describe the limitations of our measurement techniques and the needs for future work.

  11. Observation of Self-Sustaining Relativistic Ionization Wave Launched by a Sheath Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M.; Arefiev, A. V.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bengtson, R. D.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into a surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such a filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser (115 fs) at a peak intensity of 5×1017 W/cm2. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 c after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma.

  12. Observation of Self-Sustaining Relativistic Ionization Wave Launched by Sheath Field

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, M W; Quevedo, H J; Bengtson, R D; Ditmire, T

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser ($\\sim$115 fs) at a peak intensity of $5 \\times 10^{17}$ W/cm$^2$. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 $c$ after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma.

  13. Observation of Landau levels in potassium-intercalated graphite under a zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Donghui; Kondo, Takahiro; Machida, Takahiro; Iwatake, Keigo; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The charge carriers in graphene are massless Dirac fermions and exhibit a relativistic Landau-level quantization in a magnetic field. Recently, it has been reported that, without any external magnetic field, quantized energy levels have been also observed from strained graphene nanobubbles on a platinum surface, which were attributed to the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions in graphene formed by a strain-induced pseudomagnetic field. Here we show the generation of the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions on a partially potassium-intercalated graphite surface without applying external magnetic field. Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions indicate the graphene character in partially potassium-intercalated graphite. The generation of the Landau levels is ascribed to a vector potential induced by the perturbation of nearest-neighbour hopping, which may originate from a strain or a gradient of on-site potentials at the perimeters of potassium-free domains.

  14. Observation of thermally driven field-like spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Arnab, E-mail: arnabbose@ee.iitb.ac.in; Jain, Sourabh; Asam, Nagarjuna; Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Shukla, Amit Kumar; Konishi, Katsunori; Lam, Duc Duong; Fujii, Yuya; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    We report the thermally driven giant field-like spin-torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on application of heat current from top to bottom. The field-like term is detected by the shift of the magneto-resistance hysteresis loop applying temperature gradient. We observed that the field-like term depends on the magnetic symmetry of the MTJ. In asymmetric structures, with different ferromagnetic materials for free and fixed layers, the field-like term is greatly enhanced. Our results show that a pure spin current density of the order of 10{sup 9 }A/m{sup 2} can be produced by creating a 120 mK temperature difference across 0.9 nm thick MgO tunnelling barrier. Our results will be useful for writing MTJ and domain wall-based memories using thermally driven spin torque.

  15. Theoretical and Observational Consequences of Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignace, Richard

    1996-05-01

    My dissertation concerns the study of stellar winds from theoretical modeling of the wind structure and the development of observational diagnostics. First, I have investigated the effects of stellar rotation for the wind structure of stars across the H-R Diagram. The effect of rotation is to increase the wind density at the equator while decreasing the density near the poles. The model, known as the Wind-Compressed Zone (WCZ) model, predicts that equatorial wind compressions are most likely to occur for stars with rapid rotation, low terminal speeds, and/or radial velocity distributions that increase gradually from the base of the wind. It is found that in favorable cases, stellar rotation can play a significant role in shaping the winds of Wolf Rayet stars, B supergiants, Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, and even some novae. The second major part of my thesis relates to the fact that the WCZ model will predict the magnetic field structure in the wind, if the field strength is relatively weak. However, there are generally no good diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields in the weak field limit, where Zeeman splitting is smaller than Doppler broadening. Thus, I have explored applications of the Hanle effect for probing magnetic fields in stellar winds. This effect (which has been used in studies of the solar atmosphere) deals with the modification of resonance line scattering polarization by a magnetic field. Solutions for the Hanle effect in optically thin axisymmetric extended stellar envelopes have been derived. Relative to the zero field case, the Hanle effect can result in significant changes of the line polarization, in some cases causing a position angle flip of 90(deg) . With multiline observations the Hanle effect is a viable diagnostic of stellar magnetic fields in the range 1-1000 Gauss. This thesis work was completed under the supervision of Joseph Cassinelli and in collaboration with Kenneth Nordsieck and Jon Bjorkman.

  16. Field and material stresses predict observable surface forces in optical and electrostatic manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brandon A.; Sheppard, Cheyenne J.

    2016-09-01

    The momentum of light in media has been one of the most debated topics in physics over the past one hundred years. Originally a theoretical debate over the electrodynamics of moving media, practical applications have emerged over the past few decades due to interest in optical manipulation and nanotechnology. Resolution of the debate identifies a kinetic momentum as the momentum of the fields responsible for center of mass translations and a canonical momentum related to the coupled field and material system. The optical momentum resolution has been considered incomplete because it did not uniquely identify the full stress-energy-momentum (SEM) tensor of the field-kinetic subsystem. A consequence of this partial resolution is that the field-kinetic momentum could be described by three of the leading formulations found in the literature. The Abraham, Einstein-Laub, and Chu SEM tensors share the field-kinetic momentum, but their SEM tensors differ resulting in competing force densities. We can show now that the Abraham and Einstein-Laub formulations are invalid since their SEM tensors are not frame invariant, whereas the Chu SEM tensor satisfies relativistic principles as the field-kinetic formulation. However, a number of reports indicate that the force distribution in matter may not accurately represent experimental observations. In this correspondence, we show that the field-kinetic SEM tensor can be used along with the corresponding material subsystem to accurately predict experimental force and stress distributions. We model experimental examples from optical and static manipulation of particles and fluids.

  17. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-12-10

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  19. Space Technology 5 Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Wang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a constellation mission consisting of three microsatellites. It provides the first multipoint magnetic field measurements in low Earth orbit, which enables us to separate spatial and temporal variations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using the ST5 data. We examine the field-aligned current observations during and after a geomagnetic storm and compare the magnetic field profiles at the three spacecraft. The multipoint data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures, commonly embedded within large-scale current sheets, are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in approx.10 min time scales. On the other hand, the data also show that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approx.1 min for mesoscale currents and approx.10 min for large-scale currents. These temporal features are very likely associated with dynamic variations of their charge carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of mesoscale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  20. Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan's dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.A.; Wye, L.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.; Callahan, P.; Stofan, E.R.; Farr, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Large expanses of linear dunes cover Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more dune fields are becoming unveiled and examined by the microwave radar in all its modes of operation (SAR, radiometry, scatterometry, altimetry) and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this paper, we report on Cassini's radar instrument observations of the dune fields mapped through May 2009 and present our key findings in terms of Titan's geology and climate. We estimate that dune fields cover ???12.5% of Titan's surface, which corresponds to an area of ???10millionkm2, roughly the area of the United States. If dune sand-sized particles are mainly composed of solid organics as suggested by VIMS observations (Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and atmospheric modeling and supported by radiometry data, dune fields are the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. Dune regions are, with the exception of the polar lakes and seas, the least reflective and most emissive features on this moon. Interestingly, we also find a latitudinal dependence in the dune field microwave properties: up to a latitude of ???11??, dune fields tend to become less emissive and brighter as one moves northward. Above ???11?? this trend is reversed. The microwave signatures of the dune regions are thought to be primarily controlled by the interdune proportion (relative to that of the dune), roughness and degree of sand cover. In agreement with radiometry and scatterometry observations, SAR images suggest that the fraction of interdunes increases northward up to a latitude of ???14??. In general, scattering from the subsurface (volume scattering and surface scattering from buried interfaces) makes interdunal regions brighter than the dunes. The observed latitudinal trend may therefore also be partially caused by a gradual thinning of the interdunal sand cover or surrounding sand sheets to the north, thus allowing wave penetration in the underlying

  1. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were

  2. Squeezed bispectrum in the δ N formalism: local observer effect in field space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yuichiro; Vennin, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    The prospects of future galaxy surveys for non-Gaussianity measurements call for the development of robust techniques for computing the bispectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the calculation of the squeezed bispectrum in multiple-field inflation. With use of the δ N formalism, our framework sheds new light on the recently pointed out difference between the squeezed bispectrum for global observers and that for local observers, while allowing one to calculate both. For local observers in particular, the squeezed bispectrum is found to vanish in single-field inflation. Furthermore, our framework allows one to go beyond the near-equilateral ("small hierarchy") limit, and to automatically include intrinsic non-Gaussianities that do not need to be calculated separately. The explicit computational programme of our method is given and illustrated with a few examples.

  3. Magnetic field observations on DE-A and -B. [Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, W. H.; Sugiura, M.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic field observations are conducted on each of the DE-A and -B satellites by a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer. In the basic mode the instrumental resolution is + or - 1.5 nT; in addition, the DE-A magnetometer has two modes of higher resolution: + or - 0.25 nT and + or - 20 pT. The sampling rate is 16 vector samples per second in all modes. The experiment objectives include observations of field-aligned currents, magnetospheric equatorial currents, and ULF waves. These observations, taking full advantage of the specifically selected orbits of the two spacecraft and of the unique combination of instruments, are performed to achieve a better understanding of the electrodynamic coupling within the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system and of wave-particle interactions which contribute to the coupling processes.

  4. Estimation of random fields from network observations. Technical report No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabannes, A F

    1979-06-01

    When one has observed a random field Z at some points and recorded its values (network observations), a natural problem is to estimate Z at points where there are no observations. This dissertation deals first with this problem in an abstract setting, in m dimensions; later, it considers the estimation of a spatial two-dimensional random field. The problem then is one of constructing an estimated map of Z over a geographic area. For a given network of stations the quality of a map depends on the method of estimation. But for the given method of estimation the quality of a map depends on the choice of locations for the stations. This is the problem of network design. Both the study of methods of estimation and the problem of network design are addressed. 16 figures. (RWR)

  5. Squeezed Bispectrum in the $\\delta N$ Formalism: Local Observer Effect in Field Space

    CERN Document Server

    Tada, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    The prospects of future galaxy surveys for non-Gaussianity measurements call for the development of robust techniques for computing the bispectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the calculation of the squeezed bispectrum in multiple-field inflation. With use of the $\\delta N$ formalism, our framework sheds new light on the recently pointed out difference between the squeezed bispectrum for global observers and that for local observers, while allowing one to calculate both. For local observers in particular, the squeezed bispectrum is found to vanish in single-field inflation. Furthermore, our framework allows one to go beyond the near-equilateral ("small hierarchy") limit, and to automatically include intrinsic non-Gaussianities that do not need to be calculated separately. The explicit computational programme of our method is given and illustrated with a few examples.

  6. Gridded field observations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane in the atmosphere of north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Ma, Jin; Qiu, Xinghua; Lin, Yan; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Tong

    2013-08-06

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are important pollutants, yet few data on ambient BFRs levels have been available for North China, one of the most developed regions of the country. In this study, we investigated levels and spatial distributions of BFRs based on gridded field observations coupled with passive air sampling in the aforementioned region. A model incorporating both point and nonpoint sources was developed to simulate the spatial distribution and to achieve source apportionment. Although high concentration was observed at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site, the median level of the sum of tri-, tetra-, hepta-, hexa-, and hepta-PBDEs (∑10PBDEs) was 0.56 ng/sample, which was lower than those observed previously in mainland China. Source apportionment revealed that nonpoint emissions contributed nearly 78% of ∑10PBDEs observed in this study. In contrast, high levels of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed, with median concentrations of 4.0 and 10.2 ng/sample, respectively. Point sources located in the region around Laizhou Bay, Shandong Province were the major sources, which contributed 31% of BDE-209 and 70% of DBDPE observed in this study, indicating that this manufacturing base was the most important source region for atmospheric deca-BFRs in North China. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report source apportionment of atmospheric BFRs based on gridded field observations.

  7. Upper Chromospheric Magnetic Field of a Sunspot Penumbra: Observations of Fine Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, J; Solanki, S K; Feller, A; Collados, M; Suárez, D Orozco; Schlichenmaier, R; Franz, M; Balthasar, H; Denker, C; Berkefeld, T; Hofmann, A; Kiess, C; Nicklas, H; Yabar, A Pastor; Rezaei, R; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Sobotka, M; Soltau, D; Staude, J; Strassmeier, K G; Volkmer, R; von der Lühe, O; Waldmann, T

    2016-01-01

    The fine-structure of magnetic field of a sunspot penumbra in the upper chromosphere is to be explored and compared to that in the photosphere. High spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the 1.5-meter GREGOR telescope using the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS). The observed spectral domain includes the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm and the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm spectral lines. The upper chromospheric magnetic field is obtained by inverting the He I triplet assuming a Milne-Eddington type model atmosphere. A height dependent inversion was applied to the Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm lines to obtain the photospheric magnetic field. We find that the inclination of the magnetic field shows variations in the azimuthal direction both in the photosphere, but also in the upper chromosphere. The chromospheric variations remarkably well coincide with the variations in the inclination of the photospheric field and resemble the well-known sp...

  8. Identification of Variable Stars in COROT's First Main Observing Field (LRc1)

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff, C; Erikson, A; Voss, H; Kabath, P; Wiese, T; Deleuil, M; Moutou, C; Meunier, J C; Deeg, H; 10.1086/519524

    2009-01-01

    The COROT space mission will monitor several target fields for up to 150 days to perform asteroseismology and to search for extrasolar planets by photometric transits. Variable stars in the target fields are important objects for additional scientific studies but can also disturb the search for planetary transits. A variability characterization of the target fields prior to COROT observations is therefore important for two reasons: to find interesting variable stars to monitor further and to make an analysis of the impact of the variable stars on detecting extrasolar planet transits with COROT. The Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST) is a small wide-angle telescope dedicated to high-precision photometry. It has observed a 9 square degree field of view centered at (alpha, delta)=(19h00m00.0s, +00deg01'55.2") (J2000.0) over 98 nights to search for variable stars in the surroundings of the first long-run target field (LRc1) of the COROT space mission. In this data set we identified 92 periodic variable star...

  9. The radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field as deduced from Faraday rotation observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mancuso, S

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of the polarized emission from extragalactic radio sources occulted by the coronal plasma were used to infer the radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field near solar minimum activity. By inverting LASCO/SOHO polarized brightness (pB) data taken during the days of observations on May 1997, we retrieved the electron density distribution along the lines of sight to the sources, thus allowing to disentangle the two plasma properties that contribute to the observed RMs. By comparing the observed RM values to those theoretically predicted by a power-law model of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field, using a best-fitting procedure, we found that the radial component of the inner heliospheric magnetic field can be nicely approximated by a power-law of the form B_r = 3.76 r^{-2.29} G in a range of heights from about 5 to 14 solar radii. Finally, our analysis suggests that the radial computation of the potential field source surface (PFSS) model from the Wilco...

  10. Periodic variable stars in CoRoT field LRa02 observed with BEST II

    CERN Document Server

    Kabath, P; Rauer, H; Pasternacki, T; Csizmadia, Sz; Chini, R; Lemke, R; Murphy, M; Fruth, T; Titz, R; Eigmueller, P

    2009-01-01

    The Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II (BEST II) is a small wide field-of-view photometric survey telescope system located at the Observatorio Cerro Armazones, Chile. The high duty cycle combined with excellent observing conditions and millimagnitude photometric precision makes this instrument suitable for ground based support observations for the CoRoT space mission. Photometric data of the CoRoT LRa02 target field collected between November 2008 and March 2009 were analysed for stellar variability. The presented results will help in the future analysis of the CoRoT data, particularly in additional science programs related to variable stars. BEST II observes selected CoRoT target fields ahead of the space mission. The photometric data acquired are searched for stellar variability, periodic variable stars are identified with time series analysis of the obtained stellar light curves. We obtained the light curves of 104335 stars in the CoRoT LRa02 field over 41 nights. Variability was detected in light curves...

  11. Generating wind fields that honour point observations and physical conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlabing, Dirk; Bárdossy, András

    2015-04-01

    Wind exhibits a strong spatial and temporal variability. In the application of lake modelling, these features are important for simulating water flows and stratification correctly, as mean and variance of wind speed determine the input of momentum into the lake. This makes a mere interpolation of point measurements an unsuitable method for producing model input. Additionally to concrete point measurements, more subtle aspects of wind fields are to be reproduced. It follows from the fact that wind vectors represent moving air that a wind field has to be divergency-free in order to be mass-conservative. Further, a temporal sequence of wind fields has to comply with the Navier-Stokes equation in order to conserve momentum. All these constraints can be met by representing the conditioned wind field as a linear combination of unconditioned, normally distributed random fields that individually possess the same spatial covariance structuref as observed wind fields. The aim of having the same covariance structure in the conditioned wind field is formulated as an optimization problem with respect to the weights used in the linear combination. With the help of Quadratic Programming (QP) and exploiting the convexity of the problem, feasible solutions can easily be found. In this QP problem, observations become linear constraints. Conservation laws can be incorporated by introducing control volumes in a similar fashion as they are used in fluid mechanics. Budgets of flows through these control volumes become integral conditions in the QP problem. The applicability of the approach will be shown using an artificial example and real-world data measured on shore and on a moving boat on Lake Constance.

  12. Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆祥; 张耿民; 杜民; 金新喜; 侯士敏; 孙建平; 顾镇南; 赵兴钰; 刘惟敏; 吴锦雷; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observethe end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNTends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failedto remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbonand oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed onthe SWCNT ends.

  13. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenda, S; Wolf, M J; Beckmann, D

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100  μV/K, much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  14. Simulation of polarized optical speckle fields: effects of the observation scale on polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jan; Orlik, Xavier

    2016-05-16

    In this paper, we propose the simulation of polarized speckle fields using the Stokes formalism, which allows the description of partially polarized electromagnetic waves. We define a unique parameter which determines the partial decorrelation of the involved fields, allowing to simulate the polarized speckles produced by all types of scatterers, from simple to multiple scatterers. We validate this model by comparison with experimental measurements. We use that simulation model to study the impact of the imaging device parameters on polarimetric measurements: first we emphasize a limit of resolution on retardance measurements, then we study the spatial depolarization, which appears when an observer is measuring any space-variant polarization map.

  15. Coronal magnetic field and the plasma beta determined from radio and multiple satellite observations

    CERN Document Server

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Nozawa, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takuya; Sawada, Shinpei; Kitagawa, Jun; Miyawaki, Shun; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We derived the coronal magnetic field, plasma density, and temperature from the observation of polarization and intensity of radio thermal free-free emission using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations. We observed a post-flare loop on the west limb 11 April 2013. The line-of-sight magnetic field was derived from the circularly polarized free-free emission observed by NoRH. The emission measure and temperature were derived from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The derived temperature was used to estimate the emission measure from the NoRH radio free-free emission observations. The derived density from NoRH was larger than that determined using AIA, which can be explained by the fact that the low temperature plasma is not within the temperature coverage of the AIA filters used in this study. We also discuss the other observation of the post-flare loops by the EUV Imager onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (...

  16. Voyager Observations of Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Rays in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Stone, E.; McDonald, F. B.

    2011-01-01

    The major features of the profile of greater than 70 MeV/nuc cosmic ray intensity (CRI) observed by Voyager 1 (VI) in the heliosheath from 2005.8-2010.24 are described by the empirical "CR-B" relation as the cumulative effect of variations of the magnetic field strength B. The CRI profile observed by Voyager 2 (V2) from 2008.60 to 2010.28 in the heliosheath is also described by the CR-B relation. On a smaller scale, of the order of a hundred days, a sequence on CRI decreases observed by V 1 during 2006 was interpreted as the effect of a propagating interplanetary shock first interacting with the termination shock, then moving past V1, and finally reflecting from the heliopause and propagating back to V1. Our observations show that the second CRI decrease in this sequence began during the passage of a "Global Merged Interaction Region" (GMIR), 40 days after the arrival of the GMIR and its possible shock. The first and third CRI decreases in the sequence were associated with local enhancements of B. The magnetic field observations associated with the second sequence of 3 cosmic ray intensity decreases observed by V 1 in 2007/2008 are more difficult to reconcile with the scenario of Webber et al. (2009) and the CR-B relation. The discrepancy might indicate the importance of latitudinal effects

  17. Coordinated observation of field line resonance in the mid-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Standing Alfvén waves of 1.1 mHz (~15 min in period were observed by the Cluster satellites in the mid-tail during 06:00-07:00 UT on 8 August 2003. Pulsations with the same frequency were also observed at several ground stations near Cluster's footpoint. The standing wave properties were determined from the electric and magnetic field measurements of Cluster. Data from the ground magnetometers indicated a latitudinal amplitude and phase structure consistent with the driven field line resonance (FLR at 1.1 mHz. Simultaneously, quasi-periodic oscillations at different frequencies were observed in the post-midnight/early morning sector by GOES 12 (l0≈8.7, Polar (l0≈11-14 and Geotail (l0≈9.8. The 8 August 2003 event yields rare and interesting datasets. It provides, for the first time, coordinated in situ and ground-based observations of a very low frequency FLR in the mid-tail on stretched field lines.

  18. Statistical Assessment of Shapes and Magnetic Field Orientations in Molecular Clouds through Polarization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, K; Hildebrand, R H; Kirby, L; Vaillancourt, J E

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel statistical analysis aimed at deriving the intrinsic shapes and magnetic field orientations of molecular clouds using dust emission and polarization observations by the Hertz polarimeter. Our observables are the aspect ratio of the projected plane-of-the-sky cloud image, and the angle between the mean direction of the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field and the short axis of the cloud image. To overcome projection effects due to the unknown orientation of the line-of-sight, we combine observations from 24 clouds, assuming that line-of-sight orientations are random and all are equally probable. Through a weighted least-squares analysis, we find that the best-fit intrinsic cloud shape describing our sample is an oblate disk with only small degrees of triaxiality. The best-fit intrinsic magnetic field orientation is close to the direction of the shortest cloud axis, with small (~24 deg) deviations toward the long/middle cloud axes. However, due to the small number of observed clou...

  19. Observational training in visual half-fields and the coding of movement sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbuerger, Thomas; Boutin, Arnaud; Panzer, Stefan; Blandin, Yannick; Fischer, Lennart; Schorer, Joerg; Shea, Charles H

    2012-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if gating information to different hemispheres during observational training facilitates the development of a movement representation. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three observation groups that differed in terms of the type of visual half-field presentation during observation (right visual half-field (RVF), left visual half-field (LVF), or in central position (CE)), and a control group (CG). On Day 1, visual stimuli indicating the pattern of movement to be produced were projected on the respective hemisphere. The task participants observed was a 1300 ms spatial-temporal pattern of elbow flexions and extensions. On Day 2, participants physically performed the task in an inter-manual transfer paradigm with a retention test, and two contralateral transfer tests; a mirror transfer test which required the same pattern of muscle activation and limb joint angles and a non-mirror transfer test which reinstated the visual-spatial pattern of the sequence. The results demonstrated that participants of the CE, RVF and the LVF groups showed superior retention and transfer performance compared to participants of the CG. Participants of the CE- and LVF-groups demonstrated an advantage when the visual-spatial coordinates were reinstated compared to the motor coordinates, while participants of the RVF-group did not promote specific transfer patterns. These results will be discussed in the context of hemisphere specialization.

  20. Clear widens the field for observations of the Sun with multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Gorceix, Nicolas; Goode, Philip R.; Marino, Jose; Rimmele, Thomas; Berkefeld, Thomas; Wöger, Friedrich; Zhang, Xianyu; Rigaut, François; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) pathfinder Clear on the New Solar Telescope in Big Bear Lake has provided the first-ever MCAO-corrected observations of the Sun that show a clearly and visibly widened corrected field of view compared to quasi-simultaneous observations with classical adaptive optics (CAO) correction. Clear simultaneously uses three deformable mirrors, each conjugated to a different altitude, to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. While the MCAO correction was most effective over an angle that is approximately three times wider than the angle that was corrected by CAO, the full 53'' field of view did benefit from MCAO correction. We further demonstrate that ground-layer-only correction is attractive for solar observations as a complementary flavor of adaptive optics for observational programs that require homogenous seeing improvement over a wide field rather than diffraction-limited resolution. We show illustrative images of solar granulation and of a sunspot obtained on different days in July 2016, and present a brief quantitative analysis of the generalized Fried parameters of the images. The movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Cluster magnetic field observations at a quasi-parallel bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available We present four-point Cluster magnetic field data from a quasi-parallel shock crossing which allows us to probe the three-dimensional structure of this type of shock for the first time. We find that steepened ULF waves typically have a scale larger than the spacecraft separation ( ~ 400–1000 km, while SLAMS-like magnetic field enhancements have different signatures in | B | at the four spacecraft, suggesting that they have a smaller scale size. In the latter case, however, the angular variations of B are similar, consistent with the space-craft making different trajectories through the same structure. The field enhancements have different orientations relative to a model bow shock normal, which might arise from different degrees of deceleration and deflection of the surrounding solar wind plasma. The observed rotation of the magnetic field rising from a direction approximately parallel to the model bow shock normal to a direction more perpendicular to the model normal across the field enhancement is consistent with previously published results. Successive magnetic field enhancements or ULF waves, and the leading and trailing edges of the same structure, are found to have different orientations.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks

  2. Nanoparticle kinetic effects experimentally observed in a magnetic fluid under a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelina, J., E-mail: julius.stelina@fel.uniza.sk [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Musil, C. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2012-05-15

    The effect of a quasi-homogeneous external magnetic field on a created and decaying space nanoparticle structure and its distribution in a sample of a magnetic fluid was studied. This space structure was created as a grating by applying an interference field of two crossed Ar laser beams. The magnetic field was formed using two electromagnets and was applied in three main directions of the created nanoparticle grating. The magnetic field oriented parallel to the strips of the grating or perpendicular to the grating plain does not significantly change the shape of it. The magnetic field oriented in the perpendicular direction to the grating plain causes redistribution of the nanoparticles and as a consequence a perpendicular nanoparticle 'quasi-grating' arises. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer External magnetic field creates a new nanoparticle quasi-grating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find that the new grating is perpendicular to the original one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observe a planar grating in the transitional phase of about 15 s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We speculate that the new grating is related to structuralization of particles.

  3. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fiuza, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Drake, R. P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Physics Dept. and Lab. for Laser Energetics; Gregori, G. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kugland, N. L. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences; Levy, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Meinecke, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Morita, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Petrasso, R. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Plechaty, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sakawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Spitkovsky, A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Takabe, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Park, H.-S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-19

    Collisionless shocks can be produced as a result of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow, and therefore are common in many astrophysical systems. The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of su fficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability effi ciently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. Furthermore, this result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Structure of Mercury's Global Magnetic Field Determined from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a near-polar orbit about Mercury with a periapsis altitude of 200 km, an inclination of 82.5°, an apoapsis altitude of 15,300 km, and nominal orbit period of 12 hours. Magnetometer (MAG) data acquired since 23 March provide multiple circuits in solar local time and planetary longitude and yield extensive coverage of the planetary magnetic field sufficient to resolve the dominant magnetic fields of internal and external origin. Plasma pressures exceeding the magnetic pressure are commonly found within ±30° latitude of the equator and complicate solutions for the planetary field that use conventional spherical harmonic analysis. However, because the planetary field constrains the locations of external currents (e.g., the magnetopause and tail currents) to be symmetric about the magnetic equator, the location of that equator can be identified from the geometry of the magnetic field without the need to correct for local plasma pressures and external currents. We identify Mercury's magnetic equator from the orbital positions at which the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes and find that the magnetic equator is offset north of the geographic equator by 484 ± 11 km. With this offset for the dipole we then analyze the tilt, position, and intensity of the best-fit dipole moment and find that the global planetary field is best represented as a southward-directed dipole, centered on the spin axis, tilted from that axis by less than 2.5°, and having a moment of 195 ± 10 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius. Mercury's axially symmetric but equatorially asymmetric field may imply lateral variations in heat flow at the planet's core-mantle boundary. This solution provides the basis for defining Mercury-solar-magnetospheric coordinates used to order observations of Mercury's magnetosphere, constructing a model for the magnetopause and

  5. Cluster magnetic field observations of the bowshock: Orientation, motion and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Horbury

    Full Text Available Four spacecraft Cluster magnetic field observations of the low quasi-perpendicular terrestrial bowshock are presented for the first time. Multiple quasi-perpendicular crossings on 25 December 2000 are analysed. By combining data from the four spacecraft, bowshock orientations and velocities can be calculated. It is shown that, even while in rapid motion, the bowshock normal direction remains remarkably constant, and that coplanarity estimates are accurate to, typically, around 20°. Magnetic field magnitude profiles are shown to be very well correlated between spacecraft although downstream waves with fluctuations perpendicular to the local field, while statistically similar at all four spacecraft, are poorly correlated on separation scales of several hundred km. Examples are shown of a number of bowshock phenomena, including non-standing fluctuations in the shock foot and the shock interacting with changing solar wind conditions.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks Space plasma physics (shock waves; waves and instabilities

  6. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field properties unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  7. Observation of field emission from GeSn nanoparticles epitaxially grown on silicon nanopillar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Passacantando, Maurizio; Niu, Gang; Schlykow, Viktoria; Lupina, Grzegorz; Giubileo, Filippo; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow GeSn-nanoparticles on top of Si-nanopillars patterned onto p-type Si wafers. We use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm a metallic behavior of the nanoparticle surface due to partial Sn segregation as well as the presence of a superficial Ge oxide. We report the observation of stable field emission (FE) current from the GeSn-nanoparticles, with turn on field of 65 {{V}} μ {{{m}}}-{{1}} and field enhancement factor β ˜ 100 at anode-cathode distance of ˜0.6 μm. We prove that FE can be enhanced by preventing GeSn nanoparticles oxidation or by breaking the oxide layer through electrical stress. Finally, we show that GeSn/p-Si junctions have a rectifying behavior.

  8. Classic (Nonquantic Algorithm for Observations and Measurements Based on Statistical Strategies of Particles Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Savastru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge about surroundings can be achieved by observations and measurements but both are influenced by errors (noise. Therefore one of the first tasks is to try to eliminate the noise by constructing instruments with high accuracy. But any real observed and measured system is characterized by natural limits due to the deterministic nature of the measured information. The present work is dedicated to the identification of these limits. We have analyzed some algorithms for selection and estimation based on statistical hypothesis and we have developed a theoretical method for their validation. A classic (non-quantic algorithm for observations and measurements based on statistical strategies of optical field is presented in detail. A generalized statistical strategy for observations and measurements on the nuclear particles, is based on these results, taking into account the particular type of statistics resulting from the measuring process also.

  9. Magneto-frictional Modeling of Coronal Nonlinear Force-free Fields. II. Application to Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-09-01

    A magneto-frictional module has been implemented and tested in the Message Passing Interface Adaptive Mesh Refinement Versatile Advection Code (MPI-AMRVAC) in the first paper of this series. Here, we apply the magneto-frictional method to observations to demonstrate its applicability in both Cartesian and spherical coordinates, and in uniform and block-adaptive octree grids. We first reconstruct a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) on a uniform grid of 1803 cells in Cartesian coordinates, with boundary conditions provided by the vector magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) at 06:00 UT on 2010 November 11 in active region NOAA 11123. The reconstructed NLFFF successfully reproduces the sheared and twisted field lines and magnetic null points. Next, we adopt a three-level block-adaptive grid to model the same active region with a higher spatial resolution on the bottom boundary and a coarser treatment of regions higher up. The force-free and divergence-free metrics obtained are comparable to the run with a uniform grid, and the reconstructed field topology is also very similar. Finally, a group of active regions, including NOAA 11401, 11402, 11405, and 11407, observed at 03:00 UT on 2012 January 23 by SDO/HMI is modeled with a five-level block-adaptive grid in spherical coordinates, where we reach a local resolution of 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 06 pixel-1 in an area of 790 Mm × 604 Mm. Local high spatial resolution and a large field of view in NLFFF modeling can be achieved simultaneously in parallel and block-adaptive magneto-frictional relaxations.

  10. Observation of the Dependence of Scintillation from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon on Drift Field

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Cao, H; Cocco, A G; DeJongh, F; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Ghag, C; Grandi, L; Kendziora, C; Lippincott, W H; Loer, B; Love, C; Manenti, L; Martoff, C J; Meng, Y; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Olvitt, D; Pordes, S; Qian, H; Rossi, B; Saldanha, R; Tan, W; Tatarowicz, J; Walker, S; Wang, H; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Yoo, J

    2013-01-01

    We have exposed a dual-phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrowband neutron beam, produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics to study the scintillation light yield of recoiling nuclei in a LAr-TPC. A liquid scintillation counter was arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the LAr-TPC target and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report the observation of a significant dependence on drift field of liquid argon scintillation from nuclear recoils of 11 keV. This observation is important because, to date, estimates of the sensitivity of noble liquid TPC dark matter searches are based on the assumption that electric field has only a small effect on the light yield from nuclear recoils.

  11. Interferometric radar observation of fast moving meteor trails in strong electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kirkwood, S.; Kwak, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    Usually, at mid-latitudes, field-aligned irregularities cause non-specular trails while in the polar region long-lasting irregularities are possibly sustained by charged meteor dust. Unusual, non-specular, fast-moving meteor trail echoes are observed in the summer polar mesosphere at Kiruna, Sweden. The unusual meteor trails propagate downward and upward at speeds of a few kilometers per second along a slanted path between 87-93 km altitudes, merging in the middle and lasting for several seconds. Here we propose that an electrical discharge is responsible for these trails. The corresponding horizontal electric field for the observed speeds is estimated up to tens of volts per meter at 90 km. Both the long-lasting merging of two fast-moving plasma trails likely suggest a new type of meteor-trail leader discharge occurring in the summer polar upper mesosphere.

  12. In situ observation of magnetic orientation process of feeble magnetic materials under high magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Hirota et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ microscopic observation of the magnetic orientation process of feeble magnetic fibers was carried out under high magnetic fields of up to 10 T using a scanning laser microscope. In the experiment, carbon fibers and needle-like titania fibers with a length of 1 to 20 μm were used. The fibers were observed to gradually orient their axes parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. The orientation behavior of the sample fibers was evaluated on the basis of the measured duration required for a certain angular variation. As predicted from the theoretical consideration, it was confirmed that the duration required for a certain angular variation normalized by the viscosity of the fluid is described as a function of the fiber length. The results obtained here appear useful for the consideration of the magnetic orientation of materials suspended in a static fluid.

  13. Adaptive Backstepping design of an Observer for the Rotor Speed and Field of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    is de-veloped. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the rotor field. The rotor speed and the stator resis-tance are estimated by adaptive backstepping. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability with guaran-teed region of attraction. The adaptive......High performance operation of speed controlled AC drives without mechanical speed/position sensors rely on the dynamic models for estimation of flux and speed. Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a new approach for the design of observers for speed sensorless control...

  14. Can Hall drag be observed in Coulomb coupled quantum wells in a magnetic field?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    We study the transresistivity rho(21) (or equivalently, the drag rate) of two Coulomb-coupled quantum wells in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, using semi-classical transport theory. Elementary arguments seem to preclude any possibility of observation of ''Hall drag'' (i.e., a non......-zero off-diagonal component in rho(21)). We show that these arguments are specious, and in fact Hall drag can be observed at sufficiently high temperatures when the intralayer transport time tau has significant energy-dependence around the Fermi energy epsilon(F). The ratio of the Hall to longitudinal...

  15. MUSE Integral Field Observations of the Oxygen-rich SNR 1E 0102.2-7219

    OpenAIRE

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Terry, Jason P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the oxygen-rich SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 with the integral field spectrograph WiFeS at Siding Spring Observatory and discovered sulfur-rich ejecta for the first time. Follow-up deep DDT observations with MUSE on the VLT (8100 s on source) have led to the additional discovery of fast- moving hydrogen as well as argon-rich and chlorine-rich material. The detection of fast-moving hydrogen knots challenges the interpretation that the progenitor of 1E 0102 was a compact core of a Wolf-R...

  16. Indocumentado en Dixie: Inmigración Indígena en el “Nuevo Sur” de la Alabama Rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Henken

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe una contradicción en torno a la creciente inmigración indocumentada en los Estados Unidos de América en general, y en la propia de Dixie, en lo particular, el nuevo Sur de la Alabama rural. Por un lado, los estadounidenses deseamos una frontera impermeable pero, por otra parte, ejercemos una progresiva dependencia de la fuerza laboral migrante. El estudio de caso del presente artículo deja de manifiesto que la política migratoria norteamiericana no funciona, pues ni sirve a los intereses de los ciudadanos norteamericanos, ni a los patrones estadounidenses, quienes cuentan con una fuerza laboral de los inmigrantes en una economía más global. Por lo tanto, ¿cómo podemos evitar esta problemática, y a la vez crear historias de inmigrantes exitosos, cumpliendo con el respeto de las leyes inmigratorias y laborales y la integridad de nuestras fronteras? Tres principios básicos, habrán de estimarse en la resolución del problema planteado: que el hambre es más fuerte que el miedo; manejar, sí; mano dura, no; y, que solo debemos tener miedo, del miedo mismo.

  17. Observations of large scale spatial gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, D.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic field observations by the interplanetary probe Pioneer 11 are used to investigate large-scale spatial gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field. The distance of Pioneer 11 ranges from 1 AU to 24 AU radially, and from -5 deg to + 16 deg heliocentric latitude, providing a view of a small but significant fraction of the three-dimensional heliosphere. To remove the solar cycle variations, the data are normalized using measurements obtained at 1 AU at the corresponding times. To first order, the observations agree with the Parker model for spherically symmetric, radial solar wind flow. However, a second-order deficit in the magnitude and azimuthal component of the magnetic field has been confirmed. Specific issues are addressed which have arisen recently, including an apparent absence of the deficit in the Voyager measurements, the possible influence on the deficit of time and/or latitude variations in the solar wind speed, and the possible effect of latitude asymmetries in the magnetic field strength. This analysis supports the earlier conclusions that the deficit is correlated with radial distance and involves a divergence of magnetic flux away from the equatorial region.

  18. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  19. Observation of F = 2 Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiu-Quan; CHEN Shuai; YANG Fan; XIA Lin; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; WANG Yi-Qiu; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multiple-component Bose-Einstein condensation has been observed in a magnetic field generated by a controllable magnetic quadrupole-Ioffe-configuration trap. Different distributions of atoms in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates are created by changing the time difference of switching-off current in quadrupole-Ioffe-configuration coils and bias coils of the magnetic trap. A simple analysis is carried out to explain some phenomena of the experiment.

  20. Seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes: linking field observations with spatially explicit models

    OpenAIRE

    Lavabre, Jessica E.; Stouffer, Daniel B.; SANZ, RUBÉN; Bascompte, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Seed dispersal by animals drives persistence and colonization of the majority of fleshy-fruited plants. Different factors have been identified as important in shaping patterns of seed deposition. These factors include habitat heterogeneity, movement patterns of frugivore species, and their feeding behavior. Most studies, however, have analysed the effect of one factor at the time, either with a modelling approach or from field observations. Here, we combine empirical data with spatially-expli...

  1. Measuring coronal magnetic fields with remote sensing observations of shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Frassati, Federica; Fineschi, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Recent works demonstrated that remote sensing observations of shock waves propagating into the corona and associated with major solar eruptions can be used to derive the strength of coronal magnetic fields met by the shock over a very large interval of heliocentric distances and latitudes. This opinion article will summarize most recent results obtained on this topic and will discuss the weaknesses and strengths of these techniques to open a constructive discussion with the scientific community.

  2. The Influence of Dissolution on Bedrock Channel Evolution: Insights from Modelling and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, E.; Myre, J. M.; Covington, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the large global distribution of soluble bedrock, fluvial geomorphological studies typically regard dissolution as a negligible erosion mechanism in bedrock channels when compared to rates of mechanical erosion. Limited prior field observations have suggested that at the transition from insoluble to soluble substrate bedrock channels become wider, less steep, or both. By extending the Fastscape landscape evolution model to include dissolution as an erosion mechanism, we repeatedly produce landscapes with trunk streams consistent with field observations. However, in small tributaries, channel steepening occurs at the contact of the insoluble and soluble lithologies. Furthermore, as the main channel in a basin encounters the soluble layer, the increased erosion due to dissolution acts produces a local increase in the rate of base level lowering, resulting in steepening of channels upstream of the lithologic contact. The increased erosion at the lithological contact in the main stem also causes hillsope steepening in the soluble reaches. Independent field observations in the Buffalo National River Basin agree with the model results. Knickpoints and slot canyons are common at the lithologic contact in small tributaries, and channel widening occurs in soluble reaches in the main stem.

  3. Dynamics of tachyon fields and inflation - comparison of analytical and numerical results with observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n, and tensor-scalar ratio (r for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V (x ~ x−4, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176021, br. 174020 i br. 43011

  4. Perturbative Reheating After Multiple-Field Inflation: The Impact on Primordial Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of perturbative reheating on primordial observables in models of multiple-field inflation. By performing a sudden decay calculation, we derive analytic expressions for the local-type non-linearity parameter $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm local}$, the scalar spectral index $n_\\zeta$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_T$ as functions of the decay rates of the inflationary fields. We compare our analytic results to a fully numerical classical field theory simulation, finding excellent agreement. We find that the sensitivity of $f_{\\rm NL}$, $n_\\zeta$, and $r_T$ to the reheating phase depends heavily on the underlying inflationary model. We quantify this sensitivity, and discuss conditions that must be satisfied if observable predictions are to be insensitive to the dynamics of reheating. We demonstrate that upon completion of reheating, all observable quantities take values within finite ranges, the limits of which are determined completely by the conditions during inflation. Furthermore, fluctuations in b...

  5. Constraining the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Strength using Split-band Type II Radio Burst Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-frequency radio (85-35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  6. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites Observations of Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Magnetic Reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R E; Goodrich, K A; Wilder, F D; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Eriksson, S; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Torbert, R B; Lindqvist, P-A; Khotyaintsev, Y; Burch, J L; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Chen, L J; Lapenta, G; Goldman, M V; Newman, D L; Schwartz, S J; Eastwood, J P; Phan, T D; Mozer, F S; Drake, J; Shay, M A; Cassak, P A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G

    2016-06-10

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites of parallel electric fields (E_{∥}) associated with magnetic reconnection in the subsolar region of the Earth's magnetopause. E_{∥} events near the electron diffusion region have amplitudes on the order of 100  mV/m, which are significantly larger than those predicted for an antiparallel reconnection electric field. This Letter addresses specific types of E_{∥} events, which appear as large-amplitude, near unipolar spikes that are associated with tangled, reconnected magnetic fields. These E_{∥} events are primarily in or near a current layer near the separatrix and are interpreted to be double layers that may be responsible for secondary reconnection in tangled magnetic fields or flux ropes. These results are telling of the three-dimensional nature of magnetopause reconnection and indicate that magnetopause reconnection may be often patchy and/or drive turbulence along the separatrix that results in flux ropes and/or tangled magnetic fields.

  7. Synchrotron radiation topographic observation of KTiOPO4 crystals under an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In situ white-beam synchrotron radiation topographic observations under an electric field have been made on the KTiOPO4(KTP) family of crystals.The investigation shows a strong enhancement of diffracted intensity for hkl reflections(l≠0) and topographic contrast in the form of fine striations when the external electric field is parallel to the polar axis.Severalk kinds of doped and undoped samples with various grown-in defects,such as domain boundaries.growth striations,growth-sector boundaries.dislocations.etc.,have been studied in detail.The results suggest that these defects have very little effect on the field-induced striations,It is believed that the movement of K+ ions driven by the electric field leads to a local accumulation of charges and a lattice distortion.The stronly anisotropic conductivity is a governing factor in the explanation of the field-related phenomena in this kind of quasi-one-dimensional conductor.

  8. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  9. Galaxy formation in the reionization epoch as hinted by Wide Field Camera 3 observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Jing Yan; Rogier A.Windhorst; Nimish P.Hathi; Seth H.Cohen; Russell E.Ryan; Robert W.O'Connell; Patrick J.McCarthy

    2010-01-01

    We present a large sample of candidate galaxies at z ≈ 7-10,selected in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the new observations of the Wide Field Camera 3that was recently installed on the Hubble Space Telescope.Our sample is composed of 20 z850-dropouts(four new discoveries),15 Y105-dropouts(nine new discoveries)and 20 J125-dropouts(all new discoveries).The surface densities of the z850-dropouts are close to what was predicted by earlier studies,however,those of the Y105-and J125-dropouts are quite unexpected.While no Y105-or J125-dropouts have been found at AB < 28.0 mag,their surface densities seem to increase sharply at fainter levels.While some of these candidates seem to be close to foreground galaxies and thus could possibly be gravitationally lensed,the overall surface densities after excluding such cases are still much higher than what would be expected if the luminosity function does not evolve from z~7 to 10.Motivated by such steep increases,we tentatively propose a set of Schechter function parameters to describe the luminosity functions at z ≈ 8 and 10.As compared to their counterpart at z ≈ 7,here L*decreases by a factor demanded by the existing observations,they are allowed and seem to agree with the data better than other alternatives.If these luminosity functions are still valid beyond our current detection limit,this would imply a sudden emergence of a large number of low-luminosity galaxies when looking back in time to z ≈ 10,which,while seemingly exotic,would naturally fit in the picture of the cosmic hydrogen reionization.These early galaxies could easily account for the ionizing photon budget required by the reionization,and they would imply that the global star formation rate density might start from a very high value at z ≈ 10,rapidly reach the minimum at z ≈ 7,and start to rise again towards z ≈ 6.In this scenario,the majority of the stellar mass that the universe assembled through the reionization epoch seems still

  10. A comparison of laboratory and field observations of superelevation in debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdell, Brian W.; Scheidl, Christian; Graf, Christoph; Rickenmann, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Post-event estimation of debris-flow velocity is a central part of hazard analysis. Estimates of debris-flow velocity are useful for e.g. dimensioning mitigation measures, calibrating or testing debris-flow runout models, constructing intensity-based hazard maps, and designing warning systems. However independent field observations of velocity are rare and it is often necessary to indirectly estimate flow velocity. The difference in mud elevation on either side of a channel through a bend of a constant radius can be used to estimate the flow velocity using a vortex method developed for a Newtonian fluid. In 2015 we reported on the application of the vortex method to calculate the front velocity of debris flows in the laboratory (Scheidl et al., 2015). In the laboratory experiments, we found a statistically significant correction factor k for the application of the vortex equation to debris flows under supercritical flow conditions, with somewhat more scatter for subcritical flows. Nevertheless, it was possible to derive a forced-vortex equation, without a correction factor, after considering active and passive earth pressures within the flow. Herein, we compare the laboratory results with field data from the Illgraben and Schipfenbach torrents in Switzerland. Using video recordings and flow trajectory data for 17 debris flows at the Illgraben debris-flow observation station in Switzerland, we were able to independently test the application of the new forced vortex equation against field data. The general trend observed in the laboratory are confirmed using the field data: the correction factor k decreases with increasing Froude number of the flow. However the field data show a much larger degree of scatter in the vortex-equation correction factor in comparison with the laboratory data. The debris flows in the field differ from the laboratory channel in many ways. Although the observation section at the Illgraben was fairly uniform in terms of the surface width of

  11. REFIR/BB initial observations in the water vapour rotational band: Results from a field campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Grieco, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Leone, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Restieri, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Serio, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy) and Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy)]. E-mail: serio@unibas.it; Bianchini, G. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Palchetti, L. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Pellegrini, M. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Cuomo, V. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Masiello, G. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Pavese, G. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    There is a growing interest in the far infrared spectral region 17-50 {mu}m as a remote sensing tool in atmospheric sciences, since this portion of the spectrum contains the characteristic molecular rotational band for water vapour. Much of the Earth energy lost to space is radiated through this spectral region. The Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed Breadboard (REFIR/BB) spectrometer was born because of the quest to make observations in the far infrared. REFIR/BB is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a sampling resolution of 0.5 cm{sup -1} and it was tested for the first time in the field to check its reliability and radiometric performance. The field campaign was held at Toppo di Castelgrande (40{sup o} 49' N, 15{sup o} 27' E, 1258 m a. s. l.), a mountain site in South Italy. The spectral and radiometric performance of the instrument and initial observations are shown in this paper. Comparisons to both (1) BOMEM MR100 Fourier Transform spectrometer observations and (2) line-by-line radiative transfer calculations for selected clear sky are presented and discussed. These comparisons (1) show a very nice agreement between radiance measured by REFIR/BB and by BOMEM MR100 and (2) demonstrate that REFIR/BB accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the water vapour rotational band.

  12. Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-01-01

    The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

  13. NON-POTENTIAL FIELDS IN THE QUIET SUN NETWORK: EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET AND MAGNETIC FOOTPOINT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    The quiet Sun (QS) magnetic network is known to contain dynamics which are indicative of non-potential fields. Non-potential magnetic fields forming ''S-shaped'' loop arcades can lead to the breakdown of static activity and have only been observed in high temperature X-ray coronal structures—some of which show eruptive behavior. Thus, analysis of this type of atmospheric structuring has been restricted to large-scale coronal fields. Here we provide the first identification of non-potential loop arcades exclusive to the QS supergranulation network. High-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory have allowed for the first observations of fine-scale ''S-shaped'' loop arcades spanning the network. We have investigated the magnetic footpoint flux evolution of these arcades from Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager data and find evidence of evolving footpoint flux imbalances accompanying the formation of these non-potential fields. The existence of such non-potentiality confirms that magnetic field dynamics leading to the build up of helicity exist at small scales. QS non-potentiality also suggests a self-similar formation process between the QS network and high temperature corona and the existence of self-organized criticality (SOC) in the form of loop-pair reconnection and helicity dissipation. We argue that this type of behavior could lead to eruptive forms of SOC as seen in active region (AR) and X-ray sigmoids if sufficient free magnetic energy is available. QS magnetic network dynamics may be considered as a coronal proxy at supergranular scales, and events confined to the network can even mimic those in coronal ARs.

  14. Observed Enhancement of Reflectivity and Electric Field in Long-Lived Florida Anvils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, James E.; Willett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A study of two long-lived Florida anvils showed that reflectivity >20 dBZ increased in area, thickness and sometimes magnitude at mid-level well downstream of the convective cores. In these same regions electric fields maintained strengths >10 kV m1 for many tens of minutes and became quite uniform over tens of kilometers. Millimetric aggregates persisted at 9 to 10 km for extended times and distances. Aggregation of ice particles enhanced by strong electric fields might have contributed to reflectivity growth in the early anvil, but is unlikely to explain observations further out in the anvil. The enhanced reflectivity and existence of small, medium and large ice particles far out into the anvil suggest that an updraft was acting, perhaps in weak convective cells formed by instability generated from the evaporation and melting of falling ice particles. We conclude that charge separation must have occurred in these anvils, perhaps at the melting level but also at higher altitudes, in order to maintain fields >10 kV m 1 at 9 to 10 km for extended periods of time over large distances. We speculate that charge separation occurred as a result of ice-ice particle collisions (without supercooled water being present) via either a non-inductive or perhaps even an inductive mechanism, given the observed broad ice particle spectra, the strong pre-existing electric fields and the many tens of minutes available for particle interactions. The observations, particularly in the early anvil, show that the charge structure in these anvils was quite complex.

  15. Discrepancies between Observational Data and Theoretical Forecast in Single Field Slow Roll Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorós, Jaume; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-12-01

    The PLANCK collaboration has determined, or greatly constrained, values for the spectral parameters of the CMB radiation, namely the spectral index n s , its running α s , the running of the running β s , using a growing body of measurements of CMB anisotropies by the Planck satellite and other missions. These values do not follow the hierarchy of sizes predicted by single field, slow roll inflationary theory, and are thus difficult to fit for such inflation models. In this work we present first a study of 49 single field, slow roll inflationary potentials in which we assess the likelyhood of these models fitting the spectral parameters to their currently most accurate determination given by the PLANCK collaboration. We check numerically with a MATLAB program the spectral parameters that each model can yield for a very broad, comprehensive list of possible parameter and field values. The comparison of spectral parameter values supported by the models with their determinations by the PLANCK collaboration leads to the conclusion that the data provided by PLANCK2015 TT+lowP and PLANCK2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP taking into account the running of the running disfavours 40 of the 49 models with confidence level at least 92.8 %. Next, we discuss the reliability of the current computations of these spectral parameters. We identify a bias in the method of determination of the spectral parameters by least residue parameter fitting (using MCMC or any other scheme) currently used to reconstruct the power spectrum of scalar perturbations. This bias can explain the observed contradiction between theory and observations. Its removal is computationally costly, but necessary in order to compare the forecasts of single field, slow roll theories with observations.

  16. Discrepancies between Observational Data and Theoretical Forecast in Single Field Slow Roll Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorós, Jaume; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-09-01

    The PLANCK collaboration has determined, or greatly constrained, values for the spectral parameters of the CMB radiation, namely the spectral index n s , its running α s , the running of the running β s , using a growing body of measurements of CMB anisotropies by the Planck satellite and other missions. These values do not follow the hierarchy of sizes predicted by single field, slow roll inflationary theory, and are thus difficult to fit for such inflation models. In this work we present first a study of 49 single field, slow roll inflationary potentials in which we assess the likelyhood of these models fitting the spectral parameters to their currently most accurate determination given by the PLANCK collaboration. We check numerically with a MATLAB program the spectral parameters that each model can yield for a very broad, comprehensive list of possible parameter and field values. The comparison of spectral parameter values supported by the models with their determinations by the PLANCK collaboration leads to the conclusion that the data provided by PLANCK2015 TT+lowP and PLANCK2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP taking into account the running of the running disfavours 40 of the 49 models with confidence level at least 92.8 %. Next, we discuss the reliability of the current computations of these spectral parameters. We identify a bias in the method of determination of the spectral parameters by least residue parameter fitting (using MCMC or any other scheme) currently used to reconstruct the power spectrum of scalar perturbations. This bias can explain the observed contradiction between theory and observations. Its removal is computationally costly, but necessary in order to compare the forecasts of single field, slow roll theories with observations.

  17. An interplanetary magnetic field enhancement observed by five spacecraft: Deducing the magnetic structure, size and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) were discovered almost 30 years ago in the PVO magnetic-field records and attributed to the interaction between solar wind and dust particles from comets or asteroids, but the physics of this interaction remained obscure. Our current understanding is that IFEs result from collisions of small interplanetary bodies that produce electrically charged nanometer-scale dust particles possibly enhanced by tribo-electric charging in the collision. These charged dust particles in turn interact with the magnetized solar wind. Momentum is transferred from the solar wind to the dust cloud via the collective effect of the formation of a magnetic barrier. This momentum transfer accelerates the particles to near the solar wind speed and moves the dust outward through the solar gravitational potential well. Multi-spacecraft observations can help us to determine the speed of the IFE and the orientation of the current sheet. They enable us to reconstruct the pressure profile of an IFE in three dimensions and estimate the mass contained in the IFE. We have done these reconstructions with an IFE observed on March 3, 2011 with Wind, ACE, ARTEMIS P1 and P2 and Geotail. We find that the magnetic field near the center of the IFE is highly twisted indicating a complicated magnetic topology as expected in a plasma-charged dust interaction. The magnetic field and plasma properties during this event distinguish it from a typical flux rope. Based on the statistical results obtained at 1 AU and the assumption that all the IFEs are self-similar, we find that this IFE has a radial scale length several times longer than the cross flow radius and contains a mass of about 108 kg. The rates of collisions expected for objects of this size are consistent with the observed rates of these disturbances.

  18. Observed Enhancement of Reflectivity and Electric Field in Long-Lived Florida Anvils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, James E.; Willett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A study of two long-lived Florida anvils showed that reflectivity greater than 20 dBZ increased in area, thickness and sometimes magnitude at mid-level well downstream of the convective cores. In these same regions electric fields maintained strengths greater than 10 kV m(sup -1) for many tens of minutes and became quite uniform over tens of kilometers. Millimetric aggregates persisted at 9 to 10 km for extended times and distances. Aggregation of ice particles enhanced by strong electric fields might have contributed to reflectivity growth in the early anvil, but is unlikely to explain observations further out in the anvil. The enhanced reflectivity and existence of small, medium and large ice particles far out into the anvil suggest that an updraft was acting, perhaps in weak convective cells formed by instability generated from the evaporation and melting of falling ice particles. We conclude that charge separation must have occurred in these anvils, perhaps at the melting level but also at higher altitudes, in order to maintain fields greater than 10 kV m(sup -1) at 9 to 10 km for extended periods of time over large distances. We speculate that charge separation occurred as a result of ice-ice particle collisions (without supercooled water being present) via either a noninductive or perhaps even an inductive mechanism, given the observed broad ice particle spectra, the strong pre-existing electric fields and the many tens of minutes available for particle interactions. The observations, particularly in the early anvil, show that the charge structure in these anvils was quite complex.

  19. Voyager 1 observations of the interstellar magnetic field and the transition from the heliosheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) has been observing interstellar magnetic fields for more than one year beginning ≈2012/209, when V1 crossed a current sheet, a 'CS0' having the structure of a tangential discontinuity. The inclination of this current sheet is consistent with an interstellar magnetic field B draped on a blunt heliopause. Two other current sheets (sector boundaries) were observed at ≈2012/167 and ≈2011/276 with high inclinations (99° ± 10° and 89° ± 10°, respectively). From 2013.0 to ≈2013.6, the difference between the azimuthal angle λ of B from the Parker spiral angle at the latitude 34.°6 of V1 was λ – λ{sub P} = 22° ± 3° and the corresponding difference of the elevation angle δ was δ – δ{sub P} = 23° ± 8°. During 2012, the deviation from the Parker spiral angle was somewhat smaller. The interstellar magnetic field has a 'west to east polarity,' opposite to the direction of planetary motions. The magnitude of B varied smoothly in the range 0.38-0.59 nT with an average B = 0.486 ± 0.045 after 2012/237.7. The transition from heliosheath to interstellar magnetic fields is related to a 'two-step' increase in the cosmic ray intensity observed by V1 from ≈2012.30 to ≈2012.65. The first step increase began near the end of an unusual 'away-polarity' sector, and it reached a plateau when V1 moved into a 'toward-polarity' sector that ended at CS0. The second step increase began slowly after V1 crossed CS0, and it ended abruptly at 2012/237.728.

  20. An Evaluation of Tropical Cyclogenesis Theories through Intercomparison of Field Experiment Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, C. N.; Hart, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The process by which tropical cyclones evolve from loosely organized convective clusters into well organized systems is still poorly understood. A number of theories have been proposed to explain this evolution based on vortex dynamics, adiabatic processes, and diabatic processes. Due to the data sparse location in which many of these systems develop, many studies of tropical cyclogenesis theory are limited to either a few case studies or are forced to rely on simulations to critically evaluate the theories. The recent PREDICT and GRIP field experiments have provided a new opportunity to examine these theories using unusually dense observations. The present study aims at using this new data in conjunction with data from previous field experiments, such as NAMMA, GATE, and TOGA COARE, to evaluate three existing theories: top-down vortex merger (Ritchie and Holland, 1997; Simpson et al., 1997), top-down shower-head (Emanuel, 1993; Bister and Emanuel, 1997), and bottom-up vortex merger (Montgomery and Enagonio, 1998; Enagonio and Montgomery, 2001). Additionally, these observations are used to briefly examine the newer marsupial framework for tropical cyclogenesis in African easterly waves (Dunkerton et al. 2009). The processes associated with each of these theories create unique signatures in wind, vorticity, potential temperature, and humidity fields. Timelines of these fields, created from composited mean dropsonde soundings, are used to determine the system-wide evolution. Further, the temporal evolution of sub-system processes, which are minimized or removed as a result of the compositing process, are identified in isobaric surface plot series. While previous studies have shown that no theory completely explains tropical cyclogenesis, it is hoped that a thorough analysis of these data sets will highlight both consistencies and inconsistencies between theory and observation.

  1. Field Observations of Crustal Seismic Anisotropy: Implications for Mapping Tectonic Structure in Metamorphic Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, N. I.; Okaya, D.; Meltzer, A.; Brocher, T.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    The study of seismic anisotropy within continental tectonic provinces provides earth scientists with a powerful tool for measuring and quantifying deformation within the crust. Preferred mineral alignment observed in metamorphic terranes produced by recrystallization during metamorphism is associated with planar structures such as slaty cleavage, schistosity, and gneissic layering. These structures are often pervasive for tens to hundreds of kilometers and produce significant compressional wave seismic anisotropy as well as shear wave splitting. Observations of crustal anisotropy within (1) slates of the chlorite subzone of the Haast schist terrane of South Island, New Zealand, (2) lower greenschist facies phyllites and metagraywackes of the Valdez Group Chugach terrane in southern Alaska, (3) amphibolite facies mica schists within the Yukon-Tanana terrane in the eastern Alaska range and (4) amphibolite facies quartzofeldspathic gneisses, approaching granulite grade, within the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif demonstrate that crustal anisotropy is not limited to rocks of any particular metamorphic grade and thus can be present at all crustal levels. Two refraction lines at approximately right angles shown up to 10% compressional wave anisotropy in relatively low grade metapelites of the Haast schist terrane. Fast velocities parallel the strike of the upturned slaty cleavage. Measured field velocities in the Chugach terrane, obtained from observed first arrival travel times, demonstrate significant compressional wave anisotropy (~9%) with fastest directions oriented approximately east-west and parallel to foliations observed in outcrops. Within the Alaskan Yukon-Tanana terrane variations in seismic velocities of the first arrivals correlate with field observations of regional dips of foliated schists. A northward shallowing of foliation dips produces an observed northward increasing seismic velocity. The core of the Nanga-Parbat massif forms a large-scale antiformal

  2. High-speed video and electric field observation of upward flashes in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Marcelo M. F.; Schumann, Carina; Ferro, Marco A. S.; Paiva, Amanda R.; Jaques, Robson; Warner, Tom A.

    2015-04-01

    Upward flashes from tall towers in Brazil have been observed since January 2012. They have been responsible for damages on equipment installed nearby tall structures that caused their initiation. Almost all upward flashes were observed with high-speed cameras and electric field sensors; a combination of measurements that provides a very accurate classification and characterization of their properties. Although present during all seasons, upward flashes are predominant during summer. They are almost always initiated by a preceding positive cloud-to-ground flash. This study is based on an up-to-date database of 86 upward flashes observed during the last three years. The main characteristics described in this work are: time interval between triggering event and the upward leader initiation, characteristics of the triggering +CG flashes, upward leader characteristics (polarity, presence of recoil leaders and branching), initial continuous current (duration, presence of pulses and recoil leaders), flash duration and presence of subsequence of return stroke.

  3. Characterization of Saturn's bow shock: Magnetic field observations of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. Here we present the parameter space of MA bow shock crossings from 2004-2014 as observed by the Cassini spacecraft. We find that Saturn's bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we determined the {\\theta}Bn of each crossing to show that Saturn's (days...

  4. Inflation Model (with doublet scalar field) consistent with Lambda CDM and WMAP cosmological observations

    CERN Document Server

    Amruth, B R; R., Amruth B.; Patwardhan, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    Cosmological inflation models with modifications to include recent cosmological observations has been an active area of research after WMAP 3 results, which have given us information about the composition of dark matter, normal matter and dark energy and the anisotropy at the 300,000 years horizon with high precision. We work on inflation models of Guth and Linde and modify them by introducing a doublet scalar field to give normal matter particles and their supersymmetric partners which result in normal and dark matter of our universe. We include the cosmological constant term as the vaccuum expectation value of the stress energy tensor, as the dark energy. We callibrate the parameters of our model using recent observations of density fluctuations. We develop a model which consistently fits with the recent observations.

  5. Internetwork magnetic field distribution from simultaneous 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Cobo, B Ruiz; Beck, C

    2007-01-01

    We study the contradictory magnetic field strength distributions retrieved from independent analyses of spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared (1.56 micron) and in the visible (630 nm) at internetwork regions. In order to solve this apparent controversy, we present simultaneous and co-spatial 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations of an internetwork area. The properties of the circular and linear polarization signals, as well as the Stokes V area and amplitude asymmetries, are discussed. As a complement, inversion techniques are also used to infer the physical parameters of the solar atmosphere. As a first step, the infrared and visible observations are analysed separately to check their compatibility. Finally, the simultaneous inversion of the two data sets is performed. The magnetic flux densities retrieved from the individual analysis of the infrared and visible data sets are strongly correlated. The polarity of the Stokes V profiles is the same at co-spatial pixels in both wavelength ranges. T...

  6. Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations VI: Photometric and Spectroscopic Calibration for the Integral Field Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Maire, Jérôme; De Rosa, Robert J; Perrin, Marshall D; Rajan, Abhijith; Savransky, Dmitry; Wang, Jason J; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Wolff, Schuyler G; Chilcote, Jeffrey K; Doyon, René; Graham, James R; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Konopacky, Quinn M; Larkin, James E; Macintosh, Bruce A; Marois, Christian; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent A; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thomas, Sandrine J; Weiss, Jason L

    2014-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument for the Gemini Observatory designed to provide direct detection and characterization of planets and debris disks around stars in the solar neighborhood. In addition to its extreme adaptive optics and corona graphic systems which give access to high angular resolution and high-contrast imaging capabilities, GPI contains an integral field spectrograph providing low resolution spectroscopy across five bands between 0.95 and 2.5 $\\mu$m. This paper describes the sequence of processing steps required for the spectro-photometric calibration of GPI science data, and the necessary calibration files. Based on calibration observations of the white dwarf HD 8049B we estimate that the systematic error in spectra extracted from GPI observations is less than 5%. The flux ratio of the occulted star and fiducial satellite spots within coronagraphic GPI observations, required to estimate the magnitude difference between a target and any resolved companions, was measur...

  7. New Approach for Environmental Monitoring and Plant Observation Using a Light-Field Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schima, Robert; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Grenzdörffer, Görres; Merbach, Ines; Lausch, Angela; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of gaining a better understanding of ecosystems and the processes in nature accentuates the need for observing exactly these processes with a higher temporal and spatial resolution. In the field of environmental monitoring, an inexpensive and field applicable imaging technique to derive three-dimensional information about plants and vegetation would represent a decisive contribution to the understanding of the interactions and dynamics of ecosystems. This is particularly true for the monitoring of plant growth and the frequently mentioned lack of morphological information about the plants, e.g. plant height, vegetation canopy, leaf position or leaf arrangement. Therefore, an innovative and inexpensive light-field (plenoptic) camera, the Lytro LF, and a stereo vision system, based on two industrial cameras, were tested and evaluated as possible measurement tools for the given monitoring purpose. In this instance, the usage of a light field camera offers the promising opportunity of providing three-dimensional information without any additional requirements during the field measurements based on one single shot, which represents a substantial methodological improvement in the area of environmental research and monitoring. Since the Lytro LF was designed as a daily-life consumer camera, it does not support depth or distance estimation or rather an external triggering by default. Therefore, different technical modifications and a calibration routine had to be figured out during the preliminary study. As a result, the used light-field camera was proven suitable as a depth and distance measurement tool with a measuring range of approximately one meter. Consequently, this confirms the assumption that a light field camera holds the potential of being a promising measurement tool for environmental monitoring purposes, especially with regard to a low methodological effort in field. Within the framework of the Global Change Experimental Facility Project, founded by

  8. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  9. Testing MHD models of prominences and flares with observations of solar plasma electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Behr, Bradford B.

    1995-02-01

    We present measurements of electric fields in quiescent prominences and in a small flare surge, obtained with CRI electrograph at the NSO/SP 40 cm coronagraph, in 1993 and 1994. Our results on the 9 brightest quiescent prominences enable us to place r.m.s. upper limits of Et less than 2 - 5 V/cm on the component of E transverse to the line of sight. We show that these upper limits may be difficult to reconcile with non-ideal MHD models of quiescent prominences formed in extended neutral sheets, whethere or not the tearing mode instability is present. They do, however, seem consistent with ideal MHD models of prominence support. We point out also that these upper limits are within a factor 4 of the minimum value of anistropic electric field that exists due to motional Stark effect in any thermal plasma permeated by a directed magnetic field. Our data on the flare surge suggest and electric field of intensity E approximately 35 V/cm, oriented approximately parallel to the inferred magnetic field. This detection of Eparallel needs to be verified in other flares. But we note that a detectable Eparallel would not be expected in the current interruption flare mechanism, if only a single double layer is present. We show further that the observed relatively narrow, approximately-Gaussian, and only slightly Doppler-shifted Paschen lines, seem inconsistent with the multiple double layers invoked in other models based on the current interruption mechanism. Our detection of Eparallel does seem consistent with reconnection (including tearing-mode) models of flares, provided the field-aligned electrical conductivity is anomalous over substantial volumes of the plasma circuit joining the reconnecting domain to the photosphere.

  10. Mercury's Time-Averaged and Induced Magnetic Fields from MESSENGER Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Korth, H.; Al Asad, M. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hauck, S. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) have allowed the construction of a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere. The model, constructed with the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital MAG data to constrain all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the magnetospheric model, and the remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated from a grid search. The model provides an excellent fit to the MAG observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The mean distance from the planetary dipole origin to the magnetopause subsolar point, RSS, is 1.45 RM (where RM = 2440 km) and the mean planetary dipole moment is 190 nT- RM3. Temporal variations in the global-scale magnetic fields result from changes in solar wind ram pressure, Pram, at Mercury that arise from the planet's 88-day eccentric orbit around the Sun and from transient, rapid changes in solar wind conditions. For a constant planetary dipole moment, RSS varies as Pram-1/6. However, magnetopause crossings obtained from several Mercury years of MESSENGER observations indicate that RSS is proportional to Pram-1/a where a is greater than 6, suggesting induction in Mercury's highly conducting metallic interior. We obtain an effective dipole moment that varies by up to ˜15% about its mean value. We further investigate the periodic 88-day induction signature and use the paraboloid model to describe the spatial structure in the inducing magnetopause field, together with estimates for the outer radius of Mercury's liquid core and possible overlying solid iron sulfide layer, to calculate induced core fields. The baseline magnetospheric model is adapted to include the 88-day

  11. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  12. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Comastri, A; Ranalli, P; Akylas, A; Salvato, M; Lanzuisi, G; Vignali, C; Koutoulidis, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra Deep Field South. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields. In that work, we only found a moderate percentage ($<$ 50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample, but we were limited by poor photon statistics. In this paper, we use not only a deeper 6 Ms Chandra survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), but combine these data with the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (but only 3 could be CT AGN), wherea...

  13. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Hector; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull.. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  14. The large-scale magnetospheric electric field observed by Double Star TC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Carr

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the average structure of the inner magnetospheric large-scale electric field and geomagnetic activity levels has been investigated by Double Star TC-1 data for radial distances ρ between 4.5 RE and 12.5 RE and MLT between 18:00 h and 06:00 h from July to October in 2004 and 2005. The sunward component of the electric field decreases monotonically as ρ increases and approaches zero as the distance off the Earth is greater than 10 RE. The dawn-dusk component is always duskward. It decreases at about 6 RE where the ring current is typically observed to be the strongest and shows strong asymmetry with respect to the magnetic local time. Surprisingly, the average electric field obtained from TC-1 for low activity is almost comparable to that observed during moderate activity, which is always duskward at the magnetotail (8 RE~12 RE.

  15. Neutral hydrogen and magnetic fields in M83 observed with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, G.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Lucero, D.; Carignan, C.; Jarrett, T.; Elson, E.; Oozeer, N.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; van Zee, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present new KAT-7 observations of the neutral hydrogen (H I) spectral line, and polarized radio continuum emission, in the grand-design spiral M83. These observations provide a sensitive probe of the outer-disc structure and kinematics, revealing a vast and massive neutral gas distribution that appears to be tightly coupled to the interaction of the galaxy with the environment. We present a new rotation curve extending out to a radius of 50 kpc. Based on our new H I data set and comparison with multiwavelength data from the literature, we consider the impact of mergers on the outer disc and discuss the evolution of M83. We also study the periphery of the H I distribution and reveal a sharp edge to the gaseous disc that is consistent with photoionization or ram pressure from the intergalactic medium. The radio continuum emission is not nearly as extended as the H I and is restricted to the main optical disc. Despite the relatively low angular resolution, we are able to draw broad conclusions about the large-scale magnetic field topology. We show that the magnetic field of M83 is similar in form to other nearby star-forming galaxies, and suggest that the disc-halo interface may host a large-scale regular magnetic field.

  16. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  17. Sub-solar Magnetopause Observation and Simulation of a Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P.; Retino, A.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 at a rather symmetric sub-solar magnetopause that displayed different out-of-plane signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first case was reported by Mozer et al. [2002] and displayed a bipolar guide field supporting a quadrupole Hall field consistent with a single X-line. The second case, however, shows the first known example of a tripolar guide-field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause reminiscent of the types of solar wind exhausts that Eriksson et al. [2014; 2015] have reported to be in agreement with multiple X-lines. A dedicated particle-in-cell simulation is performed for the prevailing conditions across the magnetopause. We propose an explanation in terms of asymmetric Hall magnetic fields due to a presence of a magnetic island between two X-lines, and discuss how higher resolution MMS observations can be used to further study this problem at the magnetopause.

  18. The Gravity Field, Orientation, and Ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER Observations After Three Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan M.; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Gregory; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed three years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to the earlier global field, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k(sub 2) of 0.451+/-0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 +/- 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 +/- 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3: 2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  19. Observations of turbulence within reconnection jet in the presence of guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Zhou, M.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Deng, X. H.; André, M.; He, J. S.; Fu, H. S.; Li, H. M.; Yuan, Z. G.; Wang, D. D.

    2012-06-01

    We present the first comprehensive observations of turbulence properties within high speed reconnection jet in the plasma sheet with moderate guide field. The power spectral density index is about -1.73 in the inertial range, and follows the value of -2.86 in the ion dissipation range. The turbulence is strongly anisotropic in the wave-vector space with the major power having its wave-vector highly oblique to the ambient magnetic field, suggesting that the turbulence is quasi-2D. The measured "dispersion relations" obtained using the k-filtering technique are compared with theory and are found to be consistent with the Alfvén-Whistler mode. In addition, both Probability Distribution Functions and flatness results show that the turbulence in the reconnection jet is intermittent (multifractal) at scales less than the proton gyroradius/inertial lengths. The estimated electric field provided by anomalous resistivity caused by turbulence is about 3 mV/m, which is close to the typical reconnection electric field in the magnetotail.

  20. Inferring spatial clouds statistics from limited field-of-view, zenith observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Many of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) measurements produce a time series of zenith observations, but spatial averages are often the desired data product. One possible approach to deriving spatial averages from temporal averages is to invoke Taylor`s hypothesis where and when it is valid. Taylor`s hypothesis states that when the turbulence is small compared with the mean flow, the covariance in time is related to the covariance in space by the speed of the mean flow. For clouds fields, Taylor`s hypothesis would apply when the {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} turbulence is small compared with advective flow (mean wind). The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions Taylor`s hypothesis holds or does not hold true for broken cloud fields.

  1. Novel Sensorless Vector Control System of Induction Machine Based on Flux Observer in Field Weakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A speed-sensorless vector control system for induction machines (IMs) is presented. According to the vector control theory of IMs, the rotor flux is estimated based on a flux observer,and the speed is estimated through the method of q-axis rotor flux converging on zero with proportional integral regulator. A 0.75 kW,50 Hz,two-pole induction machine was used in the simulation and experimental verification. The simulation model was constructed in Matlab. A series of tests were performed in the field weakening region, for both no-load and loaded operation. The estimated speed tracks the actual speed well in the based speed region and field weakening region (1 per unit value to 4 per unit value). The small estimation error of residual speed is due to the existence of slip.

  2. BLAST Observations of the South Ecliptic Pole field: Number Counts and Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Valiante, Elisabetta; Bock, James; Braglia, Filiberto; Chapin, Edward; Devlin, Mark Joseph; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Semisch, Christopher; Stabenau, Hans; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg^2 field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m. The median 1{\\sigma} depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4 and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89 and 61 sources with S/N>4 at 250, 350, 500 {\\mu}m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

  3. Observations of diverging field-aligned ion flow with the ESR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Buchert

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on observations of a diverging ion flow along the geomagnetic field that is often seen at the EISCAT Svalbard radar. The flow is upward above the peak of the electron density in the F-region and downward below the peak. We estimate that in such events mass transport along the field line is important for the ionization balance, and that the shape of the F-layer and its ion composition should be strongly influenced by it. Diverging flow typically occurs when there are signatures of direct entry of sheath plasma to the ionosphere in the form of intense soft particle precipitation, and we suggest that it is caused by the ionization and ionospheric electron heating associated with this precipitation. On average, 30% of all events with ion upflow also show significant ion downflow below.

    Key words.Ionosphere (polar ionosphere; ionization mechanism; plasma temperature and density

  4. Laboratory and Field Observations of Microcystis aeruginosa in nearly homogeneous turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Anne; Hondzo, Miki; Guala, Michele

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a single-celled cyanobacterium, forming large colonies on the surface of freshwater ecosystems during summer, and producing a toxin (microcystin) that in high concentration can be harmful to humans and animals. In addition to water temperature, light and nutrient abundance, fluid motion is also an abiotic environmental factor affecting the growth and metabolism of Microcystis. Systematic investigations in a laboratory bioreactor are paired with field measurements in the lacustrine photic zone from two sites in Lake Minnetonka (MN) to ensure that dissipation levels, water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH are correctly reproduced under laboratory conditions. Laboratory results for biomass accrual and photosynthetic activity suggest that turbulence levels within the range observed in the field, mediates the metabolism, rather than the cell population growth, of Microcystis aeruginosa. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and University of Minnesota start-up funding.

  5. DMSP F7 observations of a substorm field-aligned current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Spence, H. E.; Meng, C.-I.

    1991-01-01

    Observations are described of a substorm field-aligned current (FAC) system traversed by the DMSP F7 spacecraft just after 0300 UT on April 25, 1985. It is shown that the substorm FAC portion of the current system was located equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. The equatorward boundary of the substorm FAC into the magnetotail was mapped using the Tsyganenko (1987) model, showing that the boundary corresponds to 6.9 earth radii. The result is consistent with the suggestion of Akasofu (1972) and Lopez and Lui (1990) that the region of substorm initiation lies relatively close to the earth and the concept that an essential feature of substorms is the disruption and diversion of the near-earth current sheet.

  6. Environmental change and household livelihood strategies: preliminary observations from field work in different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Preston

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical framework and objectives of a study of environmental change and evolving household livelihood strategies, which will include field work in Central Java, are outlined. Preliminary results of previous, related field work in Luzon (Philippines and highland Ecuador (South America are reported. Two changes that seem of importance in both areas so far studied are the increasing importance of commercial farming in central locations (near to village centres and the decreasing intensity of use of land on the periphery of rural communities. Preliminary observations in Central Java suggest that household livelihood strategies are more diversified than in either case study area in Luzon or Ecuador and that such diversification has increased through time. The relative importance of farming and the use of natural resources does not seem to have diminished.

  7. The fields of reference stars for optical positional observations of astrometric extragalactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement'eva, A. A.; Ryl'Kov, V. P.

    The Pulkovo programme (Pul ERS) and the techniques used to create a catalogue of coordinates and magnitudes for more than 7000 faint stars in 73 small fields around extragalactic radiosources (ERS) are described. Accurate positions of stars in the fields around ERS 2200+420 and ERS 2021+614 are given. The catalogue containing 223 stars is presented. The errors of coordinate reductions in the system of reference stars from the CMC catalogue are found to be 1.5-2.0 times smaller than for those in the system of the PPM catalogue. This programme (Pul ERS) is required for quick identification of the extragalactic radio sources and for obtaining their characteristics from observations with large telescopes and CCD detectors.

  8. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  9. Observation, modeling, and temperature dependence of doubly peaked electric fields in irradiated silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, M.; Allkofer, Y.; Bortoletto, D.; Cremaldi, L.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Hoermann, C.; Kim, D.; Konecki, M.; Kotlinski, D.; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Rohe, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Son, S.; Speer, T.

    2006-01-01

    We show that doubly peaked electric fields are necessary to describe grazing-angle charge collection measurements of irradiated silicon pixel sensors. A model of irradiated silicon based upon two defect levels with opposite charge states and the trapping of charge carriers can be tuned to produce a good description of the measured charge collection profiles in the fluence range from 0.5x10^{14} Neq/cm^2 to 5.9x10^{14} Neq/cm^2. The model correctly predicts the variation in the profiles as the temperature is changed from -10C to -25C. The measured charge collection profiles are inconsistent with the linearly-varying electric fields predicted by the usual description based upon a uniform effective doping density. This observation calls into question the practice of using effective doping densities to characterize irradiated silicon.

  10. Cluster magnetic field observations in the magnetosheath: four-point measurements of mirror structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available The Cluster spacecraft have returned the first simultaneous four-point measurements of the magnetosheath. We present an analysis of data recorded on 10 November 2000, when the four spacecrafts observed an interval of strong mirrorlike activity. Correlation analysis between spacecraft pairs is used to examine the scale size of the mirror structures in three dimensions. Two examples are presented which suggest that the scale size of mirror structures is ~ 1500–3000 km along the flow direction, and shortest along the magnetopause normal (< 600 km, which, in this case, is approximately perpendicular to both the mean magnetic field and the magnetosheath flow vector. Variations on scales of ~ 750–1000 km are found along the maximum variance direction. The level of correlation in this direction, however, and the time lag observed, are found to be variable. These first results suggest that variations occur on scales of the order of the spacecraft separation ( ~ 1000 km in at least two directions, but analysis of further examples and a statistical survey of structures observed with different magnetic field orientations and tetrahedral configurations will enable us to describe more fully the size and orientation of mirror structures.

    Key words. Magnetosphenic physics (magnetosheath; plasma waves and instabilities

  11. Radar observations of artificial E-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nossa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were generated using HAARP in four different experimental modes and observed with a coherent scatter radar imager located 450 km to the southwest where it could detect field-aligned backscatter. The experiments were conducted in July of 2008, during the Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science Summer School (PARS, during quiet conditions in the daytime when the E layer was dense and absorption was modest. The echoes observed during zenith and magnetic zenith heating experiments were deflected from their nominally anticipated horizontal positions toward the midpoint position. The occurrence of hysteresis when heating with amplitude modulated pulses implied the development of the resonance instability, although the threshold for the onset of instability appeared to be higher than what has been predicted theoretically. Heating experiments involving pump frequencies slightly above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency produced no significant differences in the observed echoes. Finally, heating with a pump frequency slightly above the E region critical frequency appears to have produced FAIs at two distinct altitudes where the upper-hybrid resonance condition could be satisfied.

  12. First faint dual-field phase-referenced observations on the Keck interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Woillez, Julien; Akeson, Rachel; Colavita, Mark; Eisner, Josh; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Monnier, John; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Ragland, Sam; Appleby, Eric; Cooper, Andrew; Felizardo, Claude; Herstein, Jennifer; Martin, Olivier; Medeiros, Drew; Morrison, Douglas; Panteleeva, Tatyana; Smith, Brett; Summers, Kellee; Tsubota, Kevin; Tyau, Colette; Wetherell, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Ground-based long baseline interferometers have long been limited in sensitivity by the short integration periods imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The first observation fainter than this limit was performed on January 22, 2011 when the Keck Interferometer observed a K=11.5 target, about one magnitude fainter than its K=10.3 limit. This observation was made possible by the Dual Field Phase Referencing instrument of the ASTRA project: simultaneously measuring the real-time effects of the atmosphere on a nearby bright guide star, and correcting for it on the faint target, integration time longer than the turbulence time scale are made possible. As a prelude to this demonstration, we first present the implementation of Dual Field Phase Referencing on the interferometer. We then detail its on-sky performance focusing on the accuracy of the turbulence correction, and on the resulting fringe contrast stability. We conclude with a presentation of early results obtained with Laser Guide Star AO and the interferomete...

  13. Assessing the GOANNA Visual Field Algorithm Using Artificial Scotoma Generation on Human Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Luke X.; Turpin, Andrew; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate the performance of a new perimetric algorithm (Gradient-Oriented Automated Natural Neighbor Approach; GOANNA) in humans using a novel combination of computer simulation and human testing, which we call Artificial Scotoma Generation (ASG). Methods Fifteen healthy observers were recruited. Baseline conventional automated perimetry was performed on the Octopus 900. Visual field sensitivity was measured using two different procedures: GOANNA and Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing (ZEST). Four different scotoma types were induced in each observer by implementing a novel technique that inserts a step between the algorithm and the perimeter, which in turn alters presentation levels to simulate scotomata in human observers. Accuracy, precision, and unique number of locations tested were measured, with the maximum difference between a location and its neighbors (Max_d) used to stratify results. Results GOANNA sampled significantly more locations than ZEST (paired t-test, P < 0.001), while maintaining comparable test times. Difference plots showed that GOANNA displayed greater accuracy than ZEST when Max_d was in the 10 to 30 dB range (with the exception of Max_d = 20 dB; Wilcoxon, P < 0.001). Similarly, GOANNA demonstrated greater precision than ZEST when Max_d was in the 20 to 30 dB range (Wilcoxon, P < 0.001). Conclusions We have introduced a novel method for assessing accuracy of perimetric algorithms in human observers. Results observed in the current study agreed with the results seen in earlier simulation studies, and thus provide support for performing larger scale clinical trials with GOANNA in the future. Translational Relevance The GOANNA perimetric testing algorithm offers a new paradigm for visual field testing where locations for testing are chosen that target scotoma borders. Further, the ASG methodology used in this paper to assess GOANNA shows promise as a hybrid between computer simulation and patient testing, which may allow more

  14. Linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium in the 3C 196 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, V.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Pandey, V. N.; Mevius, M.; Haverkorn, M.; Brentjens, M. A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Zaroubi, S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Iliev, I. T.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Patil, A. H.; Vedantham, H. K.; Yatawatta, S.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: This study aims to characterize linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the 3C 196 field, one of the primary fields of the LOFAR-Epoch of Reionization key science project. Methods: We have used the high band antennas (HBA) of LOFAR to image this region and rotation measure (RM) synthesis to unravel the distribution of polarized structures in Faraday depth. Results: The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is 5-15 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -3 to +8 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The most interesting morphological feature is a strikingly straight filament at a Faraday depth of +0.5 rad m-2 running from north to south, right through the centre of the field and parallel to the Galactic plane. There is also an interesting system of linear depolarization canals conspicuous in an image showing the peaks of Faraday spectra. We used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. For the first time, we see some common morphology in the RM cubes made at 150 and 350 MHz. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies and previous LOFAR observations. Based on our results, we determined physical parameters of the ISM and proposed a simple model that may explain the observed distribution of the intervening magneto-ionic medium. Conclusions: The mean line-of-sight magnetic field component, B∥, is determined to be 0.3 ± 0.1 μG and its spatial variation across the 3C 196 field is 0.1 μG. The filamentary structure is probably an ionized filament in the ISM, located somewhere within the Local Bubble. This filamentary structure shows an excess in thermal electron density (neB∥> 6.2 cm-3μG) compared to its surroundings. The RM cubes (FITS files) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  15. Estimating Field Scale Crop Evapotranspiration using Landsat and MODIS Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; Snyder, R. L.; Daniele, Z.; Gao, F.

    2016-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through Evapotranspiration (ET). Given the challenges of already-stressed water resources and ground water regulation in California, a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The Priestley-Taylor (PT) approach, calibrated with field data and driven by satellite observations, shows great promise for accurate ET estimates across diverse ecosystems. We here aim to improve the robustness of the PT approach in agricultural lands, to enable growers and farm managers to tailor irrigation management based on in-field spatial variability and in-season variation. We optimized the PT coefficients for each crop type with available ET measurements from eddy covariance towers and/or surface renewal stations at six crop fields (Alfalfa, Almond, Citrus, Corn, Pistachio and Rice) in California. Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements of net radiation, with a RMSE of less than 36 W m-2. The crop type specific optimization performed well, with a RMSE of 30 W m-2 and a correlation of 0.81 for predicted daily latent heat flux. The calibrated algorithm was used to estimate ET at 30 m resolution over the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for 2015 water year. It captures well the seasonal dynamics and spatial distribution of ET in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of canopy and consumptive water use at a field scale, will help the growers to be well prepared and informed to adaptively manage water, canopy, and grove density to maximize the yield with the least amount of water.

  16. Biome-Scale Forest Properties in Amazonia Based on Field and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana O. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amazonian forests are extremely heterogeneous at different spatial scales. This review intends to present the large-scale patterns of the ecosystem properties of Amazonia, and focuses on two parts of the main components of the net primary production: the long-lived carbon pools (wood and short-lived pools (leaves. First, the focus is on forest biophysical properties, and secondly, on the macro-scale leaf phenological patterns of these forests, looking at field measurements and bringing into discussion the recent findings derived from remote sensing dataset. Finally, I discuss the results of the three major droughts that hit Amazonia in the last 15 years. The panorama that emerges from this review suggests that slow growing forests in central and eastern Amazonia, where soils are poorer, have significantly higher above ground biomass and higher wood density, trees are higher and present lower proportions of large-leaved species than stands in northwest and southwest Amazonia. However, the opposite pattern is observed in relation to forest productivity and dynamism, which is higher in western Amazonia than in central and eastern forests. The spatial patterns on leaf phenology across Amazonia are less marked. Field data from different forest formations showed that new leaf production can be unrelated to climate seasonality, timed with radiation, timed with rainfall and/or river levels. Oppositely, satellite images exhibited a large-scale synchronized peak in new leaf production during the dry season. Satellite data and field measurements bring contrasting results for the 2005 drought. Discussions on data processing and filtering, aerosols effects and a combined analysis with field and satellite images are presented. It is suggested that to improve the understanding of the large-scale patterns on Amazonian forests, integrative analyses that combine new technologies in remote sensing and long-term field ecological data are imperative.

  17. Observed periodicities and the spectrum of field variations in Holocene magnetic records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panovska, S.; Finlay, Chris; Hirt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms that maintain and drive the evolution of the Earth's magnetic field, a characterization of its behavior on time scales of centuries to millennia is required. We have conducted a search for periodicities in Holocene sediment magnetic records, by applying three......, globally observed, periods. Rather we find a continuous broadband spectrum, with a slope corresponding to a power law with exponent of -2.3 ± 0.6 for the period range between 300 and 4000 yr. This is consistent with the hypothesis that chaotic convection in the outer core drives the majority of secular...

  18. Spatiotemporal multiplexing method for visual field of view extension in holographic displays with naked eye observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, G.; Kujawińska, M.; Kozacki, T.; Zaperty, W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a method which allows to overcome the basic functional problems in holographic displays with naked eye observation caused by delivering too small images visible in narrow viewing angles. The solution is based on combining the spatiotemporal multiplexing method with a 4f optical system. It enables to increase an aperture of a holographic display and extend the angular visual field of view. The applicability of the modified display is evidenced by Wigner distribution analysis of holographic imaging with spatiotemporal multiplexing method and by the experiments performed at the display demonstrator.

  19. Automated Astrometric Analysis of Satellite Observations using Wide-field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuljan, J.; Kay, J.

    2016-09-01

    An observational trial was conducted in the South Island of New Zealand from 24 to 28 February 2015, as a collaborative effort between the United Kingdom and New Zealand in the area of space situational awareness. The aim of the trial was to observe a number of satellites in low Earth orbit using wide-field imaging from two separate locations, in order to determine the space trajectory and compare the measurements with the predictions based on the standard two-line elements. This activity was an initial step in building a space situational awareness capability at the Defence Technology Agency of the New Zealand Defence Force. New Zealand has an important strategic position as the last land mass that many satellites selected for deorbiting pass before entering the Earth's atmosphere over the dedicated disposal area in the South Pacific. A preliminary analysis of the trial data has demonstrated that relatively inexpensive equipment can be used to successfully detect satellites at moderate altitudes. A total of 60 satellite passes were observed over the five nights of observation and about 2600 images were collected. A combination of cooled CCD and standard DSLR cameras were used, with a selection of lenses between 17 mm and 50 mm in focal length, covering a relatively wide field of view of 25 to 60 degrees. The CCD cameras were equipped with custom-made GPS modules to record the time of exposure with a high accuracy of one millisecond, or better. Specialised software has been developed for automated astrometric analysis of the trial data. The astrometric solution is obtained as a two-dimensional least-squares polynomial fit to the measured pixel positions of a large number of stars (typically 1000) detected across the image. The star identification is fully automated and works well for all camera-lens combinations used in the trial. A moderate polynomial degree of 3 to 5 is selected to take into account any image distortions introduced by the lens. A typical RMS

  20. Focus conditioning effects on molecular field-free alignment observed with high-order harmonic generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴家骏; 尉鹏飞

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the focus conditioning effects on molecular field-free alignment observed with high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from CO2 molecules.We also experimentally demonstrate that both the spectral shape and alignment signal of HHG significantly vary with changing focus position.A maximal alignment signal is achieved at a given focus position because of the optimal intensity of the driving laser.This intensity is related to the ionization potential of the molecules.These results indicate that a unique focus position provides an optimal alignment signal for practical applications.

  1. Ship-based Surface Flux Observations Under Atmospheric Rivers During the CALWATER 2015 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B.; Fairall, C. W.; Intrieri, J. M.; Wolfe, D. E.; Pezoa, S.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Physical Sciences Division portable flux system was deployed on the R/V Ron Brown as part of the surface observational strategy for the CALWATER 2015 field investigation. Measurements included turbulent fluxes of temperature, water vapor and wind stress. A refined 'best' set of bulk meteorological measurements for the duration of the cruise was produced from combined NOAA, DOE ARM-AMF2 and shipboard sensors. Direct eddy correlation and bulk model estimates of sensible and latent heat are broadly consistent (RMSE transport budget.

  2. Dust emissions of organic soils observed in the field and laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; Guo, Z.; Van Pelt, R.; Acosta-Martinez, V.; Tatarko, J.

    2011-12-01

    . In the laboratory wind tunnel, samples with the same ratio of erodible to non-erodible aggregates as the field soils were abraded and dust emissions were observed with the same sampling system as used in the field wind tunnel. In the dust generator, 5 gm samples emission rates with the laboratory results will be presented.

  3. Meteor observations with Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Orekhova, N.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9) optical monitoring system with the wide field and high temporal resolution. During the first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors have peak brightnesses about 10 mag, while the majority have them ranging from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them have been determined. The parameters of the detected meteors have been published online. The database also includes data from 10 thousands of meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera during 2006-2009.

  4. Analysis of field observations of tracer transport in a fractured till.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakowski, G; Berkowitz, B; Scher, H

    2001-01-01

    We analyze a set of observations from a recently published, field-scale tracer test in a fractured till. These observations demonstrate a dominant, underlying non-Fickian behavior, which cannot be quantified using traditional modeling approaches. We use a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach which thoroughly accounts for the measurements, and which is based on a physical picture of contaminant motion that is consistent with the geometric and hydraulic characterization of the fractured formation. We also incorporate convolution techniques in the CTRW theory, to consider transport between different regions containing distinct heterogeneity patterns. These results enhance the possibility that limitations in predicting non-Fickian modes of contaminant migration can be overcome.

  5. Tsunami damages assessment: vulnerability functions on buildings based on field and earth observation survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauraz, A. L.; Valencia, N.; Koscielny, M.; Guillande, R.; Gardi, A.; Leone, F.; Salaun, T.

    2009-04-01

    The assessment of damages caused by tsunami scenarios on coastal buildings requires using vulnerability matrixes or functions to carry out a relation between the magnitude of the phenomena and the damage expected. These functions represent the probability for a building belonging to a class of vulnerability to suffer from a mean damage level. The physical vulnerability of buildings depends on two parameters: the solicitation level applied by the tsunami on buildings and their resistance capacity. According to the authors after post-tsunami observations (Reese et al. 2007; Ruangrassamee et al. 2006; Leone et al. 2006; Peiris 2006), the level of damage is clearly linked to the water elevation of the inundated areas and the type of observed buildings. Very few works propose relations based on velocity or hydrodynamic pressure of the waves. An approach developed for the estimation of the building vulnerability consists in deriving empirical damage functions starting from field observations. As part of the SCHEMA European Project on the vulnerability assessment for tsunami hazards in the Atlantic and Mediterranean area, vulnerability functions have been elaborated for different classes of buildings in order to produce vulnerability maps for exposed areas with emphasis on extraction of building characteristics using remote sensing data. The damage detection has been carried out by field data collected after the 24 December 2006 tsunami event on the southwest area of Banda Aceh (Sumatra, Thailand) completed by photo-interpretation of satellite images to get representative functions with large population of samples. The building classes consist in several categories depending mainly on the type of construction material (timber/bamboo, traditional brick, reinforced concrete …), the type of structure (beam, pillars, etc) and the number of storeys. The level of damage has been also classified in five categories, from D0 (no damage) to D5 (total destruction). Vulnerability

  6. Density and magnetic field fluctuations observed by ISEE 1-2 in the quiet magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    Full Text Available We analyse the fluctuations of the electron density and of the magnetic field in the Earth's magnetosheath to identify the waves observed below the proton gyrofrequency. We consider two quiet magnetosheath crossings i.e. 2 days characterized by small-amplitude waves, for which the solar wind dynamic pressure was low. On 2 August 1978 the spacecraft were in the outer magnetosheath. We compare the properties of the observed narrow-band waves with those of the unstable linear wave modes calculated for an homogeneous plasma with Maxwellian electron and bi-Maxwellian (anisotropic proton and alpha particle distributions. The Alfvén ion cyclotron (AIC mode appears to be dominant in the data, but there are also density fluctuations nearly in phase with the magnetic fluctuations parallel to the magnetic field. Such a phase relation can be explained neither by the presence of a proton or helium AIC mode nor by the presence of a fast mode in a bi-Maxwellian plasma. We invoke the presence of the helium cut-off mode which is marginally stable in a bi-Maxwellian plasma with α particles: the observed phase relation could be due to a hybrid mode (proton AIC+helium cut-off generated by a non-Maxwellian or a non-gyrotropic part of the ion distribution functions in the upstream magnetosheath. On 2 September 1981 the properties of the fluctuations observed in the middle of the magnetosheath can be explained by pure AIC waves generated by protons which have reached a bi-Maxwellian equilibrium. For a given wave mode, the phase difference between BVert and the density is sensitive to the shape of the ion and electron distribution functions: it can be a diagnosis tool for natural and simulated plasmas.

  7. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  8. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2016-08-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  9. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2017-01-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  10. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min off CW modulation. The scattering cross sections, rise, and fall times of the echoes were observed as well as their spectral properties. Results were found to be mainly in agreement with observations from other mid- and high-latitude sites with some discrepancies. Radar images of the irregularity-filled volume on one case exhibited clear variations in backscatter power and Doppler shift across the volume. The images furthermore show the emergence of a small irregularity-filled region to the south southwest of the main region in the approximate direction of magnetic zenith.

  11. Temporal behavior and temperatures of Yasur volcano, Vanuatu from field remote sensing observations, May 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Lorenz, R. D.; Radebaugh, J.; Howell, R. R.

    2016-08-01

    We documented eruption activity at three primary vents at Yasur volcano, Tanna Island, Vanuatu using portable instrumentation in the field over a period of 5 h on 21 May 2014, and acquired aerial images of the craters and vents on 22 May 2014. Although limited in duration, our observations of eruption intervals, durations, temperatures, and speeds of ejected material illustrate the characteristics of the activity at the time at each of the primary vents, providing a useful snapshot of eruption behavior and revealing continued variability at Yasur in comparison to other observation campaigns. Hand-held, high-resolution, near-infrared observations of one of the vents gave peak temperatures of 850 °C to 930 °C for ejected clasts, with a maximum temperature of 1033 °C. These temperatures are significantly higher than previous measurements because exposed lavas could be resolved at timescales less than a second. Our aerial near-infrared images allowed us to estimate the combined area of the active vents within the crater to be 150 m2, and comparison to MODIS radiance measurements in the same time frame yields temperatures, averaged over the combined vent area, of 530-730 °C. In the context of previous observations at Yasur, the activity in May 2014 exhibited lower overall intensity, as well as differences in the nature of the eruptions at the various vents, providing insight regarding the temporal variability of Yasur's activity.

  12. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  13. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD. I. DATABASE OF LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cat, P. De; Ren, A. B.; Yang, X. H. [Royal observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Yang, M.; Wang, J. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Shi, H. M.; Zhang, W. [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100871 (China); Catanzaro, G.; Frasca, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Corbally, C. J. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Gray, R. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Żakowicz, J. Molenda- [Astronomical Institute of the University of Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wrocław (Poland); Uytterhoeven, K. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Briquet, M. [Institut d’Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 19C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Bruntt, H., E-mail: Peter.DeCat@oma.be [Stellar Astrophysics Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2015-09-15

    The nearly continuous light curves with micromagnitude precision provided by the space mission Kepler are revolutionizing our view of pulsating stars. They have revealed a vast sea of low-amplitude pulsation modes that were undetectable from Earth. The long time base of Kepler light curves allows for the accurate determination of the frequencies and amplitudes of pulsation modes needed for in-depth asteroseismic modeling. However, for an asteroseismic study to be successful, the first estimates of stellar parameters need to be known and they cannot be derived from the Kepler photometry itself. The Kepler Input Catalog provides values for the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, but not always with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, information on the chemical composition and rotation rate is lacking. We are collecting low-resolution spectra for objects in the Kepler field of view with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (lamost, Xinglong observatory, China). All of the requested fields have now been observed at least once. In this paper, we describe those observations and provide a useful database for the whole astronomical community.

  14. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  15. Quiet Sun Magnetic Field Evolution Observed with Hinode SOT and IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C. E.; Bello González, N.; Rezaei, R.

    2016-04-01

    We study two physical processes that can be commonly observed in the quiet sun and involve temporal evolution of the magnetic field: convective collapse and flux cancellation. The aim is to investigate the response of the chromosphere to the magnetic events in the photosphere below. We have calibrated and aligned a co-spatial and co-temporal 3 hour quiet sun time series observed with the Hinode SOT (Solar Optical Telescope) and the IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) satellites. Convective collapse events are identified in the photosphere by inverting spectropolarimetric data and searching for magnetic field intensification, preceded by a downflow and accompanied by the development of a bright point in Ca II H images. We find a corresponding downflow in the low chromosphere as deduced from IRIS Mg II k and h spectra and an ensuing oscillatory velocity pattern. We use magnetograms in the high photosphere to study pairs of magnetic elements involved in flux cancellation and find an increase in the entire quasi-continuum of the IRIS Mg II k and h spectrum following the flux cancellation process and indicating a substantial energy deposit into the lower atmosphere.

  16. Disparities in urban neighborhood conditions: evidence from GIS measures and field observation in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckerman, Kathryn M; Lovasi, Gina S; Davies, Stephen; Purciel, Marnie; Quinn, James; Feder, Eric; Raghunath, Nakita; Wasserman, Benjamin; Rundle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although many low-income urban areas are highly walkable by conventional measures such as population density or land use mix, chronic diseases related to lack of physical activity are more common among residents of these areas. Disparities in neighborhood conditions may make poor areas less attractive environments for walking, offsetting the advantages of density and land use mix. This study compared poor and nonpoor neighborhoods in New York City, using geographic information systems measures constructed from public data for US census tracts within New York City (N=2,172) as well as field observation of a matched-pair sample of 76 block faces on commercial streets in poor and nonpoor neighborhoods. Poor census tracts had significantly fewer street trees, landmarked buildings, clean streets, and sidewalk cafes, and higher rates of felony complaints, narcotics arrests, and vehicular crashes. The field observation showed similar results. Improving aesthetic and safety conditions in poor neighborhoods may help reduce disparities in physical activity among urban residents.

  17. Evaluation of team lifting on work demands, workload and workers' evaluation: an observational field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Steven; van der Molen, Henk F; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in work demands, energetic workload and workers' discomfort and physical effort in two regularly observable workdays in ironwork; one where loads up to 50kg were handled with two persons manually (T50) and one where loads up to 100kg were handled manually with four persons (T100). Differences between these typical workdays were assessed with an observational within-subject field study of 10 ironworkers. No significant differences were found for work demands, energetic workload or discomfort between T50 and T100 workdays. During team lifts, load mass exceeded 25kg per person in 57% (T50 workday) and 68% (T100 workday) of the lifts. Seven ironworkers rated team lifting with two persons as less physically demanding compared with lifting with four persons. When loads heavier than 25kg are lifted manually with a team, regulations of the maximum mass weight are frequently violated. Loads heavier than 25kg are frequently lifted during concrete reinforcement work and should be lifted by a team of persons. However, the field study showed that loads above 25kg are most of the time not lifted with the appropriate number of workers. Therefore, loads heavier than 25kg should be lifted mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Observational study of the role of magnetic fields in star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobian, Nicholas Szandor

    This project is a multi-faceted approach to establish a link between proposed theories of star formation and direct observation. Some key factors explored include: if magnetic fields cause significant support against gravitational collapse, which physical parameters are sampled by different tracer molecules, and what these results tell us about the structure and development of the regions observed. Until recently, only ambipolar diffusion theory had numerical models that simulated possible physical results that could be compared to observational data. These theories interpret the models in terms of a physical parameter: the ratio of the mass to the magnetic flux (M/phi). Performing measurements of the magnetic field, to determine the magnetic flux (phi), is complicated. It is only possible to obtain direct measurements of the strength of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field through the normal Zeeman effect. Only a few molecules have Zeeman splitting factors large enough to be successfully used to measure magnetic fields. Of these few, OH traces lower density molecular species, while CN is believed to trace higher density regions. Using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) we mapped the magnetic fields of cores and envelopes of dark cloud cores using OH as a tracer molecule. From this, the ratio of M/phi between the cores and envelopes were computed, and were consistently determined to be published ambipolar diffusion theory which expects this ratio to be > 1. This study can be extended to other types of objects by using different tracer molecules. CN can be used to probe hot dense regions; however, it requires high resolution mapping currently only obtainable with an interferometer. Using CARMA, we obtained maps of 6 high mass star formation regions with a spatial resolution of approximately 2" by combining data from the C, D, and E arrays. CARMA's correlator was used to sample several spectral lines simultaneously in order to compare the structure of the CN

  19. Observations of the field-aligned residual flow inside magnetic cloud structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuiJun; FENG XueShang; ZUO PingBing; XIE YanQiong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report two MC events observed by WIND spacecraft with good examples of field-aligned residual flow inside the MC structure. For both events, the co-moving frames are determined through the deHoffman-Teller (HT) analysis and the axial orientations are inferred by the newly devel-oped minimal residue (MR) method. The nature coordinate system for both events are constructed with velocity of the HT frame and the inferred MC axis, the field and flow remaining in the HT frame are analyzed st this coordinate system. As a result, we find that the residual flows in the co-moving HT frame of the two MC events are almost anti-parallel to the helical magnetic field. We speculate that the field-aligned residual flows are large scale coherent hydrodynamic vortices co-moving with the MCs at the supersonic speed near 1 AU. Data analyses show that the event in slow ambient solar wind is ex- panding at 1 AU and another one in fast solar wind does not show apparent expansion. Proton behav-iors for both events are quasi-isothermal. Accelerated HT analysis shows that both events have no suitable HT frame with constant accelerations, which suggests that both events may be moving at the constant speed near 1 AU under the assumptions of the HT analysis. For both events, the ratio of the dynamic pressure to the magnetic pressure is larger than that of the thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, which suggests that the dynamic effects due to the plasma flows remaining in the co-moving HT frame are more important than the thermal effects in the study of MC evolution and propagation.

  20. Modelling field scale water partitioning using on-site observations in sub-Saharan rainfed agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makurira, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2010-04-01

    Smallholder rainfed farming systems generally realise sub-optimal crop yields which are largely attributed to dry spell occurrences during crop growth stages. However, through the introduction of appropriate farming practices, it is possible to substantially increase yield levels even with little and highly variable rainfall. The presented results follow research conducted in the Makanya catchment in northern Tanzania where gross rainfall amounts to less than 400 mm/season which is insufficient to support staple food crops (e.g. maize). The yields from farming system innovations (SIs), which are basically alternative cultivation techniques, are compared against traditional farming practices. The SIs tested in this research are runoff harvesting used in combination with in-field trenches and soil bunds (fanya juus). These SIs aim to reduce soil and nutrient loss from the field and, more importantly, promote in-field infiltration and water retention. Water balance components have been observed in order to study water partitioning processes for the "with" and "without" SI scenarios. Based on rainfall, soil evaporation, transpiration, runoff and soil moisture measurements, a water balance model has been developed to simulate soil moisture variations over the growing season. Simulation results show that, during the field trials, the average productive transpiration flow ranged between 1.1-1.4 mm d-1 in the trial plots compared to 0.7-1.0 mm d-1 under traditional tillage practice. Productive transpiration processes accounted for 23-29% while losses to deep percolation accounted for 33-48% of the available water. The field system has been successfully modelled using the spreadsheet-based water balance 1-D model. Conclusions from the research are that the SIs that were tested are effective in enhancing soil moisture retention at field scale and that diversions allow crop growth moisture conditions to be attained with early rains. From the partitioning analysis, it is also

  1. Assimilation of drifter observations for the reconstruction of eulerian circulation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molcard, A.; Ozgokmen, T.; Piterbarg, L.; Griffa, A.

    2003-04-01

    In light of the increasing number of drifting buoys in the ocean, and recent advances in the realism of ocean general circulation models toward oceanic forecasting, the problem of assimilation of Lagrangian observations data in Eulerian models is investigated. A new and general rigorous approach is developed based on optimal interpolation methods, which takes into account directly the Lagrangian nature of the observations. An idealized version of this general formulation is tested in the framework of identical twin-experiments using a reduced-gravity, quasi-geostrophic model. An extensive study is conducted to quantify the effectiveness of Lagrangian data assimilation as a function of the number of drifters, the frequency of assimilation and uncertainties associated with the forcing functions driving the ocean model. The performance of the Lagrangian assimilation technique is also compared to that of conventional methods of assimilating drifters as moving current meters, and assimilation of Eulerian data, such as fixed-point velocities. Overall the results are very favorable for the assimilation of Lagrangian observations to improve the Eulerian velocity field in ocean models. The results of our assimilation twin experiments imply an optimal sampling frequency for oceanic Lagrangian instruments in the range of 20-50% of the Lagrangian integral time scale of the flow field. The method is extended to primitive equation ocean models by using a dynamical relationship between velocity components and layer thickness based on geostrophy. The method is implemented in an idealized MICOM of midlatitude circulation, and performances of three different techniques, Pseudo-Lagrangian OI, Lagrangian OI and Pseudo-Lagrangian Kalman Filter (based on Chin et al., 1999) are compared using a comprehensive set of experiments. The main finding of this study is that two different strategies of data assimilation are simultaneously supported: (i) the strategy of adopting well

  2. High-resolution regional gravity field recovery from Poisson wavelets using heterogeneous observational techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihao; Luo, Zhicai; Chen, Wu; Chen, Yongqi

    2017-02-01

    We adopt Poisson wavelets for regional gravity field recovery using data acquired from various observational techniques; the method combines data of different spatial resolutions and coverage, and various spectral contents and noise levels. For managing the ill-conditioned system, the performances of the zero- and first-order Tikhonov regularization approaches are investigated. Moreover, a direct approach is proposed to properly combine Global Positioning System (GPS)/leveling data with the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid, where GPS/leveling data are treated as an additional observation group to form a new functional model. In this manner, the quasi-geoid/geoid that fits the local leveling system can be computed in one step, and no post-processing (e.g., corrector surface or least squares collocation) procedures are needed. As a case study, we model a new reference surface over Hong Kong. The results show solutions with first-order regularization are better than those obtained from zero-order regularization, which indicates the former may be more preferable for regional gravity field modeling. The numerical results also demonstrate the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid and GPS/leveling data can be combined properly using this direct approach, where no systematic errors exist between these two data sets. A comparison with 61 independent GPS/leveling points shows the accuracy of the new geoid, HKGEOID-2016, is around 1.1 cm. Further evaluation demonstrates the new geoid has improved significantly compared to the original model, HKGEOID-2000, and the standard deviation for the differences between the observed and computed geoidal heights at all GPS/leveling points is reduced from 2.4 to 0.6 cm. Finally, we conclude HKGEOID-2016 can be substituted for HKGEOID-2000 for engineering purposes and geophysical investigations in Hong Kong.

  3. Investigating soil controls on soil moisture spatial variability: Numerical simulations and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; You, Jinsheng; Shulski, Martha D.

    2015-05-01

    Due to its complex interactions with various processes and factors, soil moisture exhibits significant spatial variability across different spatial scales. In this study, a modeling approach and field observations were used to examine the soil control on the relationship between mean (θ bar) and standard deviation (σθ) of soil moisture content. For the numerical experiments, a 1-D vadose zone model along with van Genuchten parameters generated by pedotransfer functions was used for simulating soil moisture dynamics under different climate and surface conditions. To force the model, hydrometeorological and physiological data that spanned over three years from five research sites within the continental US were used. The modeling results showed that under bare surface conditions, different forms of the θ bar -σθ relationship as observed in experimental studies were produced. For finer soils, a positive θ bar -σθ relationship gradually changed to an upward convex and a negative one from arid to humid conditions; whereas, a positive relationship existed for coarser soils, regardless of climatic conditions. The maximum σθ for finer soils was larger under semiarid conditions than under arid and humid conditions, while the maximum σθ for coarser soils increased with increasing precipitation. Moreover, vegetation tended to reduce θ bar and σθ, and thus affected the θ bar -σθ relationship. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted to examine the controls of different van Genuchten parameters on the θ bar -σθ relationship under bare surface conditions. It was found that the residual soil moisture content mainly affected σθ under dry conditions, while the saturated soil moisture content and the saturated hydraulic conductivity largely controlled σθ under wet conditions. Importantly, the upward convex θ bar -σθ relationship was mostly caused by the shape factor n that accounts for pore size distribution. Finally, measured soil moisture data from a

  4. The interplanetary magnetic field during solar cycle 21 ISEE-3/ICE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Jungman, G.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in the IMF during solar cycle 21 are investigated using magnetic field observations collected by the vector helium magnetometer on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. Analysis of the observations reveal that the IMF magnitude, which had declined to 4.7 nT in 1976, peaked in late 1982 (two years after solar maximum) at 9.0 nT and rapidly decreased during 1983-1984 to an intensity of 6.2 nT in early 1985. The IMF intensities are compared with the auroral AE index; the observed peak in strength during 1981-1983 is related to a 50 percent increase in substorm activity levels. A decrease in Parker spiral angle, revealing the existence of high-speed streams is detected in the declining phase of the solar cycle. Variations in the intensity of the IMF correlate with Mt. Wilson magnetograph measurements of full disk magnetic flux. Source regions for the evolution of solar wind and the IMF are proposed.

  5. Magnetopause expansions for quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field: THEMIS and Geotail observations

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Sibeck, D G; McFadden, J P; Hasegawa, H; Ackerson, K; Jelínek, K; Šafránková, J; Němeček, Z; 10.1029/2010JA015404

    2013-01-01

    We report THEMIS and Geotail observations of prolonged magnetopause (MP) expansions during long-lasting intervals of quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and nearly constant solar wind dynamic pressure. The expansions were global: the magnetopause was located more than 3 RE and ~7 RE outside its nominal dayside and magnetotail locations, respectively. The expanded states persisted several hours, just as long as the quasi-radial IMF conditions, indicating steady-state situations. For an observed solar wind pressure of ~1.1-1.3 nPa, the new equilibrium subsolar MP position lay at ~14.5 RE, far beyond its expected location. The equilibrium position was affected by geomagnetic activity. The magnetopause expansions result from significant decreases in the total pressure of the high-beta magnetosheath, which we term the low-pressure magnetosheath (LPM) mode. A prominent LPM mode was observed for upstream conditions characterized by IMF cone angles less than 20 ~ 25 grad, high Mach numbers and proton pla...

  6. First faint dual-field off-axis observations in optical long baseline interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woillez, J.; Wizinowich, P.; Ragland, S. [W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Akeson, R.; Millan-Gabet, R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Colavita, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Eisner, J. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Monnier, J. D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1090 (United States); Pott, J.-U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, D-69117 (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    Ground-based long baseline interferometers have long been limited in sensitivity in part by the short integration periods imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The first observation fainter than this limit was performed on 2011 January 22 when the Keck Interferometer observed a K = 11.5 target, about 1 mag fainter than its K = 10.3 atmospherically imposed limit; the currently demonstrated limit is K = 12.5. These observations were made possible by the Dual-Field Phase-Referencing (DFPR) instrument, part of the NSF-funded ASTrometry and phase-Referenced Astronomy project; integration times longer than the turbulence time scale are made possible by its ability to simultaneously measure the real-time effects of the atmosphere on a nearby bright guide star and correct for it on the faint target. We present the implementation of DFPR on the Keck Interferometer. Then, we detail its on-sky performance focusing on the accuracy of the turbulence correction and the resulting fringe contrast stability.

  7. First observation of trapped high-field seeking ultracold neutron spin states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, M., E-mail: manfred.daum@psi.ch [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4714 (United States); Fierlinger, P. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Franke, B. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Geltenbort, P. [ILL, Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Goeltl, L. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Gutsmiedl, E. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Karch, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Kessler, G. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Kirch, K. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); IPP, Institut f. Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Koch, H.-C.; Kraft, A.; Lauer, T. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Lauss, B. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pierre, E. [LPC, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ENSICAEN-CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Pignol, G. [LPSC, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, UJF-CNRS/IN2P3-INPG, Grenoble (France); Reggiani, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sobolev, Yu.; Zechlau, T. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Zsigmond, G. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-10-25

    Ultracold neutrons were stored in a volume, using a magnetic dipole field shutter. Radial confinement was provided by material walls. Low-field seeking neutrons were axially confined above the magnetic field. High-field seeking neutrons are trapped inside the magnetic field. They can systematically shift the measured neutron lifetime to lower values in experiments with magnetic confinement.

  8. Initial results on the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields observed from the DE-2 satellite in the field-aligned current regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Farthing, W. H.; Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Initial results of the electric and magnetic field observations from the DE-2 satellite show a remarkably good correlation between the north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field in many passes of the field-aligned current regions. For a dayside cusp pass on August 15, 1981 the coefficient of correlation between these components was 0.996. A preliminary inspection of the available data from the first 6 months of the DE operation indicates that the similarity between the electric and magnetic field signatures of the field-aligned currents is a commonly observed feature at all local times. This high correlation is interpreted to be an indication that the closure of the field-aligned current is essentially meridional. When the correlation between these components is not good, the closure current is likely to be flowing along the auroral belt. When the correlation between the electric and magnetic fields is high, it is possible to estimate the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity from the observed field components.

  9. Field line distribution of density at L=4.8 inferred from observations by CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available For two events observed by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the field line distribution of mass density ρ was inferred from Alfvén wave harmonic frequencies and compared to the electron density ne from plasma wave data and the oxygen density nO+ from the ion composition experiment. In one case, the average ion mass M≈ρ/ne was about 5 amu (28 October 2002, while in the other it was about 3 amu (10 September 2002. Both events occurred when the CLUSTER 1 (C1 spacecraft was in the plasmatrough. Nevertheless, the electron density ne was significantly lower for the first event (ne=8 cm−3 than for the second event (ne=22 cm−3, and this seems to be the main difference leading to a different value of M. For the first event (28 October 2002, we were able to measure the Alfvén wave frequencies for eight harmonics with unprecedented precision, so that the error in the inferred mass density is probably dominated by factors other than the uncertainty in frequency (e.g., magnetic field model and theoretical wave equation. This field line distribution (at L=4.8 was very flat for magnetic latitude |MLAT|≲20° but very steeply increasing with respect to |MLAT| for |MLAT|≳40°. The total variation in ρ was about four orders of magnitude, with values at large |MLAT| roughly consistent with ionospheric values. For the second event (10 September 2002, there was a small local maximum in mass density near the magnetic equator. The inferred mass density decreases to a minimum 23% lower than the equatorial value at |MLAT|=15.5°, and then steeply increases as one moves along the field line toward the ionosphere. For this event we were also able to examine the spatial dependence of the electron density using measurements of ne from all four CLUSTER spacecraft. Our analysis indicates that the density varies with L at L~5 roughly like L−4, and that ne is also locally peaked at the magnetic equator, but with a smaller peak. The value of ne reaches a density minimum

  10. Interrelation of geomagnetic storms and earthquakes: Insight from lab experiments and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzhin, Yuri; Kamogawa, Masashi; Novikov, Victor

    statistical approach for the problem of ionosphere-lithosphere coupling, and in each case the possible behavior of fluids should be considered under electromagnetic impact on lithosphere. Experimental results supporting this idea are obtained at the spring-block model simulating the seismic cycle (slow accumulation and sharp drop of stresses in the fault gauge), as well as from field observations of water level variations in the well during ionospheric disturbances are presented and discussed. In the lab experiments it was shown that the earthquake may be triggered by very small fluid content injected into the simulated fault (earthquake activity and geomagnetic Sq-variations // Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 3, 2003, p.p.171-177. 2. Novikov V.A. Water imbalance in the geological fault as a possible earthquake trigger // AGU 2012 Fall Meeting, Dec. 3-8, San Francisco, USA, Abstract GC42B-08.

  11. Asymmetry of the ion diffusion region Hall electric and magnetic fields during guide field reconnection: observations and comparison with simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, J P; Shay, M A; Phan, T D; Øieroset, M

    2010-05-21

    In situ measurements of magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail are presented showing that even a moderate guide field (20% of the reconnecting field) considerably distorts ion diffusion region structure. The Hall magnetic and electric fields are asymmetric and shunted away from the current sheet; an appropriately scaled particle-in-cell simulation is found to be in excellent agreement with the data. The results show the importance of correctly accounting for the effects of the magnetic shear when attempting to identify and study magnetic reconnection diffusion regions in nature.

  12. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  13. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South region: I. Survey Description and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, R P; Jackson, C A; Boyle, B J; Ekers, R D; Mitchell, D A; Sault, R J; Wieringa, M H; Williams, R E; Hopkins, A M; Higdon, J; Norris, Ray P.; Huynh, Minh T.; Jackson, Carole A.; Boyle, Brian J.; Ekers, Ronald. D.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Sault, Robert J.; Wieringa, Mark H.; Williams, Robert E.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Higdon, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series describing the results of the Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field South (ATHDFS) radio survey. The survey was conducted at four wavelengths - 20, 11, 6, and 3 cm, over a 4-year period, and achieves an rms sensitivity of about 10 microJy at each wavelength. We describe the observations and data reduction processes, and present data on radio sources close to the centre of the HDF-S. We discuss in detail the properties of a subset of these sources. The sources include both starburst galaxies and galaxies powered by an active galactic nucleus, and range in redshift from 0.1 to 2.2. Some of them are characterised by unusually high radio-to-optical luminosities, presumably caused by dust extinction.

  14. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarsu, Özgür [Department of Physics, Koç University, 34450 Sariyer, İstanbul (Turkey); Kumar, Suresh [Department of Mathematics, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M. [Centre of Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Xu, Lixin, E-mail: oakarsu@ku.edu.tr, E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: samijamia@gmail.com, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis.

  15. Observations of the field-aligned residual flow inside magnetic cloud structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we report two MC events observed by WIND spacecraft with good examples of fieldaligned residual flow inside the MC structure. For both events,the co-moving frames are determined through the deHoffman-Teller (HT) analysis and the axial orientations are inferred by the newly developed minimal residue (MR) method. The nature coordinate system for both events are constructed with velocity of the HT frame and the inferred MC axis,the field and flow remaining in the HT frame are analyzed at this coordinate system. As a result,we find that the residual flows in the co-moving HT frame of the two MC events are almost anti-parallel to the helical magnetic field. We speculate that the field-aligned residual flows are large scale coherent hydrodynamic vortices co-moving with the MCs at the supersonic speed near 1 AU. Data analyses show that the event in slow ambient solar wind is expanding at 1 AU and another one in fast solar wind does not show apparent expansion. Proton behaviors for both events are quasi-isothermal. Accelerated HT analysis shows that both events have no suitable HT frame with constant accelerations,which suggests that both events may be moving at the constant speed near 1 AU under the assumptions of the HT analysis. For both events,the ratio of the dynamic pressure to the magnetic pressure is larger than that of the thermal pressure to magnetic pressure,which suggests that the dynamic effects due to the plasma flows remaining in the co-moving HT frame are more important than the thermal effects in the study of MC evolution and propagation.

  16. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .4. Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 6.7 and 15 mu m in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirming...... these results (and, in one case, clarifying them) with independent visual searches, We find 15 ISO sources to be reliably associated with bright [I-814(AB) Hubble Flanking Fields (10 galaxies...

  17. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .4. Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.;

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 6.7 and 15 mu m in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirming...... these results (and, in one case, clarifying them) with independent visual searches, We find 15 ISO sources to be reliably associated with bright [I-814(AB) Hubble Flanking Fields (10 galaxies...

  18. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations During 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the microscale fluctuations of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + tau) -- SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha(1) = 0.88 plus or minus 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 plus or minus 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of turbulence in the heliosheath.

  19. Observation of field-induced electron emission in porous polycrystalline silicon nano-structured diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Won; Kim, Hoon; Ju, Byeong Kwon [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Hi [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Field-induced electron emission properties of porous poly-silicon nano-structured (PNS) diodes were investigated as a function of anodizing conditions, including morphological analysis, various kinds of top electrode thickness and the measuring substrate temperature. Also, the vacuum packaging process was performed by the normal glass frit method. The PNS layer was formed on heavily-dope n-type <100> Si substrate. Non-doped poly-silicon layer was grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) to a thickness of 2mm. Subsequently, the poly-silicon layer was anodized in a mixed solution HF (50 wt%): ethanol(99.8 wt%) = 1:1 as a function of anodizing condition. After anodizing, the PNS layer was thermally oxidized for 1 hr at 900 .deg. C. Subsequently, the top electrode was deposited as a function of Au thickness using E-beam evaporator and, in order to establish ohmic contact, thermally evaporated Al was deposited on the back side of a Si substrate. The prepared PNS diode was packaged using the normal vacuum sealing method. After the vacuum sealing process, the PNS diode was mounted on the PC measurement table. When a positive bias was applied to the top electrode, the electron emission was observed, which was caused by field-induced electron emission through the top metal.

  20. MCAO near-IR photometry of the Globular Cluster NGC 6388: MAD observations in crowded fields

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Arcidiacono, C; Milone, A P; Ragazzoni, R; Falomo, R; Farinato, J; Bedin, L R; Anderson, J; Sarajedini, A; Baruffolo, A; Diolaiti, E; Lombini, M; Brast, R; Donaldson, R; Kolb, J; Marchetti, E; Tordo, S

    2008-01-01

    Deep photometry of crowded fields, such as Galactic Globular Clusters, is severely limited by the actual resolution of ground-based telescopes. On the other hand, the Hubble Space Telescope does not provide the near-infrared (NIR) filters needed to allow large color baselines. In this work we aim at demonstrating how ground based observations can reach the required resolution when using Multi-Conjugated Adaptive Optic (MCAO) devices in the NIR, such as the experimental infrared camera (MAD) available on the VLT. This is particularly important since these corrections are planned to be available on all ground--based telescopes in the near future. We do this by combining the infrared photometry obtained by MAD/VLT with ACS/HST optical photometry of our scientific target, the bulge globular cluster NGC 6388, in which we imaged two fields. In particular, we constructed color-magnitude diagrams with an extremely wide color baseline in order to investigate the presence of multiple stellar populations in this cluster...

  1. Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Types and Electrical Field Information Observed by High Altitude Aircraft Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Cecil, Daniel; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Marks, Frank

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 200 1 hurricane seasons of the Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes and tropical storms were sampled during these experiments. A rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these tropical cyclones (TC) collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35,37.1, and 85.5 GHz and verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower altitude horizontal reflectivity scam collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOM) P-3 radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electrical field information collected by the LIP readily identifl convective rain regions within the TC precipitation fields. Strengths and weaknesses of the rainfall classification procedure will be discussed as well as its potential as a real-time analysis tool for monitoring vertical updrafl strength and convective intensity from a remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicle.

  2. LOFAR 150-MHz observations of the Boötes field: catalogue and source counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. L.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Best, P.; Dijkema, T. J.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Heald, G.; Prandoni, I.; Sabater, J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Tasse, C.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Conway, J. E.; Enßlin, T.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Jackson, N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mahony, E. K.; Miley, G. K.; Morabito, L. K.; Morganti, R.; Orrú, E.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Sridhar, S. S.; Toribio, M. C.; White, G. J.; Wise, M. W.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first wide area (19 deg2), deep (≈120-150 μJy beam-1), high-resolution (5.6 × 7.4 arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Boötes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6 276 sources detected over an area of 19 deg2, with a peak flux density threshold of 5σ. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150-MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.

  3. Integral Field Spectroscopy of a sample of nearby galaxies. I. Sample, Observations and Data Reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Marmol-Queralto, E; Marino, R A; Mast, D; Viironen, K; de Paz, A Gil; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Vilchez, J M

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a powerful approach for the study of nearby galaxies since it enables a detailed analysis of their resolved physical properties. Here we present the sample of nearby galaxies selected to exploit the two dimensional information provided by the IFS. Methods: We observed a sample of 48 galaxies from the Local Universe with the PPAK Integral Field Spectroscopy unit (IFU), of the PMAS spectrograph, mounted at the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almeria, Spain). Two different setups were used during these studies (low -V300- and medium -V600- resolution mode) covering a spectral range of around 3700-7000 Angs. We developed a full automatic pipeline for the data reduction, that includes an analysis of the quality of the final data products. We applied a decoupling method to obtain the ionised gas and stellar content of these galaxies, and to derive the main physical properties of the galaxies. To asses the accuracy in the measurements of the different parameters, ...

  4. MAMBO 1.2mm observations of luminous starbursts at z~2 in the SWIRE fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lonsdale, C J; Omont, A; Shupe, D; Berta, S; Zylka, R; Siana, B; Lutz, D; Farrah, D; Smith, H E; Lagache, G; De Breuck, C; Owen, F; Beelen, A; Weedman, D; Franceschini, A; Clements, D; Tacconi, L; Afonso-Luis, A; Pérez-Fournon, I; Cox, P; Bertoldi, F

    2008-01-01

    We report on--off pointed MAMBO observations at 1.2 mm of 61 Spitzer-selected star-forming galaxies from the SWIRE survey. The sources are selected on the basis of bright 24um fluxes (f_24um>0.4mJy) and of stellar dominated near-infrared spectral energy distributions in order to favor z~2 starburst galaxies. The average 1.2mm flux for the whole sample is 1.5+/-0.2 mJy. Our analysis focuses on 29 sources in the Lockman Hole field where the average 1.2mm flux (1.9+/-0.3 mJy) is higher than in other fields (1.1+/-0.2 mJy). The analysis of the sources multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions indicates that they are starburst galaxies with far-infrared luminosities ~10^12-10^13.3 Lsun, and stellar masses of ~0.2-6 x10^11 M_sun. Compared to sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs), the SWIRE-MAMBO sources are among those with the largest 24um/millimeter flux ratios. The origin of such large ratios is investigated by comparing the average mid-infrared spectra and the stacked far-infrared spectral energy distrib...

  5. Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Types and Electrical Field Information Observed by High Altitude Aircraft Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Cecil, Daniel; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Marks, Frank

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 200 1 hurricane seasons of the Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes and tropical storms were sampled during these experiments. A rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these tropical cyclones (TC) collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35,37.1, and 85.5 GHz and verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower altitude horizontal reflectivity scam collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOM) P-3 radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electrical field information collected by the LIP readily identifl convective rain regions within the TC precipitation fields. Strengths and weaknesses of the rainfall classification procedure will be discussed as well as its potential as a real-time analysis tool for monitoring vertical updrafl strength and convective intensity from a remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicle.

  6. Spin dynamics of S = 1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnets observed by high-field ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Hitoshi [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Zhang, Wei-min [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Okubo, Susumu; Fujisawa, Masashi [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Takahiro [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Hiroi, Zenji [Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Due to the existence of strong spin frustration in a system, the spin dynamics of S = 1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnet at low temperature has attracted much interest. High-field ESR has been measured on its model substances, Cu{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O (volborthite) and BaCu{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 2} (vesignieite), down to 1.8 K using pulsed magnetic fields up to 16 T. The measurements are performed for 160 and 315 GHz using polycrys-talline samples. Although both samples showed the g-shift and the change of linewidth at low temperature, volborthite showed a small gap excitation of the order of 40 GHz (1.9 K) while vesignieite showed a paramagnetic behavior down to 1.9 K. Observed difference will be discussed in connection with the crystal structure, and the possible spin liquid state in vesignieite will be discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Investigation of sounding rocket observations of field-aligned currents and electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Moen, J.; Lynch, K. A.; Heavisides, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Strangeway et al. [2005] and other authors have concluded that the establishment of the ambipolar field by the deposition of energy from soft electron precipitation is a significant driver of type-2 ion upflows. Likewise, Clemmons et al. [2008] and Zhang et al. [2012] proposed processes by which soft electron precipitation may play a role in heating neutrals and contribute to neutral upwelling. In both situations the thermal ionospheric electron population plays a crucial role in both generation of the ambipolar field and in collisional energy exchange with the atmosphere through a variety of processes. In this study we examine the dynamics of the electron population, specifically the temperature, in a slightly different context - focusing on the auroral downward current region (DCR). In many cases auroral DCRs may be depleted of plasma, which sets up interesting conditions involving thermoelectric heat fluxes (which flow upward - in the opposite direction from the current), adiabatic expansion due to the high (upward) speed of the electrons carrying the downward current, heat exchange from ions which have elevated temperatures due to frictional heating, and direct frictional heating of the electrons. A detailed understanding of the electron temperature in auroral DCRs is necessary to make quantitative statements about recombination, upflow, cavitation and a host of other processes relevant to ion outflow. In this study, we compare in situ rocket observations of electron temperature, density, and current densities with predictions from the Zettergren and Semeter [2012] model in an attempt to better understand the dynamics and relationships between these parameters in DCRs.

  8. Observed Changes in Some Biochemical Parameters After Magnetic Field Exposure to 1,5 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Akdağ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In daily life, individuals are exposed to electromagnetic contamination at different levels. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a radiodiagnostic imaging technique using non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation. Considering possible adverse effects of magnetic fields may occur at long time, complications are difficult to determined earlier. Therefore, the effects of MRI on some biochemical parameters were evaluated before and after MRI.Material and Method: In the present study, applying for MRI and with no systemic disorders, total 40 volunteers between the ages of 25-45 were enrolled. Blood samples were investigated before and after MRI, and subjects were exposed to magnetic field of 1.5 T for 30 min. Blood samples were soon centrifuged and studied in terms of the levels of serum Ca, Fe, Fe binding, triglyceride, cholesterol, TT3, TT4, free T3, free T4, TSH, ferritin, insulin, lipase, HDL, LDL and glucose. Results: In the study, levels of Ca, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, TT3, Fe, Fe binding, lipase, TSH and insulin after MRI were found to be lower than those before the procedure. This changs was observed to be statistically significant(P<0.05, and the difference related to levels of LDL, glukoz, ferritin, Free T3, Free T and TT4 were found to be statistically insignificant. Discussion: It was concluded that some biochemical parameters ocur after MRI, and further studies are needed to evaluate longterm consequences and biological effects and whether the changes are temporary.

  9. LOFAR 150-MHz observations of the Bo\\"otes field: Catalogue and Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, W L; Röttgering, H J A; Best, P; Dijkema, T J; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Heald, G; Prandoni, I; Sabater, J; Shimwell, T W; Tasse, C; van Bemmel, I M; Brüggen, M; Brunetti, G; Conway, J E; Enßlin, T; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Ferrari, C; Haverkorn, M; Jackson, N; Jarvis, M J; Kapinska, A D; Mahony, E K; Miley, G K; Morabito, L K; Morganti, R; Orrú, E; Retana-Montenegro, E; Sridhar, S S; Toribio, M C; White, G J; Wise, M W; Zwart, J T L

    2016-01-01

    We present the first wide area (19 deg$^2$), deep ($\\approx120-150$ {\\mu}Jy beam$^{-1}$), high resolution ($5.6 \\times 7.4$ arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Bo\\"otes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6276 sources detected over an area of $19$\\,deg$^2$, with a peak flux density threshold of $5\\sigma$. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150 MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux...

  10. Turbulent cross-field transport of non-thermal electrons in coronal loops: theory and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, N; McKinnon, A

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental problem in astrophysics is the interaction between magnetic turbulence and charged particles. It is now possible to use \\emph{Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)} observations of hard X-rays (HXR) emitted by electrons to identify the presence of turbulence and to estimate the magnitude of the magnetic field line diffusion coefficient at least in dense coronal flaring loops.} {We discuss the various possible regimes of cross-field transport of non-thermal electrons resulting from broadband magnetic turbulence in coronal loops. The importance of the Kubo number $K$ as a governing parameter is emphasized and results applicable in both the large and small Kubo number limits are collected.} {Generic models, based on concepts and insights developed in the statistical theory of transport, are applied to the coronal loops and to the interpretation of hard X-ray imaging data in solar flares. The role of trapping effects, which become important in the non-linear regime of transport, is ...

  11. Variability of the wind field in the tropical oceans as observed by satellite sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grima, N.; Bentamy, A.; Quilfen, Y. [IFREMER/Brest, Plouzane (France)

    1995-12-31

    It is generally agreed today that the knowledge of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean is essential for understanding climate and ocean circulation, especially in tropical regions where the oceans are mainly and quickly influenced by wind action. The wind stress is the primary force driving the topical oceans from daily to interannual time scales. Conventional measurements from ships of the wind vectors are not available with a sufficient quality regarding the data accuracy as well as their coverage. Satellite observations of the surface wind over the sea are now available on a routine basis at the Institut Francais de Recherche pour l`Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), derived from the European Remote Sensing-1 (ERS-1) scatterometer and altimeter and from the radiometer Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). More than 3 years of weekly stress fields (1991--1994) with a resolution of one degree in latitude and longitude are produced using an objective analysis method. The accuracy of these gridded winds was evaluated by comparison with TAO buoys in the tropical Pacific area (Riou, 1995). The root mean square differences are of the order of 1.2 m/s and 15 degrees. The greatest differences are observed in the TOGA/COARE region where the wind variability is largest on the weekly scale. The low frequencies (monthly to interannual) of the wind variability are discussed and compared to those obtained from the TAO buoys. In this paper the time and space scales of the sea surface wind are described using a complex EOF analysis. One of the most interesting results is that the weekly averaged wind fields derived from ERS-1 scatterometer are useful to depict a 30--50-day oscillation over the tropical Pacific ocean.

  12. Recent laboratory and field observations of the chemical composition of atmospheric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. N.; Winkler, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Lawler, M. J.; Ortega, J.; Fry, J.; Barsanti, K. C.; McMurry, P. H.; Johnston, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will focus on understanding the species and mechanisms that are responsible for the formation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles. We report 10 - 40 nm diameter nanoparticle chemical composition measurements performed in two coastal sites (Mace Head, Ireland, and Lewes, Delaware USA) and two forested sites (Hyytiälä, Finland, and Manitou Forest, Colorado USA) with the recently-developed High Resolution Time-of-Flight Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (HTOF-TDCIMS). These field measurements are supplemented by laboratory experiments of particle formation and growth performed at NCAR using a flow tube apparatus and a Teflon bag reaction chamber, and by thermodynamic modeling. Together, our field and laboratory observations point to crucial roles played in nanoparticle growth by two compounds: organic acids and organonitrates. The first, organic acids, are major contributors to the organic fraction in sub-20 nm diameter biogenic nanoparticles but appear to be less abundant in the organic fraction of larger particles, the latter of which are dominated by multifunctional carbonyl- and alcohol-containing compounds. The observed changes in chemical composition of the organic fraction as a function of particle size are supported by thermodynamic modeling results. The second, organonitrates, are commonly found in ambient nanoparticles as small as 10 nm in diameter. However unlike organic acids, organonitrates become increasingly more important in nanoparticle growth as particle size increases. Laboratory experiments suggest that organonitrates formed from the nitrate radical oxidation of biogenic organic compounds, a subset of total organonitrates, exhibit particularly low volatility and can thus partition into the smallest nanoparticles. This is confirmed by HTOF-TDCIMS measurements of 10 - 20 nm diameter particles, which show that particulate phase organonitrates peak in the morning, shortly following the period where

  13. Laboratory and field observations of stress-wave induced changes in oil flow behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P. M. (Peter M.); Majer, Ernest Luther; Wooden, W. (William); Daley, T. M. (Thomas M.)

    2001-01-01

    We present recent results of laboratory and field experiments designed to validate and quantify the phenomenon of seismically enhanced oil production in marginal reservoirs. Controlled laboratory experiments were performed where mechanical stress oscillations at 100 Hz or less were applied to sandstone cores while flowing oil and/or brine at constant flow rates. Steady-state flow and simulated flooding experiments indicated that stress stimulation causes significant changes in the ability of one fluid to displace the other and on the preference that the rock has for trapping one fluid over the other. For Berea sandstone, which is highly water wet, stress stimulation caused oil production to be impeded during water floods and caused the bulk fluid pressure drop across the core to increase during steady-state simultaneous flow of oil and brine. A possible explanation of these observations is that stimulation caused the core to become more oil wet. Field stimulation tests on producing reservoirs at Lost Hills, California were performed using a downhole fluid pressure pulsation device. Stimulation was applied in one well for 50 days total during July - November 2000. Two groups of producing wells were monitored for changes in oil cut and oil production during the test. A control group of 26 wells displayed an oil-cut increase of 29% and an oil production increase of 26% which are clearly correlated with the stimulation treatment. A larger group of 60 wells showed 11% oil-cut and 17v0 production increases. Similar increases were observed during the October 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, magnitude 7.1, in the Mojave Desert about 230 miles from Lost Hills. Downhole seismic monitoring of the stimulation wavefield is being used to help quantify the frequency range and energy threshold required for effective production enhancement.

  14. DEMETER Observations of Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated ELF Electric Field and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Middle and Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    The DEMETER spacecraft frequently encounters structured plasma and electric field irregularities associated with equatorial spread-F. However, during severe geonagnetic storms, the spacecraft detects broader regions of density structures that extend to higher latitudes, in some instances to the sub-auroral regions. In addition to the electric field irregularities, ELF magnetic field irregularities are sometimes observed. for example, on the walls of the density structures, and appear related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves. The mid-latitude irregularities are compared with those of equatorial spread-F as well as wit11 intense irregularities associated with the trough region observed at sub-auroral latitudes.

  15. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  16. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  17. Field Observations of Methane Emissions from Unconventional and Conventional Fossil Fuel Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Arata, C.; Costigan, K. R.; Frankenberg, C.; Kort, E. A.; Rahn, T. A.; Henderson, B. G.; Love, S. P.; Aubrey, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Energy from methane (CH4) has lower carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions per unit energy produced than coal or oil making it a desirable fossil fuel. Hydraulic fracturing is allowing United States to harvest the nation's abundant domestic shale gas reservoirs to achieve energy independence. However, CH4 is a gas that is hard to contain during mining, processing, transport and end-use. Therefore fugitive CH4 leaks occur that are reported in bottom up inventories by the EPA. Recent targeted field observations at selected plays have provided top down CH4 leak estimates that are larger than the reported EPA inventories. Furthermore, no long-term regional baselines are available to delineate leaks from unconventional mining operations from historical conventional mining. We will report and compare observations of fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional and unconventional mining to understand changes from technology shifts. We will report in situ and regional column measurements of CH4, its isotopologue 13CH4 and ethane (C2H6) at our Four Corners site near Farmington, NM. The region has substantial coal bed methane, conventional oil and gas production, processing and distribution with minimal hydraulic fracturing activity. We observe large enhancements in in situ and regional column CH4 with distinct time dependence. Our in situ 13CH4 observations and remote C2H6/CH4 provide strong evidence of thermogenic sources. Comparisons of WRF-simulations with emissions inventory (Edgar) with our observations show that the fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional mining are 3 times greater than reported. We also compare in situ mobile surveys of fugitive CH4 and 13CH4 leak signals in basins with conventional (San Juan) mining and unconventional (Permian and Powder River) mining. A large number of active and closed wells were sampled in these regions. Furthermore, play scale surveys on public roads allowed us to gain a regional perspective. The composition of atmospheric 13CH4

  18. Diagnosis of magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets through spectropolarimetric observations of H I Paschen lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan, T.; Ichimoto, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Casini, R., E-mail: anan@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ichimoto@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: casini@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on 2012 May 5, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional presence of a perpendicular (Lorentz type) electric field of varying strength. The inferred direction of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky approximately aligns to the active region jets and the surge, with magnetic field strengths in the range 10 G < B < 640 G for the surge. Using magnetic field strengths of 70, 200, and 600 G, we obtained upper limits for possible electric fields of 0.04, 0.3, and 0.8 V cm{sup –1}, respectively. This upper bound is conservative, since in our modeling we neglected the possible contribution of collisional depolarization. Because the velocity of neutral atoms of hydrogen moving across the magnetic field derived from these upper limits of the Lorentz electric field is far below the bulk velocity of the plasma perpendicular to the magnetic field as measured by the Doppler shift, we conclude that the neutral atoms must be highly frozen to the magnetic field in the surge.

  19. A Review of Direct Observation Research within the Past Decade in the Field of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Reesha M.; Wachsmuth, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reviewed prominent journals within the field of emotional and behavioral disorders to identify direct observation approaches, reported reliability statistics, and key features of direct observation. Selected journals were systematically reviewed for the past 10 years identifying and quantifying specific direct observation systems and…

  20. Detection of Two Buried Cross Pipelines by Observation of the Scattered Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangini, Fabio; Di Gregorio, Pietro Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Muzi, Marco; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present a numerical study on the effects that can be observed in the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave due to the presence of two crossed pipelines buried in a half-space occupied by cement. The pipeline, supposed to be used for water conveyance, is modeled as a cylindrical shell made of metallic or poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) material. In order to make the model simpler, the pipelines are supposed running parallel to the air-cement interface on two different parallel planes; moreover, initially we suppose that the two tubes make an angle of 90 degrees. We consider a circularly-polarized plane wave impinging normally to the interface between air and the previously-mentioned medium, which excites the structure in order to determine the most useful configuration in terms of scattered-field sensitivity. To perform the study, a commercially available simulator which implements the Finite Element Method was adopted. A preliminary frequency sweep allows us to choose the most suitable operating frequency depending on the dimensions of the commercial pipeline cross-section. We monitor the three components of the scattered electric field along a line just above the interface between the two media. The electromagnetic properties of the materials employed in this study are taken from the literature and, since a frequency-domain technique is adopted, no further approximation is needed. Once the ideal problem has been studied, i.e. having considered orthogonal and tangential scenario, we further complicate the model by considering different crossing angles and distances between the tubes, in two cases of PVC and metallic material. The results obtained in these cases are compared with those of the initial problem with the goal of determining the scattered field dependence on the geometrical characteristics of the cross between two pipelines. One of the practical applications in the field of Civil Engineering of this study may be the use of ground

  1. First field-based atmospheric observation of the reduction of reactive mercury driven by sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Foy, Benjamin; Tong, Yindong; Yin, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wei; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2016-06-01

    Hourly speciated measurements of atmospheric mercury made in a remote, high-altitude site in the Tibetan Plateau revealed the first field observations of the reduction of reactive mercury in the presence of sunlight in the atmosphere. Measurements were collected over four winter months on the shore of Nam Co Lake in the inland Tibetan Plateau. The data was analyzed to identify sources and atmospheric transformations of the speciated mercury compounds. The absence of local anthropogenic sources provided a unique opportunity to examine chemical transformations of mercury. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the parameters of a chemical box model that would match the measured reactive mercury concentrations. This required the presence of a photolytic reduction reaction previously observed in laboratory studies and in power plant plumes. In addition, the model estimated the role of vertical mixing in diluting reactive gaseous mercury during the day, and the role of bromine chemistry in oxidizing gaseous elemental mercury to produce reactive gaseous mercury. This work provides further evidence of the need to add the photolytic reduction reaction of oxidized mercury into atmospheric transport models in order to better simulate mercury deposition.

  2. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannay, R.; Valance, A.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.; Richard, P.

    2017-02-01

    This review article provides an overview of dry granular flows and particle fluid mixtures, including experimental and numerical modeling at the laboratory scale, large scale hydrodynamics approaches and field observations. Over the past ten years, the theoretical and numerical approaches have made such significant progress that they are capable of providing qualitative and quantitative estimates of particle concentration and particle velocity profiles in steady and fully developed particulate flows. The next step which is currently developed is the extension of these approaches to unsteady and inhomogeneous flow configurations relevant to most of geophysical flows. We also emphasize that the up-scaling from laboratory experiments to large scale geophysical flows still poses some theoretical physical challenges. For example, the reduction of the dissipation that is responsible for the unexpected long run-out of large scale granular avalanches is not observed at the laboratory scale and its physical origin is still a matter of debate. However, we believe that the theoretical approaches have reached a mature state and that it is now reasonable to tackle complex particulate flows that incorporate more and more degrees of complexity of natural flows.

  3. Field observations of the developing legal recreational cannabis economy in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric L; Roussell, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    Washington State legalized the sale of recreational cannabis in 2012. This paper describes the unfolding of the market regulatory regime in an eastern portion of the state, including field descriptions to illustrate the setting. We made observations and conducted interviews of the local supply chain comprising a producer/processor, analytic facility, and retail establishments as well as querying the state director of the regulatory board. Interviews and observations of facilities suggest an overwhelming concern for black market diversion drives state regulatory efforts. The ongoing dialogue between market actors and the state has resulted in a more equitable distribution of profits at different stages in the process. State safety regulations have thus far been shifted to independent laboratories. Banks and insurance companies have slowly begun making inroads into the industry, despite federal prohibition. The law was conceived as a social justice remedy, but the bulk of the legal and regulatory activity surrounds cannabis marketplace management. This has been characterized by concerns for black market diversion, producer/processor profits, and a hands-off approach to safety regulation. Minor cannabis violations as a pathway to criminal justice system involvement have been reduced substantially but disproportionate enforcement upon racial/ethnic minorities continues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Structure in PKS 2155-304: Optical Polarimetric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    de Almeida, U Barres; Dominici, T P; Abraham, Z; Franco, G A P; Daniel, M K; Chadwick, P M; Boisson, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present multiband optical polarimetric observations of the VHE blazar PKS 2155-304 made simultaneously with a H.E.S.S./Fermi high-energy campaign in 2008, when the source was found to be in a low state. The intense daily coverage of the dataset allowed us to study in detail the temporal evolution of the emission and we found that the particle acceleration timescales are decoupled from the changes in the polarimetric properties of the source. We present a model in which the optical polarimetric emission originates at the polarised mm-wave core and propose an explanation for the lack of correlation between the photometric and polarimetric fluxes. The optical emission is consistent with an inhomogeneous synchrotron source in which the large scale field is locally organised by a shock in which particle acceleration takes place. Finally, we use these optical polarimetric observations of PKS 2155-304 at a low state to propose an origin for the quiescent gamma-ray flux of the object, in an attempt t...

  5. Integral Field Unit Observations of NGC 4302: Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, G H; Benjamin, R A; Bershady, M A; Heald, George H.; Rand, Richard J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2007-01-01

    We present moderate resolution spectroscopy of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (EDIG) emission in the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4302. The spectra were obtained with the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU) at the WIYN Observatory. The spectra are used to construct position-velocity (PV) diagrams at several ranges of heights above the midplane. Azimuthal velocities are directly extracted from the PV diagrams using the envelope tracing method, and indicate an extremely steep dropoff in rotational velocity with increasing height, with magnitude ~30 km/s/kpc. We find evidence for a radial variation in the velocity gradient on the receding side. We have also performed artificial observations of galaxy models in an attempt to match the PV diagrams. The results of a statistical analysis also favor a gradient of ~30 km/s/kpc. We compare these results with an entirely ballistic model of disk-halo flow, and find a strong dichotomy between the observed kinematics and those predicted by the model. The disagreement is wors...

  6. Bayesian truncation errors in chiral effective field theory: Nucleon-nucleon observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, J. A.; Wesolowski, S.; Furnstahl, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) predictions are necessarily truncated at some order in the EFT expansion, which induces an error that must be quantified for robust statistical comparisons to experiment. In previous work, a Bayesian model for truncation errors of perturbative expansions was adapted to EFTs. The model yields posterior probability distribution functions (pdfs) for these errors based on expectations of naturalness encoded in Bayesian priors and the observed order-by-order convergence pattern of the EFT. A first application was made to chiral EFT for neutron-proton scattering using the semilocal potentials of Epelbaum, Krebs, and Meißner (EKM). Here we extend this application to consider a larger set of regulator parameters, energies, and observables as a general example of a statistical approach to truncation errors. The Bayesian approach allows for statistical validations of the assumptions and enables the calculation of posterior pdfs for the EFT breakdown scale. The statistical model is validated for EKM potentials whose convergence behavior is not distorted by regulator artifacts. For these cases, the posterior for the breakdown scale is consistent with EKM assumptions.

  7. Frontier Fields Clusters: Deep Chandra Observations of the Complex Merger MACS J1149.6+2223

    CERN Document Server

    Ogrean, G A; Jones, C; Forman, W; Dawson, W A; Golovich, N; Andrade-Santos, F; Murray, S S; Nulsen, P; Roediger, E; Zitrin, A; Bulbul, E; Kraft, R; Goulding, A; Umetsu, K; Mroczkowski, T; Bonafede, A; Randall, S; Sayers, J; Churazov, E; David, L; Merten, J; Donahue, M; Mason, B; Rosati, P; Vikhlinin, A; Ebeling, H

    2016-01-01

    The HST Frontier Fields cluster MACS J1149.6+2223 is one of the most complex merging clusters, believed to consist of four dark matter halos. We present results from deep (365 ks) Chandra observations of the cluster, which reveal the most distant cold front (z=0.544) discovered to date. In the cluster outskirts, we also detect hints of a surface brightness edge that could be the bow shock preceding the cold front. The substructure analysis of the cluster identified several components with large relative radial velocities, thus indicating that at least some collisions occur almost along the line of sight. The inclination of the mergers with respect to the plane of the sky poses significant observational challenges at X-ray wavelengths. MACS J1149.6+2223 possibly hosts a steep-spectrum radio halo. If the steepness of the radio halo is confirmed, then the radio spectrum, combined with the relatively regular ICM morphology, could indicate that MACS J1149.6+2223 is an old merging cluster.

  8. CONSTRAINTS ON THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD WITH GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finke, Justin D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Reyes, Luis C.; Reynolds, Kaeleigh [Department of Physics, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (United States); Georganopoulos, Markos; McCann, Kevin [Department of Physics and Center for Space Sciences and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Ajello, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Fegan, Stephen J., E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: lreyes04@calpoly.edu, E-mail: georgano@umbc.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-11-20

    Distant BL Lacertae objects emit γ-rays that interact with the extragalactic background light (EBL), creating electron–positron pairs, and reducing the flux measured by ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) at very-high energies (VHE). These pairs can Compton-scatter the cosmic microwave background, creating a γ-ray signature at slightly lower energies that is observable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This signal is strongly dependent on the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) strength (B) and its coherence length (L{sub B}). We use IACT spectra taken from the literature for 5 VHE-detected BL Lac objects and combine them with LAT spectra for these sources to constrain these IGMF parameters. Low B values can be ruled out by the constraint that the cascade flux cannot exceed that observed by the LAT. High values of B can be ruled out from the constraint that the EBL-deabsorbed IACT spectrum cannot be greater than the LAT spectrum extrapolated into the VHE band, unless the cascade spectrum contributes a sizable fraction of the LAT flux. We rule out low B values (B ≲ 10{sup −19} G for L{sub B} ≥ 1 Mpc) at >5σ in all trials with different EBL models and data selection, except when using >1 GeV spectra and the lowest EBL models. We were not able to constrain high values of B.

  9. Kepler Observations and Asteroseismology of θ Cyg, the Brightest StarObservable in the Kepler Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    θ Cyg (13 Cyg) is an F4 main sequence star that, at visual magnitude V=4.48, is the brightest star observable by the Kepler spacecraft. Short-cadence photometric data using a custom aperture requiring 1800 pixels were obtained for this star during Quarter 6 (June-Sept 2010) and Quarter 8 (Jan-Mar...

  10. Kepler Observations and Asteroseismology of θ Cyg, the Brightest StarObservable in the Kepler Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J.;

    2012-01-01

    θ Cyg (13 Cyg) is an F4 main sequence star that, at visual magnitude V=4.48, is the brightest star observable by the Kepler spacecraft. Short-cadence photometric data using a custom aperture requiring 1800 pixels were obtained for this star during Quarter 6 (June-Sept 2010) and Quarter 8 (Jan...

  11. Mental imagery of positive and neutral memories: A fMRI study comparing field perspective imagery to observer perspective imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grol, Maud; Vingerhoets, Guy; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    Imagery perspective can influence what information is recalled, processing style, and emotionality; however, the understanding of possible mechanisms mediating these observed differences is still limited. We aimed to examine differences between memory recall from a field perspective and observer perspective at the neurobiological level, in order to improve our understanding of what is underlying the observed differences at the behavioral level. We conducted a fMRI study in healthy individuals, comparing imagery perspectives during recall of neutral and positive autobiographical memories. Behavioral results revealed field perspective imagery of positive memories, as compared to observer perspective, to be associated with more positive feelings afterwards. At the neurobiological level, contrasting observer perspective to field perspective imagery was associated with greater activity, or less decrease relative to the control visual search task, in the right precuneus and in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Greater activity in the right TPJ during an observer perspective as compared to field perspective could reflect performing a greater shift of perspective and mental state during observer perspective imagery than field perspective imagery. Differential activity in the precuneus may reflect that during observer perspective imagery individuals are more likely to engage in (self-) evaluative processing and visuospatial processing. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how imagery perspective can influence the type of information that is recalled and the intensity of the emotional response. Observer perspective imagery may not automatically reduce emotional intensity but this could depend on how the imagined situation is evaluated in relation to the self-concept.

  12. Fluid flow in discrete joint sets: Field observations and numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W. Lansing [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Pollard, David D. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Aydin, Atilla [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    1999-12-10

    The distribution of flow within conductive joint sets is influenced by the geometric arrangement of joints and the hydraulic properties of both joints and matrix. We use finite element simulations with an equivalent porous media joint representation to understand the distribution of flow through joints and porous matrix. Isolated joints in a porous media create characteristic flow perturbations in the matrix with reduced fluid potentials near the upstream joint tip, elevated potentials near the downstream tip, and flow shadows adjacent to the joint. In more complex joint systems, flow in any given joint is influenced by its proximity to other joints, resulting in characteristic enhancement or reduction of flow velocities. The permeability ratio (equivalent joint permeability divided by matrix permeability) plays a major role in determining the distribution of flow within complex joint systems. When the permeability ratio is <3.0 orders of magnitude, all joints are indirectly connected to the flow system through the matrix. As joint conductivity increases, flow becomes increasingly localized into directly connected joints. When the permeability ratio exceeds 6.5 orders of magnitude, significant flow occurs only in the directly connected joints. We compare these numerical results with field observations from an ancient reactive flow system now exposed at the Earth's surface. In the field, 32% of joints are associated with chemically altered halos. By explicitly representing mapped joint distributions in numerical simulations, we estimate that 32% of the joints would conduct significant volumes of fluid if joint permeability is 5 orders of magnitude greater than the matrix permeability. This corresponds to an insitu joint aperture of 2.3 mm, closely resembling the 1.8-mm average joint aperture measured on the present-day outcrop. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  13. CHROMOSPHERIC RAPID BLUESHIFTED EXCURSIONS OBSERVED WITH IBIS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Na; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin P. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States); Lamb, Derek A.; Deforest, Craig E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302-5142 (United States); Denker, Carsten [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Liu, Rui, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Chromospheric rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) are suggested to be the disk counterparts of type II spicules at the limb and believed to contribute to the coronal heating process. Previous identification of RBEs was mainly based on feature detection using Dopplergrams. In this paper, we study RBEs on 2011 October 21 in a very quiet region at the disk center, which were observed with the high-cadence imaging spectroscopy of the Ca II 8542 Å line from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). By using an automatic spectral analysis algorithm, a total of 98 RBEs are identified during an 11 minute period. Most of these RBEs have either a round or elongated shape, with an average area of 1.2 arcsec{sup 2}. The detailed temporal evolution of spectra from IBIS makes possible a quantitative determination of the velocity (∼16 km s{sup –1}) and acceleration (∼400 m s{sup –2}) of Ca II 8542 RBEs, and reveals an additional deceleration (∼–160 m s{sup –2}) phase that usually follows the initial acceleration. In addition, we also investigate the association of RBEs with the concomitant photospheric magnetic field evolution, using coordinated high-resolution and high-sensitivity magnetograms made by Hinode. Clear examples are found where RBEs appear to be associated with the preceding magnetic flux emergence and/or the subsequent flux cancellation. However, further analysis with the aid of the Southwest Automatic Magnetic Identification Suite does not yield a significant statistical association between these RBEs and magnetic field evolution. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of understanding the driving mechanism of RBEs.

  14. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  15. Smokefree signage at children's playgrounds: Field observations and comparison with Google Street View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George; Wilson, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Although there is global growth in outdoor smokefree areas, little is known about the associated smokefree signage. We aimed to study smokefree signage at playgrounds and to compare field observations with images from Google Street View (GSV). We randomly selected playgrounds in 21 contiguous local government areas in the lower North Island of New Zealand, all of which had smokefree playground policies. Field data were collected on smokefree signage along with dog control signage to allow for comparisons. The sensitivity and specificity of using GSV for data collection were calculated. Out of the 63 playgrounds studied, only 44% (95% CI: 33%-57%) had any smokefree signage within 10 m of the playground equipment. The mean number of such signs was 0.8 per playground (range: 0 to 6). Sign size varied greatly from 42 cm(2) up to 2880 cm(2); but was typically fairly small (median = 600 cm(2); ie, as per a 20 × 30 cm rectangle). Qualitatively the dog signs appeared to use clearer images and were less wordy than the smokefree signs. Most playground equipment (82%), could be seen on GSV, but for these settings the sensitivity for identifying smokefree signs was poor at 16%. Yet specificity was reasonable at 96%. The presence and quality of smokefree signage was poor in this sample of children's playgrounds in this developed country setting. There appears to be value in comparing smokefree signage with other types of signage (eg, dog control signage). Google Street View was not a sensitive tool for studying such signage.

  16. Combining field observations and numerical modeling to better understand fault opening and hydromechanics at depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    This study adds field observations and numerical modeling results to the mounting evidence that fault surface irregularities cause local variations in slip, opening, and stress distributions along faults. A two-dimensional displacement discontinuity boundary element model (DDM) in conjunction with a complementarity algorithm is used to model both idealized and natural fault geometries in order to predict the locations and magnitudes of fault opening, and the style and spatial distribution of off-fault damage, both of which influence local fluid flow. Field observations of exhumed small faults in granodiorite from the central Sierra Nevada, California, help to constrain the numerical models. The Sierran faults exhibit sections of opening that became conduits for fluid flow and void spaces for precipitation of hydrothermal minerals; these sections are often surrounded by fractured and altered wall rock, presumably due to local stress concentrations and the influx of chemically reactive fluids. We are further developing the DDM with complementarity to add internal fluid pressure or normal cohesion along the fault surfaces, which are assigned independently of other contact properties, such as the frictional strength and coefficient of friction. While variable frictional strength or internal normal stress along a planar fault may produce opening or perturb the local stress state, these boundary conditions do not accurately mimic the mechanical behavior of faults with non-planar geometries. We advocate using the nomenclature 'lee' and 'stoss' to describe curved faults rather than 'releasing' and 'restraining bends', because the implied mechanical conditions are not necessarily met. Numerical experiments for idealized curved model faults demonstrate that fault opening can occur along lee sides of the curves, with the enhancing effects of fluid pressure and despite the countervailing effects of increased confining pressure with depth. Ambient effective compressive stresses

  17. Coupling of the magnetic field and gas flows in sunspot penumbra inferred from the Hinode/SOT observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shaltout, Abdelrazek Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    Sunspot penumbrae has been an enigmatic region that consists of fine scale filamentary structures harboring conspicuous gas flows known as the Evershed flow in the base of photosphere and the inverse-Evershed flow in higher layer. Recent high resolution observations including those by Hinode/SOT revealed that the penumbral magnetic field is highly fluctuating in its strength and inclination in space, and the geometry is called as interlocking comb structure. There is a strong coupling of the magnetic field and gas flow, i.e., many observational aspects suggest the origin of the sunspot penumbra as the vigorous thermal-convection of plasma under the inclined strong magnetic field of sunspots. However the relation between the magnetic field and gas flow is still an open issue to be settled. A number of observational and theoretical works suggest that the convective hot gas with a large flow speed is associated with a weak field. In this paper, we present an evidence of contradictory relation, i.e., a positive correlation between the field strength and flow velocity in photosphere. The geometry of the inverse-Evershed flow in conjunction with the interlocking magnetic field structure of penumbra is another issue that is not understood. We present an insight on the relation between the magnetic field structure and the inverse-Evershed flow based on the SOT/SP observations.

  18. Field geologic observation and sample collection strategies for planetary surface exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS geologist crewmembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W.

    2013-10-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic fieldwork, the Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crewmembers who participated in the 2010 field test. We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies related to duplication of samples and observations; logistical constraints on the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to "flexibly execute" their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  19. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory; 4, Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, B M

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by ISO at 6.7 and 15 micron in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirming these results (and, in one case, clarifying them) with independent visual searches. We find fifteen ISO sources to be reliably associated with bright [I(AB) < 23] galaxies in the HDF, and one with an I(AB)=19.9 star, while a further eleven are associated with objects in the Hubble Flanking Fields (ten galaxies and one star). Amongst optically bright HDF galaxies, ISO tends to detect luminous, star-forming galaxies at fairly high redshift and with disturbed morphologies, in preference to nearby ellipticals.

  20. Observation of the stray field of thin film magnetic tips using electron holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunedei, E.; Matteucci, G.; Frost, B.G.; Greve, J.

    1996-01-01

    The stray field around thin film ferromagnetic tips employed for magnetic force microscopy has been revealed using electron holography. The experimental phase difference maps are in good agreement with simulations. Quantitative flux measurements of the leakage field are obtained.

  1. Multiple Observing Modes for Wide-field Optical Surveillance of GEO Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.

    2016-09-01

    Very wide field of view optical sensors with silicon detectors are being used in multiple survey modes by J. T. McGraw and Associates to provide persistent, affordable surveillance of GEO space to faint limiting magnitudes. Examples include: classical staring mode with typical integration times of seconds provided by multiple co-directed sensors to provide a deep mosaic of tens of square degrees per exposure to faint limiting magnitude b) step-and-stare observations of several second integration time from which a continuous, overlapped, mosaicked image of GEO space can be provided time-delay and integrate (TDI) imagery obtained by driving the telescope in declination and stepping the telescope in the E-W direction, which produces repeated, overlapping (if desired), synoptic images of GEO space. With current 350 mm diameter optics, detection limits for concentrated observations (e.g. "neighborhood watch") detection limits of magnitude 18 are achieved, and for uncued survey the detection limits are fainter than magnitude 16. Each of these techniques can employ multiple telescopes to obtain search rates in excess of 1000 square degrees per hour, allowing complete uncued CONUS GEO surveillance to +/- 15 degrees latitude every two nighttime hours. With appropriate placement, sensors could provide complete coverage of GEO to these limiting magnitudes at the same survey rate. At each step of the development of this unique capability we discuss the fundamental underlying physical principals of optics, detectors, search modes and siting that enable this survey, a valuable adjunct to RF, radar, GEODSS and other optical surveys of GEO space.

  2. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Parsivel2 Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-07-01

    One of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Parsivel2 disdrometers was deployed at the first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil at the beginning of the second Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon)2014/15 intensive operational period (IOP2) in September 2014 through the end of the field campaign in December 2015. The Parsivel2 provided one-minute drop-size distribution (DSD) observations that have already been used for a number of applications related to GoAmazon2014/15 science objectives. The first use was the creation of a reflectivity-rain rate (Z-R) relation enabling the calculation of rain rates from the Brazilian Sistema de Protecao da Amazonia (SIPAM) S-band operational radar in Manaus. The radar-derived rainfall is an important constraint for the variational analysis of a large-scale forcing data set, which was recently released for the two IOPs that took place in the 2014 wet and transition seasons, respectively. The SIPAM radar rainfall is also being used to validate a number of cloud-resolving model simulations being run for the campaign. A second use of the Parsivel2 DSDs has been to provide a necessary reference point to calibrate the vertical velocity retrievals from the AMF1 W Band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) cloud-profiling and ultra-high-frequency (UHF) wind-profiling instruments. Accurate retrievals of in-cloud vertical velocities are important to understand the microphysical and kinematic properties of Amazonian convective clouds and their interaction with the land surface and atmospheric aerosols. Further use of the Parsivel2 DSD observations can be made to better understand precipitation characteristics and their variability during GoAmazon2014/15.

  3. Hořava Gravity in the Effective Field Theory formalism: From cosmology to observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Vernieri, Daniele; Hu, Bin; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    We consider Hořava gravity within the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy and modified gravity. We work out a complete mapping of the theory into the EFT language for an action including all the operators which are relevant for linear perturbations with up to sixth order spatial derivatives. We then employ an updated version of the EFTCAMB/EFTCosmoMC package to study the cosmology of the low-energy limit of Hořava gravity and place constraints on its parameters using several cosmological data sets. In particular we use cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature-temperature and lensing power spectra by Planck 2013, WMAP low- ℓ polarization spectra, WiggleZ galaxy power spectrum, local Hubble measurements, Supernovae data from SNLS, SDSS and HST and the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from BOSS, SDSS and 6dFGS. We get improved upper bounds, with respect to those from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, on the deviation of the cosmological gravitational constant from the local Newtonian one. At the level of the background phenomenology, we find a relevant rescaling of the Hubble rate at all epoch, which has a strong impact on the cosmological observables; at the level of perturbations, we discuss in details all the relevant effects on the observables and find that in general the quasi-static approximation is not safe to describe the evolution of perturbations. Overall we find that the effects of the modifications induced by the low-energy Hořava gravity action are quite dramatic and current data place tight bounds on the theory parameters.

  4. Kinetic simulations of electric field structure within magnetic island during magnetic reconnection and their applications to the satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Zhou, M.; Yuan, Z. G.; Deng, X. H.; Sahraoui, F.; Pang, Y.; Fu, S.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic islands are considered to play a crucial role in collisionless magnetic reconnection. We use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate electric field Ez structure in the magnetic islands (including primary and secondary islands) with and without a guide field during magnetic reconnection. It is found that the electric field has multilayers in the primary island and a large bipolar structure in the secondary island in the absence of guide field. The electric field is provided by the Hall term (J × B)z (mainly), the divergence of electron pressure tensor, and the convective term (Vi × B)z in the outer and the inner region of primary island, while the electric field is much smaller (~0) in the middle and the core region of primary island due to the cancelation of the three terms. The single bipolar electric field is primarily provided by the Hall term in the secondary island. In the presence of a guide field, the electric field has multiple layers in the primary island (similar to zero guide field case) and the secondary island. However, there still exists one single large sharp bipolar structure of electric field in the central region of the secondary island. The differences of electric field in the primary and secondary islands are essentially due to the variations of the current Jy. These features can be used as the observational criteria to identify different types of magnetic islands in the magnetosphere using the data of future mission, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission.

  5. Characterization of Buoyant Fluorescent Particles for Field Observations of Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Tauro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility of off-the-shelf buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in turbid water flows is investigated. Microspheres’ fluorescence intensity is experimentally measured and detected in placid aqueous suspensions of increasing concentrations of clay to simulate typical conditions occurring in natural drainage networks. Experiments are conducted in a broad range of clay concentrations and particle immersion depths by using photoconductive cells and image-based sensing technologies. Results obtained with both methodologies exhibit comparable trends and show that the considered particles are fairly detectable in critically turbid water flows. Further information on performance and integration of the studied microspheres in low-cost measurement instrumentation for field observations is obtained through experiments conducted in a custom built miniature water channel. This experimental characterization provides a first assessment of the feasibility of commercially available buoyant fluorescent beads in the analysis of high turbidity surface water flows. The proposed technology may serve as a minimally invasive sensing system for hazardous events, such as pollutant diffusion in natural streams and flash flooding due to extreme rainfall.

  6. Near Infrared Observations of GQ Lup b Using the Gemini Integral Field Spectrograph NIFS

    CERN Document Server

    Lavigne, Jean-Francois; Lafreniere, David; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2009-01-01

    We present new JHK spectroscopy (R ~ 5000) of GQ Lup b, acquired with the near-infrared integral field spectrograph NIFS and the adaptive optics system ALTAIR at the Gemini North telescope. Angular differential imaging was used in the J and H bands to suppress the speckle noise from GQ Lup A; we show that this approach can provide improvements in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) by a factor of 2 - 6 for companions located at subarcsecond separations. Based on high quality observations and GAIA synthetic spectra, we estimate the companion effective temperature to Teff = 2400 +/- 100 K, its gravity to log g = 4.0 +/- 0.5, and its luminosity to log(L/L_s) = -2.47 +/- 0.28. Comparisons with the predictions of the DUSTY evolutionary tracks allow us to constrain the mass of GQ Lup b to 8 - 60 MJup, most likely in the brown dwarf regime. Compared with the spectra published by Seifahrt and collaborators, our spectra of GQ Lup b are significantly redder (by 15 - 50%) and do not show important Pa\\beta emission. Our spectra ...

  7. Radio Galaxy 3C 230 Observed with Gemini Laser-Adaptive-Optics Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbring, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Altair laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility combined with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) on Gemini North have been employed to study the morphology and kinematics of 3C 230 at z=1.5, the first such observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy. These suggest a bi-polar outflow spanning 0"9 (~16 kpc projected distance for a standard lambda-CDM cosmology) reaching a mean relative velocity of 235 km/s in redshifted H-alpha + [NII] and [SII] emission. Structure is resolved to 0"1 (0.8 kpc), well correlated with optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array radio maps obtained at similar spatial resolution. Line diagnostics suggest that over the 10^7 yr to 10^8 yr duration of its AGN activity, gas has been ejected into bright turbulent lobes at rates comparable to star formation, although constituting perhaps only 1 percent of the baryonic mass in the galaxy.

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observations of Young Clusters. III. NGC 2264 and the Orion Flanking Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Rebull, L M; Micela, G; Ramírez, S V; Sciortino, S; Stauffer, J R; Strom, S E; Wolff, S C

    2006-01-01

    Chandra observations of solar-like pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the Orion Flanking Fields (age ~1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (~3 Myr) are compared with the results of the COUP survey of similar objects in the ONC (~0.5 Myr). The correlations between log Lx and mass found for PMS stars on convective tracks in these clusters are consistent with the relationships found for the ONC, indicating little change in the median values of either log Lx or log Lx/Lbol during the first ~3-5 Myr of evolution down convective tracks. The fraction of stars with extreme values of Lx, more than 10 times higher than the average for a given Lbol or with log Lx/Lbol greater than the canonical saturation value of -2.9, is however larger by a factor of two in the younger ONC when compared with the Orion FF and NGC 2264. PMS stars in NGC 2264 on radiative tracks have Lx/Lbol values that are systematically lower by a factor of ~10 times than those found for stars of similar mass on convective tracks. The dramatic decrease in flux from conve...

  9. The Southeast Asian Pholcus halabala species group (Araneae, Pholcidae: new data from field observations and ultrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard A. Huber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Southeast Asian Pholcus halabala species group is revised and re-delimited, based mainly on field observations (life color pattern, web design, position of egg-sac when carried by female, microhabitat and ultrastructure (silk spigots, modifications of male cheliceral apophyses. The core group includes six leafdwelling species that have distinctive color patterns in life specimens (black and white or yellowish abdominal marks, dark pattern on posterior half of carapace and build round to oval silk platforms on the undersides of leaves. Seven further species are tentatively assigned to the group pending further study. Several species originally assigned to the Pholcus halabala group are transferred to three newly proposed species groups, the Ph. krabi, Ph. buatong, and Ph. andulau groups. Nine species are newly described, four in the Ph. halabala group (Ph. khaolek Huber, sp. nov.; Ph. kuhapimuk Huber, sp. nov.; Ph. lintang Huber, sp. nov.; Ph. ubin Huber, sp. nov.; three in the Ph. krabi group (Ph. kipungit Huber, sp. nov.; Ph. krabi Huber, sp. nov.; Ph. narathiwat Huber, sp. nov.; one in the Ph. buatong group (Ph. buatong Huber, sp. nov.; and one in the Ph. andulau group (Ph. lambir Huber, sp. nov.. The females of Ph. satun Huber, 2011 and Ph. schwendingeri Huber, 2011 (both members of the buatong group are newly described.

  10. Interaction among non-toxic phytoplankton, toxic phytoplankton and zooplankton: inferences from field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shovonlal; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Das, Partha; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2007-02-01

    We explore the mutual dependencies and interactions among different groups of species of the plankton population, based on an analysis of the long-term field observations carried out by our group in the North-West coast of the Bay of Bengal. The plankton community is structured into three groups of species, namely, non-toxic phytoplankton (NTP), toxic phytoplankton (TPP) and zooplankton. To find the pair-wise dependencies among the three groups of plankton, Pearson and partial correlation coefficients are calculated. To explore the simultaneous interaction among all the three groups, a time series analysis is performed. Following an Expectation Maximization (E-M) algorithm, those data points which are missing due to irregularities in sampling are estimated, and with the completed data set a Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) model is analyzed. The overall analysis demonstrates that toxin-producing phytoplankton play two distinct roles: the inhibition on consumption of toxic substances reduces the abundance of zooplankton, and the toxic materials released by TPP significantly compensate for the competitive disadvantages among phytoplankton species. Our study suggests that the presence of TPP might be a possible cause for the generation of a complex interaction among the large number of phytoplankton and zooplankton species that might be responsible for the prolonged coexistence of the plankton species in a fluctuating biomass.

  11. Kinematic properties of double-barred galaxies: simulations vs. integral-field observations

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Using high resolution $N$-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS$^{3D}$ and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in $\\sigma_\\mathrm{LOS}$ along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term "$\\sigma$-humps", that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased $\\sigma_\\mathrm{LOS}$, (3) $h_3-\\bar{v}$ anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive $h_4$ when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the $\\sigma$-humps, these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative...

  12. Polarization leakage in Epoch of Reionization windows: I. LOFAR observations of the 3C196 field

    CERN Document Server

    Asad, Khan M B; Jelić, Vibor; Pandey, V N; Ghosh, Abhik; Abdalla, F B; Bernardi, G; Brentjens, M A; de Bruyn, A G; Bus, S; Ciardi, B; Chapman, E; Daiboo, S; Fernandez, E R; Harker, G; Iliev, I T; Jensen, H; Martinez-Rubi, O; Mellema, G; Mevius, M; Offringa, A R; Patil, A H; Schaye, J; Thomas, R M; van der Tol, S; Vedantham, H K; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the cosmological 21-cm signal coming from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is challenging in the presence of astrophysical foregrounds and direction (in)dependent systematic errors of the instrument. Even after removing the foregrounds, the residual Stokes I maps contain, in addition to the system noise, the polarized foreground leaked from Stokes Q, U due to systematic and random errors which can mimic the EoR signal. Here we discuss the systematic errors, especially the primary beam, of LOFAR and present realistic simulations of the leakages caused by them. We made a Stokes Q, U sky model of the Galactic diffuse emission based on the LOFAR observations of the 3C196 field, simulated the full-Stokes visibilities that would be produced by LOFAR in the presence of its nominal model beam, created RM-cubes and the cylindrically and spherically averaged 3D power spectra (PS), and compared them with the PS of a simulated EoR signal. From the spherical PS, we found that at 134-166 MHz, within the central...

  13. Drainage events from a glacier-dammed lake, Bear Glacier, Alaska: Remote sensing and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, A. C.; Wade, A. A.; Evans, E. G.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated drainage events from a glacier-dammed lake on Bear Glacier, Alaska, and associated outburst floods and hazards. The glacier-dammed lake, which we call Ice Lake, is 17.5 km up-glacier from Bear Glacier's terminus at Bear Glacier Lake. We combine field observations and remote sensing to examine temporal changes in the size of Ice Lake, the frequency and timing of its drainage, and down-glacier propagation of its outburst floods. We found that in recent years, Ice Lake has likely drained every year or two, in late summer or fall (August-October), with outbursts generally following the damming of sufficient water to create a lake area of between 0.35 and 0.5 km2. Ice Lake has migrated downvalley to the south since the 1990s, likely as a result of thinning of the glacier that dams it. In situ measurements of a drainage event in October 2010 showed that Ice Lake drained over a period of days, which manifested at Bear Glacier Lake as a gradual, multiday increase and then decrease in water levels. Glacial lake outburst flooding at Bear Glacier creates risks for sea kayakers in Bear Glacier Lake and may be relevant to understanding the effects of climate warming on glacier-dammed and proglacial lakes.

  14. Numerical simulations and observations of surface wave fields under an extreme tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Wright, C.W.; Walsh, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the wave model WAVEWATCH III under a very strong, category 5, tropical cyclone wind forcing is investigated with different drag coefficient parameterizations and ocean current inputs. The model results are compared with field observations of the surface wave spectra from an airborne scanning radar altimeter, National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) time series, and satellite altimeter measurements in Hurricane Ivan (2004). The results suggest that the model with the original drag coefficient parameterization tends to overestimate the significant wave height and the dominant wavelength and produces a wave spectrum with narrower directional spreading. When an improved drag parameterization is introduced and the wave-current interaction is included, the model yields an improved forecast of significant wave height, but underestimates the dominant wavelength. When the hurricane moves over a preexisting mesoscale ocean feature, such as the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico or a warm-and cold-core ring, the current associated with the feature can accelerate or decelerate the wave propagation and significantly modulate the wave spectrum. ?? 2009 American Meteorological Society.

  15. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  16. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  17. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles 60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on upwind (windward) face of the tilting wave. Retrieval of Bragg roughness properties shows that omni-directional saturation spectra at ~1000 rad/m are 2-3 times higher (0.01 at 10 m/s wind speed) than the spectra obtained from optical measurements of regular sea surface without wave breaking. This suggests that observed difference can arise

  18. Electromagnetic field interactions with the human body: Observed effects and theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of nonionizing electromagnetic (EM) field interactions with the human body were reported and human related studies were collected. Nonionizing EM fields are linked to cancer in humans in three different ways: cause, means of detection, and effective treatment. Bad and benign effects are expected from nonionizing EM fields and much more knowledge is necessary to properly categorize and qualify EM field characteristics. It is concluded that knowledge of the boundary between categories, largely dependent on field intensity, is vital to proper future use of EM radiation for any purpose and the protection of the individual from hazard.

  19. Anisotropic viscosity and fabric evolution from laboratory experiments and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars; Warren, Jessica; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David; Skemer, Philip; Hirth, Greg

    2013-04-01

    viscosities are ~1 order of magnitude larger in the unfavorable orientation than in the favorable orientation. The results of these experiments are used to model strain localization in a shear zone in the Josephine Peridotite (SW Oregon) in which crystallographic fabrics follow a similar evolution to that observed in our second set of experiments (Warren et al., EPSL, 2008). Synthetic strain profiles calculated using measured water contents, grain sizes, and laboratory-derived flow laws cannot reproduce the observed degree of strain localization. Viscous anisotropy is included in the calculation by incorporating a fabric tensor into laboratory-derived flow laws. The elements of this tensor are derived from the results of the deformation experiments. The rotation rate of the fabric anisotropy relative to the reference frame of the shear zone is defined using the crystallographic fabric evolution observed in the field. The degree of localization is more closely approximated when fabric evolution is taken into account, demonstrating that viscous anisotropy is an important component in the formation of lithospheric shear zones.

  20. Experimental observation of further frequency upshift from dc to ac radiation converter with perpendicular dc magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi; Yugami; Gao; Niiyama; Sasaki; Takahashi; Ito; Nishida

    2000-11-20

    A frequency upshift of a short microwave pulse is generated by the interaction between a relativistic underdense ionization front and a periodic electrostatic field with a perpendicular dc magnetic field. When the dc magnetic field is applied, further frequency upshift of 3 GHz is observed with respect to an unmagnetized case which has typically a GHz range. The radiation frequency depends on both the plasma density and the strength of the dc magnetic field, i.e., the plasma frequency and the cyclotron frequency. The frequency of the emitted radiation is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical values.

  1. On Alfvenic Waves and Stochastic Ion Heating with 1Re Observations of Strong Field-aligned Currents, Electric Fields, and O+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra

    2008-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling makes it a very dynamic region having similar fundamental processes to those within the auroral regions. With Polar passing through the cusp at 1 Re in the Spring of 1996, we observe a strong correlation between ion heating and broadband ELF (BBELF) emissions. This commonly observed relationship led to the study of the coupling of large field-aligned currents, burst electric fields, and the thermal O+ ions. We demonstrate the role of these measurements to Alfvenic waves and stochastic ion heating. Finally we will show the properties of the resulting density cavities.

  2. Improving our knowledge of the rapid geomagnetic field intensity variation observed in Europe around 800 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.; Dufresne, P.; Kovacheva, M.; Hill, M. J.; Beamud, E.; Gutiérrez-Lloret, S.; Cañavate, V.; Blain, S.; Bouvier, A.; Oberlin, C.; Guibert, P.; Sapin, C.; Pringent, D.

    2011-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes. The aim of this study is to obtain an improved description of the sharp geomagnetic intensity change that took place in Western Europe around 800 yrs AD as well as to investigate if this peak is observed at a continental scale. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, 4 archeological French kilns and a 3 collections of bricks used for the construction of different historical buildings from France and with ages ranging between 330 to 1290 AD have been studied. The material collected has been dated by archeological/historical constraints together with radiocarbon,thermoluminiscence (TL) and archeomagentic analysis. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 164 specimens (119 of them giving reliable results) ten new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. The new intensity data together with a selection of the most reliable data from Western Europe have been relocated to the latitude of Paris and confirm the existence of an intensity maxima of ~85 μT centred at ~850 AD and related to intensity changes up to 20 μT per century. The results also indicate that a previous abrupt intensity change (reaching a maximum value of ~ 90 μT) took place in Western Europe around 650 AD. A selection of high-quality intensity data from Bulgaria, Italy and Greece indicate a very similar intensity trend for Eastern Europe. Although available data indicate that the duration of such periods of high intensities may be of less than one century more data are needed to infer the exact duration of these maximums. A comparison between the selected data and regional and global geomagnetic field models indicates that

  3. Models of field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substorm variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Volkov

    Full Text Available We have used the global numerical model of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere-protonosphere system to simulate the electric-field, ion- and electron-temperature and -concentration variations observed by EISCAT during the substorm event of 25 March 1987. In our previous studies we adopted the model input data for field-aligned currents and precipitating electron fluxes to obtain an agreement between observed and modelled ionospheric variations. Now, we have calculated the field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substrom variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT. The calculations of the field-aligned currents have been performed by means of numerical integration of the time-dependent continuity equation for the cold magnetospheric electrons. This equation was added to the system of the modelling equations including the equation for the electric-field potential to be solved jointly. In this case the inputs of the model are the spatial and time variations of the electric-field potential at the polar-cap boundaries and those of the cold magnetospheric electron concentration which have been adopted to obtain the agreement between the observed and modelled ionospheric variations for the substorm event of 25 March 1987. By this means it has been found that during the active phase of the substorm the current wedge is formed. It is connected with the region of the decreased cold magnetospheric electron content travelling westwards with a velocity of about 1 km s–1 at ionospheric levels.

  4. Linking field observations, Landsat and MODIS data to estimate agricultural change in European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, K. M.; Ioffe, G.

    2011-12-01

    and photographs. Russian farmers employ a variety of crop-rotation schemes. In the Russian grain belt, the farmers used to be on a seven-year rotation, which typically included only one year of fallow and a variety of grain crops in the remaining six years. Through field interviews and satellite observations we learned that the crop rotation schedules are changing from a seven year crop cycle focused on grain production to a three year crop cycle focused on the production of sunflower which is currently most profitable. In addition, a switch is underway from the dominant growth of spring wheat to stronger reliance on winter wheat which has better growth potential in the area. The number of cropped years, or the complementary number of fallow years, gives an indication of the type of crop cycle that is applied. In addition, drier areas are predicted to reveal more fallow years due to decisions by farm administrators. We will discuss how the ongoing changes represent adaptations to changing climatological and social circumstances.

  5. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...... of the source region, the core-mantle boundary, we present maps of the detailed structure of the geodynamo, and how this is presently evolving. Both the trend (secular variation) and accelerations in the field changes since the launch of the Swarm mission will be presented. Assuming that field changes...

  6. Observation of thunderstorms by multilevel electric field measurement system and radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soula, S.; Sauvageot, H.; Saissac, M. P.; Chauzy, S.

    1995-03-01

    During the summer of 1992, an experiment was conducted in southwestern France, close to the Pyrenees, at the Centre de Recherches Atmospheriques (CRA) in order to study the evolution of the electric field measured at several levels below thunderclouds. We used a field mill flush to the ground and four field sensors, suspended from an insulated cable and distributed between 0 and 48 m. These altitude sensors separately measure the ambient electric field and the field created by the sensor itself. The Rabelais millimetric radar provides reflectivities and Doppler velocities of cloud and rain systems. Meteorological data like wind velocity, humidity, temperature, and rainfall rate are recorded at the site. Two storm intervals are studied, one on July 30 and one on August 6. Both examples give an idea on how the electric field signature during the development or advection of a convective cloud can be different at the ground and at altitudes of a few tens of meters.

  7. Magnetic fields around late-type stars using water maser observations

    CERN Document Server

    Vlemmings, W H T; Diamond, P J

    2005-01-01

    We present the analysis of the circular polarization, due to Zeeman splitting, of the water masers around a sample of late-type stars to determine the magnetic fields in their circumstellar envelopes. The magnetic field strengths in the water maser regions around the Mira variable stars U Ori and U Her are shown to be several Gauss while those of the supergiants S Per, NML Cyg and VY CMa are several hundred mG. We also show that large scale magnetic fields permeate the CSE of an evolved star; the polarization of the water masers around VX Sgr reveals a dipole field structure. We shortly discuss the coupling of the magnetic field with the stellar outflow, as such fields could possibly be the cause of distinctly aspherical mass-loss and the resulting aspherical planetary nebulae.

  8. THEMIS multispacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with symmetric boundary conditions and a large guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Fujimoto, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    2017-08-01

    We report three spacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with a guide field of unity, with THEMIS D (THD) and THEMIS E (THE)/THEMIS A (THA) observing oppositely directed reconnection exhausts, indicating the presence of an X line between the spacecraft. The near-constant convective speed of the magnetosheath current sheet allowed the direct translation of the observed time series into spatial profiles. THD observed asymmetries in the plasma density and temperature profiles across the exhaust, characteristics of symmetric reconnection with a guide field. The exhausts at THE and THA, on the other hand, were not the expected mirror image of the THD exhaust in terms of the plasma and field profiles. They consisted of a main outflow at the center of the current sheet, flanked by oppositely directed flows at the two edges of the current sheet, suggesting the presence of a second X line, whose outflow wraps around the outflow from the first X line.

  9. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  10. The Nature of Crustal Seismic Anisotropy: Constraints From Field and Rock Physics Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, N. I.; Okaya, D.; Meltzer, A.

    2006-12-01

    Compared with mantle seismic anisotropy studies, which have been active for almost five decades, anisotropy of the crystalline crust has been only rarely studied. Seismic anisotropy within continental tectonic provinces is however important because it provides earth scientists with a powerful tool for measuring and quantifying deformation within the crust. Preferred mineral alignment observed in metamorphic terranes produced during metamorphism by recrystallization is associated with planar structures such as slaty cleavage, schistosity, and gneissic layering. These structures are often pervasive for tens to hundreds of kilometers in major collision zones and produce significant compressional wave seismic anisotropy as well as shear wave splitting. Observations of crustal anisotropy within (1) slates of the chlorite subzone of the Haast schist terrane of South Island, New Zealand, (2) prehnite-pumpellite to lower greenschist facies slates and phyllites of the Taiwan Slate Belt, (3) greenschist faces phyllites and metagraywackes of the Valdez Group Chugach terrane in southern Alaska, and (4) amphibolite facies quartzofeldspathic gneisses, approaching granulite grade, within the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif demonstrate that crustal anisotropy is not limited to rocks of any particular metamorphic grade and thus can be present at all crustal levels. Laboratory studies of compressional and shear wave velocities provide important constraints on the magnitudes and symmetries of anisotropies at various crustal levels within these orogenic zones. Although compositional layering can produce anisotropy, preferred mineral orientation of highly anisotropic single crystals, resulting from metamorphic recrystallization, is the major contributor. Most metamorphic rocks show significant compressional and shear wave anisotropy. Anisotropy is a particularly important parameter in low grade pelitic rocks such as phyllite and slate and can be as high as 20%. For the medium grade

  11. Reservoir Changes Derived from Seismic Observations at The Geysers Geothermal Field, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, R.; Jarpre, S.

    2012-04-01

    Induced seismicity associated with the exploitation of geothermal fields is used as a tool to characterize and delineate changes associated with injection and production of fluids from the reservoir. At the same time public concern of felt seismicity has led to objections against the operation of geothermal reservoirs in close proximity to population centers. Production at the EGS sites in Basel (Switzerland) was stopped after renewed seismicity caused concern and objection from the public in the city. Operations in other geothermal reservoirs had to be scaled back or interrupted due to an unexpected increase in seismicity (Soultz-sous-forêt, France, Berlín, El Salvador). As a consequence of these concerns and in order to optimize the use of induced seismicity for reservoir engineering purposes, it becomes imperative to understand the relationship between seismic events and stress changes in the reservoir. We will address seismicity trends at The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir, CA USA, to understand the role of historical seismicity associated with past injection of water and/or production of steam. Our analysis makes use of a comprehensive database of earthquakes and associated phase arrivals from 2004 to 2011. A high-precision sub-set of the earthquake data was selected to analyze temporal changes in seismic velocities and Vp/Vs-ratio throughout the whole reservoir. We find relatively low Vp/Vs values in 2004 suggestive of a vapor dominated reservoir. With passing time, however, the observed temporal increase in Vp/Vs, coupled with a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities suggests the presence of fluid-filled fractured rock. Considering the start of a continuous water injection project in 2004, it can be concluded that the fluid saturation of the reservoir has successfully recovered. Preliminary results of 3-D velocity inversions of seismic data appear to corroborate earlier findings that the lowest Vp/Vs estimates are observed in the center of the reservoir

  12. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...

  13. Development with MESSENGER Data of a Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Confined within the Average Observed Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Al Asad, M.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a Harris sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current is fit to minimize the root mean square residual between the magnetic field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER and the model field. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function consisting of Cartesian harmonic expansions with linear and non-linear coefficients, which are fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model resembles the observed magnetic field better than the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause, i.e., at northern high latitudes and on the dayside. It will allow more accurate characterization of crustal magnetization, which may be observed during low-altitude orbits in the final months of the MESSENGER mission.

  14. Null Arguments in Transitional Trilingual Grammars: Field Observations from Misionero German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Michael T.; Lipski, John

    2016-01-01

    In this field note we discuss findings from pilot research on a variety of heritage German spoken in the Northeastern Province of Misiones of Argentina. Based on sociolinguistic field interviews with 25 consultants possessing varying degrees of proficiency in the language, we show that this variant of heritage German does in fact occasionally…

  15. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  16. Reconnection Guide Field and Quadrupolar Structure Observed by MMS on 16 October 2015 at 1307 UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R. E.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Hasagawa, H.; Phan, T. D.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the guide field near the X point, B(sub M0), for a magnetopause crossing by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft at 1307 UT on 16 October 2015 that showed features of electron-scale reconnection. This component of the magnetic field is normal to the reconnection plane L-N containing the reconnection magnetic field, B(sub L), and the direction e(sub N) normal to the current sheet. The B(sub M) field component appears to approximately have quadrupolar structure close to the X point. Using several different methods to estimate values of the guide field near the X point, some of which use an assumed quadrupolar symmetry, we find values ranging between -3.1 nT and -1.2 nT, with a nominal value of about -2.5 nT. The rough consistency of these values is evidence that the quadrupolar structure exists.

  17. Turbulent magnetic fields in the quiet Sun: implications of Hinode observations and small-scale dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Jonathan Pietarila; Schuessler, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Using turbulent MHD simulations (magnetic Reynolds numbers up to 8000) and Hinode observations, we study effects of turbulence on measuring the solar magnetic field outside active regions. Firstly, from synthetic Stokes V profiles for the FeI lines at 630.1 and 630.2 nm, we show that a peaked probability distribution function (PDF) for observationally-derived field estimates is consistent with a monotonic PDF for actual vertical field strengths. Hence, the prevalence of weak fields is greater than would be naively inferred from observations. Secondly, we employ the fractal self-similar geometry of the turbulent solar magnetic field to derive two estimates (numerical and observational) of the true mean vertical unsigned flux density. We also find observational evidence that the scales of magnetic structuring in the photosphere extend at least down to an order of magnitude smaller than 200 km: the self-similar power-law scaling in the signed measure from a Hinode magnetogram ranges (over two decades in length s...

  18. Infectious bronchitis in Brazilian chickens: current data and observations of field service personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EN Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The infectious bronchitis virus (IBV was detected for the first time in Brazil by Hipólito in 1957 in chickens sold life in the municipal market of Belo Horizonte, MG, when commercial poultry production was just starting in that country. The Massachusetts (Mass serotype was identified. However, the clinical disease was only observed in 1975, when poultry production was intensely growing. The extensive outbreak produced the classical condition in layers and breeders, affecting egg production and quality, whereas broilers presented respiratory and "nephritis-nephrosis" signs. The disease rapidly spread to all poultry-producing regions in the country, and in 1979, both the imports and the manufacturing of live vaccines against IB strains Mass, H120 and H52, were licensed. In 1980, inactivated vaccines were introduced. Molecular techniques, particularly PCR, started to bed in the identification of IBV. A retrospective analysis showed that, up to 1989, the main IBV strain circulating in Brazil was Mass. However, other studies shows the presence of a wide diversity of IBV strains in Brazil since the first strains were isolated, even before vaccination was introduced. Most researchers agree that the incidence of IBV different from Mass has increased, including of exclusively Brazilian genotypes, different from those described in other countries. Indeed, during the last few years, the number of genotypical variants has been much higher than that of the classical Mass serotype. Clinically, in addition of the classic presentations, atypical forms such as testicular atrophy and stones in the epidydimis associated to low fertility have been described. Serological techniques started to be used in vaccination monitoring and as a diagnostic tool. Serological response standards were developed, and have shown to be very useful to determine the expected profile in vaccination programs and when clinical disease is suspected. However, the immuno-enzymatic test

  19. Partial Dissolution of Charge Order Phase Observed in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 Single Crystal Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Moritoshi, Norifumi; Kuniyoshi, Shigekazu; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Masu, Hyuma

    2016-04-01

    The effect of an applied gate electric field on the charge-order phase in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 single-crystal field-effect transistor structure was observed at around room temperature by technical improvement with respect to sample preparation and electrical measurements. A relatively slight but systematic increase of the electrical conductance induced by the applied gate electric field and its temperature dependence was observed at around the metal-insulator transition temperature (TMI). The temperature dependence of the modulated electrical conductance demonstrated that TMI was shifted toward the lower side by application of a gate electric field, which corresponds to partial dissolution of the charge-order phase. The thickness of the partially dissolved charge order region was estimated to be several score times larger than the charge accumulation region.

  20. The magnetic field configuration of a solar prominence inferred from spectropolarimetric observations in the He I 10830 A triplet

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, David Orozco; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2014-01-01

    Context: The determination of the magnetic field vector in quiescent solar prominences is possible by interpreting the Hanle and Zeeman effects in spectral lines. However, observational measurements are scarce and lack high spatial resolution. Aims: To determine the magnetic field vector configuration along a quiescent solar prominence by interpreting spectropolarimetric measurements in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter installed at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide. Methods. The He I 1083.0 nm triplet Stokes profiles are analyzed with an inversion code that takes into account the physics responsible of the polarization signals in this triplet. The results are put into a solar context with the help of extreme ultraviolet observations taken with the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites. Results: For the most probable magnetic field vector configuration, the analysis depicts a mean field streng...

  1. What can we really learn about Magnetic Fields in Galaxy Clusters from Faraday Rotation observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Rave, Gilad; Waxman, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We construct a simple and robust approach for deriving constraints on magnetic fields in galaxy clusters from rotation measure (RM) maps. Relaxing the commonly used assumptions of a correlation between the magnetic field strength and the plasma density and of a power-law (in wave number) magnetic field power spectrum, and using an efficient numerical analysis method, we test the consistency of a wide range of magnetic field models with RM maps of 11 extended sources in 5 clusters, for which the data were made available to us. We show that the data reveal no indication for a radial dependence of the average magnetic field strength, and in particular no indication for a correlation between the gas density and the field strength. The RM maps of a considerable fraction of the sources either require or are consistent with the presence of a spatially uniform magnetic field of a relatively small strength, 0.02-0.3 muG, which contributes significantly to the RM. The RM maps of all but one source do not require a powe...

  2. Observation of a strong interplanar electric field in a dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, V. L.; Fedorov, V. V.; Lapin, E. G.; Leushkin, E. K.; Rumiantsev, V. L.; Sumbaev, O. I.; Voronin, V. V.

    1989-11-01

    The first experimental study of the Schwinger interaction of polarized neutrons with an electric field of a noncentrosymmetric perfect crystal (α-quartz) was made for two wave dynamical diffraction. Phase shifts of Pendellösung fringes for two different spin to crystal field orientations were measured. The theory of the effect is given. The calculated value of SiO2 (11 overline20) interplanar electr field, seen by the diffracted neutron, is 2.1 × 10 8 V/cm. This is in good agreement with the experimental result: (1.8 ± 0.3) × 10 8 V/cm.

  3. 3-D modelling the electric field due to ocean tidal flow and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, A.; Junge, A.; Utada, H.

    2006-01-01

    of the global distribution of the electric signal due to tidal ocean flow. We simulate the electric signals for two tidal constituents - lunar semidiurnal (M2) and diurnal (O1) tides. We assume a realistic Earth's conductivity model with a surface thin shell and 1-D mantle underneath. Simulations demonstrate......The tidal motion of the ocean water through the ambient magnetic field, generates secondary electric field. This motionally induced electric field can be detected in the sea or inland and has a potential for electrical soundings of the Earth. A first goal of the paper is to gain an understanding...

  4. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  5. On observation of neutron quantum states in the Earth's gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankov, Anatoli Andrei

    2010-03-01

    Observation of neutron gravitational quantum states En=mgzn in the peV energy range (z1 is about 10μm in the vertical direction) in the experiment conducted at Laue-Langevin Institute, Grenoble, with ultracold neutrons was recently reported in a series of publications. The purpose of the present work is to analyze the experiment. The experimental apparatus is designed to measure a transmission function T(za), namely, a horizontal flux of relatively fast neutrons (k≫kz in wavelength terms) passing through a slit of variable height za of upper absorbing wall. The quantum states in question are defined by the so-called Airy functions, which are solutions to the stationary 1D equation for a neutron “bouncing” above the perfect mirror in a linear potential field. The Airy functions describe the quantum bouncer (QB), the concept of which is subject to theoretical study of toy 1D models of gravitationally bound particles in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics (QM). This is essentially different from the 3D nonstationary QM object, “the running QB,” investigated in the experiment. The authors assume that there is a connection between T(za) and the probability density distribution P(z,za) for QB states. They devised the “phenomenological model,” in which the quantum pattern should be visible in the transmission curve. We argue, however, that the measured curve T(za) is not sensitive to QB states. Instead, it is sensitive to dynamics of neutron horizontal transport inside the absorbing slit for neutrons of energy values about 105 times greater than eigenvalues En. The latter are related to the neutron transverse mode kz and cannot be termed “energies of neutron gravitational quantum states.” We conclude that the experiment setup and real conditions are not adequate to the claimed objective, and the methodology of measured data treatment is flawed. The authors’ claim that “neutron gravitational quantum states are observed” is neither theoretically nor

  6. Geometry of the 1954 Fairview Peak-Dixie Valley earthquake sequence from a joint inversion of leveling and triangulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, K.M.; Stein, R.S.; Marshall, G.

    1996-01-01

    In 1954, four earthquakes greater than Ms=6.0 occurred within a 30-km radius and in a period of 6 months. Elevation and angle changes calculated from repeated leveling and triangulation surveys which span the coseismic period provide constraints on the fault geometries and coseismic slip of the faults which were activated. The quality of the coseismic geodetic data is assessed. Corrections are applied to the leveling data for subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in the Fallon area, and a rod miscalibration error of 150??30 ppm is isolated in leveling surveys made in 1967. The leveling and triangulation observations are then simultaneously inverted using the single value decomposition (SVD) inversion method to determine fault geometries and coseismic slip. Using SVD, it is possible to determine on which faults slip is resolvable given the data distribution. The faults are found to dip between 50?? and 80?? and extend to depths of 5 to 14 km. The geodetically derived slip values are generally equal to, or greater than, the maximum observed displacement along the surface scarps. Where slip is resolvable the geodetic data indicates the 1954 sequence contained a significant component of right-lateral slip. This is consistent with the N15??W trending shear zone which geodetic surveys have detected in western Nevada. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Stress and Permeability Heterogeneity within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir: Recent Results from Well 82-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. H. Hickman; M. D. Zoback; C. A. Barton; R. Benoit; J. Svitek; R. Summers

    1999-12-01

    We collected borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and conducted a hydraulic fracturing test in a well (82-5) that penetrated the SFZ within the known boundaries of the geothermal field but which failed to encounter significant permeability. Although stuck drill pipe prevented direct access to the SFZ, borehole breakouts and cooling cracks indicated a {approximately}90 degree rotation in the azimuth of the least horizontal principal stress (Shmin) in well 82-5 at about 2.7 km depth. This rotation, together with the low (Shmin) magnitude measured at 2.5 km depth in well 82-5, is most readily explained through the occurrences of one or more normal faulting earthquakes in the hanging wall of the SFZ in the northern part of the reservoir. The orientation of (Shmin) below 2.7 km (i.e., {approximately}20 to 50 m above the top of the SFZ) is such that both the overall SFZ and natural fractures directly above the SFZ are optimally oriented for normal faulting failure. If these fracture and stress orient ations persist into the SFZ itself, then the existence of a local stress relief zone (i.e., anormalously high (Shmin) magnitude) is the most likely explanation for the very low fault zone permeability encountered in well 82-5.

  8. DACCIWA Cloud-Aerosol Observations in West Africa Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J Christine [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Blanchard, Yann [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Hill, Peter [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Gregory, Laurie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Interactions between aerosols and clouds, and their effects on radiation, precipitation, and regional circulations, are one of the largest uncertainties in understanding climate. With reducing uncertainties in predictions of weather, climate, and climate impacts in mind, the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project, funded by the European Commission, set out to improve our understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions in southern West Africa. This region is ideal for studying cloud-aerosol interactions because of its rich mix of natural and anthropogenic aerosols and diverse clouds, and because of the strong dependence on the regional and global climate of the sensitive West African monsoon. The overview of DACCIWA is described in Knippertz et al. 2015. The interdisciplinary DACCIWA team includes not only several European and African universities, but also Met Centres in the UK, France, Germany, Switzerland, Benin, Ghana, and Nigeria. One of the crucial research activities in DACCIWA is the major field campaign in southern West Africa from June to July 2016, comprising a benchmark data set for assessing detailed processes on natural and anthropogenic emissions; atmospheric composition; air pollution and its impacts on human and ecosystem health; boundary layer processes; couplings between aerosols, clouds, and rainfall; weather systems; radiation; and the monsoon circulation. Details and highlights of the campaign can be found in Flamant et al. 2017. To provide aerosol/cloud microphysical and optical properties that are essential for model evaluations and for the linkage between ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne observations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility loaned two sun photometers to the DACCWIA team for the campaign from June 8 to July 29, 2016. The first sun photometer was deployed at Kumasi, Ghana (6.67962°N, 1.56019°W) by the University of Leeds

  9. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  10. Initial Determinations of Ionospheric Electric Fields and Joule Heating from MAVEN Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Fogle, A. L.; Aleryani, O.; Dunn, P.; Lillis, R. J.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R.

    2015-12-01

    MAVEN provides in-situ measurements of the neutral and ion species as well as the magnetic field throughout the ionosphere of Mars. By combining these measurements, we are able to calculate both the ionospheric currents and the ionospheric conductivity. It is then straightforward to determine the electric field in the collisional ionosphere from a simplified Ohm's law. In addition, we can also estimate the amount of Joule heating in the ionosphere from j · E. Here, we show initial determinations of both ionospheric electric fields and Joule heating using MAVEN data. The electric fields are highly variable from orbit-to-orbit suggesting that the ionospheric electrodynamics can change on timescales of several hours. These changes may be driven by changes in the upstream solar wind and IMF or may result from dynamical variations of thermospheric neutral winds.

  11. Field-aligned current observed on ISEE-2 in the innermagnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐荣栏; 王左丁; 谢榴香; 杨龙

    1995-01-01

    Field-aligned currents in the inner magnetosphere arc studied by using ISEE-2 magnetometer da-la, A method is proposed to calculate ×B with single-satellite data. From the morphology of ×B in time (or L). a lot of large fluctuations are found in ×B near L = 5.5RE corresponding to the field-aligned currents. Statistical study shows that the field-aligned current in the inner magnetosphere is a function of B, L, MLT and AL. The region of the projections of ×B along the magnetic field line onto the ionosphere is not symmetrical for the geomagnetic pole. The inner boundary is independent of the geomagnetic disturbance, but during substorms the outer boundary shifts equatorward. The spatial distribution of the in- and out-flowing currents is complicated. The region-1-and-2 system is hardly distinguishable.

  12. a Study on the SAR Data Observation Time for the Classification of Planting Condition of Paddy Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, A.; Kondo, A.; Mochizuki, K.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, cultivation methods of rice have been diversified due to the low cost of rice-growing techniques. For example, there is direct sowing of seed rice in paddy field in addition to the practice of usual paddy field to flooding at the time of planting. The yield of the usual paddy field and the direct sowing is different even though the same varieties are grown in the same area. It is necessary to grasp by performing classification for the usual paddy field or direct sowing for the management of agricultural crops. The main objective of this study was to select the observation time for the classification of paddy fields' planting conditions by utilizing Synthetic Aperture Radar TerraSAR-X satellite. The planting conditions included the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean. We selected the observation time by the statistical distance of the microwave backscattering in each paddy field for maximizing the planting condition classification. In addition, the satellite data observation timing considered the processing time of the analysis and the acquisition costs. The acquisition was performed 4 periods from 2 periods in the rice growing season and the planting phase. In the current study, we were able to classify the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean by TerraSAR-X data for the later planting of rice during mid-May and initial growth of rice in early June.

  13. Voltage spike observation in superconducting cable-in-conduit conductor under ramped magnetic fields. Pt. 1: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangkwon Jeong; Schultz, J.H.; Takayasu, Makoto; Vysotsky, Vitaly; Michael, P.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Warnes, William [Oregan State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Shen, Stewart [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A 27-strand hybrid superconducting cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) was fabricated and tested under quickly-ramped high magnetic fields. When the field increased linearly on the CICC, the voltage signal showed several intermittent spikes before it quenched. This paper describes an observation of peculiar voltage spikes during these ramp-rate limitation experiments. The voltage spikes are interpreted as quench precursors and understood as current redistribution events within the local cable inside the conduit. A quantitative correlation is obtained for the magnetic field at which the first voltage spike occurs during ramping fields. The non-uniform current distribution among the strands and the induced loop current in the cable, which is generated by ramped fields, are found to be responsible for the voltage spikes. (author)

  14. Observations of flux motion in niobium films. [study of magnetic field trapped in superconducting coatings of gyroscope rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y. M.; Keiser, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic field trapped in a superconducting sphere was examined at temperatures from 4.6 K to 5.5 K. The sphere was the rotor of a precision gyroscope and was made of fused quartz and coated with a sputtered niobium film. The rotor diameter was 3.8 cm. The film thickness was 2.5 microns. The tests were carried out at an ambient magnetic field of about 1 mG. Unexpected instability of the trapped field was observed. The experimental results and possible explanations are presented.

  15. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  16. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  17. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Temporal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from STS. The data demonstrate that masoscale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of about 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are about I min for meso-scale currents and about 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  18. Space Technology 5 Multi-Point Observations of Temporal Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Wang, Yongli; Slavin, James A.; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from ST5. The data demonstrate that meso-scale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of approximately 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approximately 1 min for meso-scale currents and approximately 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  19. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .1. Data reduction, maps and sky coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.B.G.; Eaton, N.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We present deep imaging at 6.7 and 15 mu m from the CAM instrument on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), centred on the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). These are the deepest integrations published to date at these wavelengths in any region of sky. We discuss the observational strategy and the data...... reduction. The observed source density appears to approach the CAM confusion limit at 15 mu m, and fluctuations in the 6.7-mu m sky background may be identifiable with similar spatial fluctuations in the HDF galaxy counts. ISO appears to be detecting comparable field galaxy populations to the HDF, and our...

  20. North south asymmetry in the photospheric and coronal magnetic fields observed by different instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Ilpo; Mursula, Kalevi

    2015-04-01

    Several recent studies have shown that the solar and heliospheric magnetic fields are north-south asymmetric. The southward shift of the Heliospheric current sheet (HCS) (the so-called bashful ballerina phenomenon) is a persistent pattern, which occurs typically for about three years during the late declining phase of solar cycle. We study here the hemispherical asymmetry in the photospheric and coronal magnetic fields using Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO), Mount Wilson, Kitt Peak, Solis, SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI measurements of the photospheric magnetic field since the 1970s and the potential field source surface (PFSS) model.Multipole analysis of the photospheric magnetic field has shown that the bashful ballerina phenomenon is a consequence of g20 quadrupole term, which is oppositely signed to the dipole moment. We find that, at least during the four recent solar cycles, the g20 reflects the larger magnitude of the southern polar field during a few years in the declining phase of the cycle. Although the overall magnetic activity during the full solar cycle is not very different in the two hemispheres, the temporal distribution of activity is different, contributing to the asymmetry. The used data sets are in general in a good agreement with each other, but there are some significant deviations, especially in WSO data. Also, the data from Kitt Peak 512 channel magnetograph is known to suffer from zero level errors.We also note that the lowest harmonic coefficients do not scale with the overall magnitude in photospheric synoptic magnetic maps. Scaling factors based on histogram techniques can be as large as 10 (from Wilcox to HMI), but the corresponding difference in dipole strength is typically less than two. This is because the polar field has a dominant contribution to the dipole and quadrupole components. This should be noted, e.g., when using synoptic maps as input for coronal models.

  1. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nayyer

    One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when

  2. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  3. Flat-fielding of Solar Hα Observations Based on the Maximum Correntropy Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gao-Gui; Zheng, Sheng; Lin, Gang-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2016-08-01

    The flat-field CCD calibration method of Kuhn et al. (KLL) is an efficient method for flat-fielding. However, since it depends on the minimum of the sum of squares error (SSE), its solution is sensitive to noise, especially non-Gaussian noise. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed to determine the flat field. The idea is to change the criterion of gain estimate from SSE to the maximum correntropy. The result of a test on simulated data demonstrates that our method has a higher accuracy and a faster convergence than KLL’s and Chae’s. It has been found that the method effectively suppresses noise, especially in the case of typical non-Gaussian noise. And the computing time of our algorithm is the shortest.

  4. HST/ACS Observations of RR Lyrae Stars in Six Ultra-Deep Fields of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, E. J.; Smith, E.; Brown, T. M.; Sweigart, A. V.; Kalirai, J. S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Guhathakurta, P.; Renzini, A.; Rich, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present HST/ACS observations of RR Lyrae variable stars in six ultra deep fields of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), including parts of the halo, disk, and giant stellar stream. Past work on the RR Lyrae stars in M31 has focused on various aspects of the stellar populations that make up the galaxy s halo, including their distances and metallicities. This study builds upon this previous work by increasing the spatial coverage (something that has been lacking in previous studies) and by searching for these variable stars in constituents of the galaxy not yet explored. Besides the 55 RR Lyrae stars we found in our initial field located 11kpc from the galactic nucleus, we find additional RR Lyrae stars in four of the remaining five ultra deep fields as follows: 21 in the disk, 24 in the giant stellar stream, 3 in the halo field 21kpc from the galactic nucleus, and 5 in one of the halo fields at 35kpc. No RR Lyrae were found in the second halo field at 35kpc. The RR Lyrae populations of these fields appear to mostly be of Oosterhoff I type, although the 11kpc field appears to be intermediate or mixed. We will discuss the properties of these stars including period and reddening distributions. We calculate metallicities and distances for the stars in each of these fields using different methods and compare the results, to an extent that has not yet been done. We compare these methods not just on RR Lyrae in our M31 fields, but also on a data set of Milky Way field RR Lyrae stars.

  5. Field observations of mating behavior in the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (Serpentes: Colubridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood Sasa; Sierra Curtis

    2006-01-01

    We observed the mating behavior of the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (a common species of colubrid in the South Pacific of Costa Rica) in the pre-montane wet forest of Las Cruces Biological Station (San Vito de Java, Costa Rica). Three S. annulatus were observed during courtship between 10-12 AM in a patch of primary forest. The two males were observed to interact with the female, but not signs of male-male agonistic interactions were observed. Their behavior includes grabbing ...

  6. Field observations of mating behavior in the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (Serpentes: Colubridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sasa, Mahmood; Curtis, Sierra

    2014-01-01

    We observed the mating behavior of the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (a common species of colubrid in the South Pacific of Costa Rica) in the pre-montane wet forest of Las Cruces Biological Station (San Vito de Java, Costa Rica). Three S. annulatus were observed during courtship between 10-12 AM in a patch of primary forest. The two males were observed to interact with the female, but not signs of male-maleagonistic interactions were observed. Their behavior includes grabbing a...

  7. Comparison of laboratory and field observations: Ozone water treatment for cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, K.P. [Marley Cooling Tower Co., Mission, KS (United States)

    1996-11-01

    This evaluation, comparing laboratory- and field-generated data, explains the functional results of ozone water treatment use for operating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) cooling water systems. These effects are classified in the areas of biological growth control, corrosion rate control, and scale control or retardation. Limitations on the application of ozone are discussed. Field results from multiple sites are examined and compared to laboratory-generated data. Theories as to mechanisms are discussed based on the accumulated information. Specific situations such as under-ozonation, and soft and hard water are discussed.

  8. Some observations on stray magnetic fields and power outputs from short-wave diathermy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R.W.M.; Dunscombe, P.B.

    1984-04-01

    Recent years have seen increasing interest in the possible hazards arising from the use of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation. Relatively large and potentially hazardous fields are to be found in the vicinity of short-wave and microwave equipment used in physiotherapy departments to produce therapeutic temperature rises. This note reports the results of measurements of the stray magnetic field and power output of a conventional short-wave diathermy unit when applied to tissue-equivalent phantoms. The dependence of these quantities on the variables, i.e. power setting of the unit, capacitor plate size, phantom size and phantom-capacitor plate separation, are discussed.

  9. Estimation of Plasma Properties and Magnetic Field in a Prominence-like Structure as Observed by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, Bhola N; Mohan, Anita

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a prominence-like cool plasma structure as observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We perform the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis using various filters of AIA, and also deduce the temperature and density structure in and around the observed flux-tube. In addition to deducing plasma parameters, we also find an evidence of multiple harmonics of fast magnetoacoustic kink waves in the observed prominence-like magnetic structure. Making use of estimated plasma parameters and observed wave parameters, under the baseline of MHD seismology, we deduce magnetic field in the flux-tube. The wave period ratio P1/P2 = 2.18 is also observed in the flux-tube, which carries the signature of magnetic field divergence where we estimate the tube expansion factor as 1.27. We discuss constraints in the estimation of plasma and magnetic field properties in such a structure in the current observational perspective, which may shed new light on the localized ...

  10. Fusing Observations and Model Results for Creation of Enhanced Ozone Spatial Fields: Comparison of Three Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents three simple techniques for fusing observations and numerical model predictions. The techniques rely on model/observation bias being considered either as error free, or containing some uncertainty, the latter mitigated with a Kalman filter approach or a spati...

  11. Multi-point ground-based ULF magnetic field observations in Europe during seismic active periods in 2004 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prattes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of ground-based Ultra Low Frequency (ULF magnetic field measurements observed from June to August 2004 during the Bovec earthquake on 12 July 2004. Further we give information about the seismic activity in the local observatory region for an extended time span 2004 and 2005. ULF magnetic field data are provided by the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA where the experience and heritage from the CHInese MAGnetometer (CHIMAG fluxgate magnetometer comes to application. The intensities of the horizontal H and vertical Z magnetic field and the polarization ratio R of the vertical and horizontal magnetic field intensity are analyzed taking into consideration three SEGMA observatories located at different close distances and directions from the earthquake epicenter. We observed a significant increase of high polarization ratios during strong seismic activity at the observatory nearest to the Bovec earthquake epicenter. Apart from indirect ionospheric effects electromagnetic noise could be emitted in the lithosphere due to tectonic effects in the earthquake focus region causing anomalies of the vertical magnetic field intensity. Assuming that the measured vertical magnetic field intensities are of lithospheric origin, we roughly estimate the amplitude of electromagnetic noise in the Earths crust considering an average electrical conductivity of <σ>=10−3 S/m and a certain distance of the observatory to the earthquake epicenter.

  12. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .2. Source detection and photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, P.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We present positions and fluxes of point sources found in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) images of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at 6.7 and 15 mu m. We have constructed algorithmically selected 'complete' flux-limited samples of 19 sources in the 15-mu m image, and seven sources in the 6.7-mu m...

  13. Observation of enhanced field-free molecular alignment by two laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christer; Poulsen, Mikael Dahlerup; Peronne, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    We show experimentally that field-free alignment of iodobenzene molecules, induced by a single, intense, linearly polarized 1.4-ps-long laser pulse, can be strongly enhanced by dividing the pulse into two optimally synchronized pulses of the same duration. For a given total energy of the two...

  14. Cluster observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (22 vector/s magnetic field data from Cluster FGM instrument are presented for the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence for much of the crossing. Large-scale fluctuations show some correlation between spacecraft but the higher frequency fluctuations show no correlation, indicating that the length scales of these waves are smaller than the spacecraft separation (500km. In many intervals, there are clear peaks in the wave power around the ion cyclotron frequency (~1Hz, and there is some evidence for waves at the first harmonic of this frequency. Both left- and right-hand polarised waves are found, with angles of propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field that range from parallel to perpendicular. The regions of enhanced magnetic field fluctuations appear to be associated with plasma flows possibly originating from a lobe reconnection site. The most coherent, long lasting wave trains with frequencies close to local ion cyclotron frequency occur at a boundary between a sheared flow and a stagnant plasma.

  15. Semiquantitative Decision Tools for FMD Emergency Vaccination Informed by Field Observations and Simulated Outbreak Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeberg, Preben; AlKhamis, Mohammad; Boklund, Anette

    2017-01-01

    timely, objectively, and efficiently to risk managers and less technically inclined stakeholders about the potential of introducing FMD suppressive emergency vaccination. To explore the FFI principle with complementary field data, we analyzed the FMD outbreaks in Argentina in 2001, with the 17 affected...

  16. Ground Truth Mineralogy vs. Orbital Observations at the Bagnold Dune Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, is analyzing rock and sediments in Gale crater to provide in situ sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical assessments of the crater's geologic history. Curiosity's recent traverse through an active, basaltic eolian deposit, informally named the Bagnold Dunes, provided the opportunity for a multi-instrument investigation of the dune field.

  17. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .2. Source detection and photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, P.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.;

    1997-01-01

    We present positions and fluxes of point sources found in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) images of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at 6.7 and 15 mu m. We have constructed algorithmically selected 'complete' flux-limited samples of 19 sources in the 15-mu m image, and seven sources in the 6.7-mu m...

  18. New observations of the magnetic vector field across the solar disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, C.U.; Harvey, J.W.; Henney, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Full disk solar magnetograms have been available for more than three decades. However, those maps only show the line-of-sight magnetic flux. The physical quantity we really want to know is the magnetic field vector along with the filling factor, i.e. the fractional area of the resolution element tha

  19. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .1. Data reduction, maps and sky coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.B.G.; Eaton, N.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We present deep imaging at 6.7 and 15 mu m from the CAM instrument on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), centred on the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). These are the deepest integrations published to date at these wavelengths in any region of sky. We discuss the observational strategy and the data...

  20. Gemini GMOS and WHT SAURON integral-field spectrograph observations of the AGN-driven outflow in NGC 1266

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Bureau, Martin; Sarzi, Marc; Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph integral-field spectrographs to observe the active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered outflow in NGC 1266. This unusualgalaxy is relatively nearby (D = 30 Mpc), allowing us to investigate the proces

  1. Gemini GMOS and WHT SAURON integral-field spectrograph observations of the AGN-driven outflow in NGC 1266

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Krajnovic, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Bureau, Martin; Sarzi, Marc; Nyland, Kristina; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph integral-field spectrographs to observe the active galactic nucleus (AGN) powered outflow in NGC?1266. This unusual galaxy is relatively nearby (D = 30?Mpc), allowing us to investigate the proce

  2. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best…

  3. Observation of nonlinear bands in near-field scanning optical microscopy of a photonic-crystal waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Amandev; Huisman, Simon R; Korterik, Jeroen P; Mosk, Allard P; Herek, Jennifer L; Pinkse, Pepijn W H

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the photonic bandstructure of GaAs photonic-crystal waveguides with high energy and momentum resolution using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Intriguingly, we observe additional bands that are not predicted by eigenmode solvers, as was recently demonstrated by Huisman et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 155154 (2012)]. We study the presence of these additional bands by performing measurements of these bands while varying the incident light power, revealing a non-linear power dependence. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the observed additional bands are caused by a waveguide-specific near- field tip effect not previously reported, which can significantly phase-modulate the detected field.

  4. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory; 1, Data reduction, maps and sky coverage

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, S

    1997-01-01

    We present deep imaging at 6.7 micron and 15 micron from the CAM instrument on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), centred on the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). These are the deepest integrations published to date at these wavelengths in any region of sky. We discuss the observation strategy and the data reduction. The observed source density appears to approach the CAM confusion limit at 15 micron, and fluctuations in the 6.7 micron sky background may be identifiable with similar spatial fluctuations in the HDF galaxy counts. ISO appears to be detecting comparable field galaxy populations to the HDF, and our data yields strong evidence that future IR missions (such as SIRTF, FIRST and WIRE) as well as SCUBA and millimetre arrays will easily detect field galaxies out to comparably high redshifts.

  5. Plasma sheet stretching accompanied by field aligned energetic ion fluxes observed by the MUADU instrument aboard TC-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Li; S.MCKENNA-LAWLOR; S.BARABASH; LIU ZhenXing; CAO JinBin; J.BALAZ; K.KUDELA; T.L.ZHANG; C.M.CARR

    2007-01-01

    The NUADU(NeUtral Atom Detector Unit)instrument aboard TC-2 recorded 4π solid angle images of charged particles(E>180 keV)spiraling around the magnetic field lines in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at~-7 RE,equatorial dawn-to-night side)during a geomagnetic storm(Dst=-219 nT)on August 24,2005.Energetic ion beam events characterized by symmetrical,ring-like,solid angle distributions around ambient magnetic field lines were observed during a 34-minute traversal of the plasma sheet by the TC-2 spacecraft.Also,observations during these multiple crossings of the plasma sheet were monitored by the magnetometer experiment(FGM)aboard the same spacecraft.During each crossing,a whistler-mode chorus enhancement was observed in the anisotropic area by the TC-2 low frequency electromagnetic wave detector(LFEW/TC-2)at a frequency just above that of the local lower hybrid wave.A comparison of the ion pitch angle distribution(PAD)map with the ambient magnetic field shows that an enhancement in the field aligned energetic ion flux was accompanied by tailward stretching of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.In contrast,the perpendicular ion-flux enhancement was accompanied by a signature indicating the corresponding shrinkage of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.Since both parallel ion-flux and perpendicular ion-flux enhancements occurred intermittently,the data were interpreted to imply a dynamical,oscillatory process of the magnetic field line(stretching and shrinking)in the near-Earth plasma sheet,which might have acted to help establish an interaction region in this area which would support continuous aurora-substorm triggering during the ongoing magnetic storm.The whistler-mode chorus may have been produced due to ion gyro-resonance during particle pitch angle diffusion after the plasma sheet compression.

  6. Experimental observations and modeling of ponding and overland flow in flat, permeable soil fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Willemijn; Bogaart, Patrick; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    In flat well-drained agricultural terrain, overland flow is a relatively rare phenomenon, yet still a potentially important driver of sediment and nutrient transport. Under these conditions, periods of intense rainfall, shallow groundwater dynamics and local combinations of meso- and microtopography control whether water in ponds will become connected to streams and ditches. Combining overland flow measurements at agricultural fields with a new modeling approach, we explored: (i) what rainfall conditions relate to overland flow and (ii) how does flow route connectivity develop for various types of runoff generation and meso/microtopography? For this purpose, we assessed overland flow at two field sites in flat, lowland catchments in the sandy part of the Netherlands and developed a dynamic model (FAST-runoff) to simulate redistribution of water over a heterogeneous surface with infiltration and soil water storage. Experimentally, it appeared that most overland flow occurred as saturation excess runoff during long wet periods, though infiltration excess runoff generation may have played a role during snowmelt periods that generated small amounts of runoff. For both fields, the contributing area during the saturation excess events was large and flow paths long, irrespective of the profoundly different microtopographies. We explored this behaviour with our FAST-Runoff model and found that under saturation excess conditions, mesotopographic features, such as natural depressions or those caused by tillage, gain importance at the expense of the spatial organization of microtopography. The surface topographies of our experimental fields were equal in terms of standard topographic analytical measures such as Curvature, Convergence Index, and Topographic Wetness Index. However, the fields could be distinguished when analysed with a quantitative indicator of flow for hydrological connectivity. Also, the fields had different dynamics related to the runoff generating mechanism

  7. Fouling detection in buried water pipelines by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezza, Fabrizio; Mangini, Fabio; Santini, Carlo; Stoja, Endri; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field by a buried pipeline is calculated by means of frequency-domain numerical simulations and by making use of the scattered-field formulation. The pipeline, supposed to be used for water conveyance, is modeled as a cylindrical shell made of poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) material buried in a wall or pavement composed of cement with very low losses and filled with water. In order to make the model simpler, the pipeline is supposed running parallel to the air-cement interface. To excite the model, a linearly-polarized plane wave impinging normally on the above-mentioned interface is adopted. We consider two different polarizations in order to determine the most useful in terms of scattered-field sensitivity. Moreover, a preliminary frequency sweep allows us to choose the most suitable operating frequency depending on the dimensions of the pipeline cross-section. All the three components of the scattered field are monitored along a line just above the interface. The electromagnetic properties of the materials employed in this study are present in the literature and, since a frequency-domain technique is adopted, no further approximation is needed. Once the ideal problem has been studied, we further complicate the model by introducing two fouling scenarios due to limestone formation on the pipeline walls. In the first case, the fouling is deposited at the bottom of the pipeline when the water pressure is low enough and the second one considers the fouling to deposit on the entire internal perimeter of the pipeline's cross-section by forming an additional limestone cylindrical layer. The results obtained in these cases are compared with those of the initial problem with the goal of determining the scattered field dependency on the fouling geometrical characteristics. One of the practical applications in the field of Civil Engineering of this study may be the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) techniques to monitor the fouling conditions of

  8. Temperature and magnetic field effect on oscillations observed in GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, H.M., E-mail: hkhalia@essex.ac.uk [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Mazzucato, S. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Ardali, S.; Celik, O.; Mutlu, S. [Anadolu University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Yunus Emre Campus 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Royall, B. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Tiras, E. [Anadolu University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Yunus Emre Campus 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Balkan, N. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Puustinen, J.; Korpijaervi, V.-M.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 10, FI-33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2012-06-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied p-i-n GaInNAs MQW devices as function of temperature and magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observed oscillations in the sample current-voltage curves at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shift in oscillation position with magnetic field described by Landau level split. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resonant tunnelling and thermionic emission used to describe oscillations. - Abstract: The photoconductivity of p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) mesa structures is investigated. When illuminated with photons at energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, a number of oscillations are observed in the current-voltage I-V characteristics. The amplitude and position of the oscillations is shown to depend upon the temperature, as well as upon the exciting wavelength and intensity. Due to the absence of the oscillations in the dark I-V and at temperatures above T = 200 K, we explain them in terms of photogenerated electrons escaping from quantum wells via tunnelling or thermionic emission. Magnetic fields up to B = 11 T were applied parallel to the planes of the QWs. A small voltage shift in the position of the oscillations was observed, proportional to the magnetic field intensity and dependent upon the temperature. Calculation of the Landau level energy separation (16 meV) agrees with the observed experimental data. Magneto-tunnelling spectroscopy probes in detail the nature of band- or impurity-like states responsible for resonances in first and second subbands, observing the I-V plot in dark condition and under illumination. The field-dependence of the amplitude of the oscillation peaks in I-V has the characteristic form of a quantum mechanical admixing effect. This enhancement is also probably due to the hole recombination with majority electrons tunnelling in the N-related states of the quantum wells.

  9. Cognitive Factors that Impact Learning in the Field: Observations from an REU Project on Precambrian Rocks of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Goodwin, C.

    2011-12-01

    Field work requires cognitive processing on many different levels, and constitutes a powerful and important learning environment. To be effective and meaningful, the context of field work must be fully understood in terms of key research questions, earlier published work, regional geology, geologic history, and geologic processes. Scale(s) of observation and sample selection methods and strategies must be defined. Logistical decisions must be made about equipment needed, points of access, and navigation in the field. Professional skills such as field note-taking, measuring structural data, and rock descriptions must be employed, including appropriate use of field tools. Interpretations of geologic features in the field must be interpreted through recall of concepts from the geologic knowledge base (e.g. crystallization history of igneous rocks interpreted through phase diagrams). Field workers need to be able to self-monitor and self-regulate their actions (metacognitively), and make adjustments to daily plans as needed. The results of field work must be accurately and effectively communicated to other geoscientists. Personal and professional ethics and values are brought to bear as decisions are made about whether or not the work has been satisfactorily completed at a field site. And, all of this must be done against a back drop of environmental factors that affect the ability to do this work (e.g. inclement weather, bears, impassable landscapes). The simultaneous relevance of all these factors creates a challenging, but rewarding environment for learning on many different scales. During our REU project to study the Precambrian rocks in the back country of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), we considered these cognitive factors in designing our project curriculum. To reduce the "novelty space" of the project a website was developed that described the project goals and expected outcomes, introduced primary literature, and alerted students about the physical demands

  10. Incidental avian observations: Northern Alaska Peninsula with an emphasis on field season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report compiles observations of birds recorded during surveys and incidental to surveys over a broad geographic area of the Northern Alaska Peninsula. These...

  11. Field Plot and Observation Points for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 727 vegetation plots and 217 observation points visited in 2002, 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Plots and...

  12. The Model of Nonstationary Rotor Magnetic Field Observer in the Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Alexander; Krasilnikyants, Evgenii; Smirnov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to the questions, associated with observer construction for monitoring the values of rotor magnetic vector magnitude and angular deflection of induction motor oriented on bidimensional convolution on temporal and spatial actual parameters. The interrelation of induction motor breakdown torque and rotor characteristic time and transportation lag is shown. The system of rotor running stream observer on the basis of gage rotor position and stator current is put forward.

  13. Synthesis of Moored Observations Collected During the IWISE 2011 Field Program in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    individual data sets have been collected and the data organized . A kick-off IWISE synthesis workshop has been organized for November 11-12 in Carmel...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Synthesis of Moored Observations Collected During the...Taiwanese research vessels. A comprehensive set of moored and shipboard observations were collected near the supposed generations sites (Figure 1) by M

  14. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD: SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION WITH THE MKCLASS CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Corbally, C. J. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Cat, P. De [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N.; Ren, A. B. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Wu, Y.; Cao, Z.; Li, G. [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y. [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The LAMOST-Kepler project was designed to obtain high-quality, low-resolution spectra of many of the stars in the Kepler field with the Large Sky Area Multi Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic telescope. To date 101,086 spectra of 80,447 objects over the entire Kepler field have been acquired. Physical parameters, radial velocities, and rotational velocities of these stars will be reported in other papers. In this paper we present MK spectral classifications for these spectra determined with the automatic classification code MKCLASS. We discuss the quality and reliability of the spectral types and present histograms showing the frequency of the spectral types in the main table organized according to luminosity class. Finally, as examples of the use of this spectral database, we compute the proportion of A-type stars that are Am stars, and identify 32 new barium dwarf candidates.

  15. On the heterogeneity of stratified-shear turbulence: Observations from a near-field river plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Daniel G.; Carlson, Joshua; Goodman, Louis

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneity of turbulent structure in a near-field river plume is evaluated through the application of three distinct measurement techniques: turbulent overturn analysis, direct turbulence measurement using microstructure sensors mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and a larger scale control volume approach. These techniques exploit the preturbulent potential energy available for conversion to turbulent energy, the kinetic energy associated with active turbulence, and the artifacts of turbulence demonstrated through a modified density structure, respectively. Comparisons between these methods indicate that all three techniques can provide robust estimates of mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates. Results suggest a highly heterogeneous turbulent field, with significant overturns occupying a volume fraction of less than 10%, and active turbulence occupying a volume fraction only 2-3 times larger. The combined data sets are also used to estimate expected means and confidence limits for overturn-derived dissipation rates associated with varying sample sizes.

  16. Observation of the Avalanche of Runaway Electrons in Air in a Strong Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Zybin, K. P.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  17. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  18. Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations IV: Wavelength Calibration and Flexure Correction for the Integral Field Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, Schuyler G; Maire, Jérôme; Ingraham, Patrick J; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T; Hibon, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    We present the wavelength calibration for the lenslet-based Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) that serves as the science instrument for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The GPI IFS features a 2.7" x 2.7" field of view and a 190 x 190 lenslet array (14.3 mas/lenslet) operating in $Y$, $J$, $H$, and $K$ bands with spectral resolving power ranging from $R$ $\\sim$ 35 to 78. Due to variations across the field of view, a unique wavelength solution is determined for each lenslet characterized by a two-dimensional position, the spectral dispersion, and the rotation of the spectrum with respect to the detector axes. The four free parameters are fit using a constrained Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares minimization algorithm, which compares an individual lenslet's arc lamp spectrum to a simulated arc lamp spectrum. This method enables measurement of spectral positions to better than 1/10th of a pixel on the GPI IFS detector using Gemini's facility calibration lamp unit GCAL, improving spectral extraction accuracy compar...

  19. Evidence of transverse magnetospheric field line oscillations as observed from Cluster and ground magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic spectrum of ULF waves from magnetic field data obtained by the elliptically orbiting Cluster satellites (with an apogee of 119000km, perigee of 19000km and the orbital period of 57h have been prepared in the frequency range 0 to 120mHz when the satellite was near its perigee. The existence of field line oscillations, with increasing frequency in the inbound sector and decreasing frequency in the outbound sector, is seen in the transverse components, indicating the presence of independently oscillating local magnetic flux tubes in the form of transverse standing Alfvén waves. The results show that toroidal and poloidal modes are excited simultaneously. The analysis of simultaneous ground magnetometer data at the footprint of the satellite suggests that these modes are also excited due to coupling to magnetospheric waveguide modes. The clear signature of a resonant fundamental mode is seen in the ground data whereas Cluster detects a harmonic of this frequency. Lower frequency modes indicative of waveguide oscillations are seen in both the ground data and the compressional field at Cluster.

  20. Discrepancies between observational data and theoretical forecast in single field slow roll inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Amorós, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The PLANCK collaboration has determined values for the spectral parameters of the CMB radiation, namely the spectral index $n_s$, its running $\\alpha_s$, the running of the running $\\beta_s$, using a growing body of measurements of CMB anisotropies by the Planck satellite and other missions. These values do not follow the hierarchy of sizes predicted by single field, slow roll inflationary theory, and are thus difficult to fit for such inflation models. In this work we present first a study of 49 single field, slow roll inflationary potentials in which we assess the likelyhood of these models fitting the spectral parameters to their currently most accurate determination given by the PLANCK collaboration. We check numerically with a MATLAB program the spectral parameters that each model can yield for a very broad, comprehensive list of possible parameter and field values. The comparison of spectral parameter values supported by the models with their determinations by the PLANCK collaboration leads to the concl...