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Sample records for field jc estimation

  1. A NEW METHOD FOR NON DESTRUCTIVE ESTIMATION OF Jc IN YBaCuO CERAMIC SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Cordeiro Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method for estimation of Jc as a bulk characteristic of YBCO blocks. The experimental magnetic interaction force between a SmCo permanent magnet and a YBCO block was compared to finite element method (FEM simulations results, allowing us to search a best fitting value to the critical current of the superconducting sample. As FEM simulations were based on Bean model , the critical current density was taken as an unknown parameter. This is a non destructive estimation method. since there is no need of breaking even a little piece of the sample for analysis.

  2. Jc enhancement by La-Al-O doping in Y-Ba-Cu-O films both in self-field and under magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yan; Suo, Hong-Li; Yue, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    a good epitaxial growth relationship with LAO. Compared with a pure YBCO film, the Jc value of a 5.0% LAO-doped sample is enhanced more than three times in self-field 77 K and seven times at 77 K and 1.5 T, respectively. These results indicate that LAO doping can effectively enhance the Jc of YBCO films...... toward YBCO. A series of YBCO films with different LAO doping contents was fabricated on LAO single-crystal substrates by metal organic deposition. We observed by X-ray diffractometer measurements and scanning electron microscopy observations that although a large amount of LAO is added, YBCO still keeps...

  3. Field, temperature, and angle dependent critical current density Jc(H,T, ) in coated conductors obtained via contact-free methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James R [ORNL; Sinclair IV, John W [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Chen, Y [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

    2010-01-01

    Applications of coated conductors based on high-Tc superconductors often require detailed knowledge of their critical current density Jc as a function of magnetic field orientation as well as field strength and temperature. This work demonstrates experimental methods to obtain the angularly dependent Jc using contact-free magnetic measurements, and qualifies those methods using several well defined conditions. The studies complement traditional transport techniques and are readily extended to conditions of field and temperature where the current density is very large and transport methods become difficult. Results on representative materials are presented.

  4. Angular dependence of Jc for YBCO coated conductors at low temperature and very high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, A; Jaroszynski, J J; Kametani, F; Chen, Z; Larbalestier, D C; Viouchkov, Y L; Chen, Y; Xie, Y; Selvamanickam, V

    2010-01-01

    We present very high field angle dependent critical current density (J c ) data for three recently obtained YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) coated conductors used in the construction of high field solenoids. We find that strongly correlated pins, such as BaZrO 3 (BZO) nanorods, while yielding strong c-axis peaks at 77 K, produce almost no measurable contribution at 4 K. Raising the field from c (θ) at low fields to a marked cusp-like behavior at high fields. Transmission electron micrographs show that all samples contain a high density of stacking faults which strengthen the plane correlated pinning parallel to the ab planes produced by the intrinsic ab-plane pinning of the Cu-O charge reservoir layers.

  5. Progress in Jc and magnetic field performance of Bi-2223/Ag composite tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvides, N.; Katsaros, A.; Reilly, D.; Thorley, A.; Herrmann, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The application of high-temperature superconductors to electric power systems is actively pursued by several commercial teams around the world. A promising candidate is the Bi-2223/Ag composite superconductor. For large scale commercial applications the conductor must meet certain engineering specifications including high current capacity in the presence of a self-generated magnetic field ranging from a few hundred mT in transmission cables to 1-2 T in transformers and current limiters, and to much higher fields in the case of superconducting coils for energy storage and magnets. In the last two years, a commercial consortium consisting of Metal Manufactures Ltd, University of Wollongong and CSIRO has focused on the development of Bi-2223/Ag composite tape suitable for use in electric power applications. The powder-in-tube process is used to produce conventional single filament and multifilament tapes and twisted conductors. An appropriate measure of 'process capability' is routine running of the process and evaluation of tape performance. In this paper we report on the electrical properties of Bi-2223/Ag composite tapes produced as part of the long-length product development. The transport critical current density of tapes is measured in magnetic fields up to 9 T (H parallel and H perpendicular tape-plane) and as a function of temperature (4 - 80 K). Transport ac losses are determined at 77 K and 60 Hz, and the bend strain performance is determined at 77 K for strains up to 1.5 %

  6. J.C. Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl, Poul

    I mange år var det en almindelig antagelse, at statsminister J.C. Christensens dagbøger var blevet brændt efter hans død. Nu er hans dagbøger fra årene 1900-09 imidlertid dukket op, og de giver et indblik i dansk politik i årene omkring Systemskiftet. Dagbøgerne dækker den periode, hvor J.C...... af justitsminister P.A. Albertis bedragerier og optakten til en rigsretssag. De tyve små dagbøger indeholder optegnelser om stort og småt fra perioden. De tjente som et sted, hvor den normalt tillukkede J.C. Christensen fik luft for private og ikke mindst politiske bekymringer, og mange af aktørerne...... i det politiske liv blev i dagbøgerne udsat for skarpe bemærkninger. J.C. Christensens dagbøger giver et enestående indblik i et stykke Danmarkshistorie set fra første række....

  7. Estimation of Motion Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the estimation of 2-D motion vector fields from time varying image sequences. We use a piecewise smooth model based on coupled vector/binary Markov random fields. We find the maximum a posteriori solution by simulated annealing. The algorithm generate sample...... fields by means of stochastic relaxation implemented via the Gibbs sampler....

  8. Field, temperature, and angle dependent critical current density Jc(H,T,θ) in coated conductors obtained via contact-free methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J R; Christen, D K; Zhang Yifei; Zuev, Y L; Cantoni, C; Sinclair, J W; Chen Yimin; Selvamanickam, V

    2010-01-01

    Applications of coated conductors based on high- T c superconductors often require detailed knowledge of their critical current density J c as a function of magnetic field orientation as well as field strength and temperature. This work demonstrates experimental methods for obtaining the angularly dependent J c using contact-free magnetic measurements, and qualifies those methods using several well defined conditions. The studies complement traditional transport techniques and are readily extended to conditions of field and temperature where the current density is very large and transport methods become difficult. Results on representative materials are presented.

  9. Cloning and expression analysis of JcAACT, jcMDC and JcFPS, involved in terpenoid biosynthesis in jatropha curcas l

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.; Wen, J.

    2018-01-01

    To better understand the functions of key genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis in Jatropha curcas, we cloned and characterized three genes, namely acetyl CoA acyltransferase (JcAACT), diphosphate mevalonate decarboxylase (JcMDC) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (JcFPS). The opening reading frames (ORFs) of JcAACT, JcMDC and JcFPS were 1239 bp,1248 bp and 1029 bp, respectively, encoding a 412-amino acid, 415-amino acid and 342-amino acid polypeptide, respectively. Results of homology analysis showed that JcAACT, JcMDC and JcFPS encoded proteins that all had the highest identity and closest relationship with the corresponding genes in Hevea brasiliensis, with identities of 89%, 92% and 93%, respectively. JcAACT, JcMDC and JcFPS were expressed in all organs tested of J. curcas; the highest expression level for each gene occurred in seeds. In the early growth stage of seeds, the expression level of each of these three genes increased with time, with JcAACT and JcMDC expression level reaching a peak at the late stage of seed development (50 d), while JcFPS expression level reached a peak at the mid-late stage (40 d). Following the peak, the expression of each gene then declined. The expression level of JcAACT was the highest of the three genes, regardless of the organ or the stage of seed growth, indicating its important role in J. curcas. This study lays the foundation for a better understanding of the important role of the JcAACT, JcMDC and JcFPS genes in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway of J. curcas. (author)

  10. Estimating cloud field coverage using morphological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Or, Rotem Z; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit

    2010-01-01

    The apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds ('the twilight zone') is often affected by undetectable weak signature clouds and humidified aerosols. It is suggested here to classify the atmosphere into two classes: cloud fields, and cloud-free (away from a cloud field), while detectable clouds are included in the cloud field class as a subset. Since the definition of cloud fields is ambiguous, a robust cloud field masking algorithm is presented here, based on the cloud spatial distribution. The cloud field boundaries are calculated then on the basis of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask products and the total cloud field area is estimated for the Atlantic Ocean (50 deg. S-50 deg. N). The findings show that while the monthly averaged cloud fraction over the Atlantic Ocean during July is 53%, the cloud field fraction may reach 97%, suggesting that cloud field properties should be considered in climate studies. A comparison between aerosol optical depth values inside and outside cloud fields reveals differences in the retrieved radiative properties of aerosols depending on their location. The observed mean aerosol optical depth inside the cloud fields is more than 10% higher than outside it, indicating that such convenient cloud field masking may contribute to better estimations of aerosol direct and indirect forcing.

  11. An efficient estimator for Gibbs random fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janžura, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2014), s. 883-895 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Gibbs random field * efficient estimator * empirical estimator Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/SI/janzura-0441325.pdf

  12. Entropy estimates for simple random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Justesen, Jørn

    1995-01-01

    We consider the problem of determining the maximum entropy of a discrete random field on a lattice subject to certain local constraints on symbol configurations. The results are expected to be of interest in the analysis of digitized images and two dimensional codes. We shall present some examples...... of binary and ternary fields with simple constraints. Exact results on the entropies are known only in a few cases, but we shall present close bounds and estimates that are computationally efficient...

  13. ESTIMATING ELECTRIC FIELDS FROM VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM SEQUENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G. H.; Welsch, B. T.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the electric field distribution on the Sun's photosphere is essential for quantitative studies of how energy flows from the Sun's photosphere, through the corona, and into the heliosphere. This electric field also provides valuable input for data-driven models of the solar atmosphere and the Sun-Earth system. We show how observed vector magnetogram time series can be used to estimate the photospheric electric field. Our method uses a 'poloidal-toroidal decomposition' (PTD) of the time derivative of the vector magnetic field. These solutions provide an electric field whose curl obeys all three components of Faraday's Law. The PTD solutions are not unique; the gradient of a scalar potential can be added to the PTD electric field without affecting consistency with Faraday's Law. We then present an iterative technique to determine a potential function consistent with ideal MHD evolution; but this field is also not a unique solution to Faraday's Law. Finally, we explore a variational approach that minimizes an energy functional to determine a unique electric field, a generalization of Longcope's 'Minimum Energy Fit'. The PTD technique, the iterative technique, and the variational technique are used to estimate electric fields from a pair of synthetic vector magnetograms taken from an MHD simulation; and these fields are compared with the simulation's known electric fields. The PTD and iteration techniques compare favorably to results from existing velocity inversion techniques. These three techniques are then applied to a pair of vector magnetograms of solar active region NOAA AR8210, to demonstrate the methods with real data. Careful examination of the results from all three methods indicates that evolution of the magnetic vector by itself does not provide enough information to determine the true electric field in the photosphere. Either more information from other measurements, or physical constraints other than those considered here are necessary to find

  14. Drift estimation from a simple field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, F. M.; Figueiredo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Given the outcome of a Wiener process, what can be said about the drift and diffusion coefficients? If the process is stationary, these coefficients are related to the mean and variance of the position displacements distribution. However, if either drift or diffusion are time-dependent, very little can be said unless some assumption about that dependency is made. In Bayesian statistics, this should be translated into some specific prior probability. We use Bayes rule to estimate these coefficients from a single trajectory. This defines a simple, and analytically tractable, field theory.

  15. Could JC virus provoke metastasis in colon cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Emanuele; Raimondo, Dario; Gallo, Elena; Stella, Mario; Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio; Rossi, Francesca; Orlando, Emanuele; Messina, Marco; Tomasello, Giovanni; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; La Rocca, Ennio; Rizzo, Aroldo Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of John Cunningham virus (JC virus) in a small cohort of patients with colon cancer and to assess its presence in hepatic metastasis. METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients with histologically diagnosed colon cancer were included in our study, together with ten subjects affected by histologically and serologically diagnosed hepatitis C virus infection. In the patients included in the colon cancer group, JC virus was searched for in the surgical specimen; in the control group, JC virus was searched for in the hepatic biopsy. The difference in the prevalence of JC virus in the hepatic biopsy between the two groups was assessed through the χ2 test. RESULTS: Four out of 19 patients with colon cancer had a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for JC virus, and four had liver metastasis. Among the patients with liver metastasis, three out of four had a positive PCR test for JC virus in the surgical specimen and in the liver biopsy; the only patient with liver metastasis with a negative test for JC virus also presented a negative test for JC virus in the surgical specimen. In the control group of patients with hepatitis C infection, none of the ten patients presented JC virus infection in the hepatic biopsy. The difference between the two groups regarding JC virus infection was statistically significant (χ2 = 9.55, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: JC virus may play a broader role than previously thought, and may be mechanistically involved in the late stages of these tumors. PMID:25400458

  16. Strong correlation between Jc(T, H||c) and Jc(77 K, 3 T||c) in Zr-added (Gd, Y)BaCuO coated conductors at temperatures from 77 down to 20 K and fields up to 9 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, A; Delgado, L; Heydari Gharahcheshmeh, M; Khatri, N; Liu, Y; Selvamanickam, V

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted a critical current density J c (T, H) study over a wide temperature T from 77 down to 20 K and a magnetic field H up to 9 T on more than 50 ∼ 0.9 μm-thick REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−δ (RE = rare earth) thin films containing different concentrations of BaZrO 3 (BZO). We found that, independent of the composition, there is a linear correlation between J c (77 K, 3 T||c) and J c (T, H||c) at T down to 20 K and H up to 9 T. Moreover, J c (77 K, 3 T||c) is also linearly correlated to J c (T, H||ab) below 40 K. We ascribed this linear correlation to the dominant pinning source of BZO nanorods, which act as a strong correlated pinning at T above ∼30 K and provide weak uncorrelated point pins at lower temperatures. Our result emphasizes that J c (77 K, 3 T||c) is a key metric for metal-organic chemical vapor deposited REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−δ coated conductors. (fast track communication)

  17. Gravity Field Parameter Estimation Using QR Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokocnik, J.; Wagner, C. A.; McAdoo, D.; Kostelecky, J.; Bezdek, A.; Novak, P.; Gruber, C.; Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S. L.; Gratton, S.; Balmino, G.; Baboulin, M.

    2007-12-01

    This study compares the accuracy of the estimated geopotential coefficients when QR factorization is used instead of the classical method applied at our institute, namely the generation of normal equations that are solved by means of Cholesky decomposition. The objective is to evaluate the gain in numerical precision, which is obtained at considerable extra cost in terms of computer resources. Therefore, a significant increase in precision must be realized in order to justify the additional cost. Numerical simulations were done in order to examine the performance of both solution methods. Reference gravity gradients were simulated, using the EIGEN-GL04C gravity field model to degree and order 300, every 3 seconds along a near-circular, polar orbit at 250 km altitude. The simulation spanned a total of 60 days. A polar orbit was selected in this simulation in order to avoid the 'polar gap' problem, which causes inaccurate estimation of the low-order spherical harmonic coefficients. Regularization is required in that case (e.g., the GOCE mission), which is not the subject of the present study. The simulated gravity gradients, to which white noise was added, were then processed with the GINS software package, applying EIGEN-CG03 as the background gravity field model, followed either by the usual normal equation computation or using the QR approach for incremental linear least squares. The accuracy assessment of the gravity field recovery consists in computing the median error degree-variance spectra, accumulated geoid errors, geoid errors due to individual coefficients, and geoid errors calculated on a global grid. The performance, in terms of memory usage, required disk space, and CPU time, of the QR versus the normal equation approach is also evaluated.

  18. Optimal estimations of random fields using kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barua, G.

    2004-01-01

    Kriging is a statistical procedure of estimating the best weights of a linear estimator. Suppose there is a point or an area or a volume of ground over which we do not know a hydrological variable and wish to estimate it. In order to produce an estimator, we need some information to work on, usually available in the form of samples. There can, be an infinite number of linear unbiased estimators for which the weights sum up to one. The problem is how to determine the best weights for which the estimation variance is the least. The system of equations as shown above is generally known as the kriging system and the estimator produced is the kriging estimator. The variance of the kriging estimator can be found by substitution of the weights in the general estimation variance equation. We assume here a linear model for the semi-variogram. Applying the model to the equation, we obtain a set of kriging equations. By solving these equations, we obtain the kriging variance. Thus, for the one-dimensional problem considered, kriging definitely gives a better estimation variance than the extension variance

  19. Estimation of Dense Image Flow Fields in Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Conradsen, Knut; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    or an estimate there-of is known. Estimated flow fields in weather satellite imagery might also be used on an operational basis as inputs to short-term weather prediction. In this article we describe a method for the estimation of dense flow fields. Local measurements of motion are obtained by analysis...

  20. Estimation of Dense Image Flow Fields in Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Conradsen, Knut; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    1998-01-01

    or an estimate there-of is known. Estimated flow fields in weather satellite imagery might also be used on an operational basis as inputs to short-term weather prediction. In this article we describe a method for the estimation of dense flow fields. Local measurements of motion are obtained by analysis...

  1. Model improves oil field operating cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed operating cost model that forecasts operating cost profiles toward the end of a field's life should be constructed for testing depletion strategies and plans for major oil fields. Developing a good understanding of future operating cost trends is important. Incorrectly forecasting the trend can result in bad decision making regarding investments and reservoir operating strategies. Recent projects show that significant operating expense reductions can be made in the latter stages o field depletion without significantly reducing the expected ultimate recoverable reserves. Predicting future operating cost trends is especially important for operators who are currently producing a field and must forecast the economic limit of the property. For reasons presented in this article, it is usually not correct to either assume that operating expense stays fixed in dollar terms throughout the lifetime of a field, nor is it correct to assume that operating costs stay fixed on a dollar per barrel basis

  2. Estimating and Adjusting Field Quality in Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The experience with estimating and adjusting field quality in RHIC and SSC magnets is discussed. An alternative approach which makes a better estimate for systematic and random values of harmonics is presented.

  3. Variational multi-valued velocity field estimation for transparent sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez-Manzanares, Alonso; Rivera, Mariano; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Motion estimation in sequences with transparencies is an important problem in robotics and medical imaging applications. In this work we propose a variational approach for estimating multi-valued velocity fields in transparent sequences. Starting from existing local motion estimators, we derive...... a variational model for integrating in space and time such a local information in order to obtain a robust estimation of the multi-valued velocity field. With this approach, we can indeed estimate multi-valued velocity fields which are not necessarily piecewise constant on a layer –each layer can evolve...

  4. Characterization of the Tetraspan Junctional Complex (4JC) superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Amy; Lee, Andre; Hendargo, Kevin J; Reddy, Vamsee S; Shlykov, Maksim A; Kuppusamykrishnan, Harikrishnan; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Saier, Milton H

    2017-03-01

    Connexins or innexins form gap junctions, while claudins and occludins form tight junctions. In this study, statistical data, derived using novel software, indicate that these four junctional protein families and eleven other families of channel and channel auxiliary proteins are related by common descent and comprise the Tetraspan (4 TMS) Junctional Complex (4JC) Superfamily. These proteins all share similar 4 transmembrane α-helical (TMS) topologies. Evidence is presented that they arose via an intragenic duplication event, whereby a 2 TMS-encoding genetic element duplicated tandemly to give 4 TMS proteins. In cases where high resolution structural data were available, the conclusion of homology was supported by conducting structural comparisons. Phylogenetic trees reveal the probable relationships of these 15 families to each other. Long homologues containing fusions to other recognizable domains as well as internally duplicated or fused domains are reported. Large "fusion" proteins containing 4JC domains proved to fall predominantly into family-specific patterns as follows: (1) the 4JC domain was N-terminal; (2) the 4JC domain was C-terminal; (3) the 4JC domain was duplicated or occasionally triplicated and (4) mixed fusion types were present. Our observations provide insight into the evolutionary origins and subfunctions of these proteins as well as guides concerning their structural and functional relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lipschitz estimates for convex functions with respect to vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Magnani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present Lipschitz continuity estimates for a class of convex functions with respect to Hörmander vector fields. These results have been recently obtained in collaboration with M. Scienza, [22].

  6. Moment analysis of the Delaunay tessellation field estimator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, van M.N.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Campbell–Mecke theorem is used to derive explicit expressions for the mean and variance of Schaap and Van de Weygaert’s Delaunay tessellation field estimator. Special attention is paid to Poisson processes.

  7. Attitude and Trajectory Estimation Using Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetometer has long been a reliable, inexpensive sensor used in spacecraft momentum management and attitude estimation. Recent studies show an increased accuracy potential for magnetometer-only attitude estimation systems. Since the Earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computer and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both the spacecraft trajectory and attitude errors. Therefore, these errors can be used to estimate both trajectory and attitude. Traditionally, satellite attitude and trajectory have been estimated with completely separate system, using different measurement data. Recently, trajectory estimation for low earth orbit satellites was successfully demonstrated in ground software using only magnetometer data. This work proposes a single augmented extended Kalman Filter to simultaneously and autonomously estimate both spacecraft trajectory and attitude with data from a magnetometer and either dynamically determined rates or gyro-measured body rates.

  8. Estimation of Centers and Stagnation points in optical flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    In a topological sense fluid flows are characterised by their stagnation points. Given a temporal sequence of images of fluids we will consider the application of local polynomials to the estimation of smooth fluid flow fields. The normal flow at intensity contours is estimated from the local dis...

  9. Estimation of error fields from ferromagnetic parts in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, A. Bonito [Fusion for Energy (Spain); Chiariello, A.G.; Formisano, A.; Martone, R. [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dip. di Ing. Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, I-81031 Napoli (Italy); Portone, A., E-mail: alfredo.portone@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (Spain); Testoni, P. [Fusion for Energy (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The paper deals with error fields generated in ITER by magnetic masses. ► Magnetization state is computed from simplified FEM models. ► Closed form expressions adopted for the flux density of magnetized parts are given. ► Such expressions allow to simplify the estimation of the effect of iron pieces (or lack of) on error field. -- Abstract: Error fields in tokamaks are small departures from the exact axisymmetry of the ideal magnetic field configuration. Their reduction below a threshold value by the error field correction coils is essential since sufficiently large static error fields lead to discharge disruption. The error fields are originated not only by magnets fabrication and installation tolerances, by the joints and by the busbars, but also by the presence of ferromagnetic elements. It was shown that superconducting joints, feeders and busbars play a secondary effect; however in order to estimate of the importance of each possible error field source, rough evaluations can be very useful because it can provide an order of magnitude of the correspondent effect and, therefore, a ranking in the request for in depth analysis. The paper proposes a two steps procedure. The first step aims to get the approximate magnetization state of ferromagnetic parts; the second aims to estimate the full 3D error field over the whole volume using equivalent sources for magnetic masses and taking advantage from well assessed approximate closed form expressions, well suited for the far distance effects.

  10. JC Polyomavirus (JCV and Monoclonal Antibodies: Friends or Potential Foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Antonia Diotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS, observed in immunodeficient patients and caused by JC virus ((JCV, also called JC polyomavirus (JCPyV. After the HIV pandemic and the introduction of immunomodulatory therapy, the PML incidence significantly increased. The correlation between the use of natalizumab, a drug used in multiple sclerosis (MS, and the PML development of particular relevance. The high incidence of PML in natalizumab-treated patients has highlighted the importance of two factors: the need of PML risk stratification among natalizumab-treated patients and the need of effective therapeutic options. In this review, we discuss these two needs under the light of the major viral models of PML etiopathogenesis.

  11. Association between the JC polyomavirus infection and male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available In recent years the incidence of male infertility has increased. Many risk factors have been taken into consideration, including viral infections. Investigations into viral agents and male infertility have mainly been focused on human papillomaviruses, while no reports have been published on polyomaviruses and male infertility. The aim of this study was to verify whether JC virus and BK virus are associated with male infertility. Matched semen and urine samples from 106 infertile males and 100 fertile males, as controls, were analyzed. Specific PCR analyses were carried out to detect and quantify large T (Tag coding sequences of JCV and BKV. DNA sequencing, carried out in Tag JCV-positive samples, was addressed to viral protein 1 (VP1 coding sequences. The prevalence of JCV Tag sequences in semen and urine samples from infertile males was 34% (72/212, whereas the BKV prevalence was 0.94% (2/212. Specifically, JCV Tag sequences were detected in 24.5% (26/106 of semen and 43.4% (46/106 of urine samples from infertile men. In semen and urine samples from controls the prevalence was 11% and 28%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in JCV prevalence was disclosed in semen and urine samples of cases vs. controls. A higher JC viral DNA load was detected in samples from infertile males than in controls. In samples from infertile males the JC virus type 2 strain, subtype 2b, was more prevalent than ubiquitous type 1. JCV type 2 strain infection has been found to be associated with male infertility. These data suggest that the JC virus should be taken into consideration as an infectious agent which is responsible for male infertility.

  12. Improved depth estimation with the light field camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huachun; Sang, Xinzhu; Chen, Duo; Guo, Nan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Xunbo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu

    2017-10-01

    Light-field cameras are used in consumer and industrial applications. An array of micro-lenses captures enough information that one can refocus images after acquisition, as well as shift one's viewpoint within the sub-apertures of the main lens, effectively obtaining multiple views. Thus, depth estimation from both defocus and correspondence are now available in a single capture. And Lytro.Inc also provides a depth estimation from a single-shot capture with light field camera, like Lytro Illum. This Lytro depth estimation containing many correct depth information can be used for higher quality estimation. In this paper, we present a novel simple and principled algorithm that computes dense depth estimation by combining defocus, correspondence and Lytro depth estimations. We analyze 2D epipolar image (EPI) to get defocus and correspondence depth maps. Defocus depth is obtained by computing the spatial gradient after angular integration and correspondence depth by computing the angular variance from EPIs. Lytro depth can be extracted from Lyrto Illum with software. We then show how to combine the three cues into a high quality depth map. Our method for depth estimation is suitable for computer vision applications such as matting, full control of depth-of-field, and surface reconstruction, as well as light filed display

  13. Infectious Entry and Neutralization of Pathogenic JC Polyomaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Geoghegan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a lethal brain disease caused by uncontrolled replication of JC polyomavirus (JCV. JCV strains recovered from the brains of PML patients carry mutations that prevent the engagement of sialylated glycans, which are thought to serve as receptors for the infectious entry of wild-type JCV. In this report, we show that non-sialylated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs can serve as alternative attachment receptors for the infectious entry of both wild-type and PML mutant JCV strains. After GAG-mediated attachment, PML mutant strains engage non-sialylated non-GAG co-receptor glycans, such as asialo-GM1. JCV-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies isolated from patients who recovered from PML appear to block infection by preventing the docking of post-attachment co-receptor glycans in an apical pocket of the JCV major capsid protein. Identification of the GAG-dependent/sialylated glycan-independent alternative entry pathway should facilitate the development of infection inhibitors, including recombinant neutralizing antibodies. : Geoghegan et al. show that JC polyomavirus strains that cause brain disease infect cells via a pathway involving a heparin-like attachment receptor and a non-sialylated co-receptor. Candidate therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies neutralize by blocking co-receptor engagement. Keywords: polyomavirus, JC, BK, SV40, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, monoclonal antibody, mAb, virus entry, receptor

  14. Performance of Microbial Concrete Developed Using Bacillus Subtilus JC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. Seshagiri; Reddy, V. Srinivasa; Sasikala, Ch.

    2017-12-01

    Concrete is vulnerable to deterioration, corrosion, and cracks, and the consequent damage and loss of strength requires immensely expensive remediation and repair. So need for special concrete that they would respond to crack formation with an autonomous self-healing action lead to research and development of microbial concrete. The microbial concrete works on the principle of calcite mineral precipitation by a specific group of alkali-resistant spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Bacillus called Bacillus subtilis JC3, this phenomenon is called biomineralization or Microbiologically Induced Calcite Crystal Precipitation. Bacillus subtilis JC3, a common soil bacterium, has inherent ability to precipitate calcite crystals continuously which enhances the strength and durability performance of concrete enormously. This microbial concrete can be called as a "Self healing Bacterial Concrete" because it can remediate its cracks by itself without any human intervention and would make the concrete more durable and sustainable. This paper discuss the incorporation of microorganism Bacillus subtilis JC3 (developed at JNTU, India) into concrete and presents the results of experimental investigations carried out to study the improved durability and sustainability characteristics of microbial concrete.

  15. Spatial Bias in Field-Estimated Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLT,ROBERT M.; WILSON,JOHN L.; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-12-21

    Hydraulic property measurements often rely on non-linear inversion models whose errors vary between samples. In non-linear physical measurement systems, bias can be directly quantified and removed using calibration standards. In hydrologic systems, field calibration is often infeasible and bias must be quantified indirectly. We use a Monte Carlo error analysis to indirectly quantify spatial bias in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K{sub s}, and the exponential relative permeability parameter, {alpha}, estimated using a tension infiltrometer. Two types of observation error are considered, along with one inversion-model error resulting from poor contact between the instrument and the medium. Estimates of spatial statistics, including the mean, variance, and variogram-model parameters, show significant bias across a parameter space representative of poorly- to well-sorted silty sand to very coarse sand. When only observation errors are present, spatial statistics for both parameters are best estimated in materials with high hydraulic conductivity, like very coarse sand. When simple contact errors are included, the nature of the bias changes dramatically. Spatial statistics are poorly estimated, even in highly conductive materials. Conditions that permit accurate estimation of the statistics for one of the parameters prevent accurate estimation for the other; accurate regions for the two parameters do not overlap in parameter space. False cross-correlation between estimated parameters is created because estimates of K{sub s} also depend on estimates of {alpha} and both parameters are estimated from the same data.

  16. Fuzzy logic based ELF magnetic field estimation in substations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosalay, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines estimation of the extremely low frequency magnetic fields (MF) in the power substation. First, the results of the previous relevant research studies and the MF measurements in a sample power substation are presented. Then, a fuzzy logic model based on the geometric definitions in order to estimate the MF distribution is explained. Visual software, which has a three-dimensional screening unit, based on the fuzzy logic technique, has been developed. (authors)

  17. Cover estimation and payload location using Markov random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-02-01

    Payload location is an approach to find the message bits hidden in steganographic images, but not necessarily their logical order. Its success relies primarily on the accuracy of the underlying cover estimators and can be improved if more estimators are used. This paper presents an approach based on Markov random field to estimate the cover image given a stego image. It uses pairwise constraints to capture the natural two-dimensional statistics of cover images and forms a basis for more sophisticated models. Experimental results show that it is competitive against current state-of-the-art estimators and can locate payload embedded by simple LSB steganography and group-parity steganography. Furthermore, when combined with existing estimators, payload location accuracy improves significantly.

  18. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeland, S. van; Snoeren, P.R.; Huisman, H.J.; Boetes, C.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast

  19. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    20

    available scarce water resources in dry land agriculture, but direct measurement thereof for multiple locations in the field is not always feasible. Therefore, pedotransfer functions (PTFs) were developed to estimate soil water retention at FC and PWP for dryland soils of India. A soil database available for Arid Western India ...

  20. Estimation of colored dissolved organic matter and salinity fields in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the two algorithms produced more realistic estimates of Chl and CDOM distributions in Florida. Shelf and Bay waters. ... Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS,. Hooker et al ..... visible bands. The use of the multi-waveband semi-.

  1. The application of mean field theory to image motion estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hanauer, G G

    1995-01-01

    Previously, Markov random field (MRF) model-based techniques have been proposed for image motion estimation. Since motion estimation is usually an ill-posed problem, various constraints are needed to obtain a unique and stable solution. The main advantage of the MRF approach is its capacity to incorporate such constraints, for instance, motion continuity within an object and motion discontinuity at the boundaries between objects. In the MRF approach, motion estimation is often formulated as an optimization problem, and two frequently used optimization methods are simulated annealing (SA) and iterative-conditional mode (ICM). Although the SA is theoretically optimal in the sense of finding the global optimum, it usually takes many iterations to converge. The ICM, on the other hand, converges quickly, but its results are often unsatisfactory due to its "hard decision" nature. Previously, the authors have applied the mean field theory to image segmentation and image restoration problems. It provides results nearly as good as SA but with much faster convergence. The present paper shows how the mean field theory can be applied to MRF model-based motion estimation. This approach is demonstrated on both synthetic and real-world images, where it produced good motion estimates.

  2. Estimation of photon energy distribution in gamma calibration field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shimizu, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1997-03-01

    Photon survey instruments used for radiation protection are usually calibrated at gamma radiation fields, which are traceable to the national standard with regard to exposure. Whereas scattered radiations as well as primary gamma-rays exit in the calibration field, no consideration for the effect of the scattered radiations on energy distribution is given in routine calibration works. The scattered radiations can change photon energy spectra in the field, and this can result in misinterpretations of energy-dependent instrument responses. Construction materials in the field affect the energy distribution and magnitude of the scattered radiations. The geometric relationship between a gamma source and an instrument can determine the energy distribution at the calibration point. Therefore, it is essential for the assurance of quality calibration to estimate the energy spectra at the gamma calibration fields. Then, photon energy distributions at some fields in the Facility of Radiation Standard of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were estimated by measurements using a NaI(Tl) detector and Monte Carlo calculations. It was found that the use of collimator gives a different feature in photon energy distribution. The origin of scattered radiations and the ratio of the scattered radiations to the primary gamma-rays were obtained. The results can help to improve the calibration of photon survey instruments in the JAERI. (author)

  3. Estimations for the Schwinger functions of relativistic quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Schwinger functions of a relativistic neutral scalar field the basing test function space of which is S or D are estimated by methods of the analytic continuation. Concerning the behaviour in coincident points it is shown: The two-point singularity of the n-point Schwinger function of a field theory is dominated by an inverse power of the distance of both points modulo a multiplicative constant, if the other n-2 points a sufficiently distant and remain fixed. The power thereby, depends only on n. Using additional conditions on the field the independence of the power on n may be proved. Concerning the behaviour at infinite it is shown: The n-point Schwinger functions of a field theory are globally bounded, if the minimal distance of the arguments is positive. The bound depends only on n and the minimal distance of the arguments. (orig.) [de

  4. Estimation of magnetic field in a region from measurements of the field at discrete points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, Theodore; Dris, Manolis; Lucas, Demetrios.

    1984-12-01

    A method is given to estimate the magnetic field in a region from measurements of the field in its surface and its interior. The method might be useful in high energy physics and other experiments that use large area magnets. (author)

  5. Quantifying cannabis: A field study of marijuana quantity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Mark A; Conner, Bradley T; Pearson, Matthew R

    2018-05-17

    The assessment of marijuana use quantity poses unique challenges. These challenges have limited research efforts on quantity assessments. However, quantity estimates are critical to detecting associations between marijuana use and outcomes. We examined accuracy of marijuana users' estimations of quantities of marijuana they prepared to ingest and predictors of both how much was prepared for a single dose and the degree of (in)accuracy of participants' estimates. We recruited a sample of 128 regular-to-heavy marijuana users for a field study wherein they prepared and estimated quantities of marijuana flower in a joint or a bowl as well as marijuana concentrate using a dab tool. The vast majority of participants overestimated the quantity of marijuana that they used in their preparations. We failed to find robust predictors of estimation accuracy. Self-reported quantity estimates are inaccurate, which has implications for studying the link between quantity and marijuana use outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Field Test of Gopher Tortoise (Gopherus Polyphemus) Population Estimation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Web (WWW) at URL: http://www.cecer.army.mil ERDC/CERL TR-08-7 4 2 Field Tests The gopher tortoise is a species of conservation concern in the... ncv D ⎛ ⎞⎛ ⎞ = ⎜ ⎟⎜ ⎟ ⎝ ⎠⎝ ⎠ (4) where: L = estimate of line length to be sampled b = dispersion parameter 2ˆ( )tcv D = desired coefficient of

  7. Estimating Canopy Nitrogen Concentration in Sugarcane Using Field Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Souris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrieval of nutrient concentration in sugarcane through hyperspectral remote sensing is widely known to be affected by canopy architecture. The goal of this research was to develop an estimation model that could explain the nitrogen variations in sugarcane with combined cultivars. Reflectance spectra were measured over the sugarcane canopy using a field spectroradiometer. The models were calibrated by a vegetation index and multiple linear regression. The original reflectance was transformed into a First-Derivative Spectrum (FDS and two absorption features. The results indicated that the sensitive spectral wavelengths for quantifying nitrogen content existed mainly in the visible, red edge and far near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Normalized Differential Index (NDI based on FDS(750/700 and Ratio Spectral Index (RVI based on FDS(724/700 are best suited for characterizing the nitrogen concentration. The modified estimation model, generated by the Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR technique from FDS centered at 410, 426, 720, 754, and 1,216 nm, yielded the highest correlation coefficient value of 0.86 and Root Mean Square Error of the Estimate (RMSE value of 0.033%N (n = 90 with nitrogen concentration in sugarcane. The results of this research demonstrated that the estimation model developed by SMLR yielded a higher correlation coefficient with nitrogen content than the model computed by narrow vegetation indices. The strong correlation between measured and estimated nitrogen concentration indicated that the methods proposed in this study could be used for the reliable diagnosis of nitrogen quantity in sugarcane. Finally, the success of the field spectroscopy used for estimating the nutrient quality of sugarcane allowed an additional experiment using the polar orbiting hyperspectral data for the timely determination of crop nutrient status in rangelands without any requirement of prior

  8. From neurons to circuits: linear estimation of local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Malte; Logthetis, Nikos K.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular physiological recordings are typically separated into two frequency bands: local field potentials (LFPs, a circuit property) and spiking multi-unit activity (MUA). There has been increased interest in LFPs due to their correlation with fMRI measurements and the possibility of studying local processing and neuronal synchrony. To further understand the biophysical origin of LFPs, we asked whether it is possible to estimate their time course based on the spiking activity from the same or nearby electrodes. We used Signal Estimation Theory to show that a linear filter operation on the activity of one/few neurons can explain a significant fraction of the LFP time course in the macaque primary visual cortex. The linear filter used to estimate the LFPs had a stereotypical shape characterized by a sharp downstroke at negative time lags and a slower positive upstroke for positve time lags. The filter was similar across neocortical regions and behavioral conditions including spontaneous activity and visual stimulation. The estimations had a spatial resolution of ~1 mm and a temporal resolution of ~200 ms. By considering a causal filter, we observed a temporal asymmetry such that the positive time lags in the filter contributed more to the LFP estimation than negative time lags. Additionally, we showed that spikes occurring within ~10 ms of spikes from nearby neurons yielded better estimation accuracies than nonsynchronous spikes. In sum, our results suggest that at least some circuit-level local properties of the field potentials can be predicted from the activity of one or a few neurons. PMID:19889990

  9. Cortico-Cortical Receptive Field Estimates in Human Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen V Haak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Human visual cortex comprises many visual areas that contain a map of the visual field (Wandell et al 2007, Neuron 56, 366–383. These visual field maps can be identified readily in individual subjects with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during experimental sessions that last less than an hour (Wandell and Winawer 2011, Vis Res 718–737. Hence, visual field mapping with fMRI has been, and still is, a heavily used technique to examine the organisation of both normal and abnormal human visual cortex (Haak et al 2011, ACNR, 11(3, 20–21. However, visual field mapping cannot reveal every aspect of human visual cortex organisation. For example, the information processed within a visual field map arrives from somewhere and is sent to somewhere, and visual field mapping does not derive these input/output relationships. Here, we describe a new, model-based analysis for estimating the dependence between signals in distinct cortical regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Just as a stimulus-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of the stimulus contrast, the neural-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of responses elsewhere in the nervous system. When applied to two cortical regions, this function can be called the cortico-cortical receptive field (CCRF. We model the CCRF as a Gaussian-weighted region on the cortical surface and apply the model to data from both stimulus-driven and resting-state experimental conditions in visual cortex.

  10. stochastic estimation of transmissivity fields conditioned to flow connectivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas, Genis; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-vila, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Most methods for hydraulic parameter interpretation rely on a number of simplifications regarding the homogeneity of the underlying porous media. This way, the actual heterogeneity of any natural parameter, such as transmissivity, is transferred to the estimated in a way heavily dependent on the interpretation method used. An example is a pumping test, in most cases interpreted by means of the Cooper-Jacob method, which implicitly assumes a homogeneous isotropic confined aquifer. It was shown that the estimates obtained from this method when applied to a real site are not local values, but still have a physical meaning; the estimated transmissivity is equal to the effective transmissivity characteristic of the regional scale, while the log-ratio of the estimated storage coefficient with respect to the actual real value (assumed constant), indicated by , is an indicator of flow connectivity, representative of the scale given by the distance between the pumping and the observation wells. In this work we propose a methodology to use together with actual measurements of the log transmissivity at selected points to obtain a map of the best local transmissivity estimates using cokriging. Since the interpolation involves two variables measured at different support scales, a critical point is the estimation of the covariance and crosscovariance matrices, involving some quadratures that are obtained using some simplified approach. The method was applied to a synthetic field displaying statistical anisotropy, showing that the use of connectivity indicators mixed with the local values provide a better representation of the local value map, in particular regarding the enhanced representation of the continuity of structures corresponding to either high or low values.

  11. Born iterative reconstruction using perturbed-phase field estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2008-10-01

    A method of image reconstruction from scattering measurements for use in ultrasonic imaging is presented. The method employs distorted-wave Born iteration but does not require using a forward-problem solver or solving large systems of equations. These calculations are avoided by limiting intermediate estimates of medium variations to smooth functions in which the propagated fields can be approximated by phase perturbations derived from variations in a geometric path along rays. The reconstruction itself is formed by a modification of the filtered-backpropagation formula that includes correction terms to account for propagation through an estimated background. Numerical studies that validate the method for parameter ranges of interest in medical applications are presented. The efficiency of this method offers the possibility of real-time imaging from scattering measurements.

  12. Pharmacological cdk inhibitor R-Roscovitine suppresses JC virus proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orba, Yasuko; Sunden, Yuji; Suzuki, Tadaki; Nagashima, Kazuo; Kimura, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    The human Polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) utilizes cellular proteins for viral replication and transcription in the host cell nucleus. These cellular proteins represent potential targets for antiviral drugs against the JCV. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor R-Roscovitine, which has been shown to have antiviral activity against other viruses. We found that Roscovitine significantly inhibited the viral production and cytopathic effects of the JCV in a JCV-infected cell line. Roscovitine attenuated the transcriptional activity of JCV late genes, but not early genes, and also prevented viral replication via inhibiting phosphorylation of the viral early protein, large T antigen. These data suggest that the JCV requires cdks to transcribe late genes and to replicate its own DNA. That Roscovitine exhibited antiviral activity in JCV-infected cells suggests that Roscovitine might have therapeutic utility in the treatment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)

  13. Revisiting Boltzmann learning: parameter estimation in Markov random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Kjems, Ulrik

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a generalization of the Boltzmann machine that allows us to use the learning rule for a much wider class of maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori problems, including both supervised and unsupervised learning. Furthermore, the approach allows us to discuss regularization...... and generalization in the context of Boltzmann machines. We provide an illustrative example concerning parameter estimation in an inhomogeneous Markov field. The regularized adaptation produces a parameter set that closely resembles the “teacher” parameters, hence, will produce segmentations that closely reproduce...

  14. Estimating the Magnetic Field Strength in Hot Jupiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Rakesh K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thorngren, Daniel P., E-mail: rakesh_yadav@fas.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    A large fraction of known Jupiter-like exoplanets are inflated as compared to Jupiter. These “hot” Jupiters orbit close to their parent star and are bombarded with intense starlight. Many theories have been proposed to explain their radius inflation and several suggest that a small fraction of the incident starlight is injected into the planetary interior, which helps to puff up the planet. How will such energy injection affect the planetary dynamo? In this Letter, we estimate the surface magnetic field strength of hot Jupiters using scaling arguments that relate energy available in planetary interiors to the dynamo-generated magnetic fields. We find that if we take into account the energy injected in the planetary interior that is sufficient to inflate hot Jupiters to observed radii, then the resulting dynamo should be able generate magnetic fields that are more than an order of magnitude stronger than the Jovian values. Our analysis highlights the potential fundamental role of the stellar light in setting the field strength in hot Jupiters.

  15. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  16. Estimation of field capacity from ring infiltrometer-drainage data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilo Benedicto Ottoni Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Field capacity (FC is a parameter widely used in applied soil science. However, its in situ method of determination may be difficult to apply, generally because of the need of large supplies of water at the test sites. Ottoni Filho et al. (2014 proposed a standardized procedure for field determination of FC and showed that such in situ FC can be estimated by a linear pedotransfer function (PTF based on volumetric soil water content at the matric potential of -6 kPa [θ(6] for the same soils used in the present study. The objective of this study was to use soil moisture data below a double ring infiltrometer measured 48 h after the end of the infiltration test in order to develop PTFs for standard in situ FC. We found that such ring FC data were an average of 0.03 m³ m- 3 greater than standard FC values. The linear PTF that was developed for the ring FC data based only on θ(6 was nearly as accurate as the equivalent PTF reported by Ottoni Filho et al. (2014, which was developed for the standard FC data. The root mean squared residues of FC determined from both PTFs were about 0.02 m³ m- 3. The proposed method has the advantage of estimating the soil in situ FC using the water applied in the infiltration test.

  17. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engeland, Saskia; Snoeren, Peter R; Huisman, Henkjan; Boetes, Carla; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2006-03-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast is composed of two types of tissue, fat and parenchyma. Effective linear attenuation coefficients of these tissues are derived from empirical data as a function of tube voltage (kVp), anode material, filtration, and compressed breast thickness. By employing these, tissue composition at a given pixel is computed after performing breast thickness compensation, using a reference value for fatty tissue determined by the maximum pixel value in the breast tissue projection. Validation has been performed using 22 FFDM cases acquired with a GE Senographe 2000D by comparing the volume estimates with volumes obtained by semi-automatic segmentation of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The correlation between MRI and mammography volumes was 0.94 on a per image basis and 0.97 on a per patient basis. Using the dense tissue volumes from MRI data as the gold standard, the average relative error of the volume estimates was 13.6%.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Antimicrobial-Producing Clostridium sp. JC272, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Tushar, L.; Sasi Jyothsna, T. S.; Sasikala, C.; Ramana, C. V.

    2015-01-01

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Clostridium sp. JC272, isolated from a sediment sample collected from marine habitats of Gujarat, India. Clostridium sp. JC272 is an obligate anaerobe and has the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds. The genome sequence indicates the strain?s capability of producing small peptides (microcins), which are potential novel antibiotics.

  19. Depth estimation of complex geometry scenes from light fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lipeng; Wang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    The surface camera (SCam) of light fields gathers angular sample rays passing through a 3D point. The consistency of SCams is evaluated to estimate the depth map of scene. But the consistency is affected by several limitations such as occlusions or non-Lambertian surfaces. To solve those limitations, the SCam is partitioned into two segments that one of them could satisfy the consistency constraint. The segmentation pattern of SCam is highly related to the texture of spatial patch, so we enforce a mask matching to describe the shape correlation between segments of SCam and spatial patch. To further address the ambiguity in textureless region, a global method with pixel-wise plane label is presented. Plane label inference at each pixel can recover not only depth value but also local geometry structure, that is suitable for light fields with sub-pixel disparities and continuous view variation. Our method is evaluated on public light field datasets and outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  20. On-field mounting position estimation of a lidar sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Owes; Bergelt, René; Hardt, Wolfram

    2017-10-01

    In order to retrieve a highly accurate view of their environment, autonomous cars are often equipped with LiDAR sensors. These sensors deliver a three dimensional point cloud in their own co-ordinate frame, where the origin is the sensor itself. However, the common co-ordinate system required by HAD (Highly Autonomous Driving) software systems has its origin at the center of the vehicle's rear axle. Thus, a transformation of the acquired point clouds to car co-ordinates is necessary, and thereby the determination of the exact mounting position of the LiDAR system in car coordinates is required. Unfortunately, directly measuring this position is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Therefore, different approaches have been suggested for its estimation which mostly require an exhaustive test-setup and are again time-consuming to prepare. When preparing a high number of LiDAR mounted test vehicles for data acquisition, most approaches fall short due to time or money constraints. In this paper we propose an approach for mounting position estimation which features an easy execution and setup, thus making it feasible for on-field calibration.

  1. Isolation and characterization of an ubiquitin extension protein gene (JcUEP) promoter from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; He, Liang-Liang; Niu, Long-Jian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2015-04-01

    The JcUEP promoter is active constitutively in the bio-fuel plant Jatropha curcas , and is an alternative to the widely used CaMV35S promoter for driving constitutive overexpression of transgenes in Jatropha. Well-characterized promoters are required for transgenic breeding of Jatropha curcas, a biofuel feedstock with great potential for production of bio-diesel and bio-jet fuel. In this study, an ubiquitin extension protein gene from Jatropha, designated JcUEP, was identified to be ubiquitously expressed. Thus, we isolated a 1.2 kb fragment of the 5' flanking region of JcUEP and evaluated its activity as a constitutive promoter in Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. As expected, histochemical GUS assay showed that the JcUEP promoter was active in all Arabidopsis and Jatropha tissues tested. We also compared the activity of the JcUEP promoter with that of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter, a well-characterized constitutive promoter conferring strong transgene expression in dicot species, in various tissues of Jatropha. In a fluorometric GUS assay, the two promoters showed similar activities in stems, mature leaves and female flowers; while the CaMV35S promoter was more effective than the JcUEP promoter in other tissues, especially young leaves and inflorescences. In addition, the JcUEP promoter retained its activity under stress conditions in low temperature, high salt, dehydration and exogenous ABA treatments. These results suggest that the plant-derived JcUEP promoter could be an alternative to the CaMV35S promoter for driving constitutive overexpression of transgenes in Jatropha and other plants.

  2. Det danske landskab. De danske malere på J.C. Dahls tid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Kasper

    Om værker af Jens Juel, C.W. Eckersberg, J.C. Dahl, Thomas Fearnley, Christen Købke, Johan Thomas Lundbye, Peter Christian Skovgaard, Dankvart Dreyer, Vilhelm Kyhn, Janus la Cour......Om værker af Jens Juel, C.W. Eckersberg, J.C. Dahl, Thomas Fearnley, Christen Købke, Johan Thomas Lundbye, Peter Christian Skovgaard, Dankvart Dreyer, Vilhelm Kyhn, Janus la Cour...

  3. Difference between ²JC2H3 and ²JC3H2 spin-spin couplings in heterocyclic five- and six-membered rings as a probe for studying σ-ring currents: a quantum chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Rubén H; dos Santos, Francisco P; Ducati, Lucas C; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2010-12-01

    Adequate analyses of canonical molecular orbitals (CMOs) can provide rather detailed information on the importance of different σ-Fermi contact (FC) coupling pathways (FC term transmitted through the σ-skeleton). Knowledge of the spatial distribution of CMOs is obtained by expanding them in terms of natural bond orbitals (NBOs). Their relative importance for transmitting the σ-FC contribution to a given spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs) is estimated by resorting to the expression of the FC term given by the polarisation propagator formalism. In this way, it is possible to classify the effects affecting such couplings in two different ways: delocalisation interactions taking place in the neighbourhood of the coupling nuclei and 'round the ring' effects. The latter, associated with σ-ring currents, are observed to yield significant differences between the FC terms of (2)J(C2H3) and (2)J(C3H2) SSCCs which, consequently, are taken as probes to gauge the differences in σ-ring currents for the five-membered rings (furan, thiophene, selenophene and pyrrol) and also for the six-membered rings (benzene, pyridine, protonated pyridine and N-oxide pyridine) used in the present study. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Estimating the diffuseness of sound fields: A wavenumber analysis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Melanie; Davy, John L.; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a diffuse sound field is widely used in the analysis of sound in enclosures. The diffuse sound field is generally described as composed of plane waves with random phases, which wave number vectors are uniformly distributed over all angles of incidence. In this study, an interpretat...

  5. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyabrata Santra

    2018-03-27

    Mar 27, 2018 ... of the global population (Millennium Ecosystem. Assessment 2005). Likewise, there is a .... Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop PTFs for arid soils of India to estimate soil water content at FC and PWP.

  6. On estimating perturbative coefficients in quantum field theory and statistical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, M.A.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1994-05-01

    The authors present a method for estimating perturbative coefficients in quantum field theory and Statistical Physics. They are able to obtain reliable error-bars for each estimate. The results, in all cases, are excellent

  7. High-Resolution Gravity Field Modeling for Mercury to Estimate Crust and Lithospheric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, S.; Mazarico, E.; Genova, A.; James, P. B.

    2018-05-01

    We estimate a gravity field model for Mercury using line-of-sight data to improve the gravity field model at short wavelengths. This can be used to infer crustal density and infer the support mechanism of the lithosphere.

  8. Dose estimation in embryo or fetus in external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, Beatriz N.

    2001-01-01

    The embryo or the fetus can be irradiated as result of radiological procedures of diagnosis of therapy in where the beam effects directly on the same one or in tissues or peripherical organs. Some authors have suggested that in the first stages of the pregnancy the dose in ovaries can be the good estimated of the dose in embryo or fetus. In advanced conditions of the development, probably also in the early stage, is more appropriated to specify the dose in the embryo or fetus equal of the uterus. The dose in the uterus is a good estimated so much for external irradiation as for radionuclides incorporation

  9. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the cosmic microwave background might bear the mark of predecoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated, for the first time, from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross correlation.

  10. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the Cosmic Microwave Background might bear the mark of pre-decoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross-correlation.

  11. Field, laboratory and estimated soil-water content limits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-01-21

    Jan 21, 2005 ... silt (0.002 to 0.05 mm) percentage to estimate the soil-water content at a given soil-water .... ar and br are the intercept and slope values of the regres- .... tions use the particle size classification of the South African Soil.

  12. Soil profile property estimation with field and laboratory VNIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) soil sensors have the potential to provide rapid, high-resolution estimation of multiple soil properties. Although many studies have focused on laboratory-based visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy of dried soil samples, previous work has demonstrated ...

  13. Methodological approaches in estimating anomalous geochemical field structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, R; Rudmin, M

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical statistic methods were applied to analyze the core samples from vertical expendable wells in Chertovo Koryto gold ore field. The following methods were used to analyse gold in samples: assay tests and atomic absorption method (AAS), while emission spectrum semiquantative method was applied to identify traces. The analysis of geochemical association distribution in one central profile demonstrated that bulk metasomatic aureoles are characteristic of concentric zonal structure. The distribution of geochemical associations is correlated to the hydrothermal stages of mineral formation identified in this deposit. It was proved that the processed geochemical data by factor and cluster analyses provided additional information on the anomalous geochemical field structure in gold- bearing black-shale strata. Such methods are effective tools in interpretating specific features of geochemical field structures in analogous potential ore-bearing areas

  14. Estimate of an environmental magnetic field of fast radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wei-Li; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a type of newly-discovered transient astronomical phenomenon. They have short durations, high dispersion measures and a high event rate. However, due to unknown distances and undetected electromagnetic counterparts at other wavebands, it is difficult to further investigate FRBs. Here we propose a method to study their environmental magnetic field using an indirect method. Starting with dispersion measures and rotation measures (RMs), we try to obtain the parallel magnetic field component B-bar ‖ which is the average value along the line of sight in the host galaxy. Because both RMs and redshifts are now unavailable, we demonstrate the dependence of B-bar ‖ on these two separate quantities. This result, if the RM and redshift of an FRB are measured, would be expected to provide a clue towards understanding an environmental magnetic field of an FRB. (paper)

  15. Cyclotron Lines: From Magnetic Field Strength Estimators to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandreyee Maitra

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... context can provide, to build a complete picture for the physics of accretion and ... cesses which occur near the NS surface, where the ... CRSF) which is the focal point of discussion in this arti- .... first direct measurement of the magnetic field strength of .... The above model requires a gradient in the magnetic.

  16. Direct magnetic field estimation based on echo planar raw data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, Frederik; Splitthoff, Daniel Nicolas; Speck, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Gradient recalled echo echo planar imaging is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging. The fast data acquisition is, however, very sensitive to field inhomogeneities which manifest themselves as artifacts in the images. Typically used correction methods have the common deficit that the data for the correction are acquired only once at the beginning of the experiment, assuming the field inhomogeneity distribution B(0) does not change over the course of the experiment. In this paper, methods to extract the magnetic field distribution from the acquired k-space data or from the reconstructed phase image of a gradient echo planar sequence are compared and extended. A common derivation for the presented approaches provides a solid theoretical basis, enables a fair comparison and demonstrates the equivalence of the k-space and the image phase based approaches. The image phase analysis is extended here to calculate the local gradient in the readout direction and improvements are introduced to the echo shift analysis, referred to here as "k-space filtering analysis." The described methods are compared to experimentally acquired B(0) maps in phantoms and in vivo. The k-space filtering analysis presented in this work demonstrated to be the most sensitive method to detect field inhomogeneities.

  17. Estimation of magnetic fields in cyclotron AIC-144

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, K.; Talach, M.

    2005-11-01

    The method of magnetic fields calculation, what is based on result of incomplete magnetic measurements, in the chamber of cyclotron is described. Special emphasis is given to precision of calculation, in particular concerning an impact of currents flowing in the concentric coils on harmonic components of magnetic induction on particular radiuses in the chamber. In the earlier calculation this impact was ignored or required time-consuming measurements. (author)

  18. Estimation of complete temperature fields from measured temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, S.T.; Roemer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In hyperthermia treatments, it is desirable to be able to predict complete tissue temperature fields from sampled temperatures taken at a few locations. This is a difficult problem in hyperthermia treatments since the tissue blood perfusion is unknown. An initial attempt to do this automatically using unconstrained optimization techniques to minimize the differences between steady state temperatures measured during a treatment and temperatures (at the same locations) predicted from treatment simulations has been previously reported. A second technique using transient temperatures following a step decrease in power has been developed. This technique, which appears to be able to better predict complete temperature fields is presented and both it and the steady state technique are applied to data from both simulated and experimental hyperthermia treatments. The results of applying the two techniques are compared for one-dimensional situations. One particularly important problem which the transient technique can solve (and the steady state technique does not seem to be able to do as well) is that of predicting the complete temperature field in situations where the true maximum and/or minimum temperatures present are not measured by the available instrumentation

  19. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  20. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingquan Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  1. Effect of Visual Field Presentation on Action Planning (Estimating Reach) in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl; Cordova, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors examined the effects of target information presented in different visual fields (lower, upper, central) on estimates of reach via use of motor imagery in children (5-11 years old) and young adults. Results indicated an advantage for estimating reach movements for targets placed in lower visual field (LoVF), with all…

  2. #GeriMedJC: The Twitter Complement to the Traditional-Format Geriatric Medicine Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardhouse, Amanda I; Budd, Laura; Yang, Seu Y C; Wong, Camilla L

    2017-06-01

    Twitter is a public microblogging platform that overcomes physical limitations and allows unrestricted participation beyond academic silos, enabling interactive discussions. Twitter-based journal clubs have demonstrated growth, sustainability, and worldwide communication, using a hashtag (#) to follow participation. This article describes the first year of #GeriMedJC, a monthly 1-hour live, 23-hour asynchronous Twitter-based complement to the traditional-format geriatric medicine journal club. The Twitter moderator tweets from the handle @GeriMedJC; encourages use of #GeriMedJC; and invites content experts, study authors, and followers to participate in critical appraisal of medical literature. Using the hashtag #GeriMedJC, tweets were categorized according to thematic content, relevance to the journal club, and authorship. Third-party analytical tools Symplur and Twitter Analytics were used for growth and effect metrics (number of followers, participants, tweets, retweets, replies, impressions). Qualitative analysis of follower and participant profiles was used to establish country of origin and occupation. A semistructured interview of postgraduate trainees was conducted to ascertain qualitative aspects of the experience. In the first year, @GeriMedJC has grown to 541 followers on six continents. Most followers were physicians (43%), two-thirds of which were geriatricians. Growth metrics increased over 12 months, with a mean of 121 tweets, 25 participants, and 105,831 impressions per journal club. Tweets were most often related to the article being appraised (87.5%) and ranged in thematic content from clinical practice (29%) to critical appraisal (24%) to medical education (20%). #GeriMedJC is a feasible example of using social media platforms such as Twitter to encourage international and interprofessional appraisal of medical literature. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Thickness dependence of J_c (0) in MgB_2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yiling; Yang, Can; Jia, Chunyan; Feng, Qingrong; Gan, Zizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A serial of MgB_2 superconducting films from 10 nm to 8 µm have been prepared. • T_c and J_c (5 K, 0 T) of films are high. • J_c (5 K, 0 T) reaches its maximum 2.3 × 10"8 A cm"−"2 for 100 nm films. • The relationship between thickness and J_c has been discussed in detail. - Abstract: MgB_2 superconducting films, whose thicknesses range from 10 nm to 8 µm, have been fabricated on SiC substrates by hybrid physical–chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method. It is the first time that the T_c and the J_c of MgB_2 films are studied on such a large scale. It is found that with the increasing of thickness, T_c elevates first and then keeps roughly stable except for some slight fluctuations, while J_c (5 K, 0 T) experiences a sharp increase followed by a relatively slow fall. The maximum J_c (5 K, 0 T) = 2.3 × 10"8 A cm"−"2 is obtained for 100 nm films, which is the experimental evidence for preparing high-quality MgB_2 films by HPCVD method. Thus, this work may provide guidance on choosing the suitable thickness for applications. Meanwhile, the films prepared by us cover ultrathin films, thin films and thick films, so the study on them will bring a comprehensive understanding of MgB_2 films.

  4. Anti-JC virus antibody prevalence in a multinational multiple sclerosis cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Tomas; Achiron, Anat; Alfredsson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is an opportunistic virus known to cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Anti-JC virus (Anti-JCV) antibody prevalence in a large, geographically diverse, multi-national multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort was compared in a cross-sectional study. Overall, anti-JCV antibody...... prevalence was 57.6%. Anti-JCV antibody prevalence in MS patients ranged from approximately 47% to 68% across these countries: Norway, 47.4%; Denmark, 52.6%; Israel, 56.6%; France, 57.6%; Italy, 58.3%; Sweden, 59.0%; Germany, 59.1%; Austria, 66.7% and Turkey, 67.7%. Prevalence increased with age (from 49...

  5. A rapid estimation of near field tsunami run-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riqueime, Sebastian; Fuentes, Mauricio; Hayes, Gavin; Campos, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Many efforts have been made to quickly estimate the maximum run-up height of tsunamis associated with large earthquakes. This is a difficult task, because of the time it takes to construct a tsunami model using real time data from the source. It is possible to construct a database of potential seismic sources and their corresponding tsunami a priori.However, such models are generally based on uniform slip distributions and thus oversimplify the knowledge of the earthquake source. Here, we show how to predict tsunami run-up from any seismic source model using an analytic solution, that was specifically designed for subduction zones with a well defined geometry, i.e., Chile, Japan, Nicaragua, Alaska. The main idea of this work is to provide a tool for emergency response, trading off accuracy for speed. The solutions we present for large earthquakes appear promising. Here, run-up models are computed for: The 1992 Mw 7.7 Nicaragua Earthquake, the 2001 Mw 8.4 Perú Earthquake, the 2003Mw 8.3 Hokkaido Earthquake, the 2007 Mw 8.1 Perú Earthquake, the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Earthquake, the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake and the recent 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique Earthquake. The maximum run-up estimations are consistent with measurements made inland after each event, with a peak of 9 m for Nicaragua, 8 m for Perú (2001), 32 m for Maule, 41 m for Tohoku, and 4.1 m for Iquique. Considering recent advances made in the analysis of real time GPS data and the ability to rapidly resolve the finiteness of a large earthquake close to existing GPS networks, it will be possible in the near future to perform these calculations within the first minutes after the occurrence of similar events. Thus, such calculations will provide faster run-up information than is available from existing uniform-slip seismic source databases or past events of pre-modeled seismic sources.

  6. Use of Pyranometers to Estimate PV Module Degradation Rates in the Field: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignola, Frank; Peterson, Josh; Kessler, Rich; Mavromatakis, Fotis; Dooraghi, Mike; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a methodology that uses relative measurements to estimate the degradation rates of PV modules in the field. The importance of calibration and cleaning is illustrated. The number of years of field measurements needed to measure degradation rates with data from the field is cut in half using relative comparisons.

  7. Spectral Gap Estimates in Mean Field Spin Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Gérard; Jagannath, Aukosh

    2018-05-01

    We show that mixing for local, reversible dynamics of mean field spin glasses is exponentially slow in the low temperature regime. We introduce a notion of free energy barriers for the overlap, and prove that their existence imply that the spectral gap is exponentially small, and thus that mixing is exponentially slow. We then exhibit sufficient conditions on the equilibrium Gibbs measure which guarantee the existence of these barriers, using the notion of replicon eigenvalue and 2D Guerra Talagrand bounds. We show how these sufficient conditions cover large classes of Ising spin models for reversible nearest-neighbor dynamics and spherical models for Langevin dynamics. Finally, in the case of Ising spins, Panchenko's recent rigorous calculation (Panchenko in Ann Probab 46(2):865-896, 2018) of the free energy for a system of "two real replica" enables us to prove a quenched LDP for the overlap distribution, which gives us a wider criterion for slow mixing directly related to the Franz-Parisi-Virasoro approach (Franz et al. in J Phys I 2(10):1869-1880, 1992; Kurchan et al. J Phys I 3(8):1819-1838, 1993). This condition holds in a wider range of temperatures.

  8. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai; Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  9. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  10. Chimeric immune receptors (CIRs) specific to JC virus for immunotherapy in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Yang; E.L. Beaudoin; L. Lu; R.A. Du Pasquier (Renaud); M.J. Kuroda; R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); I.J. Koralnik; R.P. Junghans

    2007-01-01

    textabstractProgressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a deadly brain disease caused by the polyomavirus JC (JCV). The aim of this study is to develop 'designer T cells' armed with anti-JCV TCR-based chimeric immune receptors (CIRs) by gene modification for PML immunotherapy. Two T cell

  11. Peel v Hamon J&C engineering (pty) ltd: Ignoring the result ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case note provides a concise and understandable version of the confusing facts in Peel v Hamon J&C Engineering (Pty) Ltd, and deals with the remedy provided for in section 163 of the Companies Act (the oppression remedy). The importance of drawing a distinction between the application of this section and the ...

  12. Spendere meno, spendere meglio: una proposta panottica di J.-C. Guédon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available J.-C. Guédon ha commentato la nostra campagna di crowdsourcing in merito alle spese delle biblioteche sulla mailing list Nexa. Offriamo, qui di seguito, la versione italiana delle sue osservazioni – che presuppongono un mondo accademico molto diverso da quello impostoci...

  13. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein

  14. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Keerti V

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT, and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3 was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein.

  15. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein. PMID:15717928

  16. JC virus chromogenic in situ hybridization in brain biopsies from patients with and without PML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, Gary W; Beck, Rose C; Pettay, James D; Kohn, Debra J; Tuohy, Marion J; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Prayson, Richard A; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2006-06-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC polyoma virus. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry are the traditional methods of confirming the presence of the virus in brain biopsies from these patients. We studied the brain biopsies from 7 patients with PML and 6 patients without PML with chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) for the JC polyoma virus using a commercially available probe. The biopsies from the patients with the PML cases were proven to contain the JC polyoma virus by traditional and molecular methods. The CISH findings were compared with the known state of infection. All (7/7) of the biopsies from patients with PML were positive for the presence of polyoma virus by CISH, whereas the biopsies from patients without PML were uniformly negative. CISH seems to be a useful tool for the detection of the JC virus in brain biopsies from patients with PML, and is more accessible because a commercial probe is available.

  17. J.C. Nalle Community School: A Study of a School Turnaround Effort. Publication #2015-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Zakia; Princiotta, Daniel; Stratford, Brandon; Caal, Selma; Li, Weilin; Murphy, Kelly; Coffey, Amelia; Carrington, Nicholas; Carney, Rachel; Oster, Maryjo; Horton, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    J.C. Nalle is a Community School located in the Marshall Heights neighborhood of Ward 7 in Washington, D.C. The community in which J.C. Nalle is located, historically one of the more economically disadvantaged areas of the city, has experienced a number of changes in recent years. This report of evaluation findings begins with an introduction to…

  18. Sums and products of sets and estimates of rational trigonometric sums in fields of prime order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaev, Mubaris Z [National Autonomous University of Mexico, Institute of Mathematics (Mexico)

    2010-11-16

    This paper is a survey of main results on the problem of sums and products of sets in fields of prime order and their applications to estimates of rational trigonometric sums. Bibliography: 85 titles.

  19. Some nonlinear estimates for lateral propagation of self-generated B fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    We present nonlinear estimates which provide plausible guidelines and scalings for the lateral transport of magnetic fields due to laser-plasma interaction in both slab and cylindrical geometries. Limitations of the modelling are also indicated

  20. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingyong; Tao, Yan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1) is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1) was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha. PMID:27168978

  1. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1 caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1 is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1 was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha.

  2. V3Si multifilamentary superconductor with high overall Jc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takao; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Kosuge, Michio; Iijima, Yasuo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    V 3 Si is one of the A15-type superconducting compounds from which single crystals can be quite easily obtained due to the nature of the equilibrium phase diagram. Thus, the fundamental characteristics of A15 compounds (such as electronic structure and cubic-to-tetragonal structural transformation) have been studied with this compound. V 3 Si is, however, also promising in practical use as an alternative to Nb 3 Sn for high field magnets, since the upper critical field H c2 (4.2 K) is more than 20 T. Although the open-quotes bronze process,close quotes the established commercial process to produce Nb 3 Sn conductors, is also available for V 3 Si, the ternary section of the Cu-V-Si phase diagram indicates two diffusion paths are possible: One from the bronze with low Si content (Si 3 Si, and the other from the bronze with higher Si content to V 3 Si via V 5 Si 3 . The high Si bronze is likely to be advantageous in reducing the bronze volume fraction and hence achieving high overall critical current density J c . This is because the initially formed V 5 Si 3 is eventually converted to V 3 Si as long as the total proportion of V to Si in the composite (overall V/Si molar ratio) is kept around 3. However, long times at high temperatures are necessary for appreciable V 3 Si layer growth, thereby yielding grain growth of V 3 Si and lowering the J c of the V 3 Si compound and the overall J c accordingly. In the present study, in order to improve the overall J c , the authors have realized ∼1μm filament diameter by preparing a double-stacked Cu-8.5at.%Si/V composite. The primary bundle is sheathed with a Ta tube. The Si in the bronze inside the Ta is available only for the diffusion reaction, and the overall V/Si ratios is ∼3

  3. Artificial force fields for multi-agent simulations of maritime traffic and risk estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, F.; Ligteringen, H.; Van Gulijk, C.; Ale, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic risk model is designed to estimate probabilities of collisions for shipping accidents in busy waterways. We propose a method based on multi-agent simulation that uses an artificial force field to model ship maneuvers. The artificial force field is calibrated by AIS data (Automatic

  4. Small-mammal density estimation: A field comparison of grid-based vs. web-based density estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, R.R.; Yates, Terry L.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.; Dunnum, J.L.; Franklin, A.B.; Friggens, M.T.; Lubow, B.C.; Miller, M.; Olson, G.S.; Parmenter, Cheryl A.; Pollard, J.; Rexstad, E.; Shenk, T.M.; Stanley, T.R.; White, Gary C.

    2003-01-01

    Statistical models for estimating absolute densities of field populations of animals have been widely used over the last century in both scientific studies and wildlife management programs. To date, two general classes of density estimation models have been developed: models that use data sets from capture–recapture or removal sampling techniques (often derived from trapping grids) from which separate estimates of population size (NÌ‚) and effective sampling area (AÌ‚) are used to calculate density (DÌ‚ = NÌ‚/AÌ‚); and models applicable to sampling regimes using distance-sampling theory (typically transect lines or trapping webs) to estimate detection functions and densities directly from the distance data. However, few studies have evaluated these respective models for accuracy, precision, and bias on known field populations, and no studies have been conducted that compare the two approaches under controlled field conditions. In this study, we evaluated both classes of density estimators on known densities of enclosed rodent populations. Test data sets (n = 11) were developed using nine rodent species from capture–recapture live-trapping on both trapping grids and trapping webs in four replicate 4.2-ha enclosures on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico, USA. Additional “saturation” trapping efforts resulted in an enumeration of the rodent populations in each enclosure, allowing the computation of true densities. Density estimates (DÌ‚) were calculated using program CAPTURE for the grid data sets and program DISTANCE for the web data sets, and these results were compared to the known true densities (D) to evaluate each model's relative mean square error, accuracy, precision, and bias. In addition, we evaluated a variety of approaches to each data set's analysis by having a group of independent expert analysts calculate their best density estimates without a priori knowledge of the true densities; this

  5. Near-field/far-field azimuth and elevation angle estimation using a single vector hydrophone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichavský, Petr; Wong, K. T.; Zoltowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 11 (2001), s. 2498-2510 ISSN 1053-587X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/97/0466; GA ČR GA102/01/0021 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1075907 Keywords : acoustic signal processing * array signal processing * direction-of-arrival estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.268, year: 2001

  6. ANN Based Approach for Estimation of Construction Costs of Sports Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Juszczyk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimates are essential for the success of construction projects. Neural networks, as the tools of artificial intelligence, offer a significant potential in this field. Applying neural networks, however, requires respective studies due to the specifics of different kinds of facilities. This paper presents the proposal of an approach to the estimation of construction costs of sports fields which is based on neural networks. The general applicability of artificial neural networks in the formulated problem with cost estimation is investigated. An applicability of multilayer perceptron networks is confirmed by the results of the initial training of a set of various artificial neural networks. Moreover, one network was tailored for mapping a relationship between the total cost of construction works and the selected cost predictors which are characteristic of sports fields. Its prediction quality and accuracy were assessed positively. The research results legitimatize the proposed approach.

  7. Rock property estimates using multiple seismic attributes and neural networks; Pegasus Field, West Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuelke, J.S.; Quirein, J.A.; Sarg, J.F.

    1998-12-31

    This case study shows the benefit of using multiple seismic trace attributes and the pattern recognition capabilities of neural networks to predict reservoir architecture and porosity distribution in the Pegasus Field, West Texas. The study used the power of neural networks to integrate geologic, borehole and seismic data. Illustrated are the improvements between the new neural network approach and the more traditional method of seismic trace inversion for porosity estimation. Comprehensive statistical methods and interpretational/subjective measures are used in the prediction of porosity from seismic attributes. A 3-D volume of seismic derived porosity estimates for the Devonian reservoir provide a very detailed estimate of porosity, both spatially and vertically, for the field. The additional reservoir porosity detail provided, between the well control, allows for optimal placement of horizontal wells and improved field development. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Methodology to estimate the relative pressure field from noisy experimental velocity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, C D; Raguin, L G

    2008-01-01

    The determination of intravascular pressure fields is important to the characterization of cardiovascular pathology. We present a two-stage method that solves the inverse problem of estimating the relative pressure field from noisy velocity fields measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) on an irregular domain with limited spatial resolution, and includes a filter for the experimental noise. For the pressure calculation, the Poisson pressure equation is solved by embedding the irregular flow domain into a regular domain. To lessen the propagation of the noise inherent to the velocity measurements, three filters - a median filter and two physics-based filters - are evaluated using a 2-D Couette flow. The two physics-based filters outperform the median filter for the estimation of the relative pressure field for realistic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = 5 to 30). The most accurate pressure field results from a filter that applies in a least-squares sense three constraints simultaneously: consistency between measured and filtered velocity fields, divergence-free and additional smoothness conditions. This filter leads to a 5-fold gain in accuracy for the estimated relative pressure field compared to without noise filtering, in conditions consistent with PC-MRI of the carotid artery: SNR = 5, 20 x 20 discretized flow domain (25 X 25 computational domain).

  9. Field Evaluation of the System Identification Approach for Tension Estimation of External Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hyun Noh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of external tendons are considered to verify the applicability of tension estimation method based on the finite element model with system identification technique. The proposed method is applied to estimate the tension of benchmark numerical example, model structure, and field structure. The numerical and experimental results show that the existing methods such as taut string theory and linear regression method show large error in the estimated tension when the condition of external tendon is different with the basic assumption used during the derivation of relationship between tension and natural frequency. However, the proposed method gives reasonable results for all of the considered external tendons in this study. Furthermore, the proposed method can evaluate the accuracy of estimated tension indirectly by comparing the measured and calculated natural frequencies. Therefore, the proposed method can be effectively used for field application of various types of external tendons.

  10. Are rapid population estimates accurate? A field trial of two different assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Rebecca F; Coulombier, Denis; Ampuero, Julia; Lucas, Marcelino E S; Barretto, Avertino T; Jacquier, Guy; Diaz, Francisco; Balandine, Serge; Mahoudeau, Claude; Brown, Vincent

    2006-09-01

    Emergencies resulting in large-scale displacement often lead to populations resettling in areas where basic health services and sanitation are unavailable. To plan relief-related activities quickly, rapid population size estimates are needed. The currently recommended Quadrat method estimates total population by extrapolating the average population size living in square blocks of known area to the total site surface. An alternative approach, the T-Square, provides a population estimate based on analysis of the spatial distribution of housing units taken throughout a site. We field tested both methods and validated the results against a census in Esturro Bairro, Beira, Mozambique. Compared to the census (population: 9,479), the T-Square yielded a better population estimate (9,523) than the Quadrat method (7,681; 95% confidence interval: 6,160-9,201), but was more difficult for field survey teams to implement. Although applicable only to similar sites, several general conclusions can be drawn for emergency planning.

  11. Delay Kalman Filter to Estimate the Attitude of a Mobile Object with Indoor Magnetic Field Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Combettes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available More and more services are based on knowing the location of pedestrians equipped with connected objects (smartphones, smartwatches, etc.. One part of the location estimation process is attitude estimation. Many algorithms have been proposed but they principally target open space areas where the local magnetic field equals the Earth’s field. Unfortunately, this approach is impossible indoors, where the use of magnetometer arrays or magnetic field gradients has been proposed. However, current approaches omit the impact of past state estimates on the current orientation estimate, especially when a reference field is computed over a sliding window. A novel Delay Kalman filter is proposed in this paper to integrate this time correlation: the Delay MAGYQ. Experimental assessment, conducted in a motion lab with a handheld inertial and magnetic mobile unit, shows that the novel filter better estimates the Euler angles of the handheld device with an 11.7° mean error on the yaw angle as compared to 16.4° with a common Additive Extended Kalman filter.

  12. Erosion and deposition in a field/forest system estimated using cesium-137 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrance, R.; McIntyre, S.; Lance, C.

    1988-01-01

    Soil erosion and deposition were estimated using Cs-137 activity within a 7.25-ha field/forest system in the southeastern coastal plain. Sol eroded from the field was deposited both in the riparian forest ecosystem and in downslope areas of the field. Total activity, depth to peak activity, and depth to zero activity increased downslope from field to stream. Erosion and deposition rates, estimated by changes in activity per unit area from a reference undisturbed forest site, showed that about twice as much total deposition had taken place as total erosion. Excess deposition was attributed to deposition from the upstream portions of the watershed. Erosion and deposition rates estimated with this method were about 63 and 256 Mg/ha/yr, respectively. Erosion and deposition rates estimated by two different calculation techniques were nearly identical. These rates were considerably higher than rates estimated in an earlier study. The rates may be overestimated because the differential rates of Cs-137 movement on clay particles were not considered. The riparian ecosystem acted as a very efficient sediment trap. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Method of estimating horizontal vectors of ionospheric electric field deduced from HF Doppler data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Ogawa, T.; Kamide, Y.; Kroehl, H.W.; Hausman, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    An HF Doppler method for estimating the time variations of the horizontal electric field in the ionosphere is presented which takes into account, for long-lasting variations in the electric field, the effect of electron decay due to attachment and/or recombination processes. The method is applied to an isolated substorm event, using equivalent ionospheric current systems deduced from worldwide magnetometer data in the estimations. The present results are found to agree with data deduced from current systems and high latitude electrojet activity. 18 references

  14. Comprehensive evaluation of attitude and orbit estimation using real earth magnetic field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1997-01-01

    A single, augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF) which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit was developed and tested with simulated and real magnetometer and rate data. Since the earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is accurately known, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft's orbit, are a function of orbit and attitude errors. These differences can be used to estimate the orbit and attitude. The test results of the EKF with magnetometer and gyro data from three NASA satellites are presented and evaluated.

  15. Estimation of local and regional components of drain - flow from an irrigated field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eching, S.O.; Hopmans, J.W.; Wallender, W.W.; Macyntyre, J.L.; Peters, D.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of regional ground water and deep percolation from a furrow irrigated field to total drain flow was estimated using salt load analysis. It was found that 64% of the drain flow comes from regional ground water flow. The electrical conductivity of the drain water was highly correlated with the drain flow rate. From the field water balance with deep percolation as estimated from the salt load analysis, using yield function derived evapotranspiration, and measured changes in root zone water storage, it was shown that 14% of the crop evapotranspiration comes from ground water during the study period. 8 figs; 5 tabs; 15 refs ( Author )

  16. Estimation of a planetary magnetic field using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of planetary magnetic fields provides deep insights into the structure and dynamics of planets. Due to the interaction of a planet with the solar wind plasma, a rather complex magnetic environment is generated. The situation at planet Mercury is an example of the complexities occurring as this planet's field is rather weak and the magnetosphere rather small. New methods are presented to separate interior and exterior magnetic field contributions which are based on a dynamic inversion approach using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD model and time-varying spacecraft observations. The methods select different data such as bow shock location information or magnetosheath magnetic field data. Our investigations are carried out in preparation for the upcoming dual-spacecraft BepiColombo mission set out to precisely estimate Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field. To validate our new approaches, we use THEMIS magnetosheath observations to estimate the known terrestrial dipole moment. The terrestrial magnetosheath provides observations from a strongly disturbed magnetic environment, comparable to the situation at Mercury. Statistical and systematic errors are considered and their dependence on the selected data sets are examined. Including time-dependent upstream solar wind variations rather than averaged conditions significantly reduces the statistical error of the estimation. Taking the entire magnetosheath data along the spacecraft's trajectory instead of only the bow shock location into account further improves accuracy of the estimated dipole moment.

  17. Isolation and characterization of the Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) promoter conferring preferential expression in inflorescence buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; He, Liang-Liang; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2016-08-01

    The 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas is predominantly active in the inflorescence buds of transgenic plants, in which the -1313/-1057 region is essential for maintaining the activity. Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1) is a MADS-domain transcription factor gene that functions primarily in flower development. We isolated a homolog of AP1 from Jatropha curcas (designated JcAP1), which was shown to exhibit flower-specific expression in Jatropha. JcAP1 is first expressed in inflorescence buds and continues to be primarily expressed in the sepals. We isolated a 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter and evaluated its activity in transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. In transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha, the inflorescence buds exhibited notable GUS activity, whereas the sepals did not. Against expectations, the JcAP1 promoter was active in the anthers of Arabidopsis and Jatropha and was highly expressed in Jatropha seeds. An analysis of promoter deletions in transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that deletion of the -1313/-1057 region resulted in loss of JcAP1 promoter activity in the inflorescence buds and increased activity in the anthers. These results suggested that some regulatory sequences in the -1313/-1057 region are essential for maintaining promoter activity in inflorescence buds and can partly suppress activity in the anthers. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that other elements located upstream of the 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter may be required for flower-specific activation. The JcAP1 promoter characterized in this study can be used to drive transgene expression in both the inflorescence buds and seeds of Jatropha.

  18. A level playing field-obtaining consistent cost estimates for advanced reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R.; Rohm, H.H.; Humphreys, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A level playing field in sports is necessary to avoid a situation in which a team has an unfair advantage over its competition. Similarly, rules and guidelines for developing cost estimates can be established which, in effect, provide a level playing field whereby cost estimates for advanced power plant concepts can be presented on a consistent and equitable basis. As an example, consider the capital costs shown in Table 1. Both sets of cost are for the exact same power plant; Estimate 1 is expressed in constant dollars while Estimate 2 is presented in nominal or as-spent dollars. As shown, the costs in Table 1 are not directly comparable. Similar problems can be introduced as a result of differing assumptions in any number of parameters including the scope of the cost estimate, inflation/escalation and interest rates, contingency costs, and site location. Of course, the motivation for having consistent cost estimates is to permit comparison among various concepts. As the U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work on several advanced reactor concepts in which expected cost is a key evaluation parameter, the emphasis in this particular endeavor has been in promoting the comparability of advanced reactor cost estimates among themselves and to existing power plant types. To continue with the analogy, the idea is to lay out the playing field and the rules of the contest such that each team participates in the match on an equal basis with the final score being solely determined by the inherent strengths and abilities of the teams. A description of the playing field and some of the more important rules will now be provided

  19. Using field feedback to estimate failure rates of safety-related systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, Florent

    2017-01-01

    The IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 functional safety standards encourage the use of field feedback to estimate the failure rates of safety-related systems, which is preferred than generic data. In some cases (if “Route 2_H” is adopted for the 'hardware safety integrity constraints”), this is even a requirement. This paper presents how to estimate the failure rates from field feedback with confidence intervals, depending if the failures are detected on-line (called 'detected failures', e.g. by automatic diagnostic tests) or only revealed by proof tests (called 'undetected failures'). Examples show that for the same duration and number of failures observed, the estimated failure rates are basically higher for “undetected failures” because, in this case, the duration observed includes intervals of time where it is unknown that the elements have failed. This points out the need of using a proper approach for failure rates estimation, especially for failures that are not detected on-line. Then, this paper proposes an approach to use the estimated failure rates, with their uncertainties, for PFDavg and PFH assessment with upper confidence bounds, in accordance with IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 requirements. Examples finally show that the highest SIL that can be claimed for a safety function can be limited by the 90% upper confidence bound of PFDavg or PFH. The requirements of the IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 relating to the data collection and analysis should therefore be properly considered for the study of all safety-related systems. - Highlights: • This paper deals with requirements of the IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 for using field feedback to estimate failure rates of safety-related systems. • This paper presents how to estimate the failure rates from field feedback with confidence intervals for failures that are detected on-line. • This paper presents how to estimate the failure rates from field feedback with confidence intervals for failures that are only revealed by

  20. Optimization of Transverse Oscillating Fields for Vector Velocity Estimation with Convex Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for making Vector Flow Images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields for convex probes and evaluates their performance using Field II simulations and measurements using the SARUS experimental...... from 90 to 45 degrees in steps of 15 degrees. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period lx to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The basic equation for lx gives 1.14 mm at 40 mm...

  1. New a priori estimates for mean-field games with congestion

    KAUST Repository

    Evangelista, David; Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent developments in crowd dynamics models (e.g. pedestrian flow problems). Our formulation is given by a mean-field game (MFG) with congestion. We start by reviewing earlier models and results. Next, we develop our model. We establish new a priori estimates that give partial regularity of the solutions. Finally, we discuss numerical results.

  2. Estimating adhesive seed-dispersal distances : field experiments and correlated random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouissie, AM; Lengkeek, W; van Diggelen, R

    1. In this study we aimed to estimate distance distributions of adhesively dispersed seeds and the factors that determine them. 2. Seed attachment and detachment were studied using field experiments with a real sheep, a sheep dummy and a cattle dummy. Seed-retention data were used in correlated

  3. New a priori estimates for mean-field games with congestion

    KAUST Repository

    Evangelista, David

    2016-01-06

    We present recent developments in crowd dynamics models (e.g. pedestrian flow problems). Our formulation is given by a mean-field game (MFG) with congestion. We start by reviewing earlier models and results. Next, we develop our model. We establish new a priori estimates that give partial regularity of the solutions. Finally, we discuss numerical results.

  4. The limiting behavior of the estimated parameters in a misspecified random field regression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; Qin, Yu

    This paper examines the limiting properties of the estimated parameters in the random field regression model recently proposed by Hamilton (Econometrica, 2001). Though the model is parametric, it enjoys the flexibility of the nonparametric approach since it can approximate a large collection of n...

  5. Effects of the near field on source-independent q estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shigapov, R.; Kashtan, B.; Droujinine, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of Q estimation from microseismic and from perforation shot data. Assuming that the source wavelet is not well known, we focused on the spectral ratio method and on source-independent viscoelastic full waveform inversion. We derived 3-D near-field approximations of monopole

  6. Estimating total evaporation at the field scale using the SEBS model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimating total evaporation at the field scale using the SEBS model and data infilling ... of two infilling techniques to create a daily satellite-derived ET time series. ... and produced R2 and RMSE values of 0.33 and 2.19 mm∙d-1, respectively, ...

  7. Comprehensive Evaluation of Attitude and Orbit Estimation Using Actual Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie K.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2000-01-01

    A single, augmented Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit has been developed and successfully tested with real magnetometer and gyro data only. Because the earth magnetic field is a function of time and position, and because time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both orbit and attitude errors. Thus, conceivably these differences could be used to estimate both orbit and attitude; an observability study validated this assumption. The results of testing the EKF with actual magnetometer and gyro data, from four satellites supported by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center, are presented and evaluated. They confirm the assumption that a single EKF can estimate both attitude and orbit when using gyros and magnetometers only.

  8. Estimating a planetary magnetic field with time-dependent global MHD simulations using an adjoint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with a planetary magnetic field causes electrical currents that modify the magnetic field distribution around the planet. We present an approach to estimating the planetary magnetic field from in situ spacecraft data using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation approach. The method is developed with respect to the upcoming BepiColombo mission to planet Mercury aimed at determining the planet's magnetic field and its interior electrical conductivity distribution. In contrast to the widely used empirical models, global MHD simulations allow the calculation of the strongly time-dependent interaction process of the solar wind with the planet. As a first approach, we use a simple MHD simulation code that includes time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field parameters. The planetary parameters are estimated by minimizing the misfit of spacecraft data and simulation results with a gradient-based optimization. As the calculation of gradients with respect to many parameters is usually very time-consuming, we investigate the application of an adjoint MHD model. This adjoint MHD model is generated by an automatic differentiation tool to compute the gradients efficiently. The computational cost for determining the gradient with an adjoint approach is nearly independent of the number of parameters. Our method is validated by application to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms magnetosheath data to estimate Earth's dipole moment.

  9. MHODE: a local-homogeneity theory for improved source-parameter estimation of potential fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, Maurizio; Florio, Giovanni; Paoletti, Valeria

    2015-08-01

    We describe a multihomogeneity theory for source-parameter estimation of potential fields. Similar to what happens for random source models, where the monofractal scaling-law has been generalized into a multifractal law, we propose to generalize the homogeneity law into a multihomogeneity law. This allows a theoretically correct approach to study real-world potential fields, which are inhomogeneous and so do not show scale invariance, except in the asymptotic regions (very near to or very far from their sources). Since the scaling properties of inhomogeneous fields change with the scale of observation, we show that they may be better studied at a set of scales than at a single scale and that a multihomogeneous model is needed to explain its complex scaling behaviour. In order to perform this task, we first introduce fractional-degree homogeneous fields, to show that: (i) homogeneous potential fields may have fractional or integer degree; (ii) the source-distributions for a fractional-degree are not confined in a bounded region, similarly to some integer-degree models, such as the infinite line mass and (iii) differently from the integer-degree case, the fractional-degree source distributions are no longer uniform density functions. Using this enlarged set of homogeneous fields, real-world anomaly fields are studied at different scales, by a simple search, at any local window W, for the best homogeneous field of either integer or fractional-degree, this yielding a multiscale set of local homogeneity-degrees and depth estimations which we call multihomogeneous model. It is so defined a new technique of source parameter estimation (Multi-HOmogeneity Depth Estimation, MHODE), permitting retrieval of the source parameters of complex sources. We test the method with inhomogeneous fields of finite sources, such as faults or cylinders, and show its effectiveness also in a real-case example. These applications show the usefulness of the new concepts, multihomogeneity and

  10. Estimation of polarization distribution on gold nanorods system from hierarchical features of optical near-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kazuharu; Nishikawa, Naoki; Nakagomi, Ryo; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Hori, Hirokazu

    2018-02-01

    To design optoelectronic functionalities in nanometer scale based on interactions of electronic system with optical near-fields, it is essential to evaluate the relationship between optical near-fields and their sources. Several theoretical studies have been performed, so far, to analyze such complex relationship to design the interaction fields of several specific scales. In this study, we have performed detailed and high-precision measurements of optical near-field structures woven by a large number of independent polarizations generated in the gold nanorods array under laser light irradiation at the resonant frequency. We have accumulated the multi-layered data of optical near-field imaging at different heights above the planar surface with the resolution of several nm by a STM-assisted scanning near-field optical microscope. Based on these data, we have performed an inverse calculation to estimate the position, direction, and strength of the local polarization buried under the flat surface of the sample. As a result of the inverse operation, we have confirmed that the complexities in the nanometer scale optical near-fields could be reconstructed by combinations of induced polarization in each gold nanorod. We have demonstrated the hierarchical properties of optical near-fields based on spatial frequency expansion and superposition of dipole fields to provide insightful information for applications such for secure multi-layered information storage.

  11. Optimization of Photospheric Electric Field Estimates for Accurate Retrieval of Total Magnetic Energy Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumme, E.; Pomoell, J.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Estimates of the photospheric magnetic, electric, and plasma velocity fields are essential for studying the dynamics of the solar atmosphere, for example through the derivative quantities of Poynting and relative helicity flux and using the fields to obtain the lower boundary condition for data-driven coronal simulations. In this paper we study the performance of a data processing and electric field inversion approach that requires only high-resolution and high-cadence line-of-sight or vector magnetograms, which we obtain from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The approach does not require any photospheric velocity estimates, and the lacking velocity information is compensated for using ad hoc assumptions. We show that the free parameters of these assumptions can be optimized to reproduce the time evolution of the total magnetic energy injection through the photosphere in NOAA AR 11158, when compared to recent state-of-the-art estimates for this active region. However, we find that the relative magnetic helicity injection is reproduced poorly, reaching at best a modest underestimation. We also discuss the effect of some of the data processing details on the results, including the masking of the noise-dominated pixels and the tracking method of the active region, neither of which has received much attention in the literature so far. In most cases the effect of these details is small, but when the optimization of the free parameters of the ad hoc assumptions is considered, a consistent use of the noise mask is required. The results found in this paper imply that the data processing and electric field inversion approach that uses only the photospheric magnetic field information offers a flexible and straightforward way to obtain photospheric magnetic and electric field estimates suitable for practical applications such as coronal modeling studies.

  12. Estimating Small-Body Gravity Field from Shape Model and Navigation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryan S.; Werner, Robert A.; Bhaskaran, Shyam

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method to model the external gravity field and to estimate the internal density variation of a small-body. We first discuss the modeling problem, where we assume the polyhedral shape and internal density distribution are given, and model the body interior using finite elements definitions, such as cubes and spheres. The gravitational attractions computed from these approaches are compared with the true uniform-density polyhedral attraction and the level of accuracies are presented. We then discuss the inverse problem where we assume the body shape, radiometric measurements, and a priori density constraints are given, and estimate the internal density variation by estimating the density of each finite element. The result shows that the accuracy of the estimated density variation can be significantly improved depending on the orbit altitude, finite-element resolution, and measurement accuracy.

  13. Estimate of symbiotically fixed nitrogen in field grown soybeans using variations in 15N natural abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarger, N.; Durr, J.C.; Bourguignon, C.; Lagacherie, B.; Mariotti, A.; Mariotti, F.

    1979-01-01

    The use of variations in natural abundance of 15 N between nitrogen fixing and non nitrogen fixing soybeans was investigated for quantitative estimate of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Isotopic analysis of 4 varieties of inoculated and non-inoculated soybeans growing under field conditions, with and without N-fertilizer was determined. It was found that inoculated soybeans had a significantly lower 15 N content than non-inoculated ones. Estimates of the participation of fixed N to the total nitrogen content of inoculated soybeans were calculated from these differences. They were compared to estimates calculated from differences in N yield between inoculated and non-inoculated plants and to the nitrogenase activity, measured by the C 2 H 2 reduction assay over the growing season. Estimates given by the 15 N measurements were correlated with the C 2 H 2 reducing activity but not with the differences in the N yield. This shows that the isotopic composition was dependent on the amount of fixed nitrogen and consequently that the estimates of fixed nitrogen based on natural 15 N abundance should be reliable. The absence of correlation between estimates based on 15 N content and estimates based on N yield was explained by differences in the uptake of soil nitrogen between inoculated and non inoculated soybeans. (Auth.)

  14. ALTERNATIVA DE MODELO LINEAR PARA ESTIMAÇÃO DA BIOMASSA VERDE DE Bambusa vulgaris SCHRAD. EX J.C. WENDL NA EXISTÊNCIA DE MULTICOLINEARIDADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Victor Lopes da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to use a multivariate statistical method as an alternative to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod, Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. i.e.: J.C. Wendl., in the presence of multicollinearity. The data came from an experiment carried out for the Agroindustrial Excelsior S. A. (Agrimex company located in the city of Goiana - PE. Quantified by their green biomass weight, 450 bamboo rods were used and 4 independent variables measured in the rod. Initially, the presence of the multicollinearity could be verified through the correlation matrix of the independent variables and the varience inflation factors, the alternative used was the regression of the principal components based on the covariate matrix. The result indicates that, when there is an interpretation to the main components, the model shows a satisfactory data adjust, and it could be used to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod.

  15. JcTI-I: a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Helen P S; Oliveira, Jose T A; Sousa, Daniele O B; Morais, Janne K S; Moreno, Frederico B; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Viegas, Ricardo A; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine, and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v) followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B) and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200). Non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0~kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252~kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m) carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH, and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration less than 5~μg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria.

  16. JcTI-I, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Paula S Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200. Non-reducing SDS-PAGE and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252 kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC less than 5 µg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Magnetic Field Exposure Estimates Based on Power Lines Near Homes (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, A.; Feychting, M.

    1999-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have based their estimates of magnetic field exposure on the proximity to power lines. This has been done in three principally different ways, which differ in the amount of information that is used. These are: (1) distance; (2) distance and configuration (wire code); and (3) distance, configuration, and load (calculated field). It is presumed that the more information that is used, the more accurate is the exposure estimate. All these three approaches suffer from the limitation that they only account for exposure that is generated by power lines. The influence on the in-home magnetic field from sources other than the power line are not considered, nor is exposure experienced at places other than the home. This raises the following question. What is the implication for the result of the epidemiological study of the exposure misclassification that is introduced by basing magnetic field exposure estimation on power lines near homes? Although the necessary information is only partly at hand the answers to this question will be discussed. The basis will be some general epidemiological principles combined with data from a Swedish study on residential exposure and cancer risk. (author)

  18. Albedo and estimates of net radiation for green beans under polyethylene cover and field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.L. de; Escobedo, J.F.; Tornero, M.T.T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the albedo (r) and estimates of net radiation and global solar irradiance for green beans crop (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), cultivated in greenhouse with cover of polyethylene and field conditions, in Botucatu, SP, Brazil (22° 54' S; 48° 27' W; 850 m). The solar global irradiance (R g ) and solar reflected radiation (R r ) were used to estimate the albedo through the ratio between R r and R g . The diurnal curves of albedo were obtained for days with clear sky and partially cloudy conditions, for different phenological stages of the crop. The albedo ranged with the solar elevation, the environment and the phenological stages. The cloudiness range have almost no influence on the albedo diurnal amount. The estimation of radiation were made by linear regression, using the global solar irradiance (R g ) and net short-waves radiation (R c ) as independent variables. All estimates of radiation showed better adjustment for specific phenological periods compared to the entire crop growing cycle. The net radiation in the greenhouse has been estimated by the global solar irradiance measured at field conditions. (author) [pt

  19. PSF Estimation of Space-Variant Ultra-Wide Field of View Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Janout

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-wide-field of view (UWFOV imaging systems are affected by various aberrations, most of which are highly angle-dependent. A description of UWFOV imaging systems, such as microscopy optics, security camera systems and other special space-variant imaging systems, is a difficult task that can be achieved by estimating the Point Spread Function (PSF of the system. This paper proposes a novel method for modeling the space-variant PSF of an imaging system using the Zernike polynomials wavefront description. The PSF estimation algorithm is based on obtaining field-dependent expansion coefficients of the Zernike polynomials by fitting real image data of the analyzed imaging system using an iterative approach in an initial estimate of the fitting parameters to ensure convergence robustness. The method is promising as an alternative to the standard approach based on Shack–Hartmann interferometry, since the estimate of the aberration coefficients is processed directly in the image plane. This approach is tested on simulated and laboratory-acquired image data that generally show good agreement. The resulting data are compared with the results of other modeling methods. The proposed PSF estimation method provides around 5% accuracy of the optical system model.

  20. Estimating Field Scale Crop Evapotranspiration using Landsat and MODIS Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; Snyder, R. L.; Daniele, Z.; Gao, F.

    2016-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through Evapotranspiration (ET). Given the challenges of already-stressed water resources and ground water regulation in California, a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The Priestley-Taylor (PT) approach, calibrated with field data and driven by satellite observations, shows great promise for accurate ET estimates across diverse ecosystems. We here aim to improve the robustness of the PT approach in agricultural lands, to enable growers and farm managers to tailor irrigation management based on in-field spatial variability and in-season variation. We optimized the PT coefficients for each crop type with available ET measurements from eddy covariance towers and/or surface renewal stations at six crop fields (Alfalfa, Almond, Citrus, Corn, Pistachio and Rice) in California. Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements of net radiation, with a RMSE of less than 36 W m-2. The crop type specific optimization performed well, with a RMSE of 30 W m-2 and a correlation of 0.81 for predicted daily latent heat flux. The calibrated algorithm was used to estimate ET at 30 m resolution over the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for 2015 water year. It captures well the seasonal dynamics and spatial distribution of ET in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of canopy and consumptive water use at a field scale, will help the growers to be well prepared and informed to adaptively manage water, canopy, and grove density to maximize the yield with the least amount of water.

  1. AN ESTIMATE OF THE NEARBY INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD USING NEUTRAL ATOMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    The strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the nearby interstellar medium have remained elusive, despite continual improvements in observations and models. Data from NASA's Voyager mission and the Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) experiment on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have placed observational constraints on the magnetic field, and the more recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) data appear to also bear an imprint of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). In this paper, we combine computational models of the heliosphere with data from Voyager, SOHO/SWAN, and IBEX to estimate both the strength and direction of the nearby ISMF. On the basis of our simulations, we find that a field strength of 2-3 μG pointing from ecliptic coordinates (220-224, 39-44), combined with an interstellar hydrogen density of ∼0.15 cm -3 , produces results most consistent with observations.

  2. Estimation of the magnetic field gradient tensor using the Swarm constellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, part of the magnetic field gradient tensor is estimated in space by the Swarm mission. We investigate the possibility of a more complete estimation of the gradient tensor exploiting the Swarm constellation. The East-West gradients can be approximated by observations from...... deviations compared to conventional vector observations at almost all latitudes. Analytical and numerical analysis of the spectral properties of the gradient tensor shows that specific combinations of the East-West and North-South gradients have almost identical signal content to the radial gradient...

  3. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. III. Twist Number Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y. [School of Astronomy and Space Science and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Pariat, E.; Moraitis, K. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-92190 Meudon (France); Valori, G. [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Anfinogentov, S. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS 664033, Irkutsk, P.O. box 291, Lermontov Street, 126a (Russian Federation); Chen, F. [Max-Plank-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Georgoulis, M. K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics of the Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Thalmann, J. K. [Institute of Physics, Univeristy of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Yang, S., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-05-01

    We study the writhe, twist, and magnetic helicity of different magnetic flux ropes, based on models of the solar coronal magnetic field structure. These include an analytical force-free Titov–Démoulin equilibrium solution, non-force-free magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and nonlinear force-free magnetic field models. The geometrical boundary of the magnetic flux rope is determined by the quasi-separatrix layer and the bottom surface, and the axis curve of the flux rope is determined by its overall orientation. The twist is computed by the Berger–Prior formula, which is suitable for arbitrary geometry and both force-free and non-force-free models. The magnetic helicity is estimated by the twist multiplied by the square of the axial magnetic flux. We compare the obtained values with those derived by a finite volume helicity estimation method. We find that the magnetic helicity obtained with the twist method agrees with the helicity carried by the purely current-carrying part of the field within uncertainties for most test cases. It is also found that the current-carrying part of the model field is relatively significant at the very location of the magnetic flux rope. This qualitatively explains the agreement between the magnetic helicity computed by the twist method and the helicity contributed purely by the current-carrying magnetic field.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Polyomavirus JC in the Biaka Pygmies and Bantu of Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvester C Chima

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is ubiquitous in humans and causes a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system , progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy which is common in AIDS. JCV is excreted in urine of 30-70% of adults worldwide. Based on sequence analysis of JCV complete genomes or fragments thereof, JCV can be classified into geographically derived genotypes. Types 1 and 2 are of European and Asian origin respectively while Types 3 and 6 are African in origin. Type 4, a possible recombinant of European and African genotypes (1 and 3 is common in the USA. To delineate the JCV genotypes in an aboriginal African population, random urine samples were collected from the Biaka Pygmies and Bantu from the Central African Republic. There were 43 males and 25 females aged 4-55 years, with an average age of 26 years. After PCR amplification of JCV in urine, products were directly cycle sequenced. Five of 23 Pygmy adults (22% and four of 20 Bantu adults (20% were positive for JC viruria. DNA sequence analysis revealed JCV Type 3 (two, Type 6 (two and one Type 1 variant in Biaka Pygmies. All the Bantu strains were Type 6. Type 3 and 6 strains of JCV are the predominant strains in central Africa. The presence of multiple subtypes of JCV in Biaka Pygmies may be a result of extensive interactions of Pygmies with their African tribal neighbors during their itinerant movements in the equatorial forest.

  5. Determining and uniformly estimating the gauge potential corresponding to a given gauge field on M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostow, M.; Shnider, S.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1986-01-01

    In an earlier paper on the field copy problem, we proved that there exists a generic set of connections (gauge potentials) on a principle bundle with a semi-simple structure group over a four-dimensional base manifold for which the connection is uniquely determined by its curvature (gauge field). We conjectured that there exists a smaller, but still generic, set of connections for which the curvature map sending a connection to its curvature admits a continuous inverse with respect to the appropriate function space topologies. The conjecture says, in other words, that restricting to certain generic curvature 2-forms, one can determine and uniformly estimate the connection and its derivatives from the curvature and uniform estimates of its derivatives. In this Letter we give an affirmative answer to the conjecture and show, moreover, that the set of such connections contains an open dense set in the Whitney C ∞ topology. (orig.)

  6. Theoretical estimation and validation of radiation field in alkaline hydrolysis plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sanjay; Krishnamohanan, T.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K., E-mail: singhs@barc.gov.in [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Anand, S. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Pancholi, K. C. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Spent organic solvent (30% TBP + 70% n-Dodecane) from reprocessing facility is treated at ETP in Alkaline Hydrolysis Plant (AHP) and Organic Waste Incineration (ORWIN) Facility. In AHP-ORWIN, there are three horizontal cylindrical tanks having 2.0 m{sup 3} operating capacity used for waste storage and transfer. The three tanks are, Aqueous Waste Tank (AWT), Waste Receiving Tank (WRT) and Dodecane Waste Tank (DWT). These tanks are en-housed in a shielded room in this facility. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to estimate ambient radiation field levels when the storage tanks are having hold up volumes of desired specific activity levels. In this paper the theoretically estimated values of radiation field is compared with the actual measured dose.

  7. The effect of silver nanoparticle size on Jc of YBa2Cu3O7-x superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbod, M.; Batvandi, M.; Shoushtari, M. Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Critical current density Jc is one of the most important superconducting parameters which is crucial in superconductor's applications. Introducing silver into the superconductors as intergrain filler has been a routine way to increase the Jc. In this work, YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO), was doped by silver nanoparticles and their effect was studied on Jc as the flux pinning centers. Silver nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 30 to 1000 nm have been prepared using the reduction of silver in ethanol. The stoichiometric amounts of initial material of YBCO superconductor were added to the solution. After evaporation of ethanol, the obtained powder was used to fabricate YBCO samples. The total weight ratio of silver nanoparticles to superconductor was 1:100. The samples were characterized using SEM, EDX and XRD measurements. Jc was measured by a standard four probe technique. The results show by increasing silver nanoparticle size up to 700 nm, Jc increases then decreases by further increase in silver particle size. (authors)

  8. Estimating salinity stress in sugarcane fields with spaceborne hyperspectral vegetation indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, S.; Naseri, A. A.; AlaviPanah, S. K.; Mojaradi, B.; Bartholomeus, H. M.; Clevers, J. G. P. W.; Behzad, M.

    2013-04-01

    The presence of salt in the soil profile negatively affects the growth and development of vegetation. As a result, the spectral reflectance of vegetation canopies varies for different salinity levels. This research was conducted to (1) investigate the capability of satellite-based hyperspectral vegetation indices (VIs) for estimating soil salinity in agricultural fields, (2) evaluate the performance of 21 existing VIs and (3) develop new VIs based on a combination of wavelengths sensitive for multiple stresses and find the best one for estimating soil salinity. For this purpose a Hyperion image of September 2, 2010, and data on soil salinity at 108 locations in sugarcane (Saccharum officina L.) fields were used. Results show that soil salinity could well be estimated by some of these VIs. Indices related to chlorophyll absorption bands or based on a combination of chlorophyll and water absorption bands had the highest correlation with soil salinity. In contrast, indices that are only based on water absorption bands had low to medium correlations, while indices that use only visible bands did not perform well. From the investigated indices the optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) had the strongest relationship (R2 = 0.69) with soil salinity for the training data, but it did not perform well in the validation phase. The validation procedure showed that the new salinity and water stress indices (SWSI) implemented in this study (SWSI-1, SWSI-2, SWSI-3) and the Vogelmann red edge index yielded the best results for estimating soil salinity for independent fields with root mean square errors of 1.14, 1.15, 1.17 and 1.15 dS/m, respectively. Our results show that soil salinity could be estimated by satellite-based hyperspectral VIs, but validation of obtained models for independent data is essential for selecting the best model.

  9. Quantitative estimation of defects from measurement obtained by remote field eddy current inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, M.E.; Fleury, G.

    1999-01-01

    Remote field eddy current technique is used for dimensioning grooves that may occurs in ferromagnetic pipes. This paper proposes a method to estimate the depth and the length of corrosion grooves from measurement of a pick-up coil signal phase at different positions close to the defect. Grooves dimensioning needs the knowledge of the physical relation between measurements and defect dimensions. So, finite element calculations are performed to obtain a parametric algebraic function of the physical phenomena. By means of this model and a previously defined general approach, an estimate of groove size may be given. In this approach, algebraic function parameters and groove dimensions are linked through a polynomial function. In order to validate this estimation procedure, a statistical study has been performed. The approach is proved to be suitable for real measurements. (authors)

  10. Sensorless Stator Field-Oriented Controlled IM Drive at Low Speed with Rr Estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Pu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pertains to a technique of a sensorless indirect stator field-oriented induction motor control, which prevents the accumulative errors incurred by the integrator and the problem relating to the stability of the control system caused by the stator resistance susceptible to temperature variations while conducting the flux estimation directly and computing the synchronous rotary speed. The research adds an adaptive flux observer to estimate the speed of the rotor and uses the fixed trace algorithm (FTA to execute an online estimation of the slip difference, thereby improving the system of stability under the low rotary speed at regenerating mode and the influence of the rotor resistance on the slip angle. Finally, the paper conducts simulations by Simulink of MATLAB and practices to verify the correctness of the result the paper presents.

  11. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  12. Mixing Matrix Estimation of Underdetermined Blind Source Separation Based on Data Field and Improved FCM Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern electronic warfare, multiple input multiple output (MIMO radar has become an important tool for electronic reconnaissance and intelligence transmission because of its anti-stealth, high resolution, low intercept and anti-destruction characteristics. As a common MIMO radar signal, discrete frequency coding waveform (DFCW has a serious overlap of both time and frequency, so it cannot be directly used in the current radar signal separation problems. The existing fuzzy clustering algorithms have problems in initial value selection, low convergence rate and local extreme values which will lead to the low accuracy of the mixing matrix estimation. Consequently, a novel mixing matrix estimation algorithm based on data field and improved fuzzy C-means (FCM clustering is proposed. First of all, the sparsity and linear clustering characteristics of the time–frequency domain MIMO radar signals are enhanced by using the single-source principal value of complex angular detection. Secondly, the data field uses the potential energy information to analyze the particle distribution, thus design a new clustering number selection scheme. Then the particle swarm optimization algorithm is introduced to improve the iterative clustering process of FCM, and finally get the estimated value of the mixing matrix. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm improves both the estimation accuracy and the robustness of the mixing matrix.

  13. Estimation of transversely isotropic material properties from magnetic resonance elastography using the optimised virtual fields method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renee; Kolipaka, Arunark; Nash, Martyn P; Young, Alistair A

    2018-03-12

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been used to estimate isotropic myocardial stiffness. However, anisotropic stiffness estimates may give insight into structural changes that occur in the myocardium as a result of pathologies such as diastolic heart failure. The virtual fields method (VFM) has been proposed for estimating material stiffness from image data. This study applied the optimised VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from both simulated harmonic displacements in a left ventricular (LV) model with a fibre field measured from histology as well as isotropic phantom MRE data. Two material model formulations were implemented, estimating either 3 or 5 material properties. The 3-parameter formulation writes the transversely isotropic constitutive relation in a way that dissociates the bulk modulus from other parameters. Accurate identification of transversely isotropic material properties in the LV model was shown to be dependent on the loading condition applied, amount of Gaussian noise in the signal, and frequency of excitation. Parameter sensitivity values showed that shear moduli are less sensitive to noise than the other parameters. This preliminary investigation showed the feasibility and limitations of using the VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from MRE images of a phantom as well as simulated harmonic displacements in an LV geometry. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Corona magnetic field over sunspots estimated by m-wave observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Masahiro

    1974-01-01

    The shape of the magnetic field in corona was estimated from the observation of the type I storm occurred in the last decade of August, 1971. It was found from the observation with a 160 MHz interferometer at Mt. Nobeyama that at most three storm sources, which are called radio wave source, were produced. The radio wave sources were fixed above sunspots. The height of the radio wave sources was estimated to be 0.45 R from the photosphere. The sunspots under the radio wave sources can be classified to four sub-groups. Weakening of the magnetic field on the photosphere was found from the reduction of the area of some sub-group. The relation between the activity of type I storm and the intensity of the magnetic field of sunspots is qualitatively suggested. It is considered that the radio wave sources and the sunspots were connected by common magnetic force lines. The probable magnetic field in corona was presumed and is shown in a figure. An interesting point is that the direction of magnetic force lines inclined by about 30 0 outward to the vertical line to the photosphere surface. (Kato, T.)

  15. Quaternionic Spatiotemporal Filtering for Dense Motion Field Estimation in Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Adrien

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blood motion estimation provides fundamental clinical information to prevent and detect pathologies such as cancer. Ultrasound imaging associated with Doppler methods is often used for blood flow evaluation. However, Doppler methods suffer from shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and the inability to estimate lateral motion. Numerous methods such as block matching and decorrelation-based techniques have been proposed to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we propose an original method to estimate dense fields of vector velocity from ultrasound image sequences. Our proposal is based on a spatiotemporal approach and considers 2D+t data as a 3D volume. Orientation of the texture within this volume is related to velocity. Thus, we designed a bank of 3D quaternionic filters to estimate local orientation and then calculate local velocities. The method was applied to a large set of experimental and simulated flow sequences with low motion ( 1 mm/s within small vessels ( 1 mm. Evaluation was conducted with several quantitative criteria such as the normalized mean error or the estimated mean velocity. The results obtained show the good behaviour of our method, characterizing the flows studied.

  16. JC2Sat-FF : An International Collaboration Nano-Sat Project Overview of the System Analyses and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, K.; van Mierlo, M.; Ng, A.; Shankar Kumar, B.; De Ruiter, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Horiguchi, H.; Hashimoto, H.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces the Japan Canada Joint Collaboration Satellites - Formation Flying (JC2Sat-FF) project. JC2Sat-FF is a joint project between the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with the end goal of building, launching and operating two 20kg- class nanosatellites for technical demonstration of formation flight (FF) using differential drag technique, relative navigation using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) dual band GPS receivers and far infra-red radiance measurement. A unique aspect of this project is that the two JC2Sats are developed by a united small team consisting of engineers and researchers from both agencies. Technical exchange in this international team gives stimulation to the members and generates a synergistic effect for the project.

  17. Correlation of irradiation-induced transition temperature increases from C sub v and K sub Jc /K sub Ic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, A.L. (Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance capsules contain Charpy-V (C{sub v}) specimens, but many do not contain fracture toughness specimens; accordingly, the radiation-induced shift (increase) in the brittle-to-ductile transition region ({Delta}T) is based upon the {Delta}T determined from notch ductility (C{sub v}) tests. Since the ASME K{sub Ic} and K{sub IR} reference fracture toughness curves are shifted by the {Delta}T from C{sub v}, assurance that this {Delta}T does not underestimate {Delta}T associated with the actual irradiated fracture toughness is required to provide confidence that safety margins do not fall below assumed levels. To assess this behavior, comparisons of {Delta}T's defined by elastic-plastic fracture toughness and C{sub v} tests have been made using data from RPV base and weld metals in which irradiations were made under test reactor conditions. Using as-measure'' fracture toughness values (K{sub Jc}), average comparisons between {Delta}T(C{sub v}) and {Delta}T(K{sub Jc}) are: (a) All data: {Delta}T(K{sub Jc} 100 MPa{radical}{bar m}) = {Delta}T(C{sub v} 41 J) +10{degree}C; (b) Plates only: {Delta}T(K{sub Jc} 100 MPa{radical}{bar m}) = {Delta}T(C{sub v} 41 J) +15{degree}C; and (c) Welds only: {Delta}T(K{sub Jc} 100 MPa{radical}{bar m}) = {Delta}T(C{sub v} 41 J) {minus}1{degree}C. Fluence rate is found to have no significant effect on the relationship between {Delta}T(C{sub v}) and {Delta}T(K{sub Jc}). 12 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Leaf Area Index Estimation Using Chinese GF-1 Wide Field View Data in an Agriculture Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangqin; Gu, Xingfa; Meng, Qingyan; Yu, Tao; Zhou, Xiang; Wei, Zheng; Jia, Kun; Wang, Chunmei

    2017-07-08

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important vegetation parameter that characterizes leaf density and canopy structure, and plays an important role in global change study, land surface process simulation and agriculture monitoring. The wide field view (WFV) sensor on board the Chinese GF-1 satellite can acquire multi-spectral data with decametric spatial resolution, high temporal resolution and wide coverage, which are valuable data sources for dynamic monitoring of LAI. Therefore, an automatic LAI estimation algorithm for GF-1 WFV data was developed based on the radiative transfer model and LAI estimation accuracy of the developed algorithm was assessed in an agriculture region with maize as the dominated crop type. The radiative transfer model was firstly used to simulate the physical relationship between canopy reflectance and LAI under different soil and vegetation conditions, and then the training sample dataset was formed. Then, neural networks (NNs) were used to develop the LAI estimation algorithm using the training sample dataset. Green, red and near-infrared band reflectances of GF-1 WFV data were used as the input variables of the NNs, as well as the corresponding LAI was the output variable. The validation results using field LAI measurements in the agriculture region indicated that the LAI estimation algorithm could achieve satisfactory results (such as R² = 0.818, RMSE = 0.50). In addition, the developed LAI estimation algorithm had potential to operationally generate LAI datasets using GF-1 WFV land surface reflectance data, which could provide high spatial and temporal resolution LAI data for agriculture, ecosystem and environmental management researches.

  19. Estimation of 3-D conduction velocity vector fields from cardiac mapping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, A R; Bayly, P V; Zhang, S; Walcott, G P; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    2000-08-01

    A method to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) conduction velocity vector fields in cardiac tissue is presented. The speed and direction of propagation are found from polynomial "surfaces" fitted to space-time (x, y, z, t) coordinates of cardiac activity. The technique is applied to sinus rhythm and paced rhythm mapped with plunge needles at 396-466 sites in the canine myocardium. The method was validated on simulated 3-D plane and spherical waves. For simulated data, conduction velocities were estimated with an accuracy of 1%-2%. In experimental data, estimates of conduction speeds during paced rhythm were slower than those found during normal sinus rhythm. Vector directions were also found to differ between different types of beats. The technique was able to distinguish between premature ventricular contractions and sinus beats and between sinus and paced beats. The proposed approach to computing velocity vector fields provides an automated, physiological, and quantitative description of local electrical activity in 3-D tissue. This method may provide insight into abnormal conduction associated with fatal ventricular arrhythmias.

  20. A stepwise validation of a wearable system for estimating energy expenditure in field-based research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumo, Martin; Mäder, Urs; Amft, Oliver; Tröster, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important contributor to a healthy lifestyle. Currently, standard sensor-based methods to assess PA in field-based research rely on a single accelerometer mounted near the body's center of mass. This paper introduces a wearable system that estimates energy expenditure (EE) based on seven recognized activity types. The system was developed with data from 32 healthy subjects and consists of a chest mounted heart rate belt and two accelerometers attached to a thigh and dominant upper arm. The system was validated with 12 other subjects under restricted lab conditions and simulated free-living conditions against indirect calorimetry, as well as in subjects' habitual environments for 2 weeks against the doubly labeled water method. Our stepwise validation methodology gradually trades reference information from the lab against realistic data from the field. The average accuracy for EE estimation was 88% for restricted lab conditions, 55% for simulated free-living conditions and 87% and 91% for the estimation of average daily EE over the period of 1 and 2 weeks

  1. Comparison of Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Estimates Obtained from Four Portable Field Spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julitta, Tommaso; Corp, Lawrence A.; Rossini, Micol; Burkart, Andreas; Cogliati, Sergio; Davies, Neville; Hom, Milton; Mac Arthur, Alasdair; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Rascher, Uwe; hide

    2016-01-01

    Remote Sensing of Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) is a research field of growing interest because it offers the potential to quantify actual photosynthesis and to monitor plant status. New satellite missions from the European Space Agency, such as the Earth Explorer 8 FLuorescence EXplorer (FLEX) mission-scheduled to launch in 2022 and aiming at SIF mapping-and from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) such as the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) sampling mission launched in July 2014, provide the capability to estimate SIF from space. The detection of the SIF signal from airborne and satellite platform is difficult and reliable ground level data are needed for calibration/validation. Several commercially available spectroradiometers are currently used to retrieve SIF in the field. This study presents a comparison exercise for evaluating the capability of four spectroradiometers to retrieve SIF. The results show that an accurate far-red SIF estimation can be achieved using spectroradiometers with an ultrafine resolution (less than 1 nm), while the red SIF estimation requires even higher spectral resolution (less than 0.5 nm). Moreover, it is shown that the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) plays a significant role in the precision of the far-red SIF measurements.

  2. Sampling Error in Relation to Cyst Nematode Population Density Estimation in Small Field Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Župunski, Vesna; Jevtić, Radivoje; Jokić, Vesna Spasić; Župunski, Ljubica; Lalošević, Mirjana; Ćirić, Mihajlo; Ćurčić, Živko

    2017-06-01

    Cyst nematodes are serious plant-parasitic pests which could cause severe yield losses and extensive damage. Since there is still very little information about error of population density estimation in small field plots, this study contributes to the broad issue of population density assessment. It was shown that there was no significant difference between cyst counts of five or seven bulk samples taken per each 1-m 2 plot, if average cyst count per examined plot exceeds 75 cysts per 100 g of soil. Goodness of fit of data to probability distribution tested with χ 2 test confirmed a negative binomial distribution of cyst counts for 21 out of 23 plots. The recommended measure of sampling precision of 17% expressed through coefficient of variation ( cv ) was achieved if the plots of 1 m 2 contaminated with more than 90 cysts per 100 g of soil were sampled with 10-core bulk samples taken in five repetitions. If plots were contaminated with less than 75 cysts per 100 g of soil, 10-core bulk samples taken in seven repetitions gave cv higher than 23%. This study indicates that more attention should be paid on estimation of sampling error in experimental field plots to ensure more reliable estimation of population density of cyst nematodes.

  3. Estimation of the Required Amount of Superconductors for High-field Accelerator Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwerg, N

    2007-01-01

    The coil size and the corresponding amount of superconducting material that is used during the design process of a magnet cross-section have direct impacts on the overall magnet cost. It is therefore of interest to estimate the minimum amount of conductors needed to reach the defined field strength before a detailed design process starts. Equally, it is useful to evaluate the efficiency of a given design by calculating the amount of superconducting cables that are used to reach the envisaged main field by simple rule. To this purpose, the minimum amount of conductors for the construction of a dipole of given main field strength and aperture size is estimated taking the actual critical current density of the used strands into account. Characteristic curves applicable for the NED Nb$_{3}$Sn strand specification are given and some of the recently studied different dipole configurations are compared. Based on these results, it is shown how the required amount of conductors changes due to the iron yoke contributio...

  4. Comparative analysis of gradient-field-based orientation estimation methods and regularized singular-value decomposition for fringe pattern processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi; Fu, Shujun

    2017-09-20

    Fringe orientation is an important feature of fringe patterns and has a wide range of applications such as guiding fringe pattern filtering, phase unwrapping, and abstraction. Estimating fringe orientation is a basic task for subsequent processing of fringe patterns. However, various noise, singular and obscure points, and orientation data degeneration lead to inaccurate calculations of fringe orientation. Thus, to deepen the understanding of orientation estimation and to better guide orientation estimation in fringe pattern processing, some advanced gradient-field-based orientation estimation methods are compared and analyzed. At the same time, following the ideas of smoothing regularization and computing of bigger gradient fields, a regularized singular-value decomposition (RSVD) technique is proposed for fringe orientation estimation. To compare the performance of these gradient-field-based methods, quantitative results and visual effect maps of orientation estimation are given on simulated and real fringe patterns that demonstrate that the RSVD produces the best estimation results at a cost of relatively less time.

  5. Rangeland monitoring using remote sensing: comparison of cover estimates from field measurements and image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammon Boswell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rangeland monitoring is important for evaluating and assessing semi-arid plant communities. Remote sensing provides an effective tool for rapidly and accurately assessing rangeland vegetation and other surface attributes such as bare soil and rock. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of remote sensing as a surrogate for field-based sampling techniques in detecting ground cover features (i.e., trees, shrubs, herbaceous cover, litter, surface, and comparing results with field-based measurements collected by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Range Trent Program. In the field, five 152 m long transects were used to sample plant, litter, rock, and bare-ground cover using the Daubenmire ocular estimate method. At the same location of each field plot, a 4-band (R,G,B,NIR, 25 cm pixel resolution, remotely sensed image was taken from a fixed-wing aircraft. Each image was spectrally classified producing 4 cover classes (tree, shrub, herbaceous, surface. No significant differences were detected between canopy cover collected remotely and in the field for tree (P = 0.652, shrub (P = 0.800, and herbaceous vegetation (P = 0.258. Surface cover was higher in field plots (P < 0.001, likely in response to the methods used to sample surface features by field crews. Accurately classifying vegetation and other features from remote sensed information can improve the efficiency of collecting vegetation and surface data. This information can also be used to improve data collection frequency for rangeland monitoring and to efficiently quantify ecological succession patterns.

  6. Estimation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from paddy fields in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shang-Shyng; Lai, Chao-Ming; Chang, Hsiu-Lan; Chang, Ed-Huan; Wei, Chia-Bei

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the greenhouse gases emissions from paddy fields, methane and nitrous oxide emissions were estimated with the local measurement and the IPCC method during 1990-2006 in Taiwan. Annual methane emission ranged from 9001 to 14,980 ton in the first crop season for 135,314-242,298 ha of paddy fields, and it was between 16,412 and 35,208 ton for 101,710-211,968 ha in the second crop season with the local measurement for intermittent irrigation. The value ranged from 31,122 to 55,729 ton of methane emission in the first crop season, and it was between 29,493 and 61,471 ton in the second crop season with the IPCC guideline for continuous flooding. Annual nitrous oxide emission from paddy fields was between 371 and 728 ton in the first crop season, and the value ranged from 163 to 365 ton in the second crop season with the local measurement. Methane emission from paddy fields in Taiwan for intermittent irrigation was only 26.72-28.92%, 55.65-57.32% and 41.19-43.10% with the IPCC guidelines for continuous flooding and mean temperature of transplanting stage in the first crop, the second crop and total paddy fields, respectively. The values were 53.44-57.84%, 111.29-114.55% and 82.38-86.20% with the IPCC guidelines for single aeration and mean temperature of transplanting stage, respectively; and the values were 133.60-144.61%, 282.56-286.62% and 205.96-215.49% with the IPCC guidelines for multiple aeration and mean temperature of transplanting stage, respectively. Intermittent irrigation in paddy fields reduces methane emission significantly; appropriate application of nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation in paddy fields also decreases nitrous oxide emission. (author)

  7. Comparative Inactivation of Murine Norovirus, Human Adenovirus, and Human JC Polyomavirus by Chlorine in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Corrêa, Adriana; Carratala, Anna; Barardi, Celia Regina Monte; Calvo, Miquel; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia

    2012-01-01

    Viruses excreted by humans affect the commercial and recreational use of coastal water. Shellfish produced in contaminated waters have been linked to many episodes and outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis, as well as other food-borne diseases worldwide. The risk can be reduced by appropriate treatment following harvesting and by depuration. The kinetics of inactivation of murine norovirus 1 and human adenovirus 2 in natural and artificial seawater by free available chlorine was studied by quantifying genomic copies (GC) using quantitative PCR and infectious viral particles (PFU). Human JC polyomavirus Mad4 kinetics were evaluated by quantitative PCR. DNase or RNase were used to eliminate free genomes and assess potential viral infectivity when molecular detection was performed. At 30 min of assay, human adenovirus 2 showed 2.6- and 2.7-log10 GC reductions and a 2.3- and 2.4-log10 PFU reductions in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, and infectious viral particles were still observed at the end of the assay. When DNase was used prior to the nucleic acid extraction the kinetic of inactivation obtained by quantitative PCR was statistically equivalent to the one observed by infectivity assays. For murine norovirus 1, 2.5, and 3.5-log10 GC reductions were observed in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, while no viruses remained infectious after 30 min of contact with chlorine. Regarding JC polyomavirus Mad4, 1.5- and 1.1-log10 GC reductions were observed after 30 min of contact time. No infectivity assays were conducted for this virus. The results obtained provide data that might be applicable to seawater used in shellfish depuration. PMID:22773637

  8. Calculating the Jc, B, T surface for commercial niobium tin conductors using a reduced state model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a method for calculating the J c , B, T critical surface for commercial grade niobium tin given an effective T c and B c2 and J c over a range of magnetic inductions B. Given the effective T c and B c2 and J c , one can estimate the J c over a range of magnetic inductions from 0.1 T to 0.8 times effective B c2 and a range of temperatures from 1.5 K to about 14 K. The effects of conductor strain can also be estimated using the method. A comparison between calculated values of J c and measurements is illustrated for a number of cases. The method presented in this report can be used to estimate the performance of niobium tin in magnets at temperatures different from those where measured data is available. The method of calculating the J c can also be used to estimate the effects of superconductor magnetization on the field quality at low fields

  9. A statistical approach to estimating soil-to-plant transfer factor of strontium in agricultural fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nao; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) is one of the important parameters in radiation dose assessment models for the environmental transfer of radionuclides. Since TFs are affected by several factors, including radionuclides, plant species and soil properties, development of a method for estimation of TF using some soil and plant properties would be useful. In this study, we took a statistical approach to estimating the TF of stable strontium (TF Sr ) from selected soil properties and element concentrations in plants, which was used as an analogue of 90 Sr. We collected the plant and soil samples used for the study from 142 agricultural fields throughout Japan. We applied a multiple linear regression analysis in order to get an empirical equation to estimate TF Sr . TF Sr could be estimated from the Sr concentration in soil (C Sr soil ) and Ca concentration in crop (C Ca crop ) using the following equation: log TF Sr =-0.88·log C Sr soil +0.93·log C Ca crop -2.53. Then, we replaced our data with Ca concentrations in crops from a food composition database compiled by the Japanese government. Finally, we predicted TF Sr using Sr concentration in soil from our data and Ca concentration in crops from the database of food composition. (author)

  10. Field estimation of the utilization coefficient of added inorganic nitrogen by sugar-beets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemann, Y.; Guiraud, G.; Christmann, J.; Auge, G.

    1981-07-01

    Fertilization with mineral nitrogen labelled with the 15 isotope permits, in the crop, the estimation of both: - the real utilization coefficient of N fertilizer, - the uptake of the available N issued from organic matter. In 1979, such an experiment was carried out on sugar beet in Beauce on a long term field experiment including 7 N.P.K. treatments with 4 repetitions. Each plot was divided into 2 parts to constitute a treatment N=0 for the estimation of the apparent utilization coefficient. In addition, 4 microplots (size: 8 m 2 ) received a labelled fertilizer for the measurement of the actual coefficients. The results obtained show the incoherence of the apparent coefficients, which are higher than 100%. The real coefficients are from 40 to 80%. Thus, the balance sheet for the input and output of mineral nitrogen is established precisely. The gross mineralization can be much more important than the net mineralization [fr

  11. Neural field theory of perceptual echo and implications for estimating brain connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Pagès, J. C.; Gabay, N. C.; Babaie, T.; Mukta, K. N.

    2018-04-01

    Neural field theory is used to predict and analyze the phenomenon of perceptual echo in which random input stimuli at one location are correlated with electroencephalographic responses at other locations. It is shown that this echo correlation (EC) yields an estimate of the transfer function from the stimulated point to other locations. Modal analysis then explains the observed spatiotemporal structure of visually driven EC and the dominance of the alpha frequency; two eigenmodes of similar amplitude dominate the response, leading to temporal beating and a line of low correlation that runs from the crown of the head toward the ears. These effects result from mode splitting and symmetry breaking caused by interhemispheric coupling and cortical folding. It is shown how eigenmodes obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments can be combined with temporal dynamics from EC or other evoked responses to estimate the spatiotemporal transfer function between any two points and hence their effective connectivity.

  12. Fast and robust estimation of spectro-temporal receptive fields using stochastic approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Arne F; Diepenbrock, Jan-Philipp; Ohl, Frank W; Anemüller, Jörn

    2015-05-15

    The receptive field (RF) represents the signal preferences of sensory neurons and is the primary analysis method for understanding sensory coding. While it is essential to estimate a neuron's RF, finding numerical solutions to increasingly complex RF models can become computationally intensive, in particular for high-dimensional stimuli or when many neurons are involved. Here we propose an optimization scheme based on stochastic approximations that facilitate this task. The basic idea is to derive solutions on a random subset rather than computing the full solution on the available data set. To test this, we applied different optimization schemes based on stochastic gradient descent (SGD) to both the generalized linear model (GLM) and a recently developed classification-based RF estimation approach. Using simulated and recorded responses, we demonstrate that RF parameter optimization based on state-of-the-art SGD algorithms produces robust estimates of the spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF). Results on recordings from the auditory midbrain demonstrate that stochastic approximations preserve both predictive power and tuning properties of STRFs. A correlation of 0.93 with the STRF derived from the full solution may be obtained in less than 10% of the full solution's estimation time. We also present an on-line algorithm that allows simultaneous monitoring of STRF properties of more than 30 neurons on a single computer. The proposed approach may not only prove helpful for large-scale recordings but also provides a more comprehensive characterization of neural tuning in experiments than standard tuning curves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of source term in radiation emergencies from field measurements: its potential and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hukkoo, R.K.; Bapat, V.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the 'early phase' of a radiation emergency the data on the nature and quantity of releases to asses the radiological impact may not be readily available thus delaying the initiation of necessary steps to contain the event and mitigate its effect. An iterative method based on the field measurements carried out at two concentric rings around the point of release is proposed to estimate the atmospheric release at the ground level and stack height. The program logic has been evaluated for internal consistency and its utility and limitations are discussed. (author). 8 figs., 4 tabs., 4 refs

  14. Optimal Weighting of Multi-Spacecraft Data to Estimate Gradients of Physical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteur, G. M.; Le Contel, O.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Mirioni, L.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-spacecraft missions like the ESA mission CLUSTER and the NASA mission MMS are essential to improve our understanding of physical processes in space plasmas. Several methods were designed in the 90's during the preparation phase of the CLUSTER mission to estimate gradients of physical fields from simultaneous multi-points measurements [1, 2]. Both CLUSTER and MMS involve four spacecraft with identical full scientific payloads including various sensors of electromagnetic fields and different type of particle detectors. In the standard methods described in [1, 2], which are presently in use, data from the four spacecraft have identical weights and the estimated gradients are most reliable when the tetrahedron formed by the four spacecraft is regular. There are three types of errors affecting the estimated gradients (see chapter 14 in [1]) : i) truncature errors are due to local non-linearity of spatial variations, ii) physical errors are due to instruments, and iii) geometrical errors are due to uncertainties on the positions of the spacecraft. An assessment of truncature errors for a given observation requires a theoretical model of the measured field. Instrumental errors can easily be taken into account for a given geometry of the cluster but are usually less than the geometrical errors which diverge quite fast when the tetrahedron flattens, a circumstance occurring twice per orbit of the cluster. Hence reliable gradients can be estimated only on part of the orbit. Reciprocal vectors of the tetrahedron were presented in chapter 4 of [1], they have the advantage over other methods to treat the four spacecraft symmetrically and to allow a theoretical analysis of the errors (see chapters 4 of [1] and 4 of [2]). We will present Generalized Reciprocal Vectors for weighted data and an optimization procedure to improve the reliability of the estimated gradients when the tetrahedron is not regular. A brief example using CLUSTER or MMS data will be given. This approach

  15. Internal and external potential-field estimation from regional vector data at varying satellite altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.

    2017-10-01

    When modelling satellite data to recover a global planetary magnetic or gravitational potential field, the method of choice remains their analysis in terms of spherical harmonics. When only regional data are available, or when data quality varies strongly with geographic location, the inversion problem becomes severely ill-posed. In those cases, adopting explicitly local methods is to be preferred over adapting global ones (e.g. by regularization). Here, we develop the theory behind a procedure to invert for planetary potential fields from vector observations collected within a spatially bounded region at varying satellite altitude. Our method relies on the construction of spatiospectrally localized bases of functions that mitigate the noise amplification caused by downward continuation (from the satellite altitude to the source) while balancing the conflicting demands for spatial concentration and spectral limitation. The `altitude-cognizant' gradient vector Slepian functions (AC-GVSF) enjoy a noise tolerance under downward continuation that is much improved relative to the `classical' gradient vector Slepian functions (CL-GVSF), which do not factor satellite altitude into their construction. Furthermore, venturing beyond the realm of their first application, published in a preceding paper, in the present article we extend the theory to being able to handle both internal and external potential-field estimation. Solving simultaneously for internal and external fields under the limitation of regional data availability reduces internal-field artefacts introduced by downward-continuing unmodelled external fields, as we show with numerical examples. We explain our solution strategies on the basis of analytic expressions for the behaviour of the estimation bias and variance of models for which signal and noise are uncorrelated, (essentially) space- and band-limited, and spectrally (almost) white. The AC-GVSF are optimal linear combinations of vector spherical harmonics

  16. Estimation of tritium radiotracer activity for interconnection study in geothermal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasi Prasetio; Satrio

    2016-01-01

    Tritium radiotracer (3H) has been applied widely in many geothermal fields around the world. This application was done by injecting radiotracer with certain amount of activity into reinjection well in order to investigate interconnection between reinjection well with surrounding production wells. The activity of injected radiotracer must meets the field condition and the volume of reservoir, detection limit of instrument, as well as safety aspect for the workers and environment from radioactive hazard. The planning of injection process must consider the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) and minimum detection limit (MDL). Based on calculation, tritium radiotracer injection in Kamojang geothermal field can be done with minimal activity of 0.15 Ci and maximum 22100 Ci, while in Lahendong field minimum activity of 0.65 Ci and maximum 7230 Ci. In these two injection studies, tritium was detected in monitoring wells between MDL and MPC limit. By using this estimation calculation, the activity of tritium that released into the environment within safety limit, thus monitoring wells with undetectable tritium infer no connectivity between those wells with reinjection well. (author)

  17. New Methods for Estimating Water Current Velocity Fields from Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Medagoda, L.

    2016-02-01

    Water current velocities are a crucial component of understanding oceanographic processes and underwater robots, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), provide a mobile platform for obtaining these observations. Estimating water current velocities requires both measurements of the water velocity, often obtained with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), as well as estimates of the vehicle velocity. Presently, vehicle velocities are supplied on the sea surface with velocity from GPS, or near the seafloor where Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) in bottom-lock is available; however, this capability is unavailable in the mid-water column where DVL bottom-lock and GPS are unavailable. Here we present a method which calculates vehicle velocities using consecutive ADCP measurements in the mid-water using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The correlation of the spatially changing water current states, along with mass transport and shear constraints on the water current field, is formulated using least square constraints. Results from the Sentry AUV from a mid-water surveying mission at Deepwater Horizon and a small-scale hydrothermal vent flux estimation mission suggest the method is suitable for real-time use. DVL data is denied to simulate mid-water missions and the results compared to ground truth water velocity measurements estimated using DVL velocities. Results show quantifiable uncertainties in the water current velocities, along with similar performance, for the DVL and no-DVL case in the mid-water. This method has the potential to provide geo-referenced water velocity measurements from mobile ocean robots in the absence of GPS and DVL as well as estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurements.

  18. Effect of mixed pinning landscapes produced by 6 MeV oxygen irradiation on the resulting critical current densities Jc in 1.3 μm thick GdBa2Cu3O7-d coated conductors grown by co-evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, N.; Suárez, S.; Pérez, P. D.; Troiani, H.; Granell, P.; Golmar, F.; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, S. H.

    2017-11-01

    We report the influence of crystalline defects introduced by 6 MeV 16O3+ irradiation on the critical current densities Jc and flux creep rates in 1.3 μm thick GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductor produced by co-evaporation. Pristine films with pinning produced mainly by random nanoparticles with diameter close to 50 nm were irradiated with doses between 2 × 1013 cm-2 and 4 × 1014 cm-2. The irradiations were performed with the ion beam perpendicular to the surface of the samples. The Jc and the flux creep rates were analyzed for two magnetic field configurations: magnetic field applied parallel (H║c) and at 45° (H║45°) to the c-axis. The results show that at temperatures below 40 K the in-field Jc dependences can be significantly improved by irradiation. For doses of 1 × 1014 cm-2 the Jc values at μ0H = 5 T are doubled without affecting significantly the Jc at small fields. Analyzing the flux creep rates as function of the temperature in both magnetic field configurations, it can be observed that the irradiation suppresses the peak associated with double-kink relaxation and increases the flux creep rates at intermediate and high temperatures. Under 0.5 T, the flux relaxation for H‖c and H||45° in pristine films presents characteristic glassy exponents μ = 1.63 and μ = 1.45, respectively. For samples irradiated with 1 × 1014 cm-2, these values drop to μ = 1.45 and μ = 1.24, respectively

  19. A label field fusion bayesian model and its penalized maximum rand estimator for image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignotte, Max

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation approach based on a Markov random field (MRF) fusion model which aims at combining several segmentation results associated with simpler clustering models in order to achieve a more reliable and accurate segmentation result. The proposed fusion model is derived from the recently introduced probabilistic Rand measure for comparing one segmentation result to one or more manual segmentations of the same image. This non-parametric measure allows us to easily derive an appealing fusion model of label fields, easily expressed as a Gibbs distribution, or as a nonstationary MRF model defined on a complete graph. Concretely, this Gibbs energy model encodes the set of binary constraints, in terms of pairs of pixel labels, provided by each segmentation results to be fused. Combined with a prior distribution, this energy-based Gibbs model also allows for definition of an interesting penalized maximum probabilistic rand estimator with which the fusion of simple, quickly estimated, segmentation results appears as an interesting alternative to complex segmentation models existing in the literature. This fusion framework has been successfully applied on the Berkeley image database. The experiments reported in this paper demonstrate that the proposed method is efficient in terms of visual evaluation and quantitative performance measures and performs well compared to the best existing state-of-the-art segmentation methods recently proposed in the literature.

  20. Field Application of Cable Tension Estimation Technique Using the h-SI Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hyun Noh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates field applicability of a new system identification technique of estimating tensile force for a cable of long span bridges. The newly proposed h-SI method using the combination of the sensitivity updating algorithm and the advanced hybrid microgenetic algorithm can allow not only avoiding the trap of local minimum at initial searching stage but also finding the optimal solution in terms of better numerical efficiency than existing methods. First, this paper overviews the procedure of tension estimation through a theoretical formulation. Secondly, the validity of the proposed technique is numerically examined using a set of dynamic data obtained from benchmark numerical samples considering the effect of sag extensibility and bending stiffness of a sag-cable system. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed method is investigated through actual field data extracted from a cable-stayed Seohae Bridge. The test results show that the existing methods require precise initial data in advance but the proposed method is not affected by such initial information. In particular, the proposed method can improve accuracy and convergence rate toward final values. Consequently, the proposed method can be more effective than existing methods in terms of characterizing the tensile force variation for cable structures.

  1. Molecular characterization of the Jatropha curcas JcR1MYB1 gene encoding a putative R1-MYB transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Liang Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cDNA encoding the R1-MYB transcription factor, designated as JcR1MYB1, was isolated from Jatropha curcas using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. JcR1MYB1 contains a 951 bp open reading frame that encodes 316 amino acids. The deduced JcR1MYB1 protein was predicted to possess the conserved, 56-amino acid-long DNA-binding domain, which consists of a single helix-turn-helix module and usually occurs in R1-MYBs. JcR1MYB1 is a member of the R1-MYB transcription factor subfamily. A subcellular localization study confirmed the nuclear localization of JcR1MYB1. Expression analysis showed that JcR1MYB1 transcripts accumulated in various examined tissues, with high expression levels in the root and low levels in the stem. JcR1MYB1 transcription was up-regulated by polyethylene glycol, NaCl, and cold treatments, as well as by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene treatment. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing JcR1MYB1 indicates an inportant function for this gene in salt stress.

  2. Isolation and functional characterization of JcFT, a FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) homologous gene from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoqiong; Luo, Li; Fu, Qiantang; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-05-08

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a potential feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of the biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) -like genes are important flowering regulators in higher plants. To date, the flowering genes in Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an FT homolog was isolated from Jatropha and designated as JcFT. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationship of JcFT revealed a high sequence similarity with the FT genes of Litchi chinensis, Populus nigra and other perennial plants. JcFT was expressed in all tissues of adult plants except young leaves, with the highest expression level in female flowers. Overexpression of JcFT in Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the constitutive promoter cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or the phloem-specific promoter Arabidopsis SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 promoter resulted in an extremely early flowering phenotype. Furthermore, several flowering genes downstream of JcFT were up-regulated in the JcFT-overexpression transgenic plant lines. JcFT may encode a florigen that acts as a key regulator in flowering pathway. This study is the first to functionally characterize a flowering gene, namely, JcFT, in the biofuel plant Jatropha.

  3. Investigation of Jc-Suppressing Factors in Flat-Rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2Fe Tapes Via Microstructure Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xianping; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Cai, Yao; Jiang, Fuguo; Wang, Zhen; Li, Jianqi; Yao, Chao; Lin, He; Zhang, Qianjun; Dong, Chiheng; Wang, Dongliang; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Yanwei

    2015-01-01

    Pnictide superconductors will be very promising for applications if wires with high critical current density Jc can allow reel-to-reel large-scale fabrication at low costs. To understand the mechanism(s) that limited Jc in flat-rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As

  4. A METHOD TO ESTIMATE TEMPORAL INTERACTION IN A CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD BASED APPROACH FOR CROP RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. A. Diaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to estimate the temporal interaction in a Conditional Random Field (CRF based approach for crop recognition from multitemporal remote sensing image sequences. This approach models the phenology of different crop types as a CRF. Interaction potentials are assumed to depend only on the class labels of an image site at two consecutive epochs. In the proposed method, the estimation of temporal interaction parameters is considered as an optimization problem, whose goal is to find the transition matrix that maximizes the CRF performance, upon a set of labelled data. The objective functions underlying the optimization procedure can be formulated in terms of different accuracy metrics, such as overall and average class accuracy per crop or phenological stages. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were carried out upon a dataset consisting of 12 co-registered LANDSAT images of a region in southeast of Brazil. Pattern Search was used as the optimization algorithm. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method was able to substantially outperform estimates related to joint or conditional class transition probabilities, which rely on training samples.

  5. Background fluorescence estimation and vesicle segmentation in live cell imaging with conditional random fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécot, Thierry; Bouthemy, Patrick; Boulanger, Jérôme; Chessel, Anatole; Bardin, Sabine; Salamero, Jean; Kervrann, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Image analysis applied to fluorescence live cell microscopy has become a key tool in molecular biology since it enables to characterize biological processes in space and time at the subcellular level. In fluorescence microscopy imaging, the moving tagged structures of interest, such as vesicles, appear as bright spots over a static or nonstatic background. In this paper, we consider the problem of vesicle segmentation and time-varying background estimation at the cellular scale. The main idea is to formulate the joint segmentation-estimation problem in the general conditional random field framework. Furthermore, segmentation of vesicles and background estimation are alternatively performed by energy minimization using a min cut-max flow algorithm. The proposed approach relies on a detection measure computed from intensity contrasts between neighboring blocks in fluorescence microscopy images. This approach permits analysis of either 2D + time or 3D + time data. We demonstrate the performance of the so-called C-CRAFT through an experimental comparison with the state-of-the-art methods in fluorescence video-microscopy. We also use this method to characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of Rab6 transport carriers at the cell periphery for two different specific adhesion geometries.

  6. The biochemical estimation of age in Euphausiids: Laboratory calibration and field comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. R.; Ju, Se-J.; Son, S.-K.; Feinberg, L. R.; Shaw, C. T.; Peterson, W. T.

    2010-04-01

    Euphausiids play a key role in many marine ecosystems as a link between primary producers and top predators. Understanding their demographic (i.e. age) structure is an essential tool to assess growth and recruitment as well as to determine how changes in environmental conditions might alter their condition and distribution. Age determination of crustaceans cannot be accomplished using traditional approaches, and here we evaluate the potential for biochemical products of tissue metabolism (termed lipofuscins) to determine the demographic structure of euphausiids in field collections . Lipofuscin was extracted from krill neural tissues (eye and eye-stalk), quantified using fluorescent intensity and normalized to tissue protein content to allow comparisons across animal sizes. Multiple fluorescent components from krill were observed, with the major product having a maximum fluorescence at excitation of 355 nm and emission of 510 nm. Needed age calibration of lipofuscin accumulation in Euphausia pacifica was accomplished using known-age individuals hatched and reared in the laboratory for over one year. Lipofuscin content extracted from neural tissues of laboratory-reared animals was highly correlated with the chronological age of animals ( r=0.87). Calibrated with laboratory lipofuscin accumulation rates, field-collected sub-adult and adult E. pacifica in the Northeast Pacific were estimated to be older than 100 days and younger than 1year. Comparative data for the Antarctic krill, E. superba showed much higher lipofuscin values suggesting a much longer lifespan than the more temperate species, E. pacifica. These regional comparisons suggest that biochemical indices allow a practical approach to estimate population age structure of diverse populations, and combined with other measurements can provide estimates of vital rates (i.e. longevity, mortality, growth) for krill populations in dynamic environments.

  7. Recovery of the Earth's Gravity Field Based on Spaceborne Atom-interferometry and Its Accuracy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic gravity gradiometer has been successfully applied as a core sensor in satellite gravity gradiometric mission GOCE, and its observations are used to recover the Earth's static gravity field with a degree and order above 200. The lifetime of GOCE has been over, and the next generation satellite gravity gradiometry with higher resolution is urgently required in order to recover the global steady-state gravity field with a degree and order of 200~360. High potential precision can be obtained in space by atom-interferometry gravity gradiometer due to its long interference time, and thus the atom-interferometry-based satellite gravity gradiometry has been proposed as one of the candidate techniques for the next satellite gravity gradiometric mission. In order to achieve the science goal for high resolution gravity field measurement in the future, a feasible scheme of atom-interferometry gravity gradiometry in micro-gravity environment is given in this paper, and the gravity gradient measurement can be achieved with a noise of 0.85mE/Hz1/2. Comparison and estimation of the Earth's gravity field recovery precision for different types of satellite gravity gradiometry is discussed, and the results show that the satellite gravity gradiometry based on atom-interferometry is expected to provide the global gravity field model with an improved accuracy of 7~8cm in terms of geoid height and 3×10-5 m/s2 in terms of gravity anomaly respectively at a degree and order of 252~290.

  8. Optimal estimation of spatially variable recharge and transmissivity fields under steady-state groundwater flow. Part 1. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Wendy D.; Tankersley, Claude D.

    1994-05-01

    Stochastic methods are used to analyze two-dimensional steady groundwater flow subject to spatially variable recharge and transmissivity. Approximate partial differential equations are developed for the covariances and cross-covariances between the random head, transmissivity and recharge fields. Closed-form solutions of these equations are obtained using Fourier transform techniques. The resulting covariances and cross-covariances can be incorporated into a Bayesian conditioning procedure which provides optimal estimates of the recharge, transmissivity and head fields given available measurements of any or all of these random fields. Results show that head measurements contain valuable information for estimating the random recharge field. However, when recharge is treated as a spatially variable random field, the value of head measurements for estimating the transmissivity field can be reduced considerably. In a companion paper, the method is applied to a case study of the Upper Floridan Aquifer in NE Florida.

  9. Excitability of jcBNST neurons is reduced in alcohol-dependent animals during protracted alcohol withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szücs

    Full Text Available Alcohol dependence and withdrawal has been shown to cause neuroadaptive changes at multiple levels of the nervous system. At the neuron level, adaptations of synaptic connections have been extensively studied in a number of brain areas and accumulating evidence also shows the importance of alcohol dependence-related changes in the intrinsic cellular properties of neurons. At the same time, it is still largely unknown how such neural adaptations impact the firing and integrative properties of neurons. To address these problems, here, we analyze physiological properties of neurons in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (jcBNST in animals with a history of alcohol dependence. As a comprehensive approach, first we measure passive and active membrane properties of neurons using conventional current clamp protocols and then analyze their firing responses under the action of simulated synaptic bombardment via dynamic clamp. We find that most physiological properties as measured by DC current injection are barely affected during protracted withdrawal. However, neuronal excitability as measured from firing responses under simulated synaptic inputs with the dynamic clamp is markedly reduced in all 3 types of jcBNST neurons. These results support the importance of studying the effects of alcohol and drugs of abuse on the firing properties of neurons with dynamic clamp protocols designed to bring the neurons into a high conductance state. Since the jcBNST integrates excitatory inputs from the basolateral amygdala (BLA and cortical inputs from the infralimbic and the insular cortices and in turn is believed to contribute to the inhibitory input to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA the reduced excitability of the jcBNST during protracted withdrawal in alcohol-dependent animals will likely affect ability of the jcBNST to shape the activity and output of the CeA.

  10. A simplified dynamic method for field capacity estimation and its parameter analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-tao CONG; Hua-fang LÜ; Guang-heng NI

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified dynamic method based on the definition of field capacity. Two soil hydraulic characteristics models, the Brooks-Corey (BC) model and the van Genuchten (vG) model, and four soil data groups were used in this study. The relative drainage rate, which is a unique parameter and independent of the soil type in the simplified dynamic method, was analyzed using the pressure-based method with a matric potential of−1/3 bar and the flux-based method with a drainage flux of 0.005 cm/d. As a result, the relative drainage rate of the simplified dynamic method was determined to be 3% per day. This was verified by the similar field capacity results estimated with the three methods for most soils suitable for cultivating plants. In addition, the drainage time calculated with the simplified dynamic method was two to three days, which agrees with the classical definition of field capacity. We recommend the simplified dynamic method with a relative drainage rate of 3% per day due to its simple application and clearly physically-based concept.

  11. Viscosity estimation utilizing flow velocity field measurements in a rotating magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of viscosity in determining plasma flow structures has been widely recognized. In laboratory plasmas, however, viscosity measurements have been seldom performed so far. In this paper we present and discuss an estimation method of effective plasma kinematic viscosity utilizing flow velocity field measurements. Imposing steady and axisymmetric conditions, we derive the expression for radial flow velocity from the azimuthal component of the ion fluid equation. The expression contains kinematic viscosity, vorticity of azimuthal rotation and its derivative, collision frequency, azimuthal flow velocity and ion cyclotron frequency. Therefore all quantities except the viscosity are given provided that the flow field can be measured. We applied this method to a rotating magnetized argon plasma produced by the Hyper-I device. The flow velocity field measurements were carried out using a directional Langmuir probe installed in a tilting motor drive unit. The inward ion flow in radial direction, which is not driven in collisionless inviscid plasmas, was clearly observed. As a result, we found the anomalous viscosity, the value of which is two orders of magnitude larger than the classical one. (author)

  12. SVBRDF-Invariant Shape and Reflectance Estimation from a Light-Field Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Chun; Chandraker, Manmohan; Efros, Alexei A; Ramamoorthi, Ravi

    2018-03-01

    Light-field cameras have recently emerged as a powerful tool for one-shot passive 3D shape capture. However, obtaining the shape of glossy objects like metals or plastics remains challenging, since standard Lambertian cues like photo-consistency cannot be easily applied. In this paper, we derive a spatially-varying (SV)BRDF-invariant theory for recovering 3D shape and reflectance from light-field cameras. Our key theoretical insight is a novel analysis of diffuse plus single-lobe SVBRDFs under a light-field setup. We show that, although direct shape recovery is not possible, an equation relating depths and normals can still be derived. Using this equation, we then propose using a polynomial (quadratic) shape prior to resolve the shape ambiguity. Once shape is estimated, we also recover the reflectance. We present extensive synthetic data on the entire MERL BRDF dataset, as well as a number of real examples to validate the theory, where we simultaneously recover shape and BRDFs from a single image taken with a Lytro Illum camera.

  13. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  14. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  15. Supplemental computational phantoms to estimate out-of-field absorbed dose in photon radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kyle J.; Tannous, Jaad; Nabha, Racile; Feghali, Joelle Ann; Ayoub, Zeina; Jalbout, Wassim; Youssef, Bassem; Taddei, Phillip J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a straightforward method of supplementing patient anatomy and estimating out-of-field absorbed dose for a cohort of pediatric radiotherapy patients with limited recorded anatomy. A cohort of nine children, aged 2-14 years, who received 3D conformal radiotherapy for low-grade localized brain tumors (LBTs), were randomly selected for this study. The extent of these patients’ computed tomography simulation image sets were cranial only. To approximate their missing anatomy, we supplemented the LBT patients’ image sets with computed tomography images of patients in a previous study with larger extents of matched sex, height, and mass and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the LBT patients’ data and that of the supplemental computational phantoms using commercial software and in-house codes. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with a previously developed analytical model that was re-fit with parameters based on new measurements for intracranial radiotherapy. Mean doses greater than 1 Gy were found in the red bone marrow, remainder, thyroid, and skin of the patients in this study. Mean organ doses between 150 mGy and 1 Gy were observed in the breast tissue of the girls and lungs of all patients. Distant organs, i.e. prostate, bladder, uterus, and colon, received mean organ doses less than 150 mGy. The mean organ doses of the younger, smaller LBT patients (0-4 years old) were a factor of 2.4 greater than those of the older, larger patients (8-12 years old). Our findings demonstrated the feasibility of a straightforward method of applying supplemental computational phantoms and dose-calculation models to estimate absorbed dose for a set of children of various ages who received radiotherapy and for whom anatomies were largely missing in their original

  16. Two-component wind fields over ocean waves using atmospheric lidar and motion estimation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models, such as large eddy simulations, are capable of providing stunning visualizations of the air-sea interface. One reason for this is the inherent spatial nature of such models. As compute power grows, models are able to provide higher resolution visualizations over larger domains revealing intricate details of the interactions of ocean waves and the airflow over them. Spatial observations on the other hand, which are necessary to validate the simulations, appear to lag behind models. The rough ocean environment of the real world is an additional challenge. One method of providing spatial observations of fluid flow is that of particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV has been successfully applied to many problems in engineering and the geosciences. This presentation will show recent research results that demonstate that a PIV-style approach using pulsed-fiber atmospheric elastic backscatter lidar hardware and wavelet-based optical flow motion estimation software can reveal two-component wind fields over rough ocean surfaces. Namely, a recently-developed compact lidar was deployed for 10 days in March of 2015 in the Eureka, California area. It scanned over the ocean. Imagery reveal that breaking ocean waves provide copius amounts of particulate matter for the lidar to detect and for the motion estimation algorithms to retrieve wind vectors from. The image below shows two examples of results from the experiment. The left panel shows the elastic backscatter intensity (copper shades) under a field of vectors that was retrieved by the wavelet-based optical flow algorithm from two scans that took about 15 s each to acquire. The vectors, that reveal offshore flow toward the NW, were decimated for clarity. The bright aerosol features along the right edge of the sector scan were caused by ocean waves breaking on the beach. The right panel is the result of scanning over the ocean on a day when wave amplitudes ranged from 8-12 feet and whitecaps offshore beyond the

  17. Improved model predictive control of resistive wall modes by error field estimator in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    Many implementations of a model-based approach for toroidal plasma have shown better control performance compared to the conventional type of feedback controller. One prerequisite of model-based control is the availability of a control oriented model. This model can be obtained empirically through a systematic procedure called system identification. Such a model is used in this work to design a model predictive controller to stabilize multiple resistive wall modes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. Model predictive control is an advanced control method that can optimize the future behaviour of a system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss an additional use of the empirical model which is to estimate the error field in EXTRAP T2R. Two potential methods are discussed that can estimate the error field. The error field estimator is then combined with the model predictive control and yields better radial magnetic field suppression.

  18. Estimation of geothermal gradients from single temperature log-field cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutasov, I M; Eppelbaum, L V

    2009-01-01

    A geothermal gradient is one of the most frequently used parameters in logging geophysics. However, the drilling process greatly disturbs the temperature of the formations around the wellbore. For this reason, in order to determine with the required accuracy the formation temperatures and geothermal gradients, a certain length of shut-in time is required. It was shown earlier (Kutasov 1968 Freiberger Forshungshefte C 238 55–61, 1987 Geothermics 16 467–72) that at least two transient temperature surveys are needed to determine the geothermal gradient with adequate accuracy. However, in many cases only one temperature log is conducted in a shut-in borehole. For these cases, we propose an approximate method for the estimation of the geothermal gradient. The utilization of this method is demonstrated on four field examples

  19. Field Programmable Gate Array Failure Rate Estimation Guidelines for Launch Vehicle Fault Tree Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Mohammad; Novack, Steven D.; Hatfield, Glen S.; Britton, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Today's launch vehicles complex electronic and avionic systems heavily utilize the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) integrated circuit (IC). FPGAs are prevalent ICs in communication protocols such as MIL-STD-1553B, and in control signal commands such as in solenoid/servo valves actuations. This paper will demonstrate guidelines to estimate FPGA failure rates for a launch vehicle, the guidelines will account for hardware, firmware, and radiation induced failures. The hardware contribution of the approach accounts for physical failures of the IC, FPGA memory and clock. The firmware portion will provide guidelines on the high level FPGA programming language and ways to account for software/code reliability growth. The radiation portion will provide guidelines on environment susceptibility as well as guidelines on tailoring other launch vehicle programs historical data to a specific launch vehicle.

  20. An Opto-Electronic Sensor for Detecting Soil Microarthropods and Estimating Their Size in Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csongor I. Gedeon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Methods to estimate density of soil-dwelling arthropods efficiently, accurately and continuously are critical for investigating soil biological activity and evaluating soil management practices. Soil-dwelling arthropods are currently monitored manually. This method is invasive, and time- and labor-consuming. Here we describe an infrared opto-electronic sensor for detection of soil microarthropods in the size range of 0.4–10 mm. The sensor is built in a novel microarthropod trap designed for field conditions. It allows automated, on-line, in situ detection and body length estimation of soil microarthropods. In the opto-electronic sensor the light source is an infrared LED. Two plano-convex optical lenses are placed along the virtual optical axis. One lens on the receiver side is placed between the observation space at 0.5–1 times its focal length from the sensor, and another emitter side lens is placed between the observation space and the light source in the same way. This paper describes the setup and operating mechanism of the sensor and the control unit, and through basic tests it demonstrates its potential in automated detection of soil microarthropods. The sensor may be used for monitoring activities, especially for remote observation activities in soil and insect ecology or pest control.

  1. Stellar mass estimation based on IRAC photometry for Spitzer SWIRE-field galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinan; Wu Hong; Li Haining; Cao Chen

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the feasibility of estimating the stellar mass of galaxies by mid-infrared luminosities based on a large sample of galaxies cross-identified from Spitzer SWIRE fields and the SDSS spectrographic survey. We derived the formulae to calculate the stellar mass by using IRAC 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities. The mass-to-luminosity ratios of IRAC 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities are more sensitive to the star formation history of galaxies than to other factors, such as the intrinsic extinction, metallicity and star formation rate. To remove the effect of star formation history, we used g - r color to recalibrate the formulae and obtain a better result. Researchers must be more careful when estimating the stellar mass of low metallicity galaxies using our formulae. Due to the emission from dust heated by the hottest young stars, luminous infrared galaxies present higher IRAC 4.5 μm luminosities compared to IRAC 3.6 μm luminosities. For most of type-II AGNs, the nuclear activity cannot enhance 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities compared with normal galaxies. Star formation in our AGN-hosting galaxies is also very weak, almost all of which are early-type galaxies.

  2. Optimal estimation of spatially variable recharge and transmissivity fields under steady-state groundwater flow. Part 2. Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Wendy D.; Neff, Christina R.

    1994-05-01

    The first-order analytical solution of the inverse problem for estimating spatially variable recharge and transmissivity under steady-state groundwater flow, developed in Part 1 is applied to the Upper Floridan Aquifer in NE Florida. Parameters characterizing the statistical structure of the log-transmissivity and head fields are estimated from 152 measurements of transmissivity and 146 measurements of hydraulic head available in the study region. Optimal estimates of the recharge, transmissivity and head fields are produced throughout the study region by conditioning on the nearest 10 available transmissivity measurements and the nearest 10 available head measurements. Head observations are shown to provide valuable information for estimating both the transmissivity and the recharge fields. Accurate numerical groundwater model predictions of the aquifer flow system are obtained using the optimal transmissivity and recharge fields as input parameters, and the optimal head field to define boundary conditions. For this case study, both the transmissivity field and the uncertainty of the transmissivity field prediction are poorly estimated, when the effects of random recharge are neglected.

  3. Ectopic Expression of JcWRKY Confers Enhanced Resistance in Transgenic Tobacco Against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Parinita; Patel, Khantika; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2018-04-01

    Plants possess an innate immune system comprising of a complex network of closely regulated defense responses involving differential gene expression mediated by transcription factors (TFs). The WRKYs comprise of an important plant-specific TF family, which is involved in regulation of biotic and abiotic defenses. The overexpression of JcWRKY resulted in improved resistance in transgenic tobacco against Macrophomina phaseolina. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its detoxification through antioxidative system in the transgenics facilitates defense against Macrophomina. The enhanced catalase activity on Macrophomina infection limits the spread of infection. The transcript expression of antioxidative enzymes gene (CAT and SOD) and salicylic acid (SA) biosynthetic gene ICS1 showed upregulation during Macrophomina infection and combinatorial stress. The enhanced transcript of pathogenesis-related genes PR-1 indicates the accumulation of SA during different stresses. The PR-2 and PR-5 highlight the activation of defense responses comprising of activation of hydrolytic cleavage of glucanases and thaumatin-like proteins causing disruption of fungal cells. The ROS homeostasis in coordination with signaling molecules regulate the defense responses and inhibit fungal growth.

  4. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. PMID:25155200

  5. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication

  6. Phase I decontamination of the J.C. Haynes site, Newark, Ohio. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emswiler, T.R.

    1985-11-01

    Phase I consisted of the primary decontamination, packaging, and shipment of all 241 Am-contaminated gloveboxes, vent system, and miscellaneous waste items located in the laboratory restricted area in the J.C. Haynes house. The primary goals of Phase I were to locate and account for a major quantity of 241 Am which was unaccounted for and to remove all radioactive materials and contamination posing an imminent hazard to public health and safety. All Phase I operations were conducted under a Quality Assurance (QA) Program Plan and QA procedures written specifically for this program. In addition, certain generic Battelle QA procedures were used for routine tasks. All operations were conducted under strict health physics supervision and procedures. Cognizant ORAU and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel were on site during the entire Phase I operation and provided support and approval in the daily operations. All staff members had participated in previous decontamination and decommissioning programs involving transuranic waste and completed Phase I in a well controlled, timely, and safe manner

  7. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  8. A generalized linear model for estimating spectrotemporal receptive fields from responses to natural sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Calabrese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the auditory system, the stimulus-response properties of single neurons are often described in terms of the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF, a linear kernel relating the spectrogram of the sound stimulus to the instantaneous firing rate of the neuron. Several algorithms have been used to estimate STRFs from responses to natural stimuli; these algorithms differ in their functional models, cost functions, and regularization methods. Here, we characterize the stimulus-response function of auditory neurons using a generalized linear model (GLM. In this model, each cell's input is described by: 1 a stimulus filter (STRF; and 2 a post-spike filter, which captures dependencies on the neuron's spiking history. The output of the model is given by a series of spike trains rather than instantaneous firing rate, allowing the prediction of spike train responses to novel stimuli. We fit the model by maximum penalized likelihood to the spiking activity of zebra finch auditory midbrain neurons in response to conspecific vocalizations (songs and modulation limited (ml noise. We compare this model to normalized reverse correlation (NRC, the traditional method for STRF estimation, in terms of predictive power and the basic tuning properties of the estimated STRFs. We find that a GLM with a sparse prior predicts novel responses to both stimulus classes significantly better than NRC. Importantly, we find that STRFs from the two models derived from the same responses can differ substantially and that GLM STRFs are more consistent between stimulus classes than NRC STRFs. These results suggest that a GLM with a sparse prior provides a more accurate characterization of spectrotemporal tuning than does the NRC method when responses to complex sounds are studied in these neurons.

  9. Estimating wildfire risk on a Mojave Desert landscape using remote sensing and field sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Linn, Peter F.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Inman, Richard D.; Abella, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting wildfires that affect broad landscapes is important for allocating suppression resources and guiding land management. Wildfire prediction in the south-western United States is of specific concern because of the increasing prevalence and severe effects of fire on desert shrublands and the current lack of accurate fire prediction tools. We developed a fire risk model to predict fire occurrence in a north-eastern Mojave Desert landscape. First we developed a spatial model using remote sensing data to predict fuel loads based on field estimates of fuels. We then modelled fire risk (interactions of fuel characteristics and environmental conditions conducive to wildfire) using satellite imagery, our model of fuel loads, and spatial data on ignition potential (lightning strikes and distance to roads), topography (elevation and aspect) and climate (maximum and minimum temperatures). The risk model was developed during a fire year at our study landscape and validated at a nearby landscape; model performance was accurate and similar at both sites. This study demonstrates that remote sensing techniques used in combination with field surveys can accurately predict wildfire risk in the Mojave Desert and may be applicable to other arid and semiarid lands where wildfires are prevalent.

  10. Use of hyperspectral remote sensing to estimate the gross photosynthesis of agricultural fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, I.B.; Pattey, E.; Salustro, C.; Miller, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of crop growth and yield is achieved through the use of effective management practices. However, transient weather conditions will modify crop growth and yield. To assess crop development it is therefore essential to understand the current crop ecophysiological status. Such information can be monitored continuously using micrometeorological instrumented towers over agricultural surfaces. The spatial coverage of this approach is limited to the upwind area contributing to the flux. Remote sensing becomes key in deriving carbon exchanges and crop vigour over larger spatial areas. Derived from ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements from five growing seasons, a relationship between the eddy covariance estimates of gross photosynthesis and the product of the standardized photochemical reflectance index and the integrated modified triangular index was expanded to the field scale through the use of Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data for corn and wheat over two consecutive seasons in the same field. Imagery-derived maps of gross photosynthesis successfully identified areas of potential stress that were known to be correlated with lower yield. Results were further verified using an independent flux dataset. This approach, modified from previous attempts in natural ecosystems, offers additional promise for managed systems. (author)

  11. Model based estimation of sediment erosion in groyne fields along the River Elbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prohaska, Sandra; Jancke, Thomas; Westrich, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    River water quality is still a vital environmental issue, even though ongoing emissions of contaminants are being reduced in several European rivers. The mobility of historically contaminated deposits is key issue in sediment management strategy and remediation planning. Resuspension of contaminated sediments impacts the water quality and thus, it is important for river engineering and ecological rehabilitation. The erodibility of the sediments and associated contaminants is difficult to predict due to complex time depended physical, chemical, and biological processes, as well as due to the lack of information. Therefore, in engineering practice the values for erosion parameters are usually assumed to be constant despite their high spatial and temporal variability, which leads to a large uncertainty of the erosion parameters. The goal of presented study is to compare the deterministic approach assuming constant critical erosion shear stress and an innovative approach which takes the critical erosion shear stress as a random variable. Furthermore, quantification of the effective value of the critical erosion shear stress, its applicability in numerical models, and erosion probability will be estimated. The results presented here are based on field measurements and numerical modelling of the River Elbe groyne fields.

  12. Estimating groundwater-ephemeral stream exchange in hyper-arid environments: Field experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Pozdniakov, Sergey P.; Vasilevskiy, Peter Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Surface water infiltration from ephemeral dryland streams is particularly important in hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in arid and semi-arid regions. However, streamflow transmission losses can vary significantly, partly due to spatiotemporal variations in streambed permeability. To extend our understanding of changes in streambed hydraulic properties, field investigations of streambed hydraulic conductivity were conducted in an ephemeral dryland stream in north-western China during high and low streamflow periods. Additionally, streamflow transmission losses were numerically estimated using combined stream and groundwater hydraulic head data and stream and streambed temperature data. An analysis of slug test data at two different river flow stages (one test was performed at a low river stage with clean water and the other at a high river stage with muddy water) suggested that sedimentation from fine-grained particles, i.e., physical clogging processes, likely led to a reduction in streambed hydraulic properties. To account for the effects of streambed clogging on changes in hydraulic properties, an iteratively increasing total hydraulic resistance during the slug test was considered to correct the estimation of streambed hydraulic conductivity. The stream and streambed temperature can also greatly influence the hydraulic properties of the streambed. One-dimensional coupled water and heat flux modelling with HYDRUS-1D was used to quantify the effects of seasonal changes in stream and streambed temperature on streamflow losses. During the period from 6 August 2014 to 4 June 2015, the total infiltration estimated using temperature-dependent hydraulic conductivity accounted for approximately 88% of that using temperature-independent hydraulic conductivity. Streambed clogging processes associated with fine particle settling/wash up cycles during flow events, and seasonal changes in streamflow temperature are two considerable factors that affect water

  13. A New Experiment for the Measurement of nJ(C,P) Coupling Constants Including 3J(C4'i,Pi) and 3J(C4'i,Pi+1) in Oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Christian; Reif, Bernd; Woerner, Karlheinz; Quant, Stefanie; Marino, John P.; Engels, Joachim W.; Griesinger, Christian; Schwalbe, Harald

    1998-01-01

    A new experiment for the measurement of nJ(C,P) coupling constants along the phosphodiester backbone in RNA and DNA based on a quantitative-J HCP experiment is presented. In addition to coupling constants, in which a carbon atom couples to only one phosphorus atom, both the intraresidual 3J(C4'i,Pi) and the sequential 3J(C4'i,Pi+1) for the C4' resonances that couple to two phosphorus atoms can be obtained. Coupling constants obtained by this new method are compared to values obtained from the P-FIDS experiment. Together with 3J(H,P) coupling constants measured using the P-FIDS experiment, the backbone angles β and element of can be determined

  14. Methodology for Time-Domain Estimation of Storm-Time Electric Fields Using the 3D Earth Impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbert, A.; Balch, C. C.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Egbert, G. D.; Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.; Fujii, I.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic storms can induce geoelectric fields in the Earth's electrically conducting interior, interfering with the operations of electric-power grid industry. The ability to estimate these electric fields at Earth's surface in close to real-time and to provide local short-term predictions would improve the ability of the industry to protect their operations. At any given time, the electric field at the Earth's surface is a function of the time-variant magnetic activity (driven by the solar wind), and the local electrical conductivity structure of the Earth's crust and mantle. For this reason, implementation of an operational electric field estimation service requires an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort between space science, real-time space weather operations, and solid Earth geophysics. We highlight in this talk an ongoing collaboration between USGS, NOAA, NASA, Oregon State University, and the Japan Meteorological Agency, to develop algorithms that can be used for scenario analyses and which might be implemented in a real-time, operational setting. We discuss the development of a time domain algorithm that employs discrete time domain representation of the impedance tensor for a realistic 3D Earth, known as the discrete time impulse response (DTIR), convolved with the local magnetic field time series, to estimate the local electric field disturbances. The algorithm is validated against measured storm-time electric field data collected in the United States and Japan. We also discuss our plans for operational real-time electric field estimation using 3D Earth impedances.

  15. Estimation of Kubo number and correlation length of fluctuating magnetic fields and pressure in BOUT + + edge pedestal collapse simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Lee, W.-J.; Jhang, Hogun; Kaang, H. H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2017-10-01

    Stochastic magnetic fields are thought to be as one of the possible mechanisms for anomalous transport of density, momentum and heat across the magnetic field lines. Kubo number and Chirikov parameter are quantifications of the stochasticity, and previous studies show that perpendicular transport strongly depends on the magnetic Kubo number (MKN). If MKN is smaller than one, diffusion process will follow Rechester-Rosenbluth model; whereas if it is larger than one, percolation theory dominates the diffusion process. Thus, estimation of Kubo number plays an important role to understand diffusion process caused by stochastic magnetic fields. However, spatially localized experimental measurement of fluctuating magnetic fields in a tokamak is difficult, and we attempt to estimate MKNs using BOUT + + simulation data with pedestal collapse. In addition, we calculate correlation length of fluctuating pressures and Chirikov parameters to investigate variation correlation lengths in the simulation. We, then, discuss how one may experimentally estimate MKNs.

  16. Pseudo-invariant Eigen-Operator Method for Solving Field-Intensity-Dependent Jaynes-Cummings Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Taxi; Fan Hongyi

    2010-01-01

    By using the pseudo invariant eigen-operator method we analyze the field-intensity-dependent Jaynes-Gumming (JC) model. The pseudo-invariant eigen-operator is found in terms of the supersymmetric generators. The energy-level gap of this JC Hamiltonian is derived. This approach seems concise. (general)

  17. JcDREB2, a Physic Nut AP2/ERF Gene, Alters Plant Growth and Salinity Stress Responses in Transgenic Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Ju; Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Kedong; Zhang, Yi; Qi, Jing; Yu, Deshui; Wang, Jian; Li, Chengwei

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors of the AP2/ERF family play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a physic nut AP2/ERF gene, JcDREB2 , was functionally characterized. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that JcDREB2 was expressed mainly in the leaf and could be induced by abscisic acid but suppressed by gibberellin (GA) and salt. Transient expression of a JcDREB2-YFP fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts cells suggested that JcDREB2 is localized in the nucleus. Rice plants overexpressing JcDREB2 exhibited dwarf and GA-deficient phenotypes with shorter shoots and roots than those of wild-type plants. The dwarfism phenotype could be rescued by the application of exogenous GA 3 . The expression levels of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1 , OsGA20ox2 , OsGA20ox4 , OsGA3ox2, OsCPS1 , OsKO2 , and OsKAO were significantly reduced in plants overexpressing JcDREB2 . Overexpression of JcDREB2 in rice increased sensitivity to salt stress. Increases in the expression levels of several salt-tolerance-related genes in response to salt stress were impaired in JcDREB2 -overexpressing plants. These results demonstrated not only that JcDREB2 influences GA metabolism, but also that it can participate in the regulation of the salt stress response in rice.

  18. Modeling of magnetic fields on a cylindrical surface and associated parameter estimation for development of a size sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops analytical sensing principles for estimation of circumferential size of a cylindrical surface using magnetic sensors. An electromagnet and magnetic sensors are used on a wearable band for measurement of leg size. In order to enable robust size estimation during rough real-world use of the wearable band, three estimation algorithms are developed based on models of the magnetic field variation over a cylindrical surface. The magnetic field models developed include those for a dipole and for a uniformly magnetized cylinder. The estimation algorithms used include a linear regression equation, an extended Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. Experimental laboratory tests show that the size sensor in general performs accurately, yielding sub-millimeter estimation errors. The unscented Kalman filter yields the best performance that is robust to bias and misalignment errors. The size sensor developed herein can be used for monitoring swelling due to fluid accumulation in the lower leg and a number of other biomedical applications. (paper)

  19. Estimating decades-long trends in petroleum field energy return on investment (EROI) with an engineering-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vinay S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates changes in the energy return on investment (EROI) for five large petroleum fields over time using the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE). The modeled fields include Cantarell (Mexico), Forties (U.K.), Midway-Sunset (U.S.), Prudhoe Bay (U.S.), and Wilmington (U.S.). Data on field properties and production/processing parameters were obtained from a combination of government and technical literature sources. Key areas of uncertainty include details of the oil and gas surface processing schemes. We aim to explore how long-term trends in depletion at major petroleum fields change the effective energetic productivity of petroleum extraction. Four EROI ratios are estimated for each field as follows: The net energy ratio (NER) and external energy ratio (EER) are calculated, each using two measures of energy outputs, (1) oil-only and (2) all energy outputs. In all cases, engineering estimates of inputs are used rather than expenditure-based estimates (including off-site indirect energy use and embodied energy). All fields display significant declines in NER over the modeling period driven by a combination of (1) reduced petroleum production and (2) increased energy expenditures on recovery methods such as the injection of water, steam, or gas. The fields studied had NER reductions ranging from 46% to 88% over the modeling periods (accounting for all energy outputs). The reasons for declines in EROI differ by field. Midway-Sunset experienced a 5-fold increase in steam injected per barrel of oil produced. In contrast, Prudhoe Bay has experienced nearly a 30-fold increase in amount of gas processed and reinjected per unit of oil produced. In contrast, EER estimates are subject to greater variability and uncertainty due to the relatively small magnitude of external energy investments in most cases. PMID:28178318

  20. Estimating decades-long trends in petroleum field energy return on investment (EROI) with an engineering-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vinay S; Brandt, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates changes in the energy return on investment (EROI) for five large petroleum fields over time using the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE). The modeled fields include Cantarell (Mexico), Forties (U.K.), Midway-Sunset (U.S.), Prudhoe Bay (U.S.), and Wilmington (U.S.). Data on field properties and production/processing parameters were obtained from a combination of government and technical literature sources. Key areas of uncertainty include details of the oil and gas surface processing schemes. We aim to explore how long-term trends in depletion at major petroleum fields change the effective energetic productivity of petroleum extraction. Four EROI ratios are estimated for each field as follows: The net energy ratio (NER) and external energy ratio (EER) are calculated, each using two measures of energy outputs, (1) oil-only and (2) all energy outputs. In all cases, engineering estimates of inputs are used rather than expenditure-based estimates (including off-site indirect energy use and embodied energy). All fields display significant declines in NER over the modeling period driven by a combination of (1) reduced petroleum production and (2) increased energy expenditures on recovery methods such as the injection of water, steam, or gas. The fields studied had NER reductions ranging from 46% to 88% over the modeling periods (accounting for all energy outputs). The reasons for declines in EROI differ by field. Midway-Sunset experienced a 5-fold increase in steam injected per barrel of oil produced. In contrast, Prudhoe Bay has experienced nearly a 30-fold increase in amount of gas processed and reinjected per unit of oil produced. In contrast, EER estimates are subject to greater variability and uncertainty due to the relatively small magnitude of external energy investments in most cases.

  1. Estimating decades-long trends in petroleum field energy return on investment (EROI with an engineering-based model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay S Tripathi

    Full Text Available This paper estimates changes in the energy return on investment (EROI for five large petroleum fields over time using the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE. The modeled fields include Cantarell (Mexico, Forties (U.K., Midway-Sunset (U.S., Prudhoe Bay (U.S., and Wilmington (U.S.. Data on field properties and production/processing parameters were obtained from a combination of government and technical literature sources. Key areas of uncertainty include details of the oil and gas surface processing schemes. We aim to explore how long-term trends in depletion at major petroleum fields change the effective energetic productivity of petroleum extraction. Four EROI ratios are estimated for each field as follows: The net energy ratio (NER and external energy ratio (EER are calculated, each using two measures of energy outputs, (1 oil-only and (2 all energy outputs. In all cases, engineering estimates of inputs are used rather than expenditure-based estimates (including off-site indirect energy use and embodied energy. All fields display significant declines in NER over the modeling period driven by a combination of (1 reduced petroleum production and (2 increased energy expenditures on recovery methods such as the injection of water, steam, or gas. The fields studied had NER reductions ranging from 46% to 88% over the modeling periods (accounting for all energy outputs. The reasons for declines in EROI differ by field. Midway-Sunset experienced a 5-fold increase in steam injected per barrel of oil produced. In contrast, Prudhoe Bay has experienced nearly a 30-fold increase in amount of gas processed and reinjected per unit of oil produced. In contrast, EER estimates are subject to greater variability and uncertainty due to the relatively small magnitude of external energy investments in most cases.

  2. JC Virus Leuko-Encephalopathy in Reduced Intensity Conditioning Cord Blood Transplant Recipient with a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Fürst, Sabine; Casalonga, Francois; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Castagna, Luca; Granata, Angela; Oudin, Claire; Faucher, Catherine; Berger, Pierre; Sarran, Anthony; Blaise, Didier

    2012-01-01

    We report here the case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) related to human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infection after an allogeneic transplantation with umbilical cord blood cells in 59-year-old woman with follicular Non Hodgkin lymphoma. She presented with dysphagia and weakness; magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked signal abnormality in the sub-cortical white matter of the left frontal lobe and in the posterior limb of the right internal capsule. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for John Cunningham (JC) virus. JC viral DNA in the CSF was positive, establishing the diagnosis of PML. Brain biopsy was not done. Extensive investigations for other viral infections seen in immuno-compromised patients were negative. The patient's neurologic deficits rapidly increased throughout her hospital stay, and she died one month after the diagnosis. These findings could have practical implications and demonstrate that in patients presenting neurological symptoms and radiological signs after UCBT, the JCV encephalitis must be early suspected.

  3. Estimate of the neutron fields in ATLAS based on ATLAS-MPX detectors data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchami, J; Dallaire, F; Gutierrez, A; Idarraga, J; Leroy, C; Picard, S; Scallon, O [Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Kral, V; PospIsil, S; Solc, J; Suk, M; Turecek, D; Vykydal, Z; Zemlieka, J, E-mail: scallon@lps.umontreal.ca [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of the CTU in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ-12800 Praha2 - Albertov (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are covered with converting layers of {sup 6}LiF and polyethylene (PE) to increase their sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. These devices allow the measurement of the composition and spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation field in ATLAS, particularly of neutrons. These detectors can operate in low or high preset energy threshold mode. The signature of particles interacting in a ATLAS-MPX detector at low threshold are clusters of adjacent pixels with different size and form depending on their type, energy and incidence angle. The classification of particles into different categories can be done using the geometrical parameters of these clusters. The Medipix analysis framework (MAFalda) - based on the ROOT application - allows the recognition of particle tracks left in ATLAS-MPX devices located at various positions in the ATLAS detector and cavern. The pattern recognition obtained from the application of MAFalda was configured to distinguish the response of neutrons from other radiation. The neutron response at low threshold is characterized by clusters of adjoining pixels (heavy tracks and heavy blobs) left by protons and heavy ions resulting from neutron interactions in the converting layers of the ATLAS-MPX devices. The neutron detection efficiency of ATLAS-MPX devices has been determined by the exposure of two detectors of reference to radionuclide sources of neutrons ({sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}AmBe). With these results, an estimate of the neutrons fields produced at the devices locations during ATLAS operation was done.

  4. Estimate of the neutron fields in ATLAS based on ATLAS-MPX detectors data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchami, J; Dallaire, F; Gutierrez, A; Idarraga, J; Leroy, C; Picard, S; Scallon, O; Kral, V; PospIsil, S; Solc, J; Suk, M; Turecek, D; Vykydal, Z; Zemlieka, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are covered with converting layers of 6 LiF and polyethylene (PE) to increase their sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. These devices allow the measurement of the composition and spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation field in ATLAS, particularly of neutrons. These detectors can operate in low or high preset energy threshold mode. The signature of particles interacting in a ATLAS-MPX detector at low threshold are clusters of adjacent pixels with different size and form depending on their type, energy and incidence angle. The classification of particles into different categories can be done using the geometrical parameters of these clusters. The Medipix analysis framework (MAFalda) - based on the ROOT application - allows the recognition of particle tracks left in ATLAS-MPX devices located at various positions in the ATLAS detector and cavern. The pattern recognition obtained from the application of MAFalda was configured to distinguish the response of neutrons from other radiation. The neutron response at low threshold is characterized by clusters of adjoining pixels (heavy tracks and heavy blobs) left by protons and heavy ions resulting from neutron interactions in the converting layers of the ATLAS-MPX devices. The neutron detection efficiency of ATLAS-MPX devices has been determined by the exposure of two detectors of reference to radionuclide sources of neutrons ( 252 Cf and 241 AmBe). With these results, an estimate of the neutrons fields produced at the devices locations during ATLAS operation was done.

  5. Estimate of the neutron fields in ATLAS based on ATLAS-MPX detectors data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchami, J.; Dallaire, F.; Gutiérrez, A.; Idarraga, J.; Král, V.; Leroy, C.; Picard, S.; Pospíšil, S.; Scallon, O.; Solc, J.; Suk, M.; Turecek, D.; Vykydal, Z.; Žemlièka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are covered with converting layers of 6LiF and polyethylene (PE) to increase their sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. These devices allow the measurement of the composition and spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation field in ATLAS, particularly of neutrons. These detectors can operate in low or high preset energy threshold mode. The signature of particles interacting in a ATLAS-MPX detector at low threshold are clusters of adjacent pixels with different size and form depending on their type, energy and incidence angle. The classification of particles into different categories can be done using the geometrical parameters of these clusters. The Medipix analysis framework (MAFalda) — based on the ROOT application — allows the recognition of particle tracks left in ATLAS-MPX devices located at various positions in the ATLAS detector and cavern. The pattern recognition obtained from the application of MAFalda was configured to distinguish the response of neutrons from other radiation. The neutron response at low threshold is characterized by clusters of adjoining pixels (heavy tracks and heavy blobs) left by protons and heavy ions resulting from neutron interactions in the converting layers of the ATLAS-MPX devices. The neutron detection efficiency of ATLAS-MPX devices has been determined by the exposure of two detectors of reference to radionuclide sources of neutrons (252Cf and 241AmBe). With these results, an estimate of the neutrons fields produced at the devices locations during ATLAS operation was done.

  6. Spatial Variation of Diapycnal Diffusivity Estimated From Seismic Imaging of Internal Wave Field, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Alex; White, N. J.; Caulfield, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Bright reflections are observed within the upper 1,000 m of the water column along a seismic reflection profile that traverses the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Independent hydrographic calibration demonstrates that these reflections are primarily caused by temperature changes associated with different water masses that are entrained into the Gulf along the Loop Current. The internal wave field is analyzed by automatically tracking 1,171 reflections, each of which is greater than 2 km in length. Power spectra of the horizontal gradient of isopycnal displacement, ϕξx, are calculated from these tracked reflections. At low horizontal wave numbers (kxcpm), ϕξx∝kx-0.2±0.6, in agreement with hydrographic observations of the internal wave field. The turbulent spectral subrange is rarely observed. Diapycnal diffusivity, K, is estimated from the observed internal wave spectral subrange of each tracked reflection using a fine-scale parametrization of turbulent mixing. Calculated values of K vary between 10-8 and 10-4 m2 s-1 with a mean value of K˜4×10-6 m2 s-1. The spatial distribution of turbulent mixing shows that K˜10-7 m2 s-1 away from the shelf edge in the upper 300 m where stratification is strong. Mixing is enhanced by up to 4 orders of magnitude adjacent to the shoaling bathymetry of the continental slope. This overall pattern matches that determined by analyzing nearby suites of CTD casts. However, the range of values recovered by spectral analysis of the seismic image is greater as a consequence of significantly better horizontal resolution.

  7. Integration of Active and Passive Safety Technologies--A Method to Study and Estimate Field Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingwen; Flannagan, Carol A; Bao, Shan; McCoy, Robert W; Siasoco, Kevin M; Barbat, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method that uses a combination of field data analysis, naturalistic driving data analysis, and computational simulations to explore the potential injury reduction capabilities of integrating passive and active safety systems in frontal impact conditions. For the purposes of this study, the active safety system is actually a driver assist (DA) feature that has the potential to reduce delta-V prior to a crash, in frontal or other crash scenarios. A field data analysis was first conducted to estimate the delta-V distribution change based on an assumption of 20% crash avoidance resulting from a pre-crash braking DA feature. Analysis of changes in driver head location during 470 hard braking events in a naturalistic driving study found that drivers' head positions were mostly in the center position before the braking onset, while the percentage of time drivers leaning forward or backward increased significantly after the braking onset. Parametric studies with a total of 4800 MADYMO simulations showed that both delta-V and occupant pre-crash posture had pronounced effects on occupant injury risks and on the optimal restraint designs. By combining the results for the delta-V and head position distribution changes, a weighted average of injury risk reduction of 17% and 48% was predicted by the 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) model and human body model, respectively, with the assumption that the restraint system can adapt to the specific delta-V and pre-crash posture. This study demonstrated the potential for further reducing occupant injury risk in frontal crashes by the integration of a passive safety system with a DA feature. Future analyses considering more vehicle models, various crash conditions, and variations of occupant characteristics, such as age, gender, weight, and height, are necessary to further investigate the potential capability of integrating passive and DA or active safety systems.

  8. Tracing Males From Different Continents by Genotyping JC Polyomavirus in DNA From Semen Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, John Charles; Candian, Tommaso; Selvatici, Rita; Mazzoni, Elisa; Bonaccorsi, Gloria; Greco, Pantaleo; Tognon, Mauro; Martini, Fernanda

    2017-05-01

    The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) is an ubiquitous viral agent infecting approximately 60% of humans. Recently, JCPyV sequences have been detected in semen samples. The aim of this investigation was to test whether semen JCPyV genotyping can be employed to trace the origin continent of males. Semen DNA samples (n = 170) from males of different Continents were investigated by PCR for the polymorphic JCPyV viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) sequences, followed by DNA sequencing. JCPyV sequences were detected with an overall prevalence of 27.6% (47/170). DNA sequencing revealed that European males carried JCPyV types 1A (71.4%), 4 (11.4%), 2B (2.9%), 2D1 (2.9%), and 3A (2.9%). Asians JCPyV type 2D1 (66.7%) and Africans JCPyV types 3A (33.3%) and 1A (33.3%). In 10.6% of males, two different JCPyV genotypes were detected, suggesting that the second JCPyV genotype was acquired in the destination country. This study indicates that the majority of semen samples found to be JCPyV-positive, were infected with the JCPyV genotype found in the geographic area of male origin. Therefore, semen JCPyV genotyping could be employed to trace the origin continent of males. Our findings could be applied to forensic investigations, in case of for instance sexual crimes. Indeed, JCPyV genotyping should enable investigators to make additional detailed profiling of the offender. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 982-985, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Entropy-Based Propagation Speed Estimation Method for Near-Field Subsurface Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last forty years, Subsurface Radar (SR has been used in an increasing number of noninvasive/nondestructive imaging applications, ranging from landmine detection to breast imaging. To properly assess the dimensions and locations of the targets within the scan area, SR data sets have to be reconstructed. This process usually requires the knowledge of the propagation speed in the medium, which is usually obtained by performing an offline measurement from a representative sample of the materials that form the scan region. Nevertheless, in some novel near-field SR scenarios, such as Microwave Wood Inspection (MWI and Breast Microwave Radar (BMR, the extraction of a representative sample is not an option due to the noninvasive requirements of the application. A novel technique to determine the propagation speed of the medium based on the use of an information theory metric is proposed in this paper. The proposed method uses the Shannon entropy of the reconstructed images as the focal quality metric to generate an estimate of the propagation speed in a given scan region. The performance of the proposed algorithm was assessed using data sets collected from experimental setups that mimic the dielectric contrast found in BMI and MWI scenarios. The proposed method yielded accurate results and exhibited an execution time in the order of seconds.

  10. An Entropy-Based Propagation Speed Estimation Method for Near-Field Subsurface Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tapia, Daniel; Pistorius, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    During the last forty years, Subsurface Radar (SR) has been used in an increasing number of noninvasive/nondestructive imaging applications, ranging from landmine detection to breast imaging. To properly assess the dimensions and locations of the targets within the scan area, SR data sets have to be reconstructed. This process usually requires the knowledge of the propagation speed in the medium, which is usually obtained by performing an offline measurement from a representative sample of the materials that form the scan region. Nevertheless, in some novel near-field SR scenarios, such as Microwave Wood Inspection (MWI) and Breast Microwave Radar (BMR), the extraction of a representative sample is not an option due to the noninvasive requirements of the application. A novel technique to determine the propagation speed of the medium based on the use of an information theory metric is proposed in this paper. The proposed method uses the Shannon entropy of the reconstructed images as the focal quality metric to generate an estimate of the propagation speed in a given scan region. The performance of the proposed algorithm was assessed using data sets collected from experimental setups that mimic the dielectric contrast found in BMI and MWI scenarios. The proposed method yielded accurate results and exhibited an execution time in the order of seconds.

  11. Estimating Ladder Fuels: A New Approach Combining Field Photography with LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Kramer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Forests historically associated with frequent fire have changed dramatically due to fire suppression and past harvesting over the last century. The buildup of ladder fuels, which carry fire from the surface of the forest floor to tree crowns, is one of the critical changes, and it has contributed to uncharacteristically large and severe fires. The abundance of ladder fuels makes it difficult to return these forests to their natural fire regime or to meet management objectives. Despite the importance of ladder fuels, methods for quantifying them are limited and imprecise. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging, a form of active remote sensing, is able to estimate many aspects of forest structure across a landscape. This study investigates a new method for quantifying ladder fuel in the field (using photographs with a calibration banner and remotely (using LiDAR data. We apply these new techniques in the Klamath Mountains of Northern California to predict ladder fuel levels across the study area. Our results demonstrate a new utility of LiDAR data to identify fire hazard and areas in need of fuels reduction.

  12. Estimation of diffusion coefficients in bitumen solvent mixtures as derived from low field NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Use of solvents for the extraction of heavy oil and bitumen appears to be an increasingly feasible technology. Both vapour extraction and direct solvent injection are considered for conventional exploration and production schemes, while solvent dilution of bitumen is a standard technique in oil sands mining. Mass transfer between solvent and bitumen is a poorly understood process. In some cases, it is totally ignored compared to viscous force effects. In other cases, phenomenological estimations of diffusion and dispersion coefficients are used. Low field NMR has been used successfully in determining both solvent content and viscosity reduction in heavy oil and bitumen mixtures with various solvents. As a solvent comes into contact with a heavy oil or bitumen sample, the mobility of hydrogen bearing molecules of both solvent and oil changes. These changes are detectable through changes in the NMR relaxation characteristics of both solvent and oil. Relaxation changes can then be correlated to mass flux and concentration changes. Based on Fick's Second Law, a diffusion coefficient, which is independent of concentration, was calculated against three oils and six solvents. (author)

  13. Quantification of human polyomavirus JC virus load in urine and blood samples of healthy tribal populations of North-Eastern part of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaraj, S; Bera, N K; Dutta, C; Bhattacharjee, S

    2015-01-01

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) is a widespread human virus with profound pathogenic potential. A study was undertaken to quantify JCV load in urine and peripheral blood samples of immunocompetent, apparently healthy tribal individuals of North-Eastern part of West Bengal, India for the first time. One hundred and thirteen samples of urine or blood were collected from different tribal groups of this region. For the quantitative estimation of the viral load in each sample, real-time polymerase chain reaction method using the SYBR Green dye was employed. The viral load estimated was found in the range between 3.5 × 102 and 2.12 × 106 copies/ml of samples having a mean and median viral copy numbers of 8.67 × 105 and 9.19 × 105 copies/ml of sample respectively. The mean viral DNA load in urine samples of the studied immunocompetent population was found to be higher than that found in a study conducted in the USA, but lower than similar groups of Italy and healthy adult women in the USA. However when compared with median values of viral DNA loads in urine samples of immunocompetent human subjects of Kuwait, Portugal, and Switzerland the observed viral DNA load was found to be substantially higher.

  14. Linking field observations, Landsat and MODIS data to estimate agricultural change in European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, K. M.; Ioffe, G.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural reform has been one of the most important anthropogenic change processes in European Russia that has been unfolding since the formal collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991. Widespread land abandonment is perhaps the most vivid side effect of the reform, even visible in synoptic imagery. Currently, Russia is transitioning into a country with an internal "archipelago" of islands of productive agriculture around cities embedded in a matrix of unproductive, abandoned lands. This heterogeneous spatial pattern is mainly driven by depopulation of the least favorable parts of the countryside, where "least favorable" is a function of fertility, remoteness, and their interaction. In this work we provide a satellite, GIS and field based overview of the current agricultural developments in Russia and look beyond the unstable period immediately following the collapse of the Soviet Union. We apply Landsat images in one of Russia's oblasts to create a detailed land cover map. We then use a logistic model to link the Landsat land cover map with the inter-annual variability in key phenological parameters calculated from MODIS to derive the percent of cropland per 500m MODIS pixel. By evaluating the phenological characteristics of the MODIS curves for each year we determine whether a pixel was actually cropped or left fallow. A comparison of satellite-estimated cropped areas with regional statistics (by rayon) revealed that the satellite estimates are highly correlated with the regional statistics for both arable lands and successfully cropped areas. We use the crop maps to determine the number of times a particular area was cropped between 2002 and 2009 by summing all the years with crops per pixel. This variable provides a good indication about the intensification and de-intensification of the Russian croplands over the last decade. We have visited several rural areas in Russia and we link the satellite data with information acquired through field interviews

  15. Cross-comparison and evaluation of air pollution field estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haofei; Russell, Armistead; Mulholland, James; Odman, Talat; Hu, Yongtao; Chang, Howard H.; Kumar, Naresh

    2018-04-01

    Accurate estimates of human exposure is critical for air pollution health studies and a variety of methods are currently being used to assign pollutant concentrations to populations. Results from these methods may differ substantially, which can affect the outcomes of health impact assessments. Here, we applied 14 methods for developing spatiotemporal air pollutant concentration fields of eight pollutants to the Atlanta, Georgia region. These methods include eight methods relying mostly on air quality observations (CM: central monitor; SA: spatial average; IDW: inverse distance weighting; KRIG: kriging; TESS-D: discontinuous tessellation; TESS-NN: natural neighbor tessellation with interpolation; LUR: land use regression; AOD: downscaled satellite-derived aerosol optical depth), one using the RLINE dispersion model, and five methods using a chemical transport model (CMAQ), with and without using observational data to constrain results. The derived fields were evaluated and compared. Overall, all methods generally perform better at urban than rural area, and for secondary than primary pollutants. We found the CM and SA methods may be appropriate only for small domains, and for secondary pollutants, though the SA method lead to large negative spatial correlations when using data withholding for PM2.5 (spatial correlation coefficient R = -0.81). The TESS-D method was found to have major limitations. Results of the IDW, KRIG and TESS-NN methods are similar. They are found to be better suited for secondary pollutants because of their satisfactory temporal performance (e.g. average temporal R2 > 0.85 for PM2.5 but less than 0.35 for primary pollutant NO2). In addition, they are suitable for areas with relatively dense monitoring networks due to their inability to capture spatial concentration variabilities, as indicated by the negative spatial R (lower than -0.2 for PM2.5 when assessed using data withholding). The performance of LUR and AOD methods were similar to

  16. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I......–II classical HL patients lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow...

  17. Experimental Quasi-Microwave Whole-Body Averaged SAR Estimation Method Using Cylindrical-External Field Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a new whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) estimation method based on the external-cylindrical field scanning technique. This technique is adopted with the goal of simplifying the dosimetry estimation of human phantoms that have different postures or sizes. An experimental scaled model system is constructed. In order to examine the validity of the proposed method for realistic human models, we discuss the pros and cons of measurements and nume...

  18. Methodology for time-domain estimation of storm time geoelectric fields using the 3-D magnetotelluric response tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbert, Anna; Balch, Christopher C.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Egbert, Gary D.; Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Fujii, Ikuko

    2017-07-01

    Geoelectric fields at the Earth's surface caused by magnetic storms constitute a hazard to the operation of electric power grids and related infrastructure. The ability to estimate these geoelectric fields in close to real time and provide local predictions would better equip the industry to mitigate negative impacts on their operations. Here we report progress toward this goal: development of robust algorithms that convolve a magnetic storm time series with a frequency domain impedance for a realistic three-dimensional (3-D) Earth, to estimate the local, storm time geoelectric field. Both frequency domain and time domain approaches are presented and validated against storm time geoelectric field data measured in Japan. The methods are then compared in the context of a real-time application.

  19. The electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle as estimated from satellite measured magnetic field variations. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didwall, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Low latitude magnetic field variations (magnetic storms) caused by large fluctuations in the equatorial ring current were derived from magnetic field magnitude data obtained by OGO 2, 4, and 6 satellites over an almost 5 year period. Analysis procedures consisted of (1) separating the disturbance field into internal and external parts relative to the surface of the Earth; (2) estimating the response function which related to the internally generated magnetic field variations to the external variations due to the ring current; and (3) interpreting the estimated response function using theoretical response functions for known conductivity profiles. Special consideration is given to possible ocean effects. A temperature profile is proposed using conductivity temperature data for single crystal olivine. The resulting temperature profile is reasonable for depths below 150-200 km, but is too high for shallower depths. Apparently, conductivity is not controlled solely by olivine at shallow depths.

  20. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M. V.; Jorgensen, M.; Brodin, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    –II classical HL patients 4 x 2 plans for each patient. The lifetime excess risks of cardiac morbidity, cardiac mortality, lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I...... to the heart, lungs, breasts, and thyroid compared to past,extended fields, even for patients with mediastinal disease. This translated into a significantly reduced estimated risk of cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and LYL. CONCLUSIONS: Involved Node Radiotherapy should be considered for pediatric...

  1. Susceptibility of Primary Human Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells and Meningeal Cells to Infection by JC Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Bethany A; Gee, Gretchen V; Atwood, Walter J; Haley, Sheila A

    2018-04-15

    JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) establishes a lifelong persistence in roughly half the human population worldwide. The cells and tissues that harbor persistent virus in vivo are not known, but renal tubules and other urogenital epithelial cells are likely candidates as virus is shed in the urine of healthy individuals. In an immunosuppressed host, JCPyV can become reactivated and cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Recent observations indicate that JCPyV may productively interact with cells in the choroid plexus and leptomeninges. To further study JCPyV infection in these cells, primary human choroid plexus epithelial cells and meningeal cells were challenged with virus, and their susceptibility to infection was compared to the human glial cell line, SVG-A. We found that JCPyV productively infects both choroid plexus epithelial cells and meningeal cells in vitro Competition with the soluble receptor fragment LSTc reduced virus infection in these cells. Treatment of cells with neuraminidase also inhibited both viral infection and binding. Treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist, ritanserin, reduced infection in SVG-A and meningeal cells. We also compared the ability of wild-type and sialic acid-binding mutant pseudoviruses to transduce these cells. Wild-type pseudovirus readily transduced all three cell types, but pseudoviruses harboring mutations in the sialic acid-binding pocket of the virus failed to transduce the cells. These data establish a novel role for choroid plexus and meninges in harboring virus that likely contributes not only to meningoencephalopathies but also to PML. IMPORTANCE JCPyV infects greater than half the human population worldwide and causes central nervous system disease in patients with weakened immune systems. Several recent reports have found JCPyV in the choroid plexus and leptomeninges of patients with encephalitis. Due to their role in forming the blood

  2. High prevalence of human polyomavirus JC VP1 gene sequences in pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiramizu, B; Hu, N; Frisque, R J; Nerurkar, V R

    2007-05-15

    The oncogenic potential of human polyomavirus JC (JCV), a ubiquitous virus that establishes infection during early childhood in approximately 70% of the human population, is unclear. As a neurotropic virus, JCV has been implicated in pediatric central nervous system tumors and has been suggested to be a pathogenic agent in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Recent studies have demonstrated JCV gene sequences in pediatric medulloblastomas and among patients with colorectal cancer. JCV early protein T-antigen (TAg) can form complexes with cellular regulatory proteins and thus may play a role in tumorigenesis. Since JCV is detected in B-lymphocytes, a retrospective analysis of pediatric B-cell and non-B-cell malignancies as well as other HIV-associated pediatric malignancies was conducted for the presence of JCV gene sequences. DNA was extracted from 49 pediatric malignancies, including Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, large cell lymphoma and sarcoma. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using JCV specific nested primer sets for the transcriptional control region (TCR), TAg, and viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) genes. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing were used to confirm specificity of the amplicons. A 215-bp region of the JCV VP1 gene was amplified from 26 (53%) pediatric tumor tissues. The JCV TCR and two JCV gene regions were amplified from a leiomyosarcoma specimen from an HIV-infected patient. The leiomyosarcoma specimen from the cecum harbored the archetype strain of JCV. Including the leiomyosarcoma specimen, three of five specimens sequenced were typed as JCV genotype 2. The failure to amplify JCV TCR, and TAg gene sequences in the presence of JCV VP1 gene sequence is surprising. Even though JCV TAg gene, which is similar to the SV40 TAg gene, is oncogenic in animal models, the presence of JCV gene sequences in pediatric malignancies does not prove causality. In light of the available data on the presence of JCV in normal and cancerous

  3. Overexpression of Jatropha Gibberellin 2-oxidase 6 (JcGA2ox6 Induces Dwarfism and Smaller Leaves, Flowers and Fruits in Arabidopsis and Jatropha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xiong Hu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellins (GAs are plant hormones that play fundamental roles in plant growth and development. Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox plays a direct role in determining the levels of bioactive GAs by catalyzing bioactive GAs or their immediate precursors to inactive forms. In this study, a GA2ox gene, designated JcGA2ox6, was isolated from Jatropha curcas. JcGA2ox6 is expressed in all tissues of adult Jatropha, with the highest expression level in male flowers and the lowest expression level in young leaves. Overexpression of JcGA2ox6 in Arabidopsis resulted in a typical dwarf phenotype, along with late flowering, smaller leaves and flowers, shorter siliques and smaller seeds. Similarly, when JcGA2ox6 was overexpressed in Jatropha, the transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype with dark-green leaves and smaller inflorescences, flowers, fruits and seeds. However, the flowering time of Jatropha was not affected by overexpression of JcGA2ox6, unlike that in the transgenic Arabidopsis. Moreover, the number of flowers per inflorescence, the weight of 10 seeds and the seed oil content were significantly decreased in transgenic Jatropha. The results indicated that overexpression of JcGA2ox6 had a great impact on the vegetative and reproductive growth of transgenic Jatropha. Furthermore, we found that the dwarf phenotype of transgenic Jatropha was caused by a decrease in endogenous bioactive GA4, which was correlated with the degree of dwarfism.

  4. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. National-scale crop type mapping and area estimation using multi-resolution remote sensing and field survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. P.; Potapov, P.; Adusei, B.; King, L.; Khan, A.; Krylov, A.; Di Bella, C. M.; Pickens, A. H.; Stehman, S. V.; Hansen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Reliable and timely information on agricultural production is essential for ensuring world food security. Freely available medium-resolution satellite data (e.g. Landsat, Sentinel) offer the possibility of improved global agriculture monitoring. Here we develop and test a method for estimating in-season crop acreage using a probability sample of field visits and producing wall-to-wall crop type maps at national scales. The method is first illustrated for soybean cultivated area in the US for 2015. A stratified, two-stage cluster sampling design was used to collect field data to estimate national soybean area. The field-based estimate employed historical soybean extent maps from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Cropland Data Layer to delineate and stratify U.S. soybean growing regions. The estimated 2015 U.S. soybean cultivated area based on the field sample was 341,000 km2 with a standard error of 23,000 km2. This result is 1.0% lower than USDA's 2015 June survey estimate and 1.9% higher than USDA's 2016 January estimate. Our area estimate was derived in early September, about 2 months ahead of harvest. To map soybean cover, the Landsat image archive for the year 2015 growing season was processed using an active learning approach. Overall accuracy of the soybean map was 84%. The field-based sample estimated area was then used to calibrate the map such that the soybean acreage of the map derived through pixel counting matched the sample-based area estimate. The strength of the sample-based area estimation lies in the stratified design that takes advantage of the spatially explicit cropland layers to construct the strata. The success of the mapping was built upon an automated system which transforms Landsat images into standardized time-series metrics. The developed method produces reliable and timely information on soybean area in a cost-effective way and could be implemented in an operational mode. The approach has also been applied for other crops in

  6. Estimation of Evapotranspiration from Fields with and without Cover Crops Using Remote Sensing and in situ Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of actual evapotranspiration (ETa based on remotely sensed imagery is very valuable in agricultural regions where ETa rates can vary greatly from field to field. This research utilizes the image processing model METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration to estimate late season, post-harvest ETa rates from fields with a cover crop planted after a cash crop (in this case, a rye/radish/pea mixture planted after spring wheat. Remotely sensed EToF (unit-less fraction of grass-based reference ET, ETo maps were generated using Erdas Imagine software for a 260 km2 area in northeastern South Dakota, USA. Meteorological information was obtained from a Bowen-Ratio Energy Balance System (BREBS located within the image. Nine image dates were used for the growing season, from May through October. Five of those nine were captured during the cover crop season. METRIC was found to successfully differentiate between fields with and without cover crops. In a blind comparison, METRIC compared favorably with the estimated ETa rates found using the BREBS (ETλE, with a difference in total estimated ETa for the cover crop season of 7%.

  7. Estimation of electromagnetic dosimetric values from non-ionizing radiofrequency fields in an indoor commercial airplane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Erik; Arpón, Javier; Azpilicueta, Leire; López, Peio; de Miguel, Silvia; Ramos, Victoria; Falcone, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the impact of topology as well as morphology of a complex indoor environment such as a commercial aircraft in the estimation of dosimetric assessment is presented. By means of an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray-launching code, estimation of electric field amplitude as a function of position for the complete volume of a commercial passenger airplane is obtained. Estimation of electromagnetic field exposure in this environment is challenging, due to the complexity and size of the scenario, as well as to the large metallic content, giving rise to strong multipath components. By performing the calculation with a deterministic technique, the complete scenario can be considered with an optimized balance between accuracy and computational cost. The proposed method can aid in the assessment of electromagnetic dosimetry in the future deployment of embarked wireless systems in commercial aircraft.

  8. Performance of the METRIC model in estimating evapotranspiration fluxes over an irrigated field in Saudi Arabia using Landsat-8 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Al-Gaadi, Khalid A.; Tola, ElKamil; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A.; Patil, Virupakshagouda C.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is essential for hydrological modeling and efficient crop water management in hyper-arid climates. In this study, we applied the METRIC algorithm on Landsat-8 images, acquired from June to October 2013, for the mapping of ET of a 50 ha center-pivot irrigated alfalfa field in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. The METRIC-estimated energy balance components and ET were evaluated against the data provided by an eddy covariance (EC) flux tower installed in the field. Results indicated that the METRIC algorithm provided accurate ET estimates over the study area, with RMSE values of 0.13 and 4.15 mm d-1. The METRIC algorithm was observed to perform better in full canopy conditions compared to partial canopy conditions. On average, the METRIC algorithm overestimated the hourly ET by 6.6 % in comparison to the EC measurements; however, the daily ET was underestimated by 4.2 %.

  9. Estimates of Environmental Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields and Risk of Lymphoma Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, G; Mascia, N; Serra, T; Salis, A; Saba, L; Sanna, S; Zucca, M G; Angelucci, E; Gabbas, A; Culurgioni, F; Pili, P; Mura, E; Cappai, M; Ennas, M G; Cocco, P

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the association between environmental exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) and risk of lymphoma subtypes in a case-control study comprised of 322 patients and 444 individuals serving as controls in Sardinia, Italy in 1998-2004. Questionnaire information included the self-reported distance of the three longest held residential addresses from fixed radio-television transmitters and mobile phone base stations. We georeferenced the residential addresses of all study subjects and obtained the spatial coordinates of mobile phone base stations. For each address within a 500-meter radius from a mobile phone base station, we estimated the RF-EMF intensity using predictions from spatial models, and we performed RF-EMF measurements at the door in the subset of the longest held addresses within a 250-meter radius. We calculated risk of lymphoma and its major subtypes associated with the RF-EMF exposure metrics with unconditional logistic regression, adjusting by age, gender and years of education. In the analysis of self-reported data, risk associated with residence in proximity (within 50 meters) to fixed radio-television transmitters was likewise elevated for lymphoma overall [odds ratio = 2.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-4.6], and for the major lymphoma subtypes. With reference to mobile phone base stations, we did not observe an association with either the self-reported, or the geocoded distance from mobile phone base stations. RF-EMF measurements did not vary by case-control status. By comparing the self-reports to the geocoded data, we discovered that the cases tended to underestimate the distance from mobile phone base stations differentially from the controls ( P = 0.073). The interpretation of our findings is compromised by the limited study size, particularly in the analysis of the individual lymphoma subtypes, and the unavailability of the spatial coordinates of radio-television transmitters. Nonetheless, our results do not

  10. A more realistic estimate of the variances and systematic errors in spherical harmonic geomagnetic field models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowes, F.J.; Olsen, Nils

    2004-01-01

    Most modern spherical harmonic geomagnetic models based on satellite data include estimates of the variances of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the model; these estimates are based on the geometry of the data and the fitting functions, and on the magnitude of the residuals. However...

  11. Erratum to: Estimating the crop response to fertilizer nitrogen residues in long-continued field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattson, L

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cumulated effect of long-continued nitrogen (N) inputs is important for both agronomic and environmental reasons. However, only little attention has been paid to estimate the crop response to mineral fertilizer N residues. Before interpreting estimates for the crop response...

  12. System of estimations and prognostications of bodily condition of skilled sportsmen in track-and-field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Bobrovnyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of estimation and prognostication of bodily condition of skilled athletes is presented. The system includes the complex of pedagogical tests, evaluation tables, estimation of the functional state vegetative, nervous, cardiovascular systems, system of the external breathing. 436 sportsmen took part in research (212 women and 224 men. The analysis of electrocardiography is conducted, variability of cardiac rhythm, determination of vegetative balance, state of myocardium, violations of rhythm of heart, spirometric researches. The estimation of efficiency of activity of sportsman in extreme terms on the basis of type and properties of temperament, level of personality anxiety and estimation of psychological reliability of sportsmen is presented. The criteria of estimation of physical preparedness are certain, functional state of the basic systems of organism, influencing in a greater degree on achievement of high sporting results, psychological state of sportsmen.

  13. Estimation of neutral-beam-induced field reversal in MFTF by an approximate scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Scaling rules are derived for field-reversed plasmas whose dimensions are common multiples of the ion gyroradius in the vacuum field. These rules are then applied to the tandem MFTF configuration, and it is shown that field reversal appears to be possible for neutral beam currents of the order of 150 amperes, provided that the electron temperature is at least 500 eV

  14. Pollutant Flux Estimation in an Estuary Comparison between Model and Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for estimating pollutant flux in an estuary. An efficient method is applied to estimate the flux of pollutants in an estuary. A gauging station network in the Danshui River estuary is established to measure the data of water quality and discharge based on the efficient method. A boat mounted with an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP traverses the river along a preselected path that is normal to the streamflow to measure the velocities, water depths and water quality for calculating pollutant flux. To know the characteristics of the estuary and to provide the basis for the pollutant flux estimation model, data of complete tidal cycles is collected. The discharge estimation model applies the maximum velocity and water level to estimate mean velocity and cross-sectional area, respectively. Thus, the pollutant flux of the estuary can be easily computed as the product of the mean velocity, cross-sectional area and pollutant concentration. The good agreement between the observed and estimated pollutant flux of the Danshui River estuary shows that the pollutant measured by the conventional and the efficient methods are not fundamentally different. The proposed method is cost-effective and reliable. It can be used to estimate pollutant flux in an estuary accurately and efficiently.

  15. Simple algorithm to estimate mean-field effects from minor differential permeability curves based on the Preisach model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2003-01-01

    The classical Preisach model (PM) of magnetic hysteresis requires that any minor differential permeability curve lies under minor curves with larger field amplitude. Measurements of ferromagnetic materials show that very often this is not true. By applying the classical PM formalism to measured minor curves one can discover that it leads to an oval-shaped region on each half of the Preisach plane where the calculations produce negative values in the Preisach function. Introducing an effective field, which differs from the applied one by a mean-field term proportional to the magnetization, usually solves this problem. Complex techniques exist to estimate the minimum necessary proportionality constant (the moving parameter). In this paper we propose a simpler way to estimate the mean-field effects for use in nondestructive testing, which is based on experience from the measurements of industrial steels. A new parameter (parameter of shift) is introduced, which monitors the mean-field effects. The relation between the shift parameter and the moving one was studied for a number of steels. From preliminary experiments no correlation was found between the shift parameter and the classical magnetic ones such as the coercive field, maximum differential permeability and remanent magnetization

  16. A level playing field: Obtaining consistent cost estimates for advanced reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R. II; Rohm, H.H.; Humphreys, J.R. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Rules and guidelines for developing cost estimates are given which provide a means for presenting cost estimates for advanced concepts on a consistent and equitable basis. For advanced reactor designs, the scope of a cost estimate includes the plant capital cost, the operating and maintenance cost, the fuel cycle cost, and the cost of decommissioning. Each element is subdivided as is necessary to provide a common reporting format for all power plant concepts. The total generation cost is taken to be a suitable choice for a summary figure of merit. To test the application of the rules and guidelines as well as developing reference costs for current technologies, several different sized coal and pressurized water reactor plant cost estimates have been prepared

  17. Estimate of symbiotically fixed nitrogen in field grown soybeans using variations in /sup 15/N natural abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarger, N; Durr, J C; Bourguignon, C; Lagacherie, B [INRA Centre de Recherches de Dijon, 21 (France). Lab. de Microbiologie des Sols; Mariotti, A; Mariotti, F [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Lab. de Geologie Dynamique

    1979-07-01

    The use of variations in natural abundance of /sup 15/N between nitrogen fixing and non nitrogen fixing soybeans was investigated for quantitative estimate of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Isotopic analysis of 4 varieties of inoculated and non-inoculated soybeans growing under field conditions, with and without N-fertilizer was determined. It was found that inoculated soybeans had a significantly lower /sup 15/N content than non-inoculated ones. Estimates of the participation of fixed N to the total nitrogen content of inoculated soybeans were calculated from these differences. They were compared to estimates calculated from differences in N yield between inoculated and non-inoculated plants and to the nitrogenase activity, measured by the C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction assay over the growing season. Estimates given by the /sup 15/N measurements were correlated with the C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reducing activity but not with the differences in the N yield. This shows that the isotopic composition was dependent on the amount of fixed nitrogen and consequently that the estimates of fixed nitrogen based on natural /sup 15/N abundance should be reliable. The absence of correlation between estimates based on /sup 15/N content and estimates based on N yield was explained by differences in the uptake of soil nitrogen between inoculated and non inoculated soybeans.

  18. Exposure estimates based on broadband elf magnetic field measurements versus the ICNIRP multiple frequency rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua, Jesus M.; Rufo, Montana; Jimenez, Antonio; Pachon, Fernando T.; Carrero, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of exposure to extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields using broadband measurement techniques gives satisfactory results when the field has essentially a single frequency. Nevertheless, magnetic fields are in most cases distorted by harmonic components. This work analyses the harmonic components of the ELF magnetic field in an outdoor urban context and compares the evaluation of the exposure based on broadband measurements with that based on spectral analysis. The multiple frequency rule of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) regulatory guidelines was applied. With the 1998 ICNIRP guideline, harmonics dominated the exposure with a 55 % contribution. With the 2010 ICNIRP guideline, however, the primary frequency dominated the exposure with a 78 % contribution. Values of the exposure based on spectral analysis were significantly higher than those based on broadband measurements. Hence, it is clearly necessary to determine the harmonic components of the ELF magnetic field to assess exposure in urban contexts. (authors)

  19. Combined equations for estimating global solar radiation: Projection of radiation field over Japan under global warming conditions by statistical downscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, T.; Nishimori, M.; Yokozawa, M.

    2008-01-01

    For this study, we developed a new statistical model to estimate the daily accumulated global solar radiation on the earth's surface and used the model to generate a high-resolution climate change scenario of the radiation field in Japan. The statistical model mainly relies on precipitable water vapor calculated from air temperature and relative humidity on the surface to estimate seasonal changes in global solar radiation. On the other hand, to estimate daily radiation fluctuations, the model uses either a diurnal temperature range or relative humidity. The diurnal temperature range, calculated from the daily maximum and minimum temperatures, and relative humidity is a general output of most climate models, and pertinent observation data are comparatively easy to access. The statistical model performed well when estimating the monthly mean value, daily fluctuation statistics, and regional differences in the radiation field in Japan. To project the change in the radiation field for the years 2081 to 2100, we applied the statistical model to the climate change scenario of a high-resolution Regional Climate Model with a 20-km mesh size (RCM20) developed at the Meteorological Research Institute based on the Special Report for Emission Scenario (SRES)-A2. The projected change shows the following tendency: global solar radiation will increase in the warm season and decrease in the cool season in many areas of Japan, indicating that global warming may cause changes in the radiation field in Japan. The generated climate change scenario for the radiation field is linked to long-term and short-term changes in air temperature and relative humidity obtained from the RCM20 and, consequently, is expected to complement the RCM20 datasets for an impact assessment study in the agricultural sector

  20. Carbon-coated boron using low-cost naphthalene for substantial enhancement of Jc in MgB2 superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranot, Mahipal; Shinde, K. P.; Oh, Y. S.; Kang, S. H.; Jang, S. H.; Hwang, D. Y.; Chung, K. C. [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Carbon coating approach is used to prepare carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} bulk samples using low-cost naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) as a carbon source. The coating of carbon (C) on boron (B) powders was achieved by direct pyrolysis of naphthalene at 120 degrees C and then the C-coated B powders were mixed well with appropriate amount of Mg by solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that there is a noticeable shift in (100) and (110) Bragg reflections towards higher angles, while no shift was observed in (002) reflections for MgB2 doped with carbon. As compared to un-doped MgB{sub 2}, a systematic enhancement in Jc(H) properties with increasing carbon doping level was observed for naphthalene-derived C-doped MgB{sub 2} samples. The substantial enhancement in Jc is most likely due to the incorporation of C into MgB{sub 2} lattice and the reduction in crystallite size, as evidenced by the increase in the FWHM values for doped samples.

  1. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret Grimm

    evaluate the performance of mark-recapture population size estimators under field conditions, which is essential for selecting an appropriate method and obtaining reliable results in ecology and conservation biology, and thus for sound management.

  2. SUPER STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS OF NEUTRON STARS IN BE X-RAY BINARIES ESTIMATED WITH NEW TORQUE AND MAGNETOSPHERE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Xiang-Dong, E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-11-10

    We re-estimate the surface magnetic fields of neutron stars (NSs) in Be X-ray binaries (BeXBs) with different models of torque, improved beyond Klus et al. In particular, a new torque model is applied to three models of magnetosphere radius. Unlike the previous models, the new torque model does not lead to divergent results for any fastness parameter. The inferred surface magnetic fields of these NSs for the two compressed magnetosphere models are much higher than that for the uncompressed magnetosphere model. The new torque model using the compressed magnetosphere radius leads to unique solutions near spin equilibrium in all cases, unlike other models that usually give two branches of solutions. Although our conclusions are still affected by the simplistic assumptions about the magnetosphere radius calculations, we show several groups of possible surface magnetic field values with our new models when the interaction between the magnetosphere and the infalling accretion plasma is considered. The estimated surface magnetic fields for NSs BeXBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Milk Way are between the quantum critical field and the maximum “virial” value by the spin equilibrium condition.

  3. Energy shift estimation of demand response activation on domestic refrigerators – A field test study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Gudmand-Høyer, Kristian; Marinelli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to estimate the amount of energy that can be shifted during demand response (DR) activation on domestic refrigerator. Though there are many methods for DR activation like load reduction, load shifting and onsite generation, the method under study is load shifting....... Electric heating and cooling equipment like refrigerators, water heaters and space heaters and coolers are preferred for such DR activation because of their energy storing capacity. Accurate estimation of available regulating power and energy shift is important to understand the value of DR activation...... at any time. In this paper a novel method to estimate the available energy shift from domestic refrigerators with only two measurements, namely fridge cool chamber temperature and compressor power consumption is proposed, discussed and evaluated....

  4. Dose estimation in embryo or fetus in external fields; Estimacion de dosis en embrion o feto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, Beatriz N [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The embryo or the fetus can be irradiated as result of radiological procedures of diagnosis of therapy in where the beam effects directly on the same one or in tissues or peripherical organs. Some authors have suggested that in the first stages of the pregnancy the dose in ovaries can be the good estimated of the dose in embryo or fetus. In advanced conditions of the development, probably also in the early stage, is more appropriated to specify the dose in the embryo or fetus equal of the uterus. The dose in the uterus is a good estimated so much for external irradiation as for radionuclides incorporation.

  5. PestLCI - a model for estimating field emissions of pesticides in agricultural LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2006-01-01

    of a product or service is a specific element of LCA termed life cycle inventory (LCI). Estimation of chemical emissions in agricultural LCA is typically based on standard emission factors which at best are determined by a few physical-chemical substance properties and the use scenario of the chemical compound...... to the different environmental compartments. It estimates the fractions of the applied quantity which is emitted to the air, surface water, and groundwater compartment based on information which will normally be available to the model user about: type and time of application, crop species and development stage...... for other regions of the world. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Model development for nutrient loading estimates from paddy rice fields in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji-Hong; Yoon, Chun G; Ham, Jong-Hwa; Jung, Kwang-Wook

    2004-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate water and nutrient balances in paddy rice culture operations during 2001-2002. The water balance analysis indicated that about half (50-60%) of the total outflow was lost by surface drainage, with the remainder occurring by evapotranspiration (490-530 mm). The surface drainage from paddy fields was mainly caused by rainfall and forced-drainage, and in particular, the runoff during early rice culture periods depends more on the forced-drainage due to fertilization practices. Most of the total phosphorus (T-P) inflow was supplied by fertilization at transplanting, while the total nitrogen (T-N) inflow was supplied by the three fertilizations, precipitation. and from the upper paddy field, which comprised 13-33% of the total inflow. Although most of the nutrient outflow was attributed to plant uptake. nutrient loss by surface drainage was substantial, comprising 20% for T-N and 10% for T-P. Water and nutrient balances indicate that reduction of surface drainage from paddy rice fields is imperative for nonpoint source pollution control. The simplified computer model, PADDIMOD, was developed to simulate water and nutrient (T-N and T-P) behavior in the paddy rice field. The model predicts daily ponded water depth, surface drainage, and nutrient concentrations. It was formulated with a few equations and simplified assumptions, but its application and a model fitness test indicated that the simulation results reasonably matched the observed data. It is a simple and convenient planning model that could be used to evaluate BMPs of paddy rice fields alone or in combination with other complex watershed models. Application of the PADDIMOD to other paddy rice fields with different agricultural environments might require further calibration and validation.

  7. Stability estimate for the aligned magnetic field in a periodic quantum waveguide from Dirichlet-to-Neumann map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejri, Youssef, E-mail: josef-bizert@hotmail.fr [Aix Marseille Universite, Toulon Universite, CNRS, CPT, Marseille (France); Dép. des Mathématiques, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Jarzouna (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Modélisation Mathématique et Numérique dans les Sciences de l’Ingénieur, ENIT BP 37, Le Belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2016-06-15

    In this article, we study the boundary inverse problem of determining the aligned magnetic field appearing in the magnetic Schrödinger equation in a periodic quantum cylindrical waveguide, by knowledge of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map. We prove a Hölder stability estimate with respect to the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map, by means of the geometrical optics solutions of the magnetic Schrödinger equation.

  8. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  9. Advances in field and analytical methods for estimating entrainment mortality factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muessig, P.H.; Young, J.R.; Vaughan, D.S.; Smith, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    The hearings and settlement negotiations in the Hudson River case focused on various modeling input factors for calculating reduction in year-class strength of important fish species in the Hudson River due to power plant operations. One of the inputs that received considerable attention, and about which the various parties to the case came to general agreement, was the entrainment mortality factor, or f-factor, the probability that an entrained live organism will be killed as a result of its passage through a power plant in the condenser cooling water. Entrainment mortality includes death due to temperature increases and death due to mechanical processes. The convergence of views about the f-factor arose from increased understanding of the sources of estimation error, improvements in gear for collection of fish larvae, and development of a model for the thermal component of entrainment mortality. Improvements in sampling-gear design reduced potential biases in mortality estimates, reduced estimates of mechanical mortality from 0.923 to 0.412, and improved the statistical power to detect entrainment mortality and the precision of mortality estimates. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  10. Comparing alternative tree canopy cover estimates derived from digital aerial photography and field-based assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey S. Frescino; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2012-01-01

    A spatially-explicit representation of live tree canopy cover, such as the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) percent tree canopy cover layer, is a valuable tool for many applications, such as defining forest land, delineating wildlife habitat, estimating carbon, and modeling fire risk and behavior. These layers are generated by predictive models wherein their accuracy...

  11. Estimating Ambiguity Preferences and Perceptions in Multiple Prior Models: Evidence from the Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Dimmock (Stephen); R.R.P. Kouwenberg (Roy); O.S. Mitchell (Olivia); K. Peijnenburg (Kim)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractWe develop a tractable method to estimate multiple prior models of decision-making under ambiguity. In a representative sample of the U.S. population, we measure ambiguity attitudes in the gain and loss domains. We find that ambiguity aversion is common for uncertain events of

  12. Estimation of visibility of phase contrast with extraction voltages for field emission gun electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com

    2017-02-15

    Estimation was made for visibility of phase contrast with varying extraction voltages. The resulting decay rates of visibility show that images with low image contrast from cryo EM will be seriously impacted with high extraction voltages. - Highlights: • Cryo EM • Phase contrast • Extraction votage.

  13. Estimation of soil profile properties using field and laboratory VNIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) soil sensors have the potential to provide rapid, high-resolution estimation of multiple soil properties. Although many studies have focused on laboratory-based visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy of dried soil samples, previous work has demonstrated ...

  14. Absorption lines, Faraday rotation, and magnetic field estimates for QSO absorption-line clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, P.P.; Perry, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have estimated the extragalactic component of Faraday rotation for a sample of 37 QSOs for which there is good absorption line data, which we have also analyzed. Statistical evidence is presented which suggests that we have isolated a component of Faraday rotation which is occurring in the absorption clouds of some QSOs

  15. Field activity cost estimates for the first 3 years of the World Bank Loan Project for schistosomiasis control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Booth, M; Jenkins, J; Wang, H; Tanner, M

    1998-12-01

    The World Bank Loan Project for schistosomiasis in China commenced field activities in 1992. In this paper, we describe disease control strategies for levels of different endemicity, and estimate unit costs and total expenditure of screening, treatment (cattle and humans) and snail control for 8 provinces where Schistosoma japonicum infection is endemic. Overall, we estimate that more than 21 million US dollars were spent on field activities during the first three years of the project. Mollusciciding (43% of the total expenditure) and screening (28% of the total) are estimated to have the most expensive field activities. However, despite the expense of screening, a simple model predicts that selective chemotherapy could have been cheaper than mass chemotherapy in areas where infection prevalence was higher than 15%, which was the threshold for mass chemotherapy intervention. It is concluded that considerable cost savings could be made in the future by narrowing the scope of snail control activities, redefining the threshold infection prevalence for mass chemotherapy, defining smaller administrative units, and developing rapid assessment tools.

  16. 3D Ground Penetrating Radar to Detect Tree Roots and Estimate Root Biomass in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Zhu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to detect coarse tree root and to estimate root biomass in the field by using an advanced 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (3D GPR system. This study obtained full-resolution 3D imaging results of tree root system using 500 MHz and 800 MHz bow-tie antennas, respectively. The measurement site included two larch trees, and one of them was excavated after GPR measurements. In this paper, a searching algorithm, based on the continuity of pixel intensity along the root in 3D space, is proposed, and two coarse roots whose diameters are more than 5 cm were detected and delineated correctly. Based on the detection results and the measured root biomass, a linear regression model is proposed to estimate the total root biomass in different depth ranges, and the total error was less than 10%. Additionally, based on the detected root samples, a new index named “magnitude width” is proposed to estimate the root diameter that has good correlation with root diameter compared with other common GPR indexes. This index also provides direct measurement of the root diameter with 13%–16% error, providing reasonable and practical root diameter estimation especially in the field.

  17. Estimating the Total Heat Flux from the ASHES Hydrothermal Vent Field Using the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Kinsey, J. C.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges influences ocean chemistry, the thermal and chemical structure of the oceanic crust, and the evolution of unique and diverse autolithotrophically-supported ecosystems. Axially-hosted hydrothermal systems are responsible for 20-25% of the total heat flux out of Earth's interior, and likely play a large role in local as well as global biogeochemical cycles. Despite the importance of these systems, only a few studies have attempted to constrain the volume and heat flux of an entire hydrothermal vent field. In July of 2014 we used the Sentry autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to survey the water column over the ASHES hydrothermal vent field which is located within the caldera of Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To estimate the total heat and mass flux from this vent field, we equipped Sentry with a Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV), an inertial measurement unit (IMU), two acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), and two SBE3 temperature probes, allowing us to obtain precise measurements of fluid temperature and water velocity. The survey was designed using a control volume approach in which Sentry was pre-programmed to survey a 150-m-square centered over the vent field flying a grid pattern with 5-m track line spacing followed by a survey of the perimeter. This pattern was repeated multiple times during several 10-h dives at different altitudes, including 10, 20, 40, and 60 m above the seafloor, and during one 40-h survey at an altitude of 10 m. During the 40-h survey, the pattern was repeated nine times allowing us to obtain observations over several tidal cycles. Water velocity data obtained with Sentry were corrected for platform motion and then combined with the temperature measurements to estimate heat flux. The analysis of these data will likely provide the most accurate and highest resolution heat and mass flux estimates at a seafloor hydrothermal field to date.

  18. Heating of field-reversed plasma rings estimated with two scaling models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1978-05-18

    Scaling calculations are presented of the one temperature heating of a field-reversed plasma ring. Two sharp-boundary models of the ring are considered: the long thin approximation and a pinch model. Isobaric, adiabatic, and isovolumetric cases are considered, corresponding to various ways of heating the plasma in a real experiment by using neutral beams, or by raising the magnetic field. It is found that the shape of the plasma changes markedly with heating. The least sensitive shape change (as a function of temperature) is found for the isovolumetric heating case, which can be achieved by combining neutral beam heating with compression. The complications introduced by this heating problem suggest that it is desirable, if possible, to create a field reversed ring which is already quite hot, rather than cold.

  19. A Numerical Estimation of a RFID Reader Field and SAR inside a Blood Bag at UHF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Fanti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of UHF electromagnetic fields produced by a RFID reader on a blood bag are evaluated numerically in several configurations. The results of the simulation, field level and distribution, specific absorption rate (SAR, and heating time show that an exposure to a typical reader field leads to a temperature increase smaller than 0.1 C and to a SAR smaller than 1 W/kg. As a consequence, no adverse biological effects occur during a typical UHF RFID reading cycle on a blood bag. Therefore, the blood contained in a bag traced using UHF-RFID is as safe as those traced using barcodes. The proposed analysis supports the use of UHF RFID in the blood transfusion supply chain.

  20. Estimates of the field-aligned current density in current-carrying filaments using auroral zone ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Danielides

    Full Text Available We described the ground signatures of dynamic substorm features as observed by the imaging riometer, magnetometers and all-sky camera (ASC at Kilpisjärvi, Finland on 5 and 25 October 1999 during the late evening hours. The magnetometer data was consistent with the motion of up-ward field-aligned currents (FACs associated with absorption patches moving within the field of view of the riometer. We used riometer data in order to estimate the intensity of FACs associated with these local current-carrying filaments. It is shown that during these events, the estimated FAC intensity exceeds a threshold value that corresponds to the excitation of the low-frequency turbulence in the upper ionosphere. As a result, a quasi-oscillating regime of anomalous resistivity on the auroral field lines can give rise to the burst-like electron acceleration responsible for simultaneously observed auroral forms and bursts of Pi1B pulsations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents

  1. Estimating the magnitude of prediction uncertainties for field-scale P loss models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models are often used to predict phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields. While it is commonly recognized that model predictions are inherently uncertain, few studies have addressed prediction uncertainties using P loss models. In this study, an uncertainty analysis for the Annual P Loss Estima...

  2. Low Complexity Sparse Bayesian Learning for Channel Estimation Using Generalized Mean Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Lovmand; Manchón, Carles Navarro; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    We derive low complexity versions of a wide range of algorithms for sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) in underdetermined linear systems. The proposed algorithms are obtained by applying the generalized mean field (GMF) inference framework to a generic SBL probabilistic model. In the GMF framework, we...

  3. Systematic Analysis and Synthesis of Integral Estimations of Bachelors’ Training in the Field of Financial Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Gaibatova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The following article describes methods and algorithms of improving the quality of students’ training in NRNU MEPHI on the profile activities in the sphere of financial monitoring. In this work, we have investigated a new subject field: application of the principal component analysis method to examine students’ performance in different profiles of their training.

  4. Estimation of the biomass of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a linseed field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P.A.; Thingstrup, I.; Jakobsen, I.

    1999-01-01

    -organisms was estimated 28, 51 and 72 d after sowing based on amounts of certain fatty acids extracted from the soil. Dazomet application strongly suppressed colonisation of the linseed roots by AM fungi throughout the experiment. In plots with no dazomet application, root colonisation by the AM fungi increased from...... that the biomass of the extraradical mycelium of AM fungi was about 10 times as high as the biomass of intraradical mycelium and that the extraradical mycelium constituted the largest fraction of the soil microbial biomass. Dazomet application also decreased the biomass of saprophytic fungi in the soil...... harvests 1 to 3 as judged both from microscopical estimates and from quantitative analysis of the AM fungal indicative fatty acid 16.1 omega 5. These methods also revealed that AM formation was reduced in P-fertilised plots. The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) 16:1 omega 5 decreased in dazomet-treated soil...

  5. Effect of Numerical Error on Gravity Field Estimation for GRACE and Future Gravity Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Christopher; Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, gravity field determination from low Earth orbiting satellites, such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), has become increasingly more effective due to the incorporation of high accuracy measurement devices. Since instrumentation quality will only increase in the near future and the gravity field determination process is computationally and numerically intensive, numerical error from the use of double precision arithmetic will eventually become a prominent error source. While using double-extended or quadruple precision arithmetic will reduce these errors, the numerical limitations of current orbit determination algorithms and processes must be accurately identified and quantified in order to adequately inform the science data processing techniques of future gravity missions. The most obvious numerical limitation in the orbit determination process is evident in the comparison of measured observables with computed values, derived from mathematical models relating the satellites' numerically integrated state to the observable. Significant error in the computed trajectory will corrupt this comparison and induce error in the least squares solution of the gravitational field. In addition, errors in the numerically computed trajectory propagate into the evaluation of the mathematical measurement model's partial derivatives. These errors amalgamate in turn with numerical error from the computation of the state transition matrix, computed using the variational equations of motion, in the least squares mapping matrix. Finally, the solution of the linearized least squares system, computed using a QR factorization, is also susceptible to numerical error. Certain interesting combinations of each of these numerical errors are examined in the framework of GRACE gravity field determination to analyze and quantify their effects on gravity field recovery.

  6. Integrating biology, field logistics, and simulations to optimize parameter estimation for imperiled species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Wendy E.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of imperiled species often requires knowledge of vital rates and population dynamics. However, these can be difficult to estimate for rare species and small populations. This problem is further exacerbated when individuals are not available for detection during some surveys due to limited access, delaying surveys and creating mismatches between the breeding behavior and survey timing. Here we use simulations to explore the impacts of this issue using four hypothetical boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas boreas) populations, representing combinations of logistical access (accessible, inaccessible) and breeding behavior (synchronous, asynchronous). We examine the bias and precision of survival and breeding probability estimates generated by survey designs that differ in effort and timing for these populations. Our findings indicate that the logistical access of a site and mismatch between the breeding behavior and survey design can greatly limit the ability to yield accurate and precise estimates of survival and breeding probabilities. Simulations similar to what we have performed can help researchers determine an optimal survey design(s) for their system before initiating sampling efforts.

  7. A less field-intensive robust design for estimating demographic parameters with Mark-resight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, B.T.; White, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    The robust design has become popular among animal ecologists as a means for estimating population abundance and related demographic parameters with mark-recapture data. However, two drawbacks of traditional mark-recapture are financial cost and repeated disturbance to animals. Mark-resight methodology may in many circumstances be a less expensive and less invasive alternative to mark-recapture, but the models developed to date for these data have overwhelmingly concentrated only on the estimation of abundance. Here we introduce a mark-resight model analogous to that used in mark-recapture for the simultaneous estimation of abundance, apparent survival, and transition probabilities between observable and unobservable states. The model may be implemented using standard statistical computing software, but it has also been incorporated into the freeware package Program MARK. We illustrate the use of our model with mainland New Zealand Robin (Petroica australis) data collected to ascertain whether this methodology may be a reliable alternative for monitoring endangered populations of a closely related species inhabiting the Chatham Islands. We found this method to be a viable alternative to traditional mark-recapture when cost or disturbance to species is of particular concern in long-term population monitoring programs. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Spatial Variation of Diapycnal Diffusivity Estimated From Seismic Imaging of Internal Wave Field, Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Nicholas; White, Nicholas Jeremiah; Caulfield, Colm-cille Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Bright reflections are observed within the upper 1000~m of the water column along a seismic reflection profile that traverses the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Independent hydrographic calibration demonstrates that these reflections are primarily caused by temperature changes associated with different water masses that are entrained into the Gulf along the Loop Current. The internal wave field is analyzed by automatically tracking 1171 reflections, each of which is greater th...

  9. Regional estimation of geomagnetically induced currents based on the local magnetic or electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljanen Ari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a close relationship between the time derivative of the horizontal geomagnetic field vector (dH/dt and geomagnetically induced currents (GIC at a nearby location in a power grid. Similarly, a high correlation exists between GIC and the local horizontal geoelectric field (E, typically modelled from a measured magnetic field. Considering GIC forecasting, it is not feasible to assume that detailed prediction of time series will be possible. Instead, other measures summarising the activity level over a given period are preferable. In this paper, we consider the 30-min maximum of dH/dt or E as a local activity indicator (|dH/dt|30 or |E|30. Concerning GIC, we use the sum of currents through the neutral leads at substations and apply its 30-min maximum as a regional activity measure (GIC30. We show that |dH/dt|30 at a single point yields a proxy for GIC activity in a larger region. A practical consequence is that if |dH/dt|30 can be predicted at some point then it is also possible to assess the expected GIC level in the surrounding area. As is also demonstrated, |E|30 and GIC30 depend linearly on |dH/dt|30, so there is no saturation with increasing geomagnetic activity contrary to often used activity indices.

  10. Estimating field-scale soil water dynamics at a heterogeneous site using multi-channel GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We explore the feasibility to quantify the field-scale soil water dynamics through time series of GPR (ground-penetrating radar measurements, which bridge the gap between point measurements and field measurements. Working on a 40 m × 50 m area in a heterogeneous agricultural field, we obtain a time series of radargrams after a heavy rainfall event. The data are analysed to simultaneously yield (i a three-dimensional representation of the subsurface architecture and (ii the total soil water volume between the surface and a reflection boundary associated with the presence of paleo sand dunes or clay inclusions in a rather uniform sand matrix. We assess the precision and the accuracy of these quantities and conclude that the method is sensitive enough to capture the spatial structure of the changing soil water content in a three-dimensional heterogeneous soil during a short-duration infiltration event. While the sensitivity of the method needs to be improved, it already produced useful information to understand the observed patterns in crop height and it yielded insight into the dynamics of soil water content at this site including the effect of evaporation.

  11. Estimating ambiguity preferences and perceptions in multiple prior models: Evidence from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Stephen G.; Kouwenberg, Roy; Mitchell, Olivia S.; Peijnenburg, Kim

    2016-01-01

    We develop a tractable method to estimate multiple prior models of decision-making under ambiguity. In a representative sample of the U.S. population, we measure ambiguity attitudes in the gain and loss domains. We find that ambiguity aversion is common for uncertain events of moderate to high likelihood involving gains, but ambiguity seeking prevails for low likelihoods and for losses. We show that choices made under ambiguity in the gain domain are best explained by the α-MaxMin model, with one parameter measuring ambiguity aversion (ambiguity preferences) and a second parameter quantifying the perceived degree of ambiguity (perceptions about ambiguity). The ambiguity aversion parameter α is constant and prior probability sets are asymmetric for low and high likelihood events. The data reject several other models, such as MaxMin and MaxMax, as well as symmetric probability intervals. Ambiguity aversion and the perceived degree of ambiguity are both higher for men and for the college-educated. Ambiguity aversion (but not perceived ambiguity) is also positively related to risk aversion. In the loss domain, we find evidence of reflection, implying that ambiguity aversion for gains tends to reverse into ambiguity seeking for losses. Our model’s estimates for preferences and perceptions about ambiguity can be used to analyze the economic and financial implications of such preferences. PMID:26924890

  12. Estimating ambiguity preferences and perceptions in multiple prior models: Evidence from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Stephen G; Kouwenberg, Roy; Mitchell, Olivia S; Peijnenburg, Kim

    2015-12-01

    We develop a tractable method to estimate multiple prior models of decision-making under ambiguity. In a representative sample of the U.S. population, we measure ambiguity attitudes in the gain and loss domains. We find that ambiguity aversion is common for uncertain events of moderate to high likelihood involving gains, but ambiguity seeking prevails for low likelihoods and for losses. We show that choices made under ambiguity in the gain domain are best explained by the α-MaxMin model, with one parameter measuring ambiguity aversion (ambiguity preferences) and a second parameter quantifying the perceived degree of ambiguity (perceptions about ambiguity). The ambiguity aversion parameter α is constant and prior probability sets are asymmetric for low and high likelihood events. The data reject several other models, such as MaxMin and MaxMax, as well as symmetric probability intervals. Ambiguity aversion and the perceived degree of ambiguity are both higher for men and for the college-educated. Ambiguity aversion (but not perceived ambiguity) is also positively related to risk aversion. In the loss domain, we find evidence of reflection, implying that ambiguity aversion for gains tends to reverse into ambiguity seeking for losses. Our model's estimates for preferences and perceptions about ambiguity can be used to analyze the economic and financial implications of such preferences.

  13. Incorporating covariance estimation uncertainty in spatial sampling design for prediction with trans-Gaussian random fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter eSpöck

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Spock and Pilz [38], demonstratedthat the spatial sampling design problem forthe Bayesian linear kriging predictor can betransformed to an equivalent experimentaldesign problem for a linear regression modelwith stochastic regression coefficients anduncorrelated errors. The stochastic regressioncoefficients derive from the polar spectralapproximation of the residual process. Thus,standard optimal convex experimental designtheory can be used to calculate optimal spatialsampling designs. The design functionals ̈considered in Spock and Pilz [38] did nottake into account the fact that kriging isactually a plug-in predictor which uses theestimated covariance function. The resultingoptimal designs were close to space-fillingconfigurations, because the design criteriondid not consider the uncertainty of thecovariance function.In this paper we also assume that thecovariance function is estimated, e.g., byrestricted maximum likelihood (REML. Wethen develop a design criterion that fully takesaccount of the covariance uncertainty. Theresulting designs are less regular and space-filling compared to those ignoring covarianceuncertainty. The new designs, however, alsorequire some closely spaced samples in orderto improve the estimate of the covariancefunction. We also relax the assumption ofGaussian observations and assume that thedata is transformed to Gaussianity by meansof the Box-Cox transformation. The resultingprediction method is known as trans-Gaussiankriging. We apply the Smith and Zhu [37]approach to this kriging method and show thatresulting optimal designs also depend on theavailable data. We illustrate our results witha data set of monthly rainfall measurementsfrom Upper Austria.

  14. Association between hMLH1 hypermethylation and JC virus (JCV) infection in human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2011-04-01

    Incorporation of viral DNA may interfere with the normal sequence of human DNA bases on the genetic level or cause secondary epigenetic changes such as gene promoter methylation or histone acetylation. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. Chromosomal instability (CIN) was established as the key mechanism in cancer development. Later, it was found that CRC results not only from the progressive accumulation of genetic alterations but also from epigenetic changes. JC virus (JCV) is a candidate etiologic factor in sporadic CRC. It may act by stabilizing β-catenin, facilitating its entrance to the cell nucleus, initialing proliferation and cancer development. Diploid CRC cell lines transfected with JCV-containing plasmids developed CIN. This result provides direct experimental evidence for the ability of JCV T-Ag to induce CIN in the genome of colonic epithelial cells. The association of CRC hMLH1 methylation and tumor positivity for JCV was recently documented. JC virus T-Ag DNA sequences were found in 77% of CRCs and are associated with promoter methylation of multiple genes. hMLH1 was methylated in 25 out of 80 CRC patients positive for T-Ag (31%) in comparison with only one out of 11 T-Ag negative cases (9%). Thus, JCV can mediate both CIN and aberrant methylation in CRC. Like other viruses, chronic infection with JCV may induce CRC by different mechanisms which should be further investigated. Thus, gene promoter methylation induced by JCV may be an important process in CRC and the polyp-carcinoma sequence.

  15. Serum IgG antibodies from healthy subjects up to 100 years old react to JC polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bononi, Ilaria; Mazzoni, Elisa; Pietrobon, Silvia; Manfrini, Marco; Torreggiani, Elena; Rossini, Marika; Lotito, Francesca; Guerra, Giovanni; Rizzo, Paola; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro

    2018-08-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was identified in 1971 in the brain tissue of a patient (J.C.) affected by the progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCPyV encodes for the oncoproteins large T antigen (Tag) and small t-antigen (tag). These oncoproteins are responsible of the cell transformation and tumorigenesis in experimental animals. JCPyV is ubiquitous in human populations. After the primary infection, which is usually asymptomatic, JCPyV remains lifelong in the host in a latent phase. Its reactivation may occur in heathy subjects and immunocompromised patients. Upon reactivation, JCPyV could reach (i) the CNS inducing the PML, (ii) the kidney of transplant patients causing the organ rejection. Association between JCPyV, which is a small DNA tumor virus, and gliomas and colorectal carcinomas has been published. In the present investigation, we report on a new indirect ELISA with two specific synthetic peptides mimicking JCPyV VP1 immunogenic epitopes to detect specific serum IgG antibodies against JCPyV. Serum samples of healthy subjects (n = 355) ranging 2-100 years old, were analyzed by this new indirect ELISA. The linear peptides VP1 K and VP1 N resemble the natural JCPyV VP1 capsidic epitopes constituting a docking site for serum antibodies. Data from this innovative immunologic assay indicate that the overall prevalence of JCPyV-VP1 antibodies in healthy subjects is at 39%. The innovative indirect ELISA with JCPyV VP1 mimotopes seems to be a useful method to detect specific IgG antibodies against this virus, without cross-reactivity with the closely related SV40 and BKPyV polyomaviruses. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Simplified methods for estimating gamma exposure fields transmitted through straight rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultis, J.K.; Thompson, K.R.; Faw, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Approximate computational models are developed to describe the spatial variation in the radiation field transmitted through a straight reactangular duct obliquely illuminated by monoenergetic gamma photons. These models account for single and multiple scattering from the duct walls and lips as well as for direct penetration by the photons. Results of calculations are compared to results from a recent benchmark duct streaming experiment, and empirical correction factors are obtained which enable the models to predict the transmitted exposure rates to within 20% of the experimental values

  17. Qualitative and quantitative estimations of the effect of geomagnetic field variations on human brain functional state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belisheva, N.K.; Popov, A.N.; Petukhova, N.V.; Pavlova, L.P.; Osipov, K.S.; Tkachenko, S.Eh.; Baranova, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    The comparison of functional dynamics of human brain with reference to qualitative and quantitative characteristics of local geomagnetic field (GMF) variations was conducted. Steady and unsteady states of human brain can be determined: by geomagnetic disturbances before the observation period; by structure and doses of GMF variations; by different combinations of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of GMF variations. Decrease of optimal GMF activity level and the appearance of aperiodic disturbances of GMF can be a reason of unsteady brain's state. 18 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Geostatistical estimation of forest biomass in interior Alaska combining Landsat-derived tree cover, sampled airborne lidar and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Chad; Finley, Andrew O.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Pattison, Robert; Cook, Bruce D.; Morton, Douglas C.; Alonzo, Michael; Nelson, Ross; Gregoire, Timothy; Ene, Liviu; Gobakken, Terje; Næsset, Erik

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this research was to develop and examine the performance of a geostatistical coregionalization modeling approach for combining field inventory measurements, strip samples of airborne lidar and Landsat-based remote sensing data products to predict aboveground biomass (AGB) in interior Alaska's Tanana Valley. The proposed modeling strategy facilitates pixel-level mapping of AGB density predictions across the entire spatial domain. Additionally, the coregionalization framework allows for statistically sound estimation of total AGB for arbitrary areal units within the study area---a key advance to support diverse management objectives in interior Alaska. This research focuses on appropriate characterization of prediction uncertainty in the form of posterior predictive coverage intervals and standard deviations. Using the framework detailed here, it is possible to quantify estimation uncertainty for any spatial extent, ranging from pixel-level predictions of AGB density to estimates of AGB stocks for the full domain. The lidar-informed coregionalization models consistently outperformed their counterpart lidar-free models in terms of point-level predictive performance and total AGB precision. Additionally, the inclusion of Landsat-derived forest cover as a covariate further improved estimation precision in regions with lower lidar sampling intensity. Our findings also demonstrate that model-based approaches that do not explicitly account for residual spatial dependence can grossly underestimate uncertainty, resulting in falsely precise estimates of AGB. On the other hand, in a geostatistical setting, residual spatial structure can be modeled within a Bayesian hierarchical framework to obtain statistically defensible assessments of uncertainty for AGB estimates.

  19. Precise Estimation of Cellular Radio Electromagnetic Field in Elevators and EMI Impact on Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Louis-Ray; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible impact of cellular phones' signals on implantable cardiac pacemakers in elevators. This is achieved by carrying out precise numerical simulations based on the Finite-Difference-Time-Domain method to examine the electromagnetic fields in elevator models. In order to examine the realistic and complicated situations where humans are present in the elevator, we apply the realistic homogeneous human phantom and cellular radios operating in the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz. These computed results of field strength inside the elevator are compared with a certain reference level determined from the experimentally obtained maximum interference distance of implantable cardiac pacemakers. This enables us to carry out a quantitative evaluation of the EMI risk to pacemakers by cellular radio transmission. The results show that for the case when up to 5 mobile radio users are present in the elevator model used, there is no likelihood of pacemaker malfunction for the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz.

  20. A microbial bioassay to estimate nutrient availability in organic fertilizers; field calibration:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, E.; Ramirez, C.

    2001-01-01

    A good correlation was recently shown between the increase in the microbial biomass (BM) in a mixture of soil/organic amendment and the growth of a test plant, sorghum, in the same substrate. This work reports the validation of the microbial assay as a potential guide to establish the fertilization rate for organic fertilizers such as compost under field conditions. A field trial was established with green pepper (Capsicum annum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L) as test plants. Treatments were soil alone or amended with 10% (W/W) of organic amendments of contrasting nutrient value, namely: chicken manure (CM), compost (C), bocashi (B), vermicompost (V) and coffe hulls (Br). A complete randomized block design with 4 replicates was used. The following variables were determined: plant dry weight (PSC) and fresh fruit weight (PFF) for green pepper, 97 days after showing; for tomato, plant dry weight (PST) was determined 32 days after showing. For the microbial biomass a complete randomized block design was also used, with 6 replicates, for the same mixtures. Microbial biomass was determined 2 days after amendment with glucose (0.8%) using the substrate- induce respiration assay. The organic amendments CM, C and B induced the highest values for BM as well as fro PSC, PFF and PST, which indicates a high nutrient availability for these organic amendments, whereas the organic amendments V and Br showed the lowest values (P [es

  1. NIS method for uncertainty estimation of airborne sound insulation measurement in field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Basheer Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In structures, airborne sound insulation is utilized to characterize the acoustic nature of barriers between rooms. However, the assessment of sound insulation index is once in a while troublesome or indeed, even questionable, both in field and laboratory measurements, notwithstanding the way that there are some unified measurement methodology indicated in the ISO 140 series standards. There are issues with the reproducibility and repeatability of the measurement results. A few troubles might be brought on by non-diffuse acoustic fields, non-uniform reverberation time, or blunders of the reverberation time measurements. Some minor issues are additionally postured by flanking transmission. In this paper, investigation of the uncertainties of the above specified measurement parts and their impact on the consolidated uncertainty in 1/3-octave frequency band. The total measurement uncertainty model contributes several different partial uncertainties, which are evaluated by the method of type A or type B. Also, the determination of the sound reduction index decided by ISO 140-4 has been performed.

  2. MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON GROUND COVER CLUMPINESS: SCALING FROM FIELD TO SENTINEL-2 COVER ESTIMATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the development of cover data and derived products based on remotely sensed fractional cover information and field data across Australia, and these cover data sets are now used for quantifying and monitoring grazing land condition. The availability of a dense time-series of nearly 30 years of cover data to describe the spatial and temporal patterns in landscape changes over time can help with monitoring the effectiveness of grazing land management practice change. With the advent of higher spatial resolution data, such as that provided by the Copernicus Sentinel 2 series of satellites, we can look beyond reporting purely on cover amount and more closely at the operational monitoring and reporting on spatial arrangement of cover and its links with land condition. We collected high spatial resolution cover transects at 20 cm intervals over the Wambiana grazing trials in the Burdekin catchment in Queensland, Australia. Spatial variance analysis was used to determine the cover autocorrelation at various support intervals. Coincident Sentinel-2 imagery was collected and processed over all the sites providing imagery to link with the field data. We show that the spatial arrangement and temporal dynamics of cover are important indicators of grazing land condition for both productivity and water quality outcomes. The metrics and products derived from this research will assist land managers to prioritize investment and practice change strategies for long term sustainability and improved water quality, particularly in the Great Barrier Reef catchments.

  3. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  4. Estimation of Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency Using Satellite and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Quick, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    Structure and function of terrestrial plant communities bring about intimate relations between water, energy, and carbon exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Total evaporation, which is the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and evaporation of intercepted water, couples water and energy balance equations. The rate of transpiration, which is the major fraction of total evaporation over most of the terrestrial land surface, is linked to the rate of carbon accumulation because functioning of stomata is optimized by both of these processes. Thus, quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the transpiration efficiency (which is defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and transpiration), and water use efficiency (defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and total evaporation), and evaluation of modeling results against observations, are of significant importance in developing a better understanding of land surface processes. An approach has been developed for quantifying spatial and temporal variations of transpiration, and water-use efficiency based on biophysical process-based models, satellite and field observations. Calculations have been done using concurrent meteorological data derived from satellite observations and four dimensional data assimilation for four consecutive years (1987-1990) over an agricultural area in the Northern Great Plains of the US, and compared with field observations within and outside the study area. The paper provides substantive new information about interannual variation, particularly the effect of drought, on the efficiency values at a regional scale.

  5. Methodologies for estimating toxicity of shoreline cleaning agents in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.R.Jr.; Stransky, B.C.; Schwartz, M.J.; Snyder, B.J.; Lees, D.C.; Michel, J.; Reilly, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Four methodologies that could be used in a portable kit to estimate quantitative and qualitative information regarding the toxicity of oil spill cleaning agents, were evaluated. Onshore cleaning agents (SCAs) are meant to enhance the removal of treated oil from shoreline surfaces, and should not increase adverse impacts to organisms in a treated area. Tests, therefore, should be performed with resident organisms likely to be impacted during the use of SCAs. The four methodologies were Microtox T M, fertilization success for echinoderm eggs, byssal thread attachment in mussels, and righting and water-escaping ability in periwinkle snails. Site specific variations in physical and chemical properties of the oil and SCAs were considered. Results were provided, showing all combinations of oils and SCAs. Evaluation showed that all four methodologies provided sufficient information to assist a user in deciding whether or not the use of an SCA was warranted. 33 refs., 7 tabs., 11 figs

  6. Field estimation of soil water content. A practical guide to methods, instrumentation and sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    During a period of five years, an international group of soil water instrumentation experts were contracted by the International Atomic Energy Agency to carry out a range of comparative assessments of soil water sensing methods under laboratory and field conditions. The detailed results of those studies are published elsewhere. Most of the devices examined worked well some of the time, but most also performed poorly in some circumstances. The group was also aware that the choice of a water measurement technology is often made for economic, convenience and other reasons, and that there was a need to be able to obtain the best results from any device used. The choice of a technology is sometimes not made by the ultimate user, or even if it is, the main constraint may be financial rather than technical. Thus, this guide is presented in a way that allows the user to obtain the best performance from any instrument, while also providing guidance as to which instruments perform best under given circumstances. That said, this expert group of the IAEA reached several important conclusions: (1) the field calibrated neutron moisture meter (NMM) remains the most accurate and precise method for soil profile water content determination in the field, and is the only indirect method capable of providing accurate soil water balance data for studies of crop water use, water use efficiency, irrigation efficiency and irrigation water use efficiency, with a minimum number of access tubes; (2) those electromagnetic sensors known as capacitance sensors exhibit much more variability in the field than either the NMM or direct soil water measurements, and they are not recommended for soil water balance studies for this reason (impractically large numbers of access tubes and sensors are required) and because they are rendered inaccurate by changes in soil bulk electrical conductivity (including temperature effects) that often occur in irrigated soils, particularly those containing

  7. Experimental Quasi-Microwave Whole-Body Averaged SAR Estimation Method Using Cylindrical-External Field Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio

    The aim of this study is to develop a new whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) estimation method based on the external-cylindrical field scanning technique. This technique is adopted with the goal of simplifying the dosimetry estimation of human phantoms that have different postures or sizes. An experimental scaled model system is constructed. In order to examine the validity of the proposed method for realistic human models, we discuss the pros and cons of measurements and numerical analyses based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. We consider the anatomical European human phantoms and plane-wave in the 2GHz mobile phone frequency band. The measured whole-body averaged SAR results obtained by the proposed method are compared with the results of the FDTD analyses.

  8. Electromagnetic fields and the public: EMF standards and estimation of risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Yury

    2010-04-01

    Mobile communications are a relatively new and additional source of electromagnetic exposure for the population. Standard daily mobile-phone use is known to increase RF-EMF (radiofrequency electromagnetic field) exposure to the brains of users of all ages, whilst mobile-phone base stations, and base station units for cordless phones, can regularly increase the exposures of large numbers of the population to RF-EMF radiation in everyday life. The need to determine appropriate standards stipulating the maximum acceptable short-term and long-term RF-EMF levels encountered by the public, and set such levels as general guidelines, is of great importance in order to help preserve the general public's health and that of the next generation of humanity.

  9. Electromagnetic fields and the public: EMF standards and estimation of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Mobile communications are a relatively new and additional source of electromagnetic exposure for the population. Standard daily mobile-phone use is known to increase RF-EMF (radiofrequency electromagnetic field) exposure to the brains of users of all ages, whilst mobile-phone base stations, and base station units for cordless phones, can regularly increase the exposures of large numbers of the population to RF-EMF radiation in everyday life. The need to determine appropriate standards stipulating the maximum acceptable short-term and long-term RF-EMF levels encountered by the public, and set such levels as general guidelines, is of great importance in order to help preserve the general public's health and that of the next generation of humanity.

  10. A story about estimation of a random field of boulders from incomplete seismic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2005-01-01

    deposits along the tunnel line. By use of this important distribution information and of the observed homogeneity of the seismic point source field together with the physical properties of diffraction it became possible to make the wanted prediction. During the excavation the found boulders were counted......This paper reports on the statistical interpretation of seismic diffraction measurements of boulder locations. The measurements are made in a corridor along the planned tunnel line for the later realized bored tunnel through the till deposits under the East Channel of the Great Belt in Denmark...... graphical registrations on seismograms do not make a proper interpretation possible without detailed knowledge about the joint distribution of the primary dimensions of the boulders. Therefore separate measurements were made of the dimensions of boulders deposited visibly on the cliff beaches of the Great...

  11. Design of double gate vertical tunnel field effect transistor using HDB and its performance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema; Chauhan, Sudakar Singh

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the double gate vertical tunnel field-effect transistor using homo/hetero dielectric buried oxide (HDB) to obtain the optimized device characteristics. In this concern, the existence of double gate, HDB and electrode work-function engineering enhances DC performance and Analog/RF performance. The use of electrostatic doping helps to achieve higher on-current owing to occurrence of higher tunneling generation rate of charge carriers at the source/epitaxial interface. Further, lightly doped drain region and high- k dielectric below channel and drain region are responsible to suppress the ambipolar current. Simulated results clarifies that proposed device have achieved the tremendous performance in terms of driving current capability, steeper subthreshold slope (SS), drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL), hot carrier effects (HCEs) and high frequency parameters for better device reliability.

  12. Monodimensional estimation of maximum Reynolds shear stress in the downstream flow field of bileaflet valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Barbaro, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    Turbulent flow generated by prosthetic devices at the bloodstream level may cause mechanical stress on blood particles. Measurement of the Reynolds stress tensor and/or some of its components is a mandatory step to evaluate the mechanical load on blood components exerted by fluid stresses, as well as possible consequent blood damage (hemolysis or platelet activation). Because of the three-dimensional nature of turbulence, in general, a three-component anemometer should be used to measure all components of the Reynolds stress tensor, but this is difficult, especially in vivo. The present study aimed to derive the maximum Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in three commercially available prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) of wide diffusion, starting with monodimensional data provided in vivo by echo Doppler. Accurate measurement of PHV flow field was made using laser Doppler anemometry; this provided the principal turbulence quantities (mean velocity, root-mean-square value of velocity fluctuations, average value of cross-product of velocity fluctuations in orthogonal directions) needed to quantify the maximum turbulence-related shear stress. The recorded data enabled determination of the relationship, the Reynolds stresses ratio (RSR) between maximum RSS and Reynolds normal stress in the main flow direction. The RSR was found to be dependent upon the local structure of the flow field. The reported RSR profiles, which permit a simple calculation of maximum RSS, may prove valuable during the post-implantation phase, when an assessment of valve function is made echocardiographically. Hence, the risk of damage to blood constituents associated with bileaflet valve implantation may be accurately quantified in vivo.

  13. Lamé Parameter Estimation from Static Displacement Field Measurements in the Framework of Nonlinear Inverse Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubmer, Simon; Sherina, Ekaterina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    . The main result of this paper is the verification of a nonlinearity condition in an infinite dimensional Hilbert space context. This condition guarantees convergence of iterative regularization methods. Furthermore, numerical examples for recovery of the Lam´e parameters from displacement data simulating......We consider a problem of quantitative static elastography, the estimation of the Lam´e parameters from internal displacement field data. This problem is formulated as a nonlinear operator equation. To solve this equation, we investigate the Landweber iteration both analytically and numerically...... a static elastography experiment are presented....

  14. A coupled remote sensing and simplified surface energy balance approach to estimate actual evapotranspiration from irrigated fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G.B.; Budde, Michael; Verdin, J.P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  15. Impact of Spatial Resolution on Wind Field Derived Estimates of Air Pressure Depression in the Hurricane Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linwood Jones

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the near surface horizontal wind field in a hurricane with spatial resolution of order 1–10 km are possible using airborne microwave radiometer imagers. An assessment is made of the information content of the measured winds as a function of the spatial resolution of the imager. An existing algorithm is used which estimates the maximum surface air pressure depression in the hurricane eye from the maximum wind speed. High resolution numerical model wind fields from Hurricane Frances 2004 are convolved with various HIRAD antenna spatial filters to observe the impact of the antenna design on the central pressure depression in the eye that can be deduced from it.

  16. RIEGER-TYPE PERIODICITY DURING SOLAR CYCLES 14–24: ESTIMATION OF DYNAMO MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE SOLAR INTERIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgenashvili, Eka; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Kukhianidze, Vasil; Ramishvili, Giorgi; Shergelashvili, Bidzina [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory at Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hanslmeier, Arnold [IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Poedts, Stefaan, E-mail: teimuraz.zaqarashvili@uni-graz.at [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-07-20

    Solar activity undergoes a variation over timescales of several months known as Rieger-type periodicity, which usually occurs near maxima of sunspot cycles. An early analysis showed that the periodicity appears only in some cycles and is absent in other cycles. But the appearance/absence during different cycles has not been explained. We performed a wavelet analysis of sunspot data from the Greenwich Royal Observatory and the Royal Observatory of Belgium during cycles 14–24. We found that the Rieger-type periods occur in all cycles, but they are cycle dependent: shorter periods occur during stronger cycles. Our analysis revealed a periodicity of 185–195 days during the weak cycles 14–15 and 24 and a periodicity of 155–165 days during the stronger cycles 16–23. We derived the dispersion relation of the spherical harmonics of the magnetic Rossby waves in the presence of differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field in the dynamo layer near the base of the convection zone. This showed that the harmonics of fast Rossby waves with m = 1 and n = 4, where m ( n ) indicates the toroidal (poloidal) wavenumbers, perfectly fit with the observed periodicity. The variation of the toroidal field strength from weaker to stronger cycles may lead to the different periods found in those cycles, which explains the observed enigmatic feature of the Rieger-type periodicity. Finally, we used the observed periodicity to estimate the dynamo field strength during cycles 14–24. Our estimations suggest a field strength of ∼40 kG for the stronger cycles and ∼20 kG for the weaker cycles.

  17. Two-dimensional magnetic field evolution measurements and plasma flow speed estimates from the coaxial thruster experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.C.; Mayo, R.M.; Gerwin, R.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Scheuer, J.T.; Hoyt, R.P.; Henins, I.

    1994-01-01

    Local, time-dependent magnetic field measurements have been made in the Los Alamos coaxial thruster experiment (CTX) [C. W. Barnes et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1871 (1990); J. C. Fernandez et al., Nucl. Fusion 28, 1555 (1988)] using a 24 coil magnetic probe array (eight spatial positions, three axis probes). The CTX is a magnetized, coaxial plasma gun presently being used to investigate the viability of high pulsed power plasma thrusters for advanced electric propulsion. Previous efforts on this device have indicated that high pulsed power plasma guns are attractive candidates for advanced propulsion that employ ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma stream flow through self-formed magnetic nozzles. Indirect evidence of magnetic nozzle formation was obtained from plasma gun performance and measurements of directed axial velocities up to v z ∼10 7 cm/s. The purpose of this work is to make direct measurement of the time evolving magnetic field topology. The intent is to both identify that applied magnetic field distortion by the highly conductive plasma is occurring, and to provide insight into the details of discharge evolution. Data from a magnetic fluctuation probe array have been used to investigate the details of applied magnetic field deformation through the reconstruction of time-dependent flux profiles. Experimentally observed magnetic field line distortion has been compared to that predicted by a simple one-dimensional (1-D) model of the discharge channel. Such a comparison is utilized to estimate the axial plasma velocity in the thruster. Velocities determined in this manner are in approximate agreement with the predicted self-field magnetosonic speed and those measured by a time-of-flight spectrometer

  18. An Integrated Approach to Estimate Instantaneous Near-Surface Air Temperature and Sensible Heat Flux Fields during the SEMAPHORE Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourras, Denis; Eymard, Laurence; Liu, W. Timothy; Dupuis, Hélène

    2002-03-01

    A new technique was developed to retrieve near-surface instantaneous air temperatures and turbulent sensible heat fluxes using satellite data during the Structure des Echanges Mer-Atmosphere, Proprietes des Heterogeneites Oceaniques: Recherche Experimentale (SEMAPHORE) experiment, which was conducted in 1993 under mainly anticyclonic conditions. The method is based on a regional, horizontal atmospheric temperature advection model whose inputs are wind vectors, sea surface temperature fields, air temperatures around the region under study, and several constants derived from in situ measurements. The intrinsic rms error of the method is 0.7°C in terms of air temperature and 9 W m2 for the fluxes, both at 0.16° × 0.16° and 1.125° × 1.125° resolution. The retrieved air temperature and flux horizontal structures are in good agreement with fields from two operational general circulation models. The application to SEMAPHORE data involves the First European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) wind fields, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) SST fields, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) air temperature boundary conditions. The rms errors obtained by comparing the estimations with research vessel measurements are 0.3°C and 5 W m2.

  19. CHANGE DETECTION OF CROPPING PATTERN IN PADDY FIELD USING MULTI SPECTRAL SATELLITE DATA FOR ESTIMATING IRRIGATION WATER NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizatus Shofiyati1

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of multi spectral satellite data for cropping pattern monitoring in paddy field. The southern coastal of Citarum watershed, West Java Province was selected as study sites. The analysis used in this study is identifying crop pattern based on growth stages of wetland paddy and other crops by investi-gating the characteristic of Normalized Differen-ce Vegetation Indices (NDVI and Wetness of Tasseled Cap Transformation (TCT derived from 14 scenes of Landsat TM date 1988 to 2001. In general, the phenological of growth stages of wetland paddy can be used to distinguish with other seasonal crops. The research results indicate that multi spectral satellite data has a great potential for identi-fication and monitoring cropping pattern in paddy field. Specific character of NDVI and Wetness can also produce a map of cropping pattern in paddy field that is useful to monitor agricultural land condition. The cropping pattern can also be used to estimate irrigation water needed of paddy field in the area. Expected implication of the information obtained from this analysis is useful for guiding more appropriate planning and better agricultural management.

  20. Investigation of Jc-Suppressing Factors in Flat-Rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2Fe Tapes Via Microstructure Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xianping

    2015-01-13

    Pnictide superconductors will be very promising for applications if wires with high critical current density Jc can allow reel-to-reel large-scale fabrication at low costs. To understand the mechanism(s) that limited Jc in flat-rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2(Sr122) tapes, microstructure analysis has been considered the most direct and efficient way. Here, we report on high-resolution microstructure imaging and analysis on Fe-sheathed flat-rolled Sr122 tapes, which have a Jc as high as 2.3 × 104 A/cm2 at 10 T and 4.2 K. The overlapping nature of the Sr122 plates was clearly observed. Transmission electron microscopy/scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that, besides the cracks formed during the fabrication process, the SrO2 phase and cavities caused by the inhomogeneously dispersed Sr and K are the other important factors suppressing Jc. The wetting phase FeAs at the grain boundaries can be partially substituted by Sn in Sn-added samples. Our findings provide insights that pave the way to further enhance the critical current of the rolled 122 tapes up to the practical level.

  1. The Best of All Possible Worlds: Applying the Model Driven Architecture Approach to a JC3IEDM OWL Ontology Modeled in UML

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    from the ODM standard. Leveraging SPARX EA’s Java application programming interface (API), the team built a tool called OWL2EA that can ingest an OWL...server MySQL creates the physical schema that enables a user to store and retrieve data conforming to the vocabulary of the JC3IEDM. 6. GENERATING AN

  2. TA [2] Continuous, regional methane emissions estimates in northern Pennsylvania gas fields using atmospheric inversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauvaux, Thomas [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-12-31

    Natural Gas (NG) production activities in the northeastern Marcellus shale have significantly increased in the last decade, possibly releasing large amounts of methane (CH4) into the atmosphere from the operations at the productions sites and during the processing and transmission steps of the natural gas chain. Based on an intensive aircraft survey, leakage rates from the NG production were quantified in May 2015 and found to be in the order of 0.5% of the total production, higher than reported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but below the usually observed leakage rates over the shale gases in the US. Thanks to the high production rates on average at each well, leakage rates normalized by production appeared to be low in the northeastern Marcellus shale. This result confirms that natural gas production using unconventional techniques in this region is emitting relatively less CH4 into the atmosphere than other shale reservoirs. The low emissions rate can be explained in part by the high productivity of wells drilled across the northeastern Marcellus region. We demonstrated here that atmospheric monitoring techniques can provide an independent quantification of NG leakage rates using aircraft measurements. The CH4 analyzers were successfully calibrated at four sites across the region, measuring continuously the atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios and isotopic 13Ch4. Our preliminary findings confirm the low leakage rates from tower data collected over September 2015 to November 2016 compared to the aircraft mass-balance estimates in may 2015. However, several episodes revealing large releases of natural gas over several weeks showed that temporal variations in the emissions of CH4 may increase the actual leakage rate over longer time periods.

  3. Measurement of transverse Jc profiles of coated conductors using a magnetic knife of permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenisch, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, F M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ashworth, S P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coulter, J Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matias, Vlad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The transverse J{sub c} distribution in YBCO coated conductors was measured non-destructively with high resolution using a 'magnetic knife' made of permanent magnets. The method utilizes the strong depression of J{sub c} in applied magnetic fields. A narrow region of low (including zero) magnetic field, in a surrounding higher field, is moved transversely across the sample in order to reveal the critical-current density distribution. The net resolution of this device is approximately 65 {micro}m, and the J{sub c} resolution is better than 0.5%. A Fourier series inversion process was used to determine the transverse J{sub c} distribution in the sample. The J{sub c} profile was correlated with other sample properties of coated conductors prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Because of its straight-forward and inexpensive design, this J{sub c} imaging technique can be a powerful tool for quality control in coated-conductor production.

  4. Revisiting Field Capacity (FC: variation of definition of FC and its estimation from pedotransfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilo Benedicto Ottoni Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the nature of the hydrological processes involved in in situ measurement of Field Capacity (FC, this study proposes a variation of the definition of FC aiming not only at minimizing the inadequacies of its determination, but also at maintaining its original, practical meaning. Analysis of FC data for 22 Brazilian soils and additional FC data from the literature, all measured according to the proposed definition, which is based on a 48-h drainage time after infiltration by shallow ponding, indicates a weak dependency on the amount of infiltrated water, antecedent moisture level, soil morphology, and the level of the groundwater table, but a strong dependency on basic soil properties. The dependence on basic soil properties allowed determination of FC of the 22 soil profiles by pedotransfer functions (PTFs using the input variables usually adopted in prediction of soil water retention. Among the input variables, soil moisture content θ (6 kPa had the greatest impact. Indeed, a linear PTF based only on it resulted in an FC with a root mean squared residue less than 0.04 m³ m-3 for most soils individually. Such a PTF proved to be a better FC predictor than the traditional method of using moisture content at an arbitrary suction. Our FC data were compatible with an equivalent and broader USA database found in the literature, mainly for medium-texture soil samples. One reason for differences between FCs of the two data sets of fine-textured soils is due to their different drainage times. Thus, a standardized procedure for in situ determination of FC is recommended.

  5. Estimating biophysical properties of coffee (Coffea canephora) plants with above-canopy field measurements, using CropSpec®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Bayu T. Widjaja; Soni, Peeyush; Morimoto, Eiji; Pujiyanto, Pujiyanto

    2018-04-01

    Remote sensing technologies have been applied to many crops, but tree crops like Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora) under shade conditions require additional attention while making above-canopy measurements. The objective of this study was to determine how well chlorophyll and nitrogen status of Robusta coffee plants can be estimated with the laser-based (CropSpec®) active sensor. This study also identified appropriate vegetation indices for estimating Nitrogen content by above-canopy measurement, using near-infra red and red-edge bands. Varying light intensity and different background of the plants were considered in developing the indices. Field experiments were conducted involving different non-destructive tools (CropSpec® and SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter). Subsequently, Kjeldahl laboratory analyses were performed to determine the actual Nitrogen content of the plants with different ages and field conditions used in the non-destructive previous stage. Measurements were undertaken for assessing the biophysical properties of tree plant. The usefulness of near-infrared and red-edge bands from these sensors in measuring critical nitrogen levels of coffee plants by above-canopy measurement are investigated in this study.

  6. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point in hot Arid Western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Priyabrata; Kumar, Mahesh; Kumawat, R. N.; Painuli, D. K.; Hati, K. M.; Heuvelink, G. B. M.; Batjes, N. H.

    2018-04-01

    Characterization of soil water retention, e.g., water content at field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (PWP) over a landscape plays a key role in efficient utilization of available scarce water resources in dry land agriculture; however, direct measurement thereof for multiple locations in the field is not always feasible. Therefore, pedotransfer functions (PTFs) were developed to estimate soil water retention at FC and PWP for dryland soils of India. A soil database available for Arid Western India ( N=370) was used to develop PTFs. The developed PTFs were tested in two independent datasets from arid regions of India ( N=36) and an arid region of USA ( N=1789). While testing these PTFs using independent data from India, root mean square error (RMSE) was found to be 2.65 and 1.08 for FC and PWP, respectively, whereas for most of the tested `established' PTFs, the RMSE was >3.41 and >1.15, respectively. Performance of the developed PTFs from the independent dataset from USA was comparable with estimates derived from `established' PTFs. For wide applicability of the developed PTFs, a user-friendly soil moisture calculator was developed. The PTFs developed in this study may be quite useful to farmers for scheduling irrigation water as per soil type.

  7. Field data provide estimates of effective permeability, fracture spacing, well drainage area and incremental production in gas shales

    KAUST Repository

    Eftekhari, Behzad

    2018-05-23

    About half of US natural gas comes from gas shales. It is valuable to study field production well by well. We present a field data-driven solution for long-term shale gas production from a horizontal, hydrofractured well far from other wells and reservoir boundaries. Our approach is a hybrid between an unstructured big-data approach and physics-based models. We extend a previous two-parameter scaling theory of shale gas production by adding a third parameter that incorporates gas inflow from the external unstimulated reservoir. This allows us to estimate for the first time the effective permeability of the unstimulated shale and the spacing of fractures in the stimulated region. From an analysis of wells in the Barnett shale, we find that on average stimulation fractures are spaced every 20 m, and the effective permeability of the unstimulated region is 100 nanodarcy. We estimate that over 30 years on production the Barnett wells will produce on average about 20% more gas because of inflow from the outside of the stimulated volume. There is a clear tradeoff between production rate and ultimate recovery in shale gas development. In particular, our work has strong implications for well spacing in infill drilling programs.

  8. Methane Emission Estimates in the Canadian Bakken Oil Fields from Mobile Lab Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, R. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Worthy, D.; Lopez, M.; Narayan, J.; Darlington, A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last few years, the progress in hydraulic fracturing methods to retrieve oil and gas from previously economically unviable sources has resulted in rapid expansion of the exploitation of fossil fuel containing shale plays across North America. These developments are associated with an increase in direct, local emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), including leakage from pipelines, wells and storage tanks. Several studies have been conducted, primarily in the US, to quantify these emissions both from the ground and from the air. In the fall of 2015, Environment and Climate Change Canada conducted a project with its mobile air quality lab CRUISER, instrumented with a suite of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation, in the southern Saskatchewan Bakken play, to investigate local emissions of GHGs. Measurement excursions were performed between 20/10/2015 and 17/11/2015 with a total driving time of 177 hours, for a total driving distance of 4897 km in the target area, potentially capturing 8822 wells and 480 tanks of the registered 28355 wells and 1666 tanks (31% and 29% respectively). Instrumentation relevant to this analysis included cavity ring-down and off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometers (Picarro Model G2201 and Los Gatos Research Model 9013 respectively), and ultrasonic anemometers mounted on the front and roof of CRUISER. Point source emission rates were estimated with two types of dispersion model, based on inputs of measured downwind concentration peaks above background and the measured wind speed and direction. Calibrated releases of N2O were conducted next to suspected CH4 sources in 228 cases to evaluate this approach. 50% of these cases reproduced the known N2O emission rate within a factor of 0.63 to 1.25. The associated CH4 emission rates were heavily skewed / nearly lognormal (25th, 50th and 75th percentiles: 1.2, 4.4 and 44 kg/h), confirming previously published findings that a few large emitters contribute the majority of the CH4

  9. Morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula de Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby (Nymphaeaceae Morphology of flower, fruit and seedling of Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby (Nymphaeaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maciel da Rosa-Osman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby é uma hidrófita que ocorre nas várzeas de águas brancas e igapós da Bacia Amazônica e na Bacia do rio Paraguai. A morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula/"tirodendro" é objeto do presente trabalho. O material botânico foi coletado em Parintins e Manaus, estado do Amazonas, Brasil. A análise morfológica foi feita em material fresco e fixado em FAA 50. O desenvolvimento das plântulas foi realizado no escuro em frascos com água com teor reduzido de oxigênio. As flores possuem pedicelo longo e são hemicíclicas, diclamídeas, monoclinas e com antese vespertina. Os frutos são carnosos, indeiscentes, com pseudossincarpia. As sementes apresentam arilo que atua na dispersão pela água. As plântulas se desenvolvem em condições de hipoxia e apresentam um cotilédone exposto acicular. O "tirodendro" apresenta eofilos com heterofilia. As flores apresentam caracteres morfológicos básicos da família, a definição do tipo de fruto exige estudo ontogenético e a heterofilia é um caráter típico de plântulas/"tirodendros"de Nymphaeaceae.Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby is a hydrophyte that occurs in the white water leas and igapos of the Amazonian and Paraguay Basin. The flower, fruit and seedling/"tirodendro" morphology is the object of the present work. The botanical material was collected at Parintins and Manaus, Amazonian state, Brazil. The morphological analysis was made in both fresh and fixed material. The seedling development was accomplished in flasks with water containing little oxygen and maintained in the darkness. Flowers present long pedicel and they are hemicyclic, dichlamydeous, bisexual with vespertine anthesis. Fruits are fleshy, indehiscent with pseudo-syncarpy. Seeds present aril that acts in the water dispersion. Seedlings grow in hypoxy conditions and they present an acicular and exposed cotyledon. The "tirodendro" stage presents eophylls with heterophylly. Flowers

  10. Approximate techniques for predicting size effects on cleavage fracture toughness (Jc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.T.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    This investigation examines the ability of an elastic T-stress analysis coupled with modified boundary layer (MBL) solution to predict stresses ahead of a crack tip in a variety of planar geometries. The approximate stresses are used as input to estimate the effective driving force for cleavage fracture (J 0 ) using the micromechanically based approach introduced by Dodds and Anderson. Finite element analyses for a wide variety of planar cracked geometries are conducted which have elastic biaxiality parameters (β) ranging from -0.99 (very low constraint) to +2.96 (very high constraint). The magnitude and sign of β indicate the rate at which crack-tip constraint changes with increasing applied load. All results pertain to a moderately strain hardening material (strain hardening exponent (η) of 10). These analyses suggest that β is an effective indicator of both the accuracy of T-MBL estimates of J 0 and of applicability limits on evolving fracture analysis methodologies (i.e. T-MBL, J-Q, and J/J 0 ). Specifically, when 1β1>0.4 these analyses show that the T-MBL approximation of J 0 is accurate to within 20% of a detailed finite-element analysis. As ''structural type'' configurations, i.e. shallow cracks in tension, generally have 1β1>0.4, it appears that only an elastic analysis may be needed to determine reasonably accurate J 0 values for structural conditions

  11. Numerical estimation of structure constants in the three-dimensional Ising conformal field theory through Markov chain uv sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Victor

    2017-09-01

    Herdeiro and Doyon [Phys. Rev. E 94, 043322 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.043322] introduced a numerical recipe, dubbed uv sampler, offering precise estimations of the conformal field theory (CFT) data of the planar two-dimensional (2D) critical Ising model. It made use of scale invariance emerging at the critical point in order to sample finite sublattice marginals of the infinite plane Gibbs measure of the model by producing holographic boundary distributions. The main ingredient of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler is the invariance under dilation. This paper presents a generalization to higher dimensions with the critical 3D Ising model. This leads to numerical estimations of a subset of the CFT data—scaling weights and structure constants—through fitting of measured correlation functions. The results are shown to agree with the recent most precise estimations from numerical bootstrap methods [Kos, Poland, Simmons-Duffin, and Vichi, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2016) 036, 10.1007/JHEP08(2016)036].

  12. INTERRUPTED IN-SITU COMPRESSIVE DEFORMATION EXPERIMENTS ON MMC FOAMS IN AN XCT: EXPERIMENTS AND ESTIMATION OF DISPLACEMENT FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Losch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of a metal-matrix composite foam are investigated by interrupted in-situ compressive deformation experiments within an X-ray computed tomography device (XCT. Each in-situ experiment generates a sequence of reconstructed 3D images of the foam microstructure. From these data, the deformation field is estimated by registring the images corresponding to three consecutive steps. To this end, the generic registration framework of the itk software suite is exploited and combined with several image preprocessing steps. Both segmented (binary images having just two grey values for foreground (strut structure and background (pore space and the result of the Euclidean distance transform (EDT on pore space and solid phase are used. The estimation quality is evaluated based on a sequence of synthetic data sets, where the foam’s microstructure is modelled by a random Laguerre tessellation. For large deformations, a combination of non-rigid registration for the EDT images and partwise-rigid registration on strongly deformed regions of the binary images, yields surprisingly small estimation errors.

  13. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge in a Japanese Headwater Area by Intensive Collaboration of Field Survey and Modelling Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, S.; Kondo, H.; Tawara, Y.; Yamada, T.; Mori, K.; Yoshida, A.; Tada, K.; Tsujimura, M.; Tokunaga, T.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to understand groundwater systems, including their recharge, flow, storage, discharge, and withdrawal, so that we can use groundwater resources efficiently and sustainably. To examine groundwater recharge, several methods have been discussed based on water balance estimation, in situ experiments, and hydrological tracers. However, few studies have developed a concrete framework for quantifying groundwater recharge rates in an undefined area. In this study, we established a robust method to quantitatively determine water cycles and estimate the groundwater recharge rate by combining the advantages of field surveys and model simulations. We replicated in situ hydrogeological observations and three-dimensional modeling in a mountainous basin area in Japan. We adopted a general-purpose terrestrial fluid-flow simulator (GETFLOWS) to develop a geological model and simulate the local water cycle. Local data relating to topology, geology, vegetation, land use, climate, and water use were collected from the existing literature and observations to assess the spatiotemporal variations of the water balance from 2011 to 2013. The characteristic structures of geology and soils, as found through field surveys, were parameterized for incorporation into the model. The simulated results were validated using observed groundwater levels and resulted in a Nash-Sutcliffe Model Efficiency Coefficient of 0.92. The results suggested that local groundwater flows across the watershed boundary and that the groundwater recharge rate, defined as the flux of water reaching the local unconfined groundwater table, has values similar to the level estimated in the `the lower soil layers on a long-term basis. This innovative method enables us to quantify the groundwater recharge rate and its spatiotemporal variability with high accuracy, which contributes to establishing a foundation for sustainable groundwater management.

  14. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for carbon cycle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujie; Zhuang, Qianlai; McGuire, David; Liu, Yaling; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations in modeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the implications of those options. We calibrated the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model on a hierarchy of three vegetation classification levels for the Alaskan boreal forest: species level, plant-functional-type level (PFT level), and biome level, and we examined the differences in simulated carbon dynamics. Species-specific field-based estimates were directly used to parameterize the model for species-level simulations, while weighted averages based on species percent cover were used to generate estimates for PFT- and biome-level model parameterization. We found that calibrated key ecosystem process parameters differed substantially among species and overlapped for species that are categorized into different PFTs. Our analysis of parameter sets suggests that the PFT-level parameterizations primarily reflected the dominant species and that functional information of some species were lost from the PFT-level parameterizations. The biome-level parameterization was primarily representative of the needleleaf PFT and lost information on broadleaf species or PFT function. Our results indicate that PFT-level simulations may be potentially representative of the performance of species-level simulations while biome-level simulations may result in biased estimates. Improved theoretical and empirical justifications for grouping species into PFTs or biomes are needed to adequately represent the dynamics of ecosystem functioning and structure.

  15. Estimating photometric redshifts for X-ray sources in the X-ATLAS field using machine-learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountrichas, G.; Corral, A.; Masoura, V. A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ruiz, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Carrera, F. J.; Fotopoulou, S.

    2017-12-01

    We present photometric redshifts for 1031 X-ray sources in the X-ATLAS field using the machine-learning technique TPZ. X-ATLAS covers 7.1 deg2 observed with XMM-Newton within the Science Demonstration Phase of the H-ATLAS field, making it one of the largest contiguous areas of the sky with both XMM-Newton and Herschel coverage. All of the sources have available SDSS photometry, while 810 additionally have mid-IR and/or near-IR photometry. A spectroscopic sample of 5157 sources primarily in the XMM/XXL field, but also from several X-ray surveys and the SDSS DR13 redshift catalogue, was used to train the algorithm. Our analysis reveals that the algorithm performs best when the sources are split, based on their optical morphology, into point-like and extended sources. Optical photometry alone is not enough to estimate accurate photometric redshifts, but the results greatly improve when at least mid-IR photometry is added in the training process. In particular, our measurements show that the estimated photometric redshifts for the X-ray sources of the training sample have a normalized absolute median deviation, nmad ≈ 0.06, and a percentage of outliers, η = 10-14%, depending upon whether the sources are extended or point like. Our final catalogue contains photometric redshifts for 933 out of the 1031 X-ray sources with a median redshift of 0.9. The table of the photometric redshifts is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/608/A39

  16. A novel HTS magnetometer, exploiting the low jc of bulk YBCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallop, J.C.; Lilleyman, S.; Langham, C.D.; Radcliffe, W.J.; Stewart, M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report here a novel of magnetometer which is based on the low critical magnetic field H/sub cl/ of sintered samples of the high temperature ceramic superconductor YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub y/. By driving a sample of the superconductor around a magnetization hysteresis loop, at a frequency of --100 kHz, and detecting the induced voltage in a coil coupled to the sample, at the second harmonic of the drive frequency, the authors find that this voltage is linearly dependent on the aplied d.c. magnetic field in which the sample is situated. They present a model which explains the operation of this magnetometer. This device, while not as sensitive as a SQUID, has the advantage of a wider dynamic range and direct measurement of flux density, unlike a SQUID which is only capable of sensing flux density changes. When operated at 77K the prototype magnetometer has already demonstrated a sensitivity at least 10 times better than that of a commercial fluxgate magnetometer. The system also appears to provide a simple method for investigation of flux flow in these materials

  17. Inverse estimation of the temperature field within a gas-filled duct section by use of acoustic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Kyoon; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of an in-duct gaseous medium is essential in the monitoring of combustion status. To obtain the temperature distribution, an inverse relationship based on the Radon transform is formulated by using the measured time retardation data from a set of acoustic sensors and actuators. The entire spatial distribution can be obtained by interpolating the estimated discrete temperature data using either a path-based or spaced-based method. An interpolation method then determines the precision of the final imaging result. The characteristics and performance of two interpolation methods are investigated in a simulation study by reconstructing the temperature distribution of a rectangular cross-section. To calculate the temperature field, the path-based interpolation method adopts a direct expression of temperature variation along the propagation path, whereas the space-based interpolation method uses data obtained at predetermined points deployed inside the field. The average reconstruction accuracy of the space-based interpolation for temperature fields with 1 and 4 local maxima is 22% and 183% better than that of path-based interpolation, respectively. Also, the space-based interpolation method is more robust with regard to measurement noise than the path-based interpolation method. (paper)

  18. GENUS STATISTICS USING THE DELAUNAY TESSELLATION FIELD ESTIMATION METHOD. I. TESTS WITH THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION AND THE SDSS DR7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Youcai; Yang Xiaohu; Springel, Volker

    2010-01-01

    We study the topology of cosmic large-scale structure through the genus statistics, using galaxy catalogs generated from the Millennium Simulation and observational data from the latest Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release (SDSS DR7). We introduce a new method for constructing galaxy density fields and for measuring the genus statistics of its isodensity surfaces. It is based on a Delaunay tessellation field estimation (DTFE) technique that allows the definition of a piece-wise continuous density field and the exact computation of the topology of its polygonal isodensity contours, without introducing any free numerical parameter. Besides this new approach, we also employ the traditional approaches of smoothing the galaxy distribution with a Gaussian of fixed width, or by adaptively smoothing with a kernel that encloses a constant number of neighboring galaxies. Our results show that the Delaunay-based method extracts the largest amount of topological information. Unlike the traditional approach for genus statistics, it is able to discriminate between the different theoretical galaxy catalogs analyzed here, both in real space and in redshift space, even though they are based on the same underlying simulation model. In particular, the DTFE approach detects with high confidence a discrepancy of one of the semi-analytic models studied here compared with the SDSS data, while the other models are found to be consistent.

  19. Improving the Curie depth estimation through optimizing the spectral block dimensions of the aeromagnetic data in the Sabalan geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Somaieh; Fathianpour, Nader

    2016-12-01

    The Curie point depth is of great importance in characterizing geothermal resources. In this study, the Curie iso-depth map was provided using the well-known method of dividing the aeromagnetic dataset into overlapping blocks and analyzing the power spectral density of each block separately. Determining the optimum block dimension is vital in improving the resolution and accuracy of estimating Curie point depth. To investigate the relation between the optimal block size and power spectral density, a forward magnetic modeling was implemented on an artificial prismatic body with specified characteristics. The top, centroid, and bottom depths of the body were estimated by the spectral analysis method for different block dimensions. The result showed that the optimal block size could be considered as the smallest possible block size whose corresponding power spectrum represents an absolute maximum in small wavenumbers. The Curie depth map of the Sabalan geothermal field and its surrounding areas, in the northwestern Iran, was produced using a grid of 37 blocks with different dimensions from 10 × 10 to 50 × 50 km2, which showed at least 50% overlapping with adjacent blocks. The Curie point depth was estimated in the range of 5 to 21 km. The promising areas with the Curie point depths less than 8.5 km are located around Mountain Sabalan encompassing more than 90% of known geothermal resources in the study area. Moreover, the Curie point depth estimated by the improved spectral analysis is in good agreement with the depth calculated from the thermal gradient data measured in one of the exploratory wells in the region.

  20. La chronologie du royaume de Qatabân du Ier siècle avant J.-C. au Ier siècle après J.-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Arbach

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Les nouvelles découvertes archéologiques et épigraphiques de ces dernières années, effectuées au cours des fouilles franco-italiennes à Tamna`, l'ancienne capitale du royaume de Qatabân, permettent d'établir une nouvelle chronologie des souverains de Qatabân entre le Ier siècle avant J.-C. et le Ier siècle après J.- C.The chronology of the kingdom of Qatabân, from the 1st century BC to the 1st century AD. Archaeological and epigraphical discoveries made in recent years by the Franco-Italian excavations at Tamna`, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Qatabân, allows us to establish a new chronology for the kings of Qatabân during the 1st century BC and the 1st century AD.

  1. Photochemical model estimated fire impacts on ozone and aerosol evaluated with field studies and routine data sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Highly instrumented field studies provide a unique opportunity to evaluate multiple aspects of photochemical grid model representation of fire emissions, dispersion, and chemical evolution. Fuel information and burn area for a specific fire coupled with near-fire and downwind chemical measurements provides information needed to constrain model predicted fire plume transport and chemical evolution of important pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) that have deleterious health effects. Most local to regional scale field campaigns to date have made relatively few transects through plumes from fires with well characterized fuel type and consumption. While more comprehensive field studies are being planned for 2018 and beyond (WE-CAN, FIREX, FIRE-CHEM, and FASMEE), existing measurement data from multiple field campaigns including 2013 SEAC4RS, satellite data, and routine surface networks are used to assess how a regulatory modeling system captures fire impacts on local to regional scale ozone and PM2.5. Key aspects of the regulatory modeling system include fire location and burn area from SMARTFIRE2, emissions from BlueSky framework, and predictions of ambient O3 and PM2.5 from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical transport model. A comparison of model estimated O3 from specific fires with routine surface measurements at rural locations in proximity to the 2013 Rim fire, 2011 Wallow fire, and 2011 Flint Hills fires suggest the modeling system over-estimates smoke impacts on hourly ozone. Sensitivity simulations where solar radiation and photolysis rates are more aggressively attenuated by smoke reduced O3 predictions but did not ameliorate the over prediction bias. PM2.5 organic carbon tends to be overpredicted at rural surface sites downwind from the 2011 Flint Hills prescribed fires while results were mixed at rural sites downwind of the 2013 Rim fire and 2011 Wallow fire suggesting differences in fuel characterization (e

  2. Open-source LCA tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from crude oil production using field characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Houjeiri, Hassan M; Brandt, Adam R; Duffy, James E

    2013-06-04

    Existing transportation fuel cycle emissions models are either general and calculate nonspecific values of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from crude oil production, or are not available for public review and auditing. We have developed the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE) to provide open-source, transparent, rigorous GHG assessments for use in scientific assessment, regulatory processes, and analysis of GHG mitigation options by producers. OPGEE uses petroleum engineering fundamentals to model emissions from oil and gas production operations. We introduce OPGEE and explain the methods and assumptions used in its construction. We run OPGEE on a small set of fictional oil fields and explore model sensitivity to selected input parameters. Results show that upstream emissions from petroleum production operations can vary from 3 gCO2/MJ to over 30 gCO2/MJ using realistic ranges of input parameters. Significant drivers of emissions variation are steam injection rates, water handling requirements, and rates of flaring of associated gas.

  3. Gene therapy for human glioblastoma using neurotropic JC virus-like particles as a gene delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Mu-Sheng; Chou, Ming-Chieh; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Lin, Mien-Chun; Tai, Chien-Kuo; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Wang, Meilin

    2018-02-02

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor, has a short period of survival even with recent multimodality treatment. The neurotropic JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects glial cells and oligodendrocytes and causes fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients with AIDS. In this study, a possible gene therapy strategy for GBM using JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) as a gene delivery vector was investigated. We found that JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver the GFP reporter gene into tumor cells (U87-MG) for expression. In an orthotopic xenograft model, nude mice implanted with U87 cells expressing the near-infrared fluorescent protein and then treated by intratumoral injection of JCPyV VLPs carrying the thymidine kinase suicide gene, combined with ganciclovir administration, exhibited significantly prolonged survival and less tumor fluorescence during the experiment compared with controls. Furthermore, JCPyV VLPs were able to protect and deliver a suicide gene to distal subcutaneously implanted U87 cells in nude mice via blood circulation and inhibit tumor growth. These findings show that metastatic brain tumors can be targeted by JCPyV VLPs carrying a therapeutic gene, thus demonstrating the potential of JCPyV VLPs to serve as a gene therapy vector for the far highly treatment-refractory GBM.

  4. A case study on multi-lane roundabouts under congestion: Comparing software capacity and delay estimates with field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanwu Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Existing studies on modern roundabouts performance are mostly based on data from singe lane roundabouts that are not heavily congested. For planners and designers interested in building multilane roundabouts for intersections with potential growth in future traffic, there has been a lack of existing studies with field data that provide reference values in terms of capacity and delay measurements. With the intent of providing such reference values, a case study was conducted by using the East Dowling Road Roundabouts in Anchorage, Alaska, which are currently operating with extensive queues during the evening peak hours. This research used multiple video camcorders to capture vehicle turning movements at the roundabouts as well as the progression of vehicle queues at the roundabout entrance approaches. With these video records, the number of vehicles in the queues can be accurately counted in any single minute during the peak hours. This study shows that unbalanced entrance flow patterns (i.e., one entrance has significant higher flow than others can intensify the queue and delay for the overall roundabouts. Then various software packages including RODEL, SIDRA and VISSIM were used to estimate several performance measurements, such as capacity, queue length, and delay, compared with the collected field data. With the comparison, it is found that all the three software packages overestimate multi-lane roundabout capacity before calibration. With default parameters, SIDRA and VISSIM tend to underestimate delays and queue lengths for the multi-lane roundabouts under congestion, while RODEL results in higher delay and queue length estimations at most of the entrance approaches.

  5. Min-max Extrapolation Scheme for Fast Estimation of 3D Potts Field Partition Functions. Application to the Joint Detection-Estimation of Brain Activity in fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risser, L.; Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P.; Risser, L.; Idier, J.; Risser, L.; Forbes, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast numerical scheme to estimate Partition Functions (PF) of symmetric Potts fields. Our strategy is first validated on 2D two-color Potts fields and then on 3D two- and three-color Potts fields. It is then applied to the joint detection-estimation of brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, where the goal is to automatically recover activated, deactivated and inactivated brain regions and to estimate region dependent hemodynamic filters. For any brain region, a specific 3D Potts field indeed embodies the spatial correlation over the hidden states of the voxels by modeling whether they are activated, deactivated or inactive. To make spatial regularization adaptive, the PFs of the Potts fields over all brain regions are computed prior to the brain activity estimation. Our approach is first based upon a classical path-sampling method to approximate a small subset of reference PFs corresponding to pre-specified regions. Then, we propose an extrapolation method that allows us to approximate the PFs associated to the Potts fields defined over the remaining brain regions. In comparison with preexisting methods either based on a path sampling strategy or mean-field approximations, our contribution strongly alleviates the computational cost and makes spatially adaptive regularization of whole brain fMRI datasets feasible. It is also robust against grid inhomogeneities and efficient irrespective of the topological configurations of the brain regions. (authors)

  6. Phase-Based Adaptive Estimation of Magnitude-Squared Coherence Between Turbofan Internal Sensors and Far-Field Microphone Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2015-01-01

    A cross-power spectrum phase based adaptive technique is discussed which iteratively determines the time delay between two digitized signals that are coherent. The adaptive delay algorithm belongs to a class of algorithms that identifies a minimum of a pattern matching function. The algorithm uses a gradient technique to find the value of the adaptive delay that minimizes a cost function based in part on the slope of a linear function that fits the measured cross power spectrum phase and in part on the standard error of the curve fit. This procedure is applied to data from a Honeywell TECH977 static-engine test. Data was obtained using a combustor probe, two turbine exit probes, and far-field microphones. Signals from this instrumentation are used estimate the post-combustion residence time in the combustor. Comparison with previous studies of the post-combustion residence time validates this approach. In addition, the procedure removes the bias due to misalignment of signals in the calculation of coherence which is a first step in applying array processing methods to the magnitude squared coherence data. The procedure also provides an estimate of the cross-spectrum phase-offset.

  7. Estimation of beam material random field properties via sensitivity-based model updating using experimental frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. R.; Adhikari, S.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2018-03-01

    Structural parameter estimation is affected not only by measurement noise but also by unknown uncertainties which are present in the system. Deterministic structural model updating methods minimise the difference between experimentally measured data and computational prediction. Sensitivity-based methods are very efficient in solving structural model updating problems. Material and geometrical parameters of the structure such as Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus, mass density, modal damping, etc. are usually considered deterministic and homogeneous. In this paper, the distributed and non-homogeneous characteristics of these parameters are considered in the model updating. The parameters are taken as spatially correlated random fields and are expanded in a spectral Karhunen-Loève (KL) decomposition. Using the KL expansion, the spectral dynamic stiffness matrix of the beam is expanded as a series in terms of discretized parameters, which can be estimated using sensitivity-based model updating techniques. Numerical and experimental tests involving a beam with distributed bending rigidity and mass density are used to verify the proposed method. This extension of standard model updating procedures can enhance the dynamic description of structural dynamic models.

  8. Magnetic, Acceleration Fields and Gyroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-Based Attitude Estimation with Smartphone Sensors for Indoor Pedestrian Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Renaudin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of proposed pedestrian navigation solutions on a dedicated infrastructure is a limiting factor to the deployment of location based services. Consequently self-contained Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning (PDR approaches are gaining interest for autonomous navigation. Even if the quality of low cost inertial sensors and magnetometers has strongly improved, processing noisy sensor signals combined with high hand dynamics remains a challenge. Estimating accurate attitude angles for achieving long term positioning accuracy is targeted in this work. A new Magnetic, Acceleration fields and GYroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-based attitude angles estimation filter is proposed and demonstrated with handheld sensors. It benefits from a gyroscope signal modelling in the quaternion set and two new opportunistic updates: magnetic angular rate update (MARU and acceleration gradient update (AGU. MAGYQ filter performances are assessed indoors, outdoors, with dynamic and static motion conditions. The heading error, using only the inertial solution, is found to be less than 10° after 1.5 km walking. The performance is also evaluated in the positioning domain with trajectories computed following a PDR strategy.

  9. Catalase measurement: A new field procedure for rapidly estimating microbial loads in fuels and water-bottoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passman, F.J. [Biodeterioration Control Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Daniels, D.A. [Basic Fuel Services, Dover, NJ (United States); Chesneau, H.F.

    1995-05-01

    Low-grade microbial infections of fuel and fuel systems generally go undetected until they cause major operational problems. Three interdependent factors contribute to this: mis-diagnosis, incorrect or inadequate sampling procedures and perceived complexity of microbiological testing procedures. After discussing the first two issues, this paper describes a rapid field test for estimating microbial loads in fuels and associated water. The test, adapted from a procedure initially developed to measure microbial loads in metalworking fluids, takes advantage of the nearly universal presence of the enzyme catalase in the microbes that contaminated fuel systems. Samples are reacted with a peroxide-based reagent; liberating oxygen gas. The gas generates a pressure-head in a reaction tube. At fifteen minutes, a patented, electronic pressure-sensing device is used to measure that head-space pressure. The authors present both laboratory and field data from fuels and water-bottoms, demonstrating the excellent correlation between traditional viable test data (acquired after 48-72 hours incubation) and catalase test data (acquired after 15 min.-4 hours). We conclude by recommending procedures for developing a failure analysis data-base to enhance our industry`s understanding of the relationship between uncontrolled microbial contamination and fuel performance problems.

  10. Estimation of Emissions from Sugarcane Field Burning in Thailand Using Bottom-Up Country-Specific Activity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilaiwan Sornpoon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Open burning in sugarcane fields is recognized as a major source of air pollution. However, the assessment of its emission intensity in many regions of the world still lacks information, especially regarding country-specific activity data including biomass fuel load and combustion factor. A site survey was conducted covering 13 sugarcane plantations subject to different farm management practices and climatic conditions. The results showed that pre-harvest and post-harvest burnings are the two main practices followed in Thailand. In 2012, the total production of sugarcane biomass fuel, i.e., dead, dry and fresh leaves, amounted to 10.15 million tonnes, which is equivalent to a fuel density of 0.79 kg∙m−2. The average combustion factor for the pre-harvest and post-harvest burning systems was determined to be 0.64 and 0.83, respectively. Emissions from sugarcane field burning were estimated using the bottom-up country-specific values from the site survey of this study and the results compared with those obtained using default values from the 2006 IPCC Guidelines. The comparison showed that the use of default values lead to underestimating the overall emissions by up to 30% as emissions from post-harvest burning are not accounted for, but it is the second most common practice followed in Thailand.

  11. Estimation of the light field inside photosynthetic microorganism cultures through Mittag-Leffler functions at depleted light conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, David; Lizama, Carlos; Urchueguía, Javier F.; Conejero, J. Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Light attenuation within suspensions of photosynthetic microorganisms has been widely described by the Lambert-Beer equation. However, at depths where most of the light has been absorbed by the cells, light decay deviates from the exponential behaviour and shows a lower attenuation than the corresponding from the purely exponential fall. This discrepancy can be modelled through the Mittag-Leffler function, extending Lambert-Beer law via a tuning parameter α that takes into account the attenuation process. In this work, we describe a fractional Lambert-Beer law to estimate light attenuation within cultures of model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Indeed, we benchmark the measured light field inside cultures of two different Synechocystis strains, namely the wild-type and the antenna mutant strain called Olive at five different cell densities, with our in silico results. The Mittag-Leffler hyper-parameter α that best fits the data is 0.995, close to the exponential case. One of the most striking results to emerge from this work is that unlike prior literature on the subject, this one provides experimental evidence on the validity of fractional calculus for determining the light field. We show that by applying the fractional Lambert-Beer law for describing light attenuation, we are able to properly model light decay in photosynthetic microorganisms suspensions.

  12. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  13. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, B B; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ∼25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and

  14. Field-level validation of a CLIMEX model for Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) using estimated larval growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaspi, Benjamin C; Legaspi, Jesusa Crisostomo

    2010-04-01

    Invasive pests, such as the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), have not reached equilibrium distributions and present unique opportunities to validate models by comparing predicted distributions with eventual realized geographic ranges. A CLIMEX model was developed for C. cactorum. Model validation was attempted at the global scale by comparing worldwide distribution against known occurrence records and at the field scale by comparing CLIMEX "growth indices" against field measurements of larval growth. Globally, CLIMEX predicted limited potential distribution in North America (from the Caribbean Islands to Florida, Texas, and Mexico), Africa (South Africa and parts of the eastern coast), southern India, parts of Southeast Asia, and the northeastern coast of Australia. Actual records indicate the moth has been found in the Caribbean (Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat Saint Kitts and Nevis, Cayman Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands), Cuba, Bahamas, Puerto Rico, southern Africa, Kenya, Mexico, and Australia. However, the model did not predict that distribution would extend from India to the west into Pakistan. In the United States, comparison of the predicted and actual distribution patterns suggests that the moth may be close to its predicted northern range along the Atlantic coast. Parts of Texas and most of Mexico may be vulnerable to geographic range expansion of C. cactorum. Larval growth rates in the field were estimated by measuring differences in head capsules and body lengths of larval cohorts at weekly intervals. Growth indices plotted against measures of larval growth rates compared poorly when CLIMEX was run using the default historical weather data. CLIMEX predicted a single period conducive to insect development, in contrast to the three generations observed in the field. Only time and more complete records will tell whether C. cactorum will extend its geographical distribution to regions predicted by the CLIMEX model. In terms

  15. Estimation of the frequency and magnetic field dependence of the skin depth in Co-rich magnetic microwires from GMI experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcady Zhukov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied giant magnetoimpedance (GMI effect in magnetically soft amorphous Co-rich microwires in the extended frequency range. From obtained experimentally dependences of the GMI ratio on magnetic field at different frequencies we estimated the penetration depth and its dependence on applied magnetic field and frequency.

  16. Enhanced Jc's of YBa2Cu3O7-x-Ag ex situ annealed coevaporated films on LaAlO3 (100) substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas; Ejrnæs, Mikkel; Olesen, Michael Wiinberg

    1995-01-01

    A 5x increase of the critical current density (J(c)) at 77 K was obtained by coating a coevaporated 500 nm thick Y, BaF2, Cu film with 50 nm Ag prior to the ex situ annealing. J(c) increased from 0.2 for uncoated samples to 1 MA/cm(2) for the Ag-coated sample without severely affecting the zero...... resistance transition temperature (T-c0). Scanning electron microscopy showed that the surface morphology was improved and that the normally observed trellislike structure was greatly reduced. By combining electron microscopy and sputter assisted Auger analysis it was found that the Ag nucleated in droplets...

  17. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  18. Estimation of methane and nitrous oxide emission from paddy fields and uplands during 1990-2000 in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangshyng Yang; Chungming Liu; Yenlan Liu; Chaoming Lai

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the greenhouse gases emissions from paddy fields and uplands, methane and nitrous oxide emissions were estimated from local measurement and the IPCC guidelines during 1990-2000 in Taiwan. Annual methane emission from 182 807 to 242 298 ha of paddy field in the first crop season ranged from 8062 to 12 066 ton, and it was between 16 261 and 25 007 ton for 144 178-211 968 ha in the second crop season with local measurement. The value ranged from 12 132 to 17 465 ton, and from 16 046 to 24 762 ton of methane in the first and second crop season with the IPCC guidelines for multiple aeration treatments, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission was between 472 and 670 ton and between 236 and 359 ton in the first and second crop season, respectively. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from uplands depend on crop, growth season, fertilizer application and environmental conditions. Annual methane emission from upland crops, vegetable, fruit, ornamental plants, forage crops and green manure crops was 138-252, 412-460, 97-100, 3-5, 4-5 and 3-51 ton, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission was 1080-1976, 1784-1994, 2540-2622, 31-54, 43-53 and 38-582 ton, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission ranged from 91 to 132 ton for 77 593-112 095 ton of nitrogen-fixing crops, from 991 to 1859 ton for 325 9731-6 183 441 ton of non-nitrogen-fixing crops, and from 1.77 to 2.22 Gg for 921 169-1 172 594 ton of chemical fertilizer application. In addition, rice hull burning emitted 19.3-24.2 ton of methane and 17.2-21.5 ton of nitrous oxide, and corn stalk burning emitted 2.1-4.2 ton of methane and 1.9-3.8 ton of nitrous oxide. Methane emission from the agriculture sector was 26 421-37 914 ton, and nitrous oxide emission was 9810-11 649 ton during 1990-2000 in Taiwan. Intermittent irrigation in paddy fields reduces significantly methane emission; appropriate application of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation in uplands and paddy fields also decreases nitrous oxide

  19. Estimating Attitude, Trajectory, and Gyro Biases in an Extended Kalman Filter using Earth Magnetic Field Data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally satellite attitude and trajectory have been estimated with completely separate systems, using different measurement data. The estimation of both trajectory and attitude for low earth orbit satellites has been successfully demonstrated in ground software using magnetometer and gyroscope data. Since the earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both the spacecraft trajectory and attitude errors. Therefore, these errors can be used to estimate both trajectory and attitude. This work further tests the single augmented Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft trajectory and attitude with data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) magnetometer and gyro-measured body rates. In addition, gyro biases are added to the state and the filter's ability to estimate them is presented.

  20. buffer Layer Growth, the Thickness Dependence of Jc in Coated Conductors, Local Identification of Current Limiting Mechanisms and Participation in the Wire Development Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David; Hellstron, Eric; Abraimov, Dmytro

    2011-12-17

    The primary thrusts of our work were to provide critical understanding of how best to enhance the current-carrying capacity of coated conductors. These include the deconstruction of Jc as a function of fim thickness, the growth of in situ films incorporating strong pinning centers and the use of a suite of position-sensitive tools that enable location and analysis of key areas where current-limiting occurs.

  1. Dynamic variability of the heading-flowering stages of single rice in China based on field observations and NDVI estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Song, Xiao; Chen, Yi; Wang, Pin; Wei, Xing; Tao, Fulu

    2015-05-01

    Although many studies have indicated the consistent impact of warming on the natural ecosystem (e.g., an early flowering and prolonged growing period), our knowledge of the impacts on agricultural systems is still poorly understood. In this study, spatiotemporal variability of the heading-flowering stages of single rice was detected and compared at three different scales using field-based methods (FBMs) and satellite-based methods (SBMs). The heading-flowering stages from 2000 to 2009 with a spatial resolution of 1 km were extracted from the SPOT/VGT NDVI time series data using the Savizky-Golay filtering method in the areas in China dominated by single rice of Northeast China (NE), the middle-lower Yangtze River Valley (YZ), the Sichuan Basin (SC), and the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YG). We found that approximately 52.6 and 76.3 % of the estimated heading-flowering stages by a SBM were within ±5 and ±10 days estimation error (a root mean square error (RMSE) of 8.76 days) when compared with those determined by a FBM. Both the FBM data and the SBM data had indicated a similar spatial pattern, with the earliest annual average heading-flowering stages in SC, followed by YG, NE, and YZ, which were inconsistent with the patterns reported in natural ecosystems. Moreover, diverse temporal trends were also detected in the four regions due to different climate conditions and agronomic factors such as cultivar shifts. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the FBM and the SBM in both the regional average value of the phenological stages and the trends, implying the consistency and rationality of the SBM at three scales.

  2. Human polyomavirus JC variants in Papua New Guinea and Guam reflect ancient population settlement and viral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryschkewitsch, C F; Friedlaender, J S; Mgone, C S; Jobes, D V; Agostini, H T; Chima, S C; Alpers, M P; Koki, G; Yanagihara, R; Stoner, G L

    2000-07-01

    The peopling of the Pacific was a complex sequence of events that is best reconstructed by reconciling insights from various disciplines. Here we analyze the human polyomavirus JC (JCV) in Highlanders of Papua New Guinea (PNG), in Austronesian-speaking Tolai people on the island of New Britain, and in nearby non-Austronesian-speaking Baining people. We also characterize JCV from the Chamorro of Guam, a Micronesian population. All JCV strains from PNG and Guam fall within the broad Asian group previously defined in the VP1 gene as Type 2 or Type 7, but the PNG strains were distinct from both genotypes. Among the Chamorro JCV samples, 8 strains (Guam-1) were like the Type 7 strains found in Southeast Asia, while nine strains (Guam-2) were distinct from both the mainland strains and most PNG strains. We identified three JCV variants within Papua New Guinea (PNG-1, PNG-2 and PNG-3), but none of the Southeast Asian (Type 7) strains. PNG-1 strains were present in all three populations (Highlanders and the Baining and Tolai of New Britain), but PNG-2 strains were restricted to the Highlanders. Their relative lack of DNA sequence variation suggests that they arose comparatively recently. The single PNG-3 strain, identified in an Austronesian-speaking Tolai individual, was closely related to the Chamorro variants (Guam-2), consistent with a common Austronesian ancestor. In PNG-2 variants a complex regulatory region mutation inserts a duplication into a nearby deletion, a change reminiscent of those seen in the brains of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patients. This is the first instance of a complex JCV rearrangement circulating in a human population.

  3. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2006-01-01

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  4. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Replacement Computational Phantoms to Estimate Dose in Out-Of-Field Organs and Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, K [Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Tannous, J; Nabha, R; Feghali, J; Ayoub, Z; Jalbout, W; Youssef, B [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Taddei, P [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues at risk for radiogenic cancer for children receiving photon radiotherapy for localized brain tumors (LBTs) by supplementing their missing body anatomies with those of replacement computational phantoms. Applied beyond the extent of the RT Images collected by computed tomography simulation, these phantoms included RT Image and RT Structure Set objects that encompassed sufficient extents and contours for dosimetric calculations. Method: Nine children, aged 2 to 14 years, who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for low-grade LBTs, were randomly selected for this study under Institutional-Review-Board protocol. Because the extents of their RT Images were cranial only, they were matched for size and sex with patients from a previous study with larger extents and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the patients’ data and those of the replacement computational phantoms using commercial software. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically-commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with an analytical model. Results: Averaged over all nine children and normalized for a therapeutic dose of 54 Gy prescribed to the PTV, where the PTV is the GTV, the highest mean organ doses were 3.27, 2.41, 1.07, 1.02, 0.24, and 0.24 Gy in the non-tumor remainder, red bone marrow, thyroid, skin, breasts, and lungs, respectively. The mean organ doses ranged by a factor of 3 between the smallest and largest children. Conclusion: For children receiving photon radiotherapy for LBTs, we found their doses in organs at risk for second cancer to be non-negligible, especially in the non-tumor remainder, red bone marrow, thyroid, skin, breasts, and lungs. This study demonstrated the feasibility for patient dosimetry studies to augment missing patient anatomy by applying size- and sex-matched replacement

  5. OPTICAL FLOW APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE IMAGE SERIES TO ESTIMATE GLACIER MOTION IN THE SOUTHERN PATAGONIA ICE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lannutti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we assessed the feasibility of using optical flow to obtain the motion estimation of a glacier. In general, former investigations used to detect glacier changes involve solutions that require repeated observations which are many times based on extensive field work. Taking into account glaciers are usually located in geographically complex and hard to access areas, deploying time-lapse imaging sensors, optical flow may provide an efficient solution at good spatial and temporal resolution to describe mass motion. Several studies in computer vision and image processing community have used this method to detect large displacements. Therefore, we carried out a test of the proposed Large Displacement Optical Flow method at the Viedma Glacier, located at South Patagonia Icefield, Argentina. We collected monoscopic terrestrial time-lapse imagery, acquired by a calibrated camera at every 24 hour from April 2014 until April 2015. A filter based on temporal correlation and RGB color discretization between the images was applied to minimize errors related to changes in lighting, shadows, clouds and snow. This selection allowed discarding images that do not follow a sequence of similarity. Our results show a flow field in the direction of the glacier movement with acceleration in the terminus. We analyzed the errors between image pairs, and the matching generally appears to be adequate, although some areas show random gross errors related to the presence of changes in lighting. The proposed technique allowed the determination of glacier motion during one year, providing accurate and reliable motion data for subsequent analysis.

  6. An Estimation of Hybrid Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanical Polarization Energies for Small Molecules Using Polarizable Force-Field Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Mei, Ye; König, Gerhard; Simmonett, Andrew C; Pickard, Frank C; Wu, Qin; Wang, Lee-Ping; MacKerell, Alexander D; Brooks, Bernard R; Shao, Yihan

    2017-02-14

    In this work, we report two polarizable molecular mechanics (polMM) force field models for estimating the polarization energy in hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. These two models, named the potential of atomic charges (PAC) and potential of atomic dipoles (PAD), are formulated from the ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) response kernels for the prediction of the QM density response to an external molecular mechanical (MM) environment (as described by external point charges). The PAC model is similar to fluctuating charge (FQ) models because the energy depends on external electrostatic potential values at QM atomic sites; the PAD energy depends on external electrostatic field values at QM atomic sites, resembling induced dipole (ID) models. To demonstrate their uses, we apply the PAC and PAD models to 12 small molecules, which are solvated by TIP3P water. The PAC model reproduces the QM/MM polarization energy with a R 2 value of 0.71 for aniline (in 10,000 TIP3P water configurations) and 0.87 or higher for other 11 solute molecules, while the PAD model has a much better performance with R 2 values of 0.98 or higher. The PAC model reproduces reference QM/MM hydration free energies for 12 solute molecules with a RMSD of 0.59 kcal/mol. The PAD model is even more accurate, with a much smaller RMSD of 0.12 kcal/mol, with respect to the reference. This suggests that polarization effects, including both local charge distortion and intramolecular charge transfer, can be well captured by induced dipole type models with proper parametrization.

  7. Electric field estimation of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation clinically used for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in anatomical head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Chiaramello, Emma; Roth, Yiftach; Zangen, Abraham; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    Literature studies showed the ability to treat neuropsychiatric disorders using H1 coil, developed for the deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS). Despite the positive results of the clinical studies, the electric field (E) distributions inside the brain induced by this coil when it is positioned on the scalp according to the clinical studies themselves are not yet precisely estimated. This study aims to characterize the E distributions due to the H1 coil in the brain of two realistic human models by computational electromagnetic techniques and to compare them with the ones due to the figure-of-8 coil, traditionally used in TMS and positioned as such to simulate the clinical experiments. Despite inter-individual differences, our results show that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is the region preferentially stimulated by both H1 and figure-of-8 coil when they are placed in the position on the scalp according to the clinical studies, with a more broad and non-focal distribution in the case of H1 coil. Moreover, the H1 coil spreads more than the figure-of-8 coil both in the prefrontal cortex and medial prefrontal cortex and towards some deeper brain structures and it is characterized by a higher penetration depth in the frontal lobe. This work highlights the importance of the knowledge of the electric field distribution in the brain tissues to interpret the outcomes of the experimental studies and to optimize the treatments. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  9. Phantom measurements and computed estimates of breast dose with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: dose reduction with the use of the involved field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Kron, T.; Sorell, G.; Cramb, J.; Wittwer, H.; Sullivan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The risk of breast cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma appears to be dose related. In this study we compared breast dose in an anthropomorphic phantom for conventional 'mantle'; upper mediastinal/bilateral neck (minimantle) and unilateral neck fields, and evaluated the accuracy of computer planned dose estimates for out-of-field doses. For each field, computer-planned breast dose (CPD) estimates were compared with thermolu-minescence dosimetry measurements in five locations within 'breast tissue'. CPD were also compared with ion chamber measurements in a slab phantom. Measured dose and CPD were within 20% of each other up to approximately 10 cm from the field edge. Beyond 10 cm, the CPD underestimated dose by a factor of 2 or more. The minimantle reduced the breast dose by a factor of approximately 10 compared with the mantle treatment. Treating the neck field lowered the breast dose by a further 50% or more. Modern involved-field radiotherapy for lymphoma substantially reduces breast dose compared with mantle fields. Computer dosimetery underestimated dose at larger distances from the field. This needs to be considered if computer dosimetery is used to estimate breast dose and, by extrapolation, breast cancer risk.

  10. Author: JC Knobel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    According to accounts in the literature, the Spanish Imperial Eagle was a common species in ... The financial support of the National Research Foundation of .... protection of the wild fauna species specified in Appendix II. ..... the continued relevance of the principles that emerged from these cases, in view thereof that a 7.

  11. EFFECT OF POLARIMETRIC NOISE ON THE ESTIMATION OF TWIST AND MAGNETIC ENERGY OF FORCE-FREE FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay; Joshi, Jayant

    2009-01-01

    The force-free parameter α, also known as helicity parameter or twist parameter, bears the same sign as the magnetic helicity under some restrictive conditions. The single global value of α for a whole active region gives the degree of twist per unit axial length. We investigate the effect of polarimetric noise on the calculation of global α value and magnetic energy of an analytical bipole. The analytical bipole has been generated using the force-free field approximation with a known value of constant α and magnetic energy. The magnetic parameters obtained from the analytical bipole are used to generate Stokes profiles from the Unno-Rachkovsky solutions for polarized radiative transfer equations. Then we add random noise of the order of 10 -3 of the continuum intensity (I c ) in these profiles to simulate the real profiles obtained by modern spectropolarimeters such as Hinode (SOT/SP), SVM (USO), ASP, DLSP, POLIS, and SOLIS etc. These noisy profiles are then inverted using a Milne-Eddington inversion code to retrieve the magnetic parameters. Hundred realizations of this process of adding random noise and polarimetric inversion is repeated to study the distribution of error in global α and magnetic energy values. The results show that (1) the sign of α is not influenced by polarimetric noise and very accurate values of global twist can be calculated, and (2) accurate estimation of magnetic energy with uncertainty as low as 0.5% is possible under the force-free condition.

  12. Estimation of droplet charge forming out of an electrified ligament in the presence of a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Castle, G S P; Adamiak, K; Fan, H T; Simmer, J

    2015-01-01

    The charge on a liquid droplet is a critical parameter that needs to be determined to accurately predict the behaviour of the droplet in many electrostatic applications, for example, electrostatic painting and ink-jet printing. The charge depends on many factors, such as the liquid conductivity, droplet and ligament radii, ligament length, droplet shape, electric field intensity, space charge, the presence of adjacent ligaments and previously formed droplets. In this paper, a 2D axisymmetric model is presented which can be used to predict the electric charge on a conductive spherical droplet ejected from a single ligament directly supplied with high voltage. It was found that the droplet charging levels for the case of isolated electrified ligaments are as much as 60 times higher than that in the case of ligaments connected to a planar high voltage electrode. It is suggested that practical atomization systems lie somewhere between these two extremes and that a better model was achieved by developing a 3D approximation of a linear array of ligaments connected to an electrode having variable width. The effect on droplet charge and its radius was estimated for several cases of different boundary conditions. (paper)

  13. Efficient uptake of blood-borne BK and JC polyomavirus-like particles in endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and renal vasa recta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Simon-Santamaria

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs are specialized scavenger cells that mediate high-capacity clearance of soluble waste macromolecules and colloid material, including blood-borne adenovirus. To explore if LSECs function as a sink for other viruses in blood, we studied the fate of virus-like particles (VLPs of two ubiquitous human DNA viruses, BK and JC polyomavirus, in mice. Like complete virions, VLPs specifically bind to receptors and enter cells, but unlike complete virions, they cannot replicate. 125I-labeled VLPs were used to assess blood decay, organ-, and hepatocellular distribution of ligand, and non-labeled VLPs to examine cellular uptake by immunohisto- and -cytochemistry. BK- and JC-VLPs rapidly distributed to liver, with lesser uptake in kidney and spleen. Liver uptake was predominantly in LSECs. Blood half-life (∼1 min, and tissue distribution of JC-VLPs and two JC-VLP-mutants (L55F and S269F that lack sialic acid binding affinity, were similar, indicating involvement of non-sialic acid receptors in cellular uptake. Liver uptake was not mediated by scavenger receptors. In spleen, the VLPs localized to the red pulp marginal zone reticuloendothelium, and in kidney to the endothelial lining of vasa recta segments, and the transitional epithelium of renal pelvis. Most VLP-positive vessels in renal medulla did not express PV-1/Meca 32, suggesting location to the non-fenestrated part of vasa recta. The endothelial cells of these vessels also efficiently endocytosed a scavenger receptor ligand, formaldehyde-denatured albumin, suggesting high endocytic activity compared to other renal endothelia. We conclude that LSECs very effectively cleared a large fraction of blood-borne BK- and JC-VLPs, indicating a central role of these cells in early removal of polyomavirus from the circulation. In addition, we report the novel finding that a subpopulation of endothelial cells in kidney, the main organ of polyomavirus persistence, showed

  14. Modifying the dissolved-in-water type natural gas field simulation model based on the distribution of estimated Young's modulus for the Kujukuri region, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nakagawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A simulation model, which covers the part of Southern-Kanto natural gas field in Chiba prefecture, was developed to perform studies and make predictions of land subsidence. However, because large differences between simulated and measured subsidence occurred in the northern modeled area of the gas field, the model was modified with an estimated Young's modulus distribution. This distribution was estimated by the yield value distribution and the correlation of yield value with Young's modulus. Consequently, the simulated subsidence in the north area was improved to some extent.

  15. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Three-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Estimation Method Using a Deformation Field Map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Lei; Chetty, Indrin J.; Zhang Junan; Jin Jianyue; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yan Hui; Brizel, David M.; Lee, W. Robert; Movsas, Benjamin; Yin Fangfang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) estimation method using a deformation field map, and to evaluate and optimize the efficiency and accuracy of the method for use in the clinical setting. Methods and Materials: We propose a method to estimate patient CBCT images using prior information and a deformation model. Patients’ previous CBCT data are used as the prior information, and the new CBCT volume to be estimated is considered as a deformation of the prior image volume. The deformation field map is solved by minimizing deformation energy and maintaining new projection data fidelity using a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. This method was implemented in 3D form using hardware acceleration and multi-resolution scheme, and it was evaluated for different scan angles, projection numbers, and scan directions using liver, lung, and prostate cancer patient data. The accuracy of the estimation was evaluated by comparing the organ volume difference and the similarity between estimated CBCT and the CBCT reconstructed from fully sampled projections. Results: Results showed that scan direction and number of projections do not have significant effects on the CBCT estimation accuracy. The total scan angle is the dominant factor affecting the accuracy of the CBCT estimation algorithm. Larger scan angles yield better estimation accuracy than smaller scan angles. Lung cancer patient data showed that the estimation error of the 3D lung tumor volume was reduced from 13.3% to 4.3% when the scan angle was increased from 60° to 360° using 57 projections. Conclusions: The proposed estimation method is applicable for 3D DTS, 3D CBCT, four-dimensional CBCT, and four-dimensional DTS image estimation. This method has the potential for significantly reducing the imaging dose and improving the image quality by removing the organ distortion artifacts and streak artifacts shown in images reconstructed by the conventional Feldkamp

  16. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2013-01-01

    the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for "smoldering compounds" emitted from the semiarid shrubland fuels should likely be increased by a factor of ~2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present emission factors for 357 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semiarid shrublands, coniferous canopy, and organic soil.

    To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke composition in atmospheric models. The results support a recent estimate of global NMOC emissions from biomass burning that is much higher than widely used estimates and they provide important insights into the nature of smoke. 31–72% of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged about three (range ~2.0–8.7. About 35–64% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of ozone and organic aerosol. For the single lab fire in organic soil about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC and ~72% of the mass of these NMOC was unidentified, highlighting the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The mass ratio of total NMOC to "NOx as NO" ranged from 11 to 267, indicating that NOx-limited O3 production would be common in evolving biomass burning plumes. The fuel consumption per unit area was 7.0 ± 2.3 Mg ha−1 and 7.7 ± 3.7 Mg ha−1

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Gene Family in Physic Nut and Overexpression of the JcERF011 Gene in Rice Increased Its Sensitivity to Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Qin, Shanshan; Guo, Yali; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF transcription factors play crucial roles in plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. A total of 119 AP2/ERF genes (JcAP2/ERFs) have been identified in the physic nut genome; they include 16 AP2, 4 RAV, 1 Soloist, and 98 ERF genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that physic nut AP2 genes could be divided into 3 subgroups, while ERF genes could be classed into 11 groups or 43 subgroups. The AP2/ERF genes are non-randomly distributed across the 11 linkage groups of the physic nut genome and retain many duplicates which arose from ancient duplication events. The expression patterns of several JcAP2/ERF duplicates in the physic nut showed differences among four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 38 JcAP2/ERF genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots according to analysis of digital gene expression tag data. The expression of JcERF011 was downregulated by salinity stress in physic nut roots. Overexpression of the JcERF011 gene in rice plants increased its sensitivity to salinity stress. The increased expression levels of several salt tolerance-related genes were impaired in the JcERF011-overexpressing plants under salinity stress.

  18. Estimation of Soil Erosion by Using Magnetic Method: A Case Study of an Agricultural Field in Southern Moravia (Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Grison, H.; Kapicka, A.; Dlouha, S.; Kodesova, R.; Jaksik, O.

    2013-05-01

    In this study we have applied magnetism of soils for estimation of erosion at an agricultural land. The testing site is situated in loess region in Southern Moravia (in Central Europe). The approach is based on well-established method of differentiation of magnetic parameters of the topsoil and the subsoil horizons as a result of in situ formation of strongly magnetic iron oxides. Our founding is established on a simple tillage homogenization model described by Royall (2001) using magnetic susceptibility and its frequency dependence to estimate soil loss caused by the tillage and subsequent erosion. The original dominant Soil Unit in the investigated area is Haplic Chernozem, which is due to intensive erosion progressively transformed into different Soil Units. The site is characterized by a flat upper part while the middle part, formed by a substantive side valley, is steeper (up to 15°). The side valley represents a major line of concentrated runoff emptying into a colluvial fan. Field measurements of the topsoil volume magnetic susceptibility were carried out by the Bartington MS2D probe. Data are resulting in regular grid of 101 data points, where the bulk soil material was gathered for further laboratory investigations. Moreover, vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility (deep to 40 cm) was measured on selected transects using the SM400 kappameter. In the laboratory, after drying and sieving of collected soil samples, mass-specific magnetic susceptibility and its frequency-dependent susceptibility was measured. In order to identify magnetic minerals the thermomagnetic analyses were performed using the AGICO KLY-4S Kappabridge with CS-3 furnace. Hysteresis loops were carried out on vibrating magnetometer ADE EV9 to assess the grain-size distribution of ferrimagnetic particles. Hereafter, the isothermal remanent magnetization acqusition followed by D.C. demagnetization were done. All these laboratory magnetic measurements were performed in order to

  19. Proper orthogonal decomposition-based estimations of the flow field from particle image velocimetry wall-gradient measurements in the backward-facing step flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John Craig; Mokhasi, Paritosh; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, particle image velocimetry (PIV) results from the recirculation zone of a backward-facing step flow, of which the Reynolds number is 2800 based on bulk velocity upstream of the step and step height (h = 16.5 mm), are used to demonstrate the capability of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-based measurement models. Three-component PIV velocity fields are decomposed by POD into a set of spatial basis functions and a set of temporal coefficients. The measurement models are built to relate the low-order POD coefficients, determined from an ensemble of 1050 PIV fields by the 'snapshot' method, to the time-resolved wall gradients, measured by a near-wall measurement technique called stereo interfacial PIV. These models are evaluated in terms of reconstruction and prediction of the low-order temporal POD coefficients of the velocity fields. In order to determine the estimation coefficients of the measurement models, linear stochastic estimation (LSE), quadratic stochastic estimation (QSE), principal component regression (PCR) and kernel ridge regression (KRR) are applied. We denote such approaches as LSE-POD, QSE-POD, PCR-POD and KRR-POD. In addition to comparing the accuracy of measurement models, we introduce multi-time POD-based estimations in which past and future information of the wall-gradient events is used separately or combined. The results show that the multi-time estimation approaches can improve the prediction process. Among these approaches, the proposed multi-time KRR-POD estimation with an optimized window of past wall-gradient information yields the best prediction. Such a multi-time KRR-POD approach offers a useful tool for real-time flow estimation of the velocity field based on wall-gradient data

  20. Critical Current Properties in Longitudinal Magnetic Field of YBCO Superconductor with APC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, R.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Jha, A. K.; Matsumoto, K.

    The critical current density (Jc) properties of the Artificial Pinning Center (APC) introduced YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) films in the longitudinal magnetic field were measured. Y2O3 or Y2BaCuO5 (Y211) was introduced as APCs to YBCO, and YBCO films with APC were fabricated on SrTiO3 single crystal substrate. The sizes of Y2O3 and Y211 were 5-10 nm and 10-20 nm, respectively. As a result, Jc enhancement in the longitudinal magnetic field was observed in Y2O3 introduced YBCO films. However, it was not observed in Y211 introduced YBCO films. Therefore, it was considered that Jc properties in the longitudinal magnetic field were affected by introducing of small size APC, and it was necessary that APC does not disturb the current pathway in the superconductor.

  1. Pollution fields estimation by local statistical adaptation and non-stationary approach; Estimation de champs de pollution par adaptation statistique locale et approche non stationnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grancher, D. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Geographie Physique UMR 8591, 92 - Meudon-Bellevue (France); Bel, L. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Mathematiques, 91 - Orsay (France); Vautard, R. [Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2005-07-01

    Several methods are designed to produce objective and physically consistent maps of ozone concentration fields using a Chemistry Transport Model on a coarse grid (50 km) and a few monitoring stations. We use geostatistical methods to correct the CTM with external variables available in a cheap way: other pollutant measured, urbanism rate, coast effect... Methods taking into account the non stationarity have also been experimented. (authors)

  2. Estimating the spatial distribution of field-applied mushroom compost in the Brandywine-Christina River Basin using multispectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, Kelsey A.

    The world's greatest concentration of mushroom farms is settled within the Brandywine-Christina River Basin in Chester County in southeastern Pennsylvania. This industry produces a nutrient-rich byproduct known as spent mushroom compost, which has been traditionally applied to local farm fields as an organic fertilizer and soil amendment. While mushroom compost has beneficial properties, the possible over-application to farm fields could potentially degrade stream water quality. The goal of this study was to estimate the spatial extent and intensity of field-applied mushroom compost. We applied a remote sensing approach using Landsat multispectral imagery. We utilized the soil line technique, using the red and near-infrared bands, to estimate differences in soil wetness as a result of increased soil organic matter content from mushroom compost. We validated soil wetness estimates by examining the spectral response of references sites. We performed a second independent validation analysis using expert knowledge from agricultural extension agents. Our results showed that the soil line based wetness index worked well. The spectral validation illustrated that compost changes the spectral response of soil because of changes in wetness. The independent expert validation analysis produced a strong significant correlation between our remotely-sensed wetness estimates and the empirical ratings of compost application intensities. Overall, the methodology produced realistic spatial distributions of field-applied compost application intensities across the study area. These spatial distributions will be used for follow-up studies to assess the effect of spent mushroom compost on stream water quality.

  3. Increased Prevalence of Human Polyomavirus JC Viruria in Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Patients in Treatment with Anti-TNF α: A 18 Month Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodio, Donatella Maria; Anzivino, Elena; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Scrivo, Rossana; Scribano, Daniela; Conte, Gianlorenzo; Prezioso, Carla; Trancassini, Maria; Valesini, Guido; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (CIRDs) are immune-mediated pathologies involving joints. To date, TNFα-blocking agents administration is the most promising therapy, although these treatments are associated with an increased Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation, the etiological agent of the Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). The aim of this study was the recruitment and the analysis of a CIRDs cohort in order to investigate a possible correlation between JCPyV presence and the influence of anti-TNF-α agents on viral loads. Blood and urine samples were collected from 34 CIRDs subjects prior the first anti-TNF-α infusion (T0) and after 3 (T3), 6 (T6), 12 (T12), and 18 (T18) months. Results showed persistent JC viruria significantly higher than JC viremia throughout the 18 month follow-up study (p = 0.002). In JCPyV positive samples, the non-coding control region (NCCR) was analyzed. Results evidenced archetypal structures (type II-S) in all isolates with the exception of a sequence isolated from a plasma sample, that corresponds to the type II-R found in PML subjects. Finally, the viral protein 1 (VP1) genotyping was performed and results showed the prevalence of the European genotypes 1A, 1B, and 4. Since only few studies have been carried out to understand whether there is a PML risk in CIRDs population infected by JCPyV, this study contributes to enrich literature insight on JCPyV biology in this cluster. Further investigations are necessary in order to recognize the real impact of biologics on JCPyV life cycle and to identify possible and specific viral variants related to increased virulence in CIRDs patients.

  4. Are morphometrics sufficient for estimating age of pre-fledging birds in the field? A test using common terns (Sterna hirundo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy N Wails

    Full Text Available Age is a key component of fitness, affecting survival and reproductive capacities. Where it is not possible to study known individuals from birth, morphometrics (predominantly patterns of plumage development for birds are most often used to estimate age. Although criteria for age estimations exist for many species, the degree to which these criteria improve the precision of estimates remains to be tested, restricting their widespread acceptance. We develop a photographic tool for estimating ages of Common Tern (Sterna hirundo chicks and test it using 100 human observers of varying prior experience across four breeding colonies (three North American sites and one European site and under controlled laboratory conditions. We followed the design approach of other morphometric tools, expanding it to create a user-friendly guide (divided into six age groupings. The majority (86% of observers improved in chick-aging accuracy when using the tool by an average of 20.1% (±1.4 SE and correctly estimated 60.3% (±1.4 of chick ages. This was similar to the intrinsic aging ability of our best field observer (63.3%. Observers with limited experience showed the greatest increases in chick-aging accuracy over experienced observers who likely had established a method for estimating chick ages prior to using the tool. Even the best observers only correctly estimated ages of chicks 62.9% (±2.8 of the time in the field and 84.0% (±2.9 of the time in the lab when using the tool and typically underestimated ages. This indicates that developmental variation between individual chicks can prevent completely reliable age estimates and corroborates the few existing data that suggest that morphometric criteria fail to achieve robust levels of accuracy and may introduce error into studies that rely on them. We conclude that novel approaches for estimating age, not only morphometric criteria, must be pursued.

  5. Integrating field plots, lidar, and landsat time series to provide temporally consistent annual estimates of biomass from 1990 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren B. Cohen; Hans-Erik Andersen; Sean P. Healey; Gretchen G. Moisen; Todd A. Schroeder; Christopher W. Woodall; Grant M. Domke; Zhiqiang Yang; Robert E. Kennedy; Stephen V. Stehman; Curtis Woodcock; Jim Vogelmann; Zhe Zhu; Chengquan. Huang

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a system that provides temporally consistent biomass estimates for national greenhouse gas inventory reporting to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Our model-assisted estimation framework relies on remote sensing to scale from plot measurements to lidar strip samples, to Landsat time series-based maps. As a demonstration, new...

  6. Effectively utilising a 3rd party 3D visualization component in a discrete event simulation environment for Joint Command and Control (JC2)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramadeen, P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Roux [1]. Figure 13 shows the how the systems were connected during the respective exercises and operations. The computer icon represents a node. 7.2 Confederation Cup The Confederation Cup is a football tournament hosted by FIFA (The Fédération... Internationale de Football Association). It was held in South Africa in June 2009. Joint Command and Control is vital in events of this nature. JC2 includes include airspace control. The system was used as an Incident Management Tool to track and log...

  7. On the correctness of the thermoluminescent high-temperature ratio (HTR) method for estimating ionization density effects in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    The high-temperature ratio (HTR) method which exploits changes in the LiF:Mg,Ti glow-curve due to high-LET radiation, has been used for several years to estimate LET in an unknown radiation field. As TL efficiency is known to decrease after doses of densely ionizing radiation, a LET estimate is used to correct the TLD-measured values of dose. The HTR method is purely empirical and its general correctness is questionable. The validity of the HTR method was investigated by theoretical simulation of various mixed radiation fields. The LET eff values estimated with the HTR method for mixed radiation fields were found in general to be incorrect, in some cases underestimating the true values of dose-averaged LET by an order of magnitude. The method produced correct estimates of average LET only in cases of almost mono-energetic fields (i.e. in non-mixed radiation conditions). The value of LET eff found by the HTR method may therefore be treated as a qualitative indicator of increased LET, but not as a quantitative estimator of average LET. However, HTR-based correction of the TLD-measured dose value (HTR-B method) was found to be quite reliable. In all cases studied, application of this technique improved the result. Most of the measured doses fell within 10% of the true values. A further empirical improvement to the method is proposed. One may therefore recommend the HTR-B method to correct for decreased TL efficiency in mixed high-LET fields.

  8. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET using analytic methods and improved computer subroutine for TFC stress estimation in TRESCODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, B.W.; Miki, Nobuharu; Hashizume, Takashi.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the comparison of TF coil stresses in NET and FER. The analyses focus on the straight part of the inner legs, since it is this part of the coil which most directly influences the radial build of the machine. NET's TF coils are wedged together and the centering force on each of the coils is reacted by toroidal compression of the inner legs. The forces that act out of the plane of each coil are reacted by friction between adjacent inner legs such that the set of legs behave much like a cylinder under torsion. In contrast, the FER device employs a bucking cylinder to react the centering load, which incurs a penalty in radial thickness, and the out of plane forces are reacted by the use of shear keys between adjacent inner legs. Analytic techniques or ''hand methods'' have been used to estimate and compare the strains and stresses at the inner leg mid-plane section resulting from both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic forces. Such techniques forced a more thorough understanding of the structural behavior of the coils. The amount of effort in analyzing the NET coil is greater than for FER as the reaction of centering load in its wedged design is more complex, and because it was found that friction plays a very important part in determining the coil stresses. The FER coil is simpler in this regard, and a ''hand estimation'' of its coil stresses was straightfoward. In this report, the program written to perform these analyses is also described. It was desired to provide new capabilities to the original TF stress subroutine in TRESCODE and to review and improve it where possible. This has been accomplished, and subroutines are now available for use in JAERI's system code, TRESCODE. It is hoped that the inner leg radial thickness can be better optimized by using the program. (author)

  9. Fast wave power flow along SOL field lines in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Leblanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2012-10-01

    On NSTX, a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power can occur along open field lines passing in front of the antenna over the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL). Up to 60% of the RF power can be lost and at least partially deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling [1,2]. The flow of HHFW power from the antenna region to the divertor is mostly aligned along the SOL magnetic field [3], which explains the pattern of heat deposition as measured with infrared (IR) cameras. By tracing field lines from the divertor back to the midplane, the IR data can be used to estimate the profile of HHFW power coupled to SOL field lines. We hypothesize that surface waves are being excited in the SOL, and these results should benchmark advanced simulations of the RF power deposition in the SOL (e.g., [4]). Minimizing this loss is critical optimal high-power long-pulse ICRF heating on ITER while guarding against excessive divertor erosion.[4pt] [1] J.C. Hosea et al., AIP Conf Proceedings 1187 (2009) 105. [0pt] [2] G. Taylor et al., Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010) 056114. [0pt] [3] R.J. Perkins et al., to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett. [0pt] [4] D.L. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 (2011) 145001.

  10. Estimated residual Magnetic Field acting on the Circulating Beam in the LHC Septum Magnets MSI and MSD - Shielding Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel

    2000-01-01

    Computation of the residual field inside the shielded vacuum chambers of the circulating beams that pass through the septum holes of the MSI and MSD magnets is very impractical because of the disproportionate effort involved in obtaining meaningful results. Therefore, a short model has been built to measure the order of magnitude of the residual field inside the LHC vacuum chambers. It is found, that a 0.9 mm thick µ-metal (or Permalloy$^{TM}$) shielding is sufficient to reduce the field, which is experienced by the circulating beam, below the level of the earth's field.

  11. Field reconstruction and estimation of the antenna support structure effect on the measurement uncertainty of the BTS1940 antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    the effect of the support structure on the measured field, by reconstructing the currents induced on the support frame with DIATOOL. The field obtained by filtering these currents is presented. Moreover, the spatial resolution obtained by the 3D reconstruction is discussed and compared with the one obtained...

  12. Field data provide estimates of effective permeability, fracture spacing, well drainage area and incremental production in gas shales

    KAUST Repository

    Eftekhari, Behzad; Marder, M.; Patzek, Tadeusz

    2018-01-01

    the external unstimulated reservoir. This allows us to estimate for the first time the effective permeability of the unstimulated shale and the spacing of fractures in the stimulated region. From an analysis of wells in the Barnett shale, we find

  13. Application of the inverse estimation method of current distribution from magnetic fields using genetic algorithm to beam profile measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Sakasai, K.; Ara, K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the new type of non-invasive beam profile monitor for intense ion accelerator using high-temperature superconductor. We regard the inverse estimation problem of beam profile as the optimum allocation problem of the currents into the cross-section of the beam vacuum pipe and applied genetic algorithm to solve this optimization problem. And we carried out the computer simulation to verify the effectiveness of this inverse estimation method of beam profile. (author)

  14. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    , EGU2014-2424, Vienna, Austria, 1-5. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014b. First Maps of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Structural-Sedimentation Floors of the Easternmost Mediterranean and their Relationship with the Deep Geophysical-Geological Zonation. Proceed. of the 19th Intern. Congress of Sedimentologists, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015a. Newly Developed Paleomagnetic Map of the Easternmost Mediterranean Unmasks Geodynamic History of this Region. Central European Jour. of Geosciences, 6, No. 4 (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015b. Application of Integrated Geological-Geophysical Analysis for Development of Paleomagnetic Maps of the Easternmost Mediterranean. In: (Eppelbaum L., Ed.), New Developments in Paleomagnetism Research, Nova Publisher, NY (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Khesin, B.E., 2004. Advanced 3-D modelling of gravity field unmasks reserves of a pyrite-polymetallic deposit: A case study from the Greater Caucasus. First Break, 22, No. 11, 53-56. Eppelbaum, L.V., Nikolaev, A.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014. Space location of the Kiama paleomagnetic hyperzone of inverse polarity in the crust of the eastern Mediterranean. Doklady Earth Sciences (Springer), 457, No. 6, 710-714. Haase, J.S., Park, C.H., Nowack, R.L. and Hill, J.R., 2010. Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates incorporating site effects - An example from Indiana, U.S.A. Environmental and Engineering Geoscience, 16, No. 4, 369-388. Hough, S.E., Borcherdt, R. D., Friberg, P. A., Busby, R., Field, E. and Jacob, K. N., 1990. The role of sediment-induced amplification in the collapse of the Nimitz freeway. Nature, 344, 853-855. Khesin, B.E. Alexeyev, V.V. and Eppelbaum, L.V., 1996. Interpretation of Geophysical Fields in Complicated Environments. Kluwer Academic Publ., Ser.: Advanced Appr. in Geophysics, Dordrecht - London - Boston. Klokočník, J., Kostelecký, J., Eppelbaum, L. and Bezděk, A., 2014. Gravity Disturbances, the Marussi Tensor, Invariants and

  15. Enhanced Production of Androst-1,4-Diene-3,17-Dione by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12 Using Three-Stage Fermentation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minglong; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Xu, Meijuan; Yang, Taowei; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    To improve the androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) production from phytosterol by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12, fructose was firstly found favorable as the initial carbon source to increase the biomass and eliminate the lag phase of M. neoaurum JC-12 in the phytosterol transformation process. Based on this phenomenon, two-stage fermentation by using fructose as the initial carbon source and feeding glucose to maintain strain metabolism was designed. By applying this strategy, the fermentation duration was decreased from 168 h to 120 h with the ADD productivity increased from 0.071 g/(L·h) to 0.108 g/(L·h). Further, three-stage fermentation by adding phytosterol to improve ADD production at the end of the two-stage fermentation was carried out and the final ADD production reached 18.6 g/L, which is the highest reported ADD production using phytosterol as substrate. Thus, this strategy provides a possible way in enhancing the ADD production in pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26352898

  16. Enhanced Production of Androst-1,4-Diene-3,17-Dione by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12 Using Three-Stage Fermentation Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available To improve the androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD production from phytosterol by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12, fructose was firstly found favorable as the initial carbon source to increase the biomass and eliminate the lag phase of M. neoaurum JC-12 in the phytosterol transformation process. Based on this phenomenon, two-stage fermentation by using fructose as the initial carbon source and feeding glucose to maintain strain metabolism was designed. By applying this strategy, the fermentation duration was decreased from 168 h to 120 h with the ADD productivity increased from 0.071 g/(L·h to 0.108 g/(L·h. Further, three-stage fermentation by adding phytosterol to improve ADD production at the end of the two-stage fermentation was carried out and the final ADD production reached 18.6 g/L, which is the highest reported ADD production using phytosterol as substrate. Thus, this strategy provides a possible way in enhancing the ADD production in pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Regulation of trichome development in tobacco by JcZFP8, a C2H2 zinc finger protein gene from Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaodong; Gu, Yuxi; Dai, Tingwei; Wu, Yang; Wu, Peng; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2018-06-05

    Trichomes are epidermal outgrowths of plant tissues that can secrete or store large quantities of secondary metabolites, which contribute to plant defense responses against stress. The use of bioengineering methods for regulating the development of trichomes and metabolism is a widely researched topic. In the present study, we demonstrate that JcZFP8, a C2H2 zinc finger protein gene from Jatropha curcas L., can regulate trichome development in transgenic tobacco. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we performed transcriptome profiling of overexpression JcZFP8 transgenic plants and wild-type tobacco. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes, we determined that genes of the plant hormone signal transduction pathway was significantly enriched, suggesting that these pathways were modulated in the transgenic plants. In addition, the transcript levels of the known trichome-related genes in Arabidopsis were not significantly changed, whereas CycB2 and MYB genes were differentially expressed in the transgenic plants. Despite tobacco and Arabidopsis have different types of trichomes, all the pathways were associated with C2H2 zinc finger protein genes. Our findings help us to understand the regulation of multicellular trichome formation and suggest a new metabolic engineering method for the improvement of plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Derivation of a JC virus-resistant human glial cell line: implications for the identification of host cell factors that determine viral tropism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, Gretchen V.; Manley, Kate; Atwood, Walter J.

    2003-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is a common human polyomavirus that infects 70-80% of the population worldwide. In immunosuppressed individuals, JCV infects oligodendrocytes and causes a fatal demyelinating disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The tropism of JCV is restricted to oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and B lymphocytes. Several mechanisms may contribute to the restricted tropism of JCV, including the presence or absence of cell-type-specific transcription and replication factors and the presence or absence of cell-type-specific receptors. We have established a system to investigate cellular factors that influence viral tropism by selecting JCV-resistant cells from a susceptible glial cell line (SVG-A). SVG-A cells were subjected to several rounds of viral infection using JC virus (M1/SVEΔ). A population of resistant cells emerged (SVGR2) that were refractory to infection with the Mad-4 strain of JCV, the hybrid virus M1/SVEΔ, as well as to the related polyomavirus SV40. SVGR2 cells were as susceptible as the SVG-A cells to infection with an unrelated amphotropic retrovirus. The stage at which these cells are resistant to infection was investigated and the block appears to be at early viral gene transcription. This system should ultimately allow us to identify glial specific factors that influence the tropism of JCV

  19. Use of TL - dosimeters of TLD - 500K type for precision estimation of spatial distributions of mixed dose fields in 'Ukryttia' conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lagutin, I G; Ershova, N N

    2003-01-01

    In some works being currently carried out in ISTC 'Ukryttia' divisions within the framework of 'Complex program of works at 'Ukryttia' object', a necessary arose to estimate local values of radiation dose fields of mixed type (beta + gamma). The most convenient tool for estimation of local values of long - term integrals of such doses are dosimeters fabricated on the basis of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) having small sensitive volume under sufficient radiating capacity, convenient performance and high reproducibility of results. It was offered to use TL - detectors of TLD-500K type on the basis of sapphire monocrystal (alpha-Al sub 2 O sub 3).

  20. Sugar as an optimal carbon source for the enhanced performance of MgB2 superconductors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, O. V.; Pan, A. V.; Wang, J. L.; Shcherbakov, A. V.; Dou, S. X.; Wexler, D.; Babić, E.; Jerčinović, M.; Husnjak, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of an extended study of the effect of sugar doping on the structural and electromagnetic properties of MgB2 superconductors. High values of the upper critical field (Bc2) of 36 T and the irreversibility field (Birr) of 27 T have been estimated at the temperature of 5 K in a bulk MgB2 sample with the addition of 10 wt% of sugar. The critical current density (Jc(Ba)) of sugar-doped samples has been significantly improved in the high field region. The value of transport Jc has reached as high as 108 A m-2 at 10 T and 5 K for Fe-sheathed sugar-doped MgB2 wire. The analysis of the pinning mechanism in the samples investigated indicated that dominant vortex pinning occurs on the surface type of pinning defects, such as grain boundaries, dislocations, stacking faults etc, for both pure and doped MgB2. In sugar-doped samples, pinning is governed by numerous crystal lattice defects, which appear in MgB2 grains as a result of crystal lattice distortion caused by carbon substitution for boron and nano-inclusions. The drastically improved superconducting properties of sugar-doped samples are also attributed to the highly homogeneous distribution and enhanced reactivity of this dopant with host Mg and B powders. The results of this work suggest that sugar is the optimal source of carbon for doping MgB2 superconductor, especially for application at high magnetic fields.

  1. A full-field residual stress estimation scheme for fitness-for-service assessment of pipe girth welds: Part II – A shell theory based implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shaopin; Dong, Pingsha; Pei, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    With the two key controlling parameters identified and their effectiveness demonstrated in Part I of this study series for constructing a continuous residual stress profile at weld region, a classical shell theory based model is proposed in this paper (Part II) for describing through-thickness residual stress distributions of both axial and hoop components at any axial location beyond weld region. The shell theory based model is analytically constructed through an assembly of two parts: One represents weld region and the other represents the remaining component section away from weld. The final assembly of the two parts leads to a closed form solution to both axial and hoop residual stress components as a function of axial distance from weld toe position. The effectiveness of the full-field residual stress estimation scheme is demonstrated by comparing with a series of finite element modeling results over a broad range of pipe weld geometries and welding conditions. The present development should provide a consistent and effective means for estimating through-thickness residual stress profile as a continuous function of pipe geometry, welding heat input, as well as material characteristics. - Highlights: • A shell theory based two-part assembly model is developed for generalizing residual stress distributions. • A full-field estimation of through-thickness residual stress profiles can be achieved. • The proposed estimation scheme offers both consistency and mechanics basis in residual stress profile generation. • An estimation scheme for welding-induced plastic zone size is proposed and validated. • The shell theory based estimation scheme can also provide a reasonable estimate on distortion in radial direction

  2. Estimate on the uncertainty of predicting radiated emission from near-field scan caused by insufficient or inaccurate near-field data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Radchenko, Andriy; Kam, Keong

    2012-01-01

    Near-field scan on a Huygens’ box can be used in order to predict the maximal radiated emission from a Printed Circuit Board. The significance of step size and phase accuracy, and the importance of a full Huygens’ box are investigated by simulation of two different models with two different...... numerical methods. The prediction of maximal radiated emission is quite robust but the results also show that a full scan on all six surfaces is probably needed....

  3. Estimation of conduction and displacement currents on p-n-junction in electromagnetic superhigh-frequency field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamirzaev, S.Kh.; Dadamirzaev, M.G.; Gulyamov, G.; Gulyamov, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Current generated in semiconductor diode that is in variable field is shown to define only by convection current, but the average value of displacement current is always zero and has not influence on current, outgoing from diode. This conclusion explains an origin of generated currents in different diode in electromagnetic field. The formula is found out allowing one to calculate the diode current with any nonlinear feature. (authors)

  4. Validation of a Robust Neural Real-Time Voltage Estimator for Active Distribution Grids on Field Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertl, Michael; Douglass, Philip James; Heussen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    network approach for voltage estimation in active distribution grids by means of measured data from two feeders of a real low voltage distribution grid. The approach enables a real-time voltage estimation at locations in the distribution grid, where otherwise only non-real-time measurements are available......The installation of measurements in distribution grids enables the development of data driven methods for the power system. However, these methods have to be validated in order to understand the limitations and capabilities for their use. This paper presents a systematic validation of a neural...

  5. An Integrated Field and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Method for the Estimation of Pigments Content of Stipa Purpurea in Shenzha, Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stipa purpurea is the representative type of alpine grassland in Tibet and the surviving and development material for herdsmen. This paper takes Shenzha County as the research area. Based on the analysis of typical hyperspectral variables sensitive to chlorophyll content of Stipa purpurea, 10 spectral variables with significant correlation with chlorophyll were extracted. The estimation model of chlorophyll was established. The photosynthetic pigment contents in the Shenzha area were calculated by using HJ-1A remote sensing images. The results show that (1 there are significant correlations between chlorophyll content and spectral variables; in particular, the coefficient of Chlb in Stipa purpurea with RVI is the largest (0.728; (2 10 variables are correlated with chlorophyll, and the order of correlation is Chlb > Chla > Chls; (3 for the estimation of Chla, the EVI is the best variable. RVI, NDVI, and VI2 are suitable for Chlb; RVI and NDVI are also suitable for the estimation of Chls; (4 the mean estimated content of Chla in Stipa bungeana is about 4.88 times that of Chlb, while Cars is slightly more than Chlb; (5 the distribution of Chla is opposite to Chlb and Chls content in water area.

  6. A model of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 2000 estimated from Orsted data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2002-01-01

    as measured simultaneously by globally distributed geomagnetic observatories. In addition, the observatory data are used to constrain secular variation. The model is estimated using an iteratively reweighted least-squares method with Huber weights to account for the non-Gaussian data error distribution...

  7. Continuous estimates on the earthquake early warning magnitude by use of the near-field acceleration records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Jin, Xing; Wei, Yongxiang; Zhang, Hongcai

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the seismic records of Japan's Kik-net are selected to measure the acceleration, displacement, and effective peak acceleration of each seismic record within a certain time after P wave, then a continuous estimation is given on earthquake early warning magnitude through statistical analysis method, and Wenchuan earthquake record is utilized to check the method. The results show that the reliability of earthquake early warning magnitude continuously increases with the increase of the seismic information, the biggest residual happens if the acceleration is adopted to fit earthquake magnitude, which may be caused by rich high-frequency components and large dispersion of peak value in acceleration record, the influence caused by the high-frequency components can be effectively reduced if the effective peak acceleration and peak displacement is adopted, it is estimated that the dispersion of earthquake magnitude obviously reduces, but it is easy for peak displacement to be affected by long-period drifting. In various components, the residual enlargement phenomenon at vertical direction is almost unobvious, thus it is recommended in this article that the effective peak acceleration at vertical direction is preferred to estimate earthquake early warning magnitude. Through adopting Wenchuan strong earthquake record to check the method mentioned in this article, it is found that this method can be used to quickly, stably, and accurately estimate the early warning magnitude of this earthquake, which shows that this method is completely applicable for earthquake early warning.

  8. Estimation of genetic effects of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pingping; Yin Ruochun; Tang Mingli; Wu Yuejin; Yu Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the chromosome aberrations in the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat was studied. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields of different magnetic flux density (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5h and with different treated time (1, 3 and 5h) at magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, abnormal segregation and fragment in PMCs. The results indicated that the exposed groups of low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in aberration frequency compared with unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, but significant differences of chromosomal bridge at 5T and lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus at 7T were detected in the exposed group (p<0.05). The dose-effect relationships indicated that the increase frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with flux density of magnetic field and treated time, but no linear effect was observed. These results lead us to the conclusion that high static magnetic fields above 5T for 5h duration might cause an increase in potential damage to organisms. (authors)

  9. Exploiting the Modified Colombo-Nyquist Rule for Co-estimating Sub-monthly Gravity Field Solutions from a GRACE-like Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraju, B.; Weigelt, M.; Mueller, J.

    2017-12-01

    In order to suppress the impact of aliasing errors on the standard monthly GRACE gravity-field solutions, co-estimating sub-monthly (daily/two-day) low-degree solutions has been suggested as a solution. The maximum degree of the low-degree solutions is chosen via the Colombo-Nyquist rule of thumb. However, it is now established that the sampling of satellites puts a restriction on the maximum estimable order and not the degree - modified Colombo-Nyquist rule. Therefore, in this contribution, we co-estimate low-order sub-monthly solutions, and compare and contrast them with the low-degree sub-monthly solutions. We also investigate their efficacies in dealing with aliasing errors.

  10. Robust extrapolation scheme for fast estimation of 3D Ising field partition functions: application to within subject fMRI data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risser, L.; Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, Ph. [NeuroSpin CEA, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Risser, L.; Vincent, T. [Laboratoire de Neuroimagerie Assistee par Ordinateur (LNAO) CEA - DSV/I2BM/NEUROSPIN (France); Risser, L. [Institut de mecanique des fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), CNRS: UMR5502 - Universite Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III - Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse - INPT (France); Idier, J. [Institut de Recherche en Communications et en Cybernetique de Nantes (IRCCyN) CNRS - UMR6597 - Universite de Nantes - ecole Centrale de Nantes - Ecole des Mines de Nantes - Ecole Polytechnique de l' Universite de Nantes (France)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present a first numerical scheme to estimate Partition Functions (PF) of 3D Ising fields. Our strategy is applied to the context of the joint detection-estimation of brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, where the goal is to automatically recover activated regions and estimate region-dependent, hemodynamic filters. For any region, a specific binary Markov random field may embody spatial correlation over the hidden states of the voxels by modeling whether they are activated or not. To make this spatial regularization fully adaptive, our approach is first based upon it, classical path-sampling method to approximate a small subset of reference PFs corresponding to pre-specified regions. Then, file proposed extrapolation method allows its to approximate the PFs associated with the Ising fields defined over the remaining brain regions. In comparison with preexisting approaches, our method is robust; to topological inhomogeneities in the definition of the reference regions. As a result, it strongly alleviates the computational burden and makes spatially adaptive regularization of whole brain fMRI datasets feasible. (authors)

  11. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibuchi, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Sakae, T.; Terunuma, T.; Isobe, T.; Kawamura, H.; Yasuoka, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Harano, H.; Nishiyama, J.; Masuda, A.; Nohtomi, A.

    2011-01-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field. (authors)

  12. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  13. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point in hot arid western India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santra, P.; Kumar, M.; Kumawat, R.N.; Painuli, D.K.; Hati, K.M.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Batjes, N.H.

    2018-01-01

    Characterization of soil water retention, e.g., water content at field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (PWP) over a landscape plays a key role in efficient utilization of available scarce water resources in dry land agriculture; however, direct measurement thereof for multiple locations in

  14. FIELD EVALUATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes preliminary results from a field experiment designed to evaluate a new approach to quantifying gaseous fugitive emissions from area air pollution sources. The new approach combines path-integrated concentration data acquired with any path-integrated optical re...

  15. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for ecosystem carbon cycle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. He; Q. Zhuang; A.D. McGuire; Y. Liu; M. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations inmodeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the...

  16. Field estimates of attraction of Ceratitis capitata to Trimedlure and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to methyl eugenol in varying environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measuring and modeling the attractiveness of semiochemical-baited traps is of significant importance to detection, delimitation and control of invasive pests. Here we describe the results of field mark-release-recapture experiments with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)...

  17. A bioluminescence ATP assay for estimating surface hydrophobicity and membrane damage of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatments, a non-thermal process have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (AJ, pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale ...

  18. Magnetic field pitch angle and perpendicular velocity measurements from multi-point time-delay estimation of poloidal correlation reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisiazhniuk, D.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Lebschy, A.; Manz, P.; Nikolaeva, V.; Stroth, U.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-02-01

    In fusion machines, turbulent eddies are expected to be aligned with the direction of the magnetic field lines and to propagate in the perpendicular direction. Time delay measurements of density fluctuations can be used to calculate the magnetic field pitch angle α and perpendicular velocity {{v}\\bot} profiles. The method is applied to poloidal correlation reflectometry installed at ASDEX Upgrade and TEXTOR, which measure density fluctuations from poloidally and toroidally separated antennas. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing the perpendicular velocity (composed of the E× B drift and the phase velocity of turbulence {{v}\\bot}={{v}E× B}+{{v}\\text{ph}} ) with Doppler reflectometry measurements and with neoclassical {{v}E× B} calculations. An important condition for the application of the method is the presence of turbulence with a sufficiently long decorrelation time. It is shown that at the shear layer the decorrelation time is reduced, limiting the application of the method. The magnetic field pitch angle measured by this method shows the expected dependence on the magnetic field, plasma current and radial position. The profile of the pitch angle reproduces the expected shape and values. However, comparison with the equilibrium reconstruction code cliste suggests an additional inclination of turbulent eddies at the pedestal position (2-3°). This additional angle decreases towards the core and at the edge.

  19. Results of cost estimates for the exploitation of the Natuna gas field in Indonesia using the HTR: A new momentum for commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a simplified method for cost estimations are presented. The main result is: There exists a potential of economical competitiveness for the exploitation of the gas of the Natuna Gas Field in Indonesia. The potential consists in the production of Energy Alcohol from the gas of the Natuna Gas Field, making use of nuclear energy in the form of high temperature heat and electricity from the High Temperature reactor, HTR. The reason is that Energy Alcohol is a readily marketable product as a substitute for gasoline and diesel, with their relatively high market values. This is not so for methane, because of its lower market value, being used mainly in the heat market only. In the conversion process some - or a little more - of the carbondioxide CO 2 , the main constituent of the gas of the Natuna Gas Field, is used; the competitiveness of the product decreases with the increasing consumption of CO 2

  20. Transport properties of field-effect transistor with Langmuir-Blodgett films of C60 dendrimer and estimation of impurity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naoko; Nagano, Takayuki; Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Sako, Yuuki; Morimoto, Yu; Takaguchi, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Chu, Chih-Chien; Imae, Toyoko

    2007-12-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET) device has been fabricated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of C60 dendrimer. The device showed n-channel normally off characteristics with the field-effect mobility of 2.7×10-3cm2V-1s-1 at 300K, whose value is twice as high as that (1.4×10-3cm2V-1s-1) for the FET with spin-coated films of C60 dendrimer. This originates from the formation of ordered π-conduction network of C60 moieties. From the temperature dependence of field-effect mobility, a structural phase transition has been observed at around 300K. Furthermore, the density of states for impurity levels was estimated in the Langmuir-Blodgett films.

  1. Estimation of forest aboveground biomass and uncertainties by integration of field measurements, airborne LiDAR, and SAR and optical satellite data in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbazaev, Mikhail; Thiel, Christian; Cremer, Felix; Dubayah, Ralph; Migliavacca, Mirco; Reichstein, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2018-02-21

    Information on the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) over large areas is needed for understanding and managing processes involved in the carbon cycle and supporting international policies for climate change mitigation and adaption. Furthermore, these products provide important baseline data for the development of sustainable management strategies to local stakeholders. The use of remote sensing data can provide spatially explicit information of AGB from local to global scales. In this study, we mapped national Mexican forest AGB using satellite remote sensing data and a machine learning approach. We modelled AGB using two scenarios: (1) extensive national forest inventory (NFI), and (2) airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) as reference data. Finally, we propagated uncertainties from field measurements to LiDAR-derived AGB and to the national wall-to-wall forest AGB map. The estimated AGB maps (NFI- and LiDAR-calibrated) showed similar goodness-of-fit statistics (R 2 , Root Mean Square Error (RMSE)) at three different scales compared to the independent validation data set. We observed different spatial patterns of AGB in tropical dense forests, where no or limited number of NFI data were available, with higher AGB values in the LiDAR-calibrated map. We estimated much higher uncertainties in the AGB maps based on two-stage up-scaling method (i.e., from field measurements to LiDAR and from LiDAR-based estimates to satellite imagery) compared to the traditional field to satellite up-scaling. By removing LiDAR-based AGB pixels with high uncertainties, it was possible to estimate national forest AGB with similar uncertainties as calibrated with NFI data only. Since LiDAR data can be acquired much faster and for much larger areas compared to field inventory data, LiDAR is attractive for repetitive large scale AGB mapping. In this study, we showed that two-stage up-scaling methods for AGB estimation over large areas need to be analyzed and validated

  2. Drag and Lift Estimation from 3-D Velocity Field Data Measured by Multi-Plane Stereo PIV

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 裕之; 松島, 紀佐; 上野, 真; 小池, 俊輔; 渡辺, 重哉; Kato, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Kisa; Ueno, Makoto; Koike, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Shigeya

    2013-01-01

    For airplane design, it is crucial to have tools that can accurately predict airplane drag and lift. Usually drag and lift prediction methods are force measurement using wind tunnel balance. Unfortunately, balance data do not provide information contribution of airplane to components to drag and lift for more precise and competitive airplane design. To obtain such information, a wake integration method for use drag and lift estimation was developed for use in wake survey data analysis. Wake s...

  3. Radiotherapy of tumors under respiratory motion. Estimation of the motional velocity field and dose accumulation based on 4D image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion represents a major challenge in radiation therapy in general, and especially for the therapy of lung tumors. In recent years and due to the introduction of modern techniques to 'acquire temporally resolved computed tomography images (4D CT images), different approaches have been developed to explicitly account for breathing motion during treatment. An integral component of such approaches is the concept of motion field estimation, which aims at a mathematical description and the computation of the motion sequences represented by the patient's images. As part of a 4D dose calculation/dose accumulation, the resulting vector fields are applied for assessing and accounting for breathing-induced effects on the dose distribution to be delivered. The reliability of related 4D treatment planning concepts is therefore directly tailored to the precision of the underlying motion field estimation process. Taking this into account, the thesis aims at developing optimized methods for the estimation of motion fields using 4D CT images and applying the resulting methods for the analysis of breathing induced dosimetric effects in radiation therapy. The thesis is subdivided into three parts that thematically build upon each other. The first part of the thesis is about the implementation, evaluation and optimization of methods for motion field estimation with the goal of precisely assessing respiratory motion of anatomical and pathological structures represented in a patient's 4D er image sequence; this step is the basis of subsequent developments and analysis parts. Especially non-linear registration techniques prove to be well suited to this purpose. After being optimized for the particular problem at hand, it is shown as part of an extensive multi-criteria evaluation study and additionally taking into account publicly accessible evaluation platforms that such methods allow estimating motion fields with subvoxel accuracy - which means that the developed methods

  4. Estimation of extremely small field radiation dose for brain stereotactic radiotherapy using the Vero4DRT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Monzen, Hajime; Onishi, Yuichi; Kaneshige, Soichiro; Kanno, Ikuo

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was a dosimetric validation of the Vero4DRT for brain stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with extremely small fields calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS) iPlan (Ver.4.5.1; algorithm XVMC). Measured and calculated data (e.g. percentage depth dose [PDD], dose profile, and point dose) were compared for small square fields of 30 × 30, 20 × 20, 10 × 10 and 5 × 5 mm 2 using ionization chambers of 0.01 or 0.04 cm 3 and a diamond detector. Dose verifications were performed using an ionization chamber and radiochromic film (EBT3; the equivalent field sizes used were 8.2, 8.7, 8.9, 9.5, and 12.9 mm 2 ) for five brain SRT cases irradiated with dynamic conformal arcs. The PDDs and dose profiles for the measured and calculated data were in good agreement for fields larger than or equal to 10 × 10 mm 2 when an appropriate detector was chosen. The dose differences for point doses in fields of 30 × 30, 20 × 20, 10 × 10 and 5 × 5 mm 2 were +0.48%, +0.56%, -0.52%, and +11.2% respectively. In the dose verifications for the brain SRT plans, the mean dose difference between the calculated and measured doses were -0.35% (range, -0.94% to +0.47%), with the average pass rates for the gamma index under the 3%/2 mm criterion being 96.71%, 93.37%, and 97.58% for coronal, sagittal, and axial planes respectively. The Vero4DRT system provides accurate delivery of radiation dose for small fields larger than or equal to 10 × 10 mm 2 . Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the near field/far field model and the advanced reach tool (ART) model V1.5: exposure estimates to benzene during parts washing with mineral spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Mallory; Allen, Joseph G; Herrick, Robert F; Stewart, James H

    2018-03-01

    The Advanced Reach Tool V1.5 (ART) is a mathematical model for occupational exposures conceptually based on, but implemented differently than, the "classic" Near Field/Far Field (NF/FF) exposure model. The NF/FF model conceptualizes two distinct exposure "zones"; the near field, within approximately 1m of the breathing zone, and the far field, consisting of the rest of the room in which the exposure occurs. ART has been reported to provide "realistic and reasonable worst case" estimates of the exposure distribution. In this study, benzene exposure during the use of a metal parts washer was modeled using ART V1.5, and compared to actual measured workers samples and to NF/FF model results from three previous studies. Next, the exposure concentrations expected to be exceeded 25%, 10% and 5% of the time for the exposure scenario were calculated using ART. Lastly, ART exposure estimates were compared with and without Bayesian adjustment. The modeled parts washing benzene exposure scenario included distinct tasks, e.g. spraying, brushing, rinsing and soaking/drying. Because ART can directly incorporate specific types of tasks that are part of the exposure scenario, the present analysis identified each task's determinants of exposure and performance time, thus extending the work of the previous three studies where the process of parts washing was modeled as one event. The ART 50th percentile exposure estimate for benzene (0.425ppm) more closely approximated the reported measured mean value of 0.50ppm than the NF/FF model estimates of 0.33ppm, 0.070ppm or 0.2ppm obtained from other modeling studies of this exposure scenario. The ART model with the Bayesian analysis provided the closest estimate to the measured value (0.50ppm). ART (with Bayesian adjustment) was then used to assess the 75th, the 90th and 95th percentile exposures, predicting that on randomly selected days during this parts washing exposure scenario, 25% of the benzene exposures would be above 0.70ppm; 10

  6. Calibration of a turbidity meter for making estimates of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Management of water resources such as a reservoir requires using analytical models which describe such parameters as the suspended sediment field. To select or develop an appropriate model requires making many measurements to describe the distribution of this parameter in the water column. One potential method for making those measurements expeditiously is to measure light transmission or turbidity and relate that parameter to total suspended solids concentrations. An instrument which may be used for this purpose was calibrated by generating curves of transmission measurements plotted against measured values of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients. Results of these experiments indicate that field measurements made with this instrument using curves generated in this study should correlate with total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in the water column within 20 percent.

  7. History Matching and Parameter Estimation of Surface Deformation Data for a CO2 Sequestration Field Project Using Ensemble-Based Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Wheeler, Mary

    2015-04-01

    The application of ensemble-based algorithms for history matching reservoir models has been steadily increasing over the past decade. However, the majority of implementations in the reservoir engineering have dealt only with production history matching. During geologic sequestration, the injection of large quantities of CO2 into the subsurface may alter the stress/strain field which in turn can lead to surface uplift or subsidence. Therefore, it is essential to couple multiphase flow and geomechanical response in order to predict and quantify the uncertainty of CO2 plume movement for long-term, large-scale CO2 sequestration projects. In this work, we simulate and estimate the properties of a reservoir that is being used to store CO2 as part of the In Salah Capture and Storage project in Algeria. The CO2 is separated from produced natural gas and is re-injected into downdip aquifer portion of the field from three long horizontal wells. The field observation data includes ground surface deformations (uplift) measured using satellite-based radar (InSAR), injection well locations and CO2 injection rate histories provided by the operators. We implement variations of ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble smoother algorithms for assimilating both injection rate data as well as geomechanical observations (surface uplift) into reservoir model. The preliminary estimation results of horizontal permeability and material properties such as Young Modulus and Poisson Ratio are consistent with available measurements and previous studies in this field. Moreover, the existence of high-permeability channels (fractures) within the reservoir; especially in the regions around the injection wells are confirmed. This estimation results can be used to accurately and efficiently predict and quantify the uncertainty in the movement of CO2 plume.

  8. History matching and parameter estimation of surface deformation data for a CO2 sequestration field project using ensemble-based algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, J.; Tavakoli, R.; Min, B.; Srinivasan, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Optimal management of subsurface processes requires the characterization of the uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance prediction. The application of ensemble-based algorithms for history matching reservoir models has been steadily increasing over the past decade. However, the majority of implementations in the reservoir engineering have dealt only with production history matching. During geologic sequestration, the injection of large quantities of CO2 into the subsurface may alter the stress/strain field which in turn can lead to surface uplift or subsidence. Therefore, it is essential to couple multiphase flow and geomechanical response in order to predict and quantify the uncertainty of CO2 plume movement for long-term, large-scale CO2 sequestration projects. In this work, we simulate and estimate the properties of a reservoir that is being used to store CO2 as part of the In Salah Capture and Storage project in Algeria. The CO2 is separated from produced natural gas and is re-injected into downdip aquifer portion of the field from three long horizontal wells. The field observation data includes ground surface deformations (uplift) measured using satellite-based radar (InSAR), injection well locations and CO2 injection rate histories provided by the operators. We implement ensemble-based algorithms for assimilating both injection rate data as well as geomechanical observations (surface uplift) into reservoir model. The preliminary estimation results of horizontal permeability and material properties such as Young Modulus and Poisson Ratio are consistent with available measurements and previous studies in this field. Moreover, the existence of high-permeability channels/fractures within the reservoir; especially in the regions around the injection wells are confirmed. This estimation results can be used to accurately and efficiently predict and monitor the movement of CO2 plume.

  9. Field method for estimation of fluoride in drinking groundwater by photometric measurement of spot on aluminium quinalizarin reagent paper

    OpenAIRE

    Zaher Barghouthi; Sameer Amereih

    2017-01-01

    A simple field method for determination of fluoride in drinking water using handmade fluoride reagent paper impregnated by aluminium quinalizarin complex was developed. Fluoride reacts with the impregnated reagent paper to release the free ligand with new colour, orange different from that of the complex. The change in the colour, which is proportional to the amount of fluoride, was measured by the Arsenator. The functionality of the Arsenator which is based on a photometric measurement of sp...

  10. Open solar flux estimates from near-Earth measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field: comparison of the first two perihelion passes of the Ulysses spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Results from all phases of the orbits of the Ulysses spacecraft have shown that the magnitude of the radial component of the heliospheric field is approximately independent of heliographic latitude. This result allows the use of near-Earth observations to compute the total open flux of the Sun. For example, using satellite observations of the interplanetary magnetic field, the average open solar flux was shown to have risen by 29% between 1963 and 1987 and using the aa geomagnetic index it was found to have doubled during the 20th century. It is therefore important to assess fully the accuracy of the result and to check that it applies to all phases of the solar cycle. The first perihelion pass of the Ulysses spacecraft was close to sunspot minimum, and recent data from the second perihelion pass show that the result also holds at solar maximum. The high level of correlation between the open flux derived from the various methods strongly supports the Ulysses discovery that the radial field component is independent of latitude. We show here that the errors introduced into open solar flux estimates by assuming that the heliospheric field's radial component is independent of latitude are similar for the two passes and are of order 25% for daily values, falling to 5% for averaging timescales of 27 days or greater. We compare here the results of four methods for estimating the open solar flux with results from the first and second perehelion passes by Ulysses. We find that the errors are lowest (1–5% for averages over the entire perehelion passes lasting near 320 days, for near-Earth methods, based on either interplanetary magnetic field observations or the aa geomagnetic activity index. The corresponding errors for the Solanki et al. (2000 model are of the order of 9–15% and for the PFSS method, based on solar magnetograms, are of the order of 13–47%. The model of Solanki et al. is based on the continuity equation of open flux, and uses the

  11. Development of a low cost method to estimate the seismic signature of a geothermal field form ambient noise analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibuleac, Ileana [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2016-06-30

    A new, cost effective and non-invasive exploration method using ambient seismic noise has been tested at Soda Lake, NV, with promising results. The material included in this report demonstrates that, with the advantage of initial S-velocity models estimated from ambient noise surface waves, the seismic reflection survey, although with lower resolution, reproduces the results of the active survey when the ambient seismic noise is not contaminated by strong cultural noise. Ambient noise resolution is less at depth (below 1000m) compared to the active survey. In general, the results are promising and useful information can be recovered from ambient seismic noise, including dipping features and fault locations.

  12. New model and field data on estimates of Antarctic Bottom Water flow through the deep Vema Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, D. I.; Fomin, V. V.; Diansky, N. A.; Morozov, E. G.; Neiman, V. G.

    2017-05-01

    We used a numerical model of the ocean circulation with a high spatial resolution to obtain estimates of the kinematic characteristics of Antarctic Bottom Water flow through the abyssal Vema Channel in the southwestern part of the Atlantic Ocean. The results of simulations correspond to the data of direct velocity measurements made at several locations in the channel. The high horizontal and vertical resolution of the model in the bottom layer allowed us to study in detail the hydrodynamics of this flow over its entire length.

  13. JC Virus T-Antigen in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with p53 Expression and Chromosomal Instability, Independent of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available JC virus has a transforming gene encoding JC virus T-antigen (JCVT. JCVT may inactivate wild-type p53, cause chromosomal instability (CIN, and stabilize β-catenin. A link between JCVT and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP has been suggested. However, no large-scale study has examined the relations of JCVT with molecular alterations, clinical outcome, or prognosis in colon cancer. We detected JCVT expression (by immunohistochemistry in 271 (35% of 766 colorectal cancers. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 and eight other loci (CHFR, HIC1, IGFBP3, MGMT, MINT1, MINT31, p14, WRN by MethyLight. We examined loss of heterozygosity in 2p, 5q, 17q, and 18q. JCVT was significantly associated with p53 expression (P < .0001, p21 loss (P < .0001, CIN (≥2 chromosomal segments with LOH; P < .0001, nuclear β-catenin (P = .006, LINE-1 hypomethylation (P = .002, and inversely with CIMP-high (P = .0005 and microsatellite instability (MSI (P < .0001, but not with PIK3CA mutation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations of JCVT with p53 [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 8.45; P < .0001], CIN (adjusted OR, 2.53; P = .003, cyclin D1 (adjusted OR, 1.57; P = .02, LINE-1 hypomethylation (adjusted OR, 1.97 for a 30% decline as a unit; P = .03, BRAF mutation (adjusted OR, 2.20; P = .04, and family history of colorectal cancer (adjusted OR, 0.64; P = .04 remained statistically significant. However, JCVT was no longer significantly associated with CIMP, MSI, β-catenin, or cyclooxygenase-2 expression in multivariate analysis. JCVT was unrelated with patient survival. In conclusion, JCVT expression in colorectal cancer is independently associated with p53 expression and CIN, which may lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

  14. Efficient and robust pupil size and blink estimation from near-field video sequences for human-machine interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyuan; Epps, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring pupil and blink dynamics has applications in cognitive load measurement during human-machine interaction. However, accurate, efficient, and robust pupil size and blink estimation pose significant challenges to the efficacy of real-time applications due to the variability of eye images, hence to date, require manual intervention for fine tuning of parameters. In this paper, a novel self-tuning threshold method, which is applicable to any infrared-illuminated eye images without a tuning parameter, is proposed for segmenting the pupil from the background images recorded by a low cost webcam placed near the eye. A convex hull and a dual-ellipse fitting method are also proposed to select pupil boundary points and to detect the eyelid occlusion state. Experimental results on a realistic video dataset show that the measurement accuracy using the proposed methods is higher than that of widely used manually tuned parameter methods or fixed parameter methods. Importantly, it demonstrates convenience and robustness for an accurate and fast estimate of eye activity in the presence of variations due to different users, task types, load, and environments. Cognitive load measurement in human-machine interaction can benefit from this computationally efficient implementation without requiring a threshold calibration beforehand. Thus, one can envisage a mini IR camera embedded in a lightweight glasses frame, like Google Glass, for convenient applications of real-time adaptive aiding and task management in the future.

  15. Notes From the Field: Secondary Task Precision for Cognitive Load Estimation During Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sebastian R; Konge, Lars; Mikkelsen, Peter T; Sørensen, Mads S; Andersen, Steven A W

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive load (CL) theory suggests that working memory can be overloaded in complex learning tasks such as surgical technical skills training, which can impair learning. Valid and feasible methods for estimating the CL in specific learning contexts are necessary before the efficacy of CL-lowering instructional interventions can be established. This study aims to explore secondary task precision for the estimation of CL in virtual reality (VR) surgical simulation and also investigate the effects of CL-modifying factors such as simulator-integrated tutoring and repeated practice. Twenty-four participants were randomized for visual assistance by a simulator-integrated tutor function during the first 5 of 12 repeated mastoidectomy procedures on a VR temporal bone simulator. Secondary task precision was found to be significantly lower during simulation compared with nonsimulation baseline, p impact on secondary task precision. This finding suggests that even though considerable changes in CL are reflected in secondary task precision, it lacks sensitivity. In contrast, secondary task reaction time could be more sensitive, but requires substantial postprocessing of data. Therefore, future studies on the effect of CL modifying interventions should weigh the pros and cons of the various secondary task measurements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Multitemporal field-based plant height estimation using 3D point clouds generated from small unmanned aerial systems high-resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malambo, L.; Popescu, S. C.; Murray, S. C.; Putman, E.; Pugh, N. A.; Horne, D. W.; Richardson, G.; Sheridan, R.; Rooney, W. L.; Avant, R.; Vidrine, M.; McCutchen, B.; Baltensperger, D.; Bishop, M.

    2018-02-01

    Plant breeders and agronomists are increasingly interested in repeated plant height measurements over large experimental fields to study critical aspects of plant physiology, genetics and environmental conditions during plant growth. However, collecting such measurements using commonly used manual field measurements is inefficient. 3D point clouds generated from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) images using Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques offer a new option for efficiently deriving in-field crop height data. This study evaluated UAS/SfM for multitemporal 3D crop modelling and developed and assessed a methodology for estimating plant height data from point clouds generated using SfM. High-resolution images in visible spectrum were collected weekly across 12 dates from April (planting) to July (harvest) 2016 over 288 maize (Zea mays L.) and 460 sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) plots using a DJI Phantom 3 Professional UAS. The study compared SfM point clouds with terrestrial lidar (TLS) at two dates to evaluate the ability of SfM point clouds to accurately capture ground surfaces and crop canopies, both of which are critical for plant height estimation. Extended plant height comparisons were carried out between SfM plant height (the 90th, 95th, 99th percentiles and maximum height) per plot and field plant height measurements at six dates throughout the growing season to test the repeatability and consistency of SfM estimates. High correlations were observed between SfM and TLS data (R2 = 0.88-0.97, RMSE = 0.01-0.02 m and R2 = 0.60-0.77 RMSE = 0.12-0.16 m for the ground surface and canopy comparison, respectively). Extended height comparisons also showed strong correlations (R2 = 0.42-0.91, RMSE = 0.11-0.19 m for maize and R2 = 0.61-0.85, RMSE = 0.12-0.24 m for sorghum). In general, the 90th, 95th and 99th percentile height metrics had higher correlations to field measurements than the maximum metric though differences among them were not statistically significant. The

  17. Effects of self-absorption on simultaneous estimation of temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames using a spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Liu, Dong

    2018-06-01

    An improved inverse reconstruction model with consideration of self-absorption effect for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames was proposed based on the flame emission spectrometry. The effects of self-absorption on the temperature profile and concentration fields were investigated for various measurement errors, flame optical thicknesses and detecting lines numbers. The model neglecting the self-absorption caused serious reconstruction errors especially in the nanofluid fuel flames with large optical thicknesses, while the improved model was used to successfully recover the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the flames regardless of the optical thickness. Through increasing detecting lines number, the reconstruction accuracy can be greatly improved due to more flame emission information received by the spectrometer. With the adequate detecting lines number, the estimations for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in flames with large optical thicknesses were still satisfying even from the noisy radiation intensities with signal to noise ratio (SNR) as low as 46 dB. The results showed that the improved reconstruction model was effective and robust to concurrently retrieve the temperature distribution and volume fraction fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the exact and noisy data in nanofluid fuel sooting flames with different optical thicknesses.

  18. Grain yield losses in yellow-rusted durum wheat estimated using digital and conventional parameters under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Vergara-Diaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biotrophic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is the causal agent of the yellow rust in wheat. Between the years 2010–2013 a new strain of this pathogen (Warrior/Ambition, against which the present cultivated wheat varieties have no resistance, appeared and spread rapidly. It threatens cereal production in most of Europe. The search for sources of resistance to this strain is proposed as the most efficient and safe solution to ensure high grain production. This will be helped by the development of high performance and low cost techniques for field phenotyping. In this study we analyzed vegetation indices in the Red, Green, Blue (RGB images of crop canopies under field conditions. We evaluated their accuracy in predicting grain yield and assessing disease severity in comparison to other field measurements including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, leaf chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, and canopy temperature. We also discuss yield components and agronomic parameters in relation to grain yield and disease severity. RGB-based indices proved to be accurate predictors of grain yield and grain yield losses associated with yellow rust (R2 = 0.581 and R2 = 0.536, respectively, far surpassing the predictive ability of NDVI (R2 = 0.118 and R2 = 0.128, respectively. In comparison to potential yield, we found the presence of disease to be correlated with reductions in the number of grains per spike, grains per square meter, kernel weight and harvest index. Grain yield losses in the presence of yellow rust were also greater in later heading varieties. The combination of RGB-based indices and days to heading together explained 70.9% of the variability in grain yield and 62.7% of the yield losses.

  19. An estimate of radiation fields in a gamma irradiation facility using fuel elements from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    2002-01-01

    A simple gamma irradiation facility set up using a few irradiated or partially irradiated swimming pool elements can be assembled to provide a convenient facility for irradiation of small and medium sized samples for research. The paper presents results of radiation levels with an arrangement using four elements from a reactor core operating at a power of 20 MW. A maximum gamma field of higher than 1 KGy/h at locations adjacent to fuel elements with negligible neutron contamination can be achieved. (author)

  20. A scalable satellite-based crop yield mapper: Integrating satellites and crop models for field-scale estimation in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M.; Singh, B.; Srivastava, A.; Lobell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Food security will be challenged over the upcoming decades due to increased food demand, natural resource degradation, and climate change. In order to identify potential solutions to increase food security in the face of these changes, tools that can rapidly and accurately assess farm productivity are needed. With this aim, we have developed generalizable methods to map crop yields at the field scale using a combination of satellite imagery and crop models, and implement this approach within Google Earth Engine. We use these methods to examine wheat yield trends in Northern India, which provides over 15% of the global wheat supply and where over 80% of farmers rely on wheat as a staple food source. In addition, we identify the extent to which farmers are shifting sow date in response to heat stress, and how well shifting sow date reduces the negative impacts of heat stress on yield. To identify local-level decision-making, we map wheat sow date and yield at a high spatial resolution (30 m) using Landsat satellite imagery from 1980 to the present. This unique dataset allows us to examine sow date decisions at the field scale over 30 years, and by relating these decisions to weather experienced over the same time period, we can identify how farmers learn and adapt cropping decisions based on weather through time.

  1. Fetal dose from radiotherapy photon beams: Physical basis, techniques to estimate radiation dose outside of the treatment field, biological effects and professional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovell, Marilyn; Blackwell, C. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The presentation will review: 1. The physical basis of radiation dose outside of the treatment field. 2. Techniques to estimate and reduce fetal dose. 3. Clinical examples of fetal dose estimation and reduction. 4. Biological effects of fetal irradiation. 5. Professional considerations. Approximately 4000 women per year in the United States require radiotherapy during pregnancy. This report presents data and techniques that allow the medical physicist to estimate the radiation dose the fetus will receive and to reduce this dose with appropriate shielding. Out-of-beam data are presented for a variety of photon beams, including cobalt-60 gamma rays and x rays from 4 to 18 MV. Designs for simple and inexpensive to more complex and expensive types of shielding equipment are described. Clinical examples show that proper shielding can reduce the radiation dose to the fetus by 50%. In addition, a review of the biological aspects of irradiation enables estimates of the risks of lethality, growth retardation, mental retardation, malformation, sterility, cancer induction, and genetic defects to the fetus. A summary of professional considerations/recommendations is also provided as a guide for the radiation oncologist and medical physicist

  2. Volume estimate of radium-contaminated soil in a section of Barrows Field Park, Glen Ridge, New Jersey, November--December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, M.J.; Mosho, G.D.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this project was to estimate the in-place volume of radium-contaminated soil in an area of Barrows Field Park, Glen Ridge, New Jersey. The information was necessary to determine whether or not there was sufficient soil with the proper radium concentration to test a new method of soil decontamination. The steps used by Argonne National Laboratory personnel to obtain the required data for estimating the volume of contaminated soil was to measure the contamination-depth profile at 118 locations in a 60 ft times 150 ft area in the park, plot the contours of depths to the specified concentration, and measure the area of the closed depth contours. 6 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs

  3. User's guide: Nimbus-7 Earth radiation budget narrow-field-of-view products. Scene radiance tape products, sorting into angular bins products, and maximum likelihood cloud estimation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. Lee; Hucek, Richard R.; Groveman, Brian; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The archived Earth radiation budget (ERB) products produced from the Nimbus-7 ERB narrow field-of-view scanner are described. The principal products are broadband outgoing longwave radiation (4.5 to 50 microns), reflected solar radiation (0.2 to 4.8 microns), and the net radiation. Daily and monthly averages are presented on a fixed global equal area (500 sq km), grid for the period May 1979 to May 1980. Two independent algorithms are used to estimate the outgoing fluxes from the observed radiances. The algorithms are described and the results compared. The products are divided into three subsets: the Scene Radiance Tapes (SRT) contain the calibrated radiances; the Sorting into Angular Bins (SAB) tape contains the SAB produced shortwave, longwave, and net radiation products; and the Maximum Likelihood Cloud Estimation (MLCE) tapes contain the MLCE products. The tape formats are described in detail.

  4. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  5. Estimates of peak electric fields induced by Transcranial magnetic stimulation in pregnant women as patients using an FEM full-body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, J; Noetscher, G M; Makarov, S N; Pascual-Leone, A

    2017-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for treatment of depression during pregnancy is an appealing alternative to fetus-threatening drugs. However, no studies to date have been performed that evaluate the safety of TMS for a pregnant mother patient and her fetus. A full-body FEM model of a pregnant woman with about 100 tissue parts has been developed specifically for the present study. This model allows accurate computations of induced electric field in every tissue given different locations of a shape-eight coil, a biphasic pulse, common TMS pulse durations, and using different values of the TMS intensity measured in SMT (Standard Motor Threshold) units. Our simulation results estimate the maximum peak values of the electric field in the fetal area for every fetal tissue separately and for the TMS intensity of one SMT unit.

  6. On the Possibility of Estimation of the Earth Crust's Properties from the Observations of Electric Field of Electrokinetic Origin, Generated by Tidal Deformation within the Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, D. A.; Gokhberg, M. B.

    2018-05-01

    A 2-D boundary problem formulation in terms of pore pressure in Biot poroelasticity model is discussed, with application to a vertical contact model mechanically excited by a lunar-solar tidal deformation wave, representing a fault zone structure. A problem parametrization in terms of permeability and Biot's modulus contrasts is proposed and its numerical solution is obtained for a series of models differing in the values of the above parameters. The behavior of pore pressure and its gradient is analyzed. From those, the electric field of the electrokinetic nature is calculated. The possibilities of estimation of the elastic properties and permeability of geological formations from the observations of the horizontal and vertical electric field measured inside the medium and at the earth's surface near the block boundary are discussed.

  7. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  8. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Chen, H; Tsai, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ( 6 LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ( 7 LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  9. Toward Estimating Wetland Water Level Changes Based on Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of PALSAR Backscattering Coefficients over Different Vegetation Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR has been successfully used to map wetland’s inundation extents and types of vegetation based on the fact that the SAR backscatter signal from the wetland is mainly controlled by the wetland vegetation type and water level changes. This study describes the relation between L-band PALSAR  and seasonal water level changes obtained from Envisat altimetry over the island of Île Mbamou in the Congo Basin where two distinctly different vegetation types are found. We found positive correlations between and water level changes over the forested southern Île Mbamou whereas both positive and negative correlations were observed over the non-forested northern Île Mbamou depending on the amount of water level increase. Based on the analysis of sensitivity, we found that denser vegetation canopy leads to less sensitive  variation with respect to the water level changes regardless of forested or non-forested canopy. Furthermore, we attempted to estimate water level changes which were then compared with the Envisat altimetry and InSAR results. Our results demonstrated a potential to generate two-dimensional maps of water level changes over the wetlands, and thus may have substantial synergy with the planned Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT mission.

  10. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Cool

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m2 with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications.

  11. Evaluation of Hyperspectral Multi-Band Indices to Estimate Chlorophyll-A Concentration Using Field Spectral Measurements and Satellite Data in Dianshan Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linna Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a concentration is considered as a key indicator of the eutrophic status of inland water bodies. Various algorithms have been developed for estimating Chl-a in order to improve the accuracy of predictive models. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of hyperspectral multi-band indices to estimate the Chl-a concentration in Dianshan Lake, which is the largest lake in Shanghai, an international metropolis of China. Based on field spectral measurements and in-situ Chl-a concentration collected on 7–8 September 2010, hyperspectral multi-band indices were calibrated to estimate the Chl-a concentration with optimal wavelengths selected by model tuning. A three-band index accounts for 87.36% (R2 = 0.8736 of the Chl-a variation. A four-band index, which adds a wavelength in the near infrared (NIR region, results in a higher R2 (0.8997 by removing the absorption and backscattering effects of suspended solids. To test the applicability of the proposed indices for routinely monitoring of Chl-a in inland lakes, simulated Hyperion and real HJ-1A satellite data were selected to estimate the Chl-a concentration. The results show that the explanatory powers of these satellite hyperspectral multi-band indices are relatively high with R2 = 0.8559, 0.8945, 0.7969, and 0.8241 for simulated Hyperion and real HJ-1A satellite data, respectively. All of the results provide strong evidence that hyperspectral multi-band indices are promising and applicable to estimate Chl-a in eutrophic inland lakes.

  12. Chlorophyll-a Estimation Around the Antarctica Peninsula Using Satellite Algorithms: Hints from Field Water Leaving Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zeng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ocean color remote sensing significantly contributes to our understanding of phytoplankton distribution and abundance and primary productivity in the Southern Ocean (SO. However, the current SO in situ optical database is still insufficient and unevenly distributed. This limits the ability to produce robust and accurate measurements of satellite-based chlorophyll. Based on data collected on cruises around the Antarctica Peninsula (AP on January 2014 and 2016, this research intends to enhance our knowledge of SO water and atmospheric optical characteristics and address satellite algorithm deficiency of ocean color products. We collected high resolution in situ water leaving reflectance (±1 nm band resolution, simultaneous in situ chlorophyll-a concentrations and satellite (MODIS and VIIRS water leaving reflectance. Field samples show that clouds have a great impact on the visible green bands and are difficult to detect because NASA protocols apply the NIR band as a cloud contamination threshold. When compared to global case I water, water around the AP has lower water leaving reflectance and a narrower blue-green band ratio, which explains chlorophyll-a underestimation in high chlorophyll-a regions and overestimation in low chlorophyll-a regions. VIIRS shows higher spatial coverage and detection accuracy than MODIS. After coefficient improvement, VIIRS is able to predict chlorophyll a with 53% accuracy.

  13. Chlorophyll-a Estimation Around the Antarctica Peninsula Using Satellite Algorithms: Hints from Field Water Leaving Reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chen; Xu, Huiping; Fischer, Andrew M

    2016-12-07

    Ocean color remote sensing significantly contributes to our understanding of phytoplankton distribution and abundance and primary productivity in the Southern Ocean (SO). However, the current SO in situ optical database is still insufficient and unevenly distributed. This limits the ability to produce robust and accurate measurements of satellite-based chlorophyll. Based on data collected on cruises around the Antarctica Peninsula (AP) on January 2014 and 2016, this research intends to enhance our knowledge of SO water and atmospheric optical characteristics and address satellite algorithm deficiency of ocean color products. We collected high resolution in situ water leaving reflectance (±1 nm band resolution), simultaneous in situ chlorophyll-a concentrations and satellite (MODIS and VIIRS) water leaving reflectance. Field samples show that clouds have a great impact on the visible green bands and are difficult to detect because NASA protocols apply the NIR band as a cloud contamination threshold. When compared to global case I water, water around the AP has lower water leaving reflectance and a narrower blue-green band ratio, which explains chlorophyll-a underestimation in high chlorophyll-a regions and overestimation in low chlorophyll-a regions. VIIRS shows higher spatial coverage and detection accuracy than MODIS. After coefficient improvement, VIIRS is able to predict chlorophyll a with 53% accuracy.

  14. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, S. P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker III, D. R.; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi

  15. Comparison of AC electronic monitoring and field data for estimating tolerance to Empoasca kraemeri (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) in common bean genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M S; Backus, E A; Cardona, C

    2000-12-01

    Two methods for estimating the tolerance of common bean genotypes to Empoasca kraemeri Ross & Moore were compared, using a yield trial carried out at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Cali, Colombia, versus stylet penetration tactics measured by AC electronic feeding monitors. A stylet penetration index was devised based on principal component scores of three penetration tactics identified (pulsing laceration, cell rupturing, and lancing sap ingestion), combined with knowledge of the hopperburn symptoms caused by each tactic. Tolerant genotypes, as classified by the CIAT yield index, showed significantly more unprotected yield and lower hopperburn scores than the susceptible control. They also induced performance of less pulsing laceration (the tactic considered most damaging to the plant), and more of the other two, mitigating tactics, especially cell rupturing. When index values were calculated for each genotype, stylet penetration index values matched those of the yield index for three out of five genotypes: two EMP-coded tolerant lines ('EMP 385' and 'EMP 392') and the susceptible control 'BAT 41'. Thus, for these three genotypes, all subsequent hoppereburn symptoms are predictable by the type of feeding behavior performed on them. 'Porrillo Sintético' and 'EMP 84', considered borderline genotypes by the yield index, were overestimated and underestimated respectively, by the stylet penetration index. We postulate that, for these two genotypes, plant physiological responses to feeding (either compensatory or heightened sensitivity, respectively) synergize with type of feeding performed to generate the overall hopperburn condition. This multivariate analysis of electronic monitoring data was successfully used to devise an index of resistance. The implications of using the stylet penetration index and the advantages of using electronic monitoring in a bean-breeding program are discussed.

  16. Margin estimation and disturbances of irradiation field in layer-stacking carbon-ion beams for respiratory moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Shinya; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Mizukami, Tomohiro; Tsukishima, Chihiro; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-ion therapy by layer-stacking irradiation for static targets has been practised in clinical treatments. In order to apply this technique to a moving target, disturbances of carbon-ion dose distributions due to respiratory motion have been studied based on the measurement using a respiratory motion phantom, and the margin estimation given by the square root of the summation Internal margin2+Setup margin2 has been assessed. We assessed the volume in which the variation in the ratio of the dose for a target moving due to respiration relative to the dose for a static target was within 5%. The margins were insufficient for use with layer-stacking irradiation of a moving target, and an additional margin was required. The lateral movement of a target converts to the range variation, as the thickness of the range compensator changes with the movement of the target. Although the additional margin changes according to the shape of the ridge filter, dose uniformity of 5% can be achieved for a spherical target 93 mm in diameter when the upward range variation is limited to 5 mm and the additional margin of 2.5 mm is applied in case of our ridge filter. Dose uniformity in a clinical target largely depends on the shape of the mini-peak as well as on the bolus shape. We have shown the relationship between range variation and dose uniformity. In actual therapy, the upper limit of target movement should be considered by assessing the bolus shape. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  17. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Brown

    Full Text Available Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to

  18. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard S; Deng, Z Daniel; Cook, Katrina V; Pflugrath, Brett D; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J; Li, Huidong; Trumbo, Bradly A; Ahmann, Martin L; Seaburg, Adam G

    2013-01-01

    Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System) used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm) downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss) to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days) single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to confirm this.

  19. Analysis of DC properties and current distribution in TFAS ITER conductor samples using high Jc Nb3Sn advanced strands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, L.; Ciazynski, D.; Torre, A.; Bruzzone, P.; Stepanov, B.; Dewittler, R.; Staehli, F.

    2007-01-01

    Two full-size conductor samples using advanced Nb 3 Sn strands were tested in the SULTAN facility in 2005-2006 within (I,B,T) ranges close to the ITER operating conditions (B MAX ∼ 12 T, T ∼ 5 K). Each sample includes two conductor legs, connected together by a twin-box joint in their lower part. The conductor design is the same for the four legs, similar to that of the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil, but each leg uses specific strands newly developed and industrially produced to reach higher J c performances than in previous samples. In addition to classical voltage taps and temperature sensors, the sample instrumentation included Hall probe (HP) heads positioned so as to discriminate current distribution between conductor main sub-cables (petals). In a first simple approach, we analyse the results supposing that the conductor drives a uniform current among strands. The model is mainly based on geometrical considerations associated with a global approach on strand mechanical behavior. In a second part, we model the conductor in a more realistic way with different currents shared between main sub-cables. Taking into account various geometrical aspects (spiral trajectories, precise self-field maps...) the current in all petals are reconstructed with help of HP's signals, expected to experience self-field from CICC's. The mechanical aspects are also tentatively considered (electromagnetic load, bending strain...). Global results for both samples are shown, and possible inaccuracies due to geometrical parameters (petals positioning) are discussed. Those data are then injected into a Matlab program for electrical and geometrical CICC modeling (derived from the previous ENSIC code from CEA) and compared with dedicated experimental runs. Results are finally commented on the basis of overall consistency with HP's signals. (authors)

  20. On the use of IMAGE FUV for estimating the latitude of the open/closed magnetic field line boundary in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Boakes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A statistical comparison of the latitude of the open/closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB as estimated from the three far ultraviolet (FUV detectors onboard the IMAGE spacecraft (the Wideband Imaging camera, WIC, and the Spectrographic Imagers, SI-12 and SI-13 has been carried out over all magnetic local times. A total of over 400 000 OCB estimations were compared from December 2000 and January and December of 2001–2002. The modal latitude difference between the FUV OCB proxies from the three detectors is small, <1°, except in the predawn and evening sectors, where the SI-12 OCB proxy is found to be displaced from both the SI-13 and WIC OCB proxies by up to 2° poleward in the predawn sector and by up to 2° equatorward in the evening sector. Comparing the IMAGE FUV OCB proxies with that determined from particle precipitation measurements by the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP also shows systematic differences. The SI-12 OCB proxy is found to be at higher latitude in the predawn sector, in better agreement with the DMSP OCB proxy. The WIC and SI-13 OCB proxies are found to be in better agreement with the DMSP OCB proxy at most other magnetic local times. These systematic offsets may be used to correct FUV OCB proxies to give a more accurate estimate of the OCB latitude.

  1. The use of caspase inhibitors in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis may improve the estimation of radiation-induced DNA repair and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, Josep; Pueyo, Gemma; Llobet, Lara I de; Baro, Marta; Sole, Xavi; Marin, Susanna; Casanovas, Oriol; Mesia, Ricard; Capella, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair can be tested by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in agarose-encapsulated cells. However, previous studies have reported that this assay is impaired by the spontaneous DNA breakage in this medium. We investigated the mechanisms of this fragmentation with the principal aim of eliminating it in order to improve the estimation of radiation-induced DNA repair. Samples from cancer cell cultures or xenografted tumours were encapsulated in agarose plugs. The cell plugs were then irradiated, incubated to allow them to repair, and evaluated by PFGE, caspase-3, and histone H2AX activation (γH2AX). In addition, apoptosis inhibition was evaluated through chemical caspase inhibitors. We confirmed that spontaneous DNA fragmentation was associated with the process of encapsulation, regardless of whether cells were irradiated or not. This DNA fragmentation was also correlated to apoptosis activation in a fraction of the cells encapsulated in agarose, while non-apoptotic cell fraction could rejoin DNA fragments as was measured by γH2AX decrease and PFGE data. We were able to eliminate interference of apoptosis by applying specific caspase inhibitors, and improve the estimation of DNA repair, and apoptosis itself. The estimation of radiation-induced DNA repair by PFGE may be improved by the use of apoptosis inhibitors. The ability to simultaneously determine DNA repair and apoptosis, which are involved in cell fate, provides new insights for using the PFGE methodology as functional assay

  2. Final report SBIR Phase II. High current density (Jc), low A.C . loss, low cost, Internal-Tin Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Final report of SBIR to develop an economical process that can produce the best material for high field magnets to be used in the next generation of accelerators. The overall objective is to develop an economical process that can produce the best material for high field magnets to be used in future particle accelerators. The internal-tin process has shown by others to produce high J c Nb 3 Sn material and the work here is primarily directed to lowering the AC losses, increasing piece lengths and lowering costs. In the previous reports on this Phase II work we have explored the finned restack approach. We have however encountered ductility problems when we have attempted to produce material without fins but with large numbers of subelements in the restacks. The work reported has concentrated on the scale up of the internal-tin materials without fins and we have finally made internal tin material with 40 (micro)m subelements which exhibited a J c at 12 T of 2757 A/mm 2 in the non-Cu and a J c at 14 T of 1985 A/mm 2 in the non-Cu. These results are the best we have achieved to date and are approaching those that Oxford has achieved for sometime.

  3. Exploring the Usefulness of MISR-HR Products to Estimate Maize Crop Extent and Using Field Evidence to Evaluate the Results in South Africa's Free State Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, M. M.; Knox, N. M.; Hunt, L. A.; Kleyn, L.

    2014-12-01

    The MISR instrument on NASA's Terra platform has been operating for almost 15 years. Standard products are generated at a spatial resolution of 1.1 km or coarser, but a recently developed method to re-analyze the Level-1B2 data allows the retrieval of biogeophysical products at the native spatial resolution of the instrument (275 m). This development opens new opportunities to better address issues such as the management of agricultural production and food security. South African maize production is of great economic and social importance, not only nationally, but on the global market too, being one of the top ten maize producing countries. Seasonal maize production statistics are currently based on a combination of field measurements and estimates derived from manually digitizing high resolution imagery from the SPOT satellite. The field measurements are collected using the Producer Independent Crop Estimate System (PICES) developed by Crop Estimates Committee of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. There is a strong desire to improve the quality of these statistics, to generate those earlier, and to automate the process to encompass larger areas. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the MISR-HR spectral and directional products, combined with the finer spatial resolution and the relatively frequent coverage afforded by that instrument, to address these needs. The study area is based in the Free State, South Africa, one of the primary maize growing areas in the country, and took place during the 2012-2013 summer growing season. The significance of the outcomes will be evaluated in the context of the 14+ years of available MISR data.

  4. Estimation of lung motion fields in 4D CT data by variational non-linear intensity-based registration: A comparison and evaluation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz; Ehrhardt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and robust estimation of motion fields in respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) images, usually performed by non-linear registration of the temporal CT frames, is a precondition for the analysis of patient-specific breathing dynamics and subsequent image-supported diagnostics and treatment planning. In this work, we present a comprehensive comparison and evaluation study of non-linear registration variants applied to the task of lung motion estimation in thoracic 4D CT data. In contrast to existing multi-institutional comparison studies (e.g. MIDRAS and EMPIRE10), we focus on the specific but common class of variational intensity-based non-parametric registration and analyze the impact of the different main building blocks of the underlying optimization problem: the distance measure to be minimized, the regularization approach and the transformation space considered during optimization. In total, 90 different combinations of building block instances are compared. Evaluated on proprietary and publicly accessible 4D CT images, landmark-based registration errors (TRE) between 1.14 and 1.20 mm for the most accurate registration variants demonstrate competitive performance of the applied general registration framework compared to other state-of-the-art approaches for lung CT registration. Although some specific trends can be observed, effects of interchanging individual instances of the building blocks on the TRE are in general rather small (no single outstanding registration variant existing); the same level of accuracy is, however, associated with significantly different degrees of motion field smoothness and computational demands. Consequently, the building block combination of choice will depend on application-specific requirements on motion field characteristics. (paper)

  5. JC virus antibody index in natalizumab-treated patients: correlations with John Cunningham virus DNA and C-reactive protein level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanzillo R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Roberta Lanzillo,1 Raffaele Liuzzi,2 Luca Vallefuoco,3 Marcello Moccia,1 Luca Amato,1 Giovanni Vacca,1 Veria Vacchiano,1 Giuseppe Portella,3 Vincenzo Brescia Morra1 1Neurological Sciences Department, Federico II University, 2Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Research Council, 3Clinical Pathology Department, Federico II University, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Natalizumab-treated patients have a higher risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Exposure to John Cunningham virus (JCV is a prerequisite for PML (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. To assess JCV exposure in multiple sclerosis patients, we performed a serological examination, obtained the antibody index, performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect JCV DNA in plasma and urine, and investigated the role of ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (usCRP as a possible biological marker of JCV reactivation. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis patients who underwent a JCV antibody test through a two-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (STRATIFY test to the measure of serum usCRP levels, and to perform blood and urine JCV PCR. The studied cohort included 97 relapsing–remitting patients (60 women. Fifty-two patients (53.6% tested positive for anti-JCV antibodies. PCR showed JCV DNA in the urine of 30 out of 83 (36.1% patients and 28 out of 44 seropositive patients (63.6%, with a 6.7% false-negative rate for the STRATIFY test. Normalized optical density values were higher in urinary JCV DNA-positive patients (P<0.0001. Interestingly, the level of usCRP was higher in urinary JCV DNA-positive patients and correlated to the number of DNA copies in urine (P=0.028. As expected, patients' age correlated with JCV seropositivity and with JC viruria (P=0.02 and P=0.001, respectively. JC viruria was significantly correlated with a high JCV antibody index and high serum usCRP levels. We suggest that PCR and

  6. A Method of Estimating Pressure and Intensity Distributions of Multielement Phased Array High Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Field at Full Power Using a Needle Hydrophone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ying; Shen Guofeng; Bai Jingfeng; Chen Yazhu

    2011-01-01

    The pressure and intensity distribution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields at full power are critical for predicting heating patterns and ensuring safety of the therapy. With the limitations of maximum pressure at the hydrophone and damage from cavitation or thermal effects, it is hard to measure pressure and intensity directly when HIFU is at full power. HIFU-phased arrays are usually composed of large numbers of small elements and the sound power radiated from some of them at full power is measureable using a hydrophone, we grouped them based on the limitation of maximum permissible pressure at the hydrophone and the characteristics of the element arrangement in the array. Then sound field measurement of the group was carried out at full power level. Using the acoustic coherence principle, the pressure and intensity distribution of the array at full power level can be calculated from corresponding values from the groups. With this method, computer simulations and sound field measurement of a 65-element concentric distributed phased array was carried out. The simulation results demonstrate theoretically the feasibility of this method. Measurements on the 65-element phased array also verify the effectiveness of this method for estimating the pressure and intensity distribution of phased array at full power level using a needle hydrophone.

  7. Estimation of electric fields and currents from International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data for the CDAW 6 intervals: Implications for substorm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Baumjohann, W.

    1985-01-01

    Using a recently developed numerical scheme combined with International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data and the Rice University Ionospheric conductivity model as input, the global distribution of the key ionospheric parameters is estimated for the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 intervals. These outputs include ionospheric electric fields and currents, field-aligned currents and Joule heat production rate at high latitudes, and are compiled in the form of a color movie film, which demonstrates dynamics of substorm changes of the three-dimensional current system as well as of the associated potential pattern. The present paper gives, on the basis of the space-time distribution of the key parameters, the substorm time frame that can be referenced to in terms of the substorm phases when discussing some other magnetospheric and ionospheric records. The distinction between ''substorm expansion'' and ''enhanced convection'' current systems is presented on the basis of the conventional equivalent current and potential patterns and ''true'' ionospheric currents. Although the auroral electrojets flow rather contiguously throughout the dark sector, there are several separate source regions of Joule heating from the electrojet currents. This indicates that the relative importance of the ionospheric conductivity and the electric field in the ionospheric currents varies considerably depending upon latitude and local time. A possible difference in the generation mechanisms of isolated and continuous substorm activity is also discussed to some extent in the light of the two CDAW 6 intervals

  8. Estimating nitrogen loading and far-field dispersal potential from background sources and coastal finfish aquaculture: A simple framework and case study in Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, R.; Milewski, I.; Loucks, R.; Smith, R.

    2018-05-01

    Far-field nutrient impacts associated with finfish aquaculture have been identified as a topic of concern for regulators, managers, scientists, and the public for over two decades but disentangling aquaculture impacts from those caused by other natural and anthropogenic sources has impeded the development of monitoring metrics and management plans. We apply a bulk, steady-state nitrogen loading model (NLM) framework to estimate the annual input of Total Dissolved Nitrogen (TDN) from point and non-point sources to the watershed surrounding Port Mouton Bay, Nova Scotia (Canada). We then use the results of the NLM together with estimates of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) loading from a sea-cage trout farm in the Bay and progressive vector diagrams to illustrate potential patterns of DIN dispersal from the trout farm. Our estimated anthropogenic nitrogen contribution to Port Mouton Bay from all terrestrial and atmospheric sources is ∼211,703 kg TDN/year with atmospheric deposition accounting for almost all (98.6%). At a stocking level of ∼400,000 rainbow trout, the Port Mouton Bay sea-cage farm increases the annual anthropogenic TDN loading to the bay by 14.4% or 30,400 kg. Depending on current flow rates, nitrogen flux from the trout farm can be more than double the background concentrations of TDN near the farm site. Although it is unlikely that nitrogen loading from this single fish farm is saturating the DIN requirements of the entire bay, progressive vector diagrams suggest that the dispersal potential may be insufficient to mitigate potential symptoms of eutrophication associated with nitrogen fluxes. We present an accessible and user-friendly tool for managers to estimate baseline nutrient loading in relation to aquaculture and our use of progressive vector diagrams illustrate a practical and simple method for characterizing potential nutrient dispersal based on local conditions and spatial scales. Our study joins numerous studies which have highlighted

  9. Enhancement of the critical current density in FeO-coated MgB2 thin films at high magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei E. Surdu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of depositing FeO nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm onto the surface of MgB2 thin films on the critical current density was studied in comparison with the case of uncoated MgB2 thin films. We calculated the superconducting critical current densities (Jc from the magnetization hysteresis (M–H curves for both sets of samples and found that the Jc value of FeO-coated films is higher at all fields and temperatures than the Jc value for uncoated films, and that it decreases to ~105 A/cm2 at B = 1 T and T = 20 K and remains approximately constant at higher fields up to 7 T.

  10. EPIC Forest LAI Dataset: LAI estimates generated from the USDA Environmental Policy Impact Climate (EPIC) model (a widely used, field-scale, biogeochemical model) on four forest complexes spanning three physiographic provinces in VA and NC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data depicts calculated and validated LAI estimates generated from the USDA Environmental Policy Impact Climate (EPIC) model (a widely used, field-scale,...

  11. Estimation of radioactive contamination of soils from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" technical areas of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, T; Belykh, E; Geras'kin, S; Majstrenko, T

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the long history of the research, radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan has not been adequately characterized. Our cartographic investigation has demonstrated highly variable radioactive contamination of the SNTS. The Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Am-241 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Balapan" site were 42.6-17646, 96-18250, 1.05-11222, 0.6-4865, 0.23-4893, and 1.2-1037 Bq kg(-1), correspondingly. Cs-137 and Sr-90 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Experimental field" site were varied from 87 up to 400 and from 94 up to 1000 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Activity concentrations of Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154 were lower than the minimum detectable activity of the method used. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (K-40, Ra-226, U-238, and Th-232) in the majority of soil samples from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites did not exceed typical for surrounding of the SNTS areas levels. Estimation of risks associated with radioactive contamination based on the IAEA clearance levels for a number of key radionuclides in solid materials shows that soils sampled from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites might be considered as radioactive wastes. Decrease in specific activity of soil from the sites studied up to safety levels due to Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154 radioactive decay and Am-241 accumulation-decay will occur not earlier than 100 years. In contrast, soils from the "Experimental field" and the "Balapan" sites (except 0.5-2.5 km distance from the "Chagan" explosion point) cannot be regarded as the radioactive wastes according safety norms valid in Russia and Kazakhstan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a model framework to estimate soil and soil organic carbon redistribution by water and tillage using 137Cs in two U.S. Midwest agricultural fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Claudia J.; Liu, Shuguang; Schumacher, Joseph A.; Schumacher, Thomas E.; Kaspar, Thomas C.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Napton, Darrell; Jaynes, Dan B.

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated lands in the U.S. Midwest have been affected by soil erosion, causing soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution in the landscape and other environmental and agricultural problems. The importance of SOC redistribution on soil productivity and crop yield, however, is still uncertain. In this study, we used a model framework, which includes the Unit Stream Power-based Erosion Deposition (USPED) and the Tillage Erosion Prediction (TEP) models, to understand the soil and SOC redistribution caused by water and tillage erosion in two agricultural fields in the U.S. Midwest. This model framework was evaluated for different digital elevation model (DEM) spatial resolutions (10-m, 24-m, 30-m, and 56-m) and topographic exponents (m = 1.0–1.6 and n = 1.0–1.3) using soil redistribution rates from 137Cs measurements. The results showed that the aggregated 24-m DEM, m = 1.4 and n = 1.0 for rill erosion, and m = 1.0 and n = 1.0 for sheet erosion, provided the best fit with the observation data at both sites. Moreover, estimated average SOC redistributions were 1.3 ± 9.8 g C m− 2 yr− 1 in field site 1 and 3.6 ± 14.3 g C m− 2 yr− 1 in field site 2. Spatial distribution patterns showed SOC loss (negative values) in the eroded areas and SOC gain (positive value) in the deposition areas. This study demonstrated the importance of the spatial resolution and the topographic exponents to estimate and map soil redistribution and the SOC dynamics throughout the landscape, helping to identify places where erosion and deposition from water and tillage are occurring at high rates. Additional research is needed to improve the application of the model framework for use in local and regional studies where rainfall erosivity and cover management factors vary. Therefore, using this model framework can help to improve the information about the spatial distribution of soil erosion across agricultural landscapes and to gain a better understanding of SOC

  13. Estimating Aboveground Forest Carbon Stock of Major Tropical Forest Land Uses Using Airborne Lidar and Field Measurement Data in Central Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, R. B.; Watanabe, M.; Motohka, T.; Shiraishi, T.; shimada, M.

    2013-12-01

    including rubber, acacia, oil palm, and coconut. To cover these variations of forest type, eight LiDAR transacts crossing 60 (1-ha size) field plots were acquired for calibrating the models. The field plots consisted of AFCS ranging from 4 - 161 Mg /ha. The calibrated LiDAR to AFCS general model enabled to predict the AFCS with R2 = 0.87 and root mean square errors (RMSE) = 17.4 Mg /ha. The specific AFCS models provided carbon estimates, varied by forest types, with R2 ranging from 0.72 - 0.97 and uncertainty (RMSE) ranging from 1.4 - 10.7 Mg /ha. Using these models, AFCS maps were prepared for the LiDAR coverage that provided AFCS estimates for 8,000 ha offering larger ground sampling measurements for calibration of SAR based carbon mapping model to wider region of Sumatra.

  14. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K.; Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F.

    1990-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV L , in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own

  15. Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus Extracts Effectively Inhibit BK Virus and JC Virus Infection of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human polyomaviruses BK (BKPyV and JC (JCPyV are ubiquitous pathogens long associated with severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis, whereas JCPyV is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. No effective therapies targeting these viruses are currently available. The goal of this study was to identify Chinese medicinal herbs with antiviral activity against BKPyV and JCPyV. We screened extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit hemagglutination by BKPyV and JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs and the ability to inhibit BKPyV and JCPyV binding and infection of host cells. Two of the 40 herbal extracts screened, Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus, had hemagglutination inhibition activity on BKPyV and JCPyV VLPs and further inhibited infection of the cells by BKPyV and JCPyV, as evidenced by reduced expression of viral proteins in BKPyV-infected and JCPyV-infected cells after treatment with Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma or Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus extract. The results in this work show that both Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus may be sources of potential antiviral compounds for treating BKPyV and JCPyV infections.

  16. Estimation of the level of anxiety in rats: differences in results of open-field test, elevated plus-maze test, and Vogel's conflict test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Bashkatova, V G

    2013-07-01

    We compared individual anxiety assessed by three standard tests, open-field test, elevated plus-maze test, and Vogel conflict drinking test, in the same animals. No significant correlations between the main anxiety parameters were found in these three experimental models. Groups of animals with high and low anxiety rats were formed by a single parameter and subsequent selection of two extreme groups (10%). It was found that none of the tests could be used for reliable estimation of individual anxiety in rats. The individual anxiety level with high degree of confidence was determined in high-anxiety and low-anxiety rats demonstrating behavioral parameters above and below the mean values in all tests used. Therefore, several tests should be used for evaluation of the individual anxiety or sensitivity to emotional stress.

  17. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, Brent; Gordon, Christopher L.; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E.; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children ≤10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences 0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 x 10 -4 mSv per Gy-cm 2 to 4.3 x 10 -3 mSv per Gy-cm 2 for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children ≤10 years at our institute is < 1 mSv. Estimations of effective dose associated with pediatric UGI examinations can be made for children up to the age of 10 using the DAP-normalized conversion factors provided in this study. These estimates can be further refined to reflect individual hospital examination protocols through the use of direct organ

  18. Fate and transport of furrow-applied granular tefluthrin and seed-coated clothianidin insecticides: Comparison of field-scale observations and model estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff Hartz, Kara E; Edwards, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    The transport of agricultural insecticides to water bodies may create risk of exposure to non-target organisms. Similarly, widespread use of furrow-applied and seed-coated insecticides may increase risk of exposure, yet accessible exposure models are not easily adapted for furrow application, and only a few examples of model validation of furrow-applied insecticides exist using actual field data. The goal of the current project was to apply an exposure model, the Pesticide in Water Calculator (PWC), to estimate the concentrations of two in-furrow insecticides applied to maize: the granular pyrethroid, tefluthrin, and the seed-coated neonicotinoid, clothianidin. The concentrations of tefluthrin and clothianidin in surface runoff water, sampled from a field in central Illinois (USA), were compared to the PWC modeled pesticide concentrations in surface runoff. The tefluthrin concentrations were used to optimize the application method in the PWC, and the addition of particulate matter and guttation droplets improved the models prediction of clothianidin concentrations. Next, the tefluthrin and clothianidin concentrations were calculated for a standard farm pond using both the optimized application method and the application methods provided in PWC. Estimated concentrations in a standard farm pond varied by a factor of 100 for tefluthrin and 50 for clothianidin depending on the application method used. The addition of guttation droplets and particulate matter to the model increased the annual clothianidin concentration in a standard farm pond by a factor of 1.5, which suggested that these transport routes should also be considered when assessing neonicotinoid exposure.

  19. Seasonal estimates of DOC standing stocks in Apalachicola Bay estuary: Towards a better understanding using field, ocean color and model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, E. J.; Joshi, I.; Osburn, C. L.; Bianchi, T. S.; Ko, D. S.; Oviedo-Vargas, D.; Arellano, A.; Ward, N.

    2016-12-01

    Apalachicola Bay, a semi-enclosed estuary located in Florida's panhandle, is well known for its water quality and oyster yields. We present the use of combined field and ocean color satellite observations and the outputs of a high-resolution hydrodynamic model to study the influence of physical processes on the distribution and the transport of terrestrially derived CDOM and DOC to shelf waters during the spring and fall of 2015. Determination of DOC stocks were based on the development of a CDOM algorithm (R2 = 0.87, N = 9) for the VIIRS ocean color sensor, and the assessment of CDOM - DOC relationships (R2 = 0.88, N = 13 in March; R2 = 0.83, N = 24 in November) for the Apalachicola Bay. Satellite-derived CDOM and DOC maps together with model-based salinity distributions revealed their spatial extent, sources and transport to the shelf water. Furthermore, strong seasonal influence on DOM distribution in the bay was associated with inputs from Apalachicola and Carrabelle Rivers and the surrounding marshes. Estimates of DOC standing stocks in the bay obtained using ocean color data and high-resolution bathymetry showed relatively higher stocks in November ( 3.71 × 106 kg C, 560 km2) than in March ( 4.07 × 106 kg C, 560 km2) despite lower river discharge in dry season. Results of DOC flux estimates from the bay to coastal waters will also be presented.

  20. A technique for estimating the probability of radiation-stimulated failures of integrated microcircuits in low-intensity radiation fields: Application to the Spektr-R spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V. D.; Khamidullina, N. M.

    2006-10-01

    In developing radio-electronic devices (RED) of spacecraft operating in the fields of ionizing radiation in space, one of the most important problems is the correct estimation of their radiation tolerance. The “weakest link” in the element base of onboard microelectronic devices under radiation effect is the integrated microcircuits (IMC), especially of large scale (LSI) and very large scale (VLSI) degree of integration. The main characteristic of IMC, which is taken into account when making decisions on using some particular type of IMC in the onboard RED, is the probability of non-failure operation (NFO) at the end of the spacecraft’s lifetime. It should be noted that, until now, the NFO has been calculated only from the reliability characteristics, disregarding the radiation effect. This paper presents the so-called “reliability” approach to determination of radiation tolerance of IMC, which allows one to estimate the probability of non-failure operation of various types of IMC with due account of radiation-stimulated dose failures. The described technique is applied to RED onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft to be launched in 2007.

  1. Field estimates of groundwater circulation depths in two mountainous watersheds in the western U.S. and the effect of deep circulation on solute concentrations in streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Tolley, Douglas G.; Wilson, John L.

    2017-04-01

    Estimates of groundwater circulation depths based on field data are lacking. These data are critical to inform and refine hydrogeologic models of mountainous watersheds, and to quantify depth and time dependencies of weathering processes in watersheds. Here we test two competing hypotheses on the role of geology and geologic setting in deep groundwater circulation and the role of deep groundwater in the geochemical evolution of streams and springs. We test these hypotheses in two mountainous watersheds that have distinctly different geologic settings (one crystalline, metamorphic bedrock and the other volcanic bedrock). Estimated circulation depths for springs in both watersheds range from 0.6 to 1.6 km and may be as great as 2.5 km. These estimated groundwater circulation depths are much deeper than commonly modeled depths suggesting that we may be forcing groundwater flow paths too shallow in models. In addition, the spatial relationships of groundwater circulation depths are different between the two watersheds. Groundwater circulation depths in the crystalline bedrock watershed increase with decreasing elevation indicative of topography-driven groundwater flow. This relationship is not present in the volcanic bedrock watershed suggesting that both the source of fracturing (tectonic versus volcanic) and increased primary porosity in the volcanic bedrock play a role in deep groundwater circulation. The results from the crystalline bedrock watershed also indicate that relatively deep groundwater circulation can occur at local scales in headwater drainages less than 9.0 km2 and at larger fractions than commonly perceived. Deep groundwater is a primary control on streamflow processes and solute concentrations in both watersheds.

  2. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emigh, Brent; Gordon, Christopher L; Connolly, Bairbre L; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E

    2013-09-01

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children ≤10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences  0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 ×10(-4) mSv per Gy-cm(2) to 4.3 × 10(-3) mSv per Gy-cm(2) for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children ≤10 years at our institute is MOSFETs, which were shown to agree with Monte Carlo simulated doses.

  3. Estimation of lower-bound KJc on pressure vessel steels from invalid data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCable, D.E.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical methods are currently being introduced into the transition temperature characterization of ferritic steels. Objective is to replace imprecise correlations between empirical impact test methods and universal K Ic or K Ia lower-bound curves with direct use of material-specific fracture mechanics data. This paper introduces a computational procedure that couples order statistics, weakest-link statistical theory, and a constraint model to arrive at estimates of lower-bound K Jc values. All of the above concepts have been used before to meet various objectives. In the present case, scheme is to make a best estimate of lower-bound fracture toughness when resource K Jc data are too few to use conventional statistical analyses. Utility of the procedure is of greatest value in the middle-to-high toughness part of the transition range where specimen constraint loss and elevated lower-bound toughness interfere with conventional statistical analysis methods

  4. Recent geomagnetic secular variation from Swarm and ground observatories as estimated in the CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    We use more than 2 years of magnetic data from the Swarm mission, and monthly means from 160 ground observatories as available in March 2016, to update the CHAOS time-dependent geomagnetic field model. The new model, CHAOS-6, provides information on time variations of the core-generated part......, jets at low latitudes, for example close to 40 degrees W, that may be responsible for localized SA oscillations. In addition to scalar data from Orsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and Swarm, and vector data from Orsted, CHAMP and Swarm, CHAOS-6 benefits from the inclusion of along-track differences of scalar...... and vector field data from both CHAMP and the three Swarm satellites, as well as east-west differences between the lower pair of Swarm satellites, Alpha and Charlie. Moreover, ground observatory SV estimates are fit to a Huber-weighted rms level of 3.1 nT/year for the eastward components and 3.8 and 3.7 n...

  5. Data quality and practical challenges of thyroid volume assessment by ultrasound under field conditions - observer errors may affect prevalence estimates of goitre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torheim Liv E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultrasonographic estimation of thyroid size has been advocated as being more precise than palpation to diagnose goitre. However, ultrasound also requires technical proficiency. This study was conducted among Saharawi refugees, where goitre is highly prevalent. The objectives were to assess the overall data quality of ultrasound measurements of thyroid volume (Tvol, including the intra- and inter-observer agreement, under field conditions, and to describe some of the practical challenges encountered. Methods In 2007 a cross-sectional study of 419 children (6-14 years old and 405 women (15-45 years old was performed on a population of Saharawi refugees with prevalent goitre, who reside in the Algerian desert. Tvol was measured by two trained fieldworkers using portable ultrasound equipment (examiner 1 measured 406 individuals, and examiner 2, 418 individuals. Intra- and inter-observer agreement was estimated in 12 children selected from the study population but not part of the main study. In the main study, an observer error was found in one examiner whose ultrasound images were corrected by linear regression after printing and remeasuring a sample of 272 images. Results The intra-observer agreement in Tvol was higher in examiner 1, with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.99 compared to 0.86 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.96 in examiner 2. The ICC for inter-observer agreement in Tvol was 0.38 (95% CI: -0.20, 0.77. Linear regression coefficients indicated a significant scaling bias in the original measurements of the AP and ML diameter and a systematic underestimation of Tvol (a product of AP, ML, CC and a constant. The agreement between re-measured and original Tvol measured by ICC (95% CI was 0.76 (0.71, 0.81. The agreement between re-measured and corrected Tvol measured by ICC (95% CI was 0.97 (0.96, 0.97. Conclusions An important challenge when using ultrasound to assess thyroid volume under field

  6. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters in the field by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-01-01

    An integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach was used to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data collected at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field. The GPR model combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propaga- tion in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. The hydrological simu- lator HYDRUS-1D was used with a two layer single- and dual-porosity model. The radar model was coupled to the hydrodynamic model, such that the soil electrical properties (permitivity and conductivity) that serve as input to the GPR model become a function of the hydrodynamic model output (water content), thereby permiting estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters from the GPR data in an inversion loop. To monitor the soil water con- tent dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. Significant effects of water dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR data and in particular precipitation and evaporation events were clearly visible. The dual porosity model provided betier results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is sup- ported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agree- ment with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and moni- toring water dynamics at the field scale. © Soil Science Society of America.

  7. State-Space Dynamic Model for Estimation of Radon Entry Rate, based on Kalman Filtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Marek; Jílek, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2007), s. 285-297 ISSN 0265-931X Grant - others:GA SÚJB JC_11/2006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : air ventilation rate * radon entry rate * state-space modeling * extended Kalman filter * maximum likelihood estimation * prediction error decomposition Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2007

  8. Small field depth dose profile of 6 MV photon beam in a simple air-water heterogeneity combination: A comparison between anisotropic analytical algorithm dose estimation with thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Ram, Chhape; Mourya, Ankur; Singh, Navin

    2017-01-01

    To establish trends of estimation error of dose calculation by anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) with respect to dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in air-water heterogeneity for small field size photon. TLDs were irradiated along the central axis of the photon beam in four different solid water phantom geometries using three small field size single beams. The depth dose profiles were estimated using AAA calculation model for each field sizes. The estimated and measured depth dose profiles were compared. The over estimation (OE) within air cavity were dependent on field size (f) and distance (x) from solid water-air interface and formulated as OE = - (0.63 f + 9.40) x2+ (-2.73 f + 58.11) x + (0.06 f2 - 1.42 f + 15.67). In postcavity adjacent point and distal points from the interface have dependence on field size (f) and equations are OE = 0.42 f2 - 8.17 f + 71.63, OE = 0.84 f2 - 1.56 f + 17.57, respectively. The trend of estimation error of AAA dose calculation algorithm with respect to measured value have been formulated throughout the radiation path length along the central axis of 6 MV photon beam in air-water heterogeneity combination for small field size photon beam generated from a 6 MV linear accelerator.

  9. New constraints on the structure of Hess Deep from regional- and micro-bathymetry data acquired during RRS James Cook in Jan-Feb 2008 (JC021)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillington, D. J.; Ferrini, V. L.; MacLeod, C. J.; Teagle, D. A.; Gillis, K. M.; Cazenave, P. W.; Hurst, S. D.; Scientific Party, J.

    2008-12-01

    In January-February 2008, new geophysical and geological data were acquired in Hess Deep using the RRS James Cook and the British ROV Isis. Hess Deep provides a tectonic window into oceanic crust emplaced by fast seafloor spreading at the East Pacific Rise, thereby offering the opportunity to test competing hypotheses for oceanic crustal accretion. The goal of this cruise was to collect datasets that can constrain the structure and composition of the lower crustal section exposed in the south-facing slope of the Intrarift Ridge just north of the Deep, and thus provide insights into the emplacement of gabbroic lower crust at fast spreading rates. Additionally, the acquired datasets provide site survey data for IODP Proposal 551-Full. The following datasets were acquired during JC021: 1) regional multibeam bathymetry survey complemented with sub-bottom profiler (SBP) data (in selected areas), 2) two micro-bathymetry surveys, and 3) seafloor rock samples acquired with an ROV. Here we present grids of regional multibeam and microbathymetry data following post-cruise processing. Regional multibeam bathymetry were acquired using the hull-mounted Kongsberg Simrad EM120 system (12 kHz). These data provide new coverage of the northern flank of the rift as far east as 100°W, which show that it comprises of a series of 50- to 100-km-long en echelon segments. Both E-W and NE-SW striking features are observed in the immediate vicinity of the Deep, including in a newly covered region to the SW of the rift tip. Such features might arise due to the rotation of the Galapagos microplate(s), as proposed by other authors. The ROV Isis acquired micro-bathymetry data in two areas using a Simrad SM2000 (200 kHz) multibeam sonar. Data were acquired at a nominal altitude of ~100 m and speed of 0.3 kts to facilitate high-resolution mapping of seabed features and also permit coverage of two relatively large areas. Swath widths were ~200- 350 m depending on noise and seabed characteristics

  10. Alimentación de Chirostoma humboldtianum (Valenciennes; (Pisces: atherinopsidae en el estanque JC en Soyaniquilpan, Estado de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Elías Fernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Los charales son peces endémicos del centro de México que han sido consumidos desde épocas prehispánicas, en la actualidad, el volumen de su captura ha disminuido por diversos motivos como la sobrepesca y la contaminación del hábitat, por lo cual es muy importante estudiar las poblaciones que quedan para conocer sus requerimientos ecológicos y alimenticios y poder plantear alternativas para su conservación. Por lo anterior, los objetivos de este trabajo fueron: determinar los grupos alimenticios que consume Chirostoma humboldtianum en el estanque JC en Soyaniquilpan, Estado de México y la variación de algunos parámetros físicos y químicos del agua. Se realizaron seis muestreos mensuales de diciembre de 2001 a mayo de 2002. Se registró la temperatura, la profundidad, la transparencia, la conductividad, la turbiedad, el pH, el oxígeno disuelto, la dureza y la alcalinidad. Los peces se capturaron con un chinchorro de 25 metros de longitud y 8 mm de abertura y fueron fijados con formalina al 10 %. El contenido alimenticio fue identificado con claves especializadas. Para determinar el porcentaje de los grupos alimenticios se utilizó el método volumétrico y de frecuencias. Se encontró que el agua es templada, turbia, con regular cantidad de oxígeno disuelto, de dureza moderada. Chirostoma humboldtianum consumió 21 tipos de organismos, destacando Keratella, Trichocerca, Asplanchna, Bosmina, además de copépodos, coríxidos y quironómidos. El método de frecuencias mostró a Cyclops y Keratella como el alimento preferencial.

  11. A Field Evaluation of the Time-of-Detection Method to Estimate Population Size and Density for Aural Avian Point Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew W. Alldredge

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The time-of-detection method for aural avian point counts is a new method of estimating abundance, allowing for uncertain probability of detection. The method has been specifically designed to allow for variation in singing rates of birds. It involves dividing the time interval of the point count into several subintervals and recording the detection history of the subintervals when each bird sings. The method can be viewed as generating data equivalent to closed capture-recapture information. The method is different from the distance and multiple-observer methods in that it is not required that all the birds sing during the point count. As this method is new and there is some concern as to how well individual birds can be followed, we carried out a field test of the method using simulated known populations of singing birds, using a laptop computer to send signals to audio stations distributed around a point. The system mimics actual aural avian point counts, but also allows us to know the size and spatial distribution of the populations we are sampling. Fifty 8-min point counts (broken into four 2-min intervals using eight species of birds were simulated. Singing rate of an individual bird of a species was simulated following a Markovian process (singing bouts followed by periods of silence, which we felt was more realistic than a truly random process. The main emphasis of our paper is to compare results from species singing at (high and low homogenous rates per interval with those singing at (high and low heterogeneous rates. Population size was estimated accurately for the species simulated, with a high homogeneous probability of singing. Populations of simulated species with lower but homogeneous singing probabilities were somewhat underestimated. Populations of species simulated with heterogeneous singing probabilities were substantially underestimated. Underestimation was caused by both the very low detection probabilities of all distant

  12. Effects of malathion on the insect succession and the development of Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in the field and implications for estimating postmortem interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Wei, Shi; Xiao-Shan, Liu; Hai-Yang, Wang; Run-Jie, Zhang

    2010-03-01

    A field study on the effects of malathion on insect succession and the development of carrion flies on corpses, and its quantitative determination from the larvae on decomposing rabbit carrion was conducted. The rabbits were treated with malathion at concentrations of lethal, half-lethal and fourth-lethal doses. Malathion altered decomposition rates and species diversity: Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) was the most abundant adult species in all the experiments; third instar larvae of Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) were not found on the toxic carcasses but were collected from the control; the appearance of beetles on the treated carcass was later by 1 to 3 days than on the control carcass. Development rate of the dominated species C. megacephala larvae and pupae was observed. Stepwise increases in the period of larval development, the maximum length of larvae, and weight of pupae were observed with increasing malathion concentrations. However, there was no significant difference in the duration of the pupal stage. The differences in development rate were sufficient to alter postmortem interval estimates based on larval development by 12 to 36 hours. The time of finding fresh pupae from the fourth-lethal carcass was 12 hours later than the control. Accumulations of the pesticide in larvae were observed, but no correlations were found between larvae concentrations and the initial quantity administered to rabbits.In conclusion, it is necessary to consider the effects of malathion present in decomposing bodies when estimating the postmortem interval based on entomological evidence. The results of this study have more practical implications for forensic investigations because it is under natural conditions.

  13. Improving snow density estimation for mapping SWE with Lidar snow depth: assessment of uncertainty in modeled density and field sampling strategies in NASA SnowEx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Smyth, E.; Small, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial distribution of snow water equivalent (SWE) is not sufficiently monitored with either remotely sensed or ground-based observations for water resources management. Recent applications of airborne Lidar have yielded basin-wide mapping of SWE when combined with a snow density model. However, in the absence of snow density observations, the uncertainty in these SWE maps is dominated by uncertainty in modeled snow density rather than in Lidar measurement of snow depth. Available observations tend to have a bias in physiographic regime (e.g., flat open areas) and are often insufficient in number to support testing of models across a range of conditions. Thus, there is a need for targeted sampling strategies and controlled model experiments to understand where and why different snow density models diverge. This will enable identification of robust model structures that represent dominant processes controlling snow densification, in support of basin-scale estimation of SWE with remotely-sensed snow depth datasets. The NASA SnowEx mission is a unique opportunity to evaluate sampling strategies of snow density and to quantify and reduce uncertainty in modeled snow density. In this presentation, we present initial field data analyses and modeling results over the Colorado SnowEx domain in the 2016-2017 winter campaign. We detail a framework for spatially mapping the uncertainty in snowpack density, as represented across multiple models. Leveraging the modular SUMMA model, we construct a series of physically-based models to assess systematically the importance of specific process representations to snow density estimates. We will show how models and snow pit observations characterize snow density variations with forest cover in the SnowEx domains. Finally, we will use the spatial maps of density uncertainty to evaluate the selected locations of snow pits, thereby assessing the adequacy of the sampling strategy for targeting uncertainty in modeled snow density.

  14. Automatic Estimation of Volumetric Breast Density Using Artificial Neural Network-Based Calibration of Full-Field Digital Mammography: Feasibility on Japanese Women With and Without Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Baba, Motoi; Cui, Yi; Li, Ruijiang; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer among women and its incidence is increasing. Risk assessment is valuable and recent methods are incorporating novel biomarkers such as mammographic density. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are adaptive algorithms capable of performing pattern-to-pattern learning and are well suited for medical applications. They are potentially useful for calibrating full-field digital mammography (FFDM) for quantitative analysis. This study uses ANN modeling to estimate volumetric breast density (VBD) from FFDM on Japanese women with and without breast cancer. ANN calibration of VBD was performed using phantom data for one FFDM system. Mammograms of 46 Japanese women diagnosed with invasive carcinoma and 53 with negative findings were anal