WorldWideScience

Sample records for field deployable gamma

  1. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  2. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER(trademark), which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack(trademark) that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  3. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of 3 He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors

  4. Miniature field deployable terahertz source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Mark G.

    2006-05-01

    Developments in terahertz sources include compacted electron beam systems, optical mixing techniques, and multiplication of microwave frequencies. Although significant advances in THz science have been achieved, efforts continue to obtain source technologies that are more mobile and suitable for field deployment. Strategies in source development have approached generation from either end of the THz spectrum, from up-conversion of high-frequency microwave to down-conversion of optical frequencies. In this paper, we present the design of a THz source which employs an up-conversion method in an assembly that integrates power supply, electronics, and radiative component into a man-portable unit for situations in which a lab system is not feasible. This unit will ultimately evolve into a ruggedized package suitable for use in extreme conditions, e.g. temporary security check points or emergency response teams, in conditions where THz diagnostics are needed with minimal planning or logistical support. In order to meet design goals of reduced size and complexity, the inner workings of the unit ideally would be condensed into a monolithic active element, with ancillary systems, e.g. user interface and power, coupled to the element. To attain these goals, the fundamental component of our design is a THz source and lens array that may be fabricated with either printed circuit board or wafer substrate. To reduce the volume occupied by the source array, the design employs a metamaterial composed of a periodic lattice of resonant elements. Each resonant element is an LC oscillator, or tank circuit, with inductance, capacitance, and center frequency determined by dimensioning and material parameters. The source array and supporting electronics are designed so that the radiative elements are driven in-phase to yield THz radiation with a high degree of partial coherence. Simulation indicates that the spectral width of operation may be controlled by detuning of critical dimensions

  5. Networked gamma radiation detection system for tactical deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Smith, Ethan; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    A networked gamma radiation detection system with directional sensitivity and energy spectral data acquisition capability is being developed by the National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory to support the close and intense tactical engagement of law enforcement who carry out counterterrorism missions. In the proposed design, three clusters of 2″ × 4″ × 16″ sodium iodide crystals (4 each) with digiBASE-E (for list mode data collection) would be placed on the passenger side of a minivan. To enhance localization and facilitate rapid identification of isotopes, advanced smart real-time localization and radioisotope identification algorithms like WAVRAD (wavelet-assisted variance reduction for anomaly detection) and NSCRAD (nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection) will be incorporated. We will test a collection of algorithms and analysis that centers on the problem of radiation detection with a distributed sensor network. We will study the basic characteristics of a radiation sensor network and focus on the trade-offs between false positive alarm rates, true positive alarm rates, and time to detect multiple radiation sources in a large area. Empirical and simulation analyses of critical system parameters, such as number of sensors, sensor placement, and sensor response functions, will be examined. This networked system will provide an integrated radiation detection architecture and framework with (i) a large nationally recognized search database equivalent that would help generate a common operational picture in a major radiological crisis; (ii) a robust reach back connectivity for search data to be evaluated by home teams; and, finally, (iii) a possibility of integrating search data from multi-agency responders.

  6. Characterizing gamma fields using isomeric activation ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Ramkumar; Fleming, Ronald F.

    1994-12-01

    Isomeric activities were induced in indium by gamma irradiation in three different gamma fields, through the reactions 115In(γ, γ') 115mIn and 113In(γ, γ') 113mIn. The irradiation fields were (i) the 15 kCi 60Co source available in the University, (ii) the spent fuel gamma irradiator in the pool of the University's Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) and (iii) south face of the core of the FNR during routine shut downs. Isomeric activation ratios can serve to characterize gamma fields, provided the response functions of the two (γ, γ') reactions sample different energy regimes of the gamma spectrum present in the irradiation fields. The response of an isomeric activation detector, in turn, depends on the number of activation energy levels of the nuclide and the probabilities with which the activation levels de-populate to the isomeric level. The reaction rate ratio RIn115m/ RIn113m was measured in the three gamma fields. The measured ratios were (i) 1.210 ± 0.011 in the 60Co source, (ii) 1.314 ± 0.060 in the spent fuel gamma irradiator and (iii) 1.298 ± 0.039 in a location alongside the FNR core during routine shut downs. The measured reaction rate ratios are not only close to each other, but close to unity as well. This indicates that the excitation functions for the reactions 115In(γ, γ') 115mIn and 113In(γ, γ') 113mIn have similar shapes and that for the nuclides 115In and 113In, the number of activation energy levels and the probabilities with which they populate the isomeric levels are very similar to each other. Thus, the ratio RIn115m/ RIn113m will not yield any information regarding the shape of gamma spectrum in the field of measurement. However by choosing (γ, γ') reactions with different shapes for the excitation functions one can measure a set of isomeric activation ratios that characterize a given gamma field.

  7. A Portable, Field-Deployable Analyzer for Isotopic Water Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Gupta, M.; Huang, Y. W.; Lacelle, D.; McKay, C. P.; Fortson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have for many years been used to study the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate among other applications. Typically, discrete water samples are collected and transported to a laboratory for isotope analysis. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have generally been limited in scope and time-resolution. Field sampling of water isotopes has been shown in recent years to provide dense data sets with the increased time resolution illuminating substantially greater short term variability than is generally observed during discrete sampling. A truly portable instrument also opens the possibility to utilize the instrument as a tool for identifying which water samples would be particularly interesting for further laboratory investigation. To make possible such field measurements of liquid water isotopes, Los Gatos Research has developed a miniaturized, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer. The prototype miniature liquid water isotope analyzer (mini-LWIA) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology in a rugged, Pelican case housing for easy transport and field operations. The analyzer simultaneously measures both δ2H and δ18O from liquid water, with both manual and automatic water introduction options. The laboratory precision for δ2H is 0.6 ‰, and for δ18O is 0.3 ‰. The mini-LWIA was deployed in the high Arctic during the summer of 2015 at Inuvik in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Samples were collected from Sachs Harbor, on the southwest coast of Banks Island, including buried basal ice from the Lurentide Ice Sheet, some ice wedges, and other types of ground ice. Methodology and water analysis results from this extreme field deployment will be presented.

  8. A programmable autosampler for a field deployable tritium analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Cable, P.R.; Beals, D.M.; Jones, J.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in the Environmental Technology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center, in cooperation with Sampling Systems, Inc. are developing a fully programmable, remotely operated, fixed volume, automatic sampler for use with the field deployable tritium analysis system currently under development at U. of GA's Center for Applied Isotope Studies. The sampler will collect a limited-volume sample and perform on-line sample purification for tritium analyses from multiple collection sites. Pneumatically operated stainless steel samplers operate satisfactorily upon remote activation. The one-step purification system removes all impurities with interfere with tritium analysis by liquid scintillation. Field testing has confirmed system operation. The autosampler may act as a stand-alone device and is enclosed in a rugged, field-portable case with wheels. The system weighs about 40 lbs

  9. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  10. Radiation breeding researches in gamma field. Results of researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract of radiation breeding researches and outline of gamma field in IRB (Institute of Radiation Breeding) are described. The gamma field is a circular field of 100 m radius with 88.8TBqCo-60 source at the center. The field is surrounded by a shielding dike of 8 m in height. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growing plants, mutant by gamma radiation and plant molecular biological researches using mutant varieties obtained by the gamma field are explained. For examples, Japanese pear, chrysanthemum, Cytisus, Eustoma grandiflorum, Manila grass, tea and rose are reported. The mutant varieties in the gamma field, nine mutant varieties of flower colors in chrysanthemum, evergreen mutant lines in Manila grass, selection of self-compatible mutants in tea plant, and the plants of the gamma field recently are shown. (S.Y.)

  11. Shielding of gamma field in residential houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smejkal, Z; Pavlata, M [Univ. Pardubice, (Czech Republic); Pokorna, I; Urban, M [Institute of CO CR, 53341 Lazne Bohdanec (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    In the past some flats were built from defective materials contained uranium-238, which radiate dangerous gamma radiation. The object of this work consisted in searching mechanical barriers, which would decrease penetrating of this radiation into a flat. The measurement was realized in system made of connecting of Ge/Li detector with multichannel analyser MCA JAK 202 and IBM PC. Plenty of building parts such as bricks, plaster slabs with/without lead dust, wasted plaster from Pocerady Electric Power Station (EPS), etc., were measured to get and compare shading abilities. Maximal intensity of gamma radiation (47.1%) is visible for energy E=609 keV radium-226, therefore the measurement was only carried out for this energy. The measurement performed in defective houses start during years 1988-1991 demonstrated that excepting higher activity radon-222 and its daughter products forms uneligible gamma field, as well. This is limited by values of rate dose equivalent. The problem was successfully solved by lead slabs fixed to wood construction that is covered by applications. The manipulation with materials and construction was difficult, therefore another materials and segments were tested, for more easy fix to defective walls. In 1995 the experiment was realised in the cooperation with the chemical department of Pocerady EPS, the plaster is outlet product from the removing sulphur process. There were made an experimental slabs, sizes 18 x 18 x 2 cm. The barrier effect of slabs were compared with other building material and parts. So that the elimination of radiation would be effective is necessary reduce the level of radiation penetrating to the smallest level. However, the the thickness of shading material is limited by economical reasons, prices of material, square weighting and reducing of living room. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Shielding of gamma field in residential houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smejkal, Z.; Pavlata, M.; Pokorna, I.; Urban, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the past some flats were built from defective materials contained uranium-238, which radiate dangerous gamma radiation. The object of this work consisted in searching mechanical barriers, which would decrease penetrating of this radiation into a flat. The measurement was realized in system made of connecting of Ge/Li detector with multichannel analyser MCA JAK 202 and IBM PC. Plenty of building parts such as bricks, plaster slabs with/without lead dust, wasted plaster from Pocerady Electric Power Station (EPS), etc., were measured to get and compare shading abilities. Maximal intensity of gamma radiation (47.1%) is visible for energy E=609 keV radium-226, therefore the measurement was only carried out for this energy. The measurement performed in defective houses start during years 1988-1991 demonstrated that excepting higher activity radon-222 and its daughter products forms uneligible gamma field, as well. This is limited by values of rate dose equivalent. The problem was successfully solved by lead slabs fixed to wood construction that is covered by applications. The manipulation with materials and construction was difficult, therefore another materials and segments were tested, for more easy fix to defective walls. In 1995 the experiment was realised in the cooperation with the chemical department of Pocerady EPS, the plaster is outlet product from the removing sulphur process. There were made an experimental slabs, sizes 18 x 18 x 2 cm. The barrier effect of slabs were compared with other building material and parts. So that the elimination of radiation would be effective is necessary reduce the level of radiation penetrating to the smallest level. However, the the thickness of shading material is limited by economical reasons, prices of material, square weighting and reducing of living room. The results of measuring is this one: the plaster slabs with lead dust made in EPS Pocerady are suitable to reduce gamma ray, the values of reducing coefficient are

  13. A method to describe inelastic gamma field distribution in neutron gamma density logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Quanying; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Xinguang; Wu, He; Jia, Wenbao; Ti, Yongzhou; Qiu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2017-11-01

    Pulsed neutron gamma density logging (NGD) is of great significance for radioprotection and density measurement in LWD, however, the current methods have difficulty in quantitative calculation and single factor analysis for the inelastic gamma field distribution. In order to clarify the NGD mechanism, a new method is developed to describe the inelastic gamma field distribution. Based on the fast-neutron scattering and gamma attenuation, the inelastic gamma field distribution is characterized by the inelastic scattering cross section, fast-neutron scattering free path, formation density and other parameters. And the contribution of formation parameters on the field distribution is quantitatively analyzed. The results shows the contribution of density attenuation is opposite to that of inelastic scattering cross section and fast-neutron scattering free path. And as the detector-spacing increases, the density attenuation gradually plays a dominant role in the gamma field distribution, which means large detector-spacing is more favorable for the density measurement. Besides, the relationship of density sensitivity and detector spacing was studied according to this gamma field distribution, therefore, the spacing of near and far gamma ray detector is determined. The research provides theoretical guidance for the tool parameter design and density determination of pulsed neutron gamma density logging technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-frequency field-deployable isotope analyzer for hydrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena S.F. Berman; Manish Gupta; Chris Gabrielli; Tina Garland; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    A high-frequency, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer was developed. The instrument was deployed for 4 contiguous weeks in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest Long-term Ecological Research site in western Oregon, where it was used for real-time measurement of the isotope ratios of precipitation and stream water during three large storm events. We were able...

  15. Borosilicate glass for gamma irradiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydogan, N.; Tugrul, A. B.

    2012-11-01

    Four different types of silicate glass specimens were irradiated with gamma radiation using a Co-60 radioisotope. Glass specimens, with four different chemical compositions, were exposed to neutron and mixed neutron/gamma doses in the central thimble and tangential beam tube of the nuclear research reactor. Optical variations were determined in accordance with standardisation concept. Changes in the direct solar absorbance (αe) of borosilicate glass were examined using the increase in gamma absorbed dose, and results were compared with the changes in the direct solar absorbance of the three different type silicate glass specimens. Solar absorption decreased due to decrease of penetration with absorbed dose. αe of borosilicate increased considerably when compared with other glass types. Changes in optical density were evaluated as an approach to create dose estimation. Mixed/thermal neutron irradiation on glass caused to increse αe.

  16. Persistent Identifiers for Field Deployments: A Missing Link in the Provenance Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R. A.; Ji, P.; Fils, D.; Shepherd, A.; Chandler, C. L.; Lehnert, K.

    2016-12-01

    Research in the geosciences is characterized by a wide range of complex and costly field deployments including oceanographic cruises, submersible dives, drilling expeditions, seismic networks, geodetic campaigns, moored arrays, aircraft flights, and satellite missions. Each deployment typically produces a mix of sensor and sample data, spanning a period from hours to decades, that ultimately yields a long tail of post-field products and publications. Publishing persistent, citable identifiers for field deployments will facilitate 1) preservation and reuse of the original field data, 2) reproducibility of the resulting publications, and 3) recognition for both the facilities that operate the platforms and the investigators who secure funding for the experiments. In the ocean domain, sharing unique identifiers for field deployments is a familiar practice. For example, the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) routinely links datasets to cruise identifiers published by the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program. In recent years, facilities have started to publish formal/persistent identifiers, typically Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), for field deployments including seismic networks, oceanographic cruises, and moored arrays. For example, the EarthChem Library (ECL) publishes a DOI for each dataset which, if it derived from an oceanographic research cruise on a US vessel, is linked to a DOI for the cruise published by R2R. Work is underway to create similar links for the IODP JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) and the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO). We present results and lessons learned including a draft schema for publishing field deployments as DataCite DOI records; current practice for linking these DOIs with related identifiers such as Open Researcher and Contributor IDs (ORCIDs), Open Funder Registry (OFR) codes, and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs); and consideration of other

  17. Recent achievements in the field of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tan; Dai Zigao

    2001-01-01

    Recent progresses in the field of gamma-ray bursts is briefly introduced. Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosion since the Big Bang of the universe. Within a few tens of seconds, the energy released in gamma-ray bursts could be several hundred times larger than that released form the sun in its whole life (about 10 billion years). The authors will first briefly discuss the observational facts, based on which the authors will discuss the standard fireball model, the dynamical behavior and evolution of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. Then, various observational phenomena that contradict the standard model are given and the importance of these post-standard effects are pointed out. The questions related to the energy source of gamma-ray bursts are still unanswered, and other important questions also remain to be solved

  18. Field Applications of Gamma Column Scanning Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Denis D.; Mallilin, Janice P.; Nuñez, Ivy Angelica A.; Bulos, Adelina DM.

    2015-01-01

    The Isotope Techniques Section (ITS) under the Nuclear Service Division (NSD) of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) conducts services, research and development on radioisotope and sealed source application in the industry. This aims to benefit the manufacturing industries such as petroleum, petrochemical, chemical, energy, waste, column treatment plant, etc. through on line inspection and troubleshooting of a process vessel, column or pipe that could optimize the process operation and increase production efficiency. One of the most common sealed source techniques for industrial applications is the gamma column scanning technology. Gamma column scanning technology is an established technique for inspection, analysis and diagnosis of industrial columns for process optimization, solving operational malfunctions and management of resources. It is a convenient non-intrusive, cost effective and cost-efficient technique to examine inner details of an industrial process vessel such as a distillation column while it is in operation. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) recognize the importance and benefits of this technology and has implemented activities to make gamma column scanning locally available to benefit the Philippine industries. Continuous effort for capacity building is being pursued thru the implementation of in-house and on-the-job training abroad and upgrading of equipment. (author)

  19. Estimation of photon energy distribution in gamma calibration field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shimizu, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1997-03-01

    Photon survey instruments used for radiation protection are usually calibrated at gamma radiation fields, which are traceable to the national standard with regard to exposure. Whereas scattered radiations as well as primary gamma-rays exit in the calibration field, no consideration for the effect of the scattered radiations on energy distribution is given in routine calibration works. The scattered radiations can change photon energy spectra in the field, and this can result in misinterpretations of energy-dependent instrument responses. Construction materials in the field affect the energy distribution and magnitude of the scattered radiations. The geometric relationship between a gamma source and an instrument can determine the energy distribution at the calibration point. Therefore, it is essential for the assurance of quality calibration to estimate the energy spectra at the gamma calibration fields. Then, photon energy distributions at some fields in the Facility of Radiation Standard of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were estimated by measurements using a NaI(Tl) detector and Monte Carlo calculations. It was found that the use of collimator gives a different feature in photon energy distribution. The origin of scattered radiations and the ratio of the scattered radiations to the primary gamma-rays were obtained. The results can help to improve the calibration of photon survey instruments in the JAERI. (author)

  20. Telecommunications in Israeli field hospitals deployed to three crisis zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Levy, Gadi; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2014-10-01

    A field hospital overseas requires various types of communication equipment. This study presents the communications equipment used by three Israeli field hospital delegations to earthquake sites at Adapazari, Turkey, in 1999, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in 2010 and Minamisanriku, Japan, in 2011. The delegations to Turkey and Haiti were relatively large (105-230 personnel) and were on the site early (three to four days after each event). The 55-person delegation to Japan arrived later and was established as an outpatient community hospital. Standard military VHF radios were the only effective tool up to 5 km, until cellular coverage was regained (1-2 weeks after each event). International communication was good. While short-wave communication (telephone and Internet) was used in Turkey, a direct satellite channel was set up in Haiti. In Japan, BGAN Inmarsat provided efficient Wi-Fi for all needs. Motorola walkie talkies were not efficient beyond the immediate vicinity. This paper recommends continued use of military-specification equipment alongside newer modalities, particularly in situations where infrastructure is damaged. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  1. Field Deployable Method for Arsenic Speciation in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice, Thomas C; Flores Del Pino, Lisveth V; Havezov, Ivan; Long, David T

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water supplies by arsenic is a world-wide problem. Total arsenic measurements are commonly used to investigate and regulate arsenic in water, but it is well understood that arsenic occurs in several chemical forms, and these exhibit different toxicities. It is problematic to use laboratory-based speciation techniques to assess exposure as it has been suggested that the distribution of species is not stable during transport in some types of samples. A method was developed in this study for the on-site speciation of the most toxic dissolved arsenic species: As (III), As (V), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA). Development criteria included ease of use under field conditions, applicable at levels of concern for drinking water, and analytical performance.The approach is based on selective retention of arsenic species on specific ion-exchange chromatography cartridges followed by selective elution and quantification using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Water samples can be delivered to a set of three cartridges using either syringes or peristaltic pumps. Species distribution is stable at this point, and the cartridges can be transported to the laboratory for elution and quantitative analysis. A set of ten replicate spiked samples of each compound, having concentrations between 1 and 60 µg/L, were analyzed. Arsenic recoveries ranged from 78-112 % and relative standard deviations were generally below 10%. Resolution between species was shown to be outstanding, with the only limitation being that the capacity for As (V) was limited to approximately 50 µg/L. This could be easily remedied by changes in either cartridge design, or the extraction procedure. Recoveries were similar for two spiked hard groundwater samples indicating that dissolved minerals are not likely to be problematic. These results suggest that this methodology can be use for analysis of the four primary arsenic species of concern in

  2. Rapid Identification of Dengue Virus by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Field-Deployable Instrumentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAvin, James C; Escamilla, Elizabeth M; Blow, James A; Turell, Micahel J; Quintana, Miguel; Bowles, David E; Swaby, James A; Barnes, William J; Huff, William B; Lahman, Kenton L

    2005-01-01

    ...) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays were developed for screening and seroype identification of infected mosquito vectors and human sera using a field-deployable, fluorometric thermocycler...

  3. The deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Ian R J; Naguib, Raouf N G

    2010-01-01

    Information systems and related technologies continue to develop and have become an integral part of healthcare provision and hospital care in particular. Field hospitals typically operate in the most austere and difficult of conditions and have yet to fully exploit related technologies. This paper addresses those aspects of healthcare informatics, healthcare knowledge management and lean healthcare that can be applied to field hospitals, with a view to improving patient care. The aim is to provide a vision for the deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals, using the British Army's field hospital as a representative model.

  4. Shrubs of the Field Irradiator - Gamma area in eastern Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugle, J.R.; Mayoh, K.R.; Barclay, P.J.

    1979-11-01

    Detailed descriptions and line drawings are given of over 100 shrub taxa (including semi-woody shrubs and vines) which are common in Manitoba; most of them are found within the Field Irradiator - Gamma (FIG) area or its immediate surroundings. Ecological and morphological notes are included along with a few general remarks on the effects of exposure to long-term gamma radiation. Keys are given for certain genera, small family groups or other critical species groups. This document is intended to facilitate identification of shrubs for experimental purposes in the FIG projects, and it should also be useful to those who are generally interested in the shrubs of Manitoba. (auth)

  5. Deployment and Performance of the NASA D3R During the GPM OLYMPEx Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Beauchamp, Robert M.; Chen, Haonan; Vega, Manuel; Schwaller, Mathew; Willie, Delbert; Dabrowski, Aaron; Kumar, Mohit; Petersen, Walter; Wolff, David

    2016-01-01

    The NASA D3R was successfully deployed and operated throughout the NASA OLYMPEx field campaign. A differential phase based attenuation correction technique has been implemented for D3R observations. Hydrometeor classification has been demonstrated for five distinct classes using Ku-band observations of both convection and stratiform rain. The stratiform rain hydrometeor classification is compared against LDR observations and shows good agreement in identification of mixed-phase hydrometeors in the melting layer.

  6. Evaluation of Methods for In-Situ Calibration of Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Current field-deployable microphone phased arrays for aeroacoustic flight testing require the placement of hundreds of individual sensors over a large area. Depending on the duration of the test campaign, the microphones may be required to stay deployed at the testing site for weeks or even months. This presents a challenge in regards to tracking the response (i.e., sensitivity) of the individual sensors as a function of time in order to evaluate the health of the array. To address this challenge, two different methods for in-situ tracking of microphone responses are described. The first relies on the use of an aerial sound source attached as a payload on a hovering small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) vehicle. The second relies on the use of individually excited ground-based sound sources strategically placed throughout the array pattern. Testing of the two methods was performed in microphone array deployments conducted at Fort A.P. Hill in 2015 and at Edwards Air Force Base in 2016. The results indicate that the drift in individual sensor responses can be tracked reasonably well using both methods. Thus, in-situ response tracking methods are useful as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the health of a phased array during long duration deployments.

  7. Measurement of the gamma field around Silene reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Frantisek; Medioni, Roger.

    1976-07-01

    A method for measuring the gamma component in the mixed field emitted by the Silene facility implanted in Valduc is investigated. Various thermoluminescent phosphors (natural LiF, 7 LiF, SO 4 Ca, Al 2 O 3 ) in containers of different sizes and types are used. The detectors results are corrected for their neutron sensitivity by using coefficients which were determined in previous studies. Alumina is shown to be the most suitable detector for this problem because of the dose ranges to be measured and its low sensitivity to neutrons. A series of measurements carried out at many points in the irradiation hall shows a good homogeneity in the gamma distribution. Results are given for different distances from the source and for a 10 17 fissions power of the reactor [fr

  8. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  9. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final detailed test plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment". This document defines the objective, approach,...

  10. Deployment of field hospitals to disaster regions: Insights from ten medical relief operations spanning three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Michael; Heyman, Samuel N; Bader, Tarif; Merin, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The Israeli Defense Force (IDF) Medical Corps developed a model of airborne field hospital. This model was structured to deal with disaster settings, requiring self-sufficiency, innovation and flexible operative mode in the setup of large margins of uncertainty regarding the disaster environment. The current study is aimed to critically analyze the experience, gathered in ten such missions worldwide. Interviews with physicians who actively participated in the missions from 1988 until 2015 as chief medical officers combined with literature review of principal medical and auxiliary publications in order to assess and integrate information about the assembly of these missions. A body of knowledge was accumulated over the years by the IDF Medical Corps from deploying numerous relief missions to both natural (earthquake, typhoon, and tsunami), and man-made disasters, occurring in nine countries (Armenia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Turkey, India, Haiti, Japan, Philippines, and Nepal). This study shows an evolutionary pattern with improvements implemented from one mission to the other, with special adaptations (creativity and improvisation) to accommodate logistics barriers. The principals and operative function for deploying medical relief system, proposed over 20 years ago, were challenged and validated in the subsequent missions of IDF outlined in the current study. These principals, with the advantage of the military infrastructure and the expertise of drafted civilian medical professionals enable the rapid assembly and allocation of highly competent medical facilities in disaster settings. This structure model is to large extent self-sufficient with a substantial operative flexibility that permits early deployment upon request while the disaster assessment and definition of needs are preliminary.

  11. Logistics analysis to Improve Deployability (LOG-AID): Field Experiment/Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    .... Under sponsorship of the Air Force Research Laboratory Logistics Readiness Branch (AFRL/HESR), the Synergy team analyzed the current wing-level deployment process as part of the Logistics Analysis to Improve Deployability (LOG-AID) program...

  12. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  13. Field evaluation of a direct push deployed sensor probe for vertical soil water content profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienken, Thomas; Reboulet, Ed; Leven, Carsten; Kreck, Manuel; Zschornack, Ludwig; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Reliable high-resolution information about vertical variations in soil water content, i.e. total porosity in the saturated zone, is essential for flow and transport predictions within the subsurface. However, porosity measurements are often associated with high efforts and high uncertainties, e.g. caused by soil disturbance during sampling or sensor installation procedures. In hydrogeological practice, commonly applied tools for the investigation of vertical soil water content distribution include gravimetric laboratory analyses of soil samples and neutron probe measurements. A yet less well established technique is the use of direct push-deployed sensor probes. Each of these methods is associated with inherent advantages and limitations due to their underlying measurement principles and operation modes. The presented study describes results of a joint field evaluation of the individual methods under different depositional and hydrogeological conditions with special focus on the performance on the direct push-deployed water content profiler. Therefore, direct push-profiling results from three different test sites are compared with results obtained from gravimetric analysis of soil cores and neutron probe measurements. In direct comparison, the applied direct push-based sensor probe proved to be a suitable alternative for vertical soil water content profiling to neutron probe technology, and, in addition, proved to be advantageous over gravimetric analysis in terms vertical resolution and time efficiency. Results of this study identify application-specific limitations of the methods and thereby highlight the need for careful data evaluation, even though neutron probe measurements and gravimetric analyses of soil samples are well established techniques (see Vienken et al. 2013). Reference: Vienken, T., Reboulet, E., Leven, C., Kreck, M., Zschornack, L., Dietrich, P., 2013. Field comparison of selected methods for vertical soil water content profiling. Journal of

  14. Biological dosimetry for mixed gamma-neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, J.O.C.; Santos, J.A.L.; Souza, P.L.G.; Lima, F.F.; Vilela, E.C.; Calixto, M.S.; Santos, N.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mitogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to mixed gamma-neutron field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two mixed gamma-neutron field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemide accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experts after painted by giemsa 5%. The preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  15. Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration's remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for 90 Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs

  16. Advances in Field Deployable Instrumented Particles for the Study of Alluvial Transport Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, B.; Strom, K.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) in the past decade have lead to the development of various instrumented or "smart" particles for use in the study of alluvial transport. The goal of many of these devices is to collect data on the interaction between hydrodynamic turbulence and individual sediment particles. Studying this interaction provides a basis to better understand entrainment and deposition processes which leads to better predictive morphologic and transport models. In collecting data on these processes, researchers seek to capture the time history of the forces incident on the particle and the particle's reaction. Many methods have been employed to capture this data - miniaturized pressure traps, accelerometers, gyroscopes, MEMs pressure transducers, and cantilevered load cells. However no system to date has been able to capture the pressure forces incident on the particle and its reaction while remaining mobile and of a size and density comparable to most gravels. Advances in the development, deployment, and use of waterproofed laboratory instrumentation have led our research group to develop such a particle. This particle has been used in both laboratory settings and large-scale fluvial environments (coupled with a field-deployable PIV system) to capture data on turbulent erosion processes. This system advances the practice in several ways: 1) It is, at present, the smallest (⌀ 19mm) instrumented erodible particle reported in the literature. 2) It contains novel developments in pressure sensing technology which allow the inclusion of six pressure ports, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 1-axis gyroscope - all of which can be recorded simultaneously. 3) It expands the researcher's abilities to gather data on phenomena that, previously, have mandated the use of a laboratory scale model. The use of this system has generated observations of the so-called very large scale motions (VLSMs) in a reach of the Virginia section of the New River. Their

  17. A field-deployable mobile molecular diagnostic system for malaria at the point of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gihoon; Song, Daniel; Shrestha, Sony; Miao, Jun; Cui, Liwang; Guan, Weihua

    2016-11-01

    In response to the urgent need of a field-deployable and highly sensitive malaria diagnosis, we developed a standalone, "sample-in-answer-out" molecular diagnostic system (AnyMDx) to enable quantitative molecular analysis of blood-borne malaria in low resource areas. The system consists of a durable battery-powered analyzer and a disposable microfluidic compact disc loaded with reagents ready for use. A low power thermal module and a novel fluorescence-sensing module are integrated into the analyzer for real-time monitoring of loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) of target parasite DNA. With 10 μL of raw blood sample, the AnyMDx system automates the nucleic acid sample preparation and subsequent LAMP and real-time detection. Under laboratory conditions with whole-blood samples spiked with cultured Plasmodium falciparum, we achieved a detection limit of ∼0.6 parasite per μL, much lower than those for the conventional microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (∼50-100 parasites per μL). The turnaround time from sample to answer is less than 40 minutes. The AnyMDx is user-friendly requiring minimal technological training. The analyzer and the disposable reagent compact discs are cost-effective, making AnyMDx a potential tool for malaria molecular diagnosis under field settings for malaria elimination.

  18. FIELD-DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-09-12

    Methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of aqueous spent fuel storage basins and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials were developed to assess the corrosion potential of a basin. this assessment can then be used to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to ascertain if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations and assist in evaluating general storage basin operations. The test kit was developed based on the identification of key physical, chemical and microbiological parameters identified using a review of the scientific and basin operations literature. The parameters were used to design bench scale test cells for additional corrosion analyses, and then tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters. The tools were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The sampling kit consisted of a total organic carbon analyzer, an YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  19. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2011-01-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at 137 Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after 137 Cs and 241 AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  20. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  1. Calibration of extremity dosemeters for gamma radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopulos, S.B.; Gregori, B.N.; Cruzate, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the kerma conversion factor are free in air, dose equivalent H(d,0 ) are presented, they were obtained theoretical and experimentally in finger and arm for gamma radiation fields. Extremity dosemeters put on surface finger and arm phantom have been irradiated. The finger phantom is a solid cylinder of PMMA polymethylmethacrylate 19 mm diameter and 300 mm height. The arm phantom is a 73 mm external diameter cylinder with PMMA walls 2.5 mm thick fill with water and 300 mm height. The radiation sources were cobalt 60 and cesium 137 from the Regional Center of Reference (CRR) of the National Commission of Atomic Energy (CNEA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). Also in ISO wide X ray spectra W60, W110 and W200 have been irradiated. The results obtained show a good correlation with those published, they have a difference less than 7%. The factors will be applied to the evaluation of the equivalent doses coming from workers whose main irradiated zone is in the hands. (author)

  2. A Field Test of the New Portable Gamma Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung-Ki; Park, Uk Ryang; Park, Seunghoon; Chung, Heejun; Kwak, Sung-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yongkwn [NuCare Medical Systems, Inc., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to perform a field test of the system, the measurement of U-235 enrichment for nuclear fuel pellets was conducted along with the IAEA Physical Inventory Verification (PIV) inspection at the KEPCO Nuclear Fuel (KNF). The enrichment value of U-235 was calculated based on the total counts of the 185.7 keV photopeak and compared with the reference line, drawn by certified sources. The goal of this study is to experimentally evaluate the system performance of the developed system. In this study, the new portable gamma spectrometry system showed a good linearity (R{sup 2}=1) but overestimated the enrichment values than IAEA inspection device. It could be caused by the stability of the new system since it found, right after this measurement, that the accuracy of the system gradually increases and becomes stable over time. Further steps will optimize the design parameter based on these results and repeat measurement with the same samples under the same environment.

  3. Subsampled Numerical Experiments as a Guide for Field Deployment of Thermistor Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Justin; Stastna, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Thermistor chains are a standard tool for recording temperature profiles in geophysical flows. Density values can be inferred from readings and the resulting density field analyzed for the passage of internal waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz billows, and other dynamic events. The number and spacing of the thermistors, both on and between chains, determines which events can be identified in the dataset. We examine the effect of changing these variables by subsampling a set of numerical experiments to simulate thermistor chain locations. A pseudo spectral method was used to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. The resulting flows are a set of high resolution seiches where the depth was held constant across experiments, and the length was varied. Sampling a known, commonly occurring flow with relatively simple geometry allows for a clear analysis of the effects of thermistor placement in the capture of dynamic events. We will discuss three dimensional deployment strategies, as well as EOF and DMD analyses if there is time. Funded by a Grant from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  4. [Impact of headache among studied military population in Afghanistan deployed in the Kabul military field hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, L; Bruneau, O; Trousselard, M; Zagnoli, F; Blanc, P A; De Greslan, T; Drouet, A

    2015-11-01

    Headaches are a common reason for consultation with a prevalence of 30%. Few data exist for military personnel, including in situations of war operations. The main objective of this work was to measure the evolution of the impact of headache in such a context. Two hundred and one personnel deployed in the Kaïa military field hospital in Afghanistan were recruited. A questionnaire designed to recognize headaches, supported by two quality of life scales (MIDAS and HIT-6) and a stress questionnaire were filled out before departure and upon return from missions. Sixty-three patients with headache were initially identified, of whom 52 remained symptomatic during the mission. The average total score of MIDAS before departure was 4 days and fell to 1.4 days upon return, with a mean measured change of 3.3 days. For HIT-6, the mean total score was 51.2 points initially and 51.9 points at the end of the mission with a mean change of-0.3 points. Nine patients without headache initially became symptomatic: MIDAS and HIT-6 were not affected. Thus, the impact of headache in the particular context of presence in a theater of operations was low: improved MIDAS score and the lack of influence on the HIT-6 score are underlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of field-deployable instrumentation based on “antigen–antibody” reactions for detection of hemorrhagic disease in ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of field-deployable methodology utilizing antigen–antibody reactions and the surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) effect to provide a rapid diagnostic test for recognition of the blue tongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhage disease virus (EHDV) in wild and domestic ruminants is reported. ...

  6. Calibration and Field Deployment of the NSF G-V VCSEL Hygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGangi, J. P.; O'Brien, A.; Diao, M.; Hamm, C.; Zhang, Q.; Beaton, S. P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    preliminary data from our most recent field deployment, the NSF Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment in May-June 2012

  7. Development of a Field-Deployable Psychomotor Vigilance Test to Monitor Helicopter Pilot Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Terry W; Newman, David G

    2016-04-01

    Flying a helicopter is a complex psychomotor skill. Fatigue is a serious threat to operational safety, particularly for sustained helicopter operations involving high levels of cognitive information processing and sustained time on task. As part of ongoing research into this issue, the object of this study was to develop a field-deployable helicopter-specific psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) for the purpose of daily performance monitoring of pilots. The PVT consists of a laptop computer, a hand-operated joystick, and a set of rudder pedals. Screen-based compensatory tracking task software includes a tracking ball (operated by the joystick) which moves randomly in all directions, and a second tracking ball which moves horizontally (operated by the rudder pedals). The 5-min test requires the pilot to keep both tracking balls centered. This helicopter-specific PVT's portability and integrated data acquisition and storage system enables daily field monitoring of the performance of individual helicopter pilots. The inclusion of a simultaneous foot-operated tracking task ensures divided attention for helicopter pilots as the movement of both tracking balls requires simultaneous inputs. This PVT is quick, economical, easy to use, and specific to the operational flying task. It can be used for performance monitoring purposes, and as a general research tool for investigating the psychomotor demands of helicopter operations. While reliability and validity testing is warranted, data acquired from this test could help further our understanding of the effect of various factors (such as fatigue) on helicopter pilot performance, with the potential of contributing to helicopter operational safety.

  8. Further developments and field deployment of phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Malcolm J.; Thornton, Alex R.; Wylde, Jonathan J.; Strachan, Catherine J.; Moir, Gordon [Clariant Oil Services, Muttenz (Switzerland); Goulding, John [John Goulding Consultancy, York (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    monomer distribution, it was important to gauge this effect in reservoir analogues. A reservoir rock will act as a large chromatography column, separating out the scale inhibitor according to molecular weight and phosphorus content. That is the larger molecular weights will adhere more strongly than lower molecular weight fractions, whereas polymer chains containing larger phosphorus functionality will adhere to the rock significantly stronger than those without. Thus it is important to understand if there were components containing phosphorus but did not contribute to the inhibition of scale. In order to study these effects the phosphorus functionalized polymers were tested on very clean sandstone core plugs in a core flood rig. Their adsorption/retention characteristics were studied. The scale inhibitor effluent was analyzed by numerous methods and confirmed by inhibition efficiency measurements. Following successful development, one of the phosphorus functionalized polymeric inhibitors was subject to sequential field-trial in a harsh BaSO{sub 4} scaling, highly naturally fractured North Sea carbonate reservoir. As this was the first deployment of this novel technology the scale inhibitor returns and water chemistry were monitored using a number of methods to assess the efficiency of the inhibitor at mitigating the BaSO{sub 4} risk. A number of previous technologies utilizing phosphorus tagging have resulted in false readings due to anomalous phosphorus signals. The results presented in this paper show a step change with the scale inhibitor analysis by both elemental phosphorus (ICP-OES) and polymer methods (cartridge/Hyamine) showing excellent correlation. Indirect analysis of the scale inhibitor performance by elemental Ba{sup 2+} measurement confirmed the results, as there was no drop in Ba{sup 2+} concentration indicating no significant scaling before the re-squeeze operation was conducted. The phosphorus functionalized inhibitor provided superior performance

  9. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-22

    This document presents the Evaluation Teams plan for conducting the evaluation of the FOT in Washington State. A companion document exists for the evaluation of the Utah deployment. This plan includes the experimental design for testing hypotheses...

  10. Development of Methodology and Field Deployable Sampling Tools for Spent Nuclear Fuel Interrogation in Liquid Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-01-01

    This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-06-04

    This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI

  12. Runaway breakdown in strong electric field as a source of terrestrial gamma flashes and gamma bursts in lightning leader steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, A.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alex@lpi.ru; Zybin, K.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Medvedev, Yu.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-22

    The new model of lightning step leader is proposed. It includes three main processes developing simultaneously in a strong electric field: conventional breakdown, effect of runaway electrons and runaway breakdown (RB). The theory of RB in strong electric field is developed. Comparison with the existing observational data shows that the model can serve as a background for the explanation of gamma bursts in step leader and TGF.

  13. Runaway breakdown in strong electric field as a source of terrestrial gamma flashes and gamma bursts in lightning leader steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, A.V.; Zybin, K.P.; Medvedev, Yu.V.

    2007-01-01

    The new model of lightning step leader is proposed. It includes three main processes developing simultaneously in a strong electric field: conventional breakdown, effect of runaway electrons and runaway breakdown (RB). The theory of RB in strong electric field is developed. Comparison with the existing observational data shows that the model can serve as a background for the explanation of gamma bursts in step leader and TGF

  14. Recent advances of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors: principles and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Wojtas, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of compact interband cascade lasers(ICLs) and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based trace gas sensors will permit the targeting of strong fundamental rotational-vibrational transitions in the mid-infrared which are one to two orders of magnitude more intense than transitions in the overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared. This has led to the design and fabrication of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors for use in the petrochemical industry, environmental monitoring and atmospheric chemistry. Specifically, the spectroscopic detection and monitoring of four molecular species, methane (CH4) [1], ethane (C2H6), formaldehyde (H2CO) [2] and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [3] will be described. CH4, C2H6 and H2CO can be detected using two detection techniques: mid-infrared tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a compact multi-pass gas cell and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Both techniques utilize state-of-the-art mid-IR, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) ICLs and QCLs. TDLAS was performed with an ultra-compact 54.6m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass gas cell capable of 435 passes between two concave mirrors separated by 12.5 cm. QEPAS used a small robust absorption detection module (ADM) which consists of a quartz tuning fork (QTF), two optical windows, gas inlet/outlet ports and a low noise frequency pre-amplifier. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection were employed for spectral data processing. TDLAS and QEPAS can achieve minimum detectable absorption losses in the range from 10-8 to 10-11cm-1/Hz1/2. Several recent examples of real world applications of field deployable gas sensors will be described. For example, an ICL based TDLAS sensor system is capable of detecting CH4 and C2H6 concentration levels of 1 ppb in a 1 sec. sampling time, using an ultra-compact, robust sensor architecture. H2S detection was realized with a THz QEPAS sensor

  15. Deficiency in Monte Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma-ray fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleka, Peane P.; Maucec, Marko; de Meijer, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The deficiency in Monte Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma-ray field was investigated by benchmarking two simulation codes with experimental data. Simulations showed better correspondence with the experimental data for gamma-ray transport only. In simulations, the neutron interactions with

  16. Unilateral irradiation of pigs in a mixed neutrons+gamma field. Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, Guy; Maas, Jean.

    1982-08-01

    Pigs (16-20kg) were irradiated with 60 Co gamma or in a mixed field (neutron + gamma from the pulsed reactor SILENE). Pigs were unilaterally exposed by the left side. Each experimental group was composed of twelve animals and one control. Within the dose range explored (reference dose is mid-line tissue dose): 4-9.8 Gy of gamma rays only; 4.6 - 5.7 Gy of neutrons and gamma rays, pigs presented the haematopioetic form of the acute radiation sickness. At 5 Gy mixed field was more harmful than gamma rays only. Therefore the numerical value of neutron RBE (lethality 50 p cent within 30 days) is more than one. Experiments will be carried out in order to determine RBE values more accurately. Bone marrow dose will also be determined [fr

  17. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  18. Scoping study to expedite development of a field deployable and portable instrument for UF6 enrichment assay

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, CYG; Valentine, JD; Russo, RE

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is to identity the most promising, viable technologies that are likely to culminate in an expedited development of the next-generation, field-deployable instrument for providing rapid, accurate, and precise enrichment assay of uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF6 is typically involved, and is arguably the most important uranium compound, in uranium enrichment processes. As the first line of defense against proliferation, accurate analytical techniques t...

  19. Fourier transformation methods in the field of gamma spectrometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The basic principles of a new version of Fourier transformation is presented. This new version was applied to solve some main problems such as smoothing, and denoising in gamma spectroscopy. The mathematical procedures were first tested by simulated data and then by actual experimental data.

  20. Photodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in passive air samplers: Field testing different deployment chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartkow, Michael E.; Kennedy, Karen E.; Huckins, James N.; Holling, Neil; Komarova, Tatiana; Mueller, Jochen F.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were loaded with deuterated anthracene and pyrene as performance reference compounds (PRCs) and deployed at a test site in four different chambers (open and closed box chamber, bowl chamber and cage chamber) for 29 days. The losses of PRCs and the uptake of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the ambient air were quantified. UV-B levels measured in each deployment chamber indicated that SPMDs would be exposed to the most UV-B in the cage chamber and open box chamber. Significantly less PAHs were quantified in SPMDs deployed in the cage chamber and open box chamber compared to samplers from the other two chambers, suggesting that photodegradation of PAHs had occurred. The loss of PRCs confirmed these results but also showed that photodegradation was occurring in the closed box chamber. The bowl chamber appears to provide the best protection from the influence of direct photodegradation. - Photodegradation/loss of PAHs occurs from passive air samplers (SPMDs) deployed in various sampler chambers

  1. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva González-Parada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  2. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Aguilera, Francisco; Sandoval, Francisco; Urdiales, Cristina

    2017-01-09

    Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN) allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i) to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii) to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  3. A study of the scintillation induced by alpha particles and gamma rays in liquid xenon in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.V.; Howard, A.S.; Akimov, D.; Araujo, H.; Bewick, A.; Davidge, D.C.R.; Jones, W.G.; Joshi, M.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Liubarsky, I.; Quenby, J.J.; Rochester, G.; Shaul, D.; Sumner, T.J.; Walker, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Scintillation produced in liquid xenon by alpha particles and gamma rays has been studied as a function of applied electric field. For back scattered gamma rays with energy of about 200keV, the number of scintillation photons was found to decrease by 64±2% with increasing field strength. Consequently, the pulse shape discrimination power between alpha particles and gamma rays is found to reduce with increasing field, but remaining non-zero at higher fields

  4. Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) Method for Airborne Aerosol Light Extinction Measurement: Instrument Validation and First Results from Field Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Perim de Faria, J.; Berg, M.; Bundke, U.; Freedman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate requires the continuous measurement of aerosol optical parameters like the aerosol extinction coefficient on a regular basis. Remote sensing and ground-based networks are well in place (e.g., AERONET, ACTRIS), whereas the regular in situ measurement of vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol optical properties remains still an important challenge in quantifying climate change. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. Recently, a compact and robust family of optical instruments based on the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique has become available for measuring aerosol light extinction. While this technique was successfully deployed for ground-based atmospheric measurements under various conditions, its suitability for operation aboard aircraft in the free and upper free troposphere still has to be demonstrated. In this work, the modifications of a CAPS PMex instrument for measuring aerosol light extinction on aircraft, the results from subsequent laboratory tests for evaluating the modified instrument prototype, and first results from a field deployment aboard a research aircraft will be covered. In laboratory studies, the instrument showed excellent agreement (deviation CAPS PMex instrument response within 10% deviation. During the field deployment, aerosol extinction coefficients and associated aerosol size distributions have been measured and will be presented as comparison studies between measured and calculated data.

  5. Sensitivity of self-powered detector probes to electron and gamma-ray fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lone, M A; Wong, P Y [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple, passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPD`s are used in nuclear reactors to monitor neutron and gamma fields. Responses of SPD`s to electrons and {gamma}-rays of various energies were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. Transmission filters were studied for the design of threshold SPD probes used for online monitoring of the energy spectrum of high-power industrial electron accelerator beams. Filters were also investigated for the enhancement of {gamma}-ray sensitivity of an SPD placed in a mixed electron and {gamma}-ray field. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  6. Optimization of electret ionization chambers for dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of combination dosemeters consisting of two air-filled electret ionization chambers in mixed neutron-gamma fields have been investigated. The first chamber, polyethylene-walled, is sensitive to neutrons and gamma rays, the second, having walls of teflon, is sensitive to gamma rays only. The properties of the dosemeters are determined by the resulting errors and the measuring range. As both properties depend on the dimensions of the electret ionization chambers they have been taken into account in optimizing the dimensions. The results show that with the use of the dosemeters the effective dose equivalent in mixed neutron-gamma fields can be determined nearly independently of the spectra. The lower detection limit is less than 1 mSv and the maximum uncertainty of dose measurements about 12%. (author)

  7. A field-deployable, aircraft-mounted sensor for the environmental survey of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Geelhood, B.D.; Hensley, W.K.; Quam, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Radionuclide Sensor System (ERSS) 3 is an extremely sensitive sensor, which has been cooperatively developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for environmental surveys of radionuclides. The ERSS sensors fit in an airborne pod and include twenty High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors for the high-resolution measurement of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, twenty-four 3 He detectors for possible neutron measurements, and two video cameras for visual correlation. These aerial HPGe sensors provide much better gamma-ray energy resolution than can be obtained with NaI(Tl) detectors. The associated electronics fit into three racks. The system can be powered by the 28 V DC electrical supply of typical aircraft or 120 V AC. The data acquisition hardware is controlled by customized software and a real-time display is provided. Each gamma-ray event is time stamped and stored for later analysis. This paper will present the physical design, discuss the software used to control the system, and provide some examples of its use. (author)

  8. Evaluation of gamma ray fields by HPGE spectrometry in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnac, S; Slugen, V [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Ragan, P; Fueloep, M [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the in situ spectrometric measurement for application in gamma radiation dosimetry with portability and flexibility in use was studied. In order to allow operation of the detector in any orientation without liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) spillage, a multi-attitude cryostat (MAC) has been used which consists of a Dewar with LN{sub 2} capacity of 7.0 litres and a holding time of 5 days. This allows the Dewar to be operated in the horizontal position, pointing vertically upward or vertically downward, without loss of LN{sub 2}. The MAC detector has been positioned in a 4{sup p}i{sup -}goniometer and, therefore is movable to any measurable angle. Pulses from the detector have been fed into a portable multichannel analyzer (Canberra 35+) with connection to a PC/AT compatible computer system. The main results and findings of present contribution may be summarized as follows: 1. A technique called the scaling confirmatory factor analysis (SCFA) presented else can be advantageously employed for determination of the response operator characterizing an influence of measuring device on physical gamma-spectra obtained. The in situ response operator has been reproduced only from the internal factors of appropriate latent structure that do not depend upon materials surrounding the detector. 2. The photon fluence rate response operator for in situ application has been obtained from the reduced response operator by a correction according to the geometric factor 4{sup p}i{sup (}r{sub 0}+r){sup 2}.The effective distance r{sub 0} has been determined via a performance of the radial calibration which yields a condition of, minimally, 10 cm distance of the detector cover from the potential sources. 3. The real incident gamma ray spectra achieved by application of the SCFA response allow direct evaluation of spectral distributions of the fundamental photon dosimetric quantities. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Use of thermoluminescent dosimetry in gamma radiation fields studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, W.

    1987-01-01

    The depth-dose curves for gamma rays in material of interest to agronomy were obtained using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters. The dose conversion factors for LiF were determined from curves of the absorved dose versus depth in water, wood and soil. Mathematics equations were chosen to best fit these curves. In the view of the results we came to the conclusion that in the studied materials the absorved radiation dose presents a great variation to the depth and could be correlated through of the exponential regression. (author)

  10. Properties of the Intergalactic Magnetic Field Constrained by Gamma-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veres, P.; Dermer, C. D.; Dhuga, K. S. [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    The magnetic field in intergalactic space gives important information about magnetogenesis in the early universe. The properties of this field can be probed by searching for radiation of secondary e {sup +} e {sup −} pairs created by TeV photons that produce GeV range radiation by Compton-scattering cosmic microwave background photons. The arrival times of the GeV “echo” photons depend strongly on the magnetic field strength and coherence length. A Monte Carlo code that accurately treats pair creation is developed to simulate the spectrum and time-dependence of the echo radiation. The extrapolation of the spectrum of powerful gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) like GRB 130427A to TeV energies is used to demonstrate how the intergalactic magnetic field can be constrained if it falls in the 10{sup −21}–10{sup −17} G range for a 1 Mpc coherence length.

  11. [Application of new technologies in the design, manufacture and use of technology deployment of field medical units and establishments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, S V; Sidorov, V A; Korniushko, I G; Medvedev, V R; Matveev, A G

    2011-11-01

    Presented data is about attendance means of deployment of field medical units and pieces of army-level medical services and disaster medicine Defense Ministry did not ensure compliance with requirements to create optimal conditions for highly effective work of the medical staff, placing the wounded, the use of modern aids and appliances. The prospects of creation of mobile unit for high-availability modular pre-fabricated on the basis of tent structures, pneumoconstructions and removable habitable bodies, containers, tents, pneumocovers till 2020 are analyzed. Livelihood systems provide armor protection against fragments, bullets, flames, damaging factors of chemical and biological weapons.

  12. A field-deployable compound-specific isotope analyzer based on quantum cascade laser and hollow waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Deev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    A field deployable Compound Specific Isotope Analyzer (CSIA) coupled with capillary chromatogrpahy based on Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers and Hollow Waveguide (HWG) with precision and chemical resolution matching mature Mass Spectroscopy has been achieved in our laboratory. The system could realize 0.3 per mil accuracy for 12C/13C for a Gas Chromatography (GC) peak lasting as short as 5 seconds with carbon molar concentration in the GC peak less than 0.5%. Spectroscopic advantages of HWG when working with QC lasers, i.e. single mode transmission, noiseless measurement and small sample volume, are compared with traditional free space and multipass spectroscopy methods.

  13. The establishment and application of direct coupled electrostatic-structural field model in electrostatically controlled deployable membrane antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongzhen; Duan, Baoyan; Du, Jingli

    2018-05-01

    The electrostatically controlled deployable membrane antenna (ECDMA) is a promising space structure due to its low weight, large aperture and high precision characteristics. However, it is an extreme challenge to describe the coupled field between electrostatic and membrane structure accurately. A direct coupled method is applied to solve the coupled problem in this paper. Firstly, the membrane structure and electrostatic field are uniformly described by energy, considering the coupled problem is an energy conservation phenomenon. Then the direct coupled electrostatic-structural field governing equilibrium equations are obtained by energy variation approach. Numerical results show that the direct coupled method improves the computing efficiency by 36% compared with the traditional indirect coupled method with the same level accuracy. Finally, the prototype has been manufactured and tested and the ECDMA finite element simulations show good agreement with the experiment results as the maximum surface error difference is 6%.

  14. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  15. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  16. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  17. STUDIES CONCERNING THE EFFECT OF GAMMA RADIATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD EXPOSURE ON GLADIOLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M CANTOR

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus (Gladiolus sp. is one of the most floral species cultivated over in the world and in Romania. There are many studies concerning the effect of gamma radiation on ornamental plants but little is known about the synergetic effect of gamma radiation and exposure to magnetic fields on Gladiolus. In our investigation we have tested the effect of gamma irradiation and magnetic field exposure of gladiolus corms and cormels of the cultivars: Her Majesty, Applause and Speranţa. The corms and cormels were irradiated for 72 hrs with 137 Cs gamma source on cylindrical exposure geometry. At medium dose of 1 Gy has been accumulated for each corm and cormel. For each variety we used 10 corms and 30 cormels in five variants. The comportment of various varieties was evaluated by recording the following characteristics: length of roots and growth tip. Significant effect was obtained at the variants which was irradiated with 1 Gy gamma radiation and 3 Gauss magnetic fields.

  18. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  19. Use of the Pipe ExplorerTM System to Deploy a Custom Gamma Tool in the Laterals Beneath High Level Waste Tanks in the 'A' and 'SX' Tank Farms, US DOE Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, D.T.; Price, R.K.; Randall, R.R.; Myers, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    The 'laterals' are 3-inch tubing installed beneath single shell high level waste tanks in the 'A' and 'SX' Tank Farms at the US DOE Hanford Site during the late 1950's as part of a multifaceted leak detection system. A pneumatic deployment/wire line retrieval system was originally used to deploy two different custom Geiger-Muller detectors (a 'RED GM' and a 'GREEN GM') into the laterals for the purposes of characterizing activity levels in the soils beneath the waste tanks. Logging of the laterals was carried out from the mid 1970's through the early 1990's, when the activity was suspended. In support of the on-going vadose zone characterization efforts in the tank farms, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. contracted with Apogen Technologies to utilize the Pipe Explorer TM system to deploy a custom gamma tool designed by Three Rivers Scientific and operated by Pacific Northwest Geophysics into selected laterals in the 'A' and 'SX' tank farms. The Pipe Explorer TM System is a unique deployment tool that utilizes a patented inverting membrane technology to deploy various detectors into piping, duct and drain lines. The conventional Pipe Explorer TM system was modified to interface with the PNG tool cabling and winch system that is typically used in bore hole applications. The gamma tool is comprised of three different detector systems, each with a different sensitivity. The most sensitive detector is a sodium iodide spectral gamma detector utilizing an on-board multi-channel analyzer. This detector is sensitive enough to measure the natural background radioactivity in these soils. Two additional Geiger-Muller gamma ray detectors complete the detector complement of the tool. These were designed with sensitivities similar to the historically used 'Green' and 'Red' GM detectors. The detectors were calibrated for Cs-137 concentration in the formation, and incorporated a correction for gamma ray attenuation due to the steel pipe of the lateral. The calibrations are traceable to

  20. Characterization of gamma field in the JSI TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrožič, Klemen; Radulović, Vladimir; Snoj, Luka; Gruel, Adrien; Guillou, Mael Le; Blaise, Patrick; Destouches, Christophe; Barbot, Loïc

    2018-01-01

    Research reactors such as the "Jožzef Stefan" Institute TRIGA reactor have primarily been designed for experimentation and sample irradiation with neutrons. However recent developments in incorporating additional instrumentation for nuclear power plant support and with novel high flux material testing reactor designs, γ field characterization has become of great interest for the characterization of the changes in operational parameters of electronic devices and for the evaluation of γ heating of MTR's structural materials in a representative reactor Γ spectrum. In this paper, we present ongoing work on γ field characterization both experimentally, by performing γ field measurements, and by simulations, using Monte Carlo particle transport codes in conjunction with R2S methodology for delayed γ field characterization.

  1. Simulation of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Jansky, B.

    2009-01-01

    Reference mixed neutron-gamma fields are used for test and calibration of dosimetric and spectrometric systems, intercomparison measurements, and benchmark tests and represent experimental base for reactor studies. Set of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation was build in the NRI Rez. Extended sets of measurements and simulation calculations were done to describe the reference mixed field dosimetry and spectral characteristics with best achievable precision. The Monte Carlo technique was used for different experimental setups models description, comparison and verification and field characteristics simulation. Effects (hardly distinguishable experimentally) were also studied ( contributions from individual parts of experimental setup, field individual components and next effects as shadow shield cones transparency, etc.). Some results and main conclusions of these studies and calculations are presented and discussed. (authors)

  2. Simulation of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Jansky, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reference mixed neutron-gamma fields are used for test and calibration of dosimetric and spectrometric systems, intercomparison measurements, and benchmark tests and represent experimental base for reactor studies. Set of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation was build in the NRI Rez. Extended sets of measurements and simulation calculations were done to describe the reference mixed field dosimetry and spectral characteristics with best achievable precision. The Monte Carlo technique was used for different experimental setups models description, comparison and verification and field characteristics simulation. Effects (hardly distinguishable experimentally) were also studied ( contributions from individual parts of experimental setup, field individual components and next effects as shadow shield cones transparency, etc.). Some results and main conclusions of these studies and calculations are presented and discussed. (authors)

  3. Performance of neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    From 1974 to 1980, six personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the performance of personnel dosimeters in a variety of neutron and gamma fields produced by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the steady state mode with and without spectral modifying shields. A total of 58 different organizations participated in these studies which produced approximately 2000 measurements of neutron and gamma dose equivalents on anthropomorphic phantoms for five different reactor spectra. Based on these data, the relative performance of three basic types of neutron dosimeters [nuclear emulsion film, thermoluminescent (TLD), and track-etch] and two basic types of gamma dosimeters (film and TLD) in mixed radiation fields was assessed

  4. Applications of outcrop gamma-ray logging to field development and exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, D.W.; Slatt, R.M.; Gillespie, R.H.; D'Agostino, A.E.; Scheihing, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gamma-ray logs of outcrops have been generated using two techniques. These techniques demonstrate the applicability of outcrop logging to better understand reservoir facies architecture and exploration type problems. The first logging technique employs the use of a standard logging truck and gamma-ray sonde. The truck is positioned near the top of the cliff face and the sonde is lowered to the bottom of the cliff. Gamma-ray counts are recorded as the sonde is raised at a constant rate. The second logging technique employs the use of a commercially available, hand-held, gamma-ray scintillometer. The tool measures total radiation at the outcrop. Equally-spaced measurements are made along the section and are displayed as a function of depth below a reference point. In this paper examples of gamma-ray logging experiments conducted on turbidities of the Jackfork Group (Pennsylvanian) in central and southern Arkansas are discussed, as are application of outcrop gamma-ray logging in the Long Beach Unit of Wilmington Oil Field, California, and Point Mugu (Santa Barbara Channel), California

  5. Development and Calibration of a Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Array for Propulsion and Airframe Noise Flyover Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Johns, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed consisting of a large channelcount, field-deployable microphone phased array suitable for airframe noise flyover measurements for a range of aircraft types and scales. The array incorporates up to 185 hardened, weather-resistant sensors suitable for outdoor use. A custom 4-mA current loop receiver circuit with temperature compensation was developed to power the sensors over extended cable lengths with minimal degradation of the signal to noise ratio and frequency response. Extensive laboratory calibrations and environmental testing of the sensors were conducted to verify the design's performance specifications. A compact data system combining sensor power, signal conditioning, and digitization was assembled for use with the array. Complementing the data system is a robust analysis system capable of near real-time presentation of beamformed and deconvolved contour plots and integrated spectra obtained from array data acquired during flyover passes. Additional instrumentation systems needed to process the array data were also assembled. These include a commercial weather station and a video monitoring / recording system. A detailed mock-up of the instrumentation suite (phased array, weather station, and data processor) was performed in the NASA Langley Acoustic Development Laboratory to vet the system performance. The first deployment of the system occurred at Finnegan Airfield at Fort A.P. Hill where the array was utilized to measure the vehicle noise from a number of sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial System) aircraft. A unique in-situ calibration method for the array microphones using a hovering aerial sound source was attempted for the first time during the deployment.

  6. Electron equilibrium for parallel plate ionization chambers in gamma radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.; Albuquerque, M. da P.P.

    1989-08-01

    Parallel plate ionization chambers, designed and constructed for use in low energy X-radiation fields, were tested in gamma radiation beams ( 6 Co and 137 Cs) of two different Calibration Laboratories, in order to study the electron equilibrium occurrence and to verify the possibility of their use for the detection of the kind of radiation too. (author) [pt

  7. Calibration of personal dosemeters for extremities of fields of radiation gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopulos, S.; Gregori, S.; Moreno, B.; Guillen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the conversion factors are presented obtained experimentally of kerma in free air in equivalent dose H(d,O o ) in finger and in arm for fields of radiation gamma of normal incidence dosemeters of extremities was irradiated, based on detecting TL of LIF 7 (TLD-700, Harshaw), placed on the surface of the finger phantom and arm

  8. Assessment of the neutron component in a neutron-gamma field of a californium-252 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetteh, G.K.

    1978-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the percentages of the different components in the radiation field of californium-252 which has now some clinical applications. Using Rossi Chambers in conjunction with absorption investigations involving lead and aluminium thimbles, it is observed that the dose rates due to the different components are: neutrons 54%; gammas 30%; betas 16%

  9. Dosimetry of the Embalse nuclear power plant neutron/gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the method used at the Embalse nuclear power plant for carrying out personal dosimetry of the agents affected to the tasks on the Embalse nuclear power plant neutron-gamma mixed fields. (Author) [es

  10. Characteristics of a single photon emission tomography system with a wide field gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathonnat, F.; Soussaline, F.; Todd-Pokropek, A.E.; Kellershohn, C.

    1979-01-01

    This text summarizes a work study describing the imagery possibilities of a single photon emission tomography system composed of a conventional wide field gamma camera, connected to a computer. The encouraging results achieved on the various phantoms studied suggest a significant development of this technique in clinical work in Nuclear Medicine Departments [fr

  11. Gamma radiation field extremity personal dosimeter. Calibration and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopulos, S.B.; Gregori, B.N.; Cruzate, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the extremity dose equivalent-kerma conversion factors obtained theoretical and experimentally in arm and finger for normally incident gamma radiation. Extremity dosemeters, based on termoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) LiF 7 (TLD-700, Harshaw), have been irradiated on designed as finger and arm phantoms. The finger phantom is been characterised as a solid cylinder made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) 19mm diameter and 300mm height. The arm phantom is a cylinder 73mm external diameter with PMMA walls 2.5mm thick filled with water and 300mm height. There were used several radiation sources like Co-60 and Cs-137 from the Regional Reference Dosimetry Centre (CRR) of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and from the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina. In the same way RX wide spectrum irradiations were made in the ISO-4037 qualities W60, W110 and W200. At the same time the conversion factors have been theoretically obtained. In order to achieve this, the finger and arm phantoms have been modelled and the photon and electron transport have been done with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B. There was a good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results, showing a difference less than 8%. Also the experimental results have been compared with the published data available giving a difference less than 7%. In this work is shown the performance of the extremity dosimeter usually used by the exposed workers of the ARN. It has got a similar energy response in the range of W110-Co-60 (not more than 7%) with respect to the experimental results obtained. The dose equivalent-kerma conversion factors are going to be used in the dose equivalent evaluation of workers mainly hands exposed. Related with the incident energy several applied recommendations have been made. An application is presented in nuclear medicine experiences. In the case of a thyroid treatment with 131 I, the external dose workers have been evaluated

  12. Attenuation of VHE Gamma Rays by the Milky Way Interstellar Radiation Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /Louisiana State U.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-04-19

    The attenuation of very high energy gamma rays by pair production on the Galactic interstellar radiation field has long been thought of as negligible. However, a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field consistent with multi-wavelength observations by DIRBE and FIRAS indicates that the energy density of the Galactic interstellar radiation field is higher, particularly in the Galactic center, than previously thought. We have made a calculation of the attenuation of very high energy gamma rays in the Galaxy using this new interstellar radiation field which takes into account its nonuniform spatial and angular distributions. We find that the maximum attenuation occurs around 100 TeV at the level of about 25% for sources located at the Galactic center, and is important for both Galactic and extragalactic sources.

  13. GAMMA–GAMMA ABSORPTION IN THE BROAD LINE REGION RADIATION FIELDS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böttcher, Markus; Els, Paul, E-mail: Markus.Bottcher@nwu.ac.za [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2531 (South Africa)

    2016-04-20

    The expected level of γγ absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of γ -ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) is evaluated as a function of the location of the γ -ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the γγ opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to γγ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the γ -ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the central engine and drops below unity for locations within the BLR. For locations outside the BLR, the BLR radiation energy density required for the production of GeV γ -rays rapidly increases beyond observational constraints, thus making the EC-BLR mechanism implausible. Therefore, in order to avoid significant γγ absorption by the BLR radiation field, the γ -ray emission region must therefore be located near the outer boundary of the BLR.

  14. A Novel Field Deployable Point-of-Care Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    could enhance the success of the RPA method in the field, including 1) isolation of DNA from clinical samples using a mini (portable) extractor at...the POC or FTA Whatman filter paper specially designed to improve DNA preservation and purification at POC. Aim 1: To optimize the analytical...sensitivity and specificity of the genus- and complex-specific RPA-LF tests using Leishmania isolates and clinical samples from collaborating study sites. We

  15. Deployment of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Good, John M.; Lee, Hanshin; Vattiat, Brian L.; Kriel, Herman; Ramsey, Jason; Bryant, Randy; Elliot, Linda; Fowler, Jim; Häuser, Marco; Landiau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Odewahn, Stephen; Perry, Dave; Savage, Richard; Schroeder Mrozinski, Emily; Shetrone, Matthew; DePoy, D. L.; Prochaska, Travis; Marshall, J. L.; Damm, George; Gebhardt, Karl; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Martin, Jerry; Armandroff, Taft; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    2016-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope, located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory. The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker, which moves the four-mirror corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. We have completed a major multi-year upgrade of the HET that has substantially increased the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22 arcminutes by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. The new wide field HET will feed the revolutionary integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX§), a new low resolution spectrograph (LRS2), an upgraded high resolution spectrograph (HRS2), and later the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF). The upgrade is being commissioned and this paper discusses the completion of the installation, the commissioning process and the performance of the new HET.

  16. Gamma Oscillations and Neural Field DCMs Can Reveal Cortical Excitability and Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how gamma oscillations can be combined with neural population models and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical excitability and microstructure. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. Neural field models are used to evaluate model evidence and obtain parameter estimates using invasive and non-invasive gamma recordings. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. We focus on model predictions of conductance and convolution based field models and show that these can yield spectral responses that are sensitive to biophysical properties of local cortical circuits like synaptic kinetics and filtering; we also consider two different mechanisms for this filtering: a nonlinear mechanism involving specific conductances and a linear convolution of afferent firing rates producing post synaptic potentials. In the second part of this paper, we use neural fields quantitatively—to fit empirical data recorded during visual stimulation. We present two studies of spectral responses obtained from the visual cortex during visual perception experiments: in the first study, MEG data were acquired during a task designed to show how activity in the gamma band is related to visual perception, while in the second study, we exploited high density electrocorticographic (ECoG data to study the effect of varying stimulus contrast on cortical excitability and gamma peak frequency.

  17. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  18. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    5] J.M. Seelig, D.P. Becker, J.D. Miller, R.P. Greenberg, J.D. Ward, S.C. Choi, Traumatic acute subdural hematoma : major mortality reduction in...the field. This results in a delay in quantifi- cation of the type and extent of TBI – epidural, subdural , versus intra-parenchymal bleeds; diffuse...example, surgical evacuation of epidural and subdural bleeds within hours of TBI immediately reduces the chance of exposure of brain to blood products

  19. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    of the head then application of a lotion hair remover. Prior to surgery, lidocaine (1 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously to the surgery site. For...resonance imaging (MRI) are capable of identifying TBI, their logistics make them ineffective diagnostic tools in the field, where rapid triage can...Dwight Co, INC., Princeton, NJ, USA). Following epilation, subcutaneous lidocaine (0.08 mL, 20 mg/mL) and bupivicaine (0.08 mL, 0.32 mg/mL) were

  20. Self-Cleaning Coatings and Materials for Decontaminating Field-Deployable Land and Water-Based Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert; Underwood, Lauren; Holekamp, Kara; May, George; Spiering, Bruce; Davis, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This technology exploits the organic decomposition capability and hydrophilic properties of the photocatalytic material titanium dioxide (TiO2), a nontoxic and non-hazardous substance, to address contamination and biofouling issues in field-deployed optical sensor systems. Specifically, this technology incorporates TiO2 coatings and materials applied to, or integrated as a part of, the optical surfaces of sensors and calibration sources, including lenses, windows, and mirrors that are used in remote, unattended, ground-based (land or maritime) optical sensor systems. Current methods used to address contamination or biofouling of these optical surfaces in deployed systems are costly, toxic, labor intensive, and non-preventative. By implementing this novel technology, many of these negative aspects can be reduced. The functionality of this innovative self-cleaning solution to address the problem of contamination or biofouling depends on the availability of a sufficient light source with the appropriate spectral properties, which can be attained naturally via sunlight or supplemented using artificial illumination such as UV LEDs (light emitting diodes). In land-based or above-water systems, the TiO2 optical surface is exposed to sunlight, which catalyzes the photocatalytic reaction, facilitating both the decomposition of inorganic and organic compounds, and the activation of superhydrophilic properties. Since underwater optical surfaces are submerged and have limited sunlight exposure, supplementary UV light sources would be required to activate the TiO2 on these optical surfaces. Nighttime operation of land-based or above-water systems would require this addition as well. For most superhydrophilic self-cleaning purposes, a rainwater wash will suffice; however, for some applications an attached rainwater collector/ dispenser or other fresh water dispensing system may be required to wash the optical surface and initiate the removal of contaminates. Deployment of this

  1. Determination of dose components in mixed gamma neutron fields by use of high pressure ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Pliszczynski, T.; Wysocka, A.; Zielczynski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The two ionization chamber method for determination of dose components in mixed γ-neutron field has been improved by increasing gas pressure in the chambers up to some milions pascals. Advantages of high pressure gas filling are the followings: 1) significant reduction of the ratio of neutron-to gamma sensitivity for the hydrogen-free chamber, 2) possibility of sensitivity correction for both chambers by application of appropriate voltage, 3) high sensitivity for small detectors. High-pressure, pen-like ionization chambers have been examined in fields of different neutron sources: a TE-chamber, filled with 0.2 MPa of quasi-TE-gas and a conductive PTFE chamber, filled with 3.1 MPa of CO 2 . The ratio of neutron-to-gamma sensitivity for the PTFE chamber, operated at electrical field strength below 100 V/cm, has not exceeded 0.01 for neutrons with energy below 8 MeV. Formula is presented for calculation of this ratio for any high-pressure, CO 2 -filled ionization chamber. Contribution of gamma component to total tissue dose in the field of typical neutron sources has been found to be 3 to 70%

  2. Deployment and Field Evaluation of In-Vehicle Traffic Signal Advisory System (ITSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyoung Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluates the impact of In-vehicle Signal Advisory System (ITSAS on signalized arterial. ITSAS provides individual drivers equipped with a mobile communication device with advisory speed information enabling to minimize the time delay and fuel consumption when crossing intersection. Given the instantaneous vehicular driving information, such as position, speed, and acceleration rate, ITSAS produces advisory speed information by taking into consideration the traffic signal changes at a downstream intersection. The advisory speed information includes not only an optimal speed range updated every 300-ft for individual drivers but also a descriptive message to warn drivers stop to ensure safety at the downstream intersection. Unlike other similar Connected Vehicles applications for intersection management, ITSAS does not require Roadside Equipment (RSE to disseminate the advisory speed information as it is designed to exploit commercial cellular network service (i.e., 3G and 4G-LTE. Thus, ITSAS can be easily plugged into existing traffic control management system to rapidly conduct its implementation without significant additional cost. This research presents the field evaluations of ITSAS on a signalized corridor in New Jersey, which discovered significant travel time savings for the equipped vehicle.

  3. Cadmium analysis using field deployable nano-band electrode system and its removal using electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttula, Mallikarjuna Murthy

    Cadmium (Cd) is an extremely toxic metal commonly found in industrial workplaces. Major industrial releases of Cd stem from waste streams, leaching of landfills, and from a variety of operations that involve cadmium or zinc. Particularly, cadmium can be released to drinking water from the corrosion of some galvanized plumbing and water main pipe materials. The United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for cadmium at 5 ppb. Long term exposure of cadmium above the MCL results in kidney, liver, bone and blood damage. An accurate and rapid measurement of cadmium in the field remains a technical challenge. In this work, a relatively new method of a Nano-Band Electrode system using anodic stripping voltammetry was optimized by changing deposition potential, electrolyte, and plating time. We efficiently used Electrocoagulation remove cadmium from wastewater and obtained a removal efficiency of +/-99%. Removal mechanism of cadmium in electrocoagulation was also proposed with the help of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS).

  4. Field deployable processing methods for stay-in-place ultrasonic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarich, Nathan; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2018-04-01

    Condition monitoring provides key data for managing the operation and maintenance of mechanical equipment in the power generation, chemical processing, and manufacturing industries. Ultrasonic transducers provide active monitoring capabilities by wall thickness measurements, elastic property determination, crack detection, and other means. In many cases the components operate in harsh environments that may include high temperature, radiation, and hazardous chemicals. Thus, it is desirable to have permanently affixed ultrasonic transducers for condition monitoring in harsh environments. Spray-on transducers provide direct coupling between the active element and the substrate, and can be applied to curved surfaces. We describe a deposition methodology for ultrasonic transducers that can be applied in the field. First, piezoceramic powders mixed into a sol-gel are air-spray deposited onto the substrate. Powder constituents are selected based on the service environment in which the condition monitoring will be performed. Then the deposited coating is pyrolyzed and partially densified using an induction heating system with a custom work coil designed to match the substrate geometry. The next step, applying the electrodes, is more challenging than might be expected because of the porosity of the piezoelectric coating and the potential reactivity of elements in the adjacent layers. After connecting lead wires to the electrodes the transducer is poled and a protective coating can be applied prior to use. Processing of a PZT-bismuth titanate transducer on a large steel substrate is described along with alternate methods.

  5. Scoping study to expedite development of a field deployable and portable instrument for UF6 enrichment assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, George; Valentine, John D.; Russo, Richard E.

    2017-09-14

    The primary objective of the present study is to identity the most promising, viable technologies that are likely to culminate in an expedited development of the next-generation, field-deployable instrument for providing rapid, accurate, and precise enrichment assay of uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF6 is typically involved, and is arguably the most important uranium compound, in uranium enrichment processes. As the first line of defense against proliferation, accurate analytical techniques to determine the uranium isotopic distribution in UF6 are critical for materials verification, accounting, and safeguards at enrichment plants. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent around the world, international nuclear safeguards and interest in UF6 enrichment assay has been growing. At present, laboratory-based mass spectrometry (MS), which offers the highest attainable analytical accuracy and precision, is the technique of choice for the analysis of stable and long-lived isotopes. Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitors the production of enriched UF6 at declared facilities by collecting a small amount (between 1 to 10 g) of gaseous UF6 into a sample bottle, which is then shipped under chain of custody to a central laboratory (IAEA’s Nuclear Materials Analysis Laboratory) for high-precision isotopic assay by MS. The logistics are cumbersome and new shipping regulations are making it more difficult to transport UF6. Furthermore, the analysis is costly, and results are not available for some time after sample collection. Hence, the IAEA is challenged to develop effective safeguards approaches at enrichment plants. In-field isotopic analysis of UF6 has the potential to substantially reduce the time, logistics and expense of sample handling. However, current laboratory-based MS techniques require too much infrastructure and operator expertise for field deployment and operation. As outlined in the IAEA Department of Safeguards Long

  6. One dimensional spatial resolution optimization on a hybrid low field MRI-gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co; Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Hybrid systems like Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and MRI/gamma camera, offer advantages combining the resolution and contrast capability of MRI with the better contrast and functional information of nuclear medicine techniques. However, the radiation detectors are expensive and need an electronic set-up, which can interfere with the MRI acquisition process or viceversa. In order to improve these drawbacks, in this work it is presented the design of a low field NMR system made up of permanent magnets compatible with a gamma radiation detector based on gel dosimetry. The design is performed using the software FEMM for estimation of the magnetic field, and GEANT4 for the physical process involved in radiation detection and effect of magnetic field. The homogeneity in magnetic field is achieved with an array of NbFeB magnets in a linear configuration with a separation between the magnets, minimizing the effect of Compton back scattering compared with a no-spacing linear configuration. The final magnetic field in the homogeneous zone is ca. 100 mT. In this hybrid proposal, although the gel detector do not have spatial resolution per se, it is possible to obtain a dose profile (1D image) as a function of the position by using a collimator array. As a result, the gamma detector system described allows a complete integrated radiation detector within the low field NMR (lfNMR) system. Finally we present the better configuration for the hybrid system considering the collimator parameters such as height, thickness and distance.

  7. Probing stochastic inter-galactic magnetic fields using blazar-induced gamma ray halo morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessis, Francis [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay, E-mail: fdupless@asu.edu, E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Inter-galactic magnetic fields can imprint their structure on the morphology of blazar-induced gamma ray halos. We show that the halo morphology arises through the interplay of the source's jet and a two-dimensional surface dictated by the magnetic field. Through extensive numerical simulations, we generate mock halos created by stochastic magnetic fields with and without helicity, and study the dependence of the halo features on the properties of the magnetic field. We propose a sharper version of the Q-statistics and demonstrate its sensitivity to the magnetic field strength, the coherence scale, and the handedness of the helicity. We also identify and explain a new feature of the Q-statistics that can further enhance its power.

  8. Gamma radiation and magnetic field mediated delay in effect of accelerated ageing of soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesh Kumar; Anand, Anjali; Singh, Bhupinder; Ahuja, Sumedha; Dahuja, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Soybean seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 3 and 5 kGy), static magnetic field (50, 100 and 200 mT) and a combination of gamma radiation and magnetic energy (0.5 kGy+200 mT and 5 kGy+50 mT) and stored at room temperature for six months. These seeds were later subjected to accelerated ageing treatment at 42°C temperature and 95-100 % relative humidity and were compared for various physical and biochemical characteristics between the untreated and the energized treatments. Energy treatment protected the quality of stored seeds in terms of its protein and oil content. Accelerated aging conditions, however, affected the oil and protein quantity and quality of seed negatively. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited a decline in their activity during aging while the LOX activity, which reflects the rate of lipid peroxidation, in general, increased during the aging. Gamma irradiated (3 and 5 kGy) and magnetic field treated seeds (100 and 200 mT) maintained a higher catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity which may help in efficient scavenging of deleterious free radical produced during the aging. Aging caused peroxidative changes to lipids, which could be contributed to the loss of oil quality. Among the electromagnetic energy treatments, a dose of 1-5 kGy of gamma and 100 mT, 200 mT magnetic field effectively slowed the rate of biochemical degradation and loss of cellular integrity in seeds stored under conditions of accelerated aging and thus, protected the deterioration of seed quality. Energy combination treatments did not yield any additional protection advantage. (author)

  9. Path to Impact for Autonomous Field Deployable Chemical Sensors: A Case Study of in Situ Nitrite Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenbeck, Tim M; Smith, Matthew C

    2017-05-02

    Natural freshwater systems have been severely affected by excess loading of macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus) from fertilizers, fossil fuels, and human and livestock waste. In the USA, impacts to drinking water quality, biogeochemical cycles, and aquatic ecosystems are estimated to cost US$210 billion annually. Field-deployable nutrient sensors (FDS) offer potential to support research and resource management efforts by acquiring higher resolution data than are currently supported by expensive conventional sampling methods. Following nearly 40 years of research and development, FDS instruments are now starting to penetrate commercial markets. However, instrument uncertainty factors (high cost, reliability, accuracy, and precision) are key drivers impeding the uptake of FDS by the majority of users. Using nitrite sensors as a case study, we review the trends, opportunities, and challenges in producing and implementing FDS from a perspective of innovation and impact. We characterize the user community and consumer needs, identify trends in research approaches, tabulate state-of-the-art examples and specifications, and discuss data life cycle considerations. With further development of FDS through prototyping and testing in real-world applications, these tools can deliver information for protecting and restoring natural waters, enhancing process control for industrial operations and water treatment, and providing novel research insights.

  10. Portable scintillation gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in extensive objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Bezshyyko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The portable scintillated gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in the volume objects was designed. The crystal CdWO4 that has weak dependence of light yield from temperature in combination with PMT was applied as the gamma-rays detector. The design of the device provides the possibility for measuring radioactivity of the extensive objects in 4-geometry without background measurements. In this case the value of the efficiency needed for specific activity calculation in close approximation depends only from crystal geometry and density of measuring object and may be set as the device parameter without efficiency calibration procedure during the operation. The spectrometer does not have an auxiliary radio-active source and connecting cables in the composition. The smartphone operated under Windows Mobile is used as the control module. Bluetooth connection provides data exchange between smartphone and measurement head.

  11. Portable scintillation gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in extensive objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besshejko, O.A.; Vishnevskij, I.N.; Denisenko, R.V.; Malyuk, I.A.; Petrosyan, Eh.E.; Karpenko, S.A.; Prijmak, V.N.

    2011-01-01

    The portable scintillated gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in the volume objects was designed. The crystal CdWO 4 that has weak dependence of light yield from temperature in combination with PMT was applied as the gamma-rays detector. The design of the device provides the possibility for measuring radioactivity of the extensive objects in 4π-geometry without background measurements. In this case the value of the efficiency needed for specific activity calculation in close approximation depends only from crystal geometry and density of measuring object and may be set as the device parameter without efficiency calibration procedure during the operation. The spectrometer does not have an auxiliary radio-active source and connecting cables in the composition. The smartphone operated under Windows Mobile is used as the control module. Bluetooth connection provides data exchange between smartphone and measurement head.

  12. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  13. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    evaluating the deployment repeatability builds upon the testing or analysis of deployment kinematics (Chapter 6) and adds repetition. Introduction...material yield or failure during a test. For the purposes of this chapter, zero shift will refer to permanent changes in the structure, while reversible ...the content of other chapters in this book: Gravity Compensation (Chapter 4) and Deployment Kinematics and Dynamics (Chapter 6). Repeating the

  14. Campbell's MSV method the neutron-gamma discrimination in mixed field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, S. J.; Loncar, B.; Avramovic, I.; Osmokrovic, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper it is carried out the analysis some capabilities of Campbell's MSV (Mean Square Value) measuring chain on base the principles derived by Campbell's theorem. Nevertheless, measurements have performed with digitized MSV method and results have compared related to they attained with classic measuring chain, when the mean value of signal from detector output has measured. In our case, detector element was uncompensated ionization chamber for mixed n-gamma fields. Thermal neutron flux, absorbed dose rate, equivalent dose rate and exposure rate in surrounding the reactor vessel of system HERBE, at nuclear reactor RB in 'VINCA' Institute, are determined. The examination of discrimination for gamma relate to neutron component in signal of detector output is performed whereby experimental work and the calculation according to linear theoretical model. The dependencies of changes for variance and mean value output detector signal versus four-decade change of fission reactor power, in range from 10 mW to 22W, are obtained. The advantage of MSV method is confirmed and concluded that the order n-gamma discrimination in MSV signal processing is around fifty times larger than classical measuring method. (author)

  15. A serendipitous observation of the gamma-ray burst GRB 921013b field with EUVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1999-01-01

    hours after the burst is 1.8 x10(-16) erg s(-1) cm(-2) after correction for absorption by the Galactic interstellar medium. Even if we exclude an intrinsic absorption, this is well below the detection limit of the EUVE measurement. Although it is widely accepted that gamma-ray bursts are at cosmological......We report a serendipitous extreme ultraviolet observation by EUVE of the field containing GRB 921013b, similar to 11 hours after its occurrence. This burst was detected on 1992 October 13 by the WATCH and PHEBUS on Granat, and by the GRB experiment on Ulysses. The lack of any transient (or...

  16. Simplified methods for estimating gamma exposure fields transmitted through straight rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultis, J.K.; Thompson, K.R.; Faw, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Approximate computational models are developed to describe the spatial variation in the radiation field transmitted through a straight reactangular duct obliquely illuminated by monoenergetic gamma photons. These models account for single and multiple scattering from the duct walls and lips as well as for direct penetration by the photons. Results of calculations are compared to results from a recent benchmark duct streaming experiment, and empirical correction factors are obtained which enable the models to predict the transmitted exposure rates to within 20% of the experimental values

  17. Hydra phantom applicability for carrying out tests of field uniformity in gamma cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao Filho, Geraldo L.; Oliveira, Alex C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical modality that makes use of radioactive material 'in vivo' in humans, making them a temporary radioactive source. The radiation emitted by the patient's body is detected by a specific equipment, called a gamma camera, creates an image showing the spatial and temporal biodistribution of radioactive material administered to the patient. Therefore, it's of fundamental importance a number of specific measures to make sure that procedure be satisfactory, called quality control. To Nuclear Medicine, quality control of gamma camera has the purpose of ensuring accurate scintillographic imaging, truthful and reliable for the diagnosis, guaranteeing visibility and clarity of details of structures, and also to determine the frequency and the need for preventive maintenance of equipment. To ensure the quality control of the gamma camera it's necessary to use some simulators, called phantom, used in Nuclear Medicine to evaluate system performance, system calibration and simulation of injuries. The goal of this study was to validate a new simulator for nuclear medicine, the Hydra phantom. The phantom was initially built for construction of calibration curves used in radiotherapy planning and quality control in CT. It has similar characteristics to specific phantoms in nuclear medicine, containing inserts and water area. Those inserts are regionally sourced materials, many of them are already used in the literature and based on information about density and interaction of radiation with matter. To verify its efficiency in quality control in Nuclear Medicine, was performed a test for uniformity field, one of the main tests performed daily, so we can verify the ability of the gamma camera to reproduce a uniform distribution of the administered activity in the phantom, been analysed qualitatively, through the image, and quantitatively, through values established for Central Field Of View (CFOV) and Useful Field Of View (UFOV). Also, was evaluated their

  18. Studies on the effective methods for induction of mutations of vegetatively propagated plants by the use of the gamma field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenji

    1977-01-01

    In the gamma field for the whole plant irradiation of vegetatively propagated plants, artificial induction of mutations in rose, tea, mulberry and chrysanthemum has been studied since 1962. The studies include induction of wholly mutated shoots (sports), irradiation techniques for mutation induction, usage of cultivars in mutation breeding and re-treatment of induced mutations with gamma ray. The results so far attained are described as follows: effects of the cutting back treatment on the induction of sports; induction of radiation injuries and mutations by whole plant irradiation; and re-treatment of induced mutants with gamma ray. (Mori, K.)

  19. Analysis of nonlocal neural fields for both general and gamma-distributed connectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Axel; Atay, Fatihcan M.

    2005-04-01

    This work studies the stability of equilibria in spatially extended neuronal ensembles. We first derive the model equation from statistical properties of the neuron population. The obtained integro-differential equation includes synaptic and space-dependent transmission delay for both general and gamma-distributed synaptic connectivities. The latter connectivity type reveals infinite, finite, and vanishing self-connectivities. The work derives conditions for stationary and nonstationary instabilities for both kernel types. In addition, a nonlinear analysis for general kernels yields the order parameter equation of the Turing instability. To compare the results to findings for partial differential equations (PDEs), two typical PDE-types are derived from the examined model equation, namely the general reaction-diffusion equation and the Swift-Hohenberg equation. Hence, the discussed integro-differential equation generalizes these PDEs. In the case of the gamma-distributed kernels, the stability conditions are formulated in terms of the mean excitatory and inhibitory interaction ranges. As a novel finding, we obtain Turing instabilities in fields with local inhibition-lateral excitation, while wave instabilities occur in fields with local excitation and lateral inhibition. Numerical simulations support the analytical results.

  20. Electron Acceleration by Stochastic Electric Fields in Thunderstorms: Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S.; Miller, J. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic pulses of photons, which are intense and short, originating in the atmosphere during thunderstorm activity. Despite the number of observations, the production mechanism(s) of TGFs and other energetic particles is not well understood. However, two mechanisms have been suggested as a source of TGFs: (1) the relativistic runaway electron avalanche mechanism (RREA), and (2) the lightning leader mechanism. The RREA can account for the TGF observations, but requires restrictive or unrealistic assumptions. The lightning leader channel is also expected to produce runaway electrons, but through inhomogeneous, small scale, strong electric fields. In this work we use the Boltzmann equation to model the electron acceleration by the lightning leader mechanism, and we derive the gamma-ray spectrum from the electron distribution function. The electric fields at the tip of the leaders are assumed to be stochastic in space and time. Since the physics involved in the lightening leader is not known, we test different cases of the stochastic acceleration agent. From this modeling we hope to investigate the possibility and efficiency of stochastic acceleration in thunderstorm.

  1. Effect of gamma-irradiation on cereal DNA investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Miura, Aya; Imura, Hiromi; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

    1996-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiation on the DNA of corn, soybean and wheat were investigated using a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique. In order to avoid strand breaks during the DNA extracting steps, protoplasts prepared from seeds were embedded in agarose plugs and the DNA was purified by the digesting membranes and proteins. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis can separate large DNA strands of about a few Mb in length. The DNA from unirradiated corn, soybean and wheat had mainly 3 fragments, about 6Mb(Fr.1), 5Mb(Fr.2), a few hundred kb(Fr.3) and so on. After gamma-irradiation, Fr.1 and Fr.2 had decreased depend on irradiation dose. The Fr.4(about 200 kb) of corn and Fr.3 of soybean DNA increased while Fr.3 of wheat did not increase under 10 kGy irradiation, however, the Fr.3 of all samples and the Fr.4 of corn decreased by over 10 kGy irradiation. It can be assumed that the large DNA strands were broken into smaller strands which increased at low irradiation doses, whereas both large and small DNA strands were broken down at higher irradiation doses. The Fr.6(2.5Mb) and Fr.7(1.5Mb) appeared in irradiated wheat DNA. (author)

  2. Detection of Primordial Magnetic Fields in TeV gamma-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingler, A.

    The analysis of the time-variable flux of γ-ray photons from extragalactic sources is currently the only proposed way to directly determine the magnetic field strengths in intergalactic space - far away from galaxies and clusters (in the cosmological "voids") - in the range below about 10,10 Gauss (Plaga 1995). Remnant magnetic fields with field strengths much below this, which may well have formed in early cosmological times, could exist in these voids. Due to their interaction with infrared photons TeV gamma-rays induce pair production in intergalactic space. The electrons and positrons are deflected by ambient magnetic fields and produce γ-rays via inverse Compton scattering that are delayed with respect to the original photons in an energy-dependent, characteristic manner. A standard method to identify these delayed events in a data sample of a source with a variable VHE γ-ray flux (as available from several Cherenkov telescope experiments for the high-emission phase of the AGN Mrk 501 in 1997) is described. Monte-Carlo simulations of existing data sets (taking into backgrounds and instrumental limitations) are used to explore how sensitive data sets similar to the existing ones are to primordial magnetic fields. We find that about 22000 (15000) events from a source with characteristics similar to Mrk 501 are needed to detect a primordial B field of 3 (10) atto Gauss (10,18 G) with a 3 significance.

  3. Sensitivity of self-powered detector probes to electron and gamma-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.; Wong, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple, passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPD's are used in nuclear reactors to monitor neutron and gamma fields. Responses of SPD's to electrons and γ-rays of various energies were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. Transmission filters were studied for the design of threshold SPD probes used for online monitoring of the energy spectrum of high-power industrial electron accelerator beams. Filters were also investigated for the enhancement of γ-ray sensitivity of an SPD placed in a mixed electron and γ-ray field. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  4. Effects of Gamma Radiation on Field Performance of Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), Males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.; Mohamad, F.

    2007-01-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), males 12-24 h. old were exposed to two gamma radiation doses (250 and 350 Gy) and released, in shade, in a 20x20 m square in the middle of an apple orchard (about 40 ha) and this experiment was repeated 3 times. The ability of irradiated males to disperse in the field and their response to the female sex pheromone were examined using pheromone taps placed in all four main directions of the release square for 300 m at 50 m intervals. The traps were examined daily for two weeks, caught males were counted, removed, their number was recorded and % of caught males to the total released ones was calculated. Results showed that irradiation negatively affected field dispersion of irradiated males and their response to the female sex pheromone. This calls for reducing the irradiation dose needed to sterilize released males as much as possible, provided that the given dose guarantees female sterility.

  5. Leveraging extreme laser-driven magnetic fields for gamma-ray generation and pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, O.; Wang, T.; Stark, D. J.; d’Humières, E.; Toncian, T.; Arefiev, A. V.

    2018-05-01

    The ability of an intense laser pulse to propagate in a classically over-critical plasma through the phenomenon of relativistic transparency is shown to facilitate the generation of strong plasma magnetic fields. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that these fields significantly enhance the radiation rates of the laser-irradiated electrons, and furthermore they collimate the emission so that a directed and dense beam of multi-MeV gamma-rays is achievable. This capability can be exploited for electron–positron pair production via the linear Breit–Wheeler process by colliding two such dense beams. Presented simulations show that more than 103 pairs can be produced in such a setup, and the directionality of the positrons can be controlled by the angle of incidence between the beams.

  6. Development of gamma probe technique for monitoring rooting pattern of pearl millet under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittal, K.P.R.; Subbiah, B.V.

    1982-01-01

    For the root distribution studies, methods are not available to measure the growth in situ and in toto under field conditions without destroying the plants. A non-destructive method was developed for measuring the gamma activity in root using a probe that was administered through the stem. Five isotopes viz. 86 Rb, 134 Cs, 59 Fe, 65 Zn and 54 Mn tested, were found to represent almost similar rooting pattern for pearl millet from flowering to harvesting stages. Among these isotopes 59 Fe was found to be suitable for field use. This method also enabled to successfully monitor the root activity over time and avoided the sampling errors. Since laboratory processing of samples was eliminated, the process of measurement was hastened. (author)

  7. Total Quality Management (TQM) in Self-Financed Technical Institutions: A Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Force Field Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Jitesh; Deshmukh, S. G.; Shastree, Anil

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential for adoption of TQM in self-financed technical institutions in the light of new demands and challenges posed by customers/students and society. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents use of quality function deployment (QFD) which prioritizes technical requirements and correlates them with various…

  8. Soil nutrient content of old-field and agricultural ecosystems exposed to chronic gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentano, T.V.; Holt, B.R.; Bottino, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Soil nutrients (extractable P. and NO 3 -N, exchangeable Ca, Mg and K), exchangeable Al, pH and organic matter content were measured over the top six inches of the soils of the seven-year old-field portion and the cultivated portion of the Brookhaven gamma field. Although concentrations of all nutrient elements were higher in the agricultural soil, the distributions of Ca, P, Al, pH and organic matter were similar along the radiation gradient in both fields. There was also a regular reduction in the phosphorus with decreasing exposure, but distribution of other elements was not clearly related to radiation effects. The distribution of all elements except K was significantly correlated with pH in the agricultural soil. In the old-field only Ca, Mg and Al showed this relationship. The most conspicuous effects of nearly 25 yr of chronic irradiation of the site were a reduction in soil organic matter content and an increase in soil P in both fields. (author)

  9. Frontal eye fields control attentional modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations in contralateral occipitoparietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Tom R; O'Shea, Jacinta; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O

    2015-01-28

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8-12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted contralaterally and attenuated ipsilaterally. These modulations must be under top-down control; however, the control mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the causal contribution of the human frontal eye field (FEF) by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with subsequent magnetoencephalography. Following inhibitory theta burst stimulation to the left FEF, right FEF, or vertex, participants performed a visual discrimination task requiring covert attention to either visual hemifield. Both left and right FEF TMS caused marked attenuation of alpha modulation in the occipitoparietal cortex. Notably, alpha modulation was consistently reduced in the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, leaving the ipsilateral hemisphere relatively unaffected. Additionally, right FEF TMS enhanced gamma modulation in left visual cortex. Behaviorally, TMS caused a relative slowing of response times to targets contralateral to stimulation during the early task period. Our results suggest that left and right FEF are causally involved in the attentional top-down control of anticipatory alpha power in the contralateral visual system, whereas a right-hemispheric dominance seems to exist for control of stimulus-induced gamma power. These findings contrast the assumption of primarily intrahemispheric connectivity between FEF and parietal cortex, emphasizing the relevance of interhemispheric interactions. The contralaterality of effects may result from a transient functional reorganization of the dorsal attention network after inhibition of either FEF. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351638-10$15.00/0.

  10. Electrical and gamma-ray logging in Gondwana and Tertiary coal fields of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayal, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical and gamma-ray logging have been very useful for identification and accurate determination of depth and thickness of coal seams in Gondwana and Tertiary coal fields of India. The characteristic resistance/resistivity peaks of coal seams in a particular area have been correlated, thus providing a picture of the subsurface structure. Physico-chemical properties of layers or sections of coal seams are responsive to electrical logs. Gamma-ray logs are found to be very useful for correlation and have sometimes been the only logs used in cased and dry boreholes for detection of coal seams. Under favourable conditions a single-point resistance log reveals a detailed picture of the formations and picks up thin coal seams as well as thin shale bands within the coal seam. But in some cases it fails to differentiate between coal and sandstone beds in spite of high contrast in true resistivities. Multi-electrode long-normal and lateral logs are found to be more useful in differentiating such formations because of higher penetration in this system. Long-normal and lateral curves can also be used to determine true resisvity of the formation. But long normal logs cannot pick up thin coal bands and/or thin shale partings within the coal seam because of the 'adjacent bed effect'. Gamma-ray logging can be done in both cased and uncased bore-holes or even in a dry borehole but its resolution for shaly coal or thin coal is not sufficient. Combined study has been found to yield the best results. (Auth.)

  11. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S., E-mail: asw@anl.gov [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sayenko, S.Yu.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Tarasov, R.V.; Rybka, A.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • It incorporates all suggestions by the reviewers. • Explanation to each new term is provided and suitable references are given. • Sample identities have been streamlined by revising the text and the tables. • Some figures have been redrawn. - Abstract: Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete’s tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  12. Gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) flight behavior and phenology based on field-deployed automated pheromone-baited traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick C. Tobin; Kenneth T. Klein; Donna S. Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Populations of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), are extensively monitored in the United States through the use of pheromone-baited traps.We report on use of automated pheromone-baited traps that use a recording sensor and data logger to record the unique date-time stamp of males as they enter the trap.We deployed a total of 352 automated traps...

  13. Gamma rays from relativistic electrons undergoing Compton losses in isotropic photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdziarski, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic equation describing Compton losses of relativistic electrons in an isotropic field of soft background photons is solved exactly including both continuous energy losses in the classical Thomson regime and catastrophic losses in the quantum Klein-Nishina regime. This extends the previous treatments of this problem, which assumed the validity of either one of these regimes alone. The problem is relevant to astrophysical sources containing relativistic electrons. Analytical solutions for the steady state electron and gamma-ray spectra in the case of power-law soft photons and monoenergetic and power-law electron injections are obtained. Numerical solutions are presented for monoenergetic, blackbody, and power-law soft photons. A comparison between the numerical and the available analytic solutions is made. 15 refs

  14. Measurement of neutron and gamma absorbed doses in phantoms exposed to mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.; Lemaire, G.; Maas, J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the dosimetric characteristics of PIN junctions, the absorbed doses measured by junctions and FLi7 in air and water phantoms were compared with the doses measured by classical neutron dosimetry in mixed fields. The validity of the experimental responses of PIN junctions being thus checked and established, neutron and gamma dose distributions in tissue equivalent plastic phantoms (plastinaut) and mammals (piglets) were evaluated as well as the absorbed dose distributions in the pig bone-marrow producing areas. By using correlatively a Monte-Carlo calculation method and applying some simplifying assumptions, the absorbed doses were derived from the spectrum of SILENE's neutrons at various depths inside a cubic water phantom and the results were compared with some from the literature [fr

  15. Field irradiator gamma: pre-irradiation occurrence of breeding birds in three boreal habitats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seabloom, R.W.

    1975-10-01

    A trail census was conducted of the breeding birds found in three major habitats in the Field Irradiator Gamma area at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, Pinawa, Manitoba. The area sampled was about 10.50 ha in size, and included 4.25 ha of upland forest, 4.75 ha of lowland conifers, and 1.50 ha of black spruce-tamarack bog. Forty-four species of birds were identified, of which 24 were considered to be resident in the study area. The highest population density was observed in the bog, followed by upland forest and lowland conifer respectively. In contrast, species diversity was greatest in the upland forest, while it decreased markedly in the relatively monotypic lowland conifer and bog habitats. (author)

  16. Study of the combined action of gamma radiation and static electric fields in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron, Michelle Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The basic principle of radiotherapy is the one of maximizing damage to the tumor, while minimizing it in neighboring health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out aiming at increasing cellular radiosensitivity, and among them is the use of exogenous fields. Our goal in this work is the study in human cells of the effect resulting from the association of irradiation with exposure to exogenous static electric fields. The T47D cell line of breast cancer cells was irradiated with gammas in the 0 - 8 Gy doses range. The corresponding survival curve provided information on the radiosensitivity of this cell line. The rate of cell deaths per Gray in the 0 - 8 Gy range exhibited a maximum at 2 Gy, which corresponds to the most efficient irradiation dose. The viability of this T47D cells exposed to both gamma radiation and 1.250 V/cm static electric field (SEF) was about 12% lower than when only irradiated. The sole exposure of the cells to SEF by 24 and 72 hours didn't induce toxicity. Immunofluorescence runs carried out in irradiated normal MRC5 cell line of human lung fibroblast, without and with exposition to a SEF, have quantified the expression of the y- H2AX histone. The amount of phosphorylated histones was approximately 40% higher after irradiation with 2 Gy plus exposure to a SEF by 1 hour, showing that the electric field negatively interfered in the repairing process of the DNA double strand breaks. The flow cytometry analysis with FACS allowed the investigation of a possible interference of radiation and SEF in the cell distributions among the cellular cycle phases. It was found that in T47D cells treated with 1 and 2 Gy by 24 hours the SEF also negatively interfered in the DNA repairing process, as evidenced by the higher accumulation of cells in the S phase. Therefore, it would be possible to conclude that static and exogenous electric fields are able of negatively interfering in the cellular repair and, presumably, in DNA repair. (author)

  17. Preliminary results on soil-emitted gamma radiation and its relation with the local atmospheric electric field at Amieira (Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, F; Barbosa, S M; Silva, H G; Bárias, S

    2015-01-01

    The atmospheric electric field near the Earth's surface is dominated by atmospheric pollutants and natural radioactivity, with the latter directly linked to radon ( 222 Rn) gas. For a better comprehension on the temporal variability of both the atmospheric electric field and the radon concentration and its relation with local atmospheric variables, simultaneous measurements of soil-emitted gamma radiation and potential gradient (defined from the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field) were taken every minute, along with local meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and daily solar radiation). The study region is Amieira, part of the Alqueva lake in Alentejo Portugal, where an interdisciplinary meteorological campaign, ALEX2014, took place from June to August 2014. Soil gamma radiation is more sensitive to small concentrations of radon as compared with alpha particles measurements, for that reason it is more suited for sites with low radon levels, as expected in this case. Preliminary results are presented here: statistical and spectral analysis show that i) the potential gradient has a stronger daily cycle as compared with the gamma radiation, ii) most of the energy of the gamma signal is concentrated in the low frequencies (close to 0), contrary to the potential gradient that has most of the energy in frequency 1 (daily cycle) and iii) a short-term relation between gamma radiation and the potential gradient has not been found. Future work and plans are also discussed. (paper)

  18. Radiation resistance of elastomeric O-rings in mixed neutron and gamma fields: Testing methodology and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenoni, A.; Bignotti, F.; Donzella, A.; Donzella, G.; Ferrari, M.; Pandini, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Ballan, M.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Scarpa, D.; Alloni, D.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Zelaschi, F.

    2017-11-01

    Materials and components employed in the presence of intense neutron and gamma fields are expected to absorb high dose levels that may induce deep modifications of their physical and mechanical properties, possibly causing loss of their function. A protocol for irradiating elastomeric materials in reactor mixed neutron and gamma fields and for testing the evolution of their main mechanical and physical properties with absorbed dose has been developed. Four elastomeric compounds used for vacuum O-rings, one fluoroelastomer polymer (FPM) based and three ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM) based, presently available on the market have been selected for the test. One EPDM is rated as radiation resistant in gamma fields, while the other elastomers are general purpose products. Particular care has been devoted to dosimetry calculations, since absorbed dose in neutron fields, unlike pure gamma fields, is strongly dependent on the material composition and, in particular, on the hydrogen content. The products have been tested up to about 2 MGy absorbed dose. The FPM based elastomer, in spite of its lower dose absorption in fast neutron fields, features the largest variations of properties, with a dramatic increase in stiffness and brittleness. Out of the three EPDM based compounds, one shows large and rapid changes in the main mechanical properties, whereas the other two feature more stable behaviors. The performance of the EPDM rated as radiation resistant in pure gamma fields does not appear significantly better than that of the standard product. The predictive capability of the accelerated irradiation tests performed as well as the applicable concepts of threshold of radiation damage is discussed in view of the use of the examined products in the selective production of exotic species facility, now under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. It results that a careful account of dose rate effects

  19. Portable scintillation gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in extensive objects; Portativnyj stsintillyatsionnyj gamma-spektrometr dlya izmereniya radioaktivnosti ob''emnykh sred v polevykh usloviyakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besshejko, O. A. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv (Ukraine); Vishnevskij, I. N.; Denisenko, R. V.; Malyuk, I. A.; Petrosyan, Eh. E. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Karpenko, S. A.; Prijmak, V. N. [Ukrainian Association for Valves Industry, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine)

    2011-07-01

    The portable scintillated gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in the volume objects was designed. The crystal CdWO{sub 4} that has weak dependence of light yield from temperature in combination with PMT was applied as the gamma-rays detector. The design of the device provides the possibility for measuring radioactivity of the extensive objects in 4{pi}-geometry without background measurements. In this case the value of the efficiency needed for specific activity calculation in close approximation depends only from crystal geometry and density of measuring object and may be set as the device parameter without efficiency calibration procedure during the operation. The spectrometer does not have an auxiliary radio-active source and connecting cables in the composition. The smartphone operated under Windows Mobile is used as the control module. Bluetooth connection provides data exchange between smartphone and measurement head.

  20. Energy dependence of an ionization chamber with parallel plates in standard gamma and x-radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistella, M.A.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1988-09-01

    The characteristics of low energy X-radiation standard fields were determined and the energy dependence of a ionization chamber of the superficial type, with parallel plates and fixed volume, normally utilized in the dosimetry at the Radiotherapy level was studied. The possibility of adaptation of this chamber type for use in gamma radiation dosimetry was verified. Different thickness Lucite build-up caps, from 2.0 up to 5.5 mm, were produced and tested in 60 Co and 137 Cs gamma radiation fields. This type of detector, with the adequate build-up cap, presented a performance comparable to that of the thimble type ionization chamber. It was concluded that it is not necessary to use different kinds of chambers for each high and mean energy interval. The superficial chamber, specially produced to detect low energy X-radiation, may be adapted to detect gamma radiation. (author) [pt

  1. Breast-specific gamma-imaging: molecular imaging of the breast using 99mTc-sestamibi and a small-field-of-view gamma-camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A; Phan, Trinh D; Blanchard, Deborah A; Miley, Abbe

    2009-12-01

    Breast-specific gamma-imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging, is breast scintigraphy using a small-field-of-view gamma-camera and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. There are many different types of breast cancer, and many have characteristics making them challenging to detect by mammography and ultrasound. BSGI is a cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific technique that complements other imaging modalities currently being used to identify malignant lesions in the breast. Using the current Society of Nuclear Medicine guidelines for breast scintigraphy, Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital began conducting BSGI, breast scintigraphy with a breast-optimized gamma-camera. In our experience, optimal imaging has been conducted in the Breast Center by a nuclear medicine technologist. In addition, the breast radiologists read the BSGI images in correlation with the mammograms, ultrasounds, and other imaging studies performed. By modifying the current Society of Nuclear Medicine protocol to adapt it to the practice of breast scintigraphy with these new systems and by providing image interpretation in conjunction with the other breast imaging studies, our center has found BSGI to be a valuable adjunctive procedure in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The development of a small-field-of-view gamma-camera, designed to optimize breast imaging, has resulted in improved detection capabilities, particularly for lesions less than 1 cm. Our experience with this procedure has proven to aid in the clinical work-up of many of our breast patients. After reading this article, the reader should understand the history of breast scintigraphy, the pharmaceutical used, patient preparation and positioning, imaging protocol guidelines, clinical indications, and the role of breast scintigraphy in breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. Characterization of TL dosimeters for determination of the gamma component in a mixed n+γ radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Ferek, S.; Dvornik, I.; Osvay, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the International Intercomparison of the Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems organized by the Commission of European Communities at SILENE Reactor in Valduc, France, 1993, the Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI) measured the total neutron and gamma tissue absorbed dose (D n+γ ) at the body surface irrespective of neutron and gamma energy spectra variations using the chemical dosimeters DL-M4. For deriving the neutron dose i.e recoil dose, D n , from the differences D n = D n+γ - D t , the total gamma dose (D tγ ) has to be measured with highest accuracy. The determination of the gamma dose in a mixed field is complicated because TL dosimeters are sensitive both to neutrons and gammas. Besides, the radiation doses and energy spectra vary because of scattering and absorption in the body or phantom. Therefore dosimeters with different sensitivities, energy dependences and encapsulations have to be used. In this paper only the study of some characteristics of various TL detectors, such as sensitivity, linearity, supralinearity and fading, for measurement of the gamma component are described. These investigations were carried out in RBI before and after the Valduc intercomparison experiments. The encapsulations, TL response corrections for thermal and fast neutron effects as well as the discussion of Valduc results will be published later

  3. Gasdynamics of relativistically expanding gamma-ray burst sources - Kinematics, energetics, magnetic fields, and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, P.; Laguna, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate both analytically and numerically the evolution of highly relativistic fireballs through the stages of free expansion and coasting, and determine the dependence of the thermodynamic and radiation variables in the comoving and laboratory flames. The dynamics and the comoving geometry change at the (lab) expansion factors r/r(0) greater than eta and r/r(0) greater than eta-squared, respectively, where eta = E(0)/M(0)c-squared is the initial Lorentz factor. In the lab, the gas appears concentrated in a thin shell of width r(0) until r/r(0) of less than about eta-squared, and increases linearly after that. Magnetic fields may have been important in the original impulsive event. We discuss their effect on the fireball dynamics and also consider their effects on the radiation emitted when the fireball runs into an external medium and is decelerated. The inverse synchro-Compton mechanism can then yield high radiative efficiency in the reverse shock (and through turbulent instabilities and mixing also in the forward blast wave), producing a burst of nonthermal radiation mainly in the MeV to GeV range. The energy and duration depend on eta, the magnetic field strength, and the external density, and can match the range of properties observed in cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  4. An estimate of radiation fields in a gamma irradiation facility using fuel elements from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    2002-01-01

    A simple gamma irradiation facility set up using a few irradiated or partially irradiated swimming pool elements can be assembled to provide a convenient facility for irradiation of small and medium sized samples for research. The paper presents results of radiation levels with an arrangement using four elements from a reactor core operating at a power of 20 MW. A maximum gamma field of higher than 1 KGy/h at locations adjacent to fuel elements with negligible neutron contamination can be achieved. (author)

  5. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    large cohort of trials to spot unusual cases. However, deployment repeatability is inherently a nonlinear phenomenon, which makes modeling difficult...and GEMS tip position were both tracked during ground testing by a laser target tracking system. Earlier SAILMAST testing in 2005 [8] used...recalls the strategy used by SRTM, where a constellation of lights was installed at the tip of the boom and a modified star tracker was used to track tip

  6. Studies of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the sensitivity of gamma-ray observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Maria

    2011-02-01

    Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a ground-based high energy gamma radiation detector. This radiation is detected by the measurement of particle showers in the atmosphere. The questions of the origin of the cosmic radiation, the functional principle of cosmic particle accelerators in the area of black holes or the nature of the dark matter are in the scientific goals of CTA. At the moment the instrument is in the planning phase and first results will probably be in 2014. The site of the instrument has an immediate influence on the sensitivity e.g. due to the weather, the height above sea level. Several possible sites for CTA are being considered at the moment including Namibia, Argentina, Canary Islands and Mexico. The geomagnetic field affects the development of showers and distorts the images of the air shower in the telescope. The aim of this work is to quantify the influence of the strength and the direction of the geomagnetic field at the different possible locations on the sensitivity of CTA using Monte Carlo simulations of particle showers. Firstly, we simulated the lateral distribution at the twelve sites. The geomagnetic field of the sites was obtained from the National Geographic Data Center (NGDC). To study the influence of the Earth's magnetic field, we held the altitude of the sites constant at 2000 m. Hence, we could choose two sites per hemisphere which could be potential candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: BeaufortWest (South Africa), El Leoncito (Argentina), La Palma (Canary Islands) and San Pedro Martir (Mexico). To compare the results with a site which is already known, we chose the observatory H.E.S.S. in Namibia. After the study of the energy thresholds and the effective areas we decided in favour of two sites, one in the southern and one in the northern hemisphere. Considering the influence of the geomagnetic field on the predictions, the southern observatory should be in Beaufort West in South Africa. The northern array of CTA

  7. Studies of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the sensitivity of gamma-ray observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Maria

    2011-02-15

    Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a ground-based high energy gamma radiation detector. This radiation is detected by the measurement of particle showers in the atmosphere. The questions of the origin of the cosmic radiation, the functional principle of cosmic particle accelerators in the area of black holes or the nature of the dark matter are in the scientific goals of CTA. At the moment the instrument is in the planning phase and first results will probably be in 2014. The site of the instrument has an immediate influence on the sensitivity e.g. due to the weather, the height above sea level. Several possible sites for CTA are being considered at the moment including Namibia, Argentina, Canary Islands and Mexico. The geomagnetic field affects the development of showers and distorts the images of the air shower in the telescope. The aim of this work is to quantify the influence of the strength and the direction of the geomagnetic field at the different possible locations on the sensitivity of CTA using Monte Carlo simulations of particle showers. Firstly, we simulated the lateral distribution at the twelve sites. The geomagnetic field of the sites was obtained from the National Geographic Data Center (NGDC). To study the influence of the Earth's magnetic field, we held the altitude of the sites constant at 2000 m. Hence, we could choose two sites per hemisphere which could be potential candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: BeaufortWest (South Africa), El Leoncito (Argentina), La Palma (Canary Islands) and San Pedro Martir (Mexico). To compare the results with a site which is already known, we chose the observatory H.E.S.S. in Namibia. After the study of the energy thresholds and the effective areas we decided in favour of two sites, one in the southern and one in the northern hemisphere. Considering the influence of the geomagnetic field on the predictions, the southern observatory should be in Beaufort West in South Africa. The northern array

  8. Cooperative Technolgy Deployed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.; Velt, R. in 't

    2011-01-01

    After the successful demonstrations of cooperative technology by the CVIS and Safespot projects the question remains how this technology can be successfully deployed. This question is explored by the Field Operational Test project FREILOT, which aims to provide fuel economy applications that must be

  9. Method for measuring and evaluation dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons in mixed gamma-neutron fields around particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruceru, I.; Sandu, M.; Cruceru, M.

    1994-01-01

    A method for measuring and evaluation of doses and dose equivalent rate in mixed gamma- neutron fields is discussed in this paper. The method is basedon a double detector system consist of an ionization chamber with components made from a plastic scintillator, coupled to on photomultiplier. Generally the radiation fields around accelerators are complex, often consisting of many different ionizing radiations extending over a broad range of energies. This method solve two major difficulties: determination of response functions of radiation detectors; interpretation of measurement and determination of accuracy. The discrimination gamma-fast neutrons is assured directly without a pulse shape discrimination circuit. The method is applied to mixed fields in which particle energies are situated in the energy range under 20 MeV and an izotropic emision (Φ=10 4 -10 11 n.s -1 ). The dose equivalent rates explored is 0.01mSV--0.1SV

  10. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibuchi, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Sakae, T.; Terunuma, T.; Isobe, T.; Kawamura, H.; Yasuoka, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Harano, H.; Nishiyama, J.; Masuda, A.; Nohtomi, A.

    2011-01-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field. (authors)

  11. Monte Carlo and experimental determination of correction factors for gamma knife perfexion small field dosimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoros, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pappas, E. P.; Georgiou, E.; Kollias, G.; Karaiskos, P.; Pantelis, E.

    2017-09-01

    Detector-, field size- and machine-specific correction factors are required for precise dosimetry measurements in small and non-standard photon fields. In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques were used to calculate the k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} and k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors for a series of ionization chambers, a synthetic microDiamond and diode dosimeters, used for reference and/or output factor (OF) measurements in the Gamma Knife Perfexion photon fields. Calculations were performed for the solid water (SW) and ABS plastic phantoms, as well as for a water phantom of the same geometry. MC calculations for the k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors in SW were compared against corresponding experimental results for a subset of ionization chambers and diode detectors. Reference experimental OF data were obtained through the weighted average of corresponding measurements using TLDs, EBT-2 films and alanine pellets. k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} values close to unity (within 1%) were calculated for most of ionization chambers in water. Greater corrections of up to 6.0% were observed for chambers with relatively large air-cavity dimensions and steel central electrode. A phantom correction of 1.006 and 1.024 (breaking down to 1.014 from the ABS sphere and 1.010 from the accompanying ABS phantom adapter) were calculated for the SW and ABS phantoms, respectively, adding up to k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} corrections in water. Both measurements and MC calculations for the diode and microDiamond detectors resulted in lower than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors, due to their denser sensitive volume and encapsulation materials. In comparison, higher than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} results for the ionization chambers suggested field size depended dose underestimations (being significant for the 4 mm field), with magnitude depending on the combination of

  12. Three-dimensional density field determination by external stationary detectors and gamma sources using selective scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.; Jacobs, A.; Ebert, D.

    1983-01-01

    In many fields one needs to know the spatial density distribution; two-phase systems are of particular importance. In particular, gas-liquid mixtures play a role in power generation, chemistry, bio-medicine etc. An intrusion into the measured system is frequently undesired or not permitted. Therefore, external, non-invasive instrumentation has definite advantages. Photon-energy discrimination methods, measuring scattered fluxes, can employ stationary equipment; they need partial collimation or only protective shielding. The results are achieved with a higher information/irradiation ratio than is the case with transmission methods. The utilization a mesh of isogonic lines (each of them being characterised by its particular scattering angle) has several advantages when compared with the mesh of straight lines (''pencil beams'') used in tomography. The ultimate experimental arrangement employing Compton scattering has fan/fan beam geometry, i.e., wide angle emitting and receiving of gammas. The direct result of the measurement is a ''scattergram'', i.e., countrate versus scattered energy spectrum. Besides representing the ''signature'' of a two- or three-dimensional density distribution, it also enables the reconstruction of local density values. The report outlines the necessary analysis and presents experimental proof of principle

  13. The field-irradiator gamma study: Fourteen years of irradiation of the boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.; Hawkins, J.L.; Laverock, M.J.; Sheppard, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Field-Irradiator Gamma (FIG) project is a long-term experiment on the response of boreal forest vegetation to chronic ionizing radiation. The forest was irradiated from 1973 to 1986 by a 370 TBq point source of 137 Cs placed at a height of 20 m. The forest is now in the recovery phase. The irradiated forest included several different community types, and each of these was affected differently by the radiation stress. New vegetation zones have now been created because of the selective tolerance to radiation along a gradient from background dose rates to a maximum of 65 mGy h -1 . One of the easiest measured indicators of the radiation stress has been photographic documentation of changes in forest communities over time. Measured changes in species composition and the decrease in tree canopy cover at dose rates >2 Gy h -1 have also helped quantify radiation effects. Indicators such as trends in annual growth rings have been less satisfactory. Our experiment suggests that there are no visible impacts at chronic dose rates less than 0.1 mGy h -1 and the threshold for effects likely is between 0.1 and 1 mGy h -1 . The experimental area has been preserved to allow measurements of long-term recovery of the site

  14. Determining the true polarity and amplitude of synaptic currents underlying gamma oscillations of local field potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martín-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in successive waves of oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs reflect the ongoing processing of neuron populations. However, their amplitude, polarity and synaptic origin are uncertain due to the blending of electric fields produced by multiple converging inputs, and the lack of a baseline in standard AC-coupled recordings. Consequently, the estimation of underlying currents by laminar analysis yields spurious sequences of inward and outward currents. We devised a combined analytical/experimental approach that is suitable to study laminated structures. The approach was essayed on an experimental oscillatory LFP as the Schaffer-CA1 gamma input in anesthetized rats, and it was verified by parallel processing of model LFPs obtained through a realistic CA1 aggregate of compartmental units. This approach requires laminar LFP recordings and the isolation of the oscillatory input from other converging pathways, which was achieved through an independent component analysis. It also allows the spatial and temporal components of pathway-specific LFPs to be separated. While reconstructed Schaffer-specific LFPs still show spurious inward/outward current sequences, these were clearly stratified into distinct subcellular domains. These spatial bands guided the localized delivery of neurotransmitter blockers in experiments. As expected, only Glutamate but not GABA blockers abolished Schaffer LFPs when applied to the active but not passive subcellular domains of pyramidal cells. The known chemical nature of the oscillatory LFP allowed an empirical offset of the temporal component of Schaffer LFPs, such that following reconstruction they yield only sinks or sources at the appropriate sites. In terms of number and polarity, some waves increased and others decreased proportional to the concomitant inputs in native multisynaptic LFPs. Interestingly, the processing also retrieved the initiation time for each wave, which can be used to discriminate

  15. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  16. TeV gamma rays from 3C 279 - A possible probe of origin and intergalactic infrared radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; De Jager, O. C.; Salamon, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of 3C 279 during 1991 June exhibited a near-perfect power law between 50 MeV and over 5 GeV with a differential spectral index of -(2.02 +/- 0.07). If extrapolated, the gamma-ray spectrum of 3C 279 should be easily detectable with first-generation air Cerenkov detectors operating above about 0.3 TeV provided there is no intergalactic absorption. However, by using model-dependent lower and upper limits for the extragalactic infrared background radiation field, a sharp cutoff of the 3C 279 spectrum is predicted at between about 0.1 and about 1 TeV. The sensitivity of present air Cerenkov detectors is good enough to measure such a cutoff, which would provide the first opportunity to obtain a measurement of the extragalactic background infrared radiation field.

  17. Application of gamma-field measurement to computer-assisted management of pressurized water nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, R.; Schwedusch, F.

    1990-01-01

    The high requirements on NPP operation to be nuclear safe and optimal with regard to electricity production need high redundancy and diversity in the instrumentation being implemented. As a contribution of the Zittau Technical University to development of alternative measuring techniques for primary coolant circuit monitoring, application of gamma-field measurement for determination of reactor power and power distribution is described. Theoretical foundation and conclusions herefrom derived are explained. (author)

  18. Treatment for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in French Soldiers Deployed in Sub-Saharan Africa: Gaps Between Policy and Field Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisse, Anne; Velut, Guillaume; Javelle, Emilie; Loarer, Gwion; Michel, Remy; Simon, F

    2018-02-07

    Malaria prevention and treatment are big challenges for the French forces deployed in sub-Saharan Africa. Since December 2013, 1,800 French soldiers have been deployed at any one time in the Central African Republic in the framework of "Operation Sangaris" and European Union Force (EUFOR). Over the 2014-2015 period, about 500 cases of malaria were notified in these troops during the operation or after their return (annual incidence: 13.4 p.100 person-year). The recommendation to use dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) as the first-line treatment for French soldiers suffering from uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in endemic areas is not always followed in practice in the field by French military general practitioners (GPs). We conduced a retrospective Knowledge-Attitude-Practice study by self-administered questionnaire, to all military French doctors who were in mission in Central African Republic from January 2014 to July 2015 to try to understand what were the reasons for the GP not to prescribe DHA-PQ on the field. Thirty-six GPs (53%) answered to the questionnaire. Eighty-three percent of them knew about the recommendation to use DHA-PQ for un uncomplicated Pf malaria. Fifty-eight percent had a favorable attitude toward DHA-PQ. The factors associated with the prescription of another drug (Atovaquone-proguanil) were: the habit (odds ratio [OR] 0.1, confidence interval (CI) 0-0.6], the fact that Atovaquone-proguanil is more practical to use [OR 0.01, CI 0-0.1]. In practice, only 37.5% prescribed DHA-PQ the most of the time during their mission. Factors associated with a non-favorable attitude toward DHA-PQ were: the necessity to calculate a QTc interval during the treatment [OR 0.2, confidence interval 0-0.9], and the fact that DHA-PQ must be taken on an empty stomach [OR 0.3, CI 0.1-0.8]. GP who received a formation before their mission about malaria and treatment had a favorable attitude toward DHA-PQ. There is very satisfactory knowledge by the

  19. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herges, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  20. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  1. Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometry of the terrestrial nightglow with a bare charge-coupled device; Remote field site deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Killeen, T.L.; Turnbull, M.

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) to the study of upper atmosphere thermodynamics has largely been restricted by the very low light levels in the terrestrial airglow as well as the limited range in wavelength of photomultiplier tube (PMT) technology. During the past decade, the development of the scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) has progressed to the stage in which the detector has become the logical replacement for the PMT. Small fast microcomputers have made it possible to ''upgrade'' the remote field sites which bare CCDs and not only retain the previous capabilities of the existing FPIs but expand the data coverage in both temporal and wavelength domains. The problems encountered and the solutions applied to the deployment of a bare CCD, with data acquisition and image reduction techniques, are discussed. Sample geophysical data determined from the FPI fringe profiles are shown for stations at Peach Mountain, Michigan, and Watson Lake, Yukon Territory

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  4. Validation of the Pockit Dengue Virus Reagent Set for Rapid Detection of Dengue Virus in Human Serum on a Field-Deployable PCR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jih-Jin; Liu, Li-Teh; Lin, Ping-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chou, Pin-Hsing; Tsai, Yun-Long; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison

    2018-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection, a mosquito-borne disease, is a major public health problem in tropical countries. Point-of-care DENV detection with good sensitivity and specificity enables timely early diagnosis of DENV infection, facilitating effective disease management and control, particularly in regions of low resources. The Pockit dengue virus reagent set (GeneReach Biotech), a reverse transcription insulated isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR), is available to detect all four serotypes of DENV on the field-deployable Pockit system, which is ready for on-site applications. In this study, analytical and clinical performances of the assay were evaluated. The index assay did not react with 14 non-DENV human viruses, indicating good specificity. Compared to the U.S. CDC DENV-1-4 real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay, testing with serial dilutions of virus-spiked human sera demonstrated that the index assay had detection endpoints that were separately comparable with the 4 serotypes. Excellent reproducibility was observed among repeat tests done by six operators at three sites. In clinical performance, 195 clinical sera collected around Kaohsiung city in 2012 and 21 DENV-4-spiked sera were tested with the RT-iiPCR and qRT-PCR assays in parallel. The 121 (11 DENV-1, 78 DENV-2, 11 DENV-3, and 21 DENV-4) qRT-PCR-positive and 95 qRT-PCR-negative samples were all positive and negative by the RT-iiPCR reagent results, respectively, demonstrating high (100%) interrater agreement (95% confidence interval [CI 95% ], ∼98.81% to 100%; κ = 1). With analytical and clinical performance equivalent to those of the reference qRT-PCR assay, the index PCR assay on the field-deployable system can serve as a highly sensitive and specific on-site tool for DENV detection. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Field-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) Assay for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambagala, A; Fisher, M; Goolia, M; Nfon, C; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Ortega Polo, R; Lung, O

    2017-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, which can decimate the livestock industry and economy of countries previously free of this disease. Rapid detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is critical to containing an FMD outbreak. Availability of a rapid, highly sensitive and specific, yet simple and field-deployable assay would support local decision-making during an FMDV outbreak. Here we report validation of a novel reverse transcription-insulated isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay that can be performed on a commercially available, compact and portable POCKIT ™ analyser that automatically analyses data and displays '+' or '-' results. The FMDV RT-iiPCR assay targets the 3D region of the FMDV genome and was capable of detecting 9 copies of in vitro-transcribed RNA standard with 95% confidence. It accurately identified 63 FMDV strains belonging to all seven serotypes and showed no cross-reactivity with viruses causing similar clinical diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. The assay was able to identify FMDV RNA in multiple sample types including oral, nasal and lesion swabs, epithelial tissue suspensions, vesicular and oral fluid samples, even before the appearance of clinical signs. Clinical sensitivity of the assay was comparable or slightly higher than the laboratory-based real-time RT-PCR assay in use. The assay was able to detect FMDV RNA in vesicular fluid samples without nucleic acid extraction. For RNA extraction from more complex sample types, a commercially available taco ™ mini transportable magnetic bead-based, automated extraction system was used. This assay provides a potentially useful field-deployable diagnostic tool for rapid detection of FMDV in an outbreak in FMD-free countries or for routine diagnostics in endemic countries with less structured laboratory systems. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  6. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I. (Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States) Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author).

  7. Development of a Small, Inexpensive, and Field-deployable Gas Chromatograph for the Automated Collection, Separation, and Analysis of Gas-phase Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K.; Xiong, F.; Gentner, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The identification and quantification of gas-phase organic compounds, like volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in the atmosphere relies on separation of complex mixtures and sensitive detection. Gas chromatography (GC) is widely applied, but relies on the need for high-purity compressed gases for separation and, often for detection. We have developed a low-cost, compact GC-based system for the collection and quantitative chemical speciation of complex mixtures of common atmospheric VOCs without the need for compressed high-purity gases or expensive detectors. We present results of lab and field testing against a commercially-available GC system. At optimized linear velocities challenging VOC pairs of similar volatility were resolved within 30 minutes, including n- and i-pentane; n-pentane and isoprene; and ethylbenzene and m/p-xylene. For 5-30 minute samples, we observe ppt-level detection limits for common VOCs such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, alpha-pinene, and limonene. We also present results of in-field use for VOC measurements. In all, this instrument is accurate, precise, small, and inexpensive (<$2500). Its lack of compressed gas cylinders make it ideal for field deployment and has been demonstrated to produce similar quality data to available GC technology.

  8. Effect of stars in the field of view of the VHE gamma-ray atmospheric Cherenkov telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badran, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range above 100 GeV has made dramatic progress through the development of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (lACTs). The technique has been pivotal in the establishing the existence of a number of discrete gamma-ray sources. Normally due to the presence of stars in the field of view (FOV), a number of photomultiplier tubes (pmts) in the camera has to be turned off. This may have the effect of distorting some images that happens to be in that part of the camera. This may in turn affect the gamma-ray sensitivity of the telescope. The present study aims to shade some light on this possible effect. Experimental data on the extragalactic gamma-ray source Mrk 421 measured using the 10-m Whipple IACT were used for this purpose because of its relative dark FOV compared with other sources; e.g. the Crab nebula. To simulate the presence of star(s) in the FOV, the analysis program selects randomly a number of clusters of pmts to be turned off in the software. The pmts in each cluster have to be adjacent to each other (neighbors) and the selected clusters have to be separated from each other. The significance of the detected signal and the gamma-ray rate were then determined and compared with the original results. Clusters of 2, 3 and 4 pmts were used. The number of clusters was increased up to 12 clusters at various distances from the center of the FOV

  9. Differences in TLD 600 and TLD 700 glow curves derived from distict mixed gamma/neutron field irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalieri, Tassio A.; Castro, Vinicius A.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.

    2013-01-01

    In Neutron Capture Therapy, a thermal neutron beam shall impinge on a specific nuclide, such as 10 B, to promote a nuclear reaction which releases the useful therapeutic energy. A nuclear reactor is usually used as the neutron source, and therefore field contaminants such as gamma and high energy neutrons are also present in the field. However, mixed field dosimetry still stands as a challenge in some cases, due to the difficulty to experimentally discriminate the dose from each field component. For the mixed field dosimetry, the International Commission on Radiation end Units (ICRU) recommends the use of detector pairs with different responses for each beam component. The TLD 600/700 pair meets this need, because these LiF detectors have different Li isotopes concentration, with distinct thermal neutron responses because 6 Li presents a much higher neutron capture cross section than does 7 Li for low energy neutrons. TLD 600 is 6 Li enriched while TLD 700 is 7 Li enriched. However, depending on the neutron spectrum presented in the mixed field, TLD 700 response to thermal neutrons cannot be disregarded. This work aims to study the difference in TLD 600 and TLD 700 glow curves when these TLDs are submitted to mixed fields of different energy spectra and components balance. The TLDs were irradiated in a pure gamma source, and in mixed fields from an AmBe sealed source and from the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. These TLDs were read and had their two main dosimetric regions analyzed to observe the differences in the glow curves of these TLDs in each irradiation. Field components discrimination was achieved through Monte Carlo simulations run with MCNP radiation transport code. (author)

  10. X-ray observations of the 5 March 1979. gamma. -burst field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfand, D J; Long, K S [Columbia Univ., New York (USA). Columbia Astrophysics Lab.

    1979-12-06

    On 5 March 1979 an extremely intense burst of hard X-rays and ..gamma..-rays was recorded by the nine interplanetary spacecraft of the burst sensor network and localised by time-of-flight determinations to a position coincident with the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Several times, both before and after the ..gamma..-ray event, this region of the sky was observed with the soft X-ray imaging instruments aboard the Einstein Observatory. Coupled with optical plate material, the soft x-ray data are used here to place severe constraints on models for the origin of this remarkable transient phenomenon.

  11. Wide-Field Gamma-Spectrometer BDRG: GRB Monitor On-Board the Lomonosov Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Amelushkin, A. M.; Barinova, V. O.; Galkin, V. I.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Petrov, V. L.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Yashin, I. V.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunov, V. M.; Park, I. H.; Jeong, S.; Kim, M. B.

    2018-02-01

    The study of GRB prompt emissions (PE) is one of the main goals of the Lomonosov space mission. The payloads of the GRB monitor (BDRG) with the wide-field optical cameras (SHOK) and the ultra-fast flash observatory (UFFO) onboard the Lomonosov satellite are intended for the observation of GRBs, and in particular, their prompt emissions. The BDRG gamma-ray spectrometer is designed to obtain the temporal and spectral information of GRBs in the energy range of 10-3000 keV as well as to provide GRB triggers on several time scales (10 ms, 1 s and 20 s) for ground and space telescopes, including the UFFO and SHOK. The BDRG instrument consists of three identical detector boxes with axes shifted by 90° from each other. This configuration allows us to localize a GRB source in the sky with an accuracy of ˜ 2°. Each BDRG box contains a phoswich NaI(Tl)/CsI(Tl) scintillator detector. A thick CsI(Tl) crystal in size of \\varnothing 130 × 17 mm is placed underneath the NaI(Tl) as an active shield in the soft energy range and as the main detector in the hard energy range. The ratio of the CsI(Tl) to NaI(Tl) event rates at varying energies can be employed as an independent metric to distinguish legitimate GRB signals from false positives originating from electrons in near-Earth vicinities. The data from three detectors are collected in a BA BDRG information unit, which generates a GRB trigger and a set of data frames in output format. The scientific data output is ˜ 500 Mb per day, including ˜ 180 Mb of continuous data for events with durations in excess of 100 ms for 16 channels in each detector, detailed energy spectra, and sets of frames with ˜ 5 Mb of detailed information for each burst-like event. A number of pre-flight tests including those for the trigger algorithm and calibration were carried out to confirm the reliability of the BDRG for operation in space.

  12. Determination of effective dose in anisotropic gamma radiation fields: application of dosimeters calibrated in terms of Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V. V.; Bakhanova, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    In this presentation authors deals with determination of effective dose in anisotropic gamma radiation fields. It was conclude that: - Straightforward application of Hp(10) as surrogate for E may not work under certain conditions; - Partial data on behavior of E and Hp(10) for different dosimeters allow to estimate E/Hp(10) conversion coefficients for any particular composite source; - In practical situations, anisotropy of workplace fields may be measured by six- collimator device assessing contribution to a dose from six orthogonal directions; - Reasonably conservative conversion coefficients may be assessed for given energy spectrum and degree of anisotropy of workplace fields; - For strongly anisotropic fields multiple dosimetry approach gives the best estimate of E comparing to plain Hp(10) readouts or integral conversion coefficients

  13. Frontal eye fields control attentional modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations in contralateral occipitoparietal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, T.R.; O'Shea, J.; Jensen, O.; Bergmann, T.O.

    2015-01-01

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8-12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted

  14. Radiation anomaly detection algorithms for field-acquired gamma energy spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ron; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing a tactical, networked radiation detection system that will be agile, reconfigurable, and capable of rapid threat assessment with high degree of fidelity and certainty. Our design is driven by the needs of users such as law enforcement personnel who must make decisions by evaluating threat signatures in urban settings. The most efficient tool available to identify the nature of the threat object is real-time gamma spectroscopic analysis, as it is fast and has a very low probability of producing false positive alarm conditions. Urban radiological searches are inherently challenged by the rapid and large spatial variation of background gamma radiation, the presence of benign radioactive materials in terms of the normally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and shielded and/or masked threat sources. Multiple spectral anomaly detection algorithms have been developed by national laboratories and commercial vendors. For example, the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) a one-dimensional deterministic radiation transport software capable of calculating gamma ray spectra using physics-based detector response functions was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection algorithm (or NSCRAD), developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses spectral comparison ratios to detect deviation from benign medical and NORM radiation source and can work in spite of strong presence of NORM and or medical sources. RSL has developed its own wavelet-based gamma energy spectral anomaly detection algorithm called WAVRAD. Test results and relative merits of these different algorithms will be discussed and demonstrated.

  15. Ionization processes in the Fe 27 region of hot iron plasma in the field of hard gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illarionov, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    A highly ionized hot plasma of an iron 26 56 Fe-type heavy element in the field of hard ionizing gamma-ray radiation is considered. The processes of ionization and recombination are discussed for a plasma consisting of the fully ionized Fe 27 and the hydrogen-like Fe 26 ions of iron in the case of large optical depth of the plasma with respect to the photoionization by gamma-ray quanta. The self-ionization process of a hot plasma with the temperature kT ≅ I (I being the ionization potential), due to the production of the own ionizing gamma-ray quanta, by the free-free (ff) and recombination (fb) radiation mechanisms, is investigated. It is noted that in the stationary situation the process of self-ionization of a hot plasma imposes the restriction upon the plasma temperature, kT<1.5 I. It is shown that the ionization of heavy-ion plasma by the impact of thermal electrons is dominating over the processes of ff- and fb-selfionization of plasma only by the large concentration of hydrogen-like iron at the periphery of the region of fully ionized iron Fe 27

  16. New insight into $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H\\gamma$ process at thermal energy with pionless effective field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Arani, M. Moeini; Nematollahi, H.; Mahboubi, N.; Bayegan, S.

    2014-01-01

    We take a new look at the neutron radiative capture by a deuteron at thermal energy with the pionless effective field theory (EFT($\\pi\\!\\!\\!/$)) approach. We present in detail the calculation of $nd\\rightarrow$ $^3H\\gamma$ amplitudes for incoming doublet and quartet channels leading to the formation of a triton fully in the projection method based on the cluster-configuration space approach. In the present work, we consider all possible one-body and two-body photon interaction diagrams. In fa...

  17. Poker-camp: a program for calculating detector responses and phantom organ doses in environmental gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblinger, L.

    1981-09-01

    A general description, user's manual and a sample problem are given in this report on the POKER-CAMP adjoint Monte Carlo photon transport program. Gamma fields of different environmental sources which are uniformly or exponentially distributed sources or plane sources in the air, in the soil or in an intermediate layer placed between them are simulated in the code. Calculations can be made on flux, kerma and spectra of photons at any point; and on responses of point-like, cylindrical, or spherical detectors; and on doses absorbed in anthropomorphic phantoms. (author)

  18. The Next Step in Deployment of Computer Based Procedures For Field Workers: Insights And Results From Field Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L.; Bly, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human operator interacts with the procedures. One way to achieve these improvements is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping, correct component verification, etc.), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the operator down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the operator’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBP system for field workers, which has been evaluated from a human factors and usability perspective in four laboratory studies. Based on the results from each study revisions were made to the CBP system. However, a crucial step to get the end users' (e.g., auxiliary operators, maintenance technicians, etc.) acceptance is to put the system in their hands and let them use it as a part of their everyday work activities. In the spring 2014 the first field evaluation of the INL CBP system was conducted at a nuclear power plant. Auxiliary operators conduct a functional test of one out of three backup air compressors each week. During the field evaluation activity, one auxiliary operator conducted the test with the paper-based procedure while a second auxiliary operator

  19. Quality function deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This book indicates quality function deployment with quality and deployment of quality function, process and prospect of quality function deployment and development, product process and conception of quality table, deployment of quality demand, design of quality table and application of concurrent multi design, progress design and quality development, main safe part and management of important function part, quality development and deployment of method of construction, quality deployment and economics, total system of quality function deployment and task of quality function deployment in the present and future.

  20. A comparison of the effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields and gamma ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savova, G.; Stankova, K. [Molecular Radiobiology and Prophylaxis Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kuzmanova, M. [Sofia University „St. Kl. Ohridski”, Faculty of Biology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    The usage of mobile phones increased significantly in the last 15 years. The concerns about the potential negative health effects arise, because of the daily use of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. EMF, produced by cell phones may affect biological systems by increasing the production of free radicals, and even DNA damage. Other environmental factor, with an impact on humans’ life is the ionizing radiation. The main purpose of this work is to compare the effects of 900-MHz radiofrequency fields and gamma-ionizing radiation (γ-IR) on the levels of free radicals and DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The EMF generated, at a power of 2W used for cell phone applications, led to a significant increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not in persisting DNA damage 2h post-exposure. In contrast, irradiation with 4Gy of gamma rays increased dramatically both - the intracellular ROS and the DNA damage compared to background. (author)

  1. Continuous Monitoring of GAMMA Radiation Field in the Reactor RA Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalevski, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the system for continuos monitoring of gamma doze rate in the reactor RA building. Industrial (PC compatible) computer acquires analog signals from eight ionization chambers and eight analog signals from three BPH devices. Digital output interface is used for testing ionization chambers and BPH devices. Computer program for data analyzes and presentation is written in graphical programming language LabVIEW and enables monitoring of measured data in real time. Measured data can be monitored over local computer network, Internet and mobile devices using standard web browsers. (author)

  2. Program system for computation of the terrestrial gamma-radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkegaard, P.; Loevborg, L.

    1979-02-01

    A system of computer programs intended for solution of the plane one-dimensional photon transport equation in the case of two adjacent media is described, and user's guides for the programs are given. One medium represents a natural ground with uniformly distributed potassium, uranium, and thorium gamma-ray emitters. The other medium is usually air with no radioactive contaminants. The solution method is the double-P 1 approximation with logarithmic energy spacing. The complete data-processing system GB contains the transport-theory code GAMP1, the code GFX for computation of scalar flux and dose rate, and a number of auxiliary programs and data files. (author)

  3. Effect of corona electric field on the production of gamma-poly glutamic acid based on bacillus natto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hong; Na, Ri; Xin, Jiletu; Jie Xie, Ya; Guo, Jiu Feng

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus Natto is an important strain for gamma-poly glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production. The mutagenesis of Bacillus Natto 20646 under corona electric field and the screening of high γ-PGA producing mutant were investigated. A new mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 was isolated from Bacillus Natto 20646 after mutation in corona electric field at 9kV for 2min. The Ndlz01 exhibited genetic stability of high γ-PGA producing ability even after five generation cultures. When the bacterium was mutated in streamer discharge state at 9kV for 2min, its death rate was more than 90%. Compared with the yield of γ-PGA based on the original Bacillus Natto 20646, the γ-PGA yield of mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 increased from 2.6 to 5.94 g/L, with an increase rate of 129.78%.

  4. Effect of corona electric field on the production of gamma-poly glutamic acid based on bacillus natto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Hong; Na, Ri; Xin, Jiletu; Xie, Ya Jie; Guo, Jiu Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus Natto is an important strain for gamma-poly glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production. The mutagenesis of Bacillus Natto 20646 under corona electric field and the screening of high γ-PGA producing mutant were investigated. A new mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 was isolated from Bacillus Natto 20646 after mutation in corona electric field at 9kV for 2min. The Ndlz01 exhibited genetic stability of high γ-PGA producing ability even after five generation cultures. When the bacterium was mutated in streamer discharge state at 9kV for 2min, its death rate was more than 90%. Compared with the yield of γ-PGA based on the original Bacillus Natto 20646, the γ-PGA yield of mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 increased from 2.6 to 5.94 g/L, with an increase rate of 129.78%.

  5. The radiation field in the New Gamma Irradiation Facility GIF++ at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Dorothea

    2017-09-11

    The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting now a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a particle background in the gas-based muon detectors that is ten times higher than under conditions at the LHC. The detailed knowledge of the detector performance in the presence of such a high background is crucial for an optimized design and efficient operation after the HL-LHC upgrade. A precise understanding of possible aging effects of detector materials and gases is of extreme importance. To cope with these challenging requirements, a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) was designed and built at the CERN SPS North Area as successor of the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) during the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) period. It features an intense source of 662 keV photons with adjustable intensity, to simulate continuous background over large areas, and, combined with a high energy muon beam, to measure detector performance in the presence of the background. The new ...

  6. Effect of gamma rays and chemical mutagens on induction of polygenic variability in field bean (Dolichos lablab)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakanth, R.S.; Seetharam, A.; Patil, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    Polygenic variability induced for 3 quantitative characters viz., flowering time, seed yield and 100 grain weight was studied in one of the local varieties (L 1 ) following treatments with gamma rays, NMU and NMG in M 2 generation. In all there were 16 treatments, five each in gamma rays (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Krad), NMU(0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 percent) and NMG(0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005 and 0.006 percent) and one control. A polygenic trail was laid out with all the 16 treatments in a randomised block deisgn with 4 replications. Mean and variance were calculated for all the 3 characters and the values were significantly different compared to control. Mean values were significantly higher than the control in several treatments for seed yield per plant and grain weight, besides flowering was also earlier in many treatments. Similarly variance was also found to be significantly higher in many treatments. Out of 15 treatments, 9 showed significantly higher variance value than control for seed yield and grain weight while 14 out of 15 treatments showed enlarged variance for flowering time. In case of gamma rays, variance was maximum at 30 Krad for seed yield and flowering time whereas for grain weight maximum variance was at 40 Krad. Among NMU treatments, maximum variance was induced at 0.04 and 0.05 percent treatments. With regard to NMG treatments 0.005 and 0.006 percent were the most effective. The results obtained in this study are suggestive of the fact that the field bean responds favourably for the induction of polyqenic variability. Since the induced variability is more towards the positive side there is a greater scope for selection and subsequent improvement of this crop species. (author)

  7. Field {gamma}-ray spectrometry on the Vulcano island (Aeolian Arc, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiozzi, P.; Pasquale, V.; Russo, D.; Verdoya, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); De Felice, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologica delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti ENEA, Dipartimento Ambiente, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    In situ NaI(Tl) {gamma}-ray spectrometric measurements on the Vulcano island show that the magmatic evolution of the main structural units is reflected by the uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations. The results allowed us to delineate two temporal and radiometric districts. The older district comprises lava flows and pyroclastics of mafic composition forming the whole southern part of the island, with an equivalent uranium concentration and an eTh/eU ratio ranging, on average, from 2.9 to 3.4 ppm and from 2.4 to 4.1, respectively. Rocks of the younger district, ranging from leucitic tephritic and trachytic to rhyolitic composition, show higher K contents (about 6%) and more variable eTh/eU ratios (2.4-6.1)

  8. An insulated isothermal PCR method on a field-deployable device for rapid and sensitive detection of canine parvovirus type 2 at points of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T

    2015-08-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), including subtypes 2a, 2b and 2c, causes an acute enteric disease in both domestic and wild animals. Rapid and sensitive diagnosis aids effective disease management at points of need (PON). A commercially available, field-deployable and user-friendly system, designed with insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) technology, displays excellent sensitivity and specificity for nucleic acid detection. An iiPCR method was developed for on-site detection of all circulating CPV-2 strains. Limit of detection was determined using plasmid DNA. CPV-2a, 2b and 2c strains, a feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) strain, and nine canine pathogens were tested to evaluate assay specificity. Reaction sensitivity and performance were compared with an in-house real-time PCR using serial dilutions of a CPV-2b strain and 100 canine fecal clinical samples collected from 2010 to 2014, respectively. The 95% limit of detection of the iiPCR method was 13 copies of standard DNA and detection limits for CPV-2b DNA were equivalent for iiPCR and real-time PCR. The iiPCR reaction detected CPV-2a, 2b and 2c and FPV. Non-targeted pathogens were not detected. Test results of real-time PCR and iiPCR from 99 fecal samples agreed with each other, while one real-time PCR-positive sample tested negative by iiPCR. Therefore, excellent agreement (k = 0.98) with sensitivity of 98.41% and specificity of 100% in detecting CPV-2 in feces was found between the two methods. In conclusion, the iiPCR system has potential to serve as a useful tool for rapid and accurate PON, molecular detection of CPV-2. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intercomparison of personnel dosimetry for thermal neutron dose equivalent in neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    1985-01-01

    In order to consider the problems concerned with personnel dosimetry using film badges and TLDs, an intercomparison of personnel dosimetry, especially dose equivalent responses of personnel dosimeters to thermal neutron, was carried out in five different neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields at KUR and UTR-KINKI from the practical point of view. For the estimation of thermal neutron dose equivalent, it may be concluded that each personnel dosimeter has good performances in the precision, that is, the standard deviations in the measured values by individual dosimeter were within 24 %, and the dose equivalent responses to thermal neutron were almost independent on cadmium ratio and gamma-ray contamination. However, the relative thermal neutron dose equivalent of individual dosimeter normalized to the ICRP recommended value varied considerably and a difference of about 4 times was observed among the dosimeters. From the results obtained, it is suggested that the standardization of calibration factors and procedures is required from the practical point of radiation protection and safety. (author)

  10. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  11. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Chen, H; Tsai, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ( 6 LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ( 7 LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  12. Resolution, efficiency and stability of HPGe detector operating in a magnetic field at various gamma-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanska, K.; Achenbach, P.; Agnello, M.; Botta, E.; Bracco, A.; Bressani, T.; Camera, F.; Cederwall, B.; Feliciello, A.; Ferro, F.; Gerl, J.; Iazzi, F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Saito, T.R.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Tegner, P.-E.; Wieland, O.

    2008-01-01

    The use of High Purity Germanium detectors (HPGe) has been planned in some future experiments of hadronic physics. The crystals will be located close to large spectrometers where the magnetic fringing field will not be negligible and their performances might change. Moreover high precision is required in these experiments. The contribution of magnetic field presence and long term measurements is unique. In this paper the results of systematic measurements of the resolution, stability and efficiency of a crystal operating inside a magnetic field of 0.8 T, using radioactive sources in the energy range from 0.08 to 1.33 MeV, are reported. The measurements have been repeated during several months in order to test if any permanent damage occurred. The resolution at 1.117 and 1.332 MeV gamma-rays from a 60 Co source has been measured at different magnetic fields in the range of 0-0.8 T and the results are compared with the previous data

  13. Calculation and mapping of gamma radiation field in the pool of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Tej; Singh, Kanchhi; Sharma, ARchana; Somakumar, K.; Raina, V.K.; Srinivasan, P.; Prasad, S.K.; Babu, D.A.R.; Sharma, D.N.

    2007-12-01

    Theoretical simulation of the radiation transport occurring in the Apsara core and bulk shield was carried out using two different radiation transport codes, MCNP and QADCG. The MCNP is a Monte Carlo based statistical method solving Boltzmann transport equation, where as the latter code QADCG is a point kernel based deterministic method with build-up factor correction. The aim of the simulation was to do a dose mapping and estimate the expected value of gamma dose rates at various locations where experimental measurements were conducted. Details regarding the simulation techniques employed by both the MCNP and QADCG software with reference to the Apsara core and shield geometry and source gamma energy distribution in the fuel plates are presented in this report. Different types of particle tallies requested in MCNP and QADCG are discussed. Details of variance reduction methods employed in reducing the statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo simulation are also mentioned in the report. The statistical errors associated with Monte Carlo based simulation varied between 3% - 6% in most of the energy bins that contribute to the total fluence and hence to the dose rates. It was observed that the experimental values and the theoretically simulated values match each other closely following a similar trend except for certain experimental locations which had photon flux contributions from extraneous sources like the N-16 activity present in water, beam tubes and pool liner towards shielding corner. It is seen that the theoretical values are found to be larger than experimental values by factors ranging from 1.1 to 3 depending on the water shield thickness. This study served in validation of the experimental measurements conducted by GM counter based teletector and dipole based detectors. In addition, the comparison provided a confirmation of the accuracy of the radiation transport simulation techniques used for dose rate evaluation in case of complex source geometries and

  14. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  15. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  16. Feature selectivity of the gamma-band of the local field potential in primate primary visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Berens

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Extra-cellular voltage fluctuations (local field potentials; LFPs reflecting neural mass action are ubiquitous across species and brain regions. Numerous studies have characterized the properties of LFP signals in the cortex to study sensory and motor computations as well as cognitive processes like attention, perception and memory. In addition, its extracranial counterpart – the electroencelphalogram (EEG – is widely used in clinical applications. However, the link between LFP signals and the underlying activity of local populations of neurons remains largely elusive. Here, we review recent work elucidating the relationship between spiking activity of local neural populations and LFP signals. We focus on oscillations in the gamma-band (30-90Hz of the local field potential in the primary visual cortex (V1 of the macaque that dominate during visual stimulation. Given that in area V1 much is known about the properties of single neurons and the cortical architecture, it provides an excellent opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying the generation of the local field potential.

  17. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALB,P.; LUCKETT,L.; MILLER,K.; GOGOLAK,C.; MILIAN,L.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and assesses its data comparability to baseline methods of sampling and laboratory analysis. The battery-operated, field deployable gamma spectrometer provides traditional spectra of counts as a function of gamma energy. The spectra are then converted to radionuclide concentration by applying innovative efficiency calculations using monte carlo statistical methods and pre-defined geometry templates in the analysis software. Measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides has been accomplished during characterization of several BGRR components including the Pile Fan Sump, Above Ground Ducts, contaminated cooling fans, and graphite pile internals. Cs-137 is the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclide identified, with smaller quantities of Co-60 and Am-241 detected. The Project used the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance and the Data Quality Objectives process to provide direction for survey planning and data quality assessment. Analytical results have been used to calculate data quality indicators (DQI) for the ISOCS measurements. Among the DQIs assessed in the report are sensitivity, accuracy, precision, bias, and minimum detectable concentration. The assessment of the in situ data quality using the DQIs demonstrates that the ISOCS data quality can be comparable to definitive level laboratory analysis when the field instrument is supported by an appropriate Quality Assurance Project Plan. A discussion of the results obtained by ISOCS analysis of

  18. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KALB, P.; LUCKETT, L.; MILLER, K.; GOGOLAK, C.; MILIAN, L.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and assesses its data comparability to baseline methods of sampling and laboratory analysis. The battery-operated, field deployable gamma spectrometer provides traditional spectra of counts as a function of gamma energy. The spectra are then converted to radionuclide concentration by applying innovative efficiency calculations using monte carlo statistical methods and pre-defined geometry templates in the analysis software. Measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides has been accomplished during characterization of several BGRR components including the Pile Fan Sump, Above Ground Ducts, contaminated cooling fans, and graphite pile internals. Cs-137 is the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclide identified, with smaller quantities of Co-60 and Am-241 detected. The Project used the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance and the Data Quality Objectives process to provide direction for survey planning and data quality assessment. Analytical results have been used to calculate data quality indicators (DQI) for the ISOCS measurements. Among the DQIs assessed in the report are sensitivity, accuracy, precision, bias, and minimum detectable concentration. The assessment of the in situ data quality using the DQIs demonstrates that the ISOCS data quality can be comparable to definitive level laboratory analysis when the field instrument is supported by an appropriate Quality Assurance Project Plan. A discussion of the results obtained by ISOCS analysis of

  19. The gamma N ---> Delta transition in chiral effective-field theory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Pascalutsa; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2006-04-27

    We describe the pion electroproduction processes in the {Delta}(1232)-resonance region within the framework of chiral effective-field theory. By studying the observables of pion electroproduction in a next-to-leading order calculation we are able to make predictions and draw conclusions on the properties of the N {yields} {Delta} electromagnetic form factors.

  20. The $\\gamma N\\to \\De$ transition in chiral effective-field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Pascalutsa; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2006-04-27

    We describe the pion electroproduction processes in the {Delta}(1232)-resonance region within the framework of chiral effective-field theory. By studying the observables of pion electroproduction in a next-to-leading order calculation we are able to make predictions and draw conclusions on the properties of the N {yields} {Delta} electromagnetic form factors.

  1. Gamma ray bursts from comet neutron star magnetosphere interaction, field twisting and Eparallel formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Consider the problem of a comet in a collision trajectory with a magnetized neutron star. The question addressed in this paper is whether the comet interacts strongly enough with a magnetic field such as to capture at a large radius or whether in general the comet will escape a magnetized neutron star. 6 refs., 4 figs

  2. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  3. Investigation of thermoluminescent response of K2YF5:Dy3+ crystals for gamma and X radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.C.; Nogueira, M.S.; Faria, L.O.; Khaidukov, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    K 2 YF 5 crystals doped with rare earths have been synthesized with 0 to 100% of Dy 3+ ions optically active ions and an investigation was conducted to test its thermoluminescent (TL) response due to function of Dy 3+ concentration and their response in energy. After being irradiated with gamma and X-rays, it was observed that crystals doped with 1.0% of Dy 3+ feature the best response TL. The main dosimetric peak can be decomposed into three secondary TL peaks, centered in 96.4, 104.9 and 130.7 deg C, respectively, showing a good linearity and reproducibility of the dose measurements. The sensitization process seems to improve response TL and TL peak sensitivity increase to 130, 7 deg C at the expense of TL peak to 104, 9 deg C. The linear coefficient sign TL for K 2 Y 0.09 Dy 0.01 F5 is comparable to that of the dosemeter CaSO 4 : Mn, irradiated with gamma radiation source ( 137 Cs) under the same conditions. Energy dependence measurements show that the answer for X-rays with energy of 41.1 keV is more than 30 times the response to Cs-137, when exposed to the same dose. Due to the main peak in low temperature and the TL high reply to low energy fields, the results reported indicate that the K 2 YF 5 crystals doped with Dy 3+ present great potential for radiation dosimetry in X-rays therapy, clinical dosimetry and also for applications in digital thermoluminescent images

  4. Effect of low doses gamma irradiation on the yield of cucumber grown under field and protected conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Ayyoubi, Z.; Razzouk, A.K.

    1994-08-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of certain field crops. To the best of our knowledge the feasibility of this treatment has not yet been tested on cucumber in Syria. Our experiments were carried out in field and greenhouse conditions. Two experiments were under field conditions, the first at Der-El-Hajar (Unfertile soil with high mean temperature), and the second at Khan-El-Sheeh (fertile soil with lower mean temperature), in these two experiments local variety was used. The third experiment was under greenhouse condition using two varieties, F1 Hybrid Taha and Sahara. Samples of air dried seeds of previous season were irradiated by gamma rays from a 60 Co source using doses of 2, 3, 4, 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 Gy at dose rate of 0.8 Gy/min. Seeds were planted after two days from irradiation and replicated 4 times. The data revealed that gamma irradiation at interval doses of 3-7.5 Gy led to increase the number of leaves and plant height. The radiation treatment had stimulating effects on earliness especially for doses of 4-7.5 Gy in Khan-El-Sheeh (14-31%) and 7.5 Gy in Der-El-Hajar (28%). In greenhouse dose of 2-4 Gy and 2-7.5 Gy stimulate the earliness by 12-36% and 11-18% for Sahara and Taha varieties respectively. The results of total yield (as well as fruits number) were significantly increased when doses of 7.5 Gy in Der-El-Hajar (25%) and 4 and 5 Gy in Khan-El-Sheeh (28-30%). The optimum doses in greenhouse condition ranged between 32-4 Gy for Taha var. and 4-5 Gy for Sahara var., and the percentage of increment was 19 and 16% respectively. In view of all above mentioned results, the use of radiation might be recommended as easy tool for seed treatment to stimulate earliness and increase productivity of cucumber. (author). 17 refs., 23 tabs

  5. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The light pulse output of a scintillator, on which incident collimated gamma rays impinge, is detected by an array of photoelectric tubes each having a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to outputs of the phototubes develops the scintillation event position coordinate electrical signals with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as is possible to obtain less distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar photocathode gamma cameras

  6. High-field/ high-frequency EPR study on stable free radicals formed in sucrose by gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R; Pardi, Luca; Jeschke, Gunnar; Gatteschi, Dante; Sorace, Lorenzo; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2006-06-01

    The EPR spectrum of sucrose irradiated by high-energy radiation is complex due to the presence of more than one radical species. In order to decompose the spectrum and elucidate the radical magnetic parameters a high-field (HF(-)EPR) study on stable free radicals in gamma-irradiated polycrystalline sucrose (table sugar) was performed at three different high frequencies--94, 190 and 285 GHz as well as at the conventional X-band. We suggest a presence of three stable radicals R1, R2 and R3 as the main radical species. Due to the increase of g-factor resolution at high fields the g-tensors of these radicals could be extracted by accurate simulations. The moderate g-anisotropy suggests that all three radicals are carbon-centred. Results from an earlier ENDOR study on X-irradiated sucrose single crystals (Vanhaelewyn et al., Appl Radiat Isot, 52, 1221 (2000)) were used for analyzing of the spectra in more details. It was confirmed that the strongest hyperfine interaction has a relatively small anisotropy, which indicates either the absence of alpha-protons or a strongly distorted geometry of the radicals.

  7. The response of the BTI bubble detectors in mixed gamma-neutron workplace fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Coeck, M.; Lievens, B.; Reginatto, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Bubble detectors have become a mature technology and are used as neutron dosemeters in a wide range of applications. At the SCK-CEN and Belgonucleaire they are used as official personal neutron dosemeter for the personnel. Two types are commercially available from Bubble Technology Industries: the BD-PND, which has a neutron energy threshold of around 100 keV, and the BDT, which is mainly sensitive to thermal neutrons. At Belgonucleaire only the BD-PND is worn, and the results are corrected with a site specific factor. At the SCK-CEN both the BD-PND and BDT are worn and a combination of both results is applied for the dose records. In the EC project EVIDOS (Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields), a whole range of neutron dosemeters were irradiated in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, including both types of bubble detectors. The bubble detectors were exposed on a phantom with different angles towards the reference directions in the workplace fields. We will report the bubble detectors' results in the simulated workplace fields at Cadarache (CANEL and Sigma), in the workplaces at Kruemmel (boiling water reactor, transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor SCK-CEN, MOX-fuel facility Belgonucleaire) and Ringhals (pressurized water reactor, transport cask). The responses of the bubble detectors and the combination of both will be compared to the reference values determined with Bonner Spheres and a novel directional spectrometer. The dosemeter readings were checked for consistency by folding the dosemeter response functions with the corresponding workplace fluence spectra in the same workplace. (author)

  8. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  9. Planning of gamma-fields: forming and checking dose-rate homogeneity in irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, V.; Foldiak, G.; Horvath, Zs.; Naszodi, L.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal geometry of the sources of an 80000-Ci 60 Co irradiation facility was calculated. The array of the sources is suitable for fundamental research and pilot-plant radiosterilization simultaneously. A method was developed to compensate the inhomogeneity of the dose-rate field: it is no worse than that of the continuous large-scale facilities. In five years the activity of the sources decreased by about half; therefore, this recharge became inevitable. Experience proved that with the new source geometry optimalized by calculations a dose-rate of 1.2 +-10% became available with the packages. (author)

  10. The field portable gamma-ray spectrometer based on wireless communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangxi; Lai Wanchang; Ge Liangquan; Li Dan; Yu Xinhua; Gu Shuiliang

    2009-01-01

    It introduces a potable multi-channel γ spectrometry based on wireless communication. The author discussed the existed inconvenience in field measurement, designed the separate structure of host and detector, developed the digital γ spectrometry detector and the application software based on PDA, and completed the short-haul wireless communication between detector and host based on bluetooth technology. The entire current of the detector is less than 180 mA through test, the distance of wireless transmission can be up to 10 meters, and the speed and functions of processing spectrum are further enhanced. (authors)

  11. Persistence and effect of lindane (gamma HCH) in a maize field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennaceur, M.; Ghezal, F.; Meguenni, H.; Hamadache, A.; Coste, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of lindane on the arthropod fauna and its persistence in soil and maize plants under field conditions were studied. Lindane significantly reduced the densities of collembola and spiders but had less significant effects on carabidae and formicidae. It decreased the damage caused by pest insects in maize plants but had no effect on the yield. Lindane dissipated rapidly from both plants and soil. The residues in harvested grains were 0.2 mg.kg -1 (year 1), 0.23 mg.kg -1 (year 2) and 0.05 mg.kg -1 (year 3) and below the recommended acceptable limit for grains. (author). 7 refs, 6 tabs

  12. Development results of portable gamma-radiation HPGe spectrometer with electric cooling for field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'ev, V.; Loshevich, E.; Pchelintsev, A.; Sokolov, A.; Gostilo, V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents development results of a portable spectrometer based on high purity germanium (HPGe spectrometer) with Stirling electric cooler for field applications. The spectrometer cryostat allows installation of HPGe coaxial detectors with efficiency up to 40% and planar detectors with sensitive area up to 3000 mm2. The detector cooling time is not more than 8 hours. Despite the mechanical vibrations due to electric cooler operation, the obtained energy resolution of the spectrometer with coaxial detector of 10% efficiency was less than 1,0 and 2,0 keV by energies 122 and 1332 keV accordingly. Miniature processor device (Android) allows control for all operation modes of the spectrometer, provides self diagnostics, initial procession, indication and spectra accumulation

  13. Background Information: Magnetars, Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters and the Most Powerful Magnetic Fields in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Near the end of its life, a star more massive than our Sun finds itself no longer able to support its own weight from the crush of gravity and so it collapses, producing an expanding shock wave that sweeps through the surrounding gas, creating what is called a supernova remnant. All that remains of the original star is a dense, compact object known as a neutron star. Magnetars are the latest addition to the "zoo" of neutron stars and they are truly exotic beasts with magnetic fields hundreds of millions of times stronger than have ever been seen on Earth. The story which led to the prediction of magnetars and then to their discovery is given elsewhere. Here we will focus on the other part of the story, the supernova remnants born at the same time as magnetars and the diffuse emission produced by the energetic outpourings of the magnetars. All four of the soft gamma-ray repeaters that we currently know are located in or near a supernova remnant. It was this discovery that led astronomers to determine that soft gamma-ray repeaters were in our Galaxy and the nearby galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud. Through the study of these supernova remnants, astronomers were able to infer that soft gamma-ray repeaters were solitary young neutron stars speeding away from their birthplace at 3 million miles per hour. Theories predict that the same process which can produce the fantastic bursts of hard X-ray emission that give soft gamma-ray repeaters their name, can also accelerate particles (electrons, protons, etc) to speeds approaching the speed of light. As the saying goes, "where there's smoke there's fire" and this case is no exception. Most of the energy released by the burst event is carried away by these high energy particles and not the gamma-ray burst itself. As the particles spiral in the surrounding magnetic field, they too emit radiation, creating extended nebulae called "plerions". Provided there is some way to confine the outflow, these plerions act as "wind

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on nutritional value of dry field beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and variability in nutritional value of varieties and breeding lines of dry field beans and peas for chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with day-old broiler type chicks to study the effect of a cobalt-60 source of gamma irradiation and autoclaving on nutritional value of dry field beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). The variability in nutritional value of varieties and breeding lines of dry field beans and peas was also studied. Total protein (N x 6.25) was not changed appreciably by gamma irradiation (21 Mrad cobalt-60) and autoclaving but solubility in water was decreased. In vitro enzymic digestibility of irradiated bean protein was increased by pepsin alone and with a mixture of trypsin, chymotrypsin and peptidase. The nutritional value of all varieties of beans, based on chick growth, was significantly improved by gamma irradiation. The irradiated treatment of beans increased nitrogen retention by chicks and decreased uric acid nitrogen excretion in relation to nitrogen intake

  15. Gamma radiation fields from activity deposited on road and soil surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1993-12-01

    Radioactive material deposited in the environment after an accidental release would cause exposure of the population living in the affected areas. The radiation field will depend on many factors such as radionuclide composition, surface contamination density, removal of activity by weathering and migration, and protective measures like decontamination, ploughing and covering by asphalt. Methods are described for calculation of air kerma rate from deposited activity on road and soil surfaces, both from the initially deposited activity and from activity distributed in the upper layer of soil as well as from activity covered by asphalt or soil. Air kerma rates are calculated for different source geometries and the results are fitted to a power-exponential function of photon energy, depth distributions in soil and horizontal dimensions. Based on this function calculations of air kerma rate can easily be made on a personal computer or programmable pocket calculator for specific radionuclide compositions and different horizontal and vertical distributions of the deposited activity. The calculations are compared to results from other methods like the Monte Carlo method and good agreement is found between the results. (au) (7 tabs., 12 ills., 8 refs.)

  16. Intraoperative Scintigraphy Using a Large Field-of-View Portable Gamma Camera for Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Hall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated a novel technique, intraoperative 99 mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI imaging (neck and excised specimen (ES, using a large field-of-view portable gamma camera (LFOVGC, for expediting confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal. Methods. Twenty patients with MIBI-avid parathyroid adenomas were preoperatively administered MIBI and intraoperatively imaged prior to incision (neck and immediately following resection (neck and/or ES. Preoperative and intraoperative serum parathyroid hormone monitoring (IOPTH and pathology (path were also performed. Results. MIBI neck activity was absent and specimen activity was present in 13/20 with imaging after initial ES removal. In the remaining 7/20 cases, residual neck activity and/or absent ES activity prompted excision of additional tissue, ultimately leading to complete hyperfunctioning tissue excision. Postexcision LFOVGC ES imaging confirmed parathyroid adenoma resection 100% when postresection imaging qualitatively had activity (ES and/or no activity (neck. The mean ± SEM time saving using intraoperative LFOVGC data to confirm resection versus first IOPTH or path result would have been 22.0 ± 2 minutes (specimen imaging and 26.0 ± 3 minutes (neck imaging. Conclusion. Utilization of a novel real-time intraoperative LFOVGC imaging approach can provide confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal appreciably faster than IOPTH and/or path and may provide a valuable adjunct to parathyroid surgery.

  17. Radiation protection in inhomogeneous beta-gamma fields and modelling of hand phantoms with MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunck, Ch; Becker, F.; Hegenbart, L.; Heide, B.; Schimmelpfeng, J.; Urban, M.

    2009-01-01

    The usage of beta-radiation sources in various nuclear medicine therapies is increasing. Consequently, enhanced radiation protection measures are required, as medical staff more frequently handle high-activity sources required for therapy. Inhomogeneous radiation fields make it difficult to determine absorbed dose reliably. Routine monitoring with dosemeters does not guarantee any accurate determination of the local skin dose (LSD). In general, correction factors are used to correct for the measured dose and the maximum absorbed dose received. However, strong underestimations of the maximum exposure are possible depending on the individual handling the process and the reliability of dose measurements. Simulations can be used as a tool for a better understanding of the maximum possible exposure depending on the individual-related handling. While measurements reveal the overall dose during the entire irradiation time of the dosemeter, simulations help to analyse sequences of action. Hence, simulations allow for tracking the points of highest absorbed dose received during the handling process. In this respect, simulations were performed using the MCNPX software. In order to investigate the LSD, two hand phantoms were used, a model based on geometrical elements and a voxel hand. A typical situation of radio-synoviorthesis, i.e. handling a syringe filled with 90 Y, was simulated. The results of the simulations show that the annual dose limit may be exceeded within minutes at the position of maximum absorbed dose received and that finger-ring dosemeters measure significantly different doses depending on their wearing position. It is of essential importance to wear the dosemeter properly and to use suitable correction factors with respect to the individual. Simulations are a suitable tool for ensuring reliable dose determination and may help to derive recommendations regarding radiation protection measures. (authors)

  18. The symmetry energy {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma }} parameter of relativistic mean-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Mariana; Lourenço, Odilon; Hen, Or; Piasetzky, Eliezer; Menezes, Débora P.

    2018-05-01

    The relativistic mean-field models tested in previous works against nuclear matter experimental values, critical parameters and macroscopic stellar properties are revisited and used in the evaluation of the symmetry energy γ parameter obtained in three different ways. We have checked that, independent of the choice made to calculate the γ values, a trend of linear correlation is observed between γ and the symmetry energy ({{\\mathscr{S}}}0) and a more clear linear relationship is established between γ and the slope of the symmetry energy (L 0). These results directly contribute to the arising of other linear correlations between γ and the neutron star radii of {R}1.0 and {R}1.4, in agreement with recent findings. Finally, we have found that short-range correlations induce two specific parametrizations, namely, IU-FSU and DD-MEδ, simultaneously compatible with the neutron star mass constraint of 1.93≤slant {M}{{\\max }}/{M}ȯ ≤slant 2.05 and with the overlap band for the {L}0× {{\\mathscr{S}}}0 region, to present γ in the range of γ =0.25+/- 0.05. This work is a part of the project INCT-FNA Proc. No. 464898/2014-5 and was partially supported by Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Brazil under grants 300602/2009-0 and 306786/2014-1. E. P. acknowledges support from the Israel Science Foundation. O. H. acknowledges the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics program under award number DE-FG02-94ER40818

  19. Tether Deployer And Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  20. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This study uses The Theory Of Constraints (TOC) management methodology and recent military missions to show that RSOI operations are generally the limiting constraint to force deployment operations...

  1. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  2. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    .... Gulf War health questions have resulted in controversy over potentially hazardous exposures during the deployment, the possibility of adverse affects from preventive health measures, and the role...

  3. Correlation Of Terrestrial gamma flashes, Electric fields, and Lightning strikes (COTEL) in thunderstorms using networked balloon payloads developed by university and community college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, B. J.; Blair, D.; Causey, J.; Collins, J.; Davis, A.; Fernandez-Kim, V.; Kennedy, J.; Pate, N.; Kearney, C.; Schayer, C.; Turk, E.; Cherry, M. L.; Fava, C.; Granger, D.; Stewart, M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2017-12-01

    High energy gamma ray flashes from terrestrial sources have been observed by satellites for decades, but the actual mechanism, assumed to be thunderstorm lightning, has yet to be fully characterized. The goal of COTEL, funded by NASA through the University Student Instrument Project (USIP) program, is to correlate in time TGF events, lightning strikes, and electric fields inside of thunderstorms. This will be accomplished using a small network of balloon-borne payloads suspended in and around thunderstorm environments. The payloads will detect and timestamp gamma radiation bursts, lightning strikes, and the intensity of localized electric fields. While in flight, data collected by the payloads will be transmitted to a ground station in real-time and will be analyzed post-flight to investigate potential correlations between lightning, TGFs, and electric fields. The COTEL student team is in its second year of effort having spent the first year developing the basic balloon payloads and ground tracking system. Currently the team is focusing on prototype electric field and gamma radiation detectors. Testing and development of these systems will continue into 2018, and flight operations will take place during the spring 2018 Louisiana thunderstorm season. The presentation, led by undergraduate Physics student Brad Landry, will cover the student team effort in developing the COTEL system, an overview of the system architecture, balloon flight tests conducted to date, preliminary results from prototype detectors, lessons learned for student-led science projects, and future plans.

  4. Calibration, field-testing, and error analysis of a gamma-ray probe for in situ measurement of dry bulk density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuzzi, P.; Bruckler, L.; Gabilly, Y.; Gaudu, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a new gamma-ray probe for measuring dry bulk density in the field. This equipment can be used with three different tube spacings (15, 20 and 30 cm). Calibration procedures and local error analyses are proposed for two cases: (1) for the case where the access tubes are parallel, calibration equations are given for three tube spacings. The linear correlation coefficient obtained in the laboratory is satisfactory (0.999), and a local error analysis shows that the standard deviation in the measured dry bulk density is small (+/- 0.02 g/cm 3 ); (2) when the access tubes are not parallel, a new calibration procedure is presented that accounts for and corrects measurement bias due to the deviating probe spacing. The standard deviation associated with the measured dry bulk density is greater (+/- 0.05 g/cm 3 ), but the measurements themselves are regarded as unbiased. After comparisons of core samplings and gamma-ray probe measurements, a field validation of the gamma-ray measurements is presented. Field validation was carried out on a variety of soils (clay, clay loam, loam, and silty clay loam), using gravimetric water contents that varied from 0.11 0.27 and dry bulk densities ranging from 1.30-1.80 g°cm -3 . Finally, an example of dry bulk density field variability is shown, and the spatial variability is analyzed in regard to the measurement errors

  5. The Co{sup 60} Irradiation Facility and the Gamma Field at Riso; Appareil d'irradiation au cobalt-60 et champ sous irradiation gamma, a Riso; Ustanovka dlya obluchenij, rabotayushchaya na So60, i pole gamma-luchej v rizo; Instalacion de irradiacion con cobalto-60 y campo de irradiacion gamma en el centro de Riso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynjolfsson, A; Holm, N W [Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Establishment Riso (Denmark)

    1960-07-15

    The paper describes both the Co{sup 60} irradiation facility and the gamma field at the Agricultural Department of the Research Establishment, Riso. The Co{sup 60} irradiation facility contains 1,800 curies of Co{sup 60.} Details of the construction are given together with the safety precautions which have been included in the design. Dosimetry has been carried out by four different methods: 1. Ionisation chambers, 2. Calorimetry, 3. Fricke dosimeter, 4. Photographic films. A general outline is given of the gamma field, including details of source position. The dose rate is approximately 100 r./hr. at a distance of 1 m. An area of radius 15 m is used for the growing of plants under irradiation. A brief indication is given of the class of products which have been irradiated in the two facilities. (author) [French] Le memoire decrit l'appareil d'irradiation au cobalt-60 et le champ sous irradiation gamma du Departement de l'agriculture de l'Organisme de recherche de Riso. L'appareil d'irradiation au cobalt-60 contient une source de 1 800 curies. Des details sont donnes sur la construction ainsi que sur les dispositifs de protection compris dans le plan. Quatre methodes differentes ont ete utilisees pour la dosimetrie: 1. Chambres d'ionisation 2. Calorimetrie 3. Dosimetrie de Fricke 4. Pellicules photographique s On donne un apercu general du champ gamma, ainsi que des details sur la position de la source. L'intensite de dose est de 100 R/h environ a une distance de 1 m. Une zone d'un rayon de 15 m est utilisee pour la croissance des plantes soumises a l'irradiation. Des indications sommaires sont donnees sur la categorie des produits qui ont ete soumis a l'irradiation dans les deux installations. (author) [Spanish] Los autores describen la instalacion de irradiacion con cobalto-60 y el campo de irradiacion gamma del Departamento de Agronomia del Instituto de Investigaciones de Riso. El dispositivo de irradiacion consiste en una fuente de cobalto-60 de 1 800 curies

  6. In situ-observation of the vertical motion of soil waters by means of deuterated water using the gamma/neutron method: Laboratory and field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutonnet, P.; Couchat, P.; Brissaud, F.; Puard, M.; Pappalardo, A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study water movements in the field, the gamma/neutron method for measuring deuterated water was investigated. A laboratory device is presented which supplies measurements on 5 ml soil solution samples. A probe for in situ experiments is studied in all its performances: Background, calibration (count rate versus volumetric deuterated water content) and resolution. A dispersive transport of D 2 O pulses on soil column is presented and checked with a numerical simulation model. Then simultaneous measurement of soil water content and D 2 O concentration by neutron moisture gauge and gamma/neutron probe enable us to interpret the evolution of D 2 O pulse with an experimental field irrigation. (orig.) [de

  7. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  8. Natural radioactivity levels in soil samples around the flood affected salt field area, Kelambakkam, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India using gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajalakshmi, A.; Chandrasekaran, A.; Thangam, V.; Jananee, B.

    2018-01-01

    Humans are exposed to natural radiation from external sources, which include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation. Gamma Ray spectroscopic technique was used to assess the natural radioactivity in soils around the flood affected salt field area, Kelambakkam Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. The activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and absorbed dose rate of soil samples were calculated to assess the radiation hazards in the study area

  9. Preliminary measurements of gamma ray effects on characteristics of broad-band GaAs field-effect transistor preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.G.; Shimizu, T.T.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on electrical characteristics of cryogenically cooled broad-band low-noise microwave preamplifiers has been preliminarily evaluated. The change in the gain and noise figure of a 1-2 GHz preamplifier using GaAs microwave transistors was determined at gamma doses between 10 5 rad to 5 /times/ 10 8 rad. The gain and noise figure was measured at ambient temperatures of 300 K and 80 K. 8 refs., 2 figs

  10. Global field synchronization in gamma range of the sleep EEG tracks sleep depth: Artifact introduced by a rectangular analysis window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusterholz, Thomas; Achermann, Peter; Dürr, Roland; Koenig, Thomas; Tarokh, Leila

    2017-06-01

    Investigating functional connectivity between brain networks has become an area of interest in neuroscience. Several methods for investigating connectivity have recently been developed, however, these techniques need to be applied with care. We demonstrate that global field synchronization (GFS), a global measure of phase alignment in the EEG as a function of frequency, must be applied considering signal processing principles in order to yield valid results. Multichannel EEG (27 derivations) was analyzed for GFS based on the complex spectrum derived by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). We examined the effect of window functions on GFS, in particular of non-rectangular windows. Applying a rectangular window when calculating the FFT revealed high GFS values for high frequencies (>15Hz) that were highly correlated (r=0.9) with spectral power in the lower frequency range (0.75-4.5Hz) and tracked the depth of sleep. This turned out to be spurious synchronization. With a non-rectangular window (Tukey or Hanning window) these high frequency synchronization vanished. Both, GFS and power density spectra significantly differed for rectangular and non-rectangular windows. Previous papers using GFS typically did not specify the applied window and may have used a rectangular window function. However, the demonstrated impact of the window function raises the question of the validity of some previous findings at higher frequencies. We demonstrated that it is crucial to apply an appropriate window function for determining synchronization measures based on a spectral approach to avoid spurious synchronization in the beta/gamma range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Modular gamma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millegan, D.R.; Nixon, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear safeguards requires sensitive, easily operated instruments for rapid inspection of personnel and vehicles to ensure that no uranium or plutonium is being diverted. Two portable gamma-ray detection systems have been developed. The Modular Gamma System (MGS) is very sensitive and two or more systems can be connected for even better performance. The multiunit configuration can be deployed by motor vehicle for search of large areas too extensive to search on foot. The Programmable Rate Monitor (PRM) is less sensitive but much smaller and therefore is more suitable for search of vehicles, personnel, or smaller areas. The PRM is programmable, which implements measurement and alarm algorithms for individual applications

  13. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, K.D.; Chang, Y.I.; Daly, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  14. Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (ND,W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2013-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60 Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60 Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organization (WHO) TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N D,W ) with the new field. The uncertainty of N D,W was estimated to be 1.1% (k=2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly. (author)

  15. Long-term effects of prenatal exposure to low levels of gamma rays on open-field activity in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, T; Hirokaga, K

    1995-11-01

    The open-field activity of first-generation (F1) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with gamma rays on day 14 of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months (young), 12-13 months (adult) and 19-20 months (old). Doses were 0.5 Gy or 1.0 Gy. Open-field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every second through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 8-cm2 units. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The walking speed of the 1.0-Gy group recorded at 19-20 months was higher than that for the comparably aged control group. The time which the irradiated group, recorded at 19-20 months, spent in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. Conversely, the time spent by the irradiated group in the middle fields when recorded at 19-20 months was shorter than in the comparably aged control group. No effect of radiation was shown for any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 6-7 and 12-13 months. The results demonstrate that such exposure to gamma rays on day 14 of gestation results in behavioral changes which occur at 19-20 months but not at 6-7 or 12-13 months.

  16. The effects of A single dose of gamma-rays applied on the head on behavior of rats in Morris's water maze and in the open field test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smajda, B.; Kiskova, J.; Lievajova, K.; Capicikova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a sublethal dose of gamma-rays applied on the head on selected behavioral parameters were investigated in this study. Adult male Sprague-Dowley rats (n=9) were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy of gamma-rays from a 60 Co radiation source. The irradiated animals as well as sham-irradiated controls were tested daily in Morris water maze (MWM) (2 sessions per day) and in the open field test. The ability of spatial learning given by latency time to find the hidden platform was followed in MWM. The horizontal and vertical locomotion, the number of crossings of the center of the field and the washing behavior were recorded during an 8-minute test in the open field. The results obtained show, that radiation didn't altered significantly the dynamic of learning in MWM during the experiment. The level of horizontal and vertical locomotory activity in open field was lower in irradiated group in comparison with controls. The number of the crossings of the field's center, related to the level of anxiozity of animals was non-significantly lower in irradiated animals, whereas no differences in number of washing between both groups were detected. The results point to differences in radiosensitivity in various behavioral parameters in rats, maybe due to different level of their control and coordination in CNS. (authors)

  17. The effects of a head only gamma-irradiation on the learning and spatial memory and on open field behavior in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smajda, B.; Kiskova, J.; Lievajova, K.; Capicikova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The effects or a sublethal dose or gamma-rays applied to the head on selected behavioral parameters were investigated in this study. Adult male Sprague-Dowley rats (n = 9) were irradiated with a single dose or 20 Gy or gamma rays from a 6O Co radiation source. The irradiated animals as well as sham-irradiated controls were tested daily in a Morris water maze (MWM) and in the open field test. The ability of spatial learning given by latency time to find the hidden platform was followed in the MWM. Horizontal and vertical locomotion, the number of crossings or the center of the field and washing behavior were recorded in tests in tbe open field. The results obtained showed, that radiation did not significantly alter the time course of learning in MWM during the experiment. The levels of horizontal and vertical locomotor activity in open field were lower in the irradiated group in comparison with the controls. The number of tbe crossings or the fields center, related to tbe level or anxiety of the animals was not significantly lower in the irradiated animals, whereas no differences in the number of washings between both groups were detected. The results point to differences in radiosensitivity in various behavioral parameters in rats, maybe due to different levels of their control and coordination in the CNS. (authors)

  18. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    ... of stress in causing chronic illness. The lack of comprehensive deployment health surveillance has made it difficult to determine possible causes of adverse health effects reported by Gulf War veterans...

  19. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  20. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    .... This runs counter to the popular belief that strategic lift is the limiting constraint. The study begins by highlighting the genesis of the military's current force projection strategy and the resulting importance of rapid force deployments...

  1. Deployable Brake for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, J. R.; Maloney, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Aerodynamic shield that could be opened and closed proposed. Report presents concepts for deployable aerodynamic brake. Brake used by spacecraft returning from high orbit to low orbit around Earth. Spacecraft makes grazing passes through atmosphere to slow down by drag of brake. Brake flexible shield made of woven metal or ceramic withstanding high temperatures created by air friction. Stored until needed, then deployed by set of struts.

  2. Quantitative investigation of a novel small field of view hybrid gamma camera (HGC) capability for sentinel lymph node detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John E; Bugby, Sarah L; Jambi, Layal K; Perkins, Alan C

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hybrid gamma camera (HGC) has been developed to enhance the localization of radiopharmaceutical uptake in targeted tissues during surgical procedures such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. To assess the capability of the HGC, a lymph node contrast (LNC) phantom was constructed to simulate medical scenarios of varying radioactivity concentrations and SLN size. Methods: The phantom was constructed using two clear acrylic glass plates. The SLNs were simulated by circular wells of diameters ranging from 10 to 2.5 mm (16 wells in total) in 1 plate. The second plate contains four larger rectangular wells to simulate tissue background activity surrounding the SLNs. The activity used to simulate each SLN ranged between 4 and 0.025 MBq. The activity concentration ratio between the background and the activity injected in the SLNs was 1 : 10. The LNC phantom was placed at different depths of scattering material ranging between 5 and 40 mm. The collimator-to-source distance was 120 mm. Image acquisition times ranged from 60 to 240 s. Results: Contrast-to-noise ratio analysis and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) measurements of the simulated SLNs were carried out for the images obtained. Over the range of activities used, the HGC detected between 87.5 and 100% of the SLNs through 20 mm of scattering material and 75–93.75% of the SLNs through 40 mm of scattering material. The FWHM of the detected SLNs ranged between 11.93 and 14.70 mm. Conclusion: The HGC is capable of detecting low accumulation of activity in small SLNs, indicating its usefulness as an intraoperative imaging system during surgical SLN procedures. Advances in knowledge: This study investigates the capability of a novel small-field-of-view (SFOV) HGC to detect low activity uptake in small SLNs. The phantom and procedure described are inexpensive and could be easily replicated and applied to any SFOV camera, to provide a comparison between systems with clinically relevant

  3. SU-C-201-06: Small Field Correction Factors for the MicroDiamond Detector in the Gamma Knife-Model C Derived Using Monte Carlo Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, J C; Knill, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine small field correction factors for PTW’s microDiamond detector in Elekta’s Gamma Knife Model-C unit. These factors allow the microDiamond to be used in QA measurements of output factors in the Gamma Knife Model-C; additionally, the results also contribute to the discussion on the water equivalence of the relatively-new microDiamond detector and its overall effectiveness in small field applications. Methods: The small field correction factors were calculated as k correction factors according to the Alfonso formalism. An MC model of the Gamma Knife and microDiamond was built with the EGSnrc code system, using BEAMnrc and DOSRZnrc user codes. Validation of the model was accomplished by simulating field output factors and measurement ratios for an available ABS plastic phantom and then comparing simulated results to film measurements, detector measurements, and treatment planning system (TPS) data. Once validated, the final k factors were determined by applying the model to a more waterlike solid water phantom. Results: During validation, all MC methods agreed with experiment within the stated uncertainties: MC determined field output factors agreed within 0.6% of the TPS and 1.4% of film; and MC simulated measurement ratios matched physically measured ratios within 1%. The final k correction factors for the PTW microDiamond in the solid water phantom approached unity to within 0.4%±1.7% for all the helmet sizes except the 4 mm; the 4 mm helmet size over-responded by 3.2%±1.7%, resulting in a k factor of 0.969. Conclusion: Similar to what has been found in the Gamma Knife Perfexion, the PTW microDiamond requires little to no corrections except for the smallest 4 mm field. The over-response can be corrected via the Alfonso formalism using the correction factors determined in this work. Using the MC calculated correction factors, the PTW microDiamond detector is an effective dosimeter in all available helmet sizes. The authors would like to

  4. SU-C-201-06: Small Field Correction Factors for the MicroDiamond Detector in the Gamma Knife-Model C Derived Using Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, J C [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Karmanos Cancer Institute McLaren-Macomb, Clinton Township, MI (United States); Knill, C [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Beaumont Hospital, Canton, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine small field correction factors for PTW’s microDiamond detector in Elekta’s Gamma Knife Model-C unit. These factors allow the microDiamond to be used in QA measurements of output factors in the Gamma Knife Model-C; additionally, the results also contribute to the discussion on the water equivalence of the relatively-new microDiamond detector and its overall effectiveness in small field applications. Methods: The small field correction factors were calculated as k correction factors according to the Alfonso formalism. An MC model of the Gamma Knife and microDiamond was built with the EGSnrc code system, using BEAMnrc and DOSRZnrc user codes. Validation of the model was accomplished by simulating field output factors and measurement ratios for an available ABS plastic phantom and then comparing simulated results to film measurements, detector measurements, and treatment planning system (TPS) data. Once validated, the final k factors were determined by applying the model to a more waterlike solid water phantom. Results: During validation, all MC methods agreed with experiment within the stated uncertainties: MC determined field output factors agreed within 0.6% of the TPS and 1.4% of film; and MC simulated measurement ratios matched physically measured ratios within 1%. The final k correction factors for the PTW microDiamond in the solid water phantom approached unity to within 0.4%±1.7% for all the helmet sizes except the 4 mm; the 4 mm helmet size over-responded by 3.2%±1.7%, resulting in a k factor of 0.969. Conclusion: Similar to what has been found in the Gamma Knife Perfexion, the PTW microDiamond requires little to no corrections except for the smallest 4 mm field. The over-response can be corrected via the Alfonso formalism using the correction factors determined in this work. Using the MC calculated correction factors, the PTW microDiamond detector is an effective dosimeter in all available helmet sizes. The authors would like to

  5. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, T; Hirokaga, K

    1996-06-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F1) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with gamma-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of gamma-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months.

  6. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamisawa, Takeru [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Tamaho (Japan); Hirokaga, Kouichi

    1996-06-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F{sub 1}) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with {gamma}-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of {gamma}-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months. (author)

  7. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  8. Beta-gamma counting system for Xe fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, P.L.; Bowyer, T.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    A beta-gamma coincidence counting system has been developed for automated analysis of Xe gas samples separated from air. The Xe gas samples are contained in a cylindrical plastic scintillator cell located between two NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. The X-ray and gamma spectra gated by coincident events in the plastic scintillator cell are recorded for each NaI(Tl) crystal. The characteristic signatures of the 131m Xe, 133g Xe, 133m Xe, and 135g Xe isotopes of interest for nuclear test-ban verification as well as the procedures and results of absolute efficiency measurements are described. A NaI(Tl) crystal with provision for 4 sample cells has been implemented for the system to be deployed in the field. Examples of data on ambient air samples in New York City obtained with the field prototype are presented. (author)

  9. Hydra phantom applicability for carrying out tests of field uniformity in gamma cameras; Aplicabilidade do fantoma hydra para realizacao dos testes de uniformidade de campo em gama camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragao Filho, Geraldo L., E-mail: geraldo_lemos10@hotmail.com [Centro de Medicina Nuclear de Pernambuco (CEMUPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H., E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: ferdinand.lopes@oi.com.br, E-mail: jose-wilson59@live.com [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical modality that makes use of radioactive material 'in vivo' in humans, making them a temporary radioactive source. The radiation emitted by the patient's body is detected by a specific equipment, called a gamma camera, creates an image showing the spatial and temporal biodistribution of radioactive material administered to the patient. Therefore, it's of fundamental importance a number of specific measures to make sure that procedure be satisfactory, called quality control. To Nuclear Medicine, quality control of gamma camera has the purpose of ensuring accurate scintillographic imaging, truthful and reliable for the diagnosis, guaranteeing visibility and clarity of details of structures, and also to determine the frequency and the need for preventive maintenance of equipment. To ensure the quality control of the gamma camera it's necessary to use some simulators, called phantom, used in Nuclear Medicine to evaluate system performance, system calibration and simulation of injuries. The goal of this study was to validate a new simulator for nuclear medicine, the Hydra phantom. The phantom was initially built for construction of calibration curves used in radiotherapy planning and quality control in CT. It has similar characteristics to specific phantoms in nuclear medicine, containing inserts and water area. Those inserts are regionally sourced materials, many of them are already used in the literature and based on information about density and interaction of radiation with matter. To verify its efficiency in quality control in Nuclear Medicine, was performed a test for uniformity field, one of the main tests performed daily, so we can verify the ability of the gamma camera to reproduce a uniform distribution of the administered activity in the phantom, been analysed qualitatively, through the image, and quantitatively, through values established for Central Field Of View (CFOV) and Useful Field Of View (UFOV

  10. Using multi spherical spectrometry for determination of dosimetric characteristics of mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields of fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyulep, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Grabovtsova, A.; Galan, P.; Trousil, J.

    1977-01-01

    Possibilities of the application of multispherical spectrometry in personnel dosimetry of neutrons (n) and gamma radiation (γ) are considered. Studies were made to elucidate a possibility of using albedo dosemeters to increase the sensitivity of personnel dosemeters. Determined were the dose due to the (n,γ) reaction in a human body, absorbed dose and dose equivalent. The effect of (n,γ) dose on the reading of personnel gamma dosemeter was considered. It is shown that the above effect on the dosemeter readings for frontal irradiation by a broad neutron beam in everyday personnel dosimetry near 252 Cf sources may be neglected. Only in the case of strongly slowed-down fission spectrum the effect of the (n,γ) reaction is considerable. The application of albedo dosemeter is expedient to take into account the corrections of personnel dosemeter readings [ru

  11. Development of a prototype apparatus visualizing on a screen the gamma sources superimposed on the image of the vision field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbard, G.; Lemaire, J.E. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. d`Exploitation du Retraitement et de Demantelement; Carcreff, H.; Marchand, L.; Thellier, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Reacteurs Experimentaux

    1994-12-31

    Mapping the gamma activity of irradiating zones is often an important prerequisite in dismantling nuclear facilities. The operation is necessary to define a suitable decommissioning strategy before any work begins; it is also required during the procedure to measure the residual activity wherever dose rates are too high to allow human intervention. This report summarizes the work carried out under CEC contract FIED-0055, covering a prototype imaging system designed to display radioactive sources superimposed in real time over a visible light image on a video monitor. This project was developed from an earlier off-line system. The gamma photons are collimated by a double cone system. The imaging system comprises a transparent scintillator bonded to the fiber-optic window of an ultrasensitive camera. The camera was miniaturized to meet specification requirements: with its radiological shielding, the gamma camera weighs 40 kg and is 120 mm in diameter. The processing system is compatible with a realtime camera, and small enough for use at any nuclear. The point-source angular resolution is 1.4 deg. for {sup 60} Co and 0.8 deg. for {sup 137} Cs. The dose rate sensitivity limit is approximately 0.01 mGy.h{sup -1}. Process reliability was confirmed by tests in a high-level radio-metallurgy cell at actual decommissioning site. (authors). 7 figs.

  12. Advanced OS deployment system

    OpenAIRE

    Galiano Molina, Sebastián

    2007-01-01

    The main project’s objective is to design and build an OS deployment system taking advantage of the Linux OS and the Open Source community developments. This means to use existing technologies that modularize the system. With this philosophy in mind, the number of developed code lines within the project is keeping as small as possible. As REMBO, the OS deployment system to develop has to be transparent to the user. This means a system with a friendly user interface and no te...

  13. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  14. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  15. Large-scale deployment of seed treatments has driven rapid increase in use of neonicotinoid insecticides and preemptive pest management in US field crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Margaret R; Tooker, John F

    2015-04-21

    Neonicotinoids are the most widely used class of insecticides worldwide, but patterns of their use in the U.S. are poorly documented, constraining attempts to understand their role in pest management and potential nontarget effects. We synthesized publicly available data to estimate and interpret trends in neonicotinoid use since their introduction in 1994, with a special focus on seed treatments, a major use not captured by the national pesticide-use survey. Neonicotinoid use increased rapidly between 2003 and 2011, as seed-applied products were introduced in field crops, marking an unprecedented shift toward large-scale, preemptive insecticide use: 34-44% of soybeans and 79-100% of maize hectares were treated in 2011. This finding contradicts recent analyses, which concluded that insecticides are used today on fewer maize hectares than a decade or two ago. If current trends continue, neonicotinoid use will increase further through application to more hectares of soybean and other crop species and escalation of per-seed rates. Alternatively, our results, and other recent analyses, suggest that carefully targeted efforts could considerably reduce neonicotinoid use in field crops without yield declines or economic harm to farmers, reducing the potential for pest resistance, nontarget pest outbreaks, environmental contamination, and harm to wildlife, including pollinator species.

  16. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  17. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Ogden, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  18. Binary neutron star mergers and short gamma-ray bursts: Effects of magnetic field orientation, equation of state, and mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Takumu; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Kastaun, Wolfgang; Ciolfi, Riccardo; Endrizzi, Andrea; Baiotti, Luca; Perna, Rosalba

    2016-09-01

    We present fully general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the merger of binary neutron star (BNS) systems. We consider BNSs producing a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) that collapses to a spinning black hole (BH) surrounded by a magnetized accretion disk in a few tens of ms. We investigate whether such systems may launch relativistic jets and hence power short gamma-ray bursts. We study the effects of different equations of state (EOSs), different mass ratios, and different magnetic field orientations. For all cases, we present a detailed investigation of the matter dynamics and of the magnetic field evolution, with particular attention to its global structure and possible emission of relativistic jets. The main result of this work is that we observe the formation of an organized magnetic field structure. This happens independently of EOS, mass ratio, and initial magnetic field orientation. We also show that those models that produce a longer-lived HMNS lead to a stronger magnetic field before collapse to a BH. Such larger fields make it possible, for at least one of our models, to resolve the magnetorotational instability and hence further amplify the magnetic field in the disk. However, by the end of our simulations, we do not (yet) observe a magnetically dominated funnel nor a relativistic outflow. With respect to the recent simulations of Ruiz et al. [Astrophys. J. 824, L6 (2016)], we evolve models with lower and more plausible initial magnetic field strengths and (for computational reasons) we do not evolve the accretion disk for the long time scales that seem to be required in order to see a relativistic outflow. Since all our models produce a similar ordered magnetic field structure aligned with the BH spin axis, we expect that the results found by Ruiz et al. (who only considered an equal-mass system with an ideal fluid EOS) should be general and—at least from a qualitative point of view—independent of the mass ratio, magnetic field

  19. Effects of the Gamma radiation on laboratory and field attractiveness of virgin females of the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouda Mediouni, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the effects of Gamma radiation on the attractiveness of the virgin females of the carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller, under laboratory and field conditions. Four Gamma radiation doses (200, 300, 400, 500 Gy) in addition to the control were studied. We examined also the effects of the age of irradiated females on their attractiveness; in particular, females 24, 48 and 72 hours old were studied. Laboratory studies showed that females' attractiveness decreased with increasing irradiation dose. At 500 Gray, 32 males were caught per week per trap against 97 males per week/trap for the control. For the doses 200, 300 and 400 Gray, the mean number of males per trap per week was 52, 51 and 50 respectively. On the other hand, for 24 hours old virgin females, the weekly mean number of caught males per trap was 63 while for 48 and 72 old females, the mean number of caught males per trap per week was 54 and 50 respectively. For field studies, results showed that irradiated females were able to attract wild males. Moreover, their attractiveness was better than the synthetic lure.

  20. Quantitative relations between beta-gamma mixed-field dosimeter responses and dose-equivalent conversion factors according to the testing standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.P.

    1982-08-01

    The conventional two-element personnel dosimeters, usually having two thick TLD (thermoluminescent dosimetry) ribbons, are used extensively for radiation protection dosimetry. Many of these dosimeters are used for the measurement of beta and gamma radiation doses received in mixed beta-gamma fields. Severe limitations exist, however, on the relative magnitudes and energies of these fields that may be measured simultaneously. Moreover, due to a well-known energy dependence of these dosimeters, particularly for the beta-radiations, systematic errors will occur whenever the differences in workplaces and calibration radiation energies exist. A simple mathematical approach is presented to estimate the deep and shallow dose equivalent values at different energies for such dosimeters. The formulae correlate the dosimeter responses and dose equivalent conversion factors at different energies by taking into account the guidelines of the adopted ANSI Standard N13.11 and the dosimetry practices followed by most dosimeter processors. This standard is to be used in a mandatory testing program in the United States

  1. An X-ray Pulsar with a Superstrong Magnetic Field in the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater SGR1806-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Dieters, S.; Strohmayer, T.; vanParadijs, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Hurley, K.; Kommers, J.; Smith, I.; Frail, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) emit multiple, brief (approximately O.1 s) intense outbursts of low-energy gamma-rays. They are extremely rare; three are known in our galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Two SGRs are associated with young supernova remnants (SNRs), and therefore most probably with neutron stars, but it remains a puzzle why SGRs are so different from 'normal' radio pulsars. Here we report the discovery of pulsations in the persistent X-ray flux of SGR1806-20, with a period of 7.47 s and a spindown rate of 2.6 x 10(exp -3) s/yr. We argue that the spindown is due to magnetic dipole emission and find that the pulsar age and (dipolar) magnetic field strength are approximately 1500 years and 8 x 10(exp 14) gauss, respectively. Our observations demonstrate the existence of 'magnetars', neutron stars with magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those of radio pulsars, and support earlier suggestions that SGR bursts are caused by neutron-star 'crust-quakes' produced by magnetic stresses. The 'magnetar' birth rate is about one per millenium, a substantial fraction of that of radio pulsars. Thus our results may explain why some SNRs have no radio pulsars.

  2. Evaluation of a protable computer to reduce in-field gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Carolis, M.

    1981-08-01

    The experiments were carried out to test and evaluate the Gamma Spectrometry Data Processor Unit developed for the IAEA safeguards. In the report the results of Pu isotopic ratios obtained by the Data Processor and by the IAEA Nuclear Data 6620 using the INEL programme are presented in the energy interval 120-208 KeV. Two measurement campaigns on Pu samples were performed: the first at SAL-Seibersdorf and the second at the Kernforschunszentrum in Karlsruhe. Results obtained by inspections on Pu rods are also reported

  3. Progress towards an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Repasky

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A laser transmitter has been developed and incorporated into a micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere as an important step towards long-term autonomous field operation. The laser transmitter utilizes two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR diode lasers to injection seed a pulsed tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA, and is capable of producing up to 10 mJ of pulse energy with a 1 ms pulse duration and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The on-line wavelength of the laser transmitter can operate anywhere along the water vapor absorption feature centered at 828.187 nm (in vacuum depending on the prevailing atmospheric conditions, while the off-line wavelength operates at 828.287 nm. This laser transmitter has been incorporated into a DIAL instrument utilizing a 35.6 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD operating in the photon counting mode. The performance of the DIAL instrument was demonstrated over a ten-day observation period. During this observation period, data from radiosondes were used to retrieve water vapor number density profiles for comparisons with the number density profiles retrieved from the DIAL data.

  4. Effect of alpha and gamma radiation on the near-field chemistry and geochemistry of high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.

    1985-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can potentially alter geochemical and chemical processes in a geologic system. These effects can either enhance or reduce the performance of the waste package in a deep geologic repository. Current indications are that, in a repository located in basalt, ionizing radiation significantly affects geochemical/chemical processes but does not appear to significantly affect factors important to the long-term performance of the repository. The experimental results presented in this paper were obtained as part of an ongoing effort by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to determine the effect of ionizing radiation on chemical and geochemical processes in the environment of the waste package. Gamma radiolysis experiments were done by subjecting samples of synthetic basalt groundwater in the presence of various waste package components (basalt/packing/low-carbon steel) to high levels of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. Post-irradiation analysis was done on the gas, liquid, and solid components of the basalt system. The results obtained are important in evaluating waste package performance during the containment period. The effect of alpha radiation on the basalt groundwater system in the presence of waste package components is important in evaluating waste package performance during the isolation period. The experimental work in this area is in a very preliminary stage. Results from two experiments are reported. 9 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Aerosol and cloud properties derived from hyperspectral transmitted light in the southeast Atlantic sampled during field campaign deployments in 2016 and 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Pistone, K.; Karol, Y.; Schmidt, S.; Cochrane, S.; Chen, H.; Meyer, K.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    We present aerosol and cloud properties collected from airborne remote-sensing measurements in the southeast Atlantic during the recent NASA ObseRvations of CLouds above Aerosols and their intEractionS (ORACLES) field campaign. During the biomass burning seasons of September 2016 and August 2017, we sampled aerosol layers which overlaid marine stratocumulus clouds off the southwestern coast of Africa. We sampled these aerosol layers and the underlying clouds from the NASA P3 airborne platform with the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR). Aerosol optical depth (AOD), along with trace gas content in the atmospheric column (water vapor, NO2, and O3), is obtained from the attenuation in the sun's direct beam, measured at the altitude of the airborne platform. Using hyperspectral transmitted light measurements from 4STAR, in conjunction with hyperspectral hemispheric irradiance measurements from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFR), we also obtained aerosol intensive properties (asymmetry parameter, single scattering albedo), aerosol size distributions, cloud optical depth (COD), cloud particle effective radius, and cloud thermodynamic phase. Aerosol intensive properties are retrieved from measurements of angularly resolved skylight and flight level spectral albedo using the inversion used with measurements from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) that has been modified for airborne use. The cloud properties are obtained from 4STAR measurements of scattered light below clouds. We show a favorable initial comparison of the above-cloud AOD measured by 4STAR to this same product retrieved from measurements by the MODIS instrument on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites. The layer AOD observed above clouds will also be compared to integrated aerosol extinction profile measurements from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 (HSRL-2).

  6. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  7. Deployable reflector configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    Both the theoretical reasons for considering a non-circular format for the Large Deployable Reflector, and a potentially realizable concept for such a device, are discussed. The optimum systems for diffraction limited telescopes with incoherent detection have either a single filled aperture, or two such apertures as an interferometer to synthesize a larger aperture. For a single aperture of limited area, a reflector in the form of a slot can be used to give increased angular resolution. It is shown how a 20 x 8 meter telescope can be configured to fit the Space Shuttle bay, and deployed with relatively simple operations. The relationship between the sunshield design and the inclination of the orbit is discussed. The possible use of the LDR as a basic module to permit the construction of supergiant space telescopes and interferometers both for IR/submm studies and for the entire ultraviolet through mm wave spectral region is discussed.

  8. THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. I. IMPLICATIONS OF PLASMA INSTABILITIES FOR THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD AND EXTRAGALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E; Chang, Philip; Pfrommer, Christoph [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-06-10

    Inverse Compton cascades (ICCs) initiated by energetic gamma rays (E {approx}> 100 GeV) enhance the GeV emission from bright, extragalactic TeV sources. The absence of this emission from bright TeV blazars has been used to constrain the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF), and the stringent limits placed on the unresolved extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) by Fermi have been used to argue against a large number of such objects at high redshifts. However, these are predicated on the assumption that inverse Compton scattering is the primary energy-loss mechanism for the ultrarelativistic pairs produced by the annihilation of the energetic gamma rays on extragalactic background light photons. Here, we show that for sufficiently bright TeV sources (isotropic-equivalent luminosities {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) plasma beam instabilities, specifically the 'oblique' instability, present a plausible mechanism by which the energy of these pairs can be dissipated locally, heating the intergalactic medium. Since these instabilities typically grow on timescales short in comparison to the inverse Compton cooling rate, they necessarily suppress the ICCs. As a consequence, this places a severe constraint on efforts to limit the IGMF from the lack of a discernible GeV bump in TeV sources. Similarly, it considerably weakens the Fermi limits on the evolution of blazar populations. Specifically, we construct a TeV-blazar luminosity function from those objects currently observed and find that it is very well described by the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 0.1, shifted to lower luminosities and number densities, suggesting that both classes of sources are regulated by similar processes. Extending this relationship to higher redshifts, we show that the magnitude and shape of the EGRB above {approx}10 GeV are naturally reproduced with this particular example of a rapidly evolving TeV-blazar luminosity function.

  9. Determination of small field synthetic single-crystal diamond detector correction factors for CyberKnife, Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion and linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselsky, T; Novotny, J; Pastykova, V; Koniarova, I

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine small field correction factors for a synthetic single-crystal diamond detector (PTW microDiamond) for routine use in clinical dosimetric measurements. Correction factors following small field Alfonso formalism were calculated by comparison of PTW microDiamond measured ratio M Qclin fclin /M Qmsr fmsr with Monte Carlo (MC) based field output factors Ω Qclin,Qmsr fclin,fmsr determined using Dosimetry Diode E or with MC simulation itself. Diode measurements were used for the CyberKnife and Varian Clinac 2100C/D linear accelerator. PTW microDiamond correction factors for Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) were derived using MC simulated reference values from the manufacturer. PTW microDiamond correction factors for CyberKnife field sizes 25-5 mm were mostly smaller than 1% (except for 2.9% for 5 mm Iris field and 1.4% for 7.5 mm fixed cone field). The correction of 0.1% and 2.0% for 8 mm and 4 mm collimators, respectively, needed to be applied to PTW microDiamond measurements for LGK Perfexion. Finally, PTW microDiamond M Qclin fclin /M Qmsr fmsr for the linear accelerator varied from MC corrected Dosimetry Diode data by less than 0.5% (except for 1 × 1 cm 2 field size with 1.3% deviation). Regarding low resulting correction factor values, the PTW microDiamond detector may be considered an almost ideal tool for relative small field dosimetry in a large variety of stereotactic and radiosurgery treatment devices. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of dual-road transportable portal monitoring system for visible light and gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnowski, Thomas P.; Cunningham, Mark F.; Goddard, James S.; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Hornback, Donald E.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Bradley, E. Craig; Chesser, J.; Marchant, W.

    2010-04-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Transportable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest, especially if they can be rapidly deployed to different locations. To serve this application, we have constructed a rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. The system operation uses machine vision methods on the visible-light images to detect vehicles as they enter and exit the field of view and to measure their position in each frame. The visible-light and gamma-ray cameras are synchronized which allows the gamma-ray imager to harvest gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. Thus our system creates vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoids source confusion problems that plague non-imaging approaches to the same problem. Our current prototype instrument was designed for measurement of upto five lanes of freeway traffic with a pair of instruments, one on either side of the roadway. Stereoscopic cameras are used with a third "alignment" camera for motion compensation and are mounted on a 50' deployable mast. In this paper we discuss the design considerations for the machine-vision system, the algorithms used for vehicle detection and position estimates, and the overall architecture of the system. We also discuss system calibration for rapid deployment. We conclude with notes on preliminary performance and deployment.

  11. Design of Dual-Road Transportable Portal Monitoring System for Visible Light and Gamma-Ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Cunningham, Mark F.; Goddard, James Samuel Jr.; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Bradley, Eric Craig; Chesser, Joel B.; Marchant, William

    2010-01-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Transportable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest, especially if they can be rapidly deployed to different locations. To serve this application, we have constructed a rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. The system operation uses machine vision methods on the visible-light images to detect vehicles as they enter and exit the field of view and to measure their position in each frame. The visible-light and gamma-ray cameras are synchronized which allows the gamma-ray imager to harvest gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. Thus our system creates vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoids source confusion problems that plague non-imaging approaches to the same problem. Our current prototype instrument was designed for measurement of upto five lanes of freeway traffic with a pair of instruments, one on either side of the roadway. Stereoscopic cameras are used with a third alignment camera for motion compensation and are mounted on a 50 deployable mast. In this paper we discuss the design considerations for the machine-vision system, the algorithms used for vehicle detection and position estimates, and the overall architecture of the system. We also discuss system calibration for rapid deployment. We conclude with notes on preliminary performance and deployment.

  12. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem

  13. Radiation damage of light guide fibers in gamma radiation field - on-line monitoring of absorption centers formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, J.; Simane, C.; Finger, M.; Slunecka, M.; Finger, M. Jr.; Sluneckova, V.; Janata, A.; Vognar, M.; Sulc, M.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of radiation-induced changes of absorption coefficient was studied by online transmission spectra measurement for two different Kuraray light guide fibers. The samples were irradiated by bremsstrahlung gamma radiation, dose rates were from 2 Gy/s to 25 Gy/s. The kinetic coefficients both for absorption centers formation and for recovery processes were calculated. Good agreement of experimental data and simple one-short-lived absorption center model were received for radiation-hard light guide Kuraray (KFC). The more complicated process was observed on Kuraray (PSM) clear fiber. It was caused by the reaction of the oxygen dissolved in fiber and created radicals. The results are very useful for prediction of an optical fibers response in conditions of new nuclear and particle physics experiments. (author)

  14. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized ... If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation ...

  15. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Miles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc. measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4, carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2, and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4 were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January–December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of −0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10

  16. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Natasha L.; Martins, Douglas K.; Richardson, Scott J.; Rella, Christopher W.; Arata, Caleb; Lauvaux, Thomas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Barkley, Zachary R.; McKain, Kathryn; Sweeney, Colm

    2018-03-01

    Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc.) measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4), carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2), and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4) were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January-December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of -0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10 min isotopic ratio differences of 0.8

  17. IV. Effect of 60Co gamma rays on survival rate of China aster plants (Callistephus chinensis Nees in M1 generations - under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wosińska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were undertaken on the effect of different doses of gamma radiation on survival rate of plants (germinated from irradiated seeds for 5 China aster varieties specified at florescence time. During their growth under field conditions (from planting time to blooming lethal effect of the radiation occurred in plants of all varieties and its level depended on dose and variety. Effect of 3 kR and 6 kR doses differed depending on variety and was not always harmful, but following irradiation with doses exceeding 6 kR a considerable decrease in survival rate was observed. Radioresistance of studied varieties - measured both: by LD50 and LDl00 - differed; depending on variety, LD50 and LDl00 values fluctuated: from 6 to 9 kR and 12 to 15 kR respectively.

  18. Supramodal Theta, Gamma, and Sustained Fields Predict Modality-specific Modulations of Alpha and Beta Oscillations during Visual and Tactile Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ede, Freek; Jensen, Ole; Maris, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Flexible control over currently relevant sensory representations is an essential feature of primate cognition. We investigated the neurophysiological bases of such flexible control in humans during an intermodal working memory task in which participants retained visual or tactile sequences. Using magnetoencephalography, we first show that working memory retention engages early visual and somatosensory areas, as reflected in the sustained load-dependent suppression of alpha and beta oscillations. Next, we identify three components that are also load dependent but modality independent: medial prefrontal theta synchronization, frontoparietal gamma synchronization, and sustained parietal event-related fields. Critically, these domain-general components predict (across trials and within load conditions) the modality-specific suppression of alpha and beta oscillations, with largely unique contributions per component. Thus, working memory engages multiple complementary frontoparietal components that have discernible neuronal dynamics and that flexibly modulate retention-related activity in sensory areas in a manner that tracks the current contents of working memory.

  19. Radiation hardness of β-Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors against gamma-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Hoi; Takeyama, Akinori; Makino, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kohei; Kuramata, Akito; Yamakoshi, Shigenobu; Higashiwaki, Masataka

    2018-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on β-Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated. A gamma-ray tolerance as high as 1.6 MGy(SiO2) was demonstrated for the bulk Ga2O3 channel by virtue of weak radiation effects on the MOSFETs' output current and threshold voltage. The MOSFETs remained functional with insignificant hysteresis in their transfer characteristics after exposure to the maximum cumulative dose. Despite the intrinsic radiation hardness of Ga2O3, radiation-induced gate leakage and drain current dispersion ascribed respectively to dielectric damage and interface charge trapping were found to limit the overall radiation hardness of these devices.

  20. Results of 1998 spectral gamma-ray monitoring of boreholes at the 216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-12 crib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, D.G.; Randall, R.R.

    1998-09-01

    This document describes the results of fiscal year 1998 vadose zone monitoring of three inactive liquid waste disposal facilities associated with the Plutonium Finishing Plant: the 216-Z-1A tile field, the 216-Z-9 trench, and the 216-Z-12 crib. Monitoring consisted of spectral gamma-ray logging of 21 boreholes. This work was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in conjunction with Three Rivers Scientific and Waste management Federal Services, inc. Northwest Operations. These three liquid waste disposal facilities were chosen for monitoring because they were identified as containing some of the most significant sources of radioactive contamination in the Hanford Site vadose zone. The basic question addressed by this logging activity is ''Has the configuration of subsurface contamination changed since it was last measured?'' Previous borehole logging and laboratory analyses provide the baseline data to help answer this question

  1. Field-Deployable Video Cloud Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    78 2. Shipboard Server or Video Cloud System .......................................79 3. 4G LTE and Wi-Fi...local area network LED light emitting diode Li-ion lithium ion LTE long term evolution Mbps mega-bits per second MBps mega-bytes per second xv...restrictions on distribution. File size is dependent on both bit rate and content length. Bit rate is a value measured in bits per second (bps) and is

  2. TLD-300 detectors for separate measurement of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions of single, multiple, and moving-field neutron treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.

    1984-01-01

    Fast neutron therapy requirements, because of the poor depth dose characteristic of present therapeutical sources, are at least as complex in treatment plans as photon therapy. The physical part of the treatment planning is very important; however, it is much more complicated than for photons or electrons owing to the need for: Separation of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)); and more stringent tissue-equivalence conditions of phantoms than in photon therapy. Therefore, methods of clinical dosimetry for the separate determination of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions in irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms are needed. A method using TLD-300 (CaF 2 :Tm) detectors is described, which is able to give an approximate solution of the above-mentioned dosimetric requirements. The two independent doses, Dsub(T) and Dsub(G), can be calculated by an on-line computer analysis of the digitalized glow curve of TLD-300 detectors, irradiated with d(14)+Be neutrons of the cyclotron isocentric neutron therapy facility CIRCE in Essen. Results are presented for depth and lateral absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)) for fixed neutron beams of different field sizes compared with measurements by standard procedures (TE-TE ionization chamber, GM counter) in an A-150 phantom. The TLD-300 results for multiple and moving-field treatments (with and without wedge filters) in a patient simulating irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms, are shown together with computer calculations of these dose distributions. The probable causes for some systematic deviations are discussed, which lead to open problems for further investigations owing to features of the detector material and the evaluation method, but mainly to differences in the composition of phantom materials used for the calculations (standard dose distributions) and TLD-300 measurements. (author)

  3. Field GE gamma spectrometry for on site measurements of some parameters characterizing radon-222 exhalation rates from soils and covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zettwoog, P.; Kobal, I.; Pineau, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method based on differential gamma spectrometry for on site determination of some of the parameters which are relevant for the production of radon 222 in soil gas and its transfer from soil to indoor and outdoor atmospheres. This method is investigated in the context of a 3-year Slovenian-French cooperation programme, the PROTEUS project. We are currently using a germanium detector of 100 cm 3 . The height of the 20 deg. C collimated detector above the soil surface is from 1.5 to 3 m when using a tripod. This arrangement provides results which are representative of soil areas ranging from 1 to 4 square metres. Routine measurements would require larger detector volumes. The main objective is to provide technology and methodology for an efficient mapping of zones with potential for being the source of a high level of indoor radon, eliminating the need for soil sampling followed by laboratory analysis. The feasibility of an airborne mapping laboratory flying at low altitude will be investigated. Another objective is the rapid measurement of radon profiles across covers used to reduce exhalation rates from the surface of a pile of tailings, with characterisation of the influence of humidity content of the top layer. Airborne survey would allow for measuring exhalations from surfaces of slurries not otherwise accessible. (author)

  4. Prompt gamma-based neutron dosimetry for Am-Be and other workplace neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udupi, Ashwini; Panikkath, Priyada; Sarkar, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    A new field-deployable technique for estimating the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) by using the measured prompt gamma intensities emitted from borated high-density polyethylene (BHDPE) and the combination of normal HDPE and BHDPE with different configurations have been evaluated in this work. Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code has been employed to calculate the responses from the prompt gammas emitted due to the monoenergetic neutrons interacting with boron, hydrogen, and carbon nuclei. A suitable linear combination of these prompt gamma responses (dose conversion coefficient (DCC)-estimated) is generated to approximate the International Commission on Radiological Protection provided DCC using the cross-entropy minimization technique. In addition, the shape and configurations of the HDPE and BHDPE combined system are optimized using the FLUKA code simulation results. The proposed method is validated experimentally, as well as theoretically, using different workplace neutron spectra with a satisfactory outcome. (author)

  5. A Remotely Deployable Wind Sonic Anemometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication and computing shape up base for explosion of Internet of Things (IoT era. Humans can efficiently control the devices around their environment as per requirements because of IoT, the communication between different devices brings more flexibility in surrounding. Useful data is also gathered from some of these devices to create Big Data; where, further analysis assist in making life easier by developing good business models corresponding to user needs, enhance scientific research, formulating weather prediction or monitoring systems and contributing in other relative fields as well. Thus, in this research a remotely deployable IoT enabled Wind Sonic Anemometer has been designed and deployed to calculate average wind speed, direction, and gust. The proposed design is remotely deployable, user-friendly, power efficient and cost-effective because of opted modules i.e., ultrasonic sensors, GSM module, and solar panel. The testbed was also deployed at the roof of Computer & Information Systems Engineering (CIS department, NED UET. Further, its calibration has been carried out by using long short-term memory (LSTM, a deep learning technique; where ground truth data has been gathered from mechanical wind speed sensor (NRG-40 H deployed at top of Industrial & Manufacturing (IM department of NED UET. The obtained results are satisfactory and the performance of designed sensor is also good under various weather conditions.

  6. Assessment of MicroDiamond PTW 60019 detector and its comparison with other detectors for relative dosimetry in small radiosurgery fields of the Leksell gamma knife perfexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J. Jr.; Kozubikova, P.; Pastykova, V.; Pipek, J.; Bhatnagar, J. P.; Huq, M. S.; Veselsky, T.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of relative output factors (ROF) for the Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) is not a trivial task due to strict demands of an accurate set up and small size of measured radiosurgery fields. The purpose of this study was to perform an assessment of a new synthetic single crystal MicroDiamond PTW 60019 detector (volume 0.004 mm 3 ) for measurement of ROFs for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators for the LGK Perfexion. Small sensitive volume of this detector, near water equivalence and low energy dependence make it an attractive candidate for small field dosimetry. Results obtained in this study were compared with results measured by broad variety of different detectors and also Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. MicroDiamond detector connected to PTW UNIDOS electrometer was positioned in ELEKTA spherical phantom and pre-irradiated to dose of 5 Gy. Measurements were performed in two different detector positions: 1) parallel with table axis, 2) orthogonal to table axis. Electrometer timer of 1 min was used to measure subsequently signal from 16 mm, 8 mm and 4 mm beams. Altogether ten measurements were performed for each of three collimator sizes. Results from MicroDiamond were compared with those obtained from various types of detectors used in the past by authors for measurement of LGK ROFs. New synthetic single crystal MicroDiamond PTW 60019 detector appears to be a very promising detector for relative output factor measurements in very small radiosurgery fields. (authors)

  7. Economics of ALMR deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country's future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment

  8. ALMR deployment economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This analysis seeks to model and evaluate the economics of the use of Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors (ALMR) as a component of this country's future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel). While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment

  9. Enhanced reliability and accuracy for field deployable bioforensic detection and discrimination of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca, causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis using razor ex technology and TaqMan quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ping; Arif, Mohammad; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Melcher, Ulrich; Ochoa Corona, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A reliable, accurate and rapid multigene-based assay combining real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a Razor Ex BioDetection System (Razor Ex) was validated for detection of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp, a xylem-limited bacterium that causes citrus variegated chlorosis [CVC]). CVC, which is exotic to the United States, has spread through South and Central America and could significantly impact U.S. citrus if it arrives. A method for early, accurate and sensitive detection of Xfp in plant tissues is needed by plant health officials for inspection of products from quarantined locations, and by extension specialists for detection, identification and management of disease outbreaks and reservoir hosts. Two sets of specific PCR primers and probes, targeting Xfp genes for fimbrillin and the periplasmic iron-binding protein were designed. A third pair of primers targeting the conserved cobalamin synthesis protein gene was designed to detect all possible X. fastidiosa (Xf) strains. All three primer sets detected as little as 1 fg of plasmid DNA carrying X. fastidiosa target sequences and genomic DNA of Xfp at as little as 1 - 10 fg. The use of Razor Ex facilitates a rapid (about 30 min) in-field assay capability for detection of all Xf strains, and for specific detection of Xfp. Combined use of three primer sets targeting different genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a field-deployable rapid and reliable bioforensic detection and discrimination method for a bacterial phytopathogen based on multigene targets.

  10. Wide field X-ray telescopes: Detecting X-ray transients/afterglows related to gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul; Rezek, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited field of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70ies but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster eye type are presented and discussed. Optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed

  11. Dose Determination using alanine detectors in a Mixed Neutron and Gamma Field for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Liver Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for liver malignancies is being investigated at the University of Mainz. One important aim is the set-up of a reliable dosimetry system. Alanine dosimeters have previously been applied for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields in antiproton therapy, and ma...

  12. Localisation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease with neural beta and gamma activity of local field potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, R.; Zwartjes - de Klerk, D.G.M; Heida, Tjitske; Contarino, M.F.; de Bie, R.M.A.; van den Munckhof, P; Schuurman, P.R.; Martens, H.C.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Bour, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the nature of oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) by means of intraoperative local field potential (LFP) recordings, its relationship with microelectrode recordings (MER) and its potential use to locate the STN and its sensorimotor sub-area in patients with Parkinson’s

  13. Broad band simulation of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) prompt emission in presence of an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaeepour, Houri; Gardner, Brian

    2011-12-01

    The origin of prompt emission in GRBs is not yet well understood. The simplest and most popular model is Synchrotron Self-Compton (SSC) emission produced by internal shocks inside an ultra-relativistic jet. However, recent observations of a delayed high energy component by the Fermi-LAT instrument have encouraged alternative models. Here we use a recently developed formulation of relativistic shocks for GRBs to simulate light curves and spectra of synchrotron and self-Compton emissions in the framework of internal shock model. This model takes into account the evolution of quantities such as densities of colliding shells, and fraction of kinetic energy transferred to electrons and to induced magnetic field. We also extend this formulation by considering the presence of a precessing external magnetic field. These simulations are very realistic and present significant improvement with respect to previous phenomenological GRB simulations. They reproduce light curves of separate peaks of real GRBs and variety of spectral slopes at E > Epeak observed by the Fermi-LAT instrument. The high energy emission can be explained by synchrotron emission and a subdominant contribution from inverse Compton. We also suggest an explanation for extended tail emission and relate it to the screening of the magnetic field and/or trapping of accelerated electrons in the electromagnetic energy structure of the plasma in the shock front. Spectral slopes of simulated bursts at E external magnetic field, we show that due to the fast variation of other quantities, its signature in the Power Distribution Spectrum (PDS) is significantly suppressed and only when the duration of the burst is few times longer than the oscillation period it can be detected, otherwise either it is confused with the Poisson noise or with intrinsic variations of the emission. Therefore, low significant oscillations observed in the PDS of GRB 090709a are most probably due to a precessing magnetic field.

  14. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  15. CCT deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, B.

    1993-01-01

    The deployment of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) is discussed by asserting that in the case of commercializing CCT, the government's involvement should not stop at the demonstration gate. Two areas in this regard are described. First, the need for the domestic DOE CCT Program to focus on the domestic deployment of demonstrated technologies, and second, the need to recognize that to participate in the phenomenal growth of international power markets through use of clean coal or advanced coal technologies an aggressive partnering between the government and industry to demonstrate technologies abroad will be required. The Clean Coal Technology Coalition's (CCT) primary mission has been to promote the development and use of CCTs. The CCT is a strong advocate for the DOE CCT Program and applauds the Department's and industry's success at developing many coal-based technologies. By current design, the DOE program is said to go no further than the initial demonstration of a technology. Since the inception of CCT in 1986, the Coalition has advocated the need to pursue a partnership with government in which more than one demonstration of the same or similar technology is supported by the clean coal program. Only in this way can one be assured of widespread acceptance of any given technology. There exists a gap (call it a open-quotes risk gapclose quotes) between CCTs that have been successfully demonstrated (and presumably available for commercial use) and their widespread commercial use. A technology matrix has been developed in which the developmental status of a variety of clean coal technologies is demonstrated. While still too early to pass judgment, it appears that while success is being achieved in demonstrating advanced coal technologies, the market place - for several reasons - is not, indeed may have no plans, to adopt these technologies

  16. Effect of seed treatment with static magnetic field (SMF) and low dose gamma radiation (GR) on grain yield of aerobic rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Anand, Anjali; Singh, Bhupinder

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic rice cultivation is gaining popularity as it demands less water. However, poor germination of rice is an important issue in this situation. Seed pretreatment with static magnetic field (SMF) and gamma radiation (GR) at prescribed dose is known to influence the germination, seedling vigour and and yield of many crops. There is a possibility to improve the crop establishment under aerobic situation by physical seed treatment with static-magnetic field (SMF) and gamma radiation (GR) prior to sowing. Hence, a field experiment was conducted at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi during kharif 2012 and 2013 to study the effect of SMF and GR-treated seeds on growth and yield of aerobic rice. The five seed treatments were: SMF 50 mT for 2 hrs, SMF 100 mT for 2 hrs, GR 0.0025 kGy, GR 0.10 kGy and an untreated control. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Block Design with four replications. Crop (variety 'Pusa Basmati-1121') was direct seeded on 25 th and 24 th June during 2012 and 2013, respectively at a spacing of 25 cm. Treatments GR 0.0025 kGy, SMF (50 mT) and SMF (100 mT) resulted in a significant improvement in grain yield of rice over control and GR dose (0.10 kGy) during both the years. Averaged across two years the grain yield increase by treating the rice seeds with GR 0.0025 kGy, SMF (50 mT) and SMF (100 mT) was 20.1, 17.6 and 14.5%, respectively over the control. Increase in GR dose (0.10 kGy ) was not effective in improving the yield, and was found to be similar to control. It is therefore concluded that treatment of rice seeds either with GR (0.0025 kGy) or SMF (50 mT) holds a great promise in increasing the grain yield of aerobic rice. (author)

  17. Air kerma national standard of Russian Federation for x-ray and gamma radiation. Activity SSDL/VNIIM in medical radiation dosimetry field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, I.A.; Villevalde, N.D.; Oborin, A.V.; Fominykh, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Primary standard of unities air kerma and air kerma rate X-ray and gamma radiation, placed at VNIIM, consists of: plate-parallel free-air ionization chamber IK 10-60 for low-energy X-ray in the generating potential range from 10 to 50 kV; plate-parallel free-air ionization chamber IK 50-400 for medium-energy X-ray in the generating potential range from 50 to 300 kV; cavity cylindrical graphite chambers C1 and C30 with volumes 1 cm 3 and 30 cm 3 for reproduction and transmission the dimensions gamma radiation unities using Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. The next irradiation facilities are used at VNIIM: in low-energy X-ray range: a constant-potential high-voltage generator and a tungsten-anode Xray tube with inherent filtration of around 1 mm Be; in medium-energy X-ray range: set on the basis of an industrial X-ray apparatus Isovolt-400 and a tungsten-anode X-ray tube with inherent filtration of around 3,5 mm Al; in gamma radiations field: units with a radioactive sources Cs-137 with activity 140 and 1200 GBq and Co-60 with activity 120 GBq and irradiation set with a source from Co-60 (activity 3200 GBq). The last one belongs to Central Research Institute for Radiology and Roentgenology (CNIRRI). For measuring currents and charges of standard chambers we use electrometers such as Keithley of model 6517A and B7-45 manufactured by 'Belvar' (Republic Belarus). The reference radiation qualities L, N, H series according to ISO 4037 and the radiation qualities RQR, RQA and RQF according to IEC 61267 for calibration and verification of the therapeutic, diagnostic measurement means are realized in the low-energy and medium-energy X-ray standards. The VNIIM air kerma primary standard of has been participated in the international comparisons: key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K1 for gamma radiation of Co-60 in 1997; supplementary comparisons BIPM.R1(I)-S10 for gamma radiation of Cs-137 in 1997; key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K2 for low-energy X-ray range in 1998; key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K3

  18. CMS software deployment on OSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B; Avery, P; Thomas, M; Wuerthwein, F

    2008-01-01

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment

  19. CMS software deployment on OSG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B; Avery, P [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Thomas, M [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wuerthwein, F [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: bockjoo@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: thomas@hep.caltech.edu, E-mail: avery@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: fkw@fnal.gov

    2008-07-15

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment.

  20. Mastering Hyper-V Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    The only book to take an in-depth look at deploying Hyper-V. Now in its second generation, the popular Hyper-V boasts technical advances that create even more dynamic systems than ever before. This unique resource serves an authoritative guide to deploying Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V comprehensively. Step-by-step instructions demonstrate how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host environment, and design a management system with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2.: Features real-world examples that show you how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host env

  1. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  2. An optical study of the GRB 970111 field beginning 19 hours after the gamma-ray burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Wolf, Christian

    1998-01-01

    to estimate photometric redshifts in the range 0.2 4 for several galaxies in this field and we did not find any conspicuous unusual object. We note that GRB 970111 and GRB 980329 could belong to the same class of GRBs, which may be related to nearby sources (2 similar to 1) in which high intrinsic...... with B galaxy with redshift z = 0.657, which we propose as the optical counterpart of the X-ray source. Further observations allowed to perform...... multicolour photometry for objects in the GRB 970111 error box. The colour-colour diagrams do not show any object with unusual colours. We applied a photometric classification method to the objects inside the GRB error box, that can distinguish stars from galaxies and estimate redshifts. We were able...

  3. Effects of gamma rays, ultraviolet radiation, sunlight, microwaves and electromagnetic fields on gene expression mediated by human immunodeficiency virus promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libertin, C.R.; Woloschak, G.E.; Panozzo, J.; Groh, K.R.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work by our group and others has shown the modulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR) after exposure to neutrons and ultraviolet radiations. Using HeLa cells stably transfected with a construct containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene, the transcription of which is mediated by the HIV-LTR, we designed experiments to examine the effects of exposure to different types of radiation (such as γ rays, ultraviolet and sunlight irradiations, electromagnetic fields and microwaves) in HIV-LTR-driven expression of CAT. These results demonstrated ultraviolet-light-induced transcription from the HIV promoter, as has been shown by others. Exposure to other DNA-damaging agents such as γ rays and sunlight (with limited exposures) had no significant effect on transcription mediated by HIV-LTR, suggesting that induction of HIV is not mediated by just any type of DNA damage but rather may require specific types of DNA damage. Microwaves did not cause cell killing when cells in culture were exposed in high volumes of medium, and the same cells showed no changes in expression. When microwave exposure was carried out in low volumes of medium (so that excessive heat was generated) induction of HIV-LTR transcription (as assayed by CAT activity) was evident. Electromagnetic field exposures had no effect on expression of HIV-LTR. These results demonstrate that not all types of radiation and not all DNA-damaging agents are capable of inducing HIV. We hypothesize that induction of HIV transcription may be mediated by several different signals exposure to radiation. 22 refs., 8 figs

  4. Intercomparison exercise on external gamma dose rate under field conditions at the laboratory of natural radiation (Saelices el Chico, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Villanueva, J. L.; Sainz-Fernandez, C.; Fuente-Merino, I.; Saez-Vergara, J. C.; Correa-Garce, E.; Quindos-Poncela, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The last nuclear accident in Fukushima nuclear power plant has increased the necessity for measuring radiation in the environment. Therefore, radiation monitors providing results traceable throughout the country become essential and it is very important to test them under the same environmental conditions. The first intercomparison of natural radioactivity under field conditions was held in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain) in May 2011, including an exercise on environmental dose rate. This article presents the results achieved by 19 instruments belonging to 12 institutions from 7 different countries. The tested detectors are proportional counters, ionisation chambers, Geiger-Mueller and scintillators measuring dose rate in three stations with reference values from 110 to 1800 nGy h -1 All the results were given in terms of air kerma (nGy h -1 ) and the measurements show agreement within 25 % in all the sites. Evaluation criteria based on accuracy and statistical uncertainty were also carried out and 25 % of participants passed the test in all sites. (authors)

  5. Field Test Of Capability To Prevent Cabbage Clubroot Disease Caused By Plasmodiophora brassicae Of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized By Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Thi Le Ha; Nguyen Tan Man; Nguyen Duy Hang; Le Hai; Tran Thi Tam; Pham Thi Sam; Le Huu Tu; Tran Thu Hong; Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Tuong Ly Lan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of four dose rates 0.27; 0.90; 1.80 and 3.60 kGy/h on the solution of silver (Ag + 10 -2 M, PVP 2%, ethylenglycol 6%) irradiated at 25 kGy were investigated. The results showed that as the dose rates increased, the absorption peak shifted to blue wavelengths and also the particles decreased in size. For field test, nano particles were prepared by irradiation of silver solution at 25 kGy with the dose rate of 3.60 kGy/h. The absorption peaks of the synthesized nanoparticles were obtained at wavelengths of 412 nm and the average diameter of particles were 14 nm. Using two concentrations of 15 and 20 ppm, silver nanoparticles had not affected the growth and development of cabbage but showed antifungal activity against Plasmodiophora brassicae cause club root in cabbage. Using nano particles, the clubroot disease index were 9-10% compared to 5% of nebijin (fungicide), and 12% of control. The yield of cabbage were 55 tons/ha, 63 tons/ha and 70 tons/ha for the control, nanosilver group, and nebijin group, respectively. (author)

  6. Optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review the status and recent progress in the field of optical observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will focus on the fundamental observational evidence for the relationship between gamma-ray bursts and the final evolutionary phases of massive stars. In particular, we will address (i) gamma-ray burst host galaxies, (ii) optically dark gamma-ray burst afterglows, (iii) the gamma-ray burst-supernova connection, and (iv) the relation between X-ray flashes, gamma-ray bursts, and supernovae

  7. Evaluation of some field bean mutants induced by using gamma rays and Ethyl methane sulphonate in M9 and M10 generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atia, Z.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Selection was practices within and between, M2,M3 and M4 field been populations derived from gamma irradiation treatments (30 and 60 Gy) and EMS treatments (0.15-0.3%) ten mutants were isolated and evaluated for yield and yield components and chemical contents of seeds in M 5 generation. The evaluation was done until M 8 generation. In this generation (M 8 ) we isolated seven mutants, in M 9 and M 1 0 generations, a comparison was done between these mutants and some local varieties; Sakha1, Sakha2, Masr1 and Giza3 in addition the mother variety Giza 2. The results indicated that:1-All faba bean mutants increased significantly Number of branches / plant in Comparison with the local commercial varieties. 2-Mutant lines No 3,4,5,6 and 7 increased number of pods per plant weight pods per plant number and weight seeds per plant and protein percentage of seeds in comparison with the local varieties in the two generations only . 3-Mutant No. 8 increased significantly No. and weight of pods, No. and weight of seeds / plant in M 9 generation . 4-Mutants No 3,4,5,6,7 and 8 increased significantly number of seeds/ pod and shelling percentage in comparison with local varieties Sakha1 and Sakha2 in the two generations on the contrast decreased significantly seed index (100 seeds weight) and shedding percentages of followers and pods

  8. A review of the evaluation of TENORM levels at the produced water lagoon of the Minagish oil field using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, H. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Alshammari, H.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    An evaluation of the specific activity concentrations associated with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) and anthropogenic radionuclides has been undertaken as part of a systematic study to provide a radiological map of the outer boundary of the produced water lagoon located in the Minagish oil field in the south west of the State of Kuwait. The lagoon contains material from the discharge of produced water which is a by-product of oil production in the region. The lagoon samples were prepared and placed into sealed, marinelli beakers for a full gamma-ray spectrometric analysis using a high-resolution, low-background, high-purity germanium detection systems at the University of Surrey Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory. Of particular interest are the calculation of the activity concentrations associated with members of the decay chains following decays of the primordial radionuclides of the 238U chain (226Ra, 214Pb, 214Bi) and the 232Th chain (228Ra, 228Ac, 212Pb, 212Bi, 208Tl), and the enhanced concentrations of radium isotopes. This conference paper presents an overview summary of the experimental samples which have been measured and the analysis techniques applied, including isotopic correlation plots across the sample region. The result shows the expected significant increase in 226Ra (and progeny) concentrations compared to the NORM values previously reported by our group for the overall terrain in Kuwait.

  9. Application of nuclear gamma methods in mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Bosak, J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of basic physical characteristics of laboratory, field and operating gamma methods, of their classifications and principles. The measuring instrumentation used and the current state of applications of nuclear gamma methods in coal and ore mining and related branches are described in detail. Principles and practical recommendations are given for safety at work when handling gamma sources. (B.S.)

  10. Ultrasonography X gamma radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Campos, A.M. de

    1989-01-01

    The accumulated experience in the last ten years of substitution to essays by gamma radiography to essay by ultrasonography, starting of the systematic comparison and tabulation of the results obtained by both essays applied in welding joints, in field, in steel pipelines of the SABESP. (V.R.B.)

  11. Gamma ray calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.; Flaherty, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is in the field of gamma ray inspection devices for tubular products and the like employing an improved calibrating block which prevents the sensing system from being overloaded when no tubular product is present, and also provides the operator with a means for visually detecting the presence of wall thicknesses which are less than a required minimum. (author)

  12. Simultaneous neutron and gamma spectrum adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum adjustment procedure was extended to simultaneous neutron and gamma spectrum adjustment, and the feasibility of this technique is demonstrated in the analysis of HFIR dosimetry experiments. Conditions in which gamma rays may contribute considerably to radiation damage in steels are discussed. Beryllium helium accumulation fluence monitors (HAFMs) were found to be good monitors in gamma fields of intensities high enough to contribute to steel embrittlement. Use of 237 Np, 238 U, and 9 Be HAFM as gamma dosimeters is proposed for high-dose irradiations in high-energy, high-intensity gamma fields

  13. Gamma astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.; Cesarsky, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    This article overviews the gamma astronomy research. Sources already observed, and what causes to give to them; the galactic radiation and its interpretation; techniques already used and current projects [fr

  14. Gamma Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Butz, Tilman; Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.

    2008-01-01

    No abstract. The sections in this article are 1 Introduction 2 Mössbauer Spectroscopy 3 Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) 4 Conclusions and Outlook Keywords: Mössbauer spectroscopy; gamma spectroscopy; perturbed angular correlation; TDPAC

  15. Assessment of the potential implementation of the Fricke dosimetric system to measure the gamma dose rate in a mixed field at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column at RA-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curotto, P.; Pozzi, E.C.C.; Thorp, S.I.; Casal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The characterization of the mixed field, i.e. neutron and gamma radiation, at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column (FCCT) at RA-3 is pivotal to the radiobiology experiments carried out there. One of the greatest difficulties of gamma dosimetry in a mixed field such as the FCCT field is to discriminate the perturbation induced by the high neutron flux. Given that the neutron spectrum of the source is very well characterized, it is of interest to have an alternative way of measuring gamma dose rate to be able to compare the results with those currently derived from an ionization chamber (IC). The Fricke dosimetric system is widely used as an absolute dosimeter in pure, very high dose radiation fields. The experimental set-up of these dosimeters exhibits advantages compared to instrumentation with IC. The aim of the present study was to adapt the system to use it as a measuring method at FCCT and perform a comparative analysis. Materials and Methods: Once the technique to prepare the dosimeters was adapted at our laboratory the following irradiations were carried out: one in a pure, known, gamma field, and four in the mixed FCCT field in the same position, employing 3 different configurations to obtain different relations between the radiation components in the field. The following configurations were employed: a) with closed neutron shielding, b) with open neutron shielding and c) no shielding. The results were compared with those derived from measurements with the IC. Results: In pure gamma field experience the following results were obtained: the dose measured by the IC was (44.6 ± 0.5) Gy (in air) and Fricke dose was (48.2 ± 1.1) Gy. Comparing the configurations with closed and open neutron shielding, the IC signal rose by 4% (considered not significant) whereas the Fricke dose rate increased by 15%. Comparing the configurations with closed shielding and no shielding, the gamma dose rate measured with the Fricke system rose by 153

  16. Rapid deployment intrusion detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly deployable security system is one that provides intrusion detection, assessment, communications, and annunciation capabilities; is easy to install and configure; can be rapidly deployed, and is reusable. A rapidly deployable intrusion detection system (RADIDS) has many potential applications within the DOE Complex: back-up protection for failed zones in a perimeter intrusion detection and assessment system, intrusion detection and assessment capabilities in temporary locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations. Many DOE user-need documents have indicated an interest in a rapidly deployable intrusion detection system. The purpose of the RADIDS project is to design, develop, and implement such a system. 2 figs

  17. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Somalia Peacekeepers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72(5), 909-913. Haas DM . Pazdernik LA. Olsen CH. A cross-sectional survey of the...relationship between partner deployment and stress in pregnancy during wartime. Haas DM . Pazdernik LA. Partner deployment and stress in pregnant...Identify 3-5 key words relating to the proposal. (Required) I used MESH Headings instead of the CRISP Thesaurus for key

  18. Deployment of a pentagonal hollow-rope tensegrity module

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode-Barbarigos , Landolf; Bel Hadj Ali , Nizar; Motro , René; Smith , Ian F.C.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Tensegrity structures are spatial reticulated structures composed of cables and struts. Tensegrity systems are good candidates for adaptive and deployable structures and thus have applications in various engineering fields. A "hollow-rope" tensegrity system composed of tensegrity-ring modules has been demonstrated by the authors to be a viable system for a pedestrian bridge. This paper focuses on the deployment of pentagonal ring modules. A geometric study is performed...

  19. Base Station Antenna Pattern Distortion in Practical Urban Deployment Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2014-01-01

    In real urban deployments, base station antennas are typically not placed in free space conditions. Therefore, the radiation pattern can be affected by mounting structures and nearby obstacles located in the proximity of the antenna (near-field), which are often not taken into consideration. Also...... presents a combination of near-field and far-field simulations aimed to provide an overview of the distortion experienced by the base station antenna pattern in two different urban deployment scenarios: rooftop and telecommunications tower. The study illustrates how, in comparison with the near...

  20. Gamma radiation scanning of nuclear waste storage tile holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Yue, S.; Sur, B.; Johnston, J.; Gaudet, M.; Wright, M.; Burton, N.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear waste management facilities at Chalk River Laboratories use below-ground 'tile holes' to store solid waste from various activities such as medical radioisotope production. A silicon PIN (p-type-intrinsic-n-type semiconductor) diode based gamma radiation scanning system has been developed and used to profile the gamma radiation fields along the depth of waste storage tile holes by deploying the sensor into verification tubes adjacent to the tile holes themselves. The radiation field measurements were consistent with expected radiation fields in the tile holes based on administrative knowledge of the radioactive contents and their corresponding decay rates. Such measurements allow non-invasive verification of tile hole contents and provide input to the assessment of radiological risk associated with removal of the waste. Using this detector system, radioactive waste that has decayed to very low levels may be identified based on the radiation profile. This information will support planning for possible transfer of this waste to a licensed waste storage facility designed for low level waste, thus freeing storage space for possible tile hole re-use for more highly radioactive waste. (author)

  1. Integrated Incident Management System (IIMS) web client application development, deployment and evaluation Staten Island (SI) demonstration project : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-27

    This evaluation report provides background on the development and findings. The aim of the UTRC project was to develop and : deploy Portable IIMS based on Smartphone web applications. Previously, traditional IIMS was deployed in the field vehicles : ...

  2. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  3. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  4. Optimal and Approximate Approaches for Deployment of Heterogeneous Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabie Ramadan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A modeling framework for the problem of deploying a set of heterogeneous sensors in a field with time-varying differential surveillance requirements is presented. The problem is formulated as mixed integer mathematical program with the objective to maximize coverage of a given field. Two metaheuristics are used to solve this problem. The first heuristic adopts a genetic algorithm (GA approach while the second heuristic implements a simulated annealing (SA algorithm. A set of experiments is used to illustrate the capabilities of the developed models and to compare their performance. The experiments investigate the effect of parameters related to the size of the sensor deployment problem including number of deployed sensors, size of the monitored field, and length of the monitoring horizon. They also examine several endogenous parameters related to the developed GA and SA algorithms.

  5. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, Ul; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is replaceably mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. Supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other

  6. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a collimation system for a gamma camera for use in nuclear medicine is described. When used with a 2-dimensional position sensitive radiation detector, the novel system can produce superior images than conventional cameras. The optimal thickness and positions of the collimators are derived mathematically. (U.K.)

  7. Advances in potential formation and findings in sheared radial electric-field effects on turbulence and loss suppression in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Islam, M.K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Numakura, T.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yoshida, M.; Imai, T.; Pastukhov, V.P.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Following the Lyon IAEA Conference, (1) a factor of three progress up to 2.1 kV in the formation of ion-confining potential heights in comparison to those attained 1992-2002 is achieved for tandem-mirror plasmas in the hot-ion mode with ion temperatures of several keV. (2) The advance in the potential formation gives bases for a finding of the remarkable effects of radially produced shear of electric fields E r , or non-uniform sheared plasma rotation Ω r =E r /(r c B) on the suppression of turbulent fluctuations for the first time in GAMMA 10. (Here, r c denotes a radius mapped to the central-cell.) (2-i) Such a shear effect on the central-cell plasmas is highlighted visually by x-ray tomography diagnostics; that is, spatially and temporally fluctuated vortex-like structures are clearly observed in plasmas produced by ICH alone [having a quite weak shear]. (2-ii) However, during the application of plug ECH into the ICH plasmas, an associated potential rise produces a stronger shear [E r =several 10 kV/m 2 ]. In this case, the disappearance of the turbulent vortices on the basis of such a high-potential formation due to ECH is found in association with plasma confinement improvement. In fact, the associated temperature rise and transverse loss suppression are observed. (3) From the viewpoints of both (i) a conventional idea of higher and better potential confinement in the axial direction [i.e., E z effects] and (ii) the present new finding of a turbulent vortex disappearance due to a strong radial electric shear [i.e., E r effects] in the transverse direction, simultaneously, such a high potential formation is found to play an essential role in providing stably improved plasma confinement both radially and axially. (4) For the physics interpretations and control of such potential [or the associated E r or Ψ r shear] formation, the validity of our proposed theory of the potential formation is extendedly tested under the conditions with auxiliary heatings. The

  8. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  9. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  10. Application of artificial neural network for development of an algorithm for TLD badge system in the mixed field dosimetry of X and gamma radiation in terms of Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, K.; Bakshi, A.K.; Geetha, V.; Kher, R.K.; Dhar, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    ICRU has introduced new operational quantities for individual monitoring. Therefore it is required to develop an algorithm that gives direct response of the TLD badge in terms of the operational quantities. For this purpose and also to improve the precision in the mixed fields dosimetry, two methods were studied i)- analytical method by developing an algorithm based on of higher order polynomial fit of the data points for known delivered doses and ii) use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Study on the response of the TLD badge system based on CaSO 4 : Dy Teflon TLD discs in the mixed fields of X and gamma radiation in terms of operational quantity Hp(10) was carried out using the prevalent algorithm, algorithm developed using higher order polynomial and neural network predicted algorithm for different proportion of dose delivered by X and gamma radiations. It was found that the uncertainties in the dose response for few fields are beyond the acceptable limit for prevalent algorithm and within the acceptable limit for other two algorithms. Algorithm based on ANN gives higher precision in the mixed field of two radiations compared to other two algorithms. (author)

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mori, Yohsimasa; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery has become a new treatment modality in the field of neurosurgery since the first gamma knife was brought into Japan in 1990. Advances in applications of new indications and long-term results have been continued to evolve during the past 12 years. Based on the experience of more than 4,500 cases treated by gamma knife at Komaki City Hospital, long-term results of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), metastatic brain tumors, acoustic neurinomas, meningiomas and trigeminal neuralgias are presented. Radiosurgery has become a novel treatment modality, especially for AVM, acoustic neurinoma and meningioma, which were once only treatable by conventional surgery, and shows a high cure rate in AVM cases and high control rate in benign tumors without major complications. The effects of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors have been thought to be superior to fractionated radiotherapy due to high response and control rates, and patients showed improved quality of life although no prolongation of the life span was obtained. Gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia has been shown to be effective and less invasive than microvascular decompression, and is useful for cases resistant to conventional therapies and as an initial treatment as well. (author)

  12. Introscopy using gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Yu.V.; Leonov, B.I.; Najorov, A.N.; Smirnov, N.N.; Firstov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described of working with standard 170 Tm, 75 Se, 192 Ir, 137 Cs and 60 Co sources at the activity of 1-4000 Ci, during television gamma introscopy of steel products. Experiments involving the RI-10T introscope are carried out to determine prospects of using various radiation sources. The results of using X-ray instruments for control of steel products are also shown for comparison. In introscopy of X-rayed steel products over 25 mm thick, spreading of the edge of the detected groove image is shown to be comparable when using X radiation and gamma radiation of standard sources. Sensitivity of control by fluorographic introscope in X-raying and gamma irradiation of products over 25 mm thick will presumably be the same owing to the detector storage capacity. The use of commercial gamma flaw detecting instruments together with a television introscope permits to reliably reveal defects of 0.5-2.0 mm in size, eliminating possible instability of operation of X-ray instruments, particularly in field conditions

  13. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  14. Application of the similitude principle to gamma-gamma density measurements; Application du principe de similitude a la mesure gamma-gamma de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czubek, J A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement d' Electronique Generale, Service d' Electronique Industrielle; Institut de Recherches Nucleaires, Dep. VI, Cracow (Poland)

    1966-07-01

    The work presented here deals with the problem of the application of the similitude principle to rock density measurements by the gamma-gamma method. A formula is presented which makes it possible to transform results of gamma-gamma measurements carried out on models in order to make them suitable for comparison with results obtained under actual field conditions. Both the space coordinates and the densities are transformed. This transformation makes it possible to obtain a calibration curve as a function of the density for a gamma-gamma probe using only a single model of given density. The influence has also been studied of the chemical composition on the results obtained from gamma-gamma measurements. A method has been developed for estimating the equivalent Z parameter of the medium; the possibility of completely eliminating the influence of the chemical composition of the medium on the measurement results has been studied. (author) [French] L'etude presentee ci-dessous traite le probleme de l'application du principe de similitude aux mesures de densite des roches par la methode gamma-gamma. Nous indiquons une formule qui permet de transformer les resultats des mesures gamma-gamma effectuees sur les modeles pour les comparer aux resultats obtenus dans les conditions reelles sur le terrain. On transforme les coordonnees spatiales ainsi que les densites. Cette transformation donne la possibilite d'obtenir une courbe d'etalonnage (en fonction de la densite) pour une sonde gamma-gamma en utilisant un seul modele de densite donnee. On a etudie aussi l'influence de la composition chimique sur les resultats obtenus des mesures gamma-gamma. On a etabli une methode d'estimation du parametre Z equivalent du milieu, ainsi que la possibilite d'eliminer completement l'influence de la composition chimique du milieu sur les resultats des mesures de densite. (auteur)

  15. When Loved Ones Get Deployed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different from hearing about conflicts and violence that break out in the world during our own time. If someone you care about is in the military and is deployed for duty, it's natural to worry about their safety. That's especially true if the person is going ...

  16. Non-traditional Infrasound Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, M. H.; McComas, S.; Simpson, C. P.; Diaz-Alvarez, H.; Costley, R. D.; Hayward, C.; Golden, P.; Endress, A.

    2017-12-01

    Historically, infrasound arrays have been deployed in rural environments where anthropological noise sources are limited. As interest in monitoring low energy sources at local distances grows in the infrasound community, it will be vital to understand how to monitor infrasound sources in an urban environment. Arrays deployed in urban centers have to overcome the decreased signal-to-noise ratio and reduced amount of real estate available to deploy an array. To advance the understanding of monitoring infrasound sources in urban environments, local and regional infrasound arrays were deployed on building rooftops on the campus at Southern Methodist University (SMU), and data were collected for one seasonal cycle. The data were evaluated for structural source signals (continuous-wave packets), and when a signal was identified, the back azimuth to the source was determined through frequency-wavenumber analysis. This information was used to identify hypothesized structural sources; these sources were verified through direct measurement and dynamic structural analysis modeling. In addition to the rooftop arrays, a camouflaged infrasound sensor was installed on the SMU campus and evaluated to determine its effectiveness for wind noise reduction. Permission to publish was granted by Director, Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory.

  17. SATWG networked quality function deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Don

    1992-01-01

    The initiative of this work is to develop a cooperative process for continual evolution of an integrated, time phased avionics technology plan that involves customers, technologists, developers, and managers. This will be accomplished by demonstrating a computer network technology to augment the Quality Function Deployment (QFD). All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  18. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, K.H.; Kotschak, O.; Conrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera with a simplified setup as compared with the state of engineering is described permitting, apart from good localization, also energy discrimination. Behind the usual vacuum image amplifier a multiwire proportional chamber filled with trifluorine bromium methane is connected in series. Localizing of the signals is achieved by a delay line, energy determination by means of a pulse height discriminator. With the aid of drawings and circuit diagrams, the setup and mode of operation are explained. (ORU) [de

  19. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  20. Gamma teletopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1987-06-01

    The mapping of gamma sources radiation emission in a nuclear plant is an important safety point. A remote gamma ray mapping process was developed in SPS/CEA/SACLAY. It uses the ''pinhole camera'' principle, precursor of photography. It mainly consists of a radiation proof box, with a small orifice, containing sensitive emulsions at the opposite. A first conventional photographic type emulsion photographs the area. A second photographic emulsion shows up the gamma radiations. The superim position of the two shots gives immediate informations of the precise location of each source of radiation in the observed area. To make easier the presentation and to improve the accuracy of the results for radiation levels mapping, the obtained films are digitally processed. The processing assigns a colours scale to the various levels of observed radiations. Taking account physical data and standard parameters, it gets possible to estimate the dose rate. The device is portable. Its compactness and fully independent nature make it suitable for use anywhere. It can be adapted to a remote automatic handling system, robot... so as to avoid all operator exposure when the local dose rate is too high [fr

  1. Applications of Dynamic Deployment of Services in Industrial Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Gonçalo; Barata, José; Jammes, François; Colombo, Armando W.

    Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a de facto paradigm for business and enterprise integration. SOA is expanding into several domains of application envisioning a unified solution suitable across all different layers of an enterprise infrastructure. The application of SOA based on open web standards can significantly enhance the interoperability and openness of those devices. By embedding a dynamical deployment service even into small field de- vices, it would be either possible to allow machine builders to place built- in services and still allow the integrator to deploy on-the-run the services that best fit his current application. This approach allows the developer to keep his own preferred development language, but still deliver a SOA- compliant application. A dynamic deployment service is envisaged as a fundamental framework to support more complex applications, reducing deployment delays, while increasing overall system agility. As use-case scenario, a dynamic deployment service was implemented over DPWS and WS-Management specifications allowing designing and programming an automation application using IEC61131 languages, and deploying these components as web services into devices.

  2. Development of air equivalent gamma dose monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, Mary; Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Karpagam, R.; Prasad, D.N.; Jakati, R.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes design and development of air equivalent gamma absorbed dose monitor. The monitor has gamma sensitivity of 84 pA/R/h for 60 Co source. The characterization of the monitor has been done to get energy dependence on gamma sensitivity and response to gamma radiation field from 1 R/hr to 5000 R/hr. The gamma sensitivity in the energy range of 0.06 to 1.25MeV relative to 137 Cs nuclide was within 2.5%. The linearity of the monitor response as a function of gamma field from 10 R/h to 3.8 kR/h was within 6%. The monitor has been designed for its application in harsh environment. It has been successfully qualified to meet environmental requirements of shock. (author)

  3. Reduction of environmental impact by FR cycle deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Atsushi; Nakai, Ryodai

    2005-03-01

    In this report radioactive waste generations in terms of disposal volume or disposal field equivalent, and the radioactive toxicity of HLW are evaluated to clarify the promising nuclear scenario for the sake of realization of sustainable society in 21st century. This analysis was conducted based on the outcomes of the mass flow evaluation tool 'FAMILY-21' which calculates a material balance for TRU in the following scenarios. 1) LWR once-through scenario, 2) Pu partly recycling in LWR scenario, 3) Pu full recycling in LWR scenario, 4) FBR deployment scenario, 5) Interim storage scenario. The result shows that the cumulative area of low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal field at 2150 in the FR cycle deployment scenario is 1.8 times larger than that in the LWR once-through scenario. The area of LLW disposal field at 2150 is a few km 2 in all the scenarios. In contrast, the cumulative area of high level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal field at 2150 in the FR cycle deployment scenario is less than half of that in the LWR once-through scenario. The area of HLW disposal field at 2150 is about 10 times of the area of LLW disposal field. Moreover, the FR deployment reduces the radioactive toxicity of HLW by U/TRU recycling, and shortens the period to decay under the natural Uranium toxicity level. Considering the area of radioactive waste disposal field and the radioactive toxicity of HLW, the advantage of the FR cycle deployment is indicated quantitatively from the viewpoint of the environmental burden reduction. (author)

  4. Advanced Deployable Structural Systems for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Straubel, Marco; Wilkie, W. Keats; Zander, Martin E.; Fernandez, Juan M.; Hillebrandt, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges for small satellites is packaging and reliable deployment of structural booms and arrays used for power, communication, and scientific instruments. The lack of reliable and efficient boom and membrane deployment concepts for small satellites is addressed in this work through a collaborative project between NASA and DLR. The paper provides a state of the art overview on existing spacecraft deployable appendages, the special requirements for small satellites, and initial concepts for deployable booms and arrays needed for various small satellite applications. The goal is to enhance deployable boom predictability and ground testability, develop designs that are tolerant of manufacturing imperfections, and incorporate simple and reliable deployment systems.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  6. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teegarden, B.J

    1999-02-11

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world.

  7. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world

  8. Supply strategy for SMR deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coccagna, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a description of Babcock and Wilcox's deployment strategy for the mPower™ Small Modular Reactor from the perspective of Supply Chain and Manufacturing. A desirable future state of readiness is described as one which leverages and revitalizes an existing supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure, as well as leveraging an existing workforce of engineering, construction, and project management employees. B and W's mPower™ SMR value proposition offers many desired design and operating advantages to the SMR market. (author)

  9. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  10. Municipal Real Estate deployed as a capital asset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel - Meulenbroek, H.A.J.A.; Maussen, S.J.E.; de Bis, N.; Verkerk, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to introduce the principles of Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) within the municipal organization. It is presumed that, looking at the private sector’s accomplishments in this field, these principles will allow a city council to deploy their real estate in a

  11. How well could existing sensors detect the deployment of a solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering effort?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, Alan J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-29

    While the stated reason for asking this question is “to understand better our ability to warn policy makers in the unlikely event of an unanticipated SRM geoengineering deployment or large-scale field experiment”, my colleagues and I felt that motives would be important context because the scale of any meaningful SRM deployment would be so large that covert deployment seems impossible. However, several motives emerged that suggest a less-than-global effort might be important.

  12. Gamma teletopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    To set the gamma activity cartography is an important element of safety in numerous cases: intervention in hot cell, search of a radioactive source, examination of radioactive waste circuit followed by a reprocessing definition of decontamination and decommissioning processes and for all other accidents. The device presented here is like a ''black box'' with an aperture and an emulsion photosensitive to the opposite; a classical film takes photography of the place; a X-ray type emulsion gives a spot more or less contrasted and extensive corresponding to each source. Images can be processed with a microprocessor [fr

  13. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  14. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  15. Gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Takakura, Kintomo

    1991-01-01

    As to the gamma knife which is the radiation surgery device developed in Sweden a quarter century ago, its principle, structure, treatment techniques, already established clinical effect and the problems being left for hereafter are described. This treatment means supplements the operation under microscopes, and at present it takes the important position in neurosurgery, but hereafter, by the interdisciplinary cooperation of neurosurgery and clinical radiobiology, the more development can be expected. The method of irradiating the radiation of high dose selectively to a target region and breaking its tissue is called radiosurgery, and the device developed for this purpose is the gamma knife. First, it was applied to functional diseases, but good results were obtained by its application to auditory nerve and brain blood vessels, and it establishes the position as the safe treatment method of the morbid state in the deep part of brains, which is difficult to reach by operation. Accompanying the recent progress of the operation of skull base part, attention is paid to its application to various tumors in skull base. On the other hand, the radiosurgery combining a cyclotron or a linear accelerator with stereotaxic brain surgery is actively tried mainly to the deformation of brain blood vessels. (K.I.)

  16. Gamma scanning equipment for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grandi, G.; Stanchi, L.

    1975-01-01

    Many reasons justify the use of gamma techniques in the field of nuclear safeguards. The paper describes electronic equipment for gamma-scanning of non-irradiated fuel elements. The control of the operation is completely digital and driven by a minicomputer and gives more accurate results in respect of an analog chain which has been successfully used in fuel element manufacturing plants

  17. Evaluation of a high-resolution, breast-specific, small-field-of-view gamma camera for the detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brem, R.F.; Kieper, D.A.; Rapelyea, J.A.; Majewski, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to review the state of the art in nuclear medicine imaging of the breast (scintimammography) and to evaluate a novel, high-resolution, breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with 58 breast lesions in whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a HRBGC prototype. Nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal/benign) or positive (suspicious/malignant) by two radiologists, blinded to mammographic and histologic results with both the conventional and high-resolution. All lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: Included in this study were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. Specificity of both systems was 93.3% (28/30). In the 18 nonpalpable cancers, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and HRBGC, respectively. In cancers ≤ 1cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four of the cancers (median size, 8.5 mm) detected with the HRBGC were missed by the conventional camera Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breasts lesions with a high resolution, breast-specific gamma camera results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer with greater improvement demonstrated in nonpalpable and ≤1 cm cancers

  18. An ARM Mobile Facility Designed for Marine Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program is designing a Mobile Facility exclusively for marine deployments. This marine facility is patterned after ARM's land Mobile Facility, which had its inaugural deployment at Point Reyes, California, in 2005, followed by deployments to Niger in 2006 and Germany in 2007 (ongoing), and a planned deployment to China in 2008. These facilities are primarily intended for the study of clouds, radiation, aerosols, and surface processes with a goal to include these processes accurately in climate models. They are preferably embedded within larger field campaigns which provide context. They carry extensive instrumentation (in several large containers) including: cloud radar, lidar, microwave radiometers, infrared spectrometers, broadband and narrowband radiometers, sonde-launching facilities, extensive surface aerosol measurements, sky imagers, and surface latent and sensible heat flux devices. ARM's Mobile Facilities are designed for 6-10 month deployments in order to capture climatically-relevant datasets. They are available to any scientist, U.S. or international, who wishes to submit a proposal during the annual Spring call. The marine facility will be adapted to, and ruggedized for, the harsh marine environment and will add a scanning two-frequency radar, a boundary-layer wind profiler, a shortwave spectrometer, and aerosol instrumentation adapted to typical marine aerosols like sea salt. Plans also include the use of roving small UAVs, automated small boats, and undersea autonomous vehicles in order to address the point-to-area-average problem which is so crucial for informing climate models. Initial deployments are planned for small islands in climatically- interesting cloud regimes, followed by deployments on oceanic platforms (like decommissioned oil rigs and the quasi-permanent platform of this session's title) and eventually on large ships like car carriers plying routine routes.

  19. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  20. Security-by-Experiment: Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Wolter; Hadžiosmanović, Dina; Dechesne, Francien

    2016-06-01

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly safety-related, meaning that potential harm is caused by the design plus accidental events in the environment. In some domains, such as cyberspace, adversarial agents (attackers) may be at least as important when it comes to undesirable effects of deployed technologies. In such cases, conditions for responsible experimentation may need to be implemented differently, as attackers behave strategically rather than probabilistically. In this contribution, we outline how adversarial aspects are already taken into account in technology deployment in the field of cyber security, and what the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments can learn from this. In particular, we show the importance of adversarial roles in social experiments with new technologies.

  1. Charges Assessed the Army by the Defense Logistics Agency for Deployable Medical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... Deployable medical systems are standardized modular field hospitals that can be prepositioned in the event of a contingency, national emergency, or war operations. In FY 1994, the Defense Personnel Support Center billed the Army $25 million for acquiring and assembling deployable medical systems.

  2. Supporting Knowledge Transfer in IS Deployment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönström, Mikael

    To deploy new information systems is an expensive and complex task, and does seldom result in successful usage where the system adds strategic value to the firm (e.g. Sharma et al. 2003). It has been argued that innovation diffusion is a knowledge integration problem (Newell et al. 2000). Knowledge about business processes, deployment processes, information systems and technology are needed in a large-scale deployment of a corporate IS. These deployments can therefore to a large extent be argued to be a knowledge management (KM) problem. An effective deployment requires that knowledge about the system is effectively transferred to the target organization (Ko et al. 2005).

  3. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, U.; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. The supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other through about 90 0 to a collimator exchange position. Each of the separate supports is swingable to a vertically aligned position, with limiting of the swinging movement and positioning of the support at the desired exchange position. The collimators are carried on the supports by means of a series of vertically disposed coil springs. Projections on the camera are movable from above into grooves of the collimator at the exchange position, whereupon the collimator is turned so that it is securely prevented from falling out of the camera head

  4. Particles and scaling for lattice fields and Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimm, J.; Jaffe, A.

    1976-01-01

    The conjectured inequality GAMMA 6 4 -fields and the scaling limit for d-dimensional Ising models. Assuming GAMMA 6 = 6 these phi 4 fields are free fields unless the field strength renormalization Z -1 diverges. (orig./BJ) [de

  5. Utilization of thermoluminescent dosemeters for determination of exposure or absorbed dose in a radiation gamma or X radiation field with unknown spectral distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.A.R. da.

    1981-06-01

    Having in view the choice of the best pair of dosemeters to be used in the 'Tandem' method, the main response characteristics of LiF:Mg, Ti, Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Mn, CaSO 4 Dy, CaF 2 :Mn and CaF 2 :Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters and also some critical parameters in their calibration and evaluation processes were studied. Three different physical forms of TLD's were investigated: hot pressed chips, disc teflon dosemeters and glass mini TLD's. Their calibration factors were obtained for the energy of Cobalt-60 gamma rays. Their energy dependences normalized to 60 Co radiation were determined using spectral width as parameter. 'Tandens' formed by all TLD's evaluated were compaired. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

    1985-07-01

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

    1985-07-01

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Effect of low doses gamma radiation on the yield of tomato (local variety) grown in the open field (1990 and 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Ayyoubi, Z.

    1994-04-01

    The stimulating effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on growth of various plants has been reported by many investigators. In 1970, the FAO/IAEA consultant group strongly recommended tomato as a test plant due to its economic importance and good adaptability to many climatic conditions. This work was carried out during the summer seasons of 1990 and 1992 in two sites in Damascus region. Samples of air dried seeds of tomato (Local variety) of previous season were irradiated by gamma-rays from a 137 Cs source using doses of 5, 10, 12.5, 15, 20, 30 and 40 Gy at dose rate of 9 Gy/min. Seeds were sown after 2 days from irradiation in complete randomized block design and replicated 4 times. The data revealed that gamma irradiation at interval doses of 5-12.5 Gy (in Khan-El-Sheeh) and 10-30 Gy (in Deir-El-Hajar) have stimulating effects on number of branches and early yield. The results of total yield as well as fruits number were significantly increased when doses of 10 and 12.5 Gy in Khan-El-Sheeh and 12.5-25 Gy in Deir-El-Hajar, were used. The percentage of increment varied from 12.6 to 18.2% in Khan-El-Sheeh and 14.3 to 30.9% in Deir-El-Hajar. In view of all above mentioned results, the use of radiation might be recommended as an easy tool for seed treatments to stimulate and increase the productivity of tomato. (author). 12 tabs

  9. Strategies for Power Line Communications Smart Metering Network Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sendin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids are becoming a reality all over the world. Nowadays, the research efforts for the introduction and deployment of these grids are mainly focused on the development of the field of Smart Metering. This emerging application requires the use of technologies to access the significant number of points of supply (PoS existing in the grid, covering the Low Voltage (LV segment with the lowest possible costs. Power Line Communications (PLC have been extensively used in electricity grids for a variety of purposes and, of late, have been the focus of renewed interest. PLC are really well suited for quick and inexpensive pervasive deployments. However, no LV grid is the same in any electricity company (utility, and the particularities of each grid evolution, architecture, circumstances and materials, makes it a challenge to deploy Smart Metering networks with PLC technologies, with the Smart Grid as an ultimate goal. This paper covers the evolution of Smart Metering networks, together with the evolution of PLC technologies until both worlds have converged to project PLC-enabled Smart Metering networks towards Smart Grid. This paper develops guidelines over a set of strategic aspects of PLC Smart Metering network deployment based on the knowledge gathered on real field; and introduces the future challenges of these networks in their evolution towards the Smart Grid.

  10. Investigation of gamma spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huailong; Liu Suping; Hao Fanhua; Gong Jian; Liu Xiaoya

    2006-01-01

    In the investigation of radiation fingerprint comparison, it is found out that some of the popular gamma spectra analysis software have shortcomings, which decrease the radiation fingerprint comparison precision. So a new analysis software is developed for solving the problems. In order to display the advantage of developed program, some typical simulative warhead gamma spectra are analyzed respectively by present software and GAMMAVISION and GENNIE2000. Present software can be applied not only in nuclear warheads deep-cuts verification, but also in any radiation measurement field. (authors)

  11. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events

  12. Investigation of gamma spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huailong; Liu Suping; Hao Fanhua

    2006-12-01

    During the investigation of radiation fingerprint comparison, it is found out that the popular gamma spectra analysis softwares are faultful, which decrease the precision of radiation fingerprint comparison. So a new analysis software is development for solving the problems. In order to display the advantage of new program, some typical simulative gamma spectra of radiation source are analyzed respectively by our software and GAMMAVISION and GENNIE2000. The software can be applied not only in nuclear warheads deep-cuts verification, but also in any radiation measurement field. (authors)

  13. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Heinzelmann, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    A gamma camera is described which obviates the distortion of locating signals generally caused by the varied light conductive capacities of the light conductors in that the flow of light through each light conductor may be varied by means of a shutter. A balancing of the flow of light through each of the individual light conductors, in effect, collective light conductors may be balanced on the basis of their light conductive capacities or properties, so as to preclude a distortion of the locating signals caused by the varied light conductive properties of the light conductors. Each light conductor has associated therewith two, relative to each other, independently adjustable shutters, of which one forms a closure member and the other an adjusting shutter. In this embodiment of the invention it is thus possible to block all of the light conductors leading to a photoelectric transducer, with the exception of those light conductors which are to be balanced. The balancing of the individual light conductors may then be obtained on the basis of the output signals of the photoelectric transducer. (auth)

  14. Gamma ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  15. The Effect of an Offset Polar Cap Dipolar Magnetic Field on the Modeling of the Vela Pulsar's Gamma-Ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, M.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We performed geometric pulsar light curve modeling using static, retarded vacuum, and offset polar cap (PC) dipole B-fields (the latter is characterized by a parameter epsilon), in conjunction with standard two-pole caustic (TPC) and outer gap (OG) emission geometries. The offset-PC dipole B-field mimics deviations from the static dipole (which corresponds to epsilon equals 0). In addition to constant-emissivity geometric models, we also considered a slot gap (SG) E-field associated with the offset-PC dipole B-field and found that its inclusion leads to qualitatively different light curves. Solving the particle transport equation shows that the particle energy only becomes large enough to yield significant curvature radiation at large altitudes above the stellar surface, given this relatively low E-field. Therefore, particles do not always attain the radiation-reaction limit. Our overall optimal light curve fit is for the retarded vacuum dipole field and OG model, at an inclination angle alpha equals 78 plus or minus 1 degree and observer angle zeta equals 69 plus 2 degrees or minus 1 degree. For this B-field, the TPC model is statistically disfavored compared to the OG model. For the static dipole field, neither model is significantly preferred. We found that smaller values of epsilon are favored for the offset-PC dipole field when assuming constant emissivity, and larger epsilon values favored for variable emissivity, but not significantly so. When multiplying the SG E-field by a factor of 100, we found improved light curve fits, with alpha and zeta being closer to best fits from independent studies, as well as curvature radiation reaction at lower altitudes.

  16. Gamma irradiators for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Radiation technology is one of the most important fields which the IAEA supports and promotes, and has several programmes that facilitate its use in the developing Member States. In view of this mandate, this Booklet on 'Gamma Irradiators for Radiation Processing' is prepared which describes variety of gamma irradiators that can be used for radiation processing applications. It is intended to present description of general principles of design and operation of the gamma irradiators available currently for industrial use. It aims at providing information to industrial end users to familiarise them with the technology, with the hope that the information contained here would assist them in selecting the most optimum irradiator for their needs. Correct selection affects not only the ease of operation but also yields higher efficiency, and thus improved economy. The Booklet is also intended for promoting radiation processing in general to governments and general public

  17. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy

  18. Simulating TGF and gamma ray emission above and within stormclouds due to the interaction of TeV cosmic ray shower electrons/positrons/photons with plausible electric field geometries generated in stormclouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Valencia has developed a software simulator LEPTRACK to simulate lepton and photon scattering in any kind of media with a variable density, and permeated by electric/magnetic fields of any geometry, and which can handle an exponential runaway avalanche. Here we show results of simulating the interaction of electrons/positrons/photons in an incoming TeV cosmic ray shower with the kind of electric fields expected in a stormcloud after a CG discharge which removes much of the positive charge build up at the centre of the cloud. The point is to show not just a Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) above the upper negative shielding layer at 12 km but other gamma ray emission due to electron/positron interaction in the remaining positive charge around 9km and the lower negative charge at 6km altitude. We present here images, lightcurves, altitude profiles, spectra and videos showing the different ionization, excitation and photon density fields produced, their time evolution, and how they depend critically on where the cosmic ray shower beam intercepts the electric field geometry. We also show a new effect of incoming positrons, which make up a significant fraction of the shower, where they appear to "orbit" within the high altitude negative shielding layer, and which has been conjectured to produce significant microwave emission, as well as a short range 511 keV annihilation line. The interesting question is if this conjectured emission can be observed and correlated with TGF orbital observations to prove that a TGF originates in the macro-fields of stormclouds or the micro-fields of light leaders and streamers where this "positron orbiting" is not likely to occur.

  19. Study of the combined action of gamma radiation and static electric fields in human cells; Estudo da acao combinada de radiacao gama e campo eletrico estatico em celulas humanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, Michelle Mendes

    2008-07-01

    The basic principle of radiotherapy is the one of maximizing damage to the tumor, while minimizing it in neighboring health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out aiming at increasing cellular radiosensitivity, and among them is the use of exogenous fields. Our goal in this work is the study in human cells of the effect resulting from the association of irradiation with exposure to exogenous static electric fields. The T47D cell line of breast cancer cells was irradiated with gammas in the 0 - 8 Gy doses range. The corresponding survival curve provided information on the radiosensitivity of this cell line. The rate of cell deaths per Gray in the 0 - 8 Gy range exhibited a maximum at 2 Gy, which corresponds to the most efficient irradiation dose. The viability of this T47D cells exposed to both gamma radiation and 1.250 V/cm static electric field (SEF) was about 12% lower than when only irradiated. The sole exposure of the cells to SEF by 24 and 72 hours didn't induce toxicity. Immunofluorescence runs carried out in irradiated normal MRC5 cell line of human lung fibroblast, without and with exposition to a SEF, have quantified the expression of the y- H2AX histone. The amount of phosphorylated histones was approximately 40% higher after irradiation with 2 Gy plus exposure to a SEF by 1 hour, showing that the electric field negatively interfered in the repairing process of the DNA double strand breaks. The flow cytometry analysis with FACS allowed the investigation of a possible interference of radiation and SEF in the cell distributions among the cellular cycle phases. It was found that in T47D cells treated with 1 and 2 Gy by 24 hours the SEF also negatively interfered in the DNA repairing process, as evidenced by the higher accumulation of cells in the S phase. Therefore, it would be possible to conclude that static and exogenous electric fields are able of negatively interfering in the cellular repair and, presumably, in DNA repair. (author)

  20. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Response rate for Wave 8 = 88% Our final sample contained 554 men and 556 women (n = 554 cross- sex couples, 1 same- sex couple). Individuals were...story in the Killeen Daily Herald (10 April 2016) http://kdhnews.com/news/local/ kids -deployments-when-a-parent-deploys-children-face- tough...years old), and (c) “Me getting sick and having to go to sick call.” (deployed Army husband, 25 years old). Sex and fidelity. Comments fell into

  1. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the CDP...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  2. Study of the response to neutrons of a personal dosemeter in mixed fields (n, {gamma}) in function of Hp(10); Estudio de la respuesta a neutrones de un dosimetro personal en campos mixtos (n, {gamma}) en funcion de Hp(10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzate, J.; Gregori, B.; Carelli, J.; Aguerre, L.; Discacciatti, A. [Autoridad REgulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: cruzate@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    In this work it is presented the theoretical study and their experimental validation of the answer of the personal dosimetro in terms of the component of neutrons of the personal equivalent dose Hpn(10) in function of the energy, in presence of fields of neutrons and range. The personal dosimetro, based on detecting termoluminiscentes (TLD), it consists of two detectors 7LiF and two 6LiF, located low filters of plastic and cadmium starting from whose information is evaluated the component range and of neutrons of the dose. Additionally it consists of a detecting CaF2, used basically to discriminate against the energy of the component range and to make the corresponding corrections on the evaluation of the dose range obtained with the 7LiF. The answer to neutrons in function of the energy, defined as the quotient among the one I number of reactions 6Li(n, a)4He taken place in each TLD and the Hpn(10), it was calculated using the code MCNPX and the library ENDF/B-VI. You model the dosimetro under the irradiation conditions proposed by the ISO8529-3. Faces monoenergeticos were simulated in the range of energy understood between 70 keV and 5 MeV. The dispersion in each one of the results of the simulation is smaller than 3%. You I study the existent relationship among the answer te6rica, reactions (n,a)/Hpn(10) and the experimental one, nC/Hpn(10), for a given thermal treatment. The factor of resulting conversion is constant in the energy and similar to 1,71 104 reacciones(n, a)/nC, with a smaller standard deviation to 10%. The experimental answer was obtained starting from the irradiations carried out in the mark of the International Intercomparacion of Dosimetria in Mixed Campos (n,) 2004 organized by the OIEA next to the PTB (Germany) and the IRSN (France). The extension of these calculations to other spectra of neutrons of fields real they will allow to obtain group of factors of application conversion in routine and accidental situations. (Author)

  3. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  4. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  5. TRIGA out of core gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Pregl, G.

    1988-01-01

    A possibility to irradiate extended objects in a gamma field inside the shielding water tank and above the core of operating TRIGA Mark II Reactor has been investigated. The irradiation cask is shielded with Cd cover to filter out thermal neutrons. The dose rate of the gamma field strongly depends on the distance of the irradiation position above the core. At 25 cm above the core, the gamma dose rate is 2.2 Gy/s and epithermal neutron flux is ∼ 8.10 6 ncm -2 s -1 ∼ 3 as measured by TLD (CaF 2 : Mn) dosimeters and Au foils respectively. Tentative applications of the gamma irradiation facility are in the studies of radiation induced accelerated aging and within the Nuclear Power Plant Equipment Qualification Program (EQP). A complete characterization of the neutron spectrum and optimization of the 7 radiation field within the cask has still to be performed. (author)

  6. Galactic structure and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, Michel; Cesarsky, Catherine; Paul Jacques

    1977-01-01

    A model of spiral structure of the Galaxy is outlined from radiosynchrotron and gamma observations. The most interesting observations in the galactic context, obtained by the SAS II American satellite are concerned with the distribution of the γ photoemission at energies higher than 10 8 eV, along the galactic equator. The model proposed is in quantitative agreement with the present ideas on the spiral structure of the Galaxy, the galactic magnetic field, and the confinement of cosmic rays by the magnetic field and of the magnetic field by matter. Following the American era, the European COS-B satellite opens the European phase towards an identification of the discrete gamma radiation sources [fr

  7. Field-deployable, nano-sensing approach for real-time detection of free mercury, speciation and quantification in surface stream waters and groundwater samples at the U.S. Department of Energy contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campiglia, Andres D. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Hernandez, Florencio E. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-28

    The detrimental effects on human health caused by long-term exposure to trace contamination of toxic metals have been documented in numerous epidemiological and toxicological studies. The fact that metals are non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain poses a severe threat to the environment and human health. Their monitoring in drinking water, aquatic ecosystems, food and biological fluids samples is then essential for global sustainability. While research efforts employing established methodology continue to advance conceptual/computational models of contaminant behavior, the increasing awareness and public concern with environmental and occupational exposure to toxic metals calls for sensing devices capable to handle on-site elemental analysis in short analysis time. Field analysis with potable methodology prevents unnecessary scrutiny of un-contaminated samples via laboratory-bound methods, reduces analysis cost and expedites turnaround time for decision making and remediation purposes. Of particular toxicological interest are mercury and its species. Mercury is recognized as a major environmental pollution issue. The field-portable sensor developed in this project provides a unique and valuable tool for the on-site, real-time determination of inorganic mercury in surface waters. The ability to perform on-site analysis of mercury should prove useful in remote locations with difficult accessibility. It should facilitate data collection from statistically meaningful population sizes for a better understanding of the dose-effect role and the water-soil-plant-animal-human transfer mechanisms. The acquired knowledge should benefit the development of efficient environmental remediation processes, which is extremely relevant for a globally sustainable environment.

  8. QUALITY FUNCTION DEPLOYMENT AS A STRATEGIC PLANNING TOOL

    OpenAIRE

    DEVRİM İÇTENBAŞ, Burcu; ERYILMAZ, Hande

    2011-01-01

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) uses a house of quality to translate customer requirements into engineering specifications. QFD has been widely used as a tool to develop new products. It has been adopted in the fields of education quality, service quality, software development and marketing planning. The tool has recently been applied in strategic planning .In this study authors reviewed current research which uses QFD as a strategic planning tool and described how QFD methods can be ...

  9. Long-term effects of prenatal exposure to low levels of gamma rays on open-field activity in male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamisawa, Takeru; Hirokaga, Kouichi

    1995-01-01

    The open-field activity of first-generation (F 1 ) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with γ rays on day 14 of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months (young), 12-13 months (adult) and 19-20 months (old). Doses were 0.5 Gy or 1.0 Gy. Open-field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every second through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 8-cm 2 units. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The walking speed of the 1.0-Gy group recorded at 19-20 months was higher than that for the comparably aged control group. The time which the irradiated group, recorded at 19-20 months, spent in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. Conversely, the time spent by the irradiated group in the middle fields when recorded at 19-20 months was shorter than in the comparably aged control group. No effect of radiation was shown for any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 6-7 and 12-13 months. The results demonstrate that such exposure to γ rays on day 14 of gestation results in behavioral changes which occur at 19-20 but not at 6-7 or 12-13 months. 10 refs. 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Field deployment test of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology at the Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility, Test Alcove No. 1, March 2-9, 1994: Milestone Report LA4047

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.; Pettit, D.; Cremers, D.

    1996-01-01

    A field test in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was performed to determine the feasibility of real-time elemental analysis of rock encountered in air core drilling using the technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Over the period March 2-9, 1994, hundreds of LIBS spectra were collected in real-time, reflecting the elemental composition of dust produced at the drill head of the second horizontal core hole in Test Alcove No. 1. The particle-laden, drill-coring effluent air stream served as the means to obtain a representative rock sample immediately surrounding the drill bit. LIBS spectra were taken with the spectral range centered at 250, 330, 410, and 500 nm so that representative, overlapping spectral coverage from 200 to 550 nm was obtained for the dust. Spectral lines for the major elements Si, Al, K, Na, and Fe and the minor elements Ca, Mg, Ti, and Mn were observed. Some simple engineering improvements to the cyclone separator were identified if this approach to dust analysis is pursued in the future

  11. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  12. Gamma ray astronomy with COS-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanenburg, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    Observational results in the field of gamma-ray astronomy that have been obtained to date with the COS-B satellite are discussed and questions raised by these observations are summarized. Following a brief review of the instrumental characteristics of COS-B and the extent of COS-B gamma-ray coverage of the sky, particular attention is given to the questions raised by the discovery of many unidentified gamma-ray sources with no apparent optical, X-ray or radio counterparts and the detection of high-energy gamma radiation from the quasar 3C 273, which suggests the role of gamma-ray emission in the creation of other radiation

  13. Cloud Environment Automation: from infrastructure deployment to application monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Costantini, A.; Bucchi, R.; Italiano, A.; Michelotto, D.; Panella, M.; Pergolesi, M.; Saletta, M.; Traldi, S.; Vistoli, C.; Zizzi, G.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    The potential offered by the cloud paradigm is often limited by technical issues, rules and regulations. In particular, the activities related to the design and deployment of the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud layer can be difficult to apply and time-consuming for the infrastructure maintainers. In this paper the research activity, carried out during the Open City Platform (OCP) research project [1], aimed at designing and developing an automatic tool for cloud-based IaaS deployment is presented. Open City Platform is an industrial research project funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), started in 2014. It intends to research, develop and test new technological solutions open, interoperable and usable on-demand in the field of Cloud Computing, along with new sustainable organizational models that can be deployed for and adopted by the Public Administrations (PA). The presented work and the related outcomes are aimed at simplifying the deployment and maintenance of a complete IaaS cloud-based infrastructure.

  14. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives

  15. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1999-12-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  16. Light Duty Utility Arm Deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Michael W

    2000-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of NonCompliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  17. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  18. Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2003-01-01

    A brief survey of plastic scintillators for various radiation measurement applications is presented here. The utility of plastic scintillators for practical applications such as gamma radiation monitoring, real-time radioisotope detection and screening is evaluated in laboratory and field measurements. This study also reports results of Monte Carlo-type predictive responses of common plastic scintillators in gamma and neutron radiation fields. Small-size plastic detectors are evaluated for static and dynamic gamma-ray detection sensitivity of selected radiation sources

  19. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    reintegration. Communication and Generalized Anxiety The emotional cycle of deployment model provides a descrip- tive framework for understanding the...counseling. Thus, communication can have a reciprocal influence on the very appraisals and emotions that motivate interaction in the first place. Communication...of service members back into family life after deployment can be extremely challenging for military couples. Understanding the factors that

  20. 5-Beam ADCP Deployment Strategy Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T.; Savidge, D. K.; Gargett, A.

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing availability of 5 beam ADCPs and expanding opportunities for their deployment within both observatory and dedicated process study settings, refinements in deployment strategies are needed.Measuring vertical velocities directly with a vertically oriented acoustic beam requires that the instrument be stably mounted and leveled within fractions of a degree. Leveled shallow water deployments to date have utilized divers to jet pipes into the sand for stability, manually mount the instruments on the pipes, and level them. Leveling has been guided by the deployed instrument's pitch and roll output, available in real-time because of the observatory settings in which the deployments occurred. To expand the range of feasible deployments to deeper, perhaps non-real-time capable settings, alternatives to diver deployment and leveling must be considered. To determine stability requirements, mooring motion (heading, pitch and roll) has been sampled at 1Hz by gimballed ADCPs at a range of instrument deployment depths, and in shrouded and unshrouded cages. Conditions under which ADCP cages resting on the bottom experience significant shifts in tilt, roll or heading are assessed using co-located wind and wave measurements. The accuracy of estimating vertical velocities using all five beams relative to a well leveled vertical single beam is assessed from archived high frequency five beam data, to explore whether easing the leveling requirement is feasible.

  1. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamisawa, Takeru; Hirokaga, Kouichi.

    1996-01-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F 1 ) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with γ-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of γ-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months. (author)

  2. A Prototype for Passive Gamma Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkamaa, T.; Levai, F.; Berndt, R.; Schwalbach, P.; Vaccaro, S.; ); Turunen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Combined efforts of multiple stakeholders of the IAEA Support Programme task JNT 1510: ''Prototype of passive gamma emission tomograph (PGET)'', resulted in the design, manufacturing and extensive testing of an advanced verification tool for partial defect testing on light water reactor spent fuel. The PGET has now reached a proven capability of detecting a single missing or substituted pin inside a BWR and VVER-440 fuel assemblies. The task started in 2004 and it is planned to be finished this year. The PGET head consists of two banks of 104 CdTe detectors each with integrated data acquisition electronics. The CdTe detectors are embedded in tungsten collimators which can be rotated around the fuel element using an integrated stepping motor mounted on a rotating table. All components are packed inside a toroid watertight enclosure. Control, data acquisition and image reconstruction analysis is fully computerized and automated. The design of the system is transportable and suitable for safeguards verifications in spent fuel ponds anywhere. Four test campaigns have been conducted. In 2009, the first test in Ringhals NPP failed collecting data but demonstrated suitability of the PGET for field deployments. Subsequent tests on fuel with increasing complexity were all successful (Ispra, Italy (2012), Olkiluoto, Finland (2013) and Loviisa, Finland (2014)). The paper will present the PGET design, results obtained from the test campaigns and mention also drawbacks that were experienced in the project. The paper also describes further tests which would allow evaluating the capabilities and limitations of the method and the algorithm used. Currently, the main technical shortcoming is long acquisition time, due to serial control and readout of detectors. With redesigned electronics it can be expected that the system would be able to verify a VVER-440 assembly in five minutes, which meets the IAEA user requirements. (author)

  3. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  4. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, A. Vinod [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-23

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  5. ISS-Lobster: A Proposed Wide-Field X-Ray Telescope on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Lobster wide-field imaging telescope combines simultaneous high FOV, high sensitivity and good position resolution. These characteristics can open the field of X-Ray time domain astronomy, which will study many interesting transient sources, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, and high redshift gamma-ray bursts. Also important will be its use for the X-ray follow-up of gravitational wave detections. I will describe our present effort to propose the Lobster concept for deployment on the International Space Station through a NASA Mission of Opportunity this fall.

  6. EarthScope's Transportable Array: Status of the Alaska Deployment and Guide to Resources for Lower48 Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Frassetto, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Alaska Transportable Array deployment is completely installed, totaling 280 stations, with 194 new stations and 86 existing stations, 28 of those upgraded with new sensor emplacement. We briefly summarize the deployment of this seismic network, describe the added meteorological instruments and soil temperature gauges, and review our expectations for operation and demobilization. Curation of data from the contiguous Lower-48 States deployment of Transportable Array (>1800 stations, 2004-2015) has continued with the few gaps in real-time data replaced by locally archived files as well as minor adjustments in metadata. We highlight station digests that provide more detail on the components and settings of individual stations, documentation of standard procedures used throughout the deployment and other resources available online. In cooperation with IRIS DMC, a copy of the complete TA archive for the Lower-48 period has been transferred to a local disk to experiment with data access and software workflows that utilize most or all of the seismic timeseries, in contrast to event segments. Assembling such large datasets reliably - from field stations to a well managed data archive to a user's workspace - is complex. Sharing a curated and defined data volume with researchers is a potentially straightforward way to make data intensive analyses less difficult. We note that data collection within the Lower-48 continues with 160 stations of the N4 network operating at increased sample rates (100 sps) as part of the CEUSN, as operational support transitions from NSF to USGS.

  7. Cosmic gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehstulin, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A brief consideration is being given to the history of cosmic gamma burst discovery and modern knowledge of their properties. The time dependence of gamma bursts is described and their possible sources are discussed

  8. Response of exfoliated human buccal epithelium cells to combined gamma radiation, microwaves, and magnetic field exposure estimated by changes in chromatin condensation and cell membrane permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. А. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of the biological effects produced by ionizing radiation (IR using microwave and magnetic fields has important theoretical and practical applications. Response of human buccal epithelium cells to different physical agents (single and combined exposure to 0.5–5 Gy γ-radiation (60Co; microwaves with the frequency of 36.64 GHz and power densities of 0.1 and 1 W/m2, and static magnetic field with the intensity of 25 mT has been investigated. The stress response of the cells was evaluated by counting heterochromatin granules quantity (HGQ in the cell nuclei stained with orcein. Membrane permeability was assessed by the percentage of cells stained with indigocarmine (cells with damaged membrane. The increase of heterochromatin granules quantity (HGQ, i.e. chromatin condensation was detected at the doses of 2 Gy and higher. Changes in the cell membrane permeability to indigocarmine expressed the threshold effect. Membrane permeability reached the threshold at the doses of 2–3 Gy for the cells of different donors and did not change with the increase of the dose of γ-radiation. Cells obtained from different donors revealed some individual peculiarities in their reaction to γ-radiation. The static magnetic field and microwaves applied before or after γ-radiation decreased its impact, as revealed by means of HGQ assessment.

  9. Gamma-ray lasers or grasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.V.H.; George, E.P.; Hora, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the emission and direction of gamma rays from excited nuclei contained in a sample source of suitable geometry having its major axis parallel to the proposed direction of gamma ray emission, comprising subjecting said sample source to thermal or dynamic polarization at temperatures approaching absolute zero in the presence of a strong magnetic field, and when a pulse of coherent gamma radiation is required along said major axis rotating the active nuclei through 90 0 by employing a short pulse of radio frequency oscillations in an auxilliary coil around the sample source

  10. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomhead, Laurent.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear gamma astronomy is presented, in particular the Gamma Ray Observatory, an enormous eight tonnes machine fitted with gamma telescopes, scheduled for launching around 1985. It is thereby hoped to study the natural nuclear reactions which occur when stars explode [fr

  11. Rover deployment system for lunar landing mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutoh, Masataku; Hoshino, Takeshi; Wakabayashi, Sachiko

    2017-09-01

    For lunar surface exploration, a deployment system is necessary to allow a rover to leave the lander. The system should be as lightweight as possible and stored retracted when launched. In this paper, two types of retractable deployment systems for lunar landing missions, telescopic- and fold-type ramps, are discussed. In the telescopic-type system, a ramp is stored with the sections overlapping and slides out during deployment. In the fold-type system, it is stored folded and unfolds for the deployment. For the development of these ramps, a design concept study and structural analysis were conducted first. Subsequently, ramp deployment and rover release tests were performed using the developed ramp prototypes. Through these tests, the validity of their design concepts and functions have been confirmed. In the rover release test, it was observed that the developed lightweight ramp was sufficiently strong for a 50-kg rover to descend. This result suggests that this ramp system is suitable for the deployment of a 300-kg-class rover on the Moon, where the gravity is about one-sixth that on Earth. The lightweight and sturdy ramp developed in this study will contribute to both safe rover deployment and increase of lander/rover payload.

  12. FY2000 Hanford Technology Deployment Accomplishments Fact Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WIBLE, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Cleaning up the Hanford Site is one of the top priorities for the U. S. Department of Energy. The department is continually looking for ways to expedite cleanup and reduce costs. During Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. Hanford Site staff deployed 24 new technologies, which produced an estimated lifecycle cost savings of 479 million dollars. This is a clear indicator of the impacts new technology has had and will have on the cleanup efforts. The Hanford Site cleanup is focused on the following: Restoring the Columbia River Corridor; Building and operating the tank waste treatment complex to complete the cleanup of highly radioactive tank waste at Hanford; and Transitioning the Central Plateau. Applying innovative science and technology from national laboratories, universities, and private industry is critical to our complex cleanup mission. The 24 new technologies deployed in FY 2000 are significantly higher than our goal of 14 technological deployments. Eleven of these technologies supported restoring the Columbia River Corridor, and seven were involved with the remediation of radioactive tank waste. These deployments produced valuable information to determine the effectiveness of the new technologies in the field and the efficiencies gained over existing cleanup methods. In several cases, the technology deployed presented a solution to a problem where a clear path of remediation had not yet been determined. New and innovative technologies will play a significant role in the cleanup of the Hanford Site and enable remediation to be done more efficiently. Technology is being developed at a staggering pace. This requires excellent communication throughout the scientific and industry arenas. To effect this communication, we have implemented a technology needs process in conjunction with the multi-year work planning process. Through the combination of these two processes, technology developments and deployments address the near-term technology needs and enable us to plan for the

  13. Mechanism of the X-ray and Soft Gamma-ray Emissions from the High Magnetic Field Pulsar: PSR B1509-58

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use the outer gap model to explain the spectrum and the energy dependent light curves of the X-ray and soft γ-ray radiations of the spin-down powered pulsar PSR B1509-58. In the outer gap model, most pairs inside the gap are created around the null charge surface and the gap’s electric field separates the opposite charges to move in opposite directions. Consequently, the region from the null charge surface to the light cylinder is dominated by the outflow current and that from the null charge surface to the star is dominated by the inflow current. We suggest that the viewing angle of PSR B1509-58 only receives the inflow radiation. The incoming curvature photons are converted to pairs by the strong magnetic field of the star. The X-rays and soft γ-rays of PSR B1509-58 result from the synchrotron radiation of these pairs. The magnetic pair creation requires a large pitch angle, which makes the pulse profile of the synchrotron radiation distinct from that of the curvature radiation. We carefully trace the pulse profiles of the synchrotron radiation with different pitch angles. We find that the differences between the light curves of different energy bands are due to the different pitch angles of the secondary pairs, and the second peak appearing at E > 10 MeV comes from the region near the star, where the stronger magnetic field allows the pair creation to happen with a smaller pitch angle.

  14. Measurement of electric field gradient at {sup 117}In on the Cu-site in mavicyanin by perturbed angular correlation of {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, A., E-mail: yokoyama@cacheibm.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Hashimoto, T.; Ihara, K.; Kikunaga, H.; Kinoshita, N.; Yamazaki, I.; Kataoka, K.; Yanase, M.; Takata, M. [Kanazawa University, Faculty of Science and Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology (Japan); Murakami, Y.; Takamiya, K.; Tanigaki, M.; Ohkubo, Y. [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The structure around the metal site of mavicyanin, a protein molecule with a copper site, was investigated in solution by using time-differential perturbed angular correlation of {sup 117}In. The electric field gradient (EFG) of the metal site was deduced from the measurement. It demonstrated that the site in a mutant-type mavicyanin, Thr15Ala-Mav, gives an EFG different from that in the wild-type mavicyanin does. The pH dependence of the EFG was also observed for both proteins.

  15. The effect of gamma radiation on sterility and mating ability of brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens(Stål) in field cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limohpasmanee, W.; Kongratarpon, T.; Tannarin, T.

    2017-06-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens(Stål) is the major rice pest in Thailand. Adults and nymphs suck the sap from the rice plant causing it to wilt and transmitting the grassy stunt and the ragged stunt diseases. The population suppression by the sterile insect technique is overwhelmingly a function of mating between sterile males and wild females. The objectives of these experiments were to determine the suitable dose which induces partially sterile in N. lugens and their effect on wild population in the field cages. One-day-old 4th and 5th instar nymphs and adults were irradiated in a 60Co irradiator at the doses of 30, 60, 90 and 120 Gy. It was found that irradiation at the dose of 90 Gy induced complete sterility in female and 78.47 % sterility in males. The inherited sterility were transferred to their progenies and induced 51.46 and 77.00 % sterility in F-1 males and females. The irradiation as the mention dose did not affect mating ability. The competitiveness index was increased when the ratio of irradiated males per normal male was increased. The releasing irradiated males at 10 fold of normal males in field cages could suppress F-1 population 80.11 % and suppress F-2 population 80.32 % when compare with the control. This technique may be applied to delay and/or reduce seasonal increase of brown planthopper.

  16. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, T. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Jóhannesson, G., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ -rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ -ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  17. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. Impact of spectral smoothing on gamma radiation portal alarm probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.; Hamada, M.; Hengartner, N.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma detector counts are included in radiation portal monitors (RPM) to screen for illicit nuclear material. Gamma counts are sometimes smoothed to reduce variance in the estimated underlying true mean count rate, which is the 'signal' in our context. Smoothing reduces total error variance in the estimated signal if the bias that smoothing introduces is more than offset by the variance reduction. An empirical RPM study for vehicle screening applications is presented for unsmoothed and smoothed gamma counts in low-resolution plastic scintillator detectors and in medium-resolution NaI detectors. - Highlights: → We evaluate options for smoothing counts from gamma detectors deployed for portal monitoring. → A new multiplicative bias correction (MBC) is shown to reduce bias in peak and valley regions. → Performance is measured using mean squared error and detection probabilities for sources. → Smoothing with the MBC improves detection probabilities and the mean squared error.

  19. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Straelberg, E.; Klemola, S.; Nielsen, Sven P.; Palsson, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  20. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.

    2010-01-01

    and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using......To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative......-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation...

  1. Project implementation plan: ASTD remote deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRASS, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the project implementation plan for the ASTD Remote Deployment Project. The Plan identifies the roles and responsibilities for the project and defines the integration between the ASTD Project and the B-Cell Cleanout Project

  2. Office of Civilian Response Deployment Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The purpose of OCR DTS is to establish, manage and track relevant Civilian Response Corps teams for deployment by sector experience, training, education etc.

  3. RadNet Air Quality (Deployable) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet Deployable Monitoring is designed to collect radiological and meteorological information and data asset needed to establish the impact of radiation levels on...

  4. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. These...

  5. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  6. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the years following military deployment, soldiers may experience problems integrating into the community. However, little is known about the nature and prevalence of these problems and if they relate to posttraumatic symptomatology. METHODS: In a prospective, longitudinal study...

  7. Deployment strategies of managed lanes on arterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report investigates issues related to planning, financing, deployment, and operation of managed : lanes on arterials. In this report, a strategy for managed lanes refers to a combination of the managed : lane type, the design and implementation,...

  8. Deploying Missile Defense: Major Operational Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunn, M

    2004-01-01

    By October 2004, the United States will have begun initial deployment of a missile defense capability albeit a modest, limited, and not completely proven one to defend the homeland against a limited...

  9. Deployable structures for a human lunar base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Petra; Häuplik, Sandra; Imhof, Barbara; Özdemir, Kürsad; Waclavicek, Rene; Perino, Maria Antoinetta

    2007-06-01

    The study Lunar exploration architecture—deployable structures for a lunar base was performed within the Alcatel Alenia Space “Lunar Exploration Architecture” study for the European Space Agency. The purpose of the study was to investigate bionic concepts applicable to deployable structures and to interpret the findings for possible implementation concepts. The study aimed at finding innovative solutions for deployment possibilities. Translating folding/unfolding principles from nature, candidate geometries were developed and researched using models, drawings and visualisations. The use of materials, joints between structural elements and construction details were investigated for these conceptual approaches. Reference scenarios were used to identify the technical and environmental conditions, which served as design drivers. Mechanical issues and the investigation of deployment processes narrowed the selection down to six chosen concepts. Their applicability was evaluated at a conceptual stage in relation to the timescale of the mission.

  10. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... temporary caregiver far in advance will make your children feel more secure. Try to have the caregiver connect prior to deployment through visits, phone calls, or social media. If you will be relocating to a family ...

  11. Concept of Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordetsky, Alex; Thiry, Jeff; Johnson, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    .... The increasing use of expeditionary and special operations forces in ad hoc, dynamic, and tactical environments poses a need for an adaptable, flexible, and responsive deployable network operations center (DNOC...

  12. In-Flight Suppressant Deployment Temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bein, Donald

    2006-01-01

    .... An assessment is made of the model output versus some aircraft measurement data, fire suppressant boiling point criterion, as well as the history of altitude/temperature at which fire suppressants have been deployed...

  13. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. A Novel Methodology for Charging Station Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yunwei; He, Yueying; Li, Mingzhe

    2018-02-01

    Lack of charging stations has been a main obstacle to the promotion of electric vehicles. This paper studies deploying charging stations in traffic networks considering grid constraints to balance the charging demand and grid stability. First, we propose a statistical model for charging demand. Then we combine the charging demand model with power grid constraints and give the formulation of the charging station deployment problem. Finally, we propose a theoretical solution for the problem by transforming it to a Markov Decision Process.

  15. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  16. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  17. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  18. High-Temperature Superconductors as Electromagnetic Deployment and Support Structures in Spacecraft. [NASA NIAC Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getliffe, Gwendolyn V.; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Masterson, Rebecca; Miller, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report, concluding a one-year NIAC Phase I study, describes a new structural and mechanical technique aimed at reducing the mass and increasing the deployed-to-stowed length and volume ratios of spacecraft systems. This technique uses the magnetic fields generated by electrical current passing through coils of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to support spacecraft structures and deploy them to operational configurations from their stowed positions inside a launch vehicle fairing.

  19. The Long Tail Issue in Large Scale Deployment of Personal Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuttone, Andrea; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    We describe the challenges and the open questions arising during the design and deployment of SensibleJournal, a mobile personal informatics system with interactive visualizations of mobility and social interactions based on data acquired from embedded smartphone sensors. The SensibleJournal system...... was evaluated in a large scale (N=136) mobile sensing field study. We report issues in deployment, limitations in user engagement and uptake, and the challenges in measuring the effect of the system....

  20. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  1. Lunar remnant magnetic field mapping from orbital observations of mirrored electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, J E [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, Tex. (USA). Johnson Space Center; Anderson, K A; Lin, R P; Howe, H C; McGuire, R E [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Space Sciences Lab.

    1975-09-01

    Areas of lunar surface magnetic field are observed to ''mirror'' low energy electrons present in the normal lunar space environment. The ambient electrons provide, in effect, a probe along the ambient magnetic field lines down to the lunar surface for remote sensing of the presence of surface fields. Use of the on-board vector magnetometer measurements of the ambient magnetic field orientation allows accurate projection of such mapping onto the lunar surface. Preliminary maps of the lunar surface magnetic areas underlying the orbit of the ''Particles and Fields Satellite deployed from Apollo 16'' have been generated, obtaining 40% coverage from partial data to demonstrate feasibility of the technique. These maps reveal many previously unreported areas of surface magnetism. The method is sensitive to fields of less than 0.1..gamma.. at the surface. The surface field regions observed are generally due to sources smaller than 10-50km in size, although many individual regions are often so close together as to give much larger regions of effectively continuous mirroring. Absence of consistent mirroring by any global field places an upper limit on the size of any net lunar dipole moment of less than 10/sup 10/..gamma..km/sup 3/. Much additional information regarding the magnetic regions can be obtained by correlated analysis of both the electron return and vector magnetometer measurements at orbital altitude, the two techniques providing each other with directly complimentary measurements at the satellite and along the ambient field lines to the surface.

  2. Comparison of gamma, neutron and proton irradiations of multimode fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Dorsey, K.L.; Askins, C.G.; Friebele, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of pure gamma, pure proton, and mixed neutron-gamma irradiation fields on a set of both pure and doped silica core multimode fibers have been investigated. Only slight differences are found in the radiation response of pure and doped silica core fibers exposed to gamma or mixed neutron-gamma fields, indicating that Co-60 sources can be used to simulate the effects of the mixed field (except in the case of a pure neutron environment). Although it is noted that neither mix field nor gamma sources adequately simulate the effects of proton irradiation of doped silica core fibers, a good correspondence is found in the case of the pure silica core waveguide. 13 references

  3. Experimental studies on the sterile male technique of spodoptera litura (F. ) by the gamma radiation from /sup 137/Cs, 3. Experiments of the mating competitiveness between moths irradiated as pupae and unirradiated ones in the field cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukuda, R; Kiyoku, M [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1973-10-01

    Experiments of the mating competitiveness between the substerilized tobacco cutworms and the normal ones were carried out in a field cage (200 x 120 x 180 cm/plot). Pupae of seven days old reared on an artificial medium during the larval stage irradiated with 12 kR of the gamma rays to substerilize. The normal adults were cultured using leaves of cabbages. Cabbages and soybeans were planted in the purpose of egg laying for adult females mated with males in the cage. Substerilized males only or both substerilized males and females were combined with normal males and females. The mating behavior, longevity, egg deposition, percentage of egg hatch and spermatophore in a receptaculum seminis were investigated. When more than ten substerilized and one normal males were exposed to one female, or more than fourteen substerilized and two normal males were combined two normal females, the substerilized males showed high competitiveness with normal males for virgin females. When both five substerilized males and females placed together with one pair of normal male and female in the cage, or each ten substerilized males and females with each two normals, these substerilized males showed full competitiveness. In addition, it was found that offspring obtained from the combination between substerilized males and normal females were sterile.

  4. X and gamma reference radiation for calibrating dosemeters and doserate meters and for determining their response as a function of photon energy - Part 4: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters in low energy X reference radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ISO 4037 consists of the following parts, under the general title X and gamma reference radiation for calibrating dosemeters and doserate meters and for determining their response as a function of photon energy: Part 1: Radiation characteristics and production methods; Part 2: Dosimetry for radiation protection over the energy ranges from 8 keV to 1,3 MeV and 4 MeV to 9 MeV; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters and the measurement of their response as a function of energy and angle of incidence; Part 4: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters in low energy X reference radiation fields. This part 4. of ISO 4037 gives guidelines on additional aspects of the characterization of low energy photon radiations. This part of ISO 4037 also describes procedures for calibration and determination of the response of area and personal dose(rate)meters as a function of photon energy and angle of incidence. This part of ISO 4037 concentrates on the accurate determination of conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(10) and H*(10) for the spectra of low energy photon radiations. As an alternative to the use of conversion coefficients, the direct calibration in terms of these quantities by means of appropriate reference instruments is described

  5. X-Ray-Driven Gamma Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J. J.; Karamian, S. A.; Rivlin, L. A.; Zadernovsky, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray-driven gamma emission describes processes that may release nuclear energy in a 'clean' way, as bursts of incoherent or coherent gamma rays without the production of radioactive by-products. Over the past decade, studies in this area, as a part of the larger field of quantum nucleonics, have gained tremendous momentum. Since 1987 it has been established that photons could trigger gamma emission from a long-lived metastable nuclear excited state of one nuclide and it appears likely that triggering in other isotopes will be demonstrated conclusively in the near future. With these experimental results have come new proposals for the creation of collective and avalanche-like incoherent gamma-ray bursts and even for the ultimate light source, a gamma-ray laser. Obviously, many applications would benefit from controlled bursts of gamma radiation, whether coherent or not. This paper reviews the experimental results and concepts for the production of gamma rays, driven by externally produced X-rays

  6. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  7. Singular point analysis during rail deployment into vacuum vessel for ITER blanket maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakudate, Satoshi; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    2007-05-01

    Remote maintenance of the ITER blanket composed of about 400 modules in the vessel is required by a maintenance robot due to high gamma radiation of ∼500Gy/h in the vessel. A concept of rail-mounted vehicle manipulator system has been developed to apply to the maintenance of the ITER blanket. The most critical issue of the vehicle manipulator system is the feasibility of the deployment of the articulated rail composed of eight rail links into the donut-shaped vessel without any driving mechanism in the rail. To solve this issue, a new driving mechanism and procedure for the rail deployment has been proposed, taking account of a repeated operation of the multi-rail links deployed in the same kinematical manner. The new driving mechanism, which is deferent from those of a usual 'articulated arm' equipped with actuator in the every joint for movement, is composed of three mechanisms. To assess the feasibility of the kinematics of the articulated rail for rail deployment, a kinematical model composed of three rail links related to a cycle of the repeated operation for rail deployment was considered. The determinant det J' of the Jacobian matrix J' was solved so as to estimate the existence of a singular point of the transformation during rail deployment. As a result, it is found that there is a singular point due to det J'=0. To avoid the singular point of the rail links, a new location of the second driving mechanism and the related rail deployment procedure are proposed. As a result of the rail deployment test based on the new proposal using a full-scale vehicle manipulator system, the respective rail links have been successfully deployed within 6 h less than the target of 8 h in the same manner of the repeated operation under a synchronized cooperation among the three driving mechanisms. It is therefore concluded that the feasibility of the rail deployment of the articulated rail composed of simple structures without any driving mechanism has been demonstrated

  8. Simulating CubeSat Structure Deployment Dynamics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is high value in simulating the nonlinear dynamics of stowing, deploying, and performance of deployable space structures, especially given the profound...

  9. Rich: Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head Selection and Node Deployment Strategy in Concentric-based WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment, sensor nodes are scattered randomly in the sensing field. Hence, the coverage can not be guaranteed. In contrast, the coverage of uniformly deployment is in general larger than the random deployment. However, uniformly deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. In this situation, larger load may be imposed to CHs (cluster heads around the sink. Therefore, CHs close to the sink use up their energy earlier than those farther away from the sink. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel node deployment strategy in the concentric model, namely, Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head selection and node deployment strategy (called Rich. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed Rich scheme. The simulation results show that the proposed Rich alleviates the unbalanced traffic pattern significantly, prolongs network lifetime and achieves satisfactory coverage ratio.

  10. Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy for process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy (PGRS) is a very powerful analytical technique able to measure many metallic, contamination problem elements. The technique involves measurement of gamma rays that are emitted by nuclei upon capturing a neutron. This method is sensitive not only to the target element but also to the particular isotope of that element. PGRS is capable of measuring dissolved metal ions in a flowing system. In the field, isotopic neutron sources are used to produce the desired neutron flux ( 252 Cf can produce neutron flux of the order of 10 8 neutrons/cm 2 --sec.). Due to high penetrating power of gamma radiation, high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be placed in an appropriate geometry to maximize sensitivity, providing real-time monitoring with low detection level capabilities

  11. SGR-76 gamma radiation level indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubinskij-Nadezhdin, I.V.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a gamma-radiation level indicator is described; the instrument is part of a mobile radiometric laboratory (MRL). The design of the instrument permits gamma-radiation dose rates recording at 0.2-200 R/hr, and signals on gamma-background levels. The instrument has two separate threshold levels of signalling actuation. The light signalling at the first level is precautionary, and the sound signalling at the second level indicates the necessity of taking a decision as to whether or not the MRL can remain in the gamma-radiation field. Halogenic counters operating in a current mode are used as detectors. The basic error in recording the dose rate amounts to +-25%. Overall dimensions of the instrument 150x280x100 mm; weight less than 2.5 kg

  12. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, Daniela; Roth, Csaba; Ghinescu, Alecse

    2010-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  13. Gamma Splines and Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Olkkonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we introduce a new family of splines termed as gamma splines for continuous signal approximation and multiresolution analysis. The gamma splines are born by -times convolution of the exponential by itself. We study the properties of the discrete gamma splines in signal interpolation and approximation. We prove that the gamma splines obey the two-scale equation based on the polyphase decomposition. to introduce the shift invariant gamma spline wavelet transform for tree structured subscale analysis of asymmetric signal waveforms and for systems with asymmetric impulse response. Especially we consider the applications in biomedical signal analysis (EEG, ECG, and EMG. Finally, we discuss the suitability of the gamma spline signal processing in embedded VLSI environment.

  14. Study on the three-station typical network deployments of workspace Measurement and Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi; Zhu, J. G.; Xue, B.; Ye, Sh. H.; Xiong, Y.

    2013-10-01

    As a novel network coordinate measurement system based on multi-directional positioning, workspace Measurement and Positioning System (wMPS) has outstanding advantages of good parallelism, wide measurement range and high measurement accuracy, which makes it to be the research hotspots and important development direction in the field of large-scale measurement. Since station deployment has a significant impact on the measurement range and accuracy, and also restricts the use-cost, the optimization method of station deployment was researched in this paper. Firstly, positioning error model was established. Then focusing on the small network consisted of three stations, the typical deployments and error distribution characteristics were studied. Finally, through measuring the simulated fuselage using typical deployments at the industrial spot and comparing the results with Laser Tracker, some conclusions are obtained. The comparison results show that under existing prototype conditions, I_3 typical deployment of which three stations are distributed in a straight line has an average error of 0.30 mm and the maximum error is 0.50 mm in the range of 12 m. Meanwhile, C_3 typical deployment of which three stations are uniformly distributed in the half-circumference of an circle has an average error of 0.17 mm and the maximum error is 0.28 mm. Obviously, C_3 typical deployment has a higher control effect on precision than I_3 type. The research work provides effective theoretical support for global measurement network optimization in the future work.

  15. Shape accuracy optimization for cable-rib tension deployable antenna structure with tensioned cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiwei; Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Rongqiang; Wang, Hongxiang; Tang, Dewei; Song, Xiaoke

    2017-11-01

    Shape accuracy is of substantial importance in deployable structures as the demand for large-scale deployable structures in various fields, especially in aerospace engineering, increases. The main purpose of this paper is to present a shape accuracy optimization method to find the optimal pretensions for the desired shape of cable-rib tension deployable antenna structure with tensioned cables. First, an analysis model of the deployable structure is established by using finite element method. In this model, geometrical nonlinearity is considered for the cable element and beam element. Flexible deformations of the deployable structure under the action of cable network and tensioned cables are subsequently analyzed separately. Moreover, the influence of pretension of tensioned cables on natural frequencies is studied. Based on the results, a genetic algorithm is used to find a set of reasonable pretension and thus minimize structural deformation under the first natural frequency constraint. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to analyze the deployable structure under two kinds of constraints. Results show that the shape accuracy and natural frequencies of deployable structure can be effectively improved by pretension optimization.

  16. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtel, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    The first certain detection of celestial high energy gamma rays came from a satellite experiment flown on the third Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-111). A Gamma ray spark chamber telescope with substantively greater sensitivity and angular resolution (a few degrees) flown on the second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-II) has now provided a better picture of the gamma ray sky, and particularly the galactic plane and pulsars. This paper will summarize the present picture of gamma ray astronomy as it has developed at this conference from measurements made with experiments carried out on balloons, those remaining on the ground, and ones flown on satellites. (orig.) [de

  17. Plant stress analysis technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring vegetation is an active area of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI) research. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) is assisting in the transfer of the LIFI technology to the agricultural private sector through a market survey. The market survey will help identify the key eco-agricultural issues of the nations that could benefit from the use of sensor technologies developed by the Office of Science and Technology (OST). The principal region of interest is the Western Hemisphere, particularly, the rapidly growing countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The analysis of needs will assure that the focus of present and future research will center on economically important issues facing both hemispheres. The application of the technology will be useful to the agriculture industry for airborne crop analysis as well as in the detection and characterization of contaminated sites by monitoring vegetation. LIFI airborne and close-proximity systems will be evaluated as stand-alone technologies and additions to existing sensor technologies that have been used to monitor crops in the field and in storage.

  18. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  19. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-93 Deployment Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnenberg, R.W.; Heard, R.E.; Milam, L.M.; Watson, L.R.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year 1993 effort will deploy seven major field demonstrations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Radioactive Waste Management Complex Cold Test Pit. These major demonstrations are Remote Characterization System, Remote Excavation System, Overburden Removal, Waste Isolation, Contamination Control Unit, Rapid Monitoring Unit, and Fixation of Soil Surface Contamination. This document is the basic operational planning document for BWID deployment of the INEL field demonstrations. Additional sections deal briefly with four nonINEL field and laboratory demonstrations (Buried Waste Retrieval, Arc Melter Vitrification, Graphite DC Plasma Arc Melter, and Fixed Hearth Plasma Process) and with four INEL laboratory demonstrations (Electrostatic Curtain, Thermal Kinetics, Multiaxis Crane Control System, and Dig-Face Characterization)

  20. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    for these experiences is the transition of telecommunication (telephony) networks from circuit switched based systems towards packet based ones. The text of this monograph proceeds, unaltered for the most, from the author’s PhD thesis “Framework for Deployment of Advanced Telecommunication Services in Current......This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  1. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  2. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  3. Design, deployment and performance of 4G-LTE networks a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    ElNashar, Ayman; Sherif, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an insight into the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G-LTE network design, performance, and deployment Design, Deployment and Performance of 4G-LTE Networks addresses the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G networks design, performance, and deployment. In addition, the book focuses on the end-to-end aspects of the LTE network architecture and different deployment scenarios of commercial LTE networks. It describes the air interface of LTE focusing on the access stratum protocol layers: PDCP, RLC, MAC, and Physical Layer. The air interface described in this book covers the concepts of LTE frame structure, downlink and uplink scheduling, and detailed illustrations of the data flow across the protocol layers. It describes the details of the optimization process including performance measurements and troubleshooting mechanisms in addition to demonstrating common issues and case studies based on actual field results. The book provides detailed performance analysis of key fe...

  4. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, Cristina; Aguilera, Francisco; González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Sandoval, Francisco

    2016-07-07

    In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN), nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i) to achieve good coverage; and (ii) to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  5. Comparing post-deployment mental health services utilization in soldiers deployed to Balkan, Iraq and Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T; Sadowa Vedtofte, M; Nordentoft, M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insight on how different missions have impacted rates of mental health service (MHS) utilization is unexplored. We compared postdeployment MHS utilization in a national cohort of first-time deployed to missions in Balkan, Iraq, and Afghanistan respectively. METHODS: A prospective...... national cohort study of 13 246 first-time deployed in the period 1996 through 2012 to missions in Balkan area, Iraq, or Afghanistan respectively. Soldiers 'MHS utilization was also compared with a 5:1 sex-, age-, and calendar year-matched never-deployed background population. Postdeployment utilization...... of psychotropics. RESULTS: Utilizing of psychiatric outpatient services and psychotropics was significantly higher in first-time deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan compared with deployed to Balkan. However, the rate of postdeployment admission to psychiatric hospital did not differ between missions. Postdeployment...

  6. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...

  7. Industrial deployment of system engineering methods

    CERN Document Server

    Romanovsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A formal method is not the main engine of a development process, its contribution is to improve system dependability by motivating formalisation where useful. This book summarizes the results of the DEPLOY research project on engineering methods for dependable systems through the industrial deployment of formal methods in software development. The applications considered were in automotive, aerospace, railway, and enterprise information systems, and microprocessor design.  The project introduced a formal method, Event-B, into several industrial organisations and built on the lessons learned to

  8. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  9. TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this review, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play in advancing this young but exciting field. (invited reviews)

  10. Gamma tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Span, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns a gamma tomography apparatus for medical diagnosis. The apparatus comprises a gamma scintillation camera head and a suspension system for supporting and positioning the camera head with respect for the patient. Both total body scanning and single photon emission tomography can be carried out with the apparatus. (U.K.)

  11. Gamma-sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, E.

    1974-01-01

    The author makes a survey of his experience in sterilization and sterility control of medical products. At present three different methods are used, steamsterilization, gassterilizing and gammasterilizing. The investments and costs for gamma radiation is presented and a comparison of the costs for gamma- and gassterilization including sterility control is made. (M.S.)

  12. Gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsen, W.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of the celestial gamma-ray fine-scale structure based on over half of the data which may ultimately be available from the COS-B satellite. A catalogue consisting of 25 gamma-ray sources measured at energies above 100 MeV is presented. (Auth.)

  13. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, R.

    1984-01-01

    The book reviews the development of gamma ray astronomy over the past twenty five years. A large section of the book is devoted to the problems of background radiation and the design of detectors. Gamma rays from the sun, the galactic disc, the galaxy, and extra galactic sources; are also discussed. (U.K.)

  14. On problems related to the deployment of depleted uranium weapons in the Balkans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mietelski, J. W.; Waligorski, M.P.R.; Zunic, Z.S.

    2002-01-01

    The likely long-term environmental and health effects of the deployment of weapons containing depleted uranium (DU) in the Balkans are discussed. To determine whether depleted uranium or spent reactor fuel was used in the weapons, knowledge is required of the 235 U to 238 U activity (or concentration) ratio in the measured samples. To this end, and to distinguish between uranium originating from natural and man-made sources, we discuss some of the methodology and metrology issues involved in performing alpha- and gamma- spectrometry of uranium in environmental and human samples. We present results of nuclear spectrometry performed on DU core deposits from the aluminium jacket of a PGU-14 bullet found in South Serbia. We draw attention to aspects involving ionising radiation, which are likely to be of importance when formulating a prognosis of the possible environmental and health impact of the deployment of DU weapons, indicating the importance of the inhalation pathway in children. (author)

  15. GammaSem Proceedings. A Nordic seminar for users of gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straalberg, E. (ed.) (Institute for Energy Technolgy (Norway)); Berg, K. (National Institute of Radiation Protection (Denmark)); Dowdall, M. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)) (and others)

    2010-11-15

    The project GammaSem was proposed to the NKS in 2008. The aim of the project was to arrange two seminars for users of gamma spectrometry, in 2009 and 2010. The seminars were meant to provide a forum for discussions and sharing of information on practical issues concerning gamma spectrometry and initiate a network of gamma spectrometry users in the Nordic countries. Such a Nordic network should strengthen the collaboration between laboratories and improve all participants' competence in practical gamma spectrometry. Both seminars' focus was practical challenges met by the users themselves, rather than theoretical matters. Scientists and users of gamma spectrometry from all five Nordic countries were invited to the seminar, as well as scientist from the Baltic countries. A total of 65 people signed up for GammaSem 2010; representing 30 different universities, commercial companies, research institutes and authorities. The working group concept as presented at last year's GammaSem, has not worked out as intended. The reason for this is probably because most of the laboratories that signed up to join the working groups, signed up because they wanted to learn more about the different subjects. In combination with the fact that no funding was made available for the working groups, it was difficult to establish goals on what to achieve. None of the working groups applied for funding from the NKS (or elsewhere) to establish separate projects. There is a big need for more cooperation and for training within the field of gamma spectrometry. This fact has been proved through these two seminars, both by the many different topics that have been discussed, but also by the huge interest for participating in the suggested series of workshop. The GammaSem seminars have thus provided a much welcomed starting point for a broader Nordic collaboration. (Author)

  16. GammaSem Proceedings. A Nordic seminar for users of gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straelberg, E.; Berg, K.; Dowdall, M.

    2010-11-01

    The project GammaSem was proposed to the NKS in 2008. The aim of the project was to arrange two seminars for users of gamma spectrometry, in 2009 and 2010. The seminars were meant to provide a forum for discussions and sharing of information on practical issues concerning gamma spectrometry and initiate a network of gamma spectrometry users in the Nordic countries. Such a Nordic network should strengthen the collaboration between laboratories and improve all participants' competence in practical gamma spectrometry. Both seminars' focus was practical challenges met by the users themselves, rather than theoretical matters. Scientists and users of gamma spectrometry from all five Nordic countries were invited to the seminar, as well as scientist from the Baltic countries. A total of 65 people signed up for GammaSem 2010; representing 30 different universities, commercial companies, research institutes and authorities. The working group concept as presented at last year's GammaSem, has not worked out as intended. The reason for this is probably because most of the laboratories that signed up to join the working groups, signed up because they wanted to learn more about the different subjects. In combination with the fact that no funding was made available for the working groups, it was difficult to establish goals on what to achieve. None of the working groups applied for funding from the NKS (or elsewhere) to establish separate projects. There is a big need for more cooperation and for training within the field of gamma spectrometry. This fact has been proved through these two seminars, both by the many different topics that have been discussed, but also by the huge interest for participating in the suggested series of workshop. The GammaSem seminars have thus provided a much welcomed starting point for a broader Nordic collaboration. (Author)

  17. CAMAC gamma ray scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible gamma-ray scanning system, based on a LeCroy 3500 multichannel analyzer and CAMAC modules, is described. The system is designed for making simultaneous passive and active scans of objects of interest to nuclear safeguards. The scanner is a stepping-motor-driven carriage; the detectors, a bismuth-germanate scintillator and a high-purity germanium detector. A total of sixteen peaks in the two detector-produced spectra can be integrated simultaneously, and any scan can be viewed during data acquisition. For active scanning, the 2615-keV gamma-ray line from a 232 U source and the 4439-keV gamma-ray line from 9 Be(α,n) 12 C were selected. The system can be easily reconfigured to accommodate up to seven detectors because it is based on CAMAC modules and FORTRAN. The system is designed for field use and is easily transported. Examples of passive and active scans are presented

  18. Transcardiac conducted electrical weapon (TASER) probe deployments: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William P; Teacher, Eric; Winslow, James E

    2012-12-01

    TASER (TASER International, Scottsdale, AZ) conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are commonly used by law enforcement officers. Although animal studies have suggested that transcardiac CEW discharges may produce direct cardiac effects, this has not been demonstrated in human studies. This study sought to determine the incidence and outcomes of transcardiac CEW probe impact locations in a large series of actual CEW deployments. A multi-center database of consecutive CEW uses by law enforcement officers was retrospectively reviewed. Case report forms were independently reviewed by three investigators to identify cases with paired probe configurations potentially producing a transcardiac discharge vector. Descriptive analysis was performed and inter-rater reliability was assessed. Among 1201 total CEW uses, 813 included probe deployments and 178 cases had paired anterior probe impacts potentially capable of producing a transcardiac discharge vector. This represents 14.8% of all CEW uses (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.9-16.9%) and 21.9% of CEW uses in probe mode (95% CI 19.1-24.9%). Inter-rater agreement was very good, with kappa = 0.82. There were no immediate deaths in any cases (97.5% CI 0.0-0.3%) to suggest a cardiac dysrhythmia, including those with transcardiac discharge vector. CEW deployments with probe impact configurations capable of producing a transcardiac discharge occur in a minority of cases in field use conditions. None of these cases, transcardiac or otherwise, produced immediately fatal dysrhythmias. These data support the overall safety of CEWs and provide a benchmark estimate of the likelihood of transcardiac discharge vectors occurring in field use of CEWs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamma ray emission from pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Massaro, E.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the production of gamma rays in a pulsar environment is presented, together with numerical computations fitted to the observations of PSR 0833-45. It is assumed that the primary particles are accelerated close to the star surface and then injected along the open field lines, which cause them to emit curvature radiation. The equation describing the particles' braking is integrated exactly up to the first order in the pulsar rotational frequency, and the transfer problem for the curvature photons is solved with the aberration, the Doppler shif, and the pair production absorption being taken into account. The latter effect is due not only to the transverse component of the magnetic field, but also to the electric field induced by the rotation. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the secondary particles is also included, subject to the 'on-the-spot' approximation. It is found that the observed gamma rays originate in the innermost regions of the magnetosphere, where the open lines' bundle is narrow and the geometrical beaming is effective. As shown by the computed pulse profiles, the duty cycle turns out to be equal to a few percent, comparable to the one of PSR 0833-45. The averaged spectra indicate that a substantial fraction of the primary photons do outlive the interaction with the magnetisphere; furthermore, the agreement in shape with the observational curves suggests that the acceleration output is fiarly close to a monoenergetic beam of particles. (orig.) [de

  20. Monitoring gamma radioactivity over large land areas using portable equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Mahon, T.D.; Gray, P.W.; Eer, A.M. D'; Naboulsi, A.H.; Koutsoyannopoulos, C.

    1990-01-01

    The principal objective of this research has been to provide information on cost-effective techniques to detect localized areas of gamma-emitting radionuclides. This objective has been achieved by determining the time required to scan unit area as a function of depth of the gamma source below the site surface, the activity of the gamma source, the energy of the emitted gamma-ray, and the gamma transport properties of the site material. A comparison between survey and sampling techniques is made, and the advantages of using survey techniques to detect localized gamma-ray sources are discussed. A survey technique based on an adaptive moving array detector system is described. A field experiment has been carried out to verify the results of calculations of the sensitivity of the techniques described

  1. Deployment Strategies and Clustering Protocols Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chérif Diallo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks face significant design challenges due to limited computing and storage capacities and, most importantly, dependence on limited battery power. Energy is a critical resource and is often an important issue to the deployment of sensor applications that claim to be omnipresent in the world of future. Thus optimizing the deployment of sensors becomes a major constraint in the design and implementation of a WSN in order to ensure better network operations. In wireless networking, clustering techniques add scalability, reduce the computation complexity of routing protocols, allow data aggregation and then enhance the network performance. The well-known MaxMin clustering algorithm was previously generalized, corrected and validated. Then, in a previous work we have improved MaxMin by proposing a Single- node Cluster Reduction (SNCR mechanism which eliminates single-node clusters and then improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we show that MaxMin, because of its original pathological case, does not support the grid deployment topology, which is frequently used in WSN architectures. The unreliability feature of the wireless links could have negative impacts on Link Quality Indicator (LQI based clustering protocols. So, in the second part of this paper we show how our distributed Link Quality based d- Clustering Protocol (LQI-DCP has good performance in both stable and high unreliable link environments. Finally, performance evaluation results also show that LQI-DCP fully supports the grid deployment topology and is more energy efficient than MaxMin.

  2. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    ready force Deploy with and care for the warrior Care for all entrusted to our care Nursing Competencies and Practice: Patient outcomes...duties, physical activities, iron intake through diet ). This additional information would improve the ability to determine factors associated with

  3. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager advanced deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Coupland, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    If you are an experienced Configuration Manager administrator looking to advance your career or get more from your current environment, then this book is ideal for you. Prior experience of deploying and managing a Configuration Manager site would be helpful in following the examples throughout this book.

  4. Military Deployment and Elementary Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Terri; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact that military deployment has upon academic achievement of elementary school students. TerraNova test scores of 137 fourth and fifth grade students in two elementary schools with a high proportion of military dependent children were examined for two consecutive years. Although the academic test performance fell…

  5. 77 FR 36903 - Accelerating Broadband Infrastructure Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... the Nation's global competitiveness in the 21st century, driving job creation, promoting innovation, and expanding markets for American businesses. Broadband access also affords public safety agencies... infrastructure has been deployed in a vast majority of communities across the country, today too many areas still...

  6. Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    August 8, 2013; Ta Kung Pao, August 12, 2013. 22 Sam Kim, “N. Korea Deploys Medium-Range Missiles, Bolsters Special Forces,” Yonhap, Seoul, February 23...building up its submarine force (both nuclear-powered and diesel-electric). In November 2004, the PLA Navy sent a Han -class nuclear attack submarine

  7. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, P; Williams, C; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N

    2014-01-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  8. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  9. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  10. Six Years of Gamma Ray Burst Observations with BeppoSAX

    OpenAIRE

    Frontera, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    I give a summary of the prompt X-/gamma-ray detections of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the BeppoSAX satellite and discuss some significant results obtained from the study of the prompt emission of these GRBs obtained with the BeppoSAX Gamma Ray Burst Monitor and Wide Field Cameras.

  11. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramebaeck, H. (ed.) (Swedish Defence Research Agency (Sweden)); Straalberg, E. (Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway)); Klemola, S. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Nielsen, Sven P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland))

    2012-01-15

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  12. The gamma function

    CERN Document Server

    Artin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    This brief monograph on the gamma function was designed by the author to fill what he perceived as a gap in the literature of mathematics, which often treated the gamma function in a manner he described as both sketchy and overly complicated. Author Emil Artin, one of the twentieth century's leading mathematicians, wrote in his Preface to this book, ""I feel that this monograph will help to show that the gamma function can be thought of as one of the elementary functions, and that all of its basic properties can be established using elementary methods of the calculus."" Generations of teachers

  13. On Efficient Deployment of Wireless Sensors for Coverage and Connectivity in Constrained 3D Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chase Q; Wang, Li

    2017-10-10

    Sensor networks have been used in a rapidly increasing number of applications in many fields. This work generalizes a sensor deployment problem to place a minimum set of wireless sensors at candidate locations in constrained 3D space to k -cover a given set of target objects. By exhausting the combinations of discreteness/continuousness constraints on either sensor locations or target objects, we formulate four classes of sensor deployment problems in 3D space: deploy sensors at Discrete/Continuous Locations (D/CL) to cover Discrete/Continuous Targets (D/CT). We begin with the design of an approximate algorithm for DLDT and then reduce DLCT, CLDT, and CLCT to DLDT by discretizing continuous sensor locations or target objects into a set of divisions without sacrificing sensing precision. Furthermore, we consider a connected version of each problem where the deployed sensors must form a connected network, and design an approximation algorithm to minimize the number of deployed sensors with connectivity guarantee. For performance comparison, we design and implement an optimal solution and a genetic algorithm (GA)-based approach. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed deployment algorithms consistently outperform the GA-based heuristic and achieve a close-to-optimal performance in small-scale problem instances and a significantly superior overall performance than the theoretical upper bound.

  14. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Jared T; Nelson, Todd G; Zimmerman, Trent K; Fernelius, Janette D; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L

    2016-09-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the 'flasher' and the 'inverted-cone fold', for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver's side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

  15. An efficient genetic algorithm for maximum coverage deployment in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Yong-Hyuk

    2013-10-01

    Sensor networks have a lot of applications such as battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and industrial diagnostics. Coverage is one of the most important performance metrics for sensor networks since it reflects how well a sensor field is monitored. In this paper, we introduce the maximum coverage deployment problem in wireless sensor networks and analyze the properties of the problem and its solution space. Random deployment is the simplest way to deploy sensor nodes but may cause unbalanced deployment and therefore, we need a more intelligent way for sensor deployment. We found that the phenotype space of the problem is a quotient space of the genotype space in a mathematical view. Based on this property, we propose an efficient genetic algorithm using a novel normalization method. A Monte Carlo method is adopted to design an efficient evaluation function, and its computation time is decreased without loss of solution quality using a method that starts from a small number of random samples and gradually increases the number for subsequent generations. The proposed genetic algorithms could be further improved by combining with a well-designed local search. The performance of the proposed genetic algorithm is shown by a comparative experimental study. When compared with random deployment and existing methods, our genetic algorithm was not only about twice faster, but also showed significant performance improvement in quality.

  16. Garden State Parkway Corridor : ITS early deployment planning study : strategic deployment plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This Strategic Deployment Plan describes ways of improving travel within the Garden : State Parkway Corridor using intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and without : constructing additional roadway lanes. Travel improvements will be possible with...

  17. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  18. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  19. Analytical applications of neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Anderson, D.L.; Paul, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Field and industrial applications of neutron capture gamma-ray spectrometry with isotopic sources or neutron generators are economically important. Geochemical exploration in boreholes is done routinely with neutron probes. Coal and ores are assayed with analyzers adjacent to a conveyor belt in dozens of industrial facilities. The use of capture gamma rays for explosives detection has been described in the literature, both for scanning airline baggage and for characterizing obsolete munitions; a packaged system for the latter is available commercially. Generalizations are drawn from the history of the field, and predictions are made about the future usefulness of capture gamma rays. (author)

  20. Gamma-ray irradiation of a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.E.; Dugle, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A long-term radiation ecology research project called Field Irradiator - Gamma (FIG) began at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in 1968. The experimental area is in southeastern Manitoba and is located on the western edge of the Precambrian shield. The project studies the ecological effects continuous exposure to a gradient of gamma radiation has on a mixed boreal forest ecosystem. The gradient ranges from 1 to 460,000 times the natural background radiation level. This paper describes the forest, the gamma irradiator and its radiation field, and the research program