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Sample records for field coil turn-to-turn

  1. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, V.W.; Dooley, J.B.; Hubrig, J.G.; Janke, C.J.; McManamy, T.J.; Welch, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Toroidal field coil torque structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    A torque structure is disclosed particularly suitable for utilization in a power reactor of the Tokamak-type, and operable therein for purposes of providing support for the toroidal field (TF) coils that comprise one of the major operating components of such a Tokamak power reactor. The subject torque structure takes the form of a frame structure that is operable to enable torque loads acting on the TF coils to be equilibrated as close to the area of force application as feasible. The aforesaid torque structure includes an intercoil structure composed of spacer wedges that are interposed between each adjacent pair of TF coils. The spacer wedges, in turn, consist of bearing plates positioned between the TF coils so as to be in contacting relation therewith and a number of cross plates that are cooperatively associated with the bearing plates so as to form therewith a rigid assembly. The intercoil structure is affixed to a segmented, membrane shell that surrounds, encloses and supports the TF coil frames. Access is had to the interior of the shell through an opening formed for this purpose in a reinforced portion of the shell. Eddy current losses are minimized by insulating the joints formed at the juncture of adjoining segments of the shell

  3. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  4. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  5. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  6. Optimization of modular coils for stellarator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1982-02-01

    Introduction of a non-sinusoidal deformation can enhance the efficacy of modular coils for generating magnetic fields with a built-in rotational transform. Techniques are developed that provide an understanding of how specific deformations affect the harmonic content of the magnetic field and thus the properties of the vacuum configuration. This provides an optimization procedure for coil design

  7. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  8. Fields analysis of TFR 604 copper coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrier, P.; Dubois, C.; Deschamps, P.; Millard, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of the toroidal Bitter type coils of TFR-604 fusion device. Electric, magnetic and mechanical fields have been investigated. The major difficulty arises from the quite complicated shape of the structure

  9. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  10. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, R.T.; Booth, J.A.; Hayward, R.J.; Keogh, P.; Pratt, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  11. ISX toroidal field coil design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussung, R.O.; Lousteau, D.C.; Johnson, N.E.; Weed, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Structural design and analysis aspects of the toroidal field coils for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) tokamak are discussed. The overall mechanical design of ISX is predicated on the ability to remove the upper segment of the toroidal field coils to allow access to the toroidal vacuum vessel. The high current, 120 kA, capability of the new 74 MW power supply, coupled with the modest field requirement of ISX, allows the use of room temperature copper coils. Seventy-two turns, grouped into 18 coils, generate a magnet field of 18 kG at the major radius of 90 cm. Finite element structural analysis codes were utilized to determine the distribution of stresses and deflections around a typical turn. Initial material distribution on a coil was sized using the two-dimensional program FEATS. The resulting coil design was then coupled to the center bucking and out-of-plane restraint systems utilizing the NASTRAN code. The boundary conditions for the analytical models used in the two programs were then iterated, reaching satisfactory agreement as to stress contours and location for the joints

  12. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  13. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  14. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  15. Structural design of the superconducting toroidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.M.G.; Sborchia, C.; Thome, R.J.; Malkov, A.; Titus, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Structural design issues and features of the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be discussed. Selected analyses of the structural and mechanical behavior of the ITER TF coils will also be presented. (orig.)

  16. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  17. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  18. Magnetic field systems employing a superconducting D.C. field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, T.C.; Hazell, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Method and equipment for transferring energy to or from a direct-current superconducting field coil to change the magnetic field generated by the coil in which a second direct-current superconducting coil is used as a storage coil, and energy transfer between the field coil and the storage coil is effected automatically in dependence upon a control program. Preferably, the control program acts upon a variable transformer which is coupled by respective rectifier/inverters to the field and storage coils and also serves for intital supply of energy to the coils

  19. Modeling the shape of a noncircular toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Marshall, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    Operating and transient forces acting on toroidal field coils may cause conductors and insulation to slide or break and may lead to quenching of the coil. Therefore, it is essential that each individual turn of the coil be modeled for detailed analysis of the coil structure. For this, a special purpose computer program is needed. As a first step in developing such a computer program, the authors present a finite element analysis of a turn of noncircular coil subjected to electromagnetic loading. A turn of superconducting coil is represented by a thin ring modeled by curved finite elements. Of the several curved beam elements reported in the literature, the strain element with two nodes, six degrees-of-freedom, and constant radius of curvature converges fastest for thin-deep arches whose geometrical characteristics are similar to those of a turn of toroidal field coil. They present an algorithm to model a noncircular ring using the number of strain elements satisfying the continuity of slopes at their nodes. This paper verifies the finite element model of a coil shape subjected to a toroidal magnetic field by solving three problems: circular and elliptic coils with the same inner and outer radii, a D-shaped coil, and a compound coil consisting of C- and D-shaped segments. The first problem shows that the resultant vertical force in the upper half of the coil is independent of coil shape. The remaining two problems calculate stresses that represent the constant tension in the D-shaped coil and in each segment of the compound coil. The results of the three problems compare well with the analytical results

  20. Structural analysis of the NET toroidal field coils and conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.; Collier, D.; Gori, R.

    1989-01-01

    The NET toroidal field coils will utilise A15-type superconductor at 4.2 K to generate fields up to 11.5 T. The superconductor strands themselves are sensitive to strain, which causes degradation of their current carrying capacity, and thus the detailed behaviour of the coil conductor must be analysied so that the strian can be minimised. This analysis must include the manufacturing processes of the conductor as well as the normal and abnormal loperational loads. The conductor will be insulated and bonded by glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with limited bonding shear strength, and the overall support of the complete coil system must be designed to reduce these shear stresses. The coils will be subjected to pulse loads form the poloidal field coils, and analysis of the slip between the various coil components, such as conductors and the coil case, giving rise to frictional heating and possible loss of superconducting properties is another important factor, which has been investigated by a number of stress analyses. The manufacturing, thermal and normal magnetic loads on the coils and the analysis leading to the proposed structural design are described. In addition to the normal operating conditions, there is a range of abnormal load conditions which could result from electrical or mechanical faults on the coils. The effect of these potential faults has been analysed and the coil design modified to prevent catastrophic structural failure. (author). 13 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Toroidal field coils for the PDX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the engineering design features of the TF coils for the PDX machine. Included are design details of the electrical insulation, water cooling, and coil segment joint which allows access to the central machine area. A discussion of the problems anticipated in the manufacture and the planned solutions are presented

  2. Poloidal field coil stress analysis for the ZTH machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girrens, S.P.; Bennett, J.G.; Murphy, D.M.

    1988-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis of representative equilibrium field and ohmic heating coils for the Los Alamos ZTH air core machine was performed to determine static stress levels developed within the coil structure caused by Lorentz-force loading. Because of the complex coil configuration in cross section (copper conductors embedded in an epoxy insulating matrix), the study was performed in three steps: a bulk orthotropic material property determination, a bulk material coil section analysis, and a detailed composite cross section of selected thickness analysis. Computational procedures used with coil stress and displacement results that were obtained are presented. Extensive work was performed to investigate the magnitude of the error in coil stress predictions arising from the use of the three-step analysis procedure. Analytical and numerical procedures used to perform the estimate of error study are also presented. 34 figs

  3. Cooling of BITTER-type electromagnetic coils with intense field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Jacques

    1966-01-01

    After having outlined the various problems faced when designing BITTER-type electromagnetic coils with axial cooling (evacuation of the power dissipated in the coil, electromagnetic forces, fabrication and machining technologies, corrosion and erosion due to the presence of water and to potential differences), the author of this research thesis reports the study of the cooling of such an electromagnetic coil. In order to know the heat power to be evacuated for a given field, both the power and the field must be computed, but the influence of cooling holes on these both values is not well known. Thus, the author reports the study of the influence of these holes on the power to be dissipated by these holes, and on the magnetic field. Then, he studies how this power is evacuated, and determines heat exchange relationships for the coil canals. He finally discusses how the obtained results can be used to design an advanced electromagnetic coil [fr

  4. Pulsed field losses and intentional quenches of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Pulsed field losses of several 5-20 kJ coils have been measured under triangular field variations. The conductors, developed as potential subcables of 25-50 kA cables, consist of Cu wires and NbTi strands with or without CuNi barriers. Losses of soft-soldered subcables are compared with those of well-compacted cables. The coils were quenched intentionally by pulsing the coils above the critical current to observe loss variations due to possible conductor damage. The method of measurements, and effects of soldering and compactness of the conductors on the pulsed field losses will be presented

  5. Finite element modeling of TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.A.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Poloidal Field (PF) coils were originally analyzed to TFTR design conditions. The coils have been reanalyzed by PPPL and Grumman to determine operating limits under as-built conditions. Critical stress levels, based upon data obtained from the reanalysis of each PF coil, are needed for input to the TFTR simulation code algorithms. The primary objective regarding structural integrity has been to ascertain the magnitude and location of critical internal stresses in each PF coil due to various combinations of electromagnetic and thermally induced loads. For each PF coil, a global finite element model (FEM) of a coil sector is being analyzed to obtain the basic coil internal loads and displacements. Subsequent fine mesh local models of the coil lead stem and lead spur regions produce the magnitudes and locations of peak stresses. Each copper turn and its surrounding insulation are modeled using solid finite elements. The corresponding electromagnetic and thermal analyses are similarly modeled. A series of test beams were developed to determine the best combination of MSC/NASTRAN-type finite elements for use in PF coil analysis. The results of this analysis compare favorably with those obtained by the earlier analysis which was limited in scope

  6. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  8. Magnetic field alignment of coil-coil diblock copolymers and blends via intrinsic chain anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Majewski, Pawel; Larson, Steven; Yager, Kevin; Gopalan, Padma; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Chan, Edwin; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic fields can control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers provided there is a suitably large magnetic susceptibility anisotropy present in the system. Recent results have highlighted the existence of a non-trivial intrinsic anisotropy in coil-coil diblock copolymers, specifically in lamellar-forming PS-b-P4VP, which enables alignment at field strengths of a few tesla in systems lacking mesogenic components. Alignment is predicated on correlation in the orientation of end-end vectors implied by the localization of block junctions at the microdomain interface and is observed on cooling across the order-disorder transition in the presence of the field. For appropriate combinations of field strength and grain size, we can leverage intrinsic chain anisotropy to magnetically direct self-assembly of many non-mesogenic systems, including other coil-coil BCPs like PS-b-PDMS and PS-b-PMMA, blends of BCPs of disparate morphologies and MWs, and blends of BCPs with homopolymers. This is noteworthy as blends of PS-b-P4VP with PEO provide a route to form functional materials such as nanoporous films by dissolution of PEO, or aligned ion conduction materials. We survey these various systems using TEM and in-situ X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior and temperature-, time- and field- dependent dynamics of alignment.

  9. Structural analysis of TFTR toroidal field coil conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    The conceptual design evaluation of the V-shaped toroidal field coils on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has been performed by detailed structural analysis with the finite element method. The innovation provided by this design and verified in this work is the capability to support toroidal field loads while simultaneously performing the function of twist restraint against the device axial torques resulting from the vertical field loads. The evaluations made for the conceptual design provide predictions for coil deflections and stresses. The results are available for the separate effects from toroidal fields, poloidal fields, and the thermal expansion of the coils as well as for the superposition of the primary loads and the primary plus thermal loads

  10. Magnetic field shielding effect for CFETR TF coil-case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Xufeng, E-mail: Lxf@ipp.ac.cn; Du, Shuangsong; Zheng, Jinxing

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The eddy current of CFETR vacuum vessel can be calculated by using a series of ideal current loops. • The shielding effect with different eddy current is studied by decomposing the exciting magnetic field as two orthogonal components. • The shielding effect can be determined from the rate of eddy current magnetic field to the external magnetic field. - Abstract: The operation of superconducting magnet for fusion device is under the complex magnetic field condition, which affect the stabilization of superconductor. The coil-case of TF coil can shield the magnetic field to some extent. The shielding effect is related to the eddy current of coil-case. The shielding effect with different eddy current is studied by decomposing the exciting magnetic field as two orthogonal components, respectively. The results indicate that the shielding effect of CFETR TF coil-case has obvious different with the different directional magnetic field, and it’s larger for tangential magnetic compared with that for normal field.

  11. Miniature coils for producing pulsed inplane magnetic fields for nanospintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawliszak, Łukasz; Zgirski, Maciej [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al.Lotnikow 32/46, PL 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Tekielak, Maria [Faculty of Physics, University of Białystok, ul.Lipowa 41, PL 15-424 Białystok (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Nanospintronic and related research often requires the application of quickly rising magnetic field pulses in the plane of the studied planar structure. We have designed and fabricated sub-millimeter-sized coils capable of delivering pulses of the magnetic field up to ∼500 Oe in the plane of the sample with the rise time of the order of 10 ns. The placement of the sample above the coil allows for easy access to its surface with manipulators or light beams for, e.g., Kerr microscopy. We use the fabricated coil to drive magnetic domain walls in 1 μm wide permalloy wires and measure magnetic domain wall velocity as a function of the applied magnetic field.

  12. A new controller for the JET error field correction coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, L.; Sartori, F.; Bigi, M.; Piccolo, F.; De Benedetti, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and the software structure of a new controller for the JET error field correction coils (EFCC) system, a set of ex-vessel coils that recently replaced the internal saddle coils. The EFCC controller has been developed on a conventional VME hardware platform using a new software framework, recently designed for real-time applications at JET, and replaces the old disruption feedback controller increasing the flexibility and the optimization of the system. The use of conventional hardware has required a particular effort in designing the software part in order to meet the specifications. The peculiarities of the new controller will be highlighted, such as its very useful trigger logic interface, which allows in principle exploring various error field experiment scenarios

  13. Magnetic field calculation for Fermilab-style magnet coil end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, K.; McInturff, A.D.

    1982-09-01

    A simple end field calculation is described, which utilizes a reciprocal theorem of mutual inductance between actual windings and a virtual coil. The calculation method is applied to a Fermilab-style magnet, and the computation results are compared with those obtained by GFUN

  14. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  15. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.; Watkin, D.C.; Hollis, M.J.; DePew, R.E.; Kuban, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  16. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof

  17. Electron beam therapy with coil-generated magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, Eran; Barnea, Gideon; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an initial study on the issues involved in the practical implementation of the use of transverse magnetic fields in electron beam therapy. By using such magnetic fields the dose delivered to the tumor region can increase significantly relative to that deposited to the healthy tissue. Initially we calculated the magnetic fields produced by the Helmholtz coil and modified Helmholtz coil configurations. These configurations, which can readily be used to generate high intensity magnetic fields, approximate the idealized magnetic fields studied in our previous publications. It was therefore of interest to perform a detailed study of the fields produced by these configurations. Electron beam dose distributions for 15 MeV electrons were calculated using the ACCEPTM code for a 3T transverse magnetic field produced by the modified Helmholtz configuration. The dose distribution was compared to those obtained with no magnetic field. The results were similar to those obtained in our previous work, where an idealized step function magnetic field was used and a 3T field was shown to be the optimal field strength. A simpler configuration was also studied in which a single external coil was used to generate the field. Electron dose distributions are also presented for a given geometry and given magnetic field strength using this configuration. The results indicate that this method is more difficult to apply to radiotherapy due to its lack of symmetry and its irregularity. For the various configurations dealt with here, a major problem is the need to shield the magnetic field in the beam propagation volume, a topic that must be studied in detail

  18. Photoelastic analyses of stresses in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.

    1977-02-01

    Several two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses were made on models of circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors. The circumferential variation of each coil's in-plane magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to 16 segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. One special loading fixture was used for the model of each shape and size. Birefringence and isoclinic angles were measured in a transmission polariscope at selected points on the loaded model. Boundary stresses in the cases of known boundary conditions were determined directly from the isochromatics. Separate principal stresses were calculated using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data obtained by the electrical analogy method from the solution of Laplace's equation. Comparisons were made between experimental results and those computed using the finite element method. The stress distribution between theoretical and experimental agrees very well, although the finite element method yielded slightly higher stresses than the photoelastic method; further work is needed to resolve this difference. In this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based on experimental results, optimum structural designs of toroidal field coils were recommended

  19. JT-60SA Toroidal Field Coils test cryostat development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamotton, Pierre, E-mail: pjamotton@ulg.ac.be [Centre Spatial de Liège (CSL), Université de Liège Avenue du Pré-Aily, B-4031 Angleur (Belgium); Wanner, Manfred [F4E Broader Fusion Development Dept., Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Massaut, Vincent [SCK/CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Génini, Laurent; Maksoud, Walid Abdel [CEA/DSM/IRFU CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Collin, Bill; Delrez, Christophe [Ateliers de la Meuse (ALM), Rue Ernest Solvay, 107, B-4000 Sclessin (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Large vacuum vessels. ► FEM mechanical design. ► Cryogenic thermal design. ► Full development process: design, manufacturing, assembly, test. -- Abstract: Within the Broader Approach Agreement, Fusion for Energy will deliver to the Japanese Atomic Energy Association, amongst other components, the 18 Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs) for the superconducting Tokamak JT-60SA [1]. These coils will be individually tested at cryogenic temperatures and at the nominal current in a test cryostat. This cryostat is provided as an in-kind contribution by Belgium and is being developed jointly with CEA-Saclay/France. The vessel is large, oval shaped with an overall length of 11 m, a width of 7.2 m and a height of 6.5 m. To reduce the heat load to the coils the cryostat is covered by LN{sub 2} cooled thermal shields. In addition to the cryostat, three test frames for the coils, the valve box vessel and the insulation vacuum system are also provided by Belgium. The Belgian contribution is design, manufacturing, assembly and test of the vacuum chamber, thermal shield and test frames by the Belgian company Ateliers de la Meuse (ALM), with the support of Centre Spatial de Liège (CSL). The TF coil test facility is assembled and the coil tests are performed by CEA/Saclay. The Belgian contribution, namely the design, manufacturing, assembly and test of the vacuum vessel, the thermal shields, and the test frames as well as of the vacuum pumping system are described in the presentation.

  20. Optimal Value of Series Capacitors for Uniform Field Distribution in Transmission Line MRI Coils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission lines are often used as coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to the distributed nature of transmission lines, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the coil...

  1. Poloidal field coil design for known plasma equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C.C.; Todd, A.M.M.; Reusch, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for obtaining plasma equilibria with given boundary conditions has long been known and understood. The inverse problem of obtaining a poloidal field (PF) coil system from a given plasma equilibrium has been widely studied, however its solution has remained largely an art form. An investigation, by the writers, of this fundamentally ill-posed inverse problem has resulted in a new understanding of the requirements that solutions must satisfy. A set of interacting computer codes has been written which may be used to successfully design PF coil systems capable of supporting given plasma equilibria. It is shown that for discrete coil systems with a reasonable number of elements the standard minimization of the R M S flux error can lead to undesirable results. Examples are given to show that an additional stability requirement must be imposed on the regularization parameter to obtain correct solutions. For some equilibria, the authors find that the inverse problem admits dual solutions corresponding to two possible magnetic field configurations that fit the constraining relations on the plasma surface equally well. An additional minimization of the absolute value of the limiter flux is required to discriminate between these solutions

  2. Electric field depth-focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-01-01

    Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d(1/2), and focality by the tangential spread, S(1/2), defined as the half-value volume (V(1/2)) divided by the half-value depth, S(1/2) = V(1/2)/d(1/2). The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth-focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d(1/2) are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0-3.5 cm and 0.9-3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S(1/2) as low as 5 cm(2) compared to 34 cm(2) for circular field coils. For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d(1/2) and S(1/2). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, W. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Keefe, C. [Tesla Engineering, Storrington, Sussex (United Kingdom); Rajainmaeki, H. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: hannu.rajainmaki@tech.efda.org; Salpietro, E. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Within the framework of the R and D programme for international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) the European team European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) has been charged with the design and manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI). The purpose of the PFCI is to test and demonstrate the performance of long-length full-scale NbTi conductors in ITER-relevant conditions. The PFCI will be tested in the central solenoid model coil test facility at the JAEA, Naka, Japan. This paper details the complete manufacturing of the PFCI including development, forming machining, pre-assembly, impregnation, final assembly and testing. The PFCI is a single-layered wound solenoid of nine turns with a transition joggle in the centre section of the winding and an intermediate joint connection between the upper termination and the main coil winding. To give the required overall dimensions to fit in the testing facility, preformed and machined glass resin composite filler pieces are assembled with the winding and is finally vacuum pressure impregnated (VPI) to create a single assembly unit. The PFCI is enclosed for assembly in a support structure, which consists of an upper and lower flange, each made up of four electrically insulated machined stainless steel castings, and 12 tie rods preloading the complete assembly in the vertical direction. The upper flange is equipped with four radial restraining jacks and the lower flange is equipped with four sets of studs and shear keys to withstand the net vertical and lateral electromagnetic forces. The PFCI is equipped with inductive heaters, voltage taps, temperature transducers, strain gauges and other instrumentation as diagnostics to monitor the performance. The current status of the manufacture is that the coil has passed the final acceptance tests and it is in the support structure assembly stage.

  4. Fuel magnetization without external field coils (AutoMag)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen; Jennings, Christopher; Awe, Thomas; Shipley, Gabe; Lamppa, Derek; McBride, Ryan

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) has produced fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z accelerator where the fuel was magnetized using external field coils. We present a novel concept that does not need external field coils. This concept (AutoMag) magnetizes the fuel during the early part of the drive current by using a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material. The drive is designed so the current rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators until a sufficiently strong magnetic field is established. Then the current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path and implode the liner. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used with AutoMag to increase the drive current without interfering with diagnostic access. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. A method for estimating tokamak poloidal field coil currents which incorporates engineering constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, W.A.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis describes the development of a design tool for the poloidal field magnet system of a tokamak. Specifically, an existing program for determining the poloidal field coil currents has been modified to: support the general case of asymmetric equilibria and coil sets, determine the coil currents subject to constraints on the maximum values of those currents, and determine the coil currents subject to limits on the forces those coils may carry. The equations representing the current limits and coil force limits are derived and an algorithm based on Newton's method is developed to determine a set of coil currents which satisfies those limits. The resulting program allows the designer to quickly determine whether or not a given coil set is capable of supporting a given equilibrium. 25 refs

  6. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  7. Optimal Value of Series Capacitors for Uniform Field Distribution in Transmission Line MRI Coils

    OpenAIRE

    Vitaliy Zhurbenko

    2016-01-01

    Transmission lines are often used as coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to the distributed nature of transmission lines, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the coil. The equations for optimal values of evenly distributed capacitors are derived and expressed in terms of the implemented transmission line parameters. The achieved magnetic field homogeneity is estimated ...

  8. Quasi-static electric field in a cylindrical volume conductor induced by external coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselle, K P; Stuchly, M A

    1994-02-01

    An expansion technique based on modified Bessel functions is used to obtain an analytical solution for the electric field induced in a homogeneous cylindrical volume conductor by an external coil. The current in the coil is assumed to be changing slowly so that quasi-static conditions can be justified. Valid for any coil type, this solution is ideal for fast computation of the induced electric field at a large number of points. Efficient implementation of this method in a computer code is described and numerical results are presented for a perpendicular circular coil and a tangential double-square coil.

  9. Vacuum magnetic field and modular coil system of the advanced stellarator Wendelstein VII-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1982-06-01

    The vacuum field and the modular coils of the advanced stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS are described. Each of the five field periods contains 9 different twisted coils, one of them with increased dimensions and current in order to provide sufficient access. The standard vacuum field configuration (B=3 T, t=0.39, aspect ratio approx. equal to 10, low shear, and magnetic well) can be varied by toroidal and vertical fields, or by changing independently the current in the large special coils. From a study of magnetic field perturbations some estimates are derived for the admissible coil tolerances. (orig.)

  10. Pulsed-Field Magnetization Properties of Bulk Superconductors by Employment of Vortex-Type Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Shinohara, N.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Watasaki, M.; Kawabe, S.; Taguchi, R.; Izumi, M.

    Vortex-type magnetizing coils are gaining more and more attention to activate bulk superconductors in pulsed-field magnetization (PFM) studies, compared with solenoid-type ones. Following existing reports, we present experimental results of the different penetration patterns of magnetic flux between the two kinds of coils. It was found that the magnetic flux will primarily penetrate inside the bulk from the upper and lower surfaces by using vortex coils, rather than from the periphery in the case of solenoid coils. Moreover, the bulk submitted to a small pulsed-field excitation exhibits a similar field profile as the excitation field (convex or concave shape); a phenomenon named field memory effect. The use of vortex- or solenoid-type coils in PFM will pose an influence on the initial flux penetration patterns during the flux trapping processes, but both coils can finally excite the best conical trapped field shape of the bulk.

  11. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Langton, W.G.; Mann, W.R.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Tarrh, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  12. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are pr...

  13. Optimal Value of Series Capacitors for Uniform Field Distribution in Transmission Line MRI Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Zhurbenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmission lines are often used as coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Due to the distributed nature of transmission lines, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the coil. The equations for optimal values of evenly distributed capacitors are derived and expressed in terms of the implemented transmission line parameters. The achieved magnetic field homogeneity is estimated under quasistatic approximation and compared to the regular transmission line resonator. Finally, a more practical case of a microstrip line coil with two series capacitors is considered.

  14. Electrostatically shielded surface coils for high-field in vivo MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misic, G.J.; Mehdizadeh, M.; Patrick, J.L.; Holland, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    High-frequency surface coil in vivo performance is restricted by coil-patient interaction. This work addresses two specific problem areas: dielectric losses from electrostatic field damping by the patient, and the issue of achieving a proper coil resonance and impedance match with various patient loading conditions. The authors present a new genre of surface coils for 42-86-MHz imaging. A Faraday screen contains the electrostatic field of the coil active loop, reducing dielectric losses and screening the coil from tuning ambiguity caused by stray capacitance to the patient. An integral FET preamplifier solves the dilemma of achieving an impedance match to a 50-ohm system. Favorable results, both of phantom and in vivo studies, are presented on a comparison basis with other well known coil concepts

  15. Calculated E-I characteristics of HTS pancakes and coils exposed to inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adanny, Y.; Wolfus, Y.; Friedman, A.; Kopansky, F.; Yeshurun, Y.; Bar-Haim, Z.; Ron, Z.; Pundak, N.

    2006-06-01

    The upper limit of the operating current of LTS solenoids can be estimated as the coordinate of the crossing point of its load line with IC (B) line of the superconductor. For HTS coils this approach seems to underestimate the allowable operating current of the coil. A better approach is to obtain a full electric field distribution over the coil and to use it as the base for a more sophisticated coil design criteria. We developed an algorithm and a Matlab program for calculating distributions of the current density, magnetic field and electric field in HTS solenoids made of pancakes, considering the inhomogeneous current density distribution inside the anisotropic tape. I-V curves of several Bi-2223 coils are calculated and good agreeement of the calculated and measured critical currents, IC, and indexes, n, are attained. One can utilize the program in the coil design choosing his own criteria of coil's critical current, e.g., 1) The average electric field 10-4 V/m over the coil, 2) The electric field 10-4 V/m at the weak point of the coil, 3) The energy dissipation in the entire coil, 4) Distribution of local energy dissipation.

  16. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of

  17. A high temperature superconductor tape RF receiver coil for a low field magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M C; Yan, B P; Lee, K H; Ma, Q Y; Yang, E S

    2005-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films have been applied in making a low loss RF receiver coil for improving magnetic resonance imaging image quality. However, the application of these coils is severely limited by their limited field of view (FOV). Stringent fabrication environment requirements and high cost are further limitations. In this paper, we propose a simpler method for designing and fabricating HTS coils. Using industrial silver alloy sheathed Bi (2-x) Pb x Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) HTS tapes, a five-inch single-turn HTS solenoid coil has been developed, and human wrist images have been acquired with this coil. The HTS tape coil has demonstrated an enhanced FOV over a six-inch YBCO thin film surface coil at 77 K with comparable signal-to-noise ratio

  18. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  19. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm 2 with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm 3 for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm 3 for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits

  20. Comparison of the induced fields using different coil configurations during deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS plays a role in the study of reward and motivation mechanisms, which may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, electric field distributions induced in the brain by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS are still unknown. In this paper, the double cone coil, H-coil and Halo-circular assembly (HCA coil which have been proposed for dTMS have been numerically designed. The distributions of magnetic flux density, induced electric field in an anatomically based realistic head model by applying the dTMS coils were numerically calculated by the impedance method. Results were compared with that of standard figure-of-eight (Fo8 coil. Simulation results show that double cone, H- and HCA coils have significantly deep field penetration compared to the conventional Fo8 coil, at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. Double cone and HCA coils have better ability to stimulate deep brain subregions compared to that of the H-coil. In the mean time, both double cone and HCA coils increase risk for optical nerve excitation. Our results suggest although the dTMS coils offer new tool with potential for both research and clinical applications for psychiatric and neurological disorders associated with dysfunctions of deep brain regions, the selection of the most suitable coil settings for a specific clinical application should be based on a balanced evaluation between stimulation depth and focality.

  1. Suppression of m = 0 in a RFP by toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.; Robertson, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Reversatron RFP is normally operated with the toroidal field coils connected in series. The time-integrated voltage applied to the circuit determines the sum of the fluxes linking each turn but not the flux within each turn. Each winding may have a different flux determined by the external drive and by currents within the plasma. A parallel connection of the field coils results in the flux within each coil being determined by the volt-seconds applied to the windings; thus the toroidal flux is the same within each coil. This configuration suppresses any toroidal variation in the toroidal flux and effectively reduces the level of the m = 0 component of the radial field. The m = 0 fluctuations are expected to arise due to nonlinear coupling of the m = 1 modes. A parallel connection of field coils is impractical due to the low impedance required for driving the coils. The authors have tested the effect of parallel connected coils by adding an auxiliary set of 36 coils. These are connected in parallel but are not connected to any supply. The toroidal flux is generated by the series-connected coils which generate voltage but not current in the parallel-connected coils. With the auxiliary coils, the discharge duration is increased from 500 to 550 μsec, the plasma current is increased from 50 kA to 60 kA, F is more negative, Θ is larger, and there is less shot-to-shot variation in the discharges. The m = 0 fluctuations measured by 43 surface coils are, however, only slightly reduced

  2. Fields and coupling between coils embedded in conductive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Son; Vallecchi, Andrea; Stevens, Christopher J.; Shamonina, Ekaterina

    2018-02-01

    An approximate solution is developed for the mutual inductance of two circular coils enclosed by insulating cavities in a conducting medium. This solution is used to investigate the variation of the mutual inductance upon the conductivity of the background (e.g., soil, seawater or human body), as well as upon other parameters such as the vertical of the coils and the displacement of one of the coils in the horizontal plane. Our theoretical results are compared with full wave simulations and a previous solution valid when a conductive slab is inserted between two coupled resonant coils. The proposed approach can have direct impact on the design and optimisation of magnetoinductive waveguides and wireless power transfer for underground/underwater networks and embedded biomedical systems.

  3. Near-field wireless sensing of single and multiple open-ended micro coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yousaf

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present near-field wireless sensing of single and multiple open-ended micro coils using an electrically small loop antenna. Wirelessly characterized parameters of open-ended micro coils include its resonance frequency, quality factor and inductance. Moreover a wireless frequency-dependent analytical model was developed. Micro coil inductance was extracted from the wirelessly measured signal using a constraint-based least-squares approach. Wireless measurements and analytical fit of micro coils are in strong agreement which validates the analytical model. Finite element method (FEM simulations of the coupled system were done in COMSOL Multiphysics.

  4. Design and field testing of solar-assisted Earth coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, J. E.

    A nominal 1000-foot, 4-inch, PVC coil buried in a serpentine pattern is the heat source/sink for two commercial heat pump systems. This system is vented which allows the easy placement of thermocouples down its length to measure changes in temperature as well as changes in overall U values as a function of length. Integral to the earth coil is a 1000-gallon uninsulated water storage tank in which solar energy from 210 sq ft of solar collectors (single-glazed, metal absorber) can be added directly to the heat pump, circulated through the 1000-foot earth coil system, or added to an insulated storage tank for direct transfer. Temperature ranges for this type of system at the four-foot level are from a nominal range of 780F to a low of 420F in the absence of heat rejection of absorption. The second type of earth coil was a vertical coil approximately 240 feet in length. The vertical heat exchanger consists of a 5-inch PVC pipe which is capped at both ends and pressurized at approximately 15 PSIG. This sealed and pressurized heat exchanger allows a low power pump to circulate water through both the heat pump and vertical heat exchanger system.

  5. Flow balancing orifice for ITER toroidal field coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinovich, A. V.; Y Rodin, I.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Safonov, A. V.; Stepanov, D. B.; Guryeva, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Flow balancing orifices (FBOs) are used in in International thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field coil to uniform flow rate of cooling gas in the side double pancakes which have a different conductor length: 99 m and 305 m, respectively. FBOs consist of straight parts, elbows produced from a 316L stainless steel tube 21.34 x 2.11 mm and orifices made from a 316L stainless steel rod. Each of right and left FBOs contains 6 orifices, straight FBOs contain 4 and 6 orifices. Before manufacturing of qualification samples D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (JSC NIIEFA) proposed to ITER a new approach to provide the seamless connection between a tube and a plate therefore the most critical weld between the orifice with 1 mm thickness and the tube removed from the FBOs final design. The proposed orifice diameter is three times less than the minimum requirement of the ISO 5167, therefore it was tasked to define accuracy of calculation flow characteristics at room temperature and compare with the experimental data. In 2015 the qualification samples of flow balancing orifices were produced and tested. The results of experimental data showed that the deviation of calculated data is less than 7%. Based on this result and other tests ITER approved the design of FBOs, which made it possible to start the serial production. In 2016 JSC NIIEFA delivered 50 FBOs to ITER, i.e. 24 left side, 24 right side and 2 straight FBOs. In order to define the quality of FBOs the test facility in JSC NIIEFA was prepared. The helium tightness test at 10-9 m3·Pa/s the pressure up to 3 MPa, flow rate measuring at the various pressure drops, the non-destructive tests of orifices and weld seams (ISO 5817, class B) were conducted. Other tests such as check dimensions and thermo cycling 300 - 80 - 300 K also were carried out for each FBO.

  6. Photoelastic and analytical investigation of stress in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.; Gray, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses on circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors were made. The circumferential variation of the coil's magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to sixteen segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. Isochromatics and isoclinics were measured at selected points on the loaded model in a transmission polariscope using a microphotometer. Separate principal stresses were obtained using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data measured from the solution of Laplace's equation by the electrical analog method. Analysis of the same coil geometries, loadings, and boundary conditions were made using the finite element method. General agreement between theory and experiment was realized. From this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based upon this experiment, suggestions for optimum structural design of toroidal field coils are presented

  7. Head fixed field coil system for measuring eye movements in freely moving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Tarasenko, Sergey; Yakushin, Sergei; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    Coil systems have been a standard for measuring eye movements since they were first introduced. These systems, which have been designed to work at low frequencies (20 KHz), generally require large field coils so that a uniform field can be established at the eye coil site. This configuration makes it virtually impossible to study eye movements in freely moving animals. In this paper, we describe the design of a coil system, which operates at radio frequencies (10 MHz). This system allows the use of compact coils with radii of 10 mm that are capable of accurately measuring eye movements in three dimensions during head free locomotion. This system opens the possibility for studying eye movements in freely moving monkeys under a wide range of conditions.

  8. Structural specificity in coiled-coil interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Keating, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Coiled coils have a rich history in the field of protein design and engineering. Novel structures, such as the first 7-helix coiled coil, continue to provide surprises and insights. Large-scale data sets quantifying the influence of systematic mutations on coiled-coil stability are a valuable new asset to the area. Scoring methods based on sequence and/or structure can predict interaction preferences in coiled-coil-mediated bZIP transcription factor dimerization. Experimental and computationa...

  9. Experimental simulation of pulsed field losses in tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to measure loss in a twisted multifilamentary composite superconductor when exposed to a transient longitudinal field. We investigate the variation of losses both as a function of transverse applied field and of sample transport current. Losses are probed mainly by measurement of the dynamic resistivity of the sample during the longitudinal pulse. Experimental results are compared with theories for the zero transport current case. The extension of theory to include transport current is also discussed, and the impact on tokamak toroidal field coil design is considered

  10. Calculation of an axisymmetric current coil field with the bounding contour integration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, Alexander P.; Klevets, Nickolay I. E-mail: pmsolution@mail.ru

    2004-06-01

    Method for the economic and stable (in the sense of calculation errors) analysis of an induction of a magnetic field created with axisymmetric coils in arbitrary points of space, including points located inside a coil or on its border, is obtained. The basic idea of the method is to replace a current coil with continuous distribution of current density by magnetization distributed in the volume of the coil and creating the equivalent magnetic field. This allows to use field surface sources at calculation of the fields. Consequently, the range of integration is reduced resulting in reduction of calculation volume by an order in most cases. Besides, the calculation of improper integrals in internal points and on the border is completely excluded.

  11. Calculation of an axisymmetric current coil field with the bounding contour integration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, Alexander P.; Klevets, Nickolay I.

    2004-01-01

    Method for the economic and stable (in the sense of calculation errors) analysis of an induction of a magnetic field created with axisymmetric coils in arbitrary points of space, including points located inside a coil or on its border, is obtained. The basic idea of the method is to replace a current coil with continuous distribution of current density by magnetization distributed in the volume of the coil and creating the equivalent magnetic field. This allows to use field surface sources at calculation of the fields. Consequently, the range of integration is reduced resulting in reduction of calculation volume by an order in most cases. Besides, the calculation of improper integrals in internal points and on the border is completely excluded

  12. A study on electromagnetic and mechanical characteristics of the field coil in HTS motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Kadota, T.; Joo, J.H.; Sano, H.; Murase, S.; Lee, S.H.; Hong, J.P.; Kim, H.M.; Kwon, Y.K.; Jo, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) motors electromagnetically consist of a rotator wound with HTS wires and an armature with conventional copper wires like Litz wire. The HTS rotor windings, as field coils, consist of a straight part and an end-ring part. Because a major rotation torque is induced by an interaction between magnetic fields and current-carrying conductors in the straight part, most of mechanical stresses in the motor occur at the straight part. An end-ring is placed in the edge of the straight part and used to connect to each adjacent straight-part coils. The magnetic fields by coil currents concentrate on the end-ring part, therefore, it is expected that the critical current of the entire coil, straight and end-ring, can be determined by the magnitude of the field in the end-ring. This paper deals with the overall J c degradation in the end-ring part by self-field generated from the coil. In addition to electromagnetic analyses, we have performed a numerical analysis in order to evaluate mechanical stresses in the straight part of field coil by armature reaction on steady-state operation. The analytical results will be presented in this paper.

  13. Thermal analysis of toroidal field coil in EAST at 3.7 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Shi; Wu, Yu; Liu, Bo.; Long, Feng; Hao, Qiang W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this study, the thermal performance of toroidal field (TF) coil is studied at 3.7 K in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device (EAST) to obtain the higher stability. • The structure and cooling process design of TF coil and case is described and the helium temperature in the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and case is evaluated during the 1.5 MA plasma disruptions. • Then, the experimental results of TF coil cooled at 3.7 K and discharged in 10 kA are shown including the thermal loss evaluation. • Finally, the thermal stability performance of TF coil is analyzed at 1.5 MA plasma current operations. - Abstract: The thermal performance of toroidal field (TF) coil is studied at 3.7 K in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device (EAST) to obtain the higher stability for the higher plasma parameters operation. It is a good way to lower the operating temperature of TF coil to acquire the higher stability margin. This paper describes the structure and cooling process design of TF coil and case firstly. Based on the thermal load in the case, the thermal performance of the TF coil is performed at the plasma disruption state. The helium temperature in the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and case is evaluated during the 1.5 MA plasma disruptions. Then, the experimental results of TF coil which has been cooled at 3.7 K and discharged in 10 kA are shown including the thermal loss evaluation. Finally, the thermal stability performance of TF coil is analyzed according to the 3.7 K experimental results and the stability prediction is performed at 1.5 MA plasma current operations

  14. An induction heating device using planar coil with high amplitude alternating magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuhe; Zhuo, Zihang; Cai, Dongyang; Wu, Jian'an; Wang, Jie; Tang, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    Induction heating devices using the induction coil and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are the way that the magnetic hyperthermia is heading. To facilitate the induction heating of in vivo magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia experiments on large animals. An induction heating device using a planar coil was designed with a magnetic field frequency of 328 kHz. The coil's magnetic field distribution and the device's induction heating performance on different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were measured. The alternating magnetic field produced in the axis position 165 mm away from the coil center is 40 Gs in amplitude; magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration higher than 80 mg. mL-1 can be heated up rapidly. Our results demonstrate that the device can be applied not only to in vitro and in small animal experiments of magnetic hyperthermia using MNPs, but also in large animal experiments.

  15. Effects of coil orientation on the electric field induced by TMS over the hand motor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Responses elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand motor area depend on the position and orientation of the stimulating coil. In this work, we computationally investigate the induced electric field for multiple coil orientations and locations in order to determine which parts of the brain are affected and how the sensitivity of motor cortical activation depends on the direction of the electric field. The finite element method is used for calculating the electric field induced by TMS in two individual anatomical models of the head and brain. The orientation of the coil affects both the strength and depth of penetration of the electric field, and the field strongly depends on the direction of the sulcus, where the target neurons are located. The coil position that gives the strongest electric field in the target cortical region may deviate from the closest scalp location by a distance on the order of 1 cm. Together with previous experimental data, the results support the hypothesis that the cortex is most sensitive to fields oriented perpendicular to the cortical layers, while it is relatively insensitive to fields parallel to them. This has important implications for targeting of TMS. To determine the most effective coil position and orientation, it is essential to consider both biological (the direction of the targeted axons) and physical factors (the strength and direction of the electric field). (paper)

  16. Magnetic field from arbitrarily shaped flat coils with filamentary, ribbon, and rectangular cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Christensen, U.R.

    1975-01-01

    This report describes the derivation of three groups of equations: (1) Field components from an arbitrarily shaped filament lying in a plane. (2) Field components from an arbitrarily shaped ribbon of infinitesimal thickness with center line lying in a plane. (3) Field components from an arbitrarily shaped bar of rectangular cross section with its center line lying in a plane. In all three cases analytical expressions for the field components were found for an infinitesimal element of the cross section. These expressions are then integrated numerically along the arbitrarily shaped center line of the coil to obtain the three field components. As a check for accuracy the calculated field values of an elliptically shaped coil were compared to an existing analytic expression for a filamentary elliptical coil

  17. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  18. Magnetization of the joint-free high temperature superconductor (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox coil by field cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Yawei; Li, Jianwei; Jin, Zhijian

    2017-09-01

    Joint-free (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox (REBCO) coil based on `wind-and-flip' technique has been developed to generate a persistent magnetic field without power supply. This paper is to study the magnetization characteristics of the joint-free REBCO coil by field cooling, in order to trap higher field. A joint-free pancake coil is wound by REBCO tapes and the field cooling magnetization test is performed on it. An approximate numerical model based on H-formulation is built for this coil to analyze its magnetization behavior, which is validated by the experimental results Analysis show that a persistent direct current is induced in the coil during the field cooling operation, which generates the trapped field. The induced current of the joint-free coil shows an intrinsic non-uniform distribution among turns. Increasing the magnetization field and critical current of REBCO conductors can considerably increase the trapped field. But the trapping factor (the rate of trapped field to background magnetization field) reaches a maximum value (60 % for the test coil). This maximum value is an intrinsic characteristics for a fabricated coil, which only depends on the coil's geometry structure. With a same usage of REBCO tapes, the trapping factor can be improved significantly by optimizing the coil structure to multiple pancakes, and it can approach 100 %.

  19. U-shaped Ladder TEM-Coil Structure with Truncated Sensitivity Profile in z-Direction for High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leussler, C.; Wirtz, D.; Wuelbern, J.H.; Vernickel, P.; Forthmann, P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional TEM-coils [1] come with a sensitivity profile and field-of view (FOV) that is largely extended in the z-direction comparedwith birdcage coils (BC) [2]. There is an analog situation when comparing TEM coil arrays [3] and degenerate birdcages (DBC) [4]. The excess z-FOV leads to safety

  20. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  1. Construction of Specialty Guide Field Coils Using an Industrial Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, William; Crawford, Christopher; Fugal, Mario; Martin, Elise; Wagner, Daniel; Milburn, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Many contemporary nuclear physics experiments require precise control of the magnetic field within key regions of the experimental apparatus. The nEDM experiment, for instance, requires uniform guide fields (produced by guide field coils) to transport neutron spin polarization from the polarizer to the measurement cell. Guide field coils in general are subject to tight geometrical constraints, and must not produce any external fields which would affect the results of the experiment. In order to produce a satisfactory coil in light of these constraints, a systematic design technique is needed. We introduce the magnetic scalar potential technique, which calculates the exact coil windings required on a specified boundary to produce any desired field distribution inside that satisfies Maxwell's equations. Realizing the designs produced by this technique introduces an additional difficulty: winding many turns according to the exact calculated paths. This is addressed by ``printing'' our coils onto a copper-plated G10 form using a calibrated robot arm and spindle, resulting in a 3-d printed circuit board. To correct for deviations in the actual shape of the form, we use a laser displacement sensor to capture the actual geometry as input into the calculation of the windings. Supported in part by NSF grant PHY-0855584.

  2. New measurements of coil-related magnetic field errors on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxon, J.L. E-mail: luxon@fusion.gat.com; Jackson, G.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Scoville, J.T.; Strait, E.J

    2003-09-01

    Non-axisymmetric (error) fields in tokamaks lead to a number of instabilities including so-called locked modes [J.T. Scoville, R.J. La Haye, Nucl. Fusion 43 (4) (2003) 250-257] and resistive wall modes (RWM) [A.M. Garofab, R.J. La Haye, J.T. Scoville, Nucl. Fusion 42 (11) (2002) 1335-1339] and subsequent loss of confinement. They can also cause errors in magnetic measurements made by point probes near the plasma edge, error in measurements made by magnetic field sensitive diagnostics, and they violate the assumption of axisymmetry in the analysis of data. Most notably, the sources of these error fields include shifts and tilts in the coil positions from ideal, coil leads, and nearby ferromagnetic materials excited by the coils. New measurements have been made of the n=1 coil-related field errors in the DIII-D plasma chamber. These measurements indicate that the errors due to the plasma shaping coil system are smaller than previously reported and no additional sources of anomalous fields were identified. Thus they fail to support the suggestion of an additional significant error field suggested by locked mode and RWM experiments.

  3. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF THE DIII-D TOROIDAL FIELD COIL TO INCREASED LATERAL LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REIS, E.E; CHIN, E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Recent calibration shots in which full toroidal field (TF) coil current interacted with the maximum poloidal field coils have produced increased lateral loads on the outer sections of the TF-coil. The increased lateral loads have resulted in deflections that have been sufficient to cause the TF-coil to contact adjacent equipment and produce a transient short to ground within the coil. The six outer turns of each TF-coil bundle are clamped together by insulated preloaded studs to provide increased bending stiffness. These sections of the outer bundles depend on friction to react the lateral loads as a bundle rather than six individual turns. A major concern is that the increased loads will produce slip between turns resulting in excessive lateral deflections and possible damage to the insulating sleeve on the preloaded studs. A finite element structural model of the TF-coil was developed for the calculation of deflections and the shear load distribution throughout the coil for the applied lateral loads from a full current calibration shot. The purpose of the updated structural model is to correlate the applied lateral loads to the total shear force between the unbonded sections of the outer turns. An allowable integrated lateral load applied to the outer turns is established based on the maximum shear force that can be reacted by friction. A program that calculates the magnetic fields and integrated lateral load along the outer turns can be incorporated into the plasma control system. The integrated load can then be compared to the calculated allowable value prior to execution of calibration shots. Calibration shots with a calculated total lateral load greater than the allowable value will be prevented

  4. Measurement of a time-periodic magnetic field by rotating coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique of the measurement data processing is developed which allows to apply the rotating coil method for measurement of a dynamic magnetic field, periodic in time. The developed technique allows to obtain time-dependent multipoles in a single measurement which takes place during one power cycle of the magnet or the coil rotation period, whichever is longer. -- Highlights: ► The rotating coil method is commonly used for measurement of a static field. ► A novel technique is developed to use it for measurement of a time-periodic field. ► Field multipoles are presented as Fourier time series with unknown coefficients. ► The Fourier series translation properties are used to obtain additional equations. ► A complete set of equations with Vandermonde matrices is derived to find unknowns

  5. Kilotesla Magnetic Field due to a Capacitor-Coil Target Driven by High Power Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Zhang, Zhe; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory generation of strong magnetic fields opens new frontiers in plasma and beam physics, astro- and solar-physics, materials science, and atomic and molecular physics. Although kilotesla magnetic fields have already been produced by magnetic flux compression using an imploding metal tube or plasma shell, accessibility at multiple points and better controlled shapes of the field are desirable. Here we have generated kilotesla magnetic fields using a capacitor-coil target, in which two nickel disks are connected by a U-turn coil. A magnetic flux density of 1.5 kT was measured using the Faraday effect 650 μm away from the coil, when the capacitor was driven by two beams from the GEKKO-XII laser (at 1 kJ (total), 1.3 ns, 0.53 or 1 μm, and 5 × 1016 W/cm2). PMID:23378905

  6. Magnetic-Field-Gradient-Coil System for Solid-State MAS and Cramps NMR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszko, M.; Maciel, G. E.

    The idea of combining cylindrical coils for producing a longitudinal gradient with respect to the MAS axis with quadrupole (straight wire) magnetic-field-gradient coils for producing two transverse gradients for 3D MAS and CRAMPS imaging has been demonstrated. A modified set of a double Maxwell pair and two sets of quadrupole (eight-wire) coils were combined in a compact way and adapted for a 5 mm MAS rotor, achieving gradients of high efficiency (4.3 and 2.9 G/cm A for longitudinal and transverse coils, respectively), low inductance (3.5 and 1.9 μH, respectively), and very good linearity(1%). A 60 μm spatial resolution in a TREV-CRAMPS imaging experiment on solid polyethylene oxide was demonstrated; gradient pulses of 12 μs duration were generated by applying currents of 2.3 and 1.5 A to longitudinal and transverse coils, respectively. This magnetic-field-gradient-coil configuration could also be applied in other areas of NMR where time-dependent gradients are required.

  7. Improved Field Homogeneity for Transmission Line MRI Coils Using Series Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Dong, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    High field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems often use short sections of transmission lines for generating and sensing alternating magnetic fields. Due to distributed nature of transmission lines, the generated field is inhomogeneous. This work investigates the application of series...... capacitors to improve the field homogeneity. The resulting magnetic field distribution is estimated analytically and evaluated numerically. The results are compared to a case of a conventional transmission line coil realization....

  8. Performance assessment and optimization of the ITER toroidal field coil joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolando, G.; Foussat, A.; Knaster, J.; Ilyin, Y.; Nijhuis, Arend

    2013-01-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) system features eighteen coils that will provide the magnetic field necessary to confine the plasma. Each winding pack is composed of seven double pancakes (DP) connected through praying hands joints. Shaking hands joints are used to interface the terminals of the

  9. Radio-frequency coils for ultra-high field magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Özlem

    2017-07-15

    Radiofrequency (RF) coils are key components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. The primary purpose of this review is to provide a basic theory of RF coil designs and their characterization by bench measurements, electromagnetic field simulations and MR measurements. With the continuing increase of magnetic field strength in MRI instruments, the RF wavelength in the subject under study becomes comparable to or smaller in size than the anatomical dimensions of the tissue under study, which amplifies the signal inhomogeneity. Also, RF energy increases quadratically with the Larmor frequency, which leads to increased heat deposition in the subject, especially at ultra-high field. Elegant RF coil designs are explored here to address these challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental study on a Nb3Al insert coil under high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guang; Dai, Yinming; Cheng, Junsheng; Chang, Kun; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Qiuliang; Pan, Xifeng; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Nb3Al is one of the most promising superconductors to replace Nb3Sn in large scale, high field superconducting magnet. Since the complicated conductor manufacturing process, long and stable Nb3Al conductor is difficult to acquire in a commercial scale. Based on a 70 m length of Nb-Al precursor conductor, we designed and fabricated a Nb3Al coil. The coil winding, low temperature diffusion heat treatment and epoxy impregnation are described in detail. The finished Nb3Al coil is tested as an insert in a background magnet. The test is performed at the background field from 7 T to 15 T. The test results are analyzed and presented in this paper.

  11. Optimization of field homogeneity of Helmholtz-like coils for measuring the balance of planar gradiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordahn, M.A.; Holst, T.; Shen, Y.Q.

    1999-01-01

    Measuring the balance of planar SQUID gradiometers using a relatively small Helmholtz-like coil system requires a careful design of the coils in order to have a high degree of field uniformity along the radial direction. The level to which planar gradiometers can be balanced will be affected by any misalignment of the gradiometer relative to the ideal central position. Therefore, the maximum degree of balancing possible is calculated numerically for the Helmholtz geometry under various perturbations, including misalignment of the gradiometer along the cylindrical and the radial axis, and angular tilting relative to the normal plane. Furthermore, if the ratio between the coil separation and coil radius is chosen to be less than unity, calculations show that the expected radial uniformity of the field can be improved considerably compared to the traditional Helmholtz geometry. The optimized coil geometry is compared to the Helmholtz geometry and is found to yield up to an order of magnitude improvement of the worst case error signal within a volume spanned by the uncertainty in the alignment. (author)

  12. Team one (GA/MCA) effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. 12 Tesla ETF toroidal field coil helium bath cooled NbTi alloy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the conceptual design of an ETF compatible toroidal field coil, employing helium bath cooled NbTi alloy conductor. The ten TF-coil array generates a peak field of 11-1/2 tesla at 2.87 m radius, corresponding to a major axis field of 6.1 tesla. The 10 kA conductor is an uninsulated, unsoldered Rutherford cable, employing NbTiTa ally as developed in Phase I of this effort. The conductor is encased within a four element frame of stainless steel strips to provide hoop and bearing load support

  13. Improved field free line magnetic particle imaging using saddle coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Marlitt; Sattel, Timo F; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel tracer-based imaging method detecting the distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles in vivo in three dimensions and in real time. Conventionally, MPI uses the signal emitted by SPIO tracer material located at a field free point (FFP). To increase the sensitivity of MPI, however, an alternative encoding scheme collecting the particle signal along a field free line (FFL) was proposed. To provide the magnetic fields needed for line imaging in MPI, a very efficient scanner setup regarding electrical power consumption is needed. At the same time, the scanner needs to provide a high magnetic field homogeneity along the FFL as well as parallel to its alignment to prevent the appearance of artifacts, using efficient radon-based reconstruction methods arising for a line encoding scheme. This work presents a dynamic FFL scanner setup for MPI that outperforms all previously presented setups in electrical power consumption as well as magnetic field quality.

  14. Structural-design considerations for the FED 50-kA equilibrium field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, G.; Bennett, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The structural support system for two equilibrium field coil conductor concepts is considered for the fusion energy design (FED) 8/10T baseline magnetic-fusion system. Both conductor concepts are discussed. Results indicate that regardless of the conductor concept employed, an external support beam/frame structural system is required to equilibrate the accumulative loadings

  15. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An Automated Procedure to Obtain Coil-specific Models for Field Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Ewald, Lars; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    potential of the TMS coils. Objective: To develop an approach to reconstruct the magnetic vector potential based on automated measurements. Methods: We implemented a setup that simultaneously measures the three components of the magnetic field with high spatial resolution. This is complemented by a novel...

  16. High magnetic field multipoles generated by superconductor magnetization within a set of nested superconducting correction coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    Correction elements in colliding beam accelerators such as the SSC can be the source of undesirable higher magnetic field multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor within the corrector. Quadrupole and sextupole correctors located within the main dipole will produce sextupole and decapole due to magnetization of the superconductor within the correction coils. Lumped nested correction coils can produce a large number of skew and normal magnetization multipoles which may have an adverse effect on a stored beam at injection into a high energy colliding beam machine such as the SSC. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Multiple coil pulsed magnetic resonance method for measuring cold SSC dipole magnet field quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.G.; Moore, J.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The operating principles and system architecture for a method to measure the magnetic field multipole expansion coefficients are described in the context of the needs of SSC dipole magnets. The operation of an 8-coil prototype system is discussed. Several of the most important technological issues that influence the design are identified and the basis of their resolution is explained. The new features of a 32-coil system presently under construction are described, along with estimates of its requirements for measurement time and data storage capacity

  18. A code for calculating force and temperature of a bitter plate type toroidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, U.

    1989-01-01

    To assist the design effort of the TF coils for CIT, a set of programs was developed to calculate the transient spatial distribution of the current density, the temperature and the forces in the TF coil conductor region. The TF coils are of the Bitter (disk) type design and therefore have negligible variation of current density in the toroidal direction. During the TF pulse, voltages are induced which cause the field and current to diffuse in the minor radial direction. This penetration, combined with the increase of resistance due to the temperature rise determines the distribution of the current. After the current distribution has been determined, the in-plane (TF-TF) and the out-of-plane (TF-PF) forces in the conductor are computed. The predicted currents and temperatures have been independently corroborated using the SPARK code which has been modified for this type of problem. 6 figs

  19. Conceptual design of cooling anchor for current lead on HTS field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon, C. J.; Kim, J. H.; Quach, H. L. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    The role of current lead in high-temperature superconducting synchronous machine (HTSSM) is to function as a power supply by connecting the power supply unit at room temperature with the HTS field coils at cryogenic temperature. Such physical and electrical connection causes conduction and Joule-heating losses, which are major thermal losses of HTSSM rotors. To ensure definite stability and economic feasibility of HTS field coils, quickly and smoothly cooling down the current lead is a key design technology. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a novel concept of a cooling anchor to enhance the cooling performance of a metal current lead. The technical concept of this technology is the simultaneously chilling and supporting the current lead. First, the structure of the current lead and cooling anchor were conceptually designed for field coils for a 1.5 MW-class HTSSM. Then, the effect of this installation on the thermal characteristics of HTS coils was investigated by 3D finite element analysis.

  20. Countering the stray magnetic field of the CUSP trap by using additional coils

    CERN Document Server

    Thole, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN tries to measure the Hyperfine Structure (HFS) of Antihydrogen (H ̄) using a Rabi spectroscopy set-up. In measuring this HFS it will yield a very precise test of CPT-symmetry. For this set-up to work a homogeneous magnetic field is needed in the cavity where the Hyperfine transition of H ̄ occurs. Due to the stray fields from the CUSP trap, where H ̄ is produced, additional coils are needed to counter these fields. It is found, using COMSOL simulations, that two coils are suitable for this. Leading to a relative standard deviation of the magnetic field of σB/B = 1.06%.

  1. Using Ferromagnetic Material to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    ARL-MR-0954 ● Jun 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Using Ferromagnetic Material to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-MR-0954 ● Jun 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Using Ferromagnetic Material ...to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a Coil by W Casey Uhlig Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  2. Evaluation of mechanical strength of the joints in JT-60 toroidal field coil conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, S.; Ohkubo, M.; Sasajima, H.

    1980-04-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils of JT-60 produce a toroidal field of 45 KG at a plasma axis, they have an inner bore of 3.90 m and a weight of about 80 metric tons per coil. Eighteen TF coils are located around a torus axis at regular intervals. TF coil conductors are mostly jointed by high frequency induction brazing, the rest jointed by welding. In deciding the details of the jointing procedures, the conductor size and the requested mechanical strength are mainly taken into consideration. Described are non-destructive inspection methods for the brazed joints, strength evaluation, and the inspection criteria. Ultrasonic testing method is found to be the most effective in evaluation of mechanical properties of the brazed joints especially in terms of fatigue strength. The ultrasonic inspection method and the detectability of this apparatus are described in detail, and the defects of known size are compared with the indication values and display figures. The apparatus developed for JT-60 is operated automatically also recording the inspection results. Mechanical strength of the brazed joints with initial defects is discussed.

  3. Quasistationary magnetic field generation with a laser-driven capacitor-coil assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Santos, J. J.; Poyé, A.

    2017-08-01

    Recent experiments are showing possibilities to generate strong magnetic fields on the excess of 500 T with high-energy nanosecond laser pulses in a compact setup of a capacitor connected to a single turn coil. Hot electrons ejected from the capacitor plate (cathode) are collected at the other plate (anode), thus providing the source of a current in the coil. However, the physical processes leading to generation of currents exceeding hundreds of kiloamperes in such a laser-driven diode are not sufficiently understood. Here we present a critical analysis of previous results and propose a self-consistent model for the high current generation in a laser-driven capacitor-coil assembly. It accounts for three major effects controlling the diode current: the space charge neutralization, the plasma magnetization between the capacitor plates, and the Ohmic heating of the external circuit—the coil-shaped connecting wire. The model provides the conditions necessary for transporting strongly super-Alfvenic currents through the diode on the time scale of a few nanoseconds. The model validity is confirmed by a comparison with the available experimental data.

  4. Quasistationary magnetic field generation with a laser-driven capacitor-coil assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonchuk, V T; Bailly-Grandvaux, M; Santos, J J; Poyé, A

    2017-08-01

    Recent experiments are showing possibilities to generate strong magnetic fields on the excess of 500 T with high-energy nanosecond laser pulses in a compact setup of a capacitor connected to a single turn coil. Hot electrons ejected from the capacitor plate (cathode) are collected at the other plate (anode), thus providing the source of a current in the coil. However, the physical processes leading to generation of currents exceeding hundreds of kiloamperes in such a laser-driven diode are not sufficiently understood. Here we present a critical analysis of previous results and propose a self-consistent model for the high current generation in a laser-driven capacitor-coil assembly. It accounts for three major effects controlling the diode current: the space charge neutralization, the plasma magnetization between the capacitor plates, and the Ohmic heating of the external circuit-the coil-shaped connecting wire. The model provides the conditions necessary for transporting strongly super-Alfvenic currents through the diode on the time scale of a few nanoseconds. The model validity is confirmed by a comparison with the available experimental data.

  5. Welding scheme optimization for the U-shaped flexible clamps of ITER poloidal field coil supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Teng; Li Pengyuan; Sun Zhenchao; Xu Dan; Han Shilei; Wang Yue

    2015-01-01

    The numerical simulation and welding experiment were adopted to investigate the welding deformation of ITER poloidal field coil supports, and the comparison of the simulation and the actual measurement was made to verify the validity of simulation. The basic law of welding seam deformation on the U-shaped flexible clamps was obtained and the existing clamps type was improved. Furthermore, based on the verified heat and mechanical boundary condition and the optimization clamp, the calculations of welding deformations of U-shaped flexible clamps in three different welding plans were carried out and an optimized plan for the poloidal field coil supports fabricating was proposed. The optimal welding deformation is controlled within 0.6 mm. (authors)

  6. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  7. Performance assessment and optimization of the ITER toroidal field coil joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, G.; Foussat, A.; Knaster, J.; Ilin, Y.; Nijhuis, A.

    2013-08-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) system features eighteen coils that will provide the magnetic field necessary to confine the plasma. Each winding pack is composed of seven double pancakes (DP) connected through praying hands joints. Shaking hands joints are used to interface the terminals of the conductor with the feeder and inter-coil U-shaped bus bars. The feasibility of operating plasma scenarios depends on the ability of the magnets to retain sufficient temperature and current margins. In this respect, the joints represent a possible critical region due to the combination of steady state Joule heating in the resistance of the joint and coupling losses and currents in ramped operation. The temperature and current margins of both DP and terminal joints are analysed during the 15 and 17 MA plasma scenarios. The effect on the joint performance of feasible optimization solutions, such as rotation of the terminal joints and sole RRR increase, is explored. The characterization of the TF coil joints is completed by the estimation of the coupling loss time constant for different inter-strand and strand-to-joint resistance values. The study is carried out with the code JackPot-ACDC, allowing the analysis of lap-type joints with a strand-level detail.

  8. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  9. Active feedback stabilization of the flute instability in a mirror machine using field-aligned coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, A.; Be'ery, I.; Fisher, A.; Ron, A.; Fruchtman, A.

    2012-01-01

    A plasma confined in linear mirror machines is unstable even at low β, mainly because of the flute instability. One possible way to stabilize the plasma is to use active feedback to correct the plasma shape in real time. The theoretically investigated apparatus consists of feedback coils aligned with the magnetic field, immersed in a cold plasma around the hot core. When the current through the feedback coils changes, the plasma moves to conserve the magnetic flux via compressional Alfvén waves. An analytical model is used to find a robust feedback algorithm with zero residual currents. It is shown that due to the plasma's rotation, maximal stability is obtained with a large phase angle between the perturbations' modes and the feedback integral-like term. Finally, a two-dimensional MHD simulation implementing the above algorithm in fact shows stabilization of the plasma with zero residual currents. (paper)

  10. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds.

  11. Dependence of CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] PF [poloidal field] coil currents on profile and shape parameters using the Control Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Jardin, S.C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma shaping flexibility of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) poloidal field (PF) coil set is demonstrated through MHD equilibrium calculations of optimal PF coil current distributions and their variation with poloidal beta, internal inductance, plasma 95% elongation, and 95% triangularity. Calculations of the magnetic stored energy are used to compare solutions associated with various plasma parameters. The Control Matrix (CM) equilibrium code, together with the nonlinear equation and numerical optimization software packages HYBRD, and VMCON, respectively, are used to find equilibrium coil current distributions for fixed divertor geometry, volt-seconds, and plasma profiles in order to isolate the dependence on individual parameters. A reference equilibrium and coil current distribution are chosen, and correction currents dI are determined using the CM equilibrium method to obtain other specified plasma shapes. The reference equilibrium is the κ = 2 divertor at beginning of flattop (BOFT) with a minimum stored energy solution for the coil current distribution. The pressure profile function is fixed

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of magnetic nanoparticles using multiple pickup coils and field-free line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Masahiro; Hamanaga, Shohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Sasayama, Teruyoshi; Yoshida, Takashi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2018-02-01

    We performed three-dimensional detection of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples using third-harmonic signal detection. In this method, a combination of five pickup coils and a gradient field with a field-free line was used to acquire three-dimensional MNP sample position information. The resulting two-dimensional maps of the signal fields generated by the MNP samples are sufficient for three-dimensional MNP image reconstruction. In the experiments, two MNP samples with different Fe contents were set at different positions. Two-dimensional field maps were measured using the five pickup coils, and the three-dimensional MNP sample distribution was then reconstructed from these field maps by solving an inversion problem. We demonstrated three-dimensional detection of two MNP samples where we reconstructed the three-dimensional positions and the Fe contents of these two MNP samples with reasonable accuracy. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed system for three-dimensional magnetic particle imaging.

  13. Advances in control of frost on evaporator coils with an applied electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudor, V. [Advanced Thermal Research Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Ohadi, M. [Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College park, MD 20742 (United States); Salehi, M.A.; Lawler, J.V. [ATEC Inc., College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    This paper introduces an innovative technique on use of an applied electric field for control of frost over evaporator coils with fin density and geometric configuration of interest to freezer/refrigerator applications. The technique discussed in this paper, referred to as the 'dielectric barrier discharge' (DBD) method, may be particularly suitable for application in evaporator coils with high fin density. Experiments conducted with a small-scale laboratory test-module, as well as a full-scale supermarket evaporator are presented. The DBD technique is based on generating localized non-resistive heating within fins of an evaporator coil via application of a high-voltage, alternating current through electrodes. Our experiments demonstrate that the defrosting time using DBD is substantially shorter than conventional techniques, while the energy consumption associated with the process is less than one half of the corresponding energy of the electrical resistance heating methods. Basic operational principles of the technique, its advantages and limitations when compared to conventional electrical defrosting techniques are discussed and presented for the first time in this paper. (author)

  14. MSC/NASTRAN ''expert'' techniques developed and applied to the TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The TFTR poloidal field (PF) coils are being analyzed by PPPL and Grumman using MSC/NASTRAN as a part of an overall effort to establish the absolute limiting conditions of operation for TFTR. Each of the PF coils will be analyzed in depth, using a detailed set of finite element models. Several of the models developed are quite large because each copper turn, as well as its surrounding insulation, was modeled using solid elements. Several of the finite element models proved large enough to tax the capabilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC), specifically disk storage space. To allow the use of substructuring techniques with their associated data bases for the larger models, it became necessary to employ certain infrequently used MSC/NASTRAN ''expert'' techniques. The techniques developed used multiple data bases and data base sets to divide each problem into a series of computer runs. For each run, only the data required was kept on active disk space, the remainder being placed in inactive ''FILEM'' storage, thus, minimizing active disk space required at any time and permitting problem solution using the NMFECC. A representative problem using the TFTR OH-1 coil global model provides an example of the techniques developed. The special considerations necessary to obtain proper results are discussed

  15. Mechanical attachment of the conductor ends in the ITER poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessette, D.; Decool, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ITER poloidal field (PF) coils are wound from a large cable-in-conduit-conductor, with a stainless steel (SS) jacket. Tapered bonded tails, consisting of shaped steel profiles welded to the conductor ends, are used in these PF coils to mechanically attach the conductor ends to the winding pack. Their main function is to transfer the tensile force from the end of the outermost turn to the adjacent turns by shear through an appropriate thickness of insulating material (glass epoxy). These tails are embedded in the winding pack thus avoiding any local protrusion. Similar tapered bonded tails have been extensively used in large copper coils. However, compared with a standard copper conductor, the tensile force to be transferred to the winding pack is larger in the ITER PF conductor because of the higher tensile stress experienced by the SS jacket (average tensile stress up to 200 MPa). This led to a new hollow tail design capable of transferring the large tensile force carried by the PF coil conductors over a length in the range 600-650 mm. Hollow tails, as opposed to solid tails, provide a larger bonded perimeter for the same effective tail cross section, which also contributes to limiting the peak shear stress in the insulation. As a first step, the geometry of the tail has been optimised through a 1-D analytical straight model that solves the force balance between shear in the insulation and tension in the tail along its length. In a second step, a FEA (finite element analysis) of the most promising configuration has been performed in order to validate the design

  16. Geometrical Design of a Scalable Overlapping Planar Spiral Coil Array to Generate a Homogeneous Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jow, Uei-Ming; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-12-21

    We present a design methodology for an overlapping hexagonal planar spiral coil (hex-PSC) array, optimized for creation of a homogenous magnetic field for wireless power transmission to randomly moving objects. The modular hex-PSC array has been implemented in the form of three parallel conductive layers, for which an iterative optimization procedure defines the PSC geometries. Since the overlapping hex-PSCs in different layers have different characteristics, the worst case coil-coupling condition should be designed to provide the maximum power transfer efficiency (PTE) in order to minimize the spatial received power fluctuations. In the worst case, the transmitter (Tx) hex-PSC is overlapped by six PSCs and surrounded by six other adjacent PSCs. Using a receiver (Rx) coil, 20 mm in radius, at the coupling distance of 78 mm and maximum lateral misalignment of 49.1 mm (1/√3 of the PSC radius) we can receive power at a PTE of 19.6% from the worst case PSC. Furthermore, we have studied the effects of Rx coil tilting and concluded that the PTE degrades significantly when θ > 60°. Solutions are: 1) activating two adjacent overlapping hex-PSCs simultaneously with out-of-phase excitations to create horizontal magnetic flux and 2) inclusion of a small energy storage element in the Rx module to maintain power in the worst case scenarios. In order to verify the proposed design methodology, we have developed the EnerCage system, which aims to power up biological instruments attached to or implanted in freely behaving small animal subjects' bodies in long-term electrophysiology experiments within large experimental arenas.

  17. Field Quality and Fabrication Analysis of HQ02 Reconstructed Nb3Sn Coil Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holik, Eddie Frank; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Carbonara, Andrea; Dietderich, Daniel R.; Dimarco, Joseph; Pong, Ian; Sabbi, GianLuca; Santini, Carlo; Schmalzle, Jesse; Wang, Xiaorong

    2017-01-23

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) quadrupole HQ02 was designed and fully tested as part of the low-beta quad development for Hi-Lumi LHC. HQ02’s design is well documented with full fabrication accounting along with full field analysis at low and high current. With this history, HQ02 is an excellent test bed for developing a methodology for measuring turn locations from magnet cross sections and comparing with CAD models and measured field. All 4 coils of HQ02 were cut in identical locations along the magnetic length corresponding to magnetic field measurement and coil metrology. A real-time camera and coordinate measuring equipment was used to plot turn corners. Measurements include systematic and random displacements of winding blocks and individual turns along the magnetic length. The range of cable shifts and the field harmonic range along the length are in agreement, although correlating turn locations and measured harmonics in each cross section is challenging.

  18. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, C.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to a high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  19. Electric fields in accelerating conductors: measurement of the EMF in rotationally accelerating coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorhead, G.F.; Opat, G.I.

    1996-06-06

    The acceleration of an electric conductor is predicted to produce an electric filed proportional to m/q where `m`is the free mass and `q` the charge of the carriers of the electric current. In certain configurations this leads to a measurable electromagnetic field (EMF). In this paper is reported a measurement of the EMF induced by rotationally accelerating coils of aluminium and copper wire. The measured EMFs are found to agree with the theoretical predictions to within the error estimates. 23 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  20. Mechanical stress calculations for toroidal field coils by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Jandl, O.; Gorenflo, H.

    1976-09-01

    After discussing fundamental relationships of the finite element method, this report describes the calculation steps worked out for mechanical stress calculations in the case of magnetic forces and forces produced by thermal expansion or compression of toroidal field coils using the SOLID SAP IV computer program. The displacement and stress analysis are based on the 20-node isoparametric solid element. The calculation of the nodal forces produced by magnetic body forces are discussed in detail. The computer programs, which can be used generally for mesh generation and determination of the nodal forces, are published elsewhere. (orig.) [de

  1. MR imaging of the knee with high-field-strength surface coil imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, R.; Halford, H.H.; Brooks, T.; Geldmeier, R.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study of high-resolution surface coil imaging of the knee in a high-field-strength (1.5-T) MR imaging system will be performed to assess the ability of MR to detect bony, ligamentous and cartilaginous abnormalities of the knee. Coronal spin-echo images (echo time [TE], 25 msec; repetition time [TR] 1,000 msec) and sagittal multiecho images (TE, 25, 70 msec; TR, 1,000, 2,000 msec) are displayed demonstrating normal anatomy, meniscal and ligamentous injuries, and miscellaneous lesions such as osteomyelitis. A minimum of 100 patients are examined, and arthroscopic correlation will be available in at least 60% of the patients

  2. Analysis and test to predict the fatigue life of the ISX-B toroidal field coils' finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Ojalvo, I.U.; Raynor, G.E.; Zatz, I.J.; Johnson, N.E.; Walls, J.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Cain, W.D.; Walstrom, P.L.; Pearce, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new and more rigorous structural evaluation of the ISX toroidal field (TF) coil fingers joints was undertaken to assess the effects of high-/beta/ operation of ISX-B. A new poloidal field (PF) coil set which allows high-/beta/ operation and produces larger out-of-plane loads on the TF coils was installed as part of the change to ISX-B. It was determined that the iron core significantly affects the out-of-plane load distribution and forces were calculated using the GFUN-3D code which considers 3-D iron core effects. These loads were applied to a half-symmetric finite element NASTRAN code model in which the TF coils were modeled as a string of beam elements. 8 refs

  3. Conceptual design of plasma position control of SST-1 tokamak using vertical field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Hitesh Kumar; Patel, Kiritkumar B.; Dhongde, Jasraj

    2015-01-01

    SST-1 (Steady State Superconducting Tokamak) is a plasma confinement device in Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) India. SST-1 has been commissioned successfully and has been carrying out plasma experiments since the beginning of 2014 achieved a maximum plasma current of 75 kA at a central field of 1.5 T and the plasma duration ∼ 500 ms. SST-1 looks forward to carrying out elongated plasma experiments and stretching plasma pulses beyond 1s. Based on the solution of Grad-Shafranov equation the shift of plasma column center from geometrical centre of vacuum chamber is measured using various magnetic probes and flux loops installed in the machine. The closed feedback loop uses plasma current (Ip), Delta R as feedback signal and manipulate the vertical field current (Ivf). The discharge starts with feed forward loop using initially provided reference then the active feedback starts after discharge by few msec once plasma column is completely formed. The feedback loop time is of the order of 10 msec. The primary objective is to acquire plasma position control related signals, compute plasma position and generate position correction signal for VF coil power supply, communicate correction to VF coil power supply and modify VF power supply output in a deterministic time span. In this we present the methodology used for plasma horizontal displacement control using vertical field and discuss the preliminary results. (author)

  4. Study on poloidal field coil optimization and equilibrium control of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya, Kichiro; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Nishio, Satoshi

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to present general features of the poloidal field coil optimization for the ITER plasma, flexibility analysis for various plasma options and some other aspect of the equilibrium control which is required for understanding plasma operation in more detail. Double null divertor plasma was selected as a main object of the optimization. Single null divertor plasma was assumed to be an alternative, because single null divertor plasma can be operational within the amounts of the total stored energy and ampere-turns of the double null divertor plasma, if it is shaped appropriately. Plasma parameters used in the present analysis are mainly those employed in the preliminary study by the Basic Device Engineering group of the ITER design team. The most part of the optimization study, however, utilizes the parameters proposed for discussion by the Japan team before starting joint design work at Garching. Plasma shape, and solenoid coil shape and size, which maximize available flux swing with reasonable amounts of the stored energy and ampere-turns, are discussed. Location and minimum number of the poloidal field coils with adequate shaping controllability were also discussed for various plasma options. Some other aspect of the equilibrium control, such as separatrix swing, moving null point operation during plasma heating and possible range of li, were evaluated and the guideline for the engineering design was proposed. Finally, fusion power output was estimated for the different pressure profiles and combinations of the average density and temperature, and the magnetic quantities of the scrape-off region was calculated to be available for the future divertor analysis. (author)

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Magnetically Driven Duffing-Type Spring-Magnet Oscillator in the Static Magnetic Field of a Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2012-01-01

    We study the nonlinear oscillations of a forced and weakly dissipative spring-magnet system moving in the magnetic fields of two fixed coaxial, hollow induction coils. As the first coil is excited with a dc current, both a linear and a cubic magnet-position dependent force appear on the magnet-spring system. The second coil, located below the…

  6. Steering Electromagnetic Fields in MRI: Investigating Radiofrequency Field Interactions with Endogenous and External Dielectric Materials for Improved Coil Performance at High Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Manushka

    Although 1.5 and 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) systems remain the clinical standard, the number of 7 T MR systems has increased over the past decade because of the promise of higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which can translate to images with higher resolution, improved image quality and faster acquisition times. However, there are a number of technical challenges that have prevented exploiting the full potential of ultra-high field (≥ 7 T) MR imaging (MRI), such as the inhomogeneous distribution of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field and specific energy absorption rate (SAR), which can compromise image quality and patient safety. To better understand the origin of these issues, we first investigated the dependence of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field associated with a surface RF coil on the operating frequency and electrical properties of the sample. Our results demonstrated that the asymmetries between the transmit (B1+) and receive (B 1-) circularly polarized components of the magnetic field, which are in part responsible for RF inhomogeneity, depend on the electric conductivity of the sample. On the other hand, when sample conductivity is low, a high relative permittivity can result in an inhomogeneous RF field distribution, due to significant constructive and destructive interference patterns between forward and reflected propagating magnetic field within the sample. We then investigated the use of high permittivity materials (HPMs) as a method to alter the field distribution and improve transmit and receive coil performance in MRI. We showed that HPM placed at a distance from an RF loop coil can passively shape the field within the sample. Our results showed improvement in transmit and receive sensitivity overlap, extension of coil field-of-view, and enhancement in transmit/receive efficiency. We demonstrated the utility of this concept by employing HPM to improve performance of an existing commercial head coil for the

  7. Higher magnetic field multipoles generated by superconductor magnetization within a set of nested superconducting correction coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Correction elements in colliding beam accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) can be the source of undesirable higher magnetic field multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor within the corrector. Quadrupole and sextupole correctors located within the main dipole will produce sextupole and decapole due to magnetization of the superconductor within the correction coils. Lumped nested correction coils can produce a large number of skew and normal magnetization multipoles which may have an adverse effect on a stored beam at injection into a high energy colliding beam machine such as the SSC. Multipole magnetization field components have been measured within the HERA storage ring dipole magnets. Calculations of these components using the SCMAG04 code, which agree substantially with the measured multipoles, are presented in the report. As a result, in the proposed continuous correction winding for the SSC, dipoles have been replaced with lumped correction elements every six dipole magnets (about 120 meters apart). Nested lumped correction elements will also produce undesirable higher magnetization multipoles. This report shows a method by which the higher multipole generated by nested correction elements can be identified. (author)

  8. Measurements on Subscale Y-Ba-Cu-O Racetrack Coils at 77 K and Self-Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Godeke, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G.

    2009-10-19

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) tapes carry significant amount of current at fields beyond the limit of Nb-based conductors. This makes the YBCO tapes a possible conductor candidate for insert magnets to increase the bore field of Nb{sub 3}Sn high-field dipoles. As an initial step of the YBCO insert technology development, two subscale racetrack coils were wound using Kapton-insulated commercial YBCO tapes. Both coils had two layers; one had 3 turns in each layer and the other 10 turns. The coils were supported by G10 side rails and waxed strips and not impregnated. The critical current of the coils was measured at 77 K and self-field. A 2D model considering the magnetic-field dependence of the critical current was used to estimate the expected critical current. The measured results show that both coils reached 80%-95% of the expected values, indicating the feasibility of the design concept and fabrication process.

  9. A Method to Evaluate the Field-Shape Multipoles Induced by Coil Deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ferracin, P; Todesco, Ezio; Tropea, P

    1999-01-01

    A semi-analytical method to evaluate the effect of coil de-formations on the field-shape imperfections of the LHC dipole is presented. The deformation induced by the collaring procedure and by the thermal stresses is evaluated numerically with a finite element code. The vector field of mechanical displacements is approximated with truncated Taylor and Fourier series. The fitting function agrees with the numerical data to within less that 10 mm. The decom-position in modes of the truncated series permits identification of displacements which are dangerous for the multi-polar content and how they could be cured. An application to compare two designs of the LHC dipole is given.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Helmholtz Coils to Study the Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on the Healing Process in Periodontitis: Preliminary Animal Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghnegahdar A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effects of electromagnetic fields on healing have been investigated for centuries. Substantial data indicate that exposure to electromagnetic field can lead to enhanced healing in both soft and hard tissues. Helmholtz coils are devices that generate pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF. Objective: In this work, a pair of Helmholtz coils for enhancing the healing process in periodontitis was designed and fabricated. Method: An identical pair of square Helmholtz coils generated the 50 Hz magnetic field. This device was made up of two parallel coaxial circular coils (100 turns in each loop, wound in series which were separated from each other by a distance equal to the radius of one coil (12.5 cm. The windings of our Helmholtz coil was made of standard 0.95mm wire to provide the maximum possible current. The coil was powered by a function generator. Results: The Helmholtz Coils generated a uniform magnetic field between its coils. The magnetic field strength at the center of the space between two coils was 97.6 μT. Preliminary biological studies performed on rats show that exposure of laboratory animals to pulsed electromagnetic fields enhanced the healing of periodontitis. Conclusion: Exposure to PEMFs can lead to stimulatory physiological effects on cells and tissues such as enhanced healing of periodontitis.

  11. The forming of a superconductor cable during the winding of a large toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messemer, G.; Zehlein, H.

    1984-01-01

    The feasible range for the tension force which acts on a superconductor cable during the winding of a large D-shaped toroidal field coil depends strongly on the mechanical properties of the cable, on the geometry of the winding pack and on the arrangement of the equipment. The upper limit is imposed by possible damage within the cable. The lower limit is set by the need to assure enough compaction and to overcome the friction forces between the layers. Within this 'corridor' optimal control of elastic prestresses is desirable: this may be chosen with regard to the residual stresses and/or the elastic springback after removal of the coil former. This paper presents a simplified elastica conductor model built by a finite chain of intervals with constant bending moment and curvature. This paper describes the discrete model as well as the iterative shooting method, which finds the equilibrium shape of the conductor. The distributions of bending moment and shear forces around the D-shaped contour, as well as along the conductor, are given. Desirable improvements are outlined. In particular, the possibility of mitigating the stress concentration effect by supporting rollers suitably placed along the 'free' conductor near the bobbin is discussed. (author)

  12. Comparison between Modelled and Measured Magnetic Field Scans of Different Planar Coil Topologies for Stress Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Robert; Moreton, Gregory; Meydan, Turgut; Williams, Paul

    2018-03-21

    The investigation of planar coils of differing topologies, when combined with a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon to form a stress-sensitive self-inductor, is an active research area for applications as stress or pressure sensors. Four topologies of planar coil (Circular, Mesh, Meander, and Square) have been constructed using copper track on 30 mm wide PCB substrate. The coils are energized to draw 0.4 A and the resulting magnetic field distribution is observed with a newly developed three-dimensional magnetic field scanner. The system is based on a variably angled Micromagnetics ® STJ-020 tunneling magneto-resistance sensor with a spatial resolution of 5-10 µm and sensitivity to fields of less than 10 A/m. These experimental results are compared with the fields computed by ANSYS Maxwell ® finite element modelling of the same topologies. Measured field shape and strength correspond well with the results of modelling, including direct observation of corner and edge effects. Three-dimensional analysis of the field shape produced by the square coil, isolating the components H ( x ) and H ( z ) , is compared with the three-dimensional field solutions from modelling. The finite element modelling is validated and the accuracy and utility of the new system for three-dimensional scanning of general stray fields is confirmed.

  13. Performance of pancake coils of parallel co-wound Ag/BSCCO tape conductors in static and ramped magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Walker, M.S.; Hazelton, D.W.; Haldar, P.; Rice, J.A.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-01-01

    Critical Currents are reported for several Ag/BSCCO single-pancake coils in static magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 5 T and temperatures from 4.2 K to 105 K. The sample coils were co-wound of one to six tape conductors in parallel. Since the closed loops formed in such an arrangement could lead to eddy current heating or instability in changing fields, one of the coils was also tested in helium gas, in fields ramped at rates of up to 1.5 T/s. For these quasi-adiabatic tests, at each temperature the transport current was set just below the critical value for a preset static field of 3.3 or 4.9 T. The field was then rapidly ramped down to zero, held for 20 sec, and then ramped back up to the original value. The maximum observed temperature transient of about 1.7 K occurred at 9 K, for a field change of 4.75 T. The temperature transients became negligible when the sample was immersed in liquid helium. Above 30 K, the transients were below 1 K. These results give confidence that parallel co-wound HTSC coils are stable in a rapidly-ramped magnetic field, without undue eddy current heating

  14. Hydraulics of the ITER toroidal field model coil cable-in-conduit conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicollet, S.; Cloez, H.; Duchateau, J.L.; Serries, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The test facility built at CEA-Cadarache OTHELLO (Operating Test facility for HELium LOop) is described, and pressure drop measurements all performed with nitrogen under pressure at room temperature are presented. Tests have been carried out on a 5 meters straight section of the superconducting cable of the Toroidal Field Model Coil. For the bundle region, a fit in form of the general formula proposed by Katheder agrees well with measurements. For the central hole, the friction factor measurements suggest a plateau at practical Reynolds numbers ranging near 10 6 , which could be modelled with the empirical Colebrook formula with an equivalent relative rugosity. This behaviour is quite different from what has been used up to now in the design criteria of ITER. (author)

  15. ROXIE the Routine for the Optimization of Magnet X-sections, Inverse Field Computation and Coil End Design

    CERN Document Server

    Russenschuck, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The ROXIE software program package has been developed for the design of the superconducting magnets for the LHC at CERN. The software is used as an approach towards the integrated design of superconducting magnets including feature-based coil geometry creation, conceptual design using genetic algorithms, optimization of the coil and iron cross-sections using a reduced vector-potential formulation, 3-D coil end geometry and field optimization using deterministic vector- optimization techniques, tolerance analysis, production of drawings by means of a DXF interface, end-spacer design with interfaces to CAD-CAM for the CNC machining of these pieces, and the tracing of manufacturing errors using field quality measurements. This paper gives an overview of the methods applied in the ROXIE program. (9 refs).

  16. Thermal analysis of the forced cooled conductor for the TF [toroidal field] superconducting coils in the TIBER II ETR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) is being designed to provide nuclear testing capabilities for first wall and blanket design concepts. The baseline design for TIBER II is to provide steady-state nuclear burn capabilities. These objectives must be met using reactor relevant components, such as state-of-the-art current drive schemes coupled with superconducting toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The design is also constrained to be cost effective, which forces the machine to be as small as possible. This last constraint limits the nuclear shielding in TIBER. Therefore, the TF coils will have a high nuclear heat load of up to 4.5 kW per coil. The cooling scheme and the thermal analysis for this design are presented

  17. Effect of error field correction coils on W7-X limiter loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhenkov, S. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Niemann, H.; Lazerson, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Biedermann, C.; Kocsis, G.; König, R.; Pisano, F.; Stephey, L.; Szepesi, T.; Wenzel, U.; Pedersen, T. S.; Wolf, R. C.; W7-X Team

    2017-12-01

    In the first campaign Wendelstein 7-X was operated with five poloidal graphite limiters installed stellarator symmetrically. In an ideal situation the power losses would be equally distributed between the limiters. The limiter shape was designed to smoothly distribute the heat flux over two strike lines. Vertically the strike lines are not uniform because of different connection lengths. In this paper it is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally that the heat flux distribution can be significantly changed by non-resonant n=1 perturbation field of the order of 10-4 . Numerical studies are performed with field line tracing. In experiments perturbation fields are excited with five error field trim coils. The limiters are diagnosed with infrared cameras, neutral gas pressure gauges, thermocouples and spectroscopic diagnostics. Experimental results are qualitatively consistent with the simulations. With a suitable choice of the phase and amplitude of the perturbation a more symmetric plasma-limiter interaction can be potentially achieved. These results are also of interest for the later W7-X divertor operation.

  18. Unified View on the Mean-Field Order of Coil-Globule Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that a polymer chain immersed in a small-molecule solvent undergoes the coil-globule transition (CGT) as the solvent quality changes. In the study of CGT, a mean-field theory, either of the Flory-type or the self-consistent field theory, has been commonly used; the transition order predicted by the mean-field theory, however, has been controversial. By examining the first- and second-order derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the solvent equality, the continuity of which defines the transition order but has not been reported in the literature, we concluded that the mean-field CGT of a polymer chain of finite length N exhibits the type-I behavior; that is, it is either a first-order phase transition, a critical point, or a crossover depending on the location of the critical point. It becomes a second-order phase transition with respect to the solvent equality characterized by the Flory-Huggins parameter χ (or equivalently the second virial coefficient v or the temperature T) only in the limit of N --> ∞ . Even in this limit, it still has the type-I behavior with respect to vN 1 / 2 (or equivalently (1 - 2 χ) N 1 / 2). Financial support for this work was provided by NSF CAREER Award CBET-0847016, which is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruber, S; Farrher, G D; Anoardo, E

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α-helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm(3) the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  1. Design study for superconducting main field coils for the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Litherland, P.S.; Ballou, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The design study described here demonstrated the feasibility of replacing the existing ORIC coils with superconducting magnets. The design is quite conservative, requires no unusual technology, and should result in a coil system with good reliability and durability. The operating regime of ORIC will be considerably extended, and running costs should be reduced. A proposal to continue with detailed design and coil fabrication is currently under review and has been submitted to the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

  2. Influence of standard RF coil materials on surface and buildup dose from a 6 MV photon beam in magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonance guided teletherapy systems aspire to image the patient concurrently with the radiation delivery. Thus, the radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging, placed on or close to patient skin and in close proximity to the treatment volume, would be irradiated leading to modifications of radiation dose to the skin and in the buildup region. The purpose of this work is to measure and assess these dose modifications due to standard off-the-shelf RF coil materials. A typical surface coil was approximated as layered sheets of polycarbonate, copper tape, and Teflon to emulate the base, conductor, and cover, respectively. A separate investigation used additional coil materials, such as copper pipe, plastic coil housing, a typical coil padding material, and a thin copper conductor. The materials were placed in the path of a 6 MV photon beam at various distances from polystyrene phantoms in which the surface and buildup doses were measured. The experiments were performed on a clinical Varian linac with no magnetic field and with a 0.21 T electromagnet producing a magnetic field parallel to the beam central axis. The authors repeated similar experiments in the presence of a 0.22 T magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the beam central axis using an earlier linac-MR prototype, with a biplanar permanent magnet. The radiation detectors used for the measurements were two different parallel plate ion chambers and GAFChromic films. A typical open beam surface dose of 20% (relative to open beam D max ) was increased to 63% by the coil padding material and to >74% by all other materials when placed in direct contact with the phantom, irrespective of magnetic field presence or orientation. Without a magnetic field, the surface dose decreased as the test materials were moved away from the phantom surface toward the radiation source, reaching between 30% and 40% at 10 cm gap between the phantom and the test materials. In the presence of the transverse

  3. A DT fusion reactor design in field-reversed configuration using normal conductive coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Y.; Sekiguchi, J.; Matsumoto, T.; Asai, T.; Nogi, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Takahashi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Assuming continued stability, favorable energy confinement time scaling, and an effective current drive and maintenance methods, a feasible DT fusion reactor design is proposed for field-reversed configuration (FRC) which uses normal conductive copper magnetic field coils at room temperature. The reactor has 3 GW fusion power, 1.5 MW m‑2 neutron wall loading at the first wall, and thermal loading less than 1 MW m‑2 at diverter plates. Plasma has an almost straight cylindrical shape of 40 m in length and 8.6 m in diameter. FRC can obtain very high beta (over 0.7 in average) and the magnetic field strength of the reactor will be 1.215 T, which can be produced by normal conductive coils having 70 m in length, 17.6 m in diameter, and 1.5 m in thickness with 0.6 effective conductive area ratio. Its Ohmic power loss is ~74 MW, which is less than 10% of the expected electric power output. A scenario to reach ignition from the initial formation is considered. At first, two FRCs are formed at the both ends of the reactor by fast theta-pinch with a negative bias magnetic field 6 m in length and 0.5 m in diameter. The FRCs are accelerated up to 250 km s‑1 by the gradient of magnetic field strength towards the center of the burning region, collide with each other, and form a single large FRC. Their kinetic energy is converted to thermal energy, and the merged FRC is 10 m in length and 1.8 m in diameter. This FRC plasma is brought to ignition by intensive neutral beam injection (NBI) heating and particle supply. Given 200 s heating duration, the maximum NBI power is ~250 MW before alpha particle heating becomes significant. After ignition, NBI heating is not required, but there is a possibility that some part of equilibrium current must be supplied by the NBI in the MeV region.

  4. Flux pumping for non-insulated and metal-insulated HTS coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2018-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils wound from coated conductors without turn-to-turn insulation (non-insulated (NI) coils) have been proven with excellent electrical and thermal performances. However, the slow charging of NI coils has been a long-lasting problem. In this work, we explore using a transformer-rectifier HTS flux pump to charge an NI coil and a metal-insulated coil. The charging performance comparison is made between different coils. Comprehensive study is done to thoroughly understand the electrical-magnetic transience in charging these coils. We will show that the low-voltage high-current flux pump is especially suitable for charging NI coils with very low characteristic resistance.

  5. Analysis of the magnetic field data and computation of Trim coil currents for the variable energy cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, T.K.; Basu, S.K.; Bhattacharya, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic Field Data of the Calcutta 88'' Cyclotron has been analyzed with the Berkeley Code CYDE to compute trial Trim Coil Settings, ν r , ν Z and phase history Sin φ, in order to improve the beam quality of the cyclotron. (author)

  6. MHD equilibrium methods for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] PF [poloidal field] coil design and systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1989-03-01

    Two versions of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) free-boundary equilibrium code designed to computer the poloidal field (PF) coil current distribution of elongated, magnetically limited tokamak plasmas are demonstrated and applied to the systems analysis of the impact of plasma elongation on the design point of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These notes were presented at the ITER Specialists' Meeting on the PF Coil System and Operational Scenario, held at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Garching, Federal Republic of Germany, May 24--27, 1988. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Analysis of quench-vent pressures for present design of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Japan, the European Community, the Union of the Soviet Union, and the United States. This paper examines the effects of a quench within the toroidal field (TF) coils based on current ITER design. It is a preliminary, rough analysis. Its intent is to assist ITER designers while more accurate computer codes are being developed and to provide a check against these more rigorous solutions. Rigorous solutions to the quench problem are very complex involving three-dimensional heat transfer, extreme changes in heat capacities and copper resistivity, and varying flow dynamics within the conductors. This analysis addresses all these factors in an approximate way. The result is much less accurate than a rigorous analysis. Results here could be in error as much as 30 to 40 percent. However, it is believed that this paper can still be very useful to the coil designer. Coil pressures and temperatures vs time into a quench are presented. Rate of helium vent, energy deposition in the coil, and depletion of magnetic stored energy are also presented. Peak pressures are high (about 43 MPa). This is due to the very long vent path length (446 m), small hydraulic diameters, and high current densities associated with ITER's cable-in-conduit design. The effects of these pressures as well as the ability of the coil to be self protecting during a quench are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. ac Modeling and impedance spectrum tests of the superconducting magnetic field coils for the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmler, Hartmut; Köppen, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    The impedance spectrum test was employed for detection of short circuits within Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) superconducting magnetic field coils. This test is based on measuring the complex impedance over several decades of frequency. The results are compared to predictions of appropriate electrical equivalent circuits of coils in different production states or during cold test. When the equivalent circuit is not too complicated the impedance can be represented by an analytic function. A more detailed analysis is performed with a network simulation code. The overall agreement of measured and calculated or simulated spectra is good. Two types of short circuits which appeared are presented and analyzed. The detection limit of the method is discussed. It is concluded that combined high-voltage ac and low-voltage impedance spectrum tests are ideal means to rule out short circuits in the W7-X coils.

  9. ac modeling and impedance spectrum tests of the superconducting magnetic field coils for the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmler, Hartmut; Köppen, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    The impedance spectrum test was employed for detection of short circuits within Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) superconducting magnetic field coils. This test is based on measuring the complex impedance over several decades of frequency. The results are compared to predictions of appropriate electrical equivalent circuits of coils in different production states or during cold test. When the equivalent circuit is not too complicated the impedance can be represented by an analytic function. A more detailed analysis is performed with a network simulation code. The overall agreement of measured and calculated or simulated spectra is good. Two types of short circuits which appeared are presented and analyzed. The detection limit of the method is discussed. It is concluded that combined high-voltage ac and low-voltage impedance spectrum tests are ideal means to rule out short circuits in the W7-X coils.

  10. Effect of power parameter and induction coil on magnetic field in cold crucible during continuous melting and directional solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ruirun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bottomless electromagnetic cold crucible is a new apparatus for continuous melting and directional solidification; however, improving its power efficiency and optimizing the configuration are important for experiment and production. In this study, a 3-D finite element (FE method based on experimental verification was applied to calculate the magnetic flux density (Bz. The effects of the power parameters and the induction coil on the magnetic field distribution in the cold crucible were investigated. The results show that higher current intensity and lower frequency are beneficial to the increase of Bz at both the segment midpoint and the slit location. The induction coil with racetrack section can induce greater Bz, and a larger gap between the induction coil and the shield ring increases Bz. The mechanism for this effect is also discussed.

  11. Investigation of electrical characteristics of no-insulation coil wound with surface-processed HTS tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Haeryong; Lee, Woo Seung; Kim, Jinsub; Baek, Geonwoo; Jeon, Sangsu; Yoon, Yong Soo; Ko, Tae Kuk

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the electrical characteristics of no-insulation coil wound with surface-processed HTS tape. The bypassing current path through turn-to-turn contacts within a coil is formed in the no-insulation coil, and this bypassing current path determines two characteristics: 1) self-protection and 2) charge-discharge delay. The amplitude of bypassing current is determined by contact resistance between the turn-to-turn contacts of the no-insulation coil. The surface roughness of the HTS tape is one of the parameters to change the contact resistance. The HTS tapes were processed to roughen by bead blast and abrasive paper, and the no-insulation coil is fabricated using processed HTS tape. We have studied the charge-discharge delay and self-protecting characteristic of each no-insulation coil by 1) sudden discharge tests and 2) overcurrent tests. The FEM simulations of contact resistance of no-insulation coil were carried out. The contact surface resistance of a case processed by abrasive paper has almost three times larger than that of reference no-insulation coil, and a case processed by bead blast presents almost same contact surface resistance with reference no-insulation coil.

  12. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kraus, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sayukov, Igor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wurden, Caroline J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  13. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christoph M.

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  14. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  15. Shielding Electric Fields to Prevent Coalescence of Emulsions in Microfluidic Channels Using a 3D Metallic Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmei Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In microfluidics, electric fields are widely used to assist the generation and the manipulation of droplets or jets. However, uncontrolled electric field can disrupt the operation of an integrated microfluidic system, for instance, through undesired coalescence of droplets, undesired changes in the wettability of the channel wall or unexpected death of cells. Therefore, an approach to control the distribution of electric fields inside microfluidic channels is needed. Inspired by the electro-magnetic shielding effect in electrical and radiation systems, we demonstrate the shielding of electric fields by incorporating 3D metallic coils in microfluidic devices. Using the degree of coalescence of emulsion drops as an indicator, we have shown that electric fields decrease dramatically in micro-channels surrounded by these conductive metallic coils both experimentally and numerically. Our work illustrates an approach to distribute electric fields in integrated microfluidic networks by selectively installing metallic coils or electrodes, and represents a significant step towards large-scale electro-microfluidic systems.

  16. Correlations between Field Quality and Geometry of Components in the Collared Coils of the LHC Main Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [1], a proton-proton superconducting accelerator, will consist of about 8400 superconducting magnet units, all operating in superfluid helium at a temperature of 1.9 K. The design of the superconducting main dipole magnets for the LHC is guided by the requirement of an extremely high field quality in the magnet aperture which is mainly defined by the layout of the superconducting coil and the position of the conductors. In order to avoid conductor movements within the magnet cross-section, the superconducting coils are held in place by surrounding stainless steel collars. In this paper, we review the dependence of field harmonics in the LHC main dipoles on dimensions of the hardware components of the collared coils. An analysis of the dimensional measurements of these compo-nents which are used in the collared coils produced so far is given. Sensitivity tables which are worked out through a coupled magneto-static model give the variation of the multipoles on collars, copper we...

  17. Fabrication of Nb3Sn cables for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hideo; Ishibashi, Tatsuji; Sato, Go; Chida, Kenji; Suzuki, Rikio; Tanji, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils will be operated at 68 kA and 11.8 T. The cable is composed of 1,422 strands with a diameter of 0.82 mm. There were two options for initial procurement. For option 2, the twist pitches at lower stages are longer than in option 1. Trials were performed to assess the feasibility of these options. In the trials for option 1, the nominal outer diameter of sub-cables and reduction schedule of final cables were evaluated and finalized. In the trials for option 2, problems were encountered at the third stage cabling. These problems were resolved through increasing the die size in that stage and improving the tension balance of the second-stage cables to reduce friction between the die and the cable, and also through avoiding loose twisting at both edges of the third cables. Option 2 was finally selected in 2009 based on superconducting performance enhancement of the cable. After the qualification of the fabrication procedure using fabrication of a 760-m dummy cable and a 415-m superconducting cable, mass production of the cables started in March 2010. (author)

  18. Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, G.K.; Sherick, M.J.; Sparks, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil insulation materials. Insulation samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in a large I-hole. The insulation samples were irradiated within a lead shield to reduce exposure to gamma radiation to better approximate the desired ration of neutron to gamma exposure. Two different exposure levels were specified for the insulation samples. To accomplish this, the samples were encapsulated in two separate aluminum capsules; the capsules positioned at the ATR core mid-plane and at the top of the fueled region to take advantage of the axial cosine distribution of the neutron and gamma flux; and by varying the length of irradiation time of the two capsules. Disassembly of the irradiated capsules and testing of the insulation samples were performed at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cell Facilities. Testing of the samples included shear compression static, shear compression fatigue, flexure static, and electrical resistance measurements

  19. R and D Activities of Joint Manufacture for ITER Poloidal Field Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yao; Song Yuntao; Huang Xiongyi; Shen Guang; Wu Huan; Wang Lin; Hu Bing; Luo Zhiren

    2015-01-01

    Electrical joints are critical components of the PF coil in the tokamak, serving as an electric and coolant transfer between adjacent conductors. The technologies and tooling used for joint manufacture are great challenges in coil fabrication, including termination box and cover manufacturing, jacket removal of the conductor, petals drawing apart and reformation, nickel coating removal and tin plating on the cable, compaction of the cable into the termination, final machining of the termination, etc. This paper mainly focuses on the solution of technical issues, based on previous R and D activities of joint. Meanwhile, a detailed manufacture plan has been confirmed. The technologies and tooling also can be used as reference for the electrical joint manufacture for PF coils and other large-scale coils. (paper)

  20. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  1. ARCIMBOLDO on coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iracema; Sammito, Massimo; Millán, Claudia; Lebedev, Andrey; Soler, Nicolas; Usón, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    ARCIMBOLDO solves the phase problem by combining the location of small model fragments using Phaser with density modification and autotracing using SHELXE. Mainly helical structures constitute favourable cases, which can be solved using polyalanine helical fragments as search models. Nevertheless, the solution of coiled-coil structures is often complicated by their anisotropic diffraction and apparent translational noncrystallographic symmetry. Long, straight helices have internal translational symmetry and their alignment in preferential directions gives rise to systematic overlap of Patterson vectors. This situation has to be differentiated from the translational symmetry relating different monomers. ARCIMBOLDO_LITE has been run on single workstations on a test pool of 150 coiled-coil structures with 15-635 amino acids per asymmetric unit and with diffraction data resolutions of between 0.9 and 3.0 Å. The results have been used to identify and address specific issues when solving this class of structures using ARCIMBOLDO. Features from Phaser v.2.7 onwards are essential to correct anisotropy and produce translation solutions that will pass the packing filters. As the resolution becomes worse than 2.3 Å, the helix direction may be reversed in the placed fragments. Differentiation between true solutions and pseudo-solutions, in which helix fragments were correctly positioned but in a reverse orientation, was found to be problematic at resolutions worse than 2.3 Å. Therefore, after every new fragment-placement round, complete or sparse combinations of helices in alternative directions are generated and evaluated. The final solution is once again probed by helix reversal, refinement and extension. To conclude, density modification and SHELXE autotracing incorporating helical constraints is also exploited to extend the resolution limit in the case of coiled coils and to enhance the identification of correct solutions. This study resulted in a specialized mode

  2. Effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration of coil constants while using noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the calibration of coil constants using the Free Induction Decay (FID signal of noble gases, we analyse the effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration results. This method is based on the inverse relation between the π/2 pulse duration and its amplitude. We confirmed that obtaining a precise frequency is a prerequisite for ensuring the accuracy of research using the initial amplitude of the FID signal. In this paper, the spin dynamics of noble gases and its time-domain solution under the driving pulse have been discussed with regard to different detuning ranges. Experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical predictions, which indicate the correctness of our theoretical deduction. Therefore, the frequency of the pulse-driven magnetic field is an important factor to the calibration of coil constants, it should be determined with a high degree of accuracy.

  3. Solve: a non linear least-squares code and its application to the optimal placement of torsatron vertical field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspinall, J.

    1982-01-01

    A computational method was developed which alleviates the need for lengthy parametric scans as part of a design process. The method makes use of a least squares algorithm to find the optimal value of a parameter vector. Optimal is defined in terms of a utility function prescribed by the user. The placement of the vertical field coils of a torsatron is such a non linear problem

  4. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  6. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. RF Magnetic Field Uniformity of Rectangular Planar Coils for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-04

    KCLO3 material and matched at 50 ohm input impedance. One planar coil is a one turn 32mm x 135mm rectangular coil, and the other is a rectangular...frequency of potassium chlorate (KCLO3), and matched to a 50 ohm input impedance using L-network circuit of capacitors. Fig.1 shows a diagram of the...voltage variable capacitor from Jennings Tech San Jose, CA USA shown in Fig.2. The NRC and RCOS both have an added series resistance of 2.2 ohms and

  8. Numerical simulations to model laser-driven coil-capacitor targets for generation of kilo-Tesla magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, F.; De Marco, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Korn, G.; Margarone, D.

    2018-02-01

    A coil-capacitor target is modeled using FEM simulations and analytical calculations, which allow to explain the time evolution of such complex target during magnetic field production driven by the flow of an extremely high current generated through the interaction with a high power laser. The numerical model includes a detailed study of the magnetic field produced by the coil-capacitor target, both in the static and transient cases, as well as magnetic force and Joule heating. The model is validated by experimental data reported in literature and can be of interest for several applications. As an example, the combination of two synchronized nanosecond lasers with the purpose of producing a plasma responsible of the proton-boron (p+ + 11B → 8.5 MeV + 3α) fusion reaction, and energizing two multi-turn coils with the main purpose of confining such a plasma could enhance the reaction rate. The preliminary conceptual design of a magnetic mirror configuration to be used for confining protons and boron ions up to a few MeV/u in a region of less than 1 mm2 is briefly reported.

  9. Numerical simulations to model laser-driven coil-capacitor targets for generation of kilo-Tesla magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schillaci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A coil-capacitor target is modeled using FEM simulations and analytical calculations, which allow to explain the time evolution of such complex target during magnetic field production driven by the flow of an extremely high current generated through the interaction with a high power laser. The numerical model includes a detailed study of the magnetic field produced by the coil-capacitor target, both in the static and transient cases, as well as magnetic force and Joule heating. The model is validated by experimental data reported in literature and can be of interest for several applications. As an example, the combination of two synchronized nanosecond lasers with the purpose of producing a plasma responsible of the proton-boron (p+ + 11B → 8.5 MeV + 3α fusion reaction, and energizing two multi-turn coils with the main purpose of confining such a plasma could enhance the reaction rate. The preliminary conceptual design of a magnetic mirror configuration to be used for confining protons and boron ions up to a few MeV/u in a region of less than 1 mm2 is briefly reported.

  10. Football coil: a device to produce absolute minimum magnetic field and an isochronous cyclotron for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szu, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    An electric solenoid is considered which consists of several discrete, circular and superconducting wires. The size of each loop varies from one to several meters in the radius. Furthermore, if such a solenoid is made into a football shape by squeezing the ends symmetrically, it is referred to here as a football coil. A discussion is given of the theory of synergic focusing; phase stability and universal orbit; application and computer simulation; and ion self-fields and self-focusing. An isochronous cyclotron was designed using the superconducted football coil and van resonators with flare height. It can accelerate various species of heavy ions; the heavier the rest mass of an ion, the better the present scheme will be

  11. ROXIE: Routine for the optimization of magnet X-sections, inverse field calculation and coil end design. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russenschuck, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV which requires high field superconducting magnets to guide the counter-rotating beams in the existing LEP tunnel with a circumference of about 27 km. The LHC magnet system consists of 1232 superconducting dipoles and 386 main quadrupoles together with about 20 different types of magnets for insertions and correction. The design and optimization of these magnets is dominated by the requirement of a extremely uniform field which is mainly defined by the layout of the superconducting coils. The program package ROXIE (Routine for the Optimization of magnet X-sections, Inverse field calculation and coil End design) has been developed for the design and optimization of the coil geometries in two and three dimensions. Recently it has been extended in a collaboration with the University of Graz, Austria, to the calculation of saturation induced effects using a reduced vector-potential FEM formulation. With the University of Stuttgart, Germany, a collaboration exists fro the application of the BEM-FEM coupling method for the 2D and 3D field calculation. ROXIE now also features a TCL-TK user interface. The growing number of ROXIE users inside and outside CERN gave rise to the idea of organizing the 'First International ROXIE Users Meeting and Workshop' at CERN, March 16-18, 1998 which brought together about 50 researchers in the field. This report contains the contributions to the workshop and describes the features of the program, the mathematical optimization techniques applied and gives examples of the recent design work carried out. It also gives the theoretical background for the field computation methods and serves as a handbook for the installation and application of the program. (orig.)

  12. ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC). Test and analysis summary report (testing handbook) chapter 3 TOSKA FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbricht, A.

    2001-05-01

    In the frame of a contract between the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Director and the European Home Team Director was concluded the extension of the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe as test bed for the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), one of the 7 large research and development projects of the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activity). The report describes the work and development, which were performed together with industry to extend the existing components and add new components. In this frame a new 2 kW refrigerator was added to the TOSKA facility including the cold lines to the Helium dewar in the TOSKA experimental area. The measuring and control system as well as data acquisition was renewed according to the state-of-the-art. Two power supplies (30 kA, 50 kA) were switched in parallel across an Al bus bar system and combined with an 80 kA dump circuit. For the test of the TFMC in the background field of the EURATOM LCT coil a new 20 kA power supply was taken into operation with the existing 20 kA discharge circuit. Two forced flow cooled 80 kA current leads for the TFMC were developed. The total lifting capacity for loads in the TOSKA building was increased by an ordered new 80 t crane with a suitable cross head (125 t lifting capacity +5 t net mass) to 130 t for assembling and installation of the test arrangement. Numerous pre-tests and development and adaptation work was required to make the components suitable for application. The 1.8 K test of the EURATOM LCT coil and the test of the W 7-X prototype coil count to these tests as overall pre-tests. (orig.)

  13. Design, construction and test of a corrector coil set for magnetic field homogenization of a dipolar magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method to improve the homogeneity of the distribution of the magnetic flux density in the gap of a dipole magnet. It is based on correcting the magnetic field by means of a system of coils, which employs etching thin copper foils, similarly as those for electronic circuits, is presented. The advantage of this method lies on its simplicity, its small space use, and its low price. The method was applied to correct the field of a dipole magnet, and it worked properly. (author) [pt

  14. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  15. Increasing the magnetic-field capability of the magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system using an inductively coupled coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Zabir, E.; Betti, R.

    2018-03-01

    Magnetized high energy density physics (HEDP) is a very active and relatively unexplored field that has applications in inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasma science, and basic plasma physics. A self-contained device, the Magneto-Inertial Fusion Electrical Discharge System, MIFEDS [G. Fiksel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 016105 (2015)], was developed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics to conduct magnetized HEDP experiments on both the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495-506 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [J. H. Kelly et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 75 (2006) and L. J. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)] laser systems. Extremely high magnetic fields are a necessity for magnetized HEDP, and the need for stronger magnetic fields continues to drive the redevelopment of the MIFEDS device. It is proposed in this paper that a magnetic coil that is inductively coupled rather than directly connecting to the MIFEDS device can increase the overall strength of the magnetic field for HEDP experiments by increasing the efficiency of energy transfer while decreasing the effective magnetized volume. A brief explanation of the energy delivery of the MIFEDS device illustrates the benefit of inductive coupling and is compared to that of direct connection for varying coil size and geometry. A prototype was then constructed to demonstrate a 7-fold increase in energy delivery using inductive coupling.

  16. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  17. Study of single pulsed-field magnetization of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk high-temperature superconductor with a split type of armature coil for rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, E; Matsuzaki, H; Kimura, Y; Ohtani, I; Ogata, H; Izumi, M; Nonaka, Y; Murakami, M; Ida, T; Sugimoto, H; Miki, M; Kitano, M

    2006-01-01

    We employed a Gd-bulk HTS as rotating field magnet poles aiming for a smaller and lighter axial-gap-type motor. The bulk was inserted in the split-type armature pulsed copper coils and cooled down to 77 K under zero field. Employing the bulk magnet to HTS rotating machinery, the number of pulsed field magnetizations should be reduced for practical use. Thereby, a single pulsed current was applied to the pulsed copper coils to magnetize the bulk. The trapped field distribution and transient flux behaviour strongly depend on the radial dimension of the armature coil with a vortex-type winding. On decreasing the diameter of the pulsed copper armature coil, the distribution of the trapped flux density on the surface of the bulk becomes close to a conical shape. In contrast to the use of a solenoid, the application of vortex-type armature coils to magnetization of Gd-bulk HTS shows a quick intervention of the external magnetic flux into the centre of the bulk. The magnetization to the bulk HTS of the vortex-type copper coils with an optimum radius is useful and may be an effective technique for applied bulk HTS for rotating machines such as motors and/or generators

  18. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koska, W.; Sims, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ring the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed

  19. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koska, W.; Sims, R.E.

    1992-04-01

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ''ring'' the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed

  20. Design Aspects on Winding of an MgB2 Superconducting Generator Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, N.; Eliassen, J.C.; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2015-01-01

    by the thickness of the turn-to-turn electrical insulation. Here we discuss the impact of the insulation and suggest the use of a one-step winding process, employing wet-winding, where the applied epoxy also constitutes the insulation layer between turns. In this way the coil is densified by approximately 10......% compared to the use of an additional, dedicated, electrical insulation like Kapton for wet-winding or glass-fibre for dry-winding followed by vacuum impregnation. We show the results of a trial winding of 500 m of MgB2 superconducting wire into a double pancake coil using the wet-winding technique...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in ophthalmic diagnosis. Results of examinations using a small field-of-view surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yuji; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Kanno, Harumi; Ogasawara, Hironobu; Murakami, Noboru [Asahikawa Medical College, Hokkaido (Japan); Cheng, Hong-Ming

    1997-01-01

    We obtained T{sub 1}-and T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images in 3 patients with vitreoretinal disorders using a recently developed surface coil that was inductively coupled and had a small field of view. On both T{sub 1}-and T{sub 2}-weighted images, tractional retinal detachment was clearly detected in the first patient, who had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted images of the second patient, who had total retinal detachment with proliferative vitreous retinopathy, revealed a funnel-shaped thickened retina. The third patient had postoperative rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with opacity due to postoperative cataract and intravitreous injection of gas; on this patient`s MR images we could clearly differentiate the reattached retina, silicone used for scleral buckling, and intravitreous gas, even though these differentiations were not possible with ophthalmoscopy or B-scan ultrasonography. High resolution MR imaging with our technique can be performed in a short time and regardless of the eye`s condition. Our findings strongly indicate that MRI with a small field-of-view surface coil is a useful tool for diagnosing various vitreoretinal disorders and observing pathological changes. (author)

  2. Design of Correction Coil for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hiroatsu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Omine, Takeshi

    1998-11-01

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project is under way among EU, Japan, Russia and US. In order to shut plasma, the magnetic field is applied by the superconducting coils in ITER. The coils which are called 'Poloidal field (PF-coil)' are installed to control the location and the cross-section shape for plasma in the vacuum vessel. Incorrect position of Magnetic field (Magnetic error) is occurred by the manufacture tolerance for PF-coil. The coils which are called 'Correction-Coil' are installed in order to correct these magnetic error around the PF-coil. The Correction Coils are consist of the 3-sets of the superconducting coil. The stress analysis for the correction coils is performed and the supporting structure of the coils are designed. The bolts for clamps and the position for clamps are examined from this analysis. (J.P.N.)

  3. Creep Effects in the Toroidal Field Coils of Fire and Other Burning Plasma Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, Peter H.; Salvetti, Matteo

    2003-01-01

    All three burning plasma experiments discussed at Snowmass during the summer of 2002, use preloaded structures to resist some component of the operating loads. For the resistive pulsed reactors, it is the preloads which introduce the most noticeable creep responses because these loads are applied for much longer than the operating loads. If the preloads are maintained during shut-down and maintenance periods, then the structure experiences the preload stresses at room temperature. OFHC copper has significant creep behavior, predominantly at high stress and high temp, but copper experiences finite creep even at cryogenic temperatures. The Beryllium copper used in the FIRE inner leg has better creep properties than OFHC copper.The purpose of these analyses is to characterize the influence of creep on the magnets of the Fusion Ignition Research Reactor (FIRE) and compare it with the creep response of the other proposed burning plasma experiments. The concern is that the desirable features provided by coil preloads will be lost over the lives of the experiments. Structural finite element models of FIRE and IGNITOR are used with creep equations derived from NIST[6] data to explore the structural sensitivity of the machines to creep. For both FIRE and IGNITOR, copper coil material, creep has been found to have a minimal effect on magnet performance. IGNITOR's generally lower stresses (with respect to FIRE's BeCu TF stresses) and the use of active as well as passive preload systems helps reduce creep to acceptable levels. FIRE's structure is more sensitive to creep due to the free standing wedged TF coil, but the BeCu used in FIRE's inner TF legs has a much lower creep behavior than ETP or OFHC copper. This reduces creep to acceptable levels. For FIRE, however, there is some creep in the horizontal legs which relaxes some of the support of the inner leg. Recommendations are presented to support the OFHC copper horizontal legs more effectively. More work is needed to

  4. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Paolo; Cucchiaro, A.; Brolatti, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Ginoulhiac, G.; Polli, G.; Gabriele, M.; Di Muzio, F.; Philips, G.; Tomarchio, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  5. Temporally resolved proton radiography of rapidly varying electric and magnetic fields in laser-driven capacitor coil targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, A.; Santos, J. J.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Ehret, M.; Alpinaniz, J.; Brabetz, C.; Schaumann, G.; Volpe, L.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields in intense short pulse laser plasma interactions is of key importance to understand the mechanisms at the basis of a wide variety of physical processes, from high energy density physics and fusion science to the development of ultrafast laser plasma devices to control laser-generated particle beams. Target normal sheath accelerated (TNSA) proton radiography represents an ideal tool to diagnose ultrafast electromagnetic phenomena, providing 2D spatially and temporally resolved radiographs with temporal resolution varying from 2-3 ps to few tens of ps. In this work we introduce the proton radiography technique and its application to diagnose the spatial and temporal evolution of electromagnetic fields in laser-driven capacitor coil targets.

  6. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  7. Toroidal field coil design concept and structural support system for CTHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianese, R. B.; Kelly, J. L.; Ruck, G. W.

    1980-09-01

    The CTHR conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined (tokamak) fusion reactor fitted with a fertile uranium blanket. The fusion driver concept was based on an ignited plasma. All concepts and parameters were selected on the basis that technical feasibility would be achieved by 1995 to assure a viable commercial operation in the early to mid-21st century. The reactor was designed to achieve good fissile fuel production, with electricity production being a second order priority. However, the resulting concepts that evolved were all excellent power producers which significantly improved the economic performance. The subsystems discussed in the following paragraphs provide a background of the application for the TF coil design described in this report.

  8. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: 'Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented

  9. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  10. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  11. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. The structural system developed is an arrangement in which the CIT device is installed in the jaws of the press. Large built-up beams above and below the CIT span the machine and deliver the vertical force to the center cylinder formed by the inboard legs of the TF coils. During the conceptual design study, the vertical force requirement has ranged between 25,000 and 52,000 t. The access requirement on top and bottom limits the width of the spanning beams. Nonmagnetic steel materials are also required because of operation in the high magnetic fields. In the hydraulic system design for the press, several options are being explored. These range from small-diameter jacks operating at very high pressure [228 MPa (33 ksi)] to large-diameter jacks operating at pressures up to 69 MPa (10 ksi). Configurations with various locations for the hydraulic cylinders have also been explored. The nuclear environment and maintenance requirements are factors that affect cylinder location. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  12. MR-based measurements and simulations of the magnetic field created by a realistic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil and stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, Stefano; Petrov, Petar I; Neggers, Sebastian F W; Luijten, Peter R; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an emerging technique that allows non-invasive neurostimulation. However, the correct validation of electromagnetic models of typical TMS coils and the correct assessment of the incident TMS field (B TMS ) produced by standard TMS stimulators are still lacking. Such a validation can be performed by mapping B TMS produced by a realistic TMS setup. In this study, we show that MRI can provide precise quantification of the magnetic field produced by a realistic TMS coil and a clinically used TMS stimulator in the region in which neurostimulation occurs. Measurements of the phase accumulation created by TMS pulses applied during a tailored MR sequence were performed in a phantom. Dedicated hardware was developed to synchronize a typical, clinically used, TMS setup with a 3-T MR scanner. For comparison purposes, electromagnetic simulations of B TMS were performed. MR-based measurements allow the mapping and quantification of B TMS starting 2.5 cm from the TMS coil. For closer regions, the intra-voxel dephasing induced by B TMS prohibits TMS field measurements. For 1% TMS output, the maximum measured value was ~0.1 mT. Simulations reflect quantitatively the experimental data. These measurements can be used to validate electromagnetic models of TMS coils, to guide TMS coil positioning, and for dosimetry and quality assessment of concurrent TMS-MRI studies without the need for crude methods, such as motor threshold, for stimulation dose determination. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI--a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. RESULTS: Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38--0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis......OBJECTIVES: To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. METHODS: Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2(nd)--5(th) metacarpophalangeal...... joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T...

  14. Screening current induced magnetic field in REBCO superconducting coil wound by using split wire having intermittent inner split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tetsuro; Jin, Xinzhe; Okamura, Tetsuji

    2017-09-01

    REBCO-coated conductor having a high critical current is promising for applications in next generation apparatuses such as ultra-high field NMR, high-resolution MRI, and high-precision accelerator. However, it has an important challenge for application in NMR and MRI, due to the single core in REBCO superconducting layer. The single core induces a large screening current-induced magnetic field (screening current field), and it influences the controlling of center field in NMR/MRI magnet. To reduce the screening current field, we have recently developed a split wire having multi-core structure by inner split method (electrical separation by bending stress, ESBS). In experiment, short samples with linear inner split by a large bending stress of 80 N were prepared and tested. However, to fabricate a long length wire with good quality, it is better to use a smaller bending stress. In this study, a low-bending-stress inner split method is used to fabricate superconducting tapes with longitudinal split in their superconducting layer. The fabrication and experimental assessments for the wire and coil are carried out.

  15. The use of mirror image symmetry in coil winding, applications and advantages in magnetic field generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, T.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, an improved method of winding inductors, transformers and motors is discovered. This invention greatly enhances the ability to generate magnetic fields with a given amount of wire. This invention may be as fundamental to the use of magnetic fields as was Nikola Tesla's use of rotating magnetic fields for the generation of alternating current

  16. The discrepancy between human peripheral nerve chronaxie times as measured using magnetic and electric field stimuli: the relevance to MRI gradient coil safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoskie, Bryan J; Chronik, Blaine A; Scholl, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) resulting from electric fields induced from the rapidly changing magnetic fields of gradient coils is a concern in MRI. Nerves exposed to either electric fields or changing magnetic fields would be expected to display consistent threshold characteristics, motivating the direct application of electric field exposure criteria from the literature to guide the development of gradient magnetic field exposure criteria for MRI. The consistency of electric and magnetic field exposures was tested by comparing chronaxie times for electric and magnetic PNS curves for 22 healthy human subjects. Electric and magnetic stimulation thresholds were measured for exposure of the forearm using both surface electrodes and a figure-eight magnetic coil, respectively. The average chronaxie times for the electric and magnetic field conditions were 109 ± 11 μs and 651 ± 53 μs (±SE), respectively. We do not propose that these results call into question the basic mechanism, namely that rapidly switched gradient magnetic fields induce electric fields in human tissues, resulting in PNS. However, this result does motivate us to suggest that special care must be taken when using electric field exposure data from the literature to set gradient coil PNS safety standards in MRI.

  17. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris [The Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oestergaard, Mikkel [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boeyesen, Pernille [Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); Moeller, Jakob M. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Therkildsen, Flemming [Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen (Denmark); Madsen, Ole Rintek [Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2{sup nd}-5{sup th} metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  18. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  19. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  20. Rope coiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitichoke Amnuanpol

    2017-10-19

    Oct 19, 2017 ... In rope coiling the centre of the circle is static. How- ever, it evolves in time as seen in the curling of .... friction force between the rope and the plane, because no significant changes in the coiling radius R and ... friction force relative to the axial compressive forces,. i.e. gravitational force and inertial force, ...

  1. Rope coiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present the results of the combined experimental and theoretical investigation of rope coiling arising from the buckling instability. The shape of the rope is perfectly circular in the coiling region and is straight in the region below the feeding point. In between these two distant regions, the rope assumes a catenary-like ...

  2. Calculation of electromagnetic fields and forces in coil systems of arbitrary geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program, EFFI, is described which calculates the electric and magnetic fields due to an arbitrary spatial distribution of current-carrying circular loops, circular arcs, and straight lines. The electric field is assumed to arise solely from the time variation of the magnetic field, and the magnetic field due to the changing electric field is assumed to be negligible. In addition, the conductor bundle elements (loops, arcs, lines) are assumed to be absent. Electric and magnetic flux lines and magnetic forces and inductances are also calculated by the program. The algorithm used in the code, which is based on a combination of direct and numerical integration using the Biot-Savart law, is discussed. The methods used to maintain accuracy in calculating fields within the conductor bundle, in particular, are detailed. Several examples are then presented to illustrate the input and output features as well as the accuracy obtained and the running time required

  3. α/β coiled coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Marcus D; Mendler, Claudia T; Bassler, Jens; Karamichali, Ioanna; Ridderbusch, Oswin; Lupas, Andrei N; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Coiled coils are the best-understood protein fold, as their backbone structure can uniquely be described by parametric equations. This level of understanding has allowed their manipulation in unprecedented detail. They do not seem a likely source of surprises, yet we describe here the unexpected formation of a new type of fiber by the simple insertion of two or six residues into the underlying heptad repeat of a parallel, trimeric coiled coil. These insertions strain the supercoil to the breaking point, causing the local formation of short β-strands, which move the path of the chain by 120° around the trimer axis. The result is an α/β coiled coil, which retains only one backbone hydrogen bond per repeat unit from the parent coiled coil. Our results show that a substantially novel backbone structure is possible within the allowed regions of the Ramachandran space with only minor mutations to a known fold. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11861.001 PMID:26771248

  4. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  5. Adiabatic sweep pulses for earth's field NMR with a surface coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradi, Mark S.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Sowko, Nicholas J.; Conradi, Susan H.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2018-03-01

    Adiabatic NMR sweep pulses are described for inversion and excitation in very low magnetic fields B0 and with broad distribution of excitation field amplitude B1. Two aspects distinguish the low field case: (1) when B1 is comparable to or greater than B0, the rotating field approximation fails and (2) inversion sweeps cannot extend to values well below the Larmor frequency because they would approach or pass through zero frequency. Three approaches to inversion are described. The first is a conventional tangent frequency sweep down to the Larmor frequency, a 180° phase shift, and a sweep back up to the starting frequency. The other two are combined frequency and amplitude sweeps covering a narrower frequency range; one is a symmetric sweep from above to below the Larmor frequency and the other uses a smooth decrease of B1 immediately before and after the 180° phase shift. These two AM/FM sweeps show excellent inversion efficiencies over a wide range of B1, a factor of 30 or more. We also demonstrate an excitation sweep that works well in the presence of the same wide range of B1. We show that the primary effect of the counter-rotating field (i.e., at low B0) is that the magnetization suffers large, periodic deviations from where it would be at large B0. Thus, successful sweep pulses must avoid any sharp features in the amplitude, phase, or frequency.

  6. Efficient Arrangement of Field Coils for Rotational Induction Heating of Nonmagnetic Cylindrical Billets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Donátová, M.; Karban, P.; Doležel, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2010), s. 83-85 ISSN 0033-2097 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) MEB050807 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : induction heating * integrodifferential model * electromagnetic field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.242, year: 2010 http://pe.org.pl/

  7. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's…

  8. Design and field testing of solar-assisted earth coils. Final report, August 1, 1978-January 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, J E

    1981-01-01

    Two types of earth coils were designed, constructed, and are operational on the Oklahoma State University campus. A nominal 1000-foot, 4-inch, PVC coil buried in a serpentine pattern is the heat source/sink for two commercial heat pump systems. This system is vented which allows the easy placement of thermocouples down its length to measure changes in temperature as well as changes in overall U values as a function of length. Integral to the earth coil is a 1000-gallon uninsulated water storage tank in which solar energy from 210 ft/sup 2/ of solar collectors (single-glazed, metal absorber) can be added directly to the heat pump, circulated through the 1000-foot earth coil system, or added to an insulated storage tank for direct transfer. Temperature ranges for this type of system at the four-foot level are from a nominal range of 78/sup 0/F in mid-September to a low of 42/sup 0/F in mid-February in the absence of heat rejection or absorption. The second type of earth coil under study was a vertical coil approximately 240 feet in length. Placement of the coil is with a conventional water well drilling machine. The vertical heat exchanger consists of a 5-inch PVC pipe which is capped at both ends and pressurized at approximately 15 PSIG. This sealed and pressurized heat exchanger allows a low power pump to circulate water through both the heat pump and vertical heat exchanger system.

  9. Recent advances in lateral field excited and monolithic spiral coil acoustic transduction bulk acoustic wave sensor platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Donald F; French, Lester A Jr; Wark, Mitchell S; Vetelino, John F

    2009-01-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has been used extensively as a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) platform for applications such as chemical and biological sensors and rate monitors in thin film deposition systems. Although the QCM is capable of measuring mechanical property changes critical in many thin film deposition systems, it cannot measure electrical property changes that can occur in many sensor applications. In this paper we review the recent developments of two novel transducer configurations for BAW sensors. In the first sensor, called the lateral field excited (LFE) sensor, the transverse shear mode (TSM) in AT-cut quartz is excited by two electrodes on the reference surface, resulting in a bare sensing surface which allows both electrical and mechanical properties of target analytes to be measured. In the second sensor, called the monolithic spiral coil acoustic transduction (MSCAT) sensor, the TSM is excited by a photolithographically deposited spiral antenna on the reference surface which can excite high-order harmonics in the substrate, and potentially lead to increased sensitivity. The responses of both the LFE and MSCAT sensors to electrical and mechanical property changes of liquids have been examined and compared to the response of the standard QCM. In addition, results relating to the detection of chemical and biological target analytes using the LFE and MSCAT sensor platforms are presented

  10. FRC formation studies in a field reversed theta pinch with a variable length coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqueda, R.; Sobehart, J.; Rodrigo, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    The formation phase of field reversed configurations (FRC) produced using a theta pinch has received considerable attention lately in connection with the possibility of developing formation methods in time scales longer than the Alven radial time, which would permit the use of low-voltage technology and represent an important engineering simplification in the trend towards larger scale machines sup (1)). The mechanisms leading to the loss of trapped reversed flux during the preheating 2 ) and formation sup (3,4)) stages, looking for maximization of this quantity in order to improve on the stability and transport properties of the configuration in its final equilibrium state are investigated. As a result, semi-emperical scaling laws have been obtained relating the reversed flux loss with experimental operating parameters during the early stages of the formation process 1 ). (author) [pt

  11. Statistical analysis of the Nb3Sn strand production for the ITER toroidal field coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostner, A.; Jewell, M.; Pong, I.; Sullivan, N.; Devred, A.; Bessette, D.; Bevillard, G.; Mitchell, N.; Romano, G.; Zhou, C.

    2017-04-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) strand procurement initiated the largest Nb3Sn superconducting strand production hitherto. The industrial-scale production started in Japan in 2008 and finished in summer 2015. Six ITER partners (so-called Domestic Agencies, or DAs) are in charge of the procurement and involved eight different strand suppliers all over the world, of which four are using the bronze route (BR) process and four the internal-tin (IT) process. In total more than 500 tons have been produced including excess material covering losses during the conductor manufacturing process, in particular the cabling. The procurement is based on a functional specification where the main strand requirements like critical current, hysteresis losses, Cu ratio and residual resistance ratio are specified but not the strand production process or layout. This paper presents the analysis on the data acquired during the quality control (QC) process that was carried out to ensure the same conductor performance requirements are met by the different strand suppliers regardless of strand design. The strand QC is based on 100% billet testing and on applying statistical process control (SPC) limits. Throughout the production, samples adjacent to the strand pieces tested by the suppliers are cross-checked (‘verified’) by their respective DAs reference labs. The level of verification was lowered from 100% at the beginning of the procurement progressively to approximately 25% during the final phase of production. Based on the complete dataset of the TF strand production, an analysis of the SPC limits of the critical strand parameters is made and the related process capability indices are calculated. In view of the large-scale production and costs, key manufacturing parameters such as billet yield, number of breakages and piece-length distribution are also discussed. The results are compared among all the strand suppliers, focusing on the difference between BR and IT processes. Following

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of a magnetically driven Duffing-type spring–magnet oscillator in the static magnetic field of a coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L

    2012-01-01

    We study the nonlinear oscillations of a forced and weakly dissipative spring–magnet system moving in the magnetic fields of two fixed coaxial, hollow induction coils. As the first coil is excited with a dc current, both a linear and a cubic magnet-position dependent force appear on the magnet–spring system. The second coil, located below the first, excited with an ac current, provides the oscillating magnetic driving force on the system. From the magnet–coil interactions, we obtain, analytically, the nonlinear motion equation of the system, found to be a forced and damped cubic Duffing oscillator moving in a quartic potential. The relative strengths of the coefficients of the motion equation can be easily set by varying the coils’ dc and ac currents. We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, the nonlinear behaviour of this oscillator, including its oscillation modes and nonlinear resonances, the fold-over effect, the hysteresis and amplitude jumps, and its chaotic behaviour. It is an oscillating system suitable for teaching an advanced experiment in nonlinear dynamics both at senior undergraduate and graduate levels. (paper)

  13. Ejector COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Valeriy D.; Svistun, Michael I.; Zagidullin, Marsel V.

    2004-06-01

    The historical ejector-like chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) contribution at the Lebedev Physical Institute, Samara Branch is briefly presented. Two possible schemes of such COIL which provide the high exhaust pressure are considered. The high-pressure hot driver nitrogen is carrier of iodine vapor in the first scheme. In the second version the additional nozzles with the low-pressure secondary nitrogen are employed for injection iodine vapor but the pure high-pressure driver nitrogen has the room temperature. The last COIL version was investigated in Lebedev Physical Institute in more detail and results of these investigations are presented. This ejector nozzle bank generates gain medium with high Mach number, low temperature and high gain. A high chemical efficiency up to 25% and the potential pressure recovery up to 90 torr have been achieved simultaneously.

  14. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  15. Magnetic field shimming of a permanent magnet using a combination of pieces of permanent magnets and a single-channel shim coil for skeletal age assessment of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y; Kono, S; Ishizawa, K; Inamura, S; Uchiumi, T; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2013-05-01

    We adopted a combination of pieces of permanent magnets and a single-channel (SC) shim coil to shim the magnetic field in a magnetic resonance imaging system dedicated for skeletal age assessment of children. The target magnet was a 0.3-T open and compact permanent magnet tailored to the hand imaging of young children. The homogeneity of the magnetic field was first improved by shimming using pieces of permanent magnets. The residual local inhomogeneity was then compensated for by shimming using the SC shim coil. The effectiveness of the shimming was measured by imaging the left hands of human subjects and evaluating the image quality. The magnetic resonance images for the child subject clearly visualized anatomical structures of all bones necessary for skeletal age assessment, demonstrating the usefulness of combined shimming. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analytical study of cover plate welding deformation of the radial plate of the ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Junji; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuru

    2009-09-01

    The winding pack (WP) of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil of ITER consists of 7 double-pancakes (DPs). In the DP, the conductor is embedded in a groove of a radial plate (RP), and cover plates (CP) are welded to the RP teeth to fix the conductors in the RP groove. The dimensions of the DP are 15 m in height and 9 m in width while the tolerances of the DP are very severe, such as a flatness of 2 mm and an in-plane deviation of a few millimeters. It is therefore required to reduce the deformation of the DP by CP welding. In order to estimate welding deformation, the authors apply an analytical method in which the CP welding deformation of the DP can be calculated using inherent strain evaluated from welding deformation measured using a RP mock-up. Calculated results indicate that out-of-plane distortion can be kept to within required tolerances, but in-plane deformation is larger than allowed when welding thickness is 2.5 mm. The in-plane deformation is mainly caused by the bending of the curved RP region. Therefore, reducing the welding thickness at the curved region emerges as the most promising solution of this issue. Calculated results assuming a welding thickness of 1 mm at the curved region show that the in-plane deformation conforms to required tolerances. Furthermore, since the maximum out-of-plane deformation is within tolerances but marginal, an alternative design in which the number of welding lines is half that of the reference design, is proposed not only to improve the out-of-plane distortion but also to simplify the manufacture of the DP. It is found that the alternative design is effective in reducing welding distortion. (author)

  17. High-Field Quench Behavior and Protection of $Bi_2 Sr_2 Ca Cu_2 O_x$ Coils: Minimum and Maximum Quench Detection Voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Tengming [Fermilab; Ye, Liyang [NCSU, Raleigh; Turrioni, Daniele [Fermilab; Li, Pei [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    Small insert coils have been built using a multifilamentary Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire, and characterized in background fields to explore the quench behaviors and limits of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox superconducting magnets, with an emphasis on assessing the impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection. Using heaters of various lengths to initiate a small normal zone, a coil was quenched safely more than 70 times without degradation, with the maximum coil temperature reaching 280 K. Coils withstood a resistive voltage of tens of mV for seconds without quenching, showing the high stability of these coils and suggesting that the quench detection voltage shall be greater than 50 mV to not to falsely trigger protection. The hot spot temperature for the resistive voltage of the normal zone to reach 100 mV increases from ~40 K to ~80 K with increasing the operating wire current density Jo from 89 A/mm2 to 354 A/mm2 whereas for the voltage to reach 1 V, it increases from ~60 K to ~140 K, showing the increasing negative impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection with increasing Jo and the need to limit the quench detection voltage to < 1 V. These measurements, coupled with an analytical quench model, were used to access the impact of the maximum allowable voltage and temperature upon quench detection on the quench protection, assuming to limit the hot spot temperature to <300 K.

  18. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  19. Simple coil-powering techniques for generating 10KA/m alternating magnetic field at multiple frequencies using 0.5KW RF power for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Sun, Tengfei; Ranjan, Ashish

    2017-02-01

    Alternating magnetic field (AMF) configurable at a range of frequencies is a critical need for optimization of magnetic nanoparticle based hyperthermia, and for their application in targeted drug delivery. Currently, most commercial AMF devices including induction heaters operate at one factory-fixed frequency, thereby limiting customized frequency configuration required for triggered drug release at mild hyperthermia (40-42°C) and ablations (>55°C). Most AMF devices run as an inductor-capacitor resonance network that could allow AMF frequencies to be changed by changing the capacitor bank or the coil looped with it. When developing AMF inhouse, the most expensive component is usually the RF power amplifier, and arguably the most critical step of building a strong AMF field is impedance-matched coupling of RF power to the coolant-cooled AMF coil. AMF devices running at 10KA/m strength are quite common, but generating AMF at that level of field strength using RF power less than 1KW has remained challenging. We practiced a few techniques for building 10KA/m AMFs at different frequencies, by utilizing a 0.5KW 80-800KHz RF power amplifier. Among the techniques indispensable to the functioning of these AMFs, a simple cost-effective technique was the tapping methods for discretely or continuously adjusting the position of an RF-input-tap on a single-layer or the outer-layer of a multi-layer AMF coil for maximum power coupling into the AMF coil. These in-house techniques when combined facilitated 10KA/m AMF at frequencies of 88.8 KHz and higher as allowed by the inventory of capacitors using 0.5KW RF power, for testing heating of 10-15nm size magnetic particles and on-going evaluation of drug-release by low-level temperature-sensitive liposomes loaded with 15nm magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  1. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  2. Quantitative pixel-wise measurement of myocardial blood flow: the impact of surface coil-related field inhomogeneity and a comparison of methods for its correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher A; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Ta, Allison; Conn, Hannah; Winkler, Susanne; Arai, Andrew E

    2015-02-11

    Surface coil-related field inhomogeneity potentially confounds pixel-wise quantitative analysis of perfusion CMR images. This study assessed the effect of surface coil-related field inhomogeneity on the spatial variation of pixel-wise myocardial blood flow (MBF), and assessed its impact on the ability of MBF quantification to differentiate ischaemic from remote coronary territories. Two surface coil intensity correction (SCIC) techniques were evaluated: 1) a proton density-based technique (PD-SCIC) and; 2) a saturation recovery steady-state free precession-based technique (SSFP-SCIC). 26 subjects (18 with significant CAD and 8 healthy volunteers) underwent stress perfusion CMR using a motion-corrected, saturation recovery SSFP dual-sequence protocol. A proton density (PD)-weighted image was acquired at the beginning of the sequence. Surface coil-related field inhomogeneity was approximated using a third-order surface fit to the PD image or a pre-contrast saturation prepared SSFP image. The estimated intensity bias field was subsequently applied to the image series. Pixel-wise MBF was measured from mid-ventricular stress images using the two SCIC approaches and compared to measurements made without SCIC. MBF heterogeneity in healthy volunteers was higher using SSFP-SCIC (24.8 ± 4.1%) compared to PD-SCIC (20.8 ± 3.0%; p = 0.009), however heterogeneity was significantly lower using either SCIC technique compared to analysis performed without SCIC (36.2 ± 6.3%). In CAD patients, the difference in MBF between remote and ischaemic territories was minimal when analysis was performed without SCIC (0.06 ± 0.91 mL/min/kg), and was substantially lower than with either PD-SCIC (0.50 ± 0.63 mL/min/kg; p = 0.013) or with SSFP-SCIC (0.63 ± 0.89 mL/min/kg; p = 0.005). In 6 patients, MBF quantified without SCIC was artifactually higher in the stenosed coronary territory compared to the remote territory. PD-SCIC and SSFP-SCIC had similar differences in MBF between remote and

  3. High field Nb3Sn Axicell insert coils for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Two 12-tesla superconducting insert coils are being designed by General Dynamics Convair Division for the axicell regions of MFTF-B for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A major challenge of this project is to ensure that combined fabrication and operational strains induced in the conductor are within stringent limitations of the relatively brittle Nb 3 Sn superconductor filaments. These coils are located in the axicell region of MFTF-B. They have a clear-bore diameter of 36.195cm (14.25 inches) and consist of 27 double pancakes (i.e., 54 pancakes per coil) would on an electrically insulated 304LN stainless steel/bobbin helium vessel. Each pancake has 57 turns separated by G-10CR insulation. The complete winding bundle has 4.6 million ampere-turns and uniform current density of 2007 A/cm 2 . In conjunction with the other magnets in the system, they produce a 12-tesla central field and a 12.52-tesla peak field. A multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn conductor was selected to meet these requirements. The conductor consists of a monolithic insert soldered into a copper stabilizer. Sufficient cross-sectional area and work-hardening of the copper stabilizer has been provided for the conductor to self-react the electromagnetic Lorentz force induced hoop stresses with normal operational tensile strains less than 0.07 percent

  4. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  5. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  6. Magnetic field fluctuations measurement onboard ESA/JUICE mission by search-coil magnetometer: SCM instrument as a part of RPWI consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retinò, A.; Chust, T.; Mansour, M.; Canu, P.; Sahraoui, F.; Le Contel, O.; Alison, D.; Sou, G.; Varizat, L.; Techer, J.-D.; Jeandet, A.; Geyskens, N.; Chariet, M.; Cecconi, B.; Bergman, J.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Santolik, O.; Soucek, J.; Dougherty, M.

    2017-09-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission is planned for launch in 2022 with arrival at Jupiter in 2029 and will spend at least three years making detailed observations of Jupiter's system. The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (RPWI) consortium will carry the most advanced set of electric and magnetic fields sensors ever flown therein, which will allow to characterize the plasma wave environment and the radio emission of Jupiter and its icy moons in great detail. The Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) will provide high-quality measurements of the magnetic field fluctuations' vector for RPWI. Here we present the technical features of the SCM instrument and we discuss its scientific objectives.

  7. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity group, Engineering Department, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  8. Nested Surface Coils for Multinuclear NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Magill, Arthur; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the design of surface coils for multinuclear applications. The relative sensitivities of several NMR-visible nuclei of biological interest are considered, and the motivations to operate an RF coil at multiple frequencies, both sequentially and simultaneously, are reviewed. The design of nested surface coils is then developed. Magnetic fields generated by planar loop and butterfly coils are first introduced. The benefits of quadrature design are briefly considered, and ...

  9. Analysis of specific absorption rate and internal electric field in human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil-type transcutaneous energy transmission transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kenji; Zulkifli, Nur Elina Binti; Ishioka, Yuji

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed the internal electric field E and specific absorption rate (SAR) of human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil transcutaneous energy transmission transformer. Using an electromagnetic simulator, we created a model of human biological tissues consisting of a dry skin, wet skin, fat, muscle, and cortical bone. A primary coil was placed on the surface of the skin, and a secondary coil was located subcutaneously inside the body. The E and SAR values for the model representing a 34-year-old male subject were analyzed using electrical frequencies of 0.3-1.5 MHz. The transmitting power was 15 W, and the load resistance was 38.4 Ω. The results showed that the E values were below the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.9 and 1.5 MHz, and SAR values were well below the limit prescribed by the ICNIRP for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.3 and 1.2 MHz.

  10. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  11. Two tests of electric fields, second-order in source-velocity terms of closed, steady currents: (1) an electron beam; (2) a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    One particular prediction of Maxwell's theory that has been previously neglected is that the motion of charges traveling in closed loops produces no constant electric fields. This study presents and analyzes the results of two new experiments designed to test for second-order, source-velocity electric fields from steady, closed currents and analyzes another experiment in light of these fields. The first experiment employed an electron beam. The second used a niobium-titanium coil designed so that the voltage measurement configuration could be easily switched from a Faraday to a non-faraday configuration between sets of runs. The implications of the observation of a null charge on magnetically suspended superconducting spheres vis-a-vis the second-order, source-velocity fields were discussed as the third case. The observation of a null potential corresponding to a null effective charge from a hypothetical velocity-squared field in both the beam and the coil experiment placed the upper bound on a field term at 0.02 with respect a Coulomb term. An observed null charge on the suspended spheres reduced this bound to 0.001. Such an upper bound is strong evidence against alternative theories predicting a relative contribution of the order of unity for a simple velocity-squared term. A simple velocity-squared electric field would be indistinguishable from a velocity-squared charge variation. The latter test limits such a charge variation to 0.001 of the total charge. The suspended-spheres test allowed the previously neglected issue of a general second-order, source-velocity electric field to be addressed. The observed null charge in this test contradicts and thus eliminates a hypothesized, general, electric field expression containing three second-order, source-velocity terms

  12. Radio frequency self-resonant coil for contactless AC-conductivity in 100 T class ultra-strong pulse magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Takeyama, S.

    2018-03-01

    A contactless measurement system of electrical conductivity was developed for application under pulsed high magnetic fields over 100 T by using a self-resonant-type, high-frequency circuit. Electromagnetic fields in the circuit were numerically analysed by the finite element method, to show how the resonant power spectra of the circuit depends on the electrical conductivity of a sample set on the probe-coil. The performance was examined using a high-temperature cuprate superconductor, La2-x Sr x CuO4, in magnetic fields up to 102 T with a high frequency of close to 800 MHz. As a result, the upper critical field could be determined with a good signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  14. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  15. Crystallographic study on oligonucleotide coiled-coils

    OpenAIRE

    Luchi, Daniela de

    2008-01-01

    En la presente tesis doctoral se han realizado estudios estructurales de DNA. Estudios previos han demostrado que los coiled-coils de d(ATATATATATAT) y d(ATATATATAT) tienen unos parámetros geométricos muy diferentes. El objetivo de esta tesis es aclarar las propiedades de los coiled-coils.Con esta finalidad se han estudiado por cristalografía de Rayos X oligonucleótidos con diferentes secuencias y con extremos cohesivos que fijen la geometría de los coiled-coils. Se han utilizado oligonucleót...

  16. Internal split field generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat,; George, Thomas [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Vass, Arpad Alexander [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  17. Pulse coil concepts for the LCP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The pulse coils described in this paper are resistive copper magnets driven by time-varying currents. They are included in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) portion of the Large Coil Program (LCP) to simulate the pulsed field environment of the toroidal coils in a tokamak reactor. Since TNS (a 150 sec, 5MA, igniting tokamak) and the Oak Ridge EPR (Experimental Power Reactor) are representative of the first tokamaks to require the technology developed in LCP, the reference designs for these machines, especially TNS, are used to derive the magnetic criteria for the pulse coils. This criteria includes the magnitude, distribution, and rate of change of pulsed fields in the toroidal coil windings. Three pulse coil concepts are evaluated on the basis of magnetic criteria and factors such as versatility of design, ease of fabrication and cost of operation. The three concepts include (1) a pair of poloidal coils outside the LCTF torus, (2) a single poloidal coil threaded through the torus, and (3) a pair of vertical axis coil windings inside the bore of one or more of the toroidal test coils

  18. Determining electrical properties based on B1 fields measured in an MR scanner using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil: a general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Electrical properties tomography (EPT) is a recently developed noninvasive technology to image the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues at Larmor frequency in magnetic resonance scanners. The absolute phase of the complex radio-frequency magnetic field (B1) is necessary for electrical property calculation. However, due to the lack of practical methods to directly measure the absolute B1 phases, current EPT techniques have been achieved with B1 phase estimation based on certain assumptions on object anatomy, coil structure and/or electromagnetic wave behavior associated with the main magnetic field, limiting EPT from a larger variety of applications. In this study, using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil, the framework of a new general approach for EPT has been introduced, which is independent on the assumptions utilized in previous studies. Using a human head model with realistic geometry, a series of computer simulations at 7 T were conducted to evaluate the proposed method under different noise levels. Results showed that the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the conductivity and permittivity images with noticeable accuracy and stability. The feasibility of this approach was further evaluated in a phantom experiment at 7 T.

  19. Poloidal coils for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahata, K.; Satow, T.; Iwamoto, A.

    1996-01-01

    Poloidal coil system of the Large Helical Device (LHD) consists of three pairs of circular solenoids; Inner Vertical (IV), Inner shaping (IS) and Outer Vertical (OV) coils. Forced flow cooling is adopted as a cooling method of the poloidal coils. The conductors of the poloidal coils are Nb-Ti cable-in-conduit types. Each coil consists of eight double-pancake coils, and coolant flows in parallel from the inner turns to the outer turns. A superconducting joint technique is adopted in the joints among the double-pancake coils. Miniaturized joints and severe quality control bring the reduction of error field. (author)

  20. Predicting coiled coils by use of pairwise residue correlations.

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, B; Wilson, D B; Wolf, E; Tonchev, T; Milla, M; Kim, P S

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented that predicts coiled-coil domains in protein sequences by using pairwise residue correlations obtained from a (two-stranded) coiled-coil database of 58,217 amino acid residues. A program called PAIRCOIL implements this method and is significantly better than existing methods at distinguishing coiled coils from alpha-helices that are not coiled coils. The database of pairwise residue correlations suggests structural features that stabilize or destabilize coiled coils.

  1. Design description of the Large Coil Test Facility pulse-coil support and transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queen, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to simulate the transient fields which would be imposed on superconducting toroidal field coils in an operating tokamak reactor, the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand includes a set of pulse coils. This set of pulse coils is designed to be moved from one test location to another within the LCTF vacuum vessel while the vessel is operating under vacuum and the test stand and test coils are at an operating temperature of 4.2K. This operating environment and the extremely high magnetic loads have necessitated some unique design features for the pulse coil support and transport system. The support structure for the pulse coil must react high overturning moments and axial loads induced on the pulse coil by the interaction of the pulse field with the field generated by the large test coils. These loads are reacted into the test stand support structure or spider frame by an arrangement of six pedestals and a support beam. In order to move the pulse coil set from one test location to another, the support beam containing the pulse coils must be driven across rollers mounted on the pedestals, then clamped securely to react the loads. Because these operations must be performed in a vacuum environment at cryogenic tmperature, special consideration was given to component design

  2. Multicoil2: Predicting Coiled Coils and Their Oligomerization States from Sequence in the Twilight Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Jason; Gutwin, Karl; Keating, Amy E.; Berger, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices) of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) in a Markov Random Field (MRF). The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu. PMID:21901122

  3. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  4. Evolutionary patterns in coiled-coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2015-01-10

    Models of protein evolution are used to describe evolutionary processes, for phylogenetic analyses and homology detection. Widely used general models of protein evolution are biased toward globular domains and lack resolution to describe evolutionary processes for other protein types. As three-dimensional structure is a major constraint to protein evolution, specific models have been proposed for other types of proteins. Here, we consider evolutionary patterns in coiled-coil forming proteins. Coiled-coils are widespread structural domains, formed by a repeated motif of seven amino acids (heptad repeat). Coiled-coil forming proteins are frequently rods and spacers, structuring both the intracellular and the extracellular spaces that often form protein interaction interfaces. We tested the hypothesis that due to their specific structure the associated evolutionary constraints differ from those of globular proteins. We showed that substitution patterns in coiled-coil regions are different than those observed in globular regions, beyond the simple heptad repeat. Based on these substitution patterns we developed a coiled-coil specific (CC) model that in the context of phylogenetic reconstruction outperforms general models in tree likelihood, often leading to different topologies. For multidomain proteins containing both a coiled-coil region and a globular domain, we showed that a combination of the CC model and a general one gives higher likelihoods than a single model. Finally, we showed that the model can be used for homology detection to increase search sensitivity for coiled-coil proteins. The CC model, software, and other supplementary materials are available at http://www.evocell.org/cgl/resources (last accessed January 29, 2015). © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. AC magnetic field measurement using a small flip coil system for rapid cycling AC magnets at the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianxin; Kang, Wen; Li, Shuai; Liu, Yudong; Liu, Yiqin; Xu, Shouyan; Guo, Xiaoling; Wu, Xi; Deng, Changdong; Li, Li; Wu, Yuwen; Wang, Sheng

    2018-02-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has two major accelerator systems, a linear accelerator and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accelerator is used to accumulate and accelerate protons from the energy of 80 MeV to the design energy of 1.6 GeV at the repetition rate of 25 Hz, and extract the high energy beam to the target. The main magnets of the RCS accelerator are excited by AC current with DC bias. The magnetic field quality is very important for the RCS accelerator operation, since it should guarantee and focus a circulating beam. In order to characterize the AC magnets, a small flip coil measurement system has been developed and one of each type of AC magnets has been studied. The measurement system and selected measurement results are presented in this paper.

  6. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.; Mann, T.L.

    1978-02-01

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  7. Notes on the creation of high magnetic fields. Cooling of the coils; Considerations sur la creation de champs magnetiques eleves. Refroidissement des bobines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armand, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    When the temperature of a conductor is lowered, its resistance decreases appreciably. This fact can be made particular use of in the production of high magnetic fields, to reduce the total energy consumed for a given coil. In this paper the problem of the evacuation of heat is examined, and the various fluids which can be used are compared from the viewpoint of the maximum fields attainable from them for a given coil. These fluids are: - water (nucleate boiling); - liquid nitrogen; - liquid hydrogen; - helium at a temperature of 20 deg. K; - helium at a temperature of 10 deg. K. First of all a method for calculating the quantities of heat evacuated by a fluid is established, using general equations for fluid flow with heat exchange. (author) [French] Lorsque l'on abaisse la temperature d'un conducteur, sa resistivite diminue d'une facon sensible. Ce fait peut etre mis a profit notamment en vue de la production de champs magnetiques eleves, de facon a reduire l'energie totale consommee pour une bobine donnee. Dans ce qui suit, le probleme de l'evacuation des pertes Joules est examinee et les differents fluides utilisables sont compares du point de vue des champs maximum qu'ils permettent d'atteindre pour une bobine donnee. Ces fluides sont: - l'eau (nucleate boiling); - l'azote liquide; - l'hydrogene liquide; - l'helium a une temperature de 20 deg. K; - l'helium a une temperature de 10 deg. K. Au prealable une methode de calcul des quantites de chaleur evacuee par un fluide est etablie, a partir des equations globales de dynamique des fluides avec echange de chaleur. (auteur)

  8. A new type of coil structure called pan-shaped coil of wireless charging system based on magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z. K.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Liang, L. H.; Cui, S.

    2017-11-01

    The problem that misalignment between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil significantly impairs the transmission power and efficiency of the system has been attached more and more attention. In order to improve the uniformity of the magnetic field between the two coils to solve this problem, a new type of coil called pan-shaped coil is proposed. Three-dimension simulation models of the planar-core coil and the pan-shaped coil are established using Ansoft Maxwell software. The coupling coefficient between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil is obtained by simulating the magnetic field with the receiving coil misalignment or not. And the maximum percentage difference strength along the radial direction which is defined as the magnetic field uniformity factor is calculated. According to the simulation results of the two kinds of coil structures, it is found that the new type of coil structure can obviously improve the uniformity of the magnetic field, coupling coefficient and power transmission properties between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil.

  9. Programming protein self assembly with coiled coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Hendrik; Bornschlögl, Thomas; Heym, Roland; König, Frauke; Rief, Matthias

    2007-11-01

    The controlled assembly of protein domains into supramolecular structures will be an important prerequisite for the use of functional proteins in future nanotechnology applications. Coiled coils are multimerization motifs whose dimerization properties can be programmed by amino acid sequence. Here, we report programmed supramolecular self-assembly of protein molecules using coiled coils and directly demonstrate its potential on the single molecule level by AFM force spectroscopy. We flanked two different model proteins, Ig27 from human cardiac titin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), by coiled coil binding partners and studied the capability of these elementary building blocks to self-assemble into linear chains. Simple sterical constraints are shown to control the assembly process, providing evidence that many proteins can be assembled with this method. An application for this technique is the design of polyproteins for single molecule force spectroscopy with an integrated force-calibration standard.

  10. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  11. Remote maintenance of tandem mirror hybrid coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Coils (superconducting coils with normal conducting inserts) are being employed with increasing frequency on Tandem Mirror Devices to obtain high field strengths. The normal conducting copper inserts are short lived in comparison to their encircling superconductors. It becomes desirable, therefore, to devise design features and maintenance procedures to replace the inner normal conducting coils without simultaneously replacing the longer lived (and significantly more costly) superconducting coils. The high neutron wall loadings require that the task be accomplished by remote control. The approach is to permanently mount the coil assemblies on track mounted carriages which serve, during machine operation merely as structural supports, but during maintenance procedures as moveable transport devices. The carriages incorporate all necessary provisions to facilitate remote maintenance operations and to adjust and align the coil assemblies with respect to adjacent machine components. The vacuum vessel is severed on both sides of the hybrid coil by means of a remote cutting machine. The entire coil is transported horizontally, normal to the machine axis to a nearby repair station. Prepositioned carriage mounted repair equipment at the repair station withdraws the damaged normal coil as a single entity and inserts a preassembled spare unit. The repaired hybrid coil is reassembled to the reactor. A cost and risk effective procedure has been evolved to maintain one of the more critical components of a Tandem Mirror Machine

  12. Large magnetic coils for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.; Ulbricht, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of research in this field and outlines future tasks and experiments for the Next European Torus (NET). Research and development work accomplished so far permits generation and safe operation of magnetic fields up to 9 T by means of NbTi coils. Fields up to 11 T are feasible if the coils are cooled with superfluid helium at 1.8 K. The potential of the Nb 3 Sn coils promise achievement of magnetic fields between 12 and 13 T. (MM) [de

  13. Argonne National Laboratory superconducting pulsed coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    The main objectives are to develop high current (approx. 100 kA) cryostable cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to build a demonstration pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat. A 1.5-MJ cryostable pulsed superconducting coil has been developed and constructed at ANL. The coil has a peak field of 4.5 T at an operating current of 11.0 kA. A large inexpensive plastic cryostat has been developed for testing the pulsed coil. The coil has been pulsed with a maximum dB/dt of 11 T/s. The coil was pulsed more than 4000 cycles. Detailed results of the ac loss measurements and the current sharing of the cryostability will be described

  14. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10–30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, D. C., E-mail: dcrovan@sandia.gov; Lamppa, D. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Owen, A. C.; McKenney, J.; Johnson, D. W.; Radovich, S.; Kaye, R. J.; McBride, R. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Awe, T. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Haill, T. A.; Jones, P. A.; Argo, J. W.; Dalton, D. G.; Robertson, G. K.; Waisman, E. M.; Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2014-12-15

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  15. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10-30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovang, D C; Lamppa, D C; Cuneo, M E; Owen, A C; McKenney, J; Johnson, D W; Radovich, S; Kaye, R J; McBride, R D; Alexander, C S; Awe, T J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Haill, T A; Jones, P A; Argo, J W; Dalton, D G; Robertson, G K; Waisman, E M; Sinars, D B; Meissner, J; Milhous, M; Nguyen, D N; Mielke, C H

    2014-12-01

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10-30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1-3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2-7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  16. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10-30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovang, D. C.; Lamppa, D. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Owen, A. C.; McKenney, J.; Johnson, D. W.; Radovich, S.; Kaye, R. J.; McBride, R. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Awe, T. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Haill, T. A.; Jones, P. A.; Argo, J. W.; Dalton, D. G.; Robertson, G. K.; Waisman, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Meissner, J.; Milhous, M.; Nguyen, D. N.; Mielke, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10-30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1-3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2-7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  17. The bar coil for NMR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorodzki, P.; Piatkowski, A.; Wasielewski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The bar coil (bi-planar) for the NMR tomograph, designed for medical diagnostics, has been described. The tests of coil shown that it generates good homogenous magnetic field in a big volume what results in improving of the signal-to-noise ratio

  18. The coil array method for creating a dynamic imaging volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elliot; Freschi, Fabio; Repetto, Maurizio; Crozier, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    Gradient strength and speed are limited by peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) thresholds. The coil array method allows the gradient field to be moved across the imaging area. This can help reduce PNS and provide faster imaging for image-guided therapy systems such as the magnetic resonance imaging-guided linear accelerator (MRI-linac). The coil array is designed such that many coils produce magnetic fields, which combine to give the desired gradient profile. The design of the coil array uses two methods: either the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a set of field profiles or the electromagnetic modes of the coil surface. Two whole-body coils and one experimental coil were designed to investigate the method. The field produced by the experimental coil was compared to simulated results. The experimental coil region of uniformity (ROU) was moved along the z axis as shown in simulation. The highest observed field deviation was 16.9% at the edge of the ROU with a shift of 35 mm. The whole-body coils showed a median field deviation across all offsets below 5% with an eight-coil basis when using the SVD design method. Experimental results show the feasibility of a moving imaging region within an MRI with a low number of coils in the array. Magn Reson Med 78:784-793, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Statistical theory of polarizable target compound impregnation into a polymer coil under the influence of an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, A L; Budkov, Yu A; Basharova, E A; Kiselev, M G

    2017-06-21

    The paper presents a theoretical approach for describing the influence of an electric field on the conformation of an electrically neutral dielectric polymer chain dissolved in a dielectric solvent with an admixture of a target compound. Each monomer and each molecule of the target compound carries positive excess polarizability and the solvent is described as a continuous dielectric medium. The model is based on the Flory-type mean-field theory. We demonstrate non-monotonic dependences of the expansion factor and the concentration of the target compound on the strength of the electric field and molecular polarizability. Namely, the target compound concentration in the internal polymer volume as a function of electric field strength has pronounced maxima if the molecules are polarizable. In addition, the expansion factor of the non-polarizable polymer chain can be controlled by the electric field. The dependences of the expansion factor and target compound concentration on the monomer polarizability exhibit minima and intersection points. The intersection points correspond to the equality of dielectric permittivities in the bulk solution and in the internal polymer volume.

  20. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET using analytic methods and improved computer subroutine for TFC stress estimation in TRESCODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, B.W.; Miki, Nobuharu; Hashizume, Takashi.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the comparison of TF coil stresses in NET and FER. The analyses focus on the straight part of the inner legs, since it is this part of the coil which most directly influences the radial build of the machine. NET's TF coils are wedged together and the centering force on each of the coils is reacted by toroidal compression of the inner legs. The forces that act out of the plane of each coil are reacted by friction between adjacent inner legs such that the set of legs behave much like a cylinder under torsion. In contrast, the FER device employs a bucking cylinder to react the centering load, which incurs a penalty in radial thickness, and the out of plane forces are reacted by the use of shear keys between adjacent inner legs. Analytic techniques or ''hand methods'' have been used to estimate and compare the strains and stresses at the inner leg mid-plane section resulting from both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic forces. Such techniques forced a more thorough understanding of the structural behavior of the coils. The amount of effort in analyzing the NET coil is greater than for FER as the reaction of centering load in its wedged design is more complex, and because it was found that friction plays a very important part in determining the coil stresses. The FER coil is simpler in this regard, and a ''hand estimation'' of its coil stresses was straightfoward. In this report, the program written to perform these analyses is also described. It was desired to provide new capabilities to the original TF stress subroutine in TRESCODE and to review and improve it where possible. This has been accomplished, and subroutines are now available for use in JAERI's system code, TRESCODE. It is hoped that the inner leg radial thickness can be better optimized by using the program. (author)

  1. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  2. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  3. Strain and stress of the ASDEX multipole magnetic coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, O.; Pillsticker, M.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of the technical concept of the multipole magnetic field coils for the ASDEX tokamak is given. The various loads of the coils are explained in quality. To compute displacement and stress of the coils FEM computer programs are used. The computing models applied to this problem are founded and the results and the conclusions are reported. (orig.) [de

  4. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  5. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  6. The IEA large coil task test results in IFSMTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.; Clinard, J.A.; Dresner, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT) is an international collaboration of the United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland to develop large superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. The testing phase of LCT was completed on September 3, 1987. All six coils exceeded the design goals, both as single coils and in six-coil toroidal tests. In addition, a symmetric torus test was performed in which a maximum field of 9 T was reached in all coils simultaneously. These are by far the largest magnets (either in size, weight, or stored energy) ever to achieve such a field. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Correcting coils in end magnets of accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. P. Kassab

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an empirical investigation of the correcting coils behavior used to homogenize the field distribution of the race-track microtron accelerator end magnets. These end magnets belong to the second stage of the 30.0 MeV cw electron accelerator under construction at IFUSP, the race-track microtron booster, in which the beam energy is raised from 1.97 to 5.1 MeV. The correcting coils are attached to the pole faces and are based on the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field measured. The performance of these coils, when operating the end magnets with currents that differ by ±10% from the one used in the mappings that originated the coils copper leads, is presented. For one of the magnets, adjusting conveniently the current of the correcting coils makes it possible to homogenize field distributions of different intensities, once their shapes are practically identical to those that originated the coils. For the other one, the shapes are changed and the coils are less efficient. This is related to intrinsic factors that determine the inhomogeneities. However, we obtained uniformity of 0.001% in both cases.

  8. Testing electrical insulation of LCT coils and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Ulbricht, A.R.; Ellis, J.F.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.; Okuno, K.; Siewerdt, L.O.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    Three of the superconducting test coils in the Large Coil Task (LCT) use conductors cooled internally by forced flow of helium. In the other three coils, the conductors are cooled externally by a bath of helium. The coils and facility are designed for rapid discharges (dumps) at voltages up to 2.5 kV, depending on coil design. Many coil sensors are connected electrically to the conductors. These sensor leads and signal conditioning equipment also experience high voltage. High-potential tests of ground insulation were performed on all components of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Coil insulation was also tested by ring-down tests that produced voltage distributions within the coils like those occurring during rapid discharge. Methods were developed to localize problem areas and to eliminate them. The effect on breakdown voltage near the Paschen minimum of magnetic fields up to 2 T was investigated

  9. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  10. Characterization of size, morphology and elemental composition of nano-, submicron, and micron particles of street dust separated using field-flow fractionation in a rotating coiled column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, Petr S; Ermolin, Mikhail S; Karandashev, Vasily K; Ladonin, Dmitry V

    2014-12-01

    For the first time, nano- and submicron particles of street dust have been separated, weighted, and analyzed. A novel technique, sedimentation field-flow fractionation in a rotating coiled column, was applied to the fractionation of dust samples with water being used as a carrier fluid. The size and morphology of particles in the separated fractions were characterized by electronic microscopy before digestion and the determination of the concentration of elements by ICP-AES and ICP-MS. The elements that may be of anthropogenic origin (Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Sn, Pb) were found to concentrate mainly in <0.3 and 0.3-1 μm fractions. It has been shown that the concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zn in the finest fraction (<0.3 μm) of street dust can be one order of magnitude higher than the concentrations of elements in bulk sample and coarse fractions. For example, the concentrations of Ni in <0.3, 0.3-1, 1-10, and 10-100 μm fractions were 297 ± 46, 130 ± 21, 36 ± 10, and 21 ± 4 mg/kg, correspondingly. Though the finest particles present only about 0.1 mass% of the sample they are of special concern due to their increased mobility and ability to penetrate into the deepest alveolar area of the lungs. For rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) that are evidently of natural source and may be found in soil minerals, in contrary, higher concentrations were observed in large particles (10-100 μm). Sc was an exception that needs further studies. The proposed approach to the fractionation and analysis of nano-, submicron, and micron particles can be a powerful tool for risk assessment related to toxic elements in dust, ash, and other particulate environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic resonance dacryocystography: comparison between conventional surface coils and microscopic coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Junior, Luiz de; Wolosker, Angela Maria Borri; Borri, Maria Lucia; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo; Hartmann, Luiz Guilherme de Carvalho; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized in the evaluation of the lacrimal apparatus with some advantages over conventional dacryocystography. The present study was aimed at acquiring high resolution images utilizing microscopic coils for evaluating typical structures of the lacrimal apparatus as compared with the findings observed with conventional surface coils. Materials and methods: Five asymptomatic volunteers with no history of epiphora were submitted to high-field magnetic resonance imaging with microscopic and conventional surface coils, and STIR sequence after instillation of saline solution. The definition of normal anatomic structures of lacrimal apparatuses was compared utilizing conventional and microscopic surface coils. Based on a consensual scoring system, the mean values for each structure were calculated by two observers. Results: In 90% of cases, higher scores were attributed to images acquired with the microscopic coil. On average, a 1.17 point increase was observed in the scoring of anatomic structures imaged with the microscopic coil. Additionally, a subjective improvement was observed in the signal-to-noise ratio with the microscopic coil. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance dacryocystography with microscopic coils is the appropriate method for evaluating the lacrimal apparatus, providing images with better quality as compared with those acquired with conventional surface coils. (author)

  12. Computational characterization of parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled-coils using effective amino acid indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2015-02-01

    The coiled-coil, which consists of two or more α-helices winding around each other, is a ubiquitous and the most frequently observed protein-protein interaction motif in nature. The coiled-coil is known for its straightforward heptad repeat pattern and can be readily recognized based on protein primary sequences, exhibiting a variety of oligomer states and topologies. Due to the stable interaction formed between their α-helices, coiled-coils have been under close scrutiny to design novel protein structures for potential applications in the fields of material science, synthetic biology and medicine. However, their broader application requires an in-depth and systematic analysis of the sequence-to-structure relationship of coiled-coil folding and oligomeric formation. In this article, we propose a new oligomerization state predictor, termed as RFCoil, which exploits the most useful and non-redundant amino acid indices combined with the machine learning algorithm - random forest (RF) - to predict the oligomeric states of coiled-coil regions. Benchmarking experiments show that RFCoil achieves an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.849 on the 10-fold cross-validation test using the training dataset and 0.855 on the independent test using the validation dataset, respectively. Performance comparison results indicate that RFCoil outperforms the four existing predictors LOGICOIL, PrOCoil, SCORER 2.0 and Multicoil2. Furthermore, we extract a number of predominant rules from the trained RF model that underlie the oligomeric formation. We also present two case studies to illustrate the applicability of the extracted rules to the prediction of coiled-coil oligomerization state. The RFCoil web server, source codes and datasets are freely available for academic users at http://protein.cau.edu.cn/RFCoil/.

  13. Practical aspects of 13C surface receive coils with active decoupling and tuning circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2012-01-01

    is based on application-specified coil profile and includes impedance matching and balancing circuits. Active decoupling is implemented in order to minimize the influence of the receiving coil on the homogeneity of the transmit-coil field. Measurement results for a coil prototype are presented, including...... imaging experiments and estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio....

  14. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  15. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The coiled coil is a superhelical structural protein motif that has been thoroughly investigated in recent years. Because of the relatively well-understood principles that determine the properties of coiled coil peptides and proteins, macromolecular systems containing the coiled coil motif have been suggested for various applications. This short review focuses on hybrid polymer coiled coil systems designed for drug delivery purposes. After a short introduction, the most important features of the coiled coils (stability, association number, oligomerization selectivity and orientation of helices) are described, and the factors influencing these characteristics are discussed. Several examples of the most interesting biomedical applications of the polymer-coiled coil systems (according to the authors' opinion) are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A volume birdcage coil with an adjustable sliding tuner ring for neuroimaging in high field vertical magnets: Ex and in vivo applications at 21.1 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chunqi; Masad, Ihssan S.; Rosenberg, Jens T.; Elumalai, Malathy; Brey, William W.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gor'kov, Peter L.

    2012-08-01

    A tunable 900 MHz transmit/receive volume coil was constructed for 1H MR imaging of biological samples in a 21.1 T vertical bore magnet. To accommodate a diverse range of specimen and RF loads at such a high frequency, a sliding-ring adaptation of a low-pass birdcage was implemented through simultaneous alteration of distributed capacitance. To make efficient use of the constrained space inside the vertical bore, a modular probe design was implemented with a bottom-adjustable tuning and matching apparatus. The sliding ring coil displays good homogeneity and sufficient tuning range for different samples of various dimensions representing large span of RF loads. High resolution in vivo and ex vivo images of large rats (up to 350 g), mice and human postmortem tissues were obtained to demonstrate coil functionality and to provide examples of potential applications at 21.1 T.

  17. Magnetic coil design considerations for functional magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, V W; Hsiao, I N; Dhaka, V

    2000-05-01

    Our studies have demonstrated effective stimulation of the bladder, bowel, and expiratory muscles in patients with spinal cord injury using functional magnetic stimulation. However, one limitation of the magnetic coils (MC) is related to their inability to specifically stimulate the target tissue without activation of surrounding tissue. The primary goal of this study was to determine the governing parameters in the MC design, such as coil configuration, diameter, and number of turns in one loop of the coil. By varying these parameters, our approach was to design, construct, and evaluate the induced electric field distributions of two sets of novel MC's. Based on the slinky coil design, the first set of coils was constructed to compare their abilities in generating induced electric fields for focal nerve excitation. The second set of coils was built to determine the effect that changes in two parameters, coil diameter and number of turns in one loop, had on field penetration. The results showed that the slinky coil design produced more focalized stimulation when compared to the planar round coils. The primary-to-secondary peak ratios of the induced electric field from slinky 1 to 5 were 1.00, 2.20, 2.85, 2.62, and 3.54. We also determined that coils with larger diameters had better penetration than those with smaller diameters. Coils with less number of turns in one loop had higher initial field strengths; when compared to coils that had more turns per loop, initial field strengths remained higher as distance from the coil increased. In our attempt to customize MC design according to each functional magnetic stimulation application and patients of different sizes, the parameters of MC explored in this study may facilitate designing an optimal MC for a certain clinical application.

  18. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribe, N.M.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes

  19. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  20. Divertor coil device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Satoru.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a divertor coil device used in a tokamak type thermonuclear device and the object thereof is to reduce thermal loads in the heat receiving portion. An auxiliary power source is disposed, in addition to a main power source, for supplying main electric current for changing electric current ratio between each of the divertor coils. Then, the null point for forming plasmas is made controllable. As a result, a power source for a part of coils connected to the auxiliary power source of the divertor coils can be changed by controlling the voltage of the auxiliary power source. Accordingly, the electric current distribution in the divertor coils is changed and the position for the null point high thermal load region can be moved laterally. The area of the heat receiving portion can be increased by moving the high thermal load region, thereby decreasing the thermal load density. (I.S.)

  1. Deep brain transcranial magnetic stimulation using variable "Halo coil" system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Y.; Hadimani, R. L.; Crowther, L. J.; Xu, Z.; Qu, J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has the potential to treat various neurological disorders non-invasively and safely. The "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate deeper regions of the brain with lower surface to deep-brain field ratio compared to other coil configurations. The existing "Halo coil" configuration is fixed and is limited in varying the site of stimulation in the brain. We have developed a new system based on the current "Halo coil" design along with a graphical user interface system that enables the larger coil to rotate along the transverse plane. The new system can also enable vertical movement of larger coil. Thus, this adjustable "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate different regions of the brain by adjusting the position and orientation of the larger coil on the head. We have calculated magnetic and electric fields inside a MRI-derived heterogeneous head model for various positions and orientations of the coil. We have also investigated the mechanical and thermal stability of the adjustable "Halo coil" configuration for various positions and orientations of the coil to ensure safe operation of the system.

  2. Design of superconducting toroidal magnet coils and testing facility in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    In the U.S. Large Coil Program, three industrial teams are presently designing test coils to general specifications prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with guidance from USERDA. Each test coil is approximately half the bore size of reactor coils, being oval or D-shaped, with a bore of 2.5 x 3.5 m. The dimensions and operating requirements of the coils are identical for all test coils. The coils are designed to produce a peak field of at least 8 tesla at the winding of a selected coil operated at its design current. This condition is met when the selected coil is operated in a compact toroidal array of 6 coils, with the other five coils being operated at 0.8 of their design current. The six coils are of three different designs. Both pool boiling and forced flow designs are included. The coils are housed in a single large vacuum chamber for economy and testing convenience. Auxiliary coils provide a pulse field over the test coil winding volume. This auxiliary system is designed to produce a pulse field which rises to a peak of 0.14 T in 1 sec. With the exception of material damage due to neutron irradiation, all reactor requirements and environments will be either duplicated, approximated, or simulated. The test facility is being designed to accept coils producing up to 12 tesla in later phases of the program

  3. 18-12 Salient-Pole structure Brushless dc Motor with an assisted dc Field coil: Design Optimization and Numerical Analysis on the Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Moradi CheshmehBeigi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper presents the design optimization and accurate electromagnetic field analysis of an 18-12 there phase Brushless dc motor (BLDCM by using a three-dimensional Finite-Element analysis. Proposed motor will provide a wide range of air-gap flux control by a dc assisted field winding which is replaced with the permanent magnet in the rotor structure. In proposed BLDCM a simple dc current control is used and no brushes or slip rings are required to perform this control. To achieve the required performance within a specified space envelope, the physical dimensions of the proposed configuration were optimized; subject to maximize the average output power. Proposed 18-12 BLDCM configuration has been compared with a 9-6 BLDCM configuration. To evaluate the motor performance, the numerical techniques have been utilized. In the numerical part, 3-D Finite Element (FE analysis has been carried out using a MagNet CAD package (Infolytica Corporation Ltd. for two type of BLDCM to confirm the accuracy and the efficacy of the proposed design procedure. The analysis results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed machine design methodology. Keywords: FE Analysis; Field analysis; Brushless Dc Motor ­­­

  4. Coil development for W VII-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisslinger, J.

    1988-01-01

    Starting from a closed vacuum flux surface near the edge and using the NESCOIL code, current distributions on various toroidal surfaces are obtained. The toroidal surfaces are optimized by varying the coefficients which describe the torus topology, and by restricting the number of coefficients for the potential distribution. Configuration HS4-12 with 4 field periods has 12 coils per field period, and that with 5 periods has 10 or 12 coils per period at an average coil aspect ratio of 5. Aspect ratio of the largest flux surfaces is 10. For Helias configurations with 5 field periods compared to those with 4 field periods, higher beta values are predicted. Keeping the coil aspect ratio constant the configuration with 5 field periods has coils with lower minimum curvature radius and a larger lateral excursion. They also have reduced distance between wall and plasma. To improve the geometrical tightness with 5 field periods an increase of the major radius from 5 to 6.5m and a reduction of Bo from 4 to 3T (which allows an increase of current density from 40 to 50 MA/m 2 ) is proposed

  5. New technique for wiring SSC superconducting sextupole corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B.

    1985-01-01

    There exists in the electronics industry, a technology for the manufacture of printed circuit (PC) boards which is directly transferable into the creation of highly controlled coils, such as the SSC sextupole superconducting corrector coils. This technology, which uses a process of laying down insulated wire in highly controlled patterns has heretofore been confined exclusively to the manufacture of high density printed circuit (PC) boards, possibly due to an ignorance of its utility in the field of precision winding of coils. This ability to fix wires in a well defined location can be used to produce precision wound coils in a very cost-effective manner. These coils may be superior in quality to conventionally made coils. Before describing what can be created with this technology, it is necessary to take a look at this coil winding process, the MULTIWIRE process, and the industry which has utilized this technology

  6. A new technique for wiring SSC superconducting sextupole corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B.

    1985-01-01

    There exists in the electronics industry, a technology for the manufacture of printed circuit (PC) boards which is directly transferable into the creation of highly controlled coils, such as the SSC sextupole superconducting corrector coils. This technology, which uses a process of laying down insulated wire in highly controlled patterns, has heretofore been confined excusively to the manufacture of high density printed circuit (PC) boards, possibly due to an ignorance of its utility in the field of precision winding of coils. This ability to fix wires in a well defined location can be used to produce precision wound coils in a very cost-effective manner. These coils may be superior in quality to conventionally made coils. Before describing what can be created with this technology, it is necessary to take a look at this coil winding process, the MULTIWIRE process, and the industry which has utilized this technology

  7. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  8. Coil in coil - components for the high voltage superconducting resistive current limiter CULT 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, S.; Stemmle, M.; Breuer, F.; Walter, H.; Frohne, C.; Noe, M.; Bock, J.

    2008-02-01

    The German government (BMBF/VDI) funded project CULT 110 is presently the largest European current limiter project and aims at the development of a one-phase resistive limiter for the voltage level of 110 kV. The contribution presents the actual state of development of the superconducting components. As in the successful predecessor project CURL 10 these are made of melt cast processed BSCCO 2212 bulk material, however monofilar instead of bifilar coils are used. The electrical protection concept is based on a normal conducting coil arranged around a superconducting coil and connected in parallel. Simultaneously this coil serves as an electrical bypass and, under fault conditions, generates a magnetic field for quench homogenisation. Since no continuously connected shunt is needed, a much higher voltage during faults can be applied. The rules for an optimum superconductor and coil design are given and the viability of the whole concept is demonstrated by both, experiment and numerical simulation.

  9. Open coil traction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement.

  10. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  11. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  12. 12 tesla test coil. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Fusion Center at MIT has been charged with responsibility for the design, development, fabrication and test operation of a Niobium-3-Tin Superconducting Test Coil. Research is described on DOE's 12 tesla coil demonstration program in which several one-meter diameter superconducting test coils will be inserted and tested in DOE's High Field Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories. The work was initiated at the start of FY 79. FY 79 saw the completion of our Preliminary Design and the initiation of three (3) subcontracts: (1) Westinghouse review of the Preliminary Design, (II) Supercon, Inc. development of a tubular copper matrix, Nb 3 Sn Superconductor and (III) Airco optimization of the LCP-W Nb 3 Sn superconductor for 12T service. In addition, Airco was charged with the production of a 1000 foot length of model 15,000A conductor. Coil winding exercises were initiated at the Everson Electric Company

  13. Coiled-coils: The long and short of it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truebestein, Linda; Leonard, Thomas A

    2016-09-01

    Coiled-coils are found in proteins throughout all three kingdoms of life. Coiled-coil domains of some proteins are almost invariant in sequence and length, betraying a structural and functional role for amino acids along the entire length of the coiled-coil. Other coiled-coils are divergent in sequence, but conserved in length, thereby functioning as molecular spacers. In this capacity, coiled-coil proteins influence the architecture of organelles such as centrioles and the Golgi, as well as permit the tethering of transport vesicles. Specialized coiled-coils, such as those found in motor proteins, are capable of propagating conformational changes along their length that regulate cargo binding and motor processivity. Coiled-coil domains have also been identified in enzymes, where they function as molecular rulers, positioning catalytic activities at fixed distances. Finally, while coiled-coils have been extensively discussed for their potential to nucleate and scaffold large macromolecular complexes, structural evidence to substantiate this claim is relatively scarce. © 2016 The Authors BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  15. Disruption of Bcr-Abl coiled coil oligomerization by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew S; Pendley, Scott S; Bruno, Benjamin J; Woessner, David W; Shimpi, Adrian A; Cheatham, Thomas E; Lim, Carol S

    2011-08-05

    Oligomerization is an important regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including oncoproteins and other pathogenic proteins. The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl relies on oligomerization via its coiled coil domain for its kinase activity, suggesting that a designed coiled coil domain with enhanced binding to Bcr-Abl and reduced self-oligomerization would be therapeutically useful. Key mutations in the coiled coil domain of Bcr-Abl were identified that reduce homo-oligomerization through intermolecular charge-charge repulsion yet increase interaction with the Bcr-Abl coiled coil through additional salt bridges, resulting in an enhanced ability to disrupt the oligomeric state of Bcr-Abl. The mutations were modeled computationally to optimize the design. Assays performed in vitro confirmed the validity and functionality of the optimal mutations, which were found to exhibit reduced homo-oligomerization and increased binding to the Bcr-Abl coiled coil domain. Introduction of the mutant coiled coil into K562 cells resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl, reduced cell proliferation, and increased caspase-3/7 activity and DNA segmentation. Importantly, the mutant coiled coil domain was more efficacious than the wild type in all experiments performed. The improved inhibition of Bcr-Abl through oligomeric disruption resulting from this modified coiled coil domain represents a viable alternative to small molecule inhibitors for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Shaped magnetic field pulses by multi-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) differentially modulate anterior cingulate cortex responses and pain in volunteers and fibromyalgia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promise in the alleviation of acute and chronic pain by altering the activity of cortical areas involved in pain sensation. However, current single-coil rTMS technology only allows for effects in surface cortical structures. The ability to affect activity in certain deep brain structures may however, allow for a better efficacy, safety, and tolerability. This study used PET imaging to determine whether a novel multi-coil rTMS would allow for preferential targeting of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), an area always activated with pain, and to provide preliminary evidence as to whether this targeted approach would allow for efficacious, safe, and tolerable analgesia both in a volunteer/acute pain model as well as in fibromyalgia chronic pain patients. Methods Part 1: Different coil configurations were tested in a placebo-controlled crossover design in volunteers (N = 16). Tonic pain was induced using a capsaicin/thermal pain model and functional brain imaging was performed by means of H215O positron emission tomography – computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Differences in NRS pain ratings between TMS and sham treatment (NRSTMS-NRSplacebo) which were recorded each minute during the 10 minute PET scans. Part 2: 16 fibromyalgia patients were subjected to 20 multi-coil rTMS treatments over 4 weeks and effects on standard pain scales (Brief Pain Inventory, item 5, i.e. average pain NRS over the last 24 hours) were recorded. Results A single 30 minute session using one of 3 tested rTMS coil configurations operated at 1 Hz consistently produced robust reduction (mean 70% on NRS scale) in evoked pain in volunteers. In fibromyalgia patients, the 20 rTMS sessions also produced a significant pain inhibition (43% reduction in NRS pain over last 24 hours), but only when operated at 10 Hz. This degree of pain control was maintained for at least 4 weeks after the final session

  17. AC loss in a high-temperature superconducting coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevtchenko, O.A.; Rabbers, J.J.; Godeke, A.; ten Haken, Bernard; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1998-01-01

    In a typical superconducting coil made of BSCCO/Ag tape, both amplitude and direction of the magnetic field determine the critical current, resistive voltage and AC loss. The distribution of the magnetic field along and across the superconducting tape in a coil is rather complex. This gives rise to

  18. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  19. LHCb magnet coils arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Each of the two coils for the LHCb magnet comprises 15 individual monolayer 'pancakes' of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of eight turns of conductor, wound from a single length (approx. 290 m) of extruded aluminium. The coils have arrived at CERN; one of them is seen here being unloaded above the LHCb experimental cavern.

  20. Extrap with iron-cored coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1985-05-01

    In Extrap configurations there is a high average beta value with respect to the plasma confinement volume. The externally imposed magnetic field which is required for stabilization therefore comes out to have a rather moderate strength, even under expected reactor conditions. As a consequence, this field can be generated not only by conventional external conductor arrangements, but also by iron-cored coils being operated below the saturation limit. A proposal for such iron-cored coil systems is presented in this paper. As compared to conventional conductors, this has the advantage of localizing the magnetic energy of the externally imposed magnetic field mainly to the discharge vessel and the plasma volume, thereby increasing the engineering beta value substantially. Also the problems of the coil stresses and of irradiation of the coils appear to become simplified, as well as replacement of the coil system. A main limitation of this proposal is due to combination of iron core saturation with the required stabilization effect from an ion Larmor radius of sufficient relative magnitude. This limitaion requires further investigation, especially in the full-scale reactor case. Also the modifications of the field geometry by iron core shaping needs further analysis. (Author)

  1. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  2. Superconducting Coil of Po Dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Po superconducting dipole was built as a prototype beam transport magnet for the SPS extracted proton beam P0. Its main features were: coil aperture 72 mm, length 5 m, room-temperature yoke, NbTi cable conductor impregnated with solder, nominal field 4.2 T at 4.7 K (87% of critical field). It reached its nominal field without any quench.After this successful test up to its nominal field of 4.2 T, the power was not raised to reach a quench. The magnet was not installed in a beam and had no other further use. Nevertheless its construction provided knowledges and experience which became useful in the design and construction of the LHC magnets. The photo shows a detail of the inner layer winding before superposing the outer layer to form the complete coil of a pole. Worth noticing is the interleaved glass-epoxy sheet (white) with grooved channels for the flow of cooling helium. See also 8211532X.

  3. Coil optimisation for transcranial magnetic stimulation in realistic head geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Lari M; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Mutanen, Tuomas P; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows focal, non-invasive stimulation of the cortex. A TMS pulse is inherently weakly coupled to the cortex; thus, magnetic stimulation requires both high current and high voltage to reach sufficient intensity. These requirements limit, for example, the maximum repetition rate and the maximum number of consecutive pulses with the same coil due to the rise of its temperature. To develop methods to optimise, design, and manufacture energy-efficient TMS coils in realistic head geometry with an arbitrary overall coil shape. We derive a semi-analytical integration scheme for computing the magnetic field energy of an arbitrary surface current distribution, compute the electric field induced by this distribution with a boundary element method, and optimise a TMS coil for focal stimulation. Additionally, we introduce a method for manufacturing such a coil by using Litz wire and a coil former machined from polyvinyl chloride. We designed, manufactured, and validated an optimised TMS coil and applied it to brain stimulation. Our simulations indicate that this coil requires less than half the power of a commercial figure-of-eight coil, with a 41% reduction due to the optimised winding geometry and a partial contribution due to our thinner coil former and reduced conductor height. With the optimised coil, the resting motor threshold of abductor pollicis brevis was reached with the capacitor voltage below 600 V and peak current below 3000 A. The described method allows designing practical TMS coils that have considerably higher efficiency than conventional figure-of-eight coils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hierarchical cascades of instability govern the mechanics of coiled coils: helix unfolding precedes coil unzipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Elham; Keten, Sinan

    2014-07-15

    Coiled coils are a fundamental emergent motif in proteins found in structural biomaterials, consisting of α-helical secondary structures wrapped in a supercoil. A fundamental question regarding the thermal and mechanical stability of coiled coils in extreme environments is the sequence of events leading to the disassembly of individual oligomers from the universal coiled-coil motifs. To shed light on this phenomenon, here we report atomistic simulations of a trimeric coiled coil in an explicit water solvent and investigate the mechanisms underlying helix unfolding and coil unzipping in the assembly. We employ advanced sampling techniques involving steered molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations to obtain the free-energy landscapes of single-strand unfolding and unzipping in a three-stranded assembly. Our comparative analysis of the free-energy landscapes of instability pathways shows that coil unzipping is a sequential process involving multiple intermediates. At each intermediate state, one heptad repeat of the coiled coil first unfolds and then unzips due to the loss of contacts with the hydrophobic core. This observation suggests that helix unfolding facilitates the initiation of coiled-coil disassembly, which is confirmed by our 2D metadynamics simulations showing that unzipping of one strand requires less energy in the unfolded state compared with the folded state. Our results explain recent experimental findings and lay the groundwork for studying the hierarchical molecular mechanisms that underpin the thermomechanical stability/instability of coiled coils and similar protein assemblies. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  6. Inverse approach for determination of the coils location during magnetic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, Iliana; Kovachev, Ludmil

    2002-01-01

    An inverse approach using neural networks is extended and applied for determination of coils location during magnetic stimulation. The major constructions of magnetic stimulation coils have been investigated. The electric and magnetic fields are modelled using finite element method and integral equation method. The effects of changing the construction of coils and the frequency to the effect of magnetic stimulation are analysed. The results show that the coils for magnetic stimulation characterize with different focality and magnetic field concentration. The proposed inverse approach using neural networks is very useful for determination the spatial position of the stimulation coils especially when the location of the coil system is required to be changed dynamically. (Author)

  7. 7T head volume coils: improvements for rostral brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Hetherington, Hoby P; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Pan, Jullie W

    2009-02-01

    To improve the performance of 7T head coils over the rostral head regions. Due to radiofrequency (RF) field/tissue interactions, the RF magnetic field profile produced by 7T volume head coils is very inhomogeneous, with enhanced sensitivity near the center of the human brain and substantially reduced in the periphery. Two head-sized quadrature volume coils of similar diameters but substantially different lengths (17 and 10 cm) were constructed and tested using a 7T Varian Inova system. Experimental data demonstrated that by using a shorter volume head-sized coil or simply by partially moving a head out of the coil, coil efficiency near the top of a head can be improved by 20%. The homogeneity also improved, largely resulting from an increase in peripheral B(1) values. This resulted in 10%-20% variation in axial slices located near the top of a head. We have demonstrated a less deeply positioned head or substantially shorter volume coil can significantly improve coil performance and homogeneity for the rostral head at ultrahigh magnetic fields (7T and above). For studies that target superior brain regions, this coil arrangement can be highly effective.

  8. Split-coil-system SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.

    1992-08-01

    The high field superconductor test facility SULTAN started operation successfully in May 1992. Originally designed for testing full scale conductors for the large magnets of the next generation fusion reactors, the SULTAN facility installed at PSI (Switzerland) was designed as a common venture of three European Laboratories: ENEA (Italy), ECN (Netherlands) and PSI, and built by ENEA and PSI in the framework of the Euratom Fusion Technology Program. Presently the largest facility in the world, with its superconducting split coil system generating 11 Tesla in a 0.6 m bore, it is ready now for testing superconductor samples with currents up to 50 kA at variable cooling conditions. Similar tests can be arranged also for other applications. SULTAN is offered by the European Community as a contribution to the worldwide cooperation for the next step of fusion reactor development ITER. First measurements on conductor developed by CEA (Cadarache) are now in progress. Others like those of ENEA and CERN will follow. For 1993, a test of an Italian 12 TZ model coil for fusion application is planned. SULTAN is a worldwide unique facility marking the competitive presence of Swiss technology in the field of applied superconductivity research. Based on development and design of PSI, the high field Nb 3 Sn superconductors and coils were fabricated at the works of Kabelwerke Brugg and ABB, numerous Swiss companies contributed to the success of this international effort. Financing of the Swiss contribution of SULTAN was made available by NEFF, BEW, BBW, PSI and EURATOM. (author) figs., tabs., 20 refs

  9. Simulation and comparison of coils for Hyperpolarized 13C MRS cardiac metabolism studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, G.; Hartwig, V.; Frijia, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    with experimental results, for coils performance evaluation in terms of coil resistance, sampleinduced resistance and magnetic field pattern. In particular, coil resistances were calculated from Ohm’s law, while magnetic field patterns and sample induced resistances were calculated using a numerical Finite...

  10. AAFreqCoil: a new classifier to distinguish parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yuan; Yan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Coiled coils are characteristic rope-like protein structures, constituted by one or more heptad repeats. Native coiled-coil structures play important roles in various biological processes, while the designed ones are widely employed in medicine and industry. To date, two major oligomeric states (i.e. dimeric and trimeric states) of a coiled-coil structure have been observed, plausibly exerting different biological functions. Therefore, exploration of the relationship between heptad repeat sequences and coiled coil structures is highly important. In this paper, we develop a new method named AAFreqCoil to classify parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. Our method demonstrated its competitive performance when benchmarked based on 10-fold cross validation and jackknife cross validation. Meanwhile, the rules that can explicitly explain the prediction results of the test coiled coil can be extracted from the AAFreqCoil model for a better explanation of user predictions. A web server and stand-alone program implementing the AAFreqCoil algorithm are freely available at .

  11. New method to design stellarator coils without the winding surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caoxiang; Hudson, Stuart R.; Song, Yuntao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2018-01-01

    Finding an easy-to-build coils set has been a critical issue for stellarator design for decades. Conventional approaches assume a toroidal ‘winding’ surface, but a poorly chosen winding surface can unnecessarily constrain the coil optimization algorithm, This article presents a new method to design coils for stellarators. Each discrete coil is represented as an arbitrary, closed, one-dimensional curve embedded in three-dimensional space. A target function to be minimized that includes both physical requirements and engineering constraints is constructed. The derivatives of the target function with respect to the parameters describing the coil geometries and currents are calculated analytically. A numerical code, named flexible optimized coils using space curves (FOCUS), has been developed. Applications to a simple stellarator configuration, W7-X and LHD vacuum fields are presented.

  12. Electromagnetic results of the Japanese LCT coil's domestic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Masataka; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ando, Toshinari; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1984-01-01

    The domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil was carried out in 1982. During this test, the coil was charged up to the single coil's 100% state (10.22kA, 6.4T, 106MJ) four times and experienced no quenche. at the 100% charging state, coil stability was tested by using heaters installed in the conductor. A half turn length normal zone (about 5 m) generated by heaters was spontenously disappeared in 2 second. This normalized zone included the highest magnetic field position. The transport current which gives the stable limit is extraporated to be about 12.5kA at 8T by this test result. The dump test was carried out also from the 100% charging state. At that time, about 90% of the coil's stored energy was extracted by the dump resistor and the coil was not damaged. (author)

  13. Method and apparatus for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy using microstrip transmission line coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2006-04-04

    Apparatus and method for MRI imaging using a coil constructed of microstrip transmission line (MTL coil) are disclosed. In one method, a target is positioned to be imaged within the field of a main magnetic field of a magnet resonance imaging (MRI) system, a MTL coil is positioned proximate the target, and a MRI image is obtained using the main magnet and the MTL coil. In another embodiment, the MRI coil is used for spectroscopy. MRI imaging and spectroscopy coils are formed using microstrip transmission line. These MTL coils have the advantageous property of good performance while occupying a relatively small space, thus allowing MTL coils to be used inside restricted areas more easily than some other prior art coils. In addition, the MTL coils are relatively simple to construct of inexpensive components and thus relatively inexpensive compared to other designs. Further, the MTL coils of the present invention can be readily formed in a wide variety of coil configurations, and used in a wide variety of ways. Further, while the MTL coils of the present invention work well at high field strengths and frequencies, they also work at low frequencies and in low field strengths as well.

  14. TESLA Coil Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  15. Coil planet centrifugation as a means for small particle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge uses a centrifugal force field to provide separation of particles based on differences in sedimentation rates by flow through a rotating coiled tube. Three main separations are considered: (1) single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes, (2) single phase fixed heep and human erythrocytes, and (3) electrophoretically enhanced single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes.

  16. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuzaki Daisuke

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  17. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  18. Design of a quadrature surface coil for hyperpolarized 13C MRS cardiac metabolism studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, G.; Frijia, F.; Hartwig, V.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the design of a quadrature surface coil constituted by a circular loop and a butterfly coil, employed in transmit/receive (TX/RX) mode for hyperpolarized 13C studies of pig heart with a clinical 3T scanner. The coil characterization is performed by developing an SNR model...... for coil performance evaluation in terms of coil resistance, sample-induced resistance and magnetic field pattern. Experimental SNR-vs.-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), showed good agreement with the theoretical SNR-vs.-depth profiles. Moreover......, the performance of the quadrature coil was compared with the single TX/RX circular and TX/RX butterfly coil, in order to verify the advantage of the proposed configuration over the single coils throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Finally, the quadrature surface coil was tested...

  19. Design, Analysis, Prototyping, and Experimental Evaluation of an Efficient Double Coil Magnetorheological Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Hu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A double coil magnetorheological (MR valve with an outer annular resistance gap was designed and prototyped. The finite element modeling and analysis of double coil MR valve were carried out using ANSYS/Emag software, and the optimal magnetic field distribution and magnetic flux density of the double coil MR valve were achieved. The mechanism of the pressure drop was studied by building a mathematical model of pressure drop in the double coil MR valve. The proposed double coil MR valve was prototyped and its performance was experimentally evaluated. The new MR valve design has improved the efficiency of double coil MR valve significantly.

  20. Structure design of the Westinghouse superconducting magnet for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domeisen, F.N.; Hackworth, D.T.; Stuebinger, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    In the on-going development of superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak reactors, the Large Coil Program (LCP) managed by Union Carbide Corporation will include the design, fabrication, and testing of large superconducting coils to determine their feasibility for use in the magnetic fusion energy effort. Structural analysis of the large coil is essential to ensure adequate safety in the test coil design and confidence in the scalability of the design. This paper will discuss the action of tensile and shear loads on the various materials used in the coil. These loads are of magnetic and thermal origin

  1. Moving coil linear variable differential transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J F; Walstrom, P L

    1978-03-01

    A moving-coil linear variable differential transformer with no ferromagnetic components is described. The device is essentially interchangeable with a conventional moving-core linear variable differential transformer, but is virtually unaffected by ambient magnetic fields up to 8 T. The transducer is connected to a standard commercially available carrier amplifier for signal conditioning.

  2. Parametric design of tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jake J

    2015-05-01

    This paper provides an optimal parametric design for tri-axial nested Helmholtz coils, which are used to generate a uniform magnetic field with controllable magnitude and direction. Circular and square coils, both with square cross section, are considered. Practical considerations such as wire selection, wire-wrapping efficiency, wire bending radius, choice of power supply, and inductance and time response are included. Using the equations provided, a designer can quickly create an optimal set of custom coils to generate a specified field magnitude in the uniform-field region while maintaining specified accessibility to the central workspace. An example case study is included.

  3. Study on Pole Arrangement of the CEDM Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Myoung Goo; Kim, Hyun Min; Cho, Yeon Ho; Choi, Taek Sang

    2013-01-01

    The coil stack assembly is important for reliable operation of the CEDM, there have been efforts to improve the design by optimizing the design parameters such as dimensions and winding turns. However, magnetic forces of the CEDM can also change by different pole arrangement even if their design parameters are the same. Since the latch coil and lift coil are installed connected to each other, they produce magnetically coupled field when they are energized at the same time. This coupling field can affect the magnetic force of the CEDM significantly. In this paper, coil pole arrangement effects are studied. Electro-magnetic analysis is performed for the different pole arrangements of the CEDM coils to calculate the magnetic forces. Pole arrangement effects on magnetic forces were studied by static analysis of the CEDM magnetic field. Magnetic forces were calculated and compared for the two different pole arrangements of the coils. The results show that the magnetic poles of the lift coil and latch coil shall be arranged to have the same magnetic pole direction to achieve higher magnetic force

  4. A Full-Size High-Temperature Superconducting Coil Employed in a Wind Turbine Generator Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Kellers, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    of the full generator. This paper deals with the HTS coil employed in the setup. The coil utilizing YBCO tapes is double-layered with 152 turns per layer and is wound on an FeNi9 iron core. Several sensors are installed to monitor the operating status of the coil, e.g., temperature, field, and voltage...

  5. Development of Ground Coils with Low Eddy Current Loss by Applying the Compression Molding Method after the Coil Winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Aiba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ota, Satoru; Okada, Shigenori

    In a magnetically levitated transportation (MAGLEV) system, a huge number of ground coils will be required because they must be laid for the whole line. Therefore, stable performance and reduced cost are essential requirements for the ground coil development. On the other hand, because the magnetic field changes when the superconducting magnet passes by, an eddy current will be generated in the conductor of the ground coil and will result in energy loss. The loss not only increases the magnetic resistance for the train running but also brings an increase in the ground coil temperature. Therefore, the reduction of the eddy current loss is extremely important. This study examined ground coils in which both the eddy current loss and temperature increase were small. Furthermore, quantitative comparison for the eddy current loss of various magnet wire samples was performed by bench test. On the basis of the comparison, a round twisted wire having low eddy current loss was selected as an effective ground coil material. In addition, the ground coils were manufactured on trial. A favorable outlook to improve the size accuracy of the winding coil and uneven thickness of molded resin was obtained without reducing the insulation strength between the coil layers by applying a compression molding after winding.

  6. Field application. Selective stimulation of reservoirs or perforated intervals with use of coiled tubing equipped with real-time data communication system in combination with straddle packer assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberascher, R.; Breimer, G. [GDF SUEZ E and P Deutschland GmbH, Lingen (Germany); Jonge, R.M. de [Baker Hughes (Netherlands)

    2013-08-01

    In two German gas wells a decline in production and wellhead pressures had been observed. Production logging data obtained by PLT surveys were evaluated, which showed that certain intervals within the reservoir section did not contribute, or showed a restricted contribution to the overall gas production. The restricted contribution was suspected to be caused by near-wellbore damage. To restore or enhance the production of the perforated intervals an acid treatment was considered in these wells in order to remove skin damage. To restore or enhance the production of the wells, an acid treatment of the perforated intervals was designed. For obtaining the required selective placement of the acid across the zones of interest, the use of coiled tubing (CT) in combination with a resettable straddle packer assembly was selected. The accuracy of the setting depth of the straddle packer was a critical issue for the execution of the well intervention operations. In order to obtain the required depth accuracy, the CT string was equipped with an intelligent CT communication system, which transfers real-time downhole data to surface. For the first time, a reservoir stimulation project was executed by combining CT equipped with a real-time data communication system (TeleCoil) and the Inflatable Straddle Acidizing Packer (ISAP) assembly. Inside the CT an encapsulated monoconductor cable was installed to transmit real-time data from the CT Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) to surface. The BHA consists of a Casing Collar Locator (CCL) and downhole pressure and temperature gauges. Due to the protective jacket of the monoconductor cable, there are no restrictions in the use of different fluids in combination with the system. Information provided by the CCL monitoring tool ensures accurate depth correlations, whereas differential pressure measurements from the down-hole pressure gauges provide positive information about the setting and sealing conditions of the straddle packer assembly. The

  7. External split field generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, Thomas George [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Vass, Arpad Alexander [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  8. Coiled-coil networking shapes cell molecular machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xinlei; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yi; Huang, Haolong; Dong, Xiaoxi; Chen, Jinan; Dong, Jiuhong; Yang, Xiao; Hang, Haiying; Jiang, Taijiao

    2012-01-01

    The highly abundant α-helical coiled-coil motif not only mediates crucial protein–protein interactions in the cell but is also an attractive scaffold in synthetic biology and material science and a potential target for disease intervention. Therefore a systematic understanding of the coiled-coil interactions (CCIs) at the organismal level would help unravel the full spectrum of the biological function of this interaction motif and facilitate its application in therapeutics. We report the first identified genome-wide CCI network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which consists of 3495 pair-wise interactions among 598 predicted coiled-coil regions. Computational analysis revealed that the CCI network is specifically and functionally organized and extensively involved in the organization of cell machinery. We further show that CCIs play a critical role in the assembly of the kinetochore, and disruption of the CCI network leads to defects in kinetochore assembly and cell division. The CCI network identified in this study is a valuable resource for systematic characterization of coiled coils in the shaping and regulation of a host of cellular machineries and provides a basis for the utilization of coiled coils as domain-based probes for network perturbation and pharmacological applications. PMID:22875988

  9. Heterodimeric coiled-coil interactions of human GABAB receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmakina, Svetlana; Geng, Yong; Chen, Yan; Fan, Qing R

    2014-05-13

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the CNS. It functions as an obligatory heterodimer of GABAB receptor 1 (GBR1) and GABAB receptor 2 (GBR2) subunits. The association between GBR1 and GBR2 masks an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal in the cytoplasmic region of GBR1 and facilitates cell surface expression of both subunits. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structure of an intracellular coiled-coil heterodimer of human GABAB receptor. We found that polar interactions buried within the hydrophobic core determine the specificity of heterodimer pairing. Disruption of the hydrophobic coiled-coil interface with single mutations in either subunit impairs surface expression of GBR1, confirming that the coiled-coil interaction is required to inactivate the adjacent ER retention signal of GBR1. The coiled-coil assembly buries an internalization motif of GBR1 at the heterodimer interface. The ER retention signal of GBR1 is not part of the core coiled-coil structure, suggesting that it is sterically shielded by GBR2 upon heterodimer formation.

  10. Electrospun Buckling Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Reneker, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning offers a useful way to produce fibers with micron and nanometer scale diameter. The present work deals with the buckling phenomenon characteristic of a jet impinging upon the surface of collector. A viscous jet may have either tensile or compressive forces along its axis. The periodic buckling that is often observed is attributed to the occurrence of compressive forces as the jet decelerates at the collector. With the increase of axial compressive stresses along the jet, a jet with circular cross sections first buckles by formation of sharp folds, and then by formation of coils. The resulting buckling patterns include zigzag patterns and coils that which can be controlled by changing parameters, such as density, viscosity, conductivity, voltage, polymer concentration, distance and volumetric flow rate. Uniformly buckled polymer fibers can be made at a rate of one turn per microsecond. An experimental apparatus was built to continuously collect buckling coils of nylon 6, from a water surface, into a multilayer sheet. These small ``springs'' and sheets will be tested for mechanical properties needed in biomedical applications.

  11. Program NICOLET to integrate energy loss in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1978-08-01

    A voltage pickup coil, inductively coupled to the magnetic field of the superconducting coil under test, is connected so its output may be compared with the terminal voltage of the coil under test. The integrated voltage difference is indicative of the resistive volt-seconds. When multiplied with the main coil current, the volt-seconds yield the loss. In other words, a hysteresis loop is obtained if the integrated voltage difference phi = ∫ΔVdt is plotted as a function of the coil current, i. First, time functions of the two signals phi(t) and i(t) are recorded on a dual-trace digital oscilloscope, and these signals are then recorded on magnetic tape. On a CDC-6600, the recorded information is decoded and plotted, and the hysteresis loops are integrated by the set of FORTRAN programs NICOLET described in this report. 4 figures

  12. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-12-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7- x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10- x (Bi-2223) and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8- x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large coil test structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, J.A.; Hammonds, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being utilized for testing of 2.5 x 3.5-m bore superconducting 8-T magnets produced by four international agencies (U.S., Euratom, Japan, and Switzerland). The definitive tests in the design configuration, six coils arranged in a compact torus, will begin in late 1985. Partial-array tests involving one US coil and the Japanese coil were completed in the fall of 1984. This presentation describes structural analysis using NASTRAN, with symmetry and superelement techniques, to predict the IFSMTF test stand and coil responses to various combinations of in-plane and out-of-plane loading conditions for both the partial-array and six-coil test configurations. Comparison to partial-array displacement and strain measurements are presented and discussed. Six-coil results and their utilization for determining safe levels of operation of the system are likewise discussed

  15. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T...... is suitable for which coil segment is presented. Thus, the performed study gives valuable input for the coil design of HTS machines ensuring optimal usage of HTS tapes....

  16. Optimization of gradient coil technology for human magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronik, Blaine Alexander

    The general problem of identifying the optimal gradient coil design for any given application is addressed in this thesis. The problem is divided into stages. The first step is the development of an optimal mathematical solution for single designs conforming to some set of constraints. The second step is the systematic implementation of the mathematical algorithm to search for the optimal set of design constraints for an intended application, two examples of which are investigated. The final step is the consideration of gradient coil dependent physiological limits specific to the application of strong gradient fields in human subjects. A modified minimum inductance target field method that allows the placement of a set of constraints on the final current density is developed. This constrained current minimum inductance (CCMI) method is derived in the context of previous target field methods. The method has been fully implemented on computer and applied to the design of both central and edge uniformity gradient coils. A three axis gradient coil set that utilizes interleaved, multilayer axes to achieve maximum gradient strengths of over 2000mT/m in rise times of less than 50μs with an inner coil diameter of 5cm was designed. Water cooling was incorporated into the coil to assist in thermal management. The duty cycle for the most extreme cases of single shot EPI is limited by the thermal response and expressions for maximum rates of image collection are given for burst and continuous modes of operation. A three axis gradient coil set with an imaging region extending outside the physical edge of the coil was designed, constructed, and tested. The configuration is compatible with both neck and brain imaging in humans. The coil produces a cylindrical imaging region 16cm in diameter and 16cm in length. The coil axes produce gradient strengths between 80mT/m and 100mT/m at 250A peak current, with minimum rise times of approximately 400μs. Heating tests were performed

  17. Discrete-coil investigations of modular stellarator configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilliequist, C.G.

    1985-10-01

    The existence of a vacuum magnetic well is generally accepted as a prerequisite to start-up. The special set of modular-stellarator configurations selected for the present computational investigation was derived from coefficients and equations that produced finite-beta wells in a continuous-current-sheet representation. The corresponding coils did not produce magnetic wells in a vacuum when their field configuration was investigated with a discrete-coil code. Vacuum magnetic wells have been identified through the use of this discrete-coil code in previous Heliac and stellarator studies. Therefore, these finite-beta magnetic wells could be the consequence of the continuous-current-sheet model: a conjecture that is supported by the linear scaling of the magnetic hills found in the present work as a function of the separation between the coils used. In addition to magnetic field profiles, comparisons are shown here of ripple, rotational transform, and flux-surface shapes for the discrete-coil, modular stellarators under study. Initially, each of the significant parameters affecting the shape of the control surface upon which the coils lie and the deformation of the individual coils was varied separately in search of a vacuum magnetic well in the parameter neighborhood of the successful finite-beta configuration

  18. NSTX Protection And Interlock Systems For Coil And Powers Supply Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Lawson, J.; Neumeyer, C.; Marsala, R.; Schneider, H.

    2009-01-01

    NSTX at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) requires sophisticated plasma positioning control system for stable plasma operation. TF magnetic coils and PF magnetic coils provide electromagnetic fields to position and shape the plasma vertically and horizontally respectively. NSTX utilizes twenty six coil power supplies to establish and initiate electromagnetic fields through the coil system for plasma control. A power protection and interlock system is utilized to detect power system faults and protect the TF coils and PF coils against excessive electromechanical forces, overheating, and over current. Upon detecting any fault condition the power system is restricted, and it is either prevented from initializing or suppressed to de-energize coil power during pulsing. Power fault status is immediately reported to the computer system. This paper describes the design and operation of NSTX's protection and interlocking system and possible future expansion.

  19. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  20. High-resolution structures of a heterochiral coiled coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, David E; Steinkruger, Jay D; Kreitler, Dale F; Perroni, Dominic V; Sorenson, Gregory P; Huang, Lijun; Mittal, Ritesh; Yun, Hyun Gi; Travis, Benjamin R; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K; Forest, Katrina T; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-10-27

    Interactions between polypeptide chains containing amino acid residues with opposite absolute configurations have long been a source of interest and speculation, but there is very little structural information for such heterochiral associations. The need to address this lacuna has grown in recent years because of increasing interest in the use of peptides generated from d amino acids (d peptides) as specific ligands for natural proteins, e.g., to inhibit deleterious protein-protein interactions. Coiled-coil interactions, between or among α-helices, represent the most common tertiary and quaternary packing motif in proteins. Heterochiral coiled-coil interactions were predicted over 50 years ago by Crick, and limited experimental data obtained in solution suggest that such interactions can indeed occur. To address the dearth of atomic-level structural characterization of heterochiral helix pairings, we report two independent crystal structures that elucidate coiled-coil packing between l- and d-peptide helices. Both structures resulted from racemic crystallization of a peptide corresponding to the transmembrane segment of the influenza M2 protein. Networks of canonical knobs-into-holes side-chain packing interactions are observed at each helical interface. However, the underlying patterns for these heterochiral coiled coils seem to deviate from the heptad sequence repeat that is characteristic of most homochiral analogs, with an apparent preference for a hendecad repeat pattern.

  1. Coiled Coils Ensure the Physiological Ectodomain Shedding of Collagen XVII*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishie, Wataru; Jackow, Joanna; Hofmann, Silke C.; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2012-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils, frequent protein oligomerization motifs, are commonly observed in vital proteins. Here, using collagen XVII as an example, we provide evidence for a novel function of coiled coils in the regulation of ectodomain shedding. Transmembrane collagen XVII, an epithelial cell surface receptor, mediates dermal-epidermal adhesion in the skin, and its dysfunction is linked to human skin blistering diseases. The ectodomain of this collagen is constitutively shed from the cell surface by proteinases of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family; however, the mechanisms regulating shedding remain elusive. Here, we used site-specific mutagenesis to target the coiled-coil heptad repeats within the juxtamembranous, extracellular noncollagenous 16th A (NC16A) domain of collagen XVII. This resulted in a substantial increase of ectodomain shedding, which was not mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteases. Instead, conformational changes induced by the mutation(s) unmasked a furin recognition sequence that was used for cleavage. This study shows that apart from their functions in protein oligomerization, coiled coils can also act as regulators of ectodomain shedding depending on the biological context. PMID:22761443

  2. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2013), s. 90-96 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0543; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coiled coil * hydrophilic polymer * recombinant protein Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.905, year: 2013

  3. Competition between Coiled-Coil Structures and the Impact on Myosin-10 Bundle Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavra, Kevin C; Xia, Youlin; Rock, Ronald S

    2016-06-07

    Coiled-coil fusions are a useful approach to enforce dimerization in protein engineering. However, the final structures of coiled-coil fusion proteins have received relatively little attention. Here, we determine the structural outcome of adjacent parallel and antiparallel coiled coils. The targets are coiled coils that stabilize myosin-10 in single-molecule biophysical studies. We reveal the solution structure of a short, antiparallel, myosin-10 coiled-coil fused to the parallel GCN4-p1 coiled coil. Surprisingly, this structure is a continuous, antiparallel coiled coil where GCN4-p1 pairs with myosin-10 rather than itself. We also show that longer myosin-10 segments in these parallel/antiparallel fusions are dynamic and do not fold cooperatively. Our data resolve conflicting results on myosin-10 selection of actin filament bundles, demonstrating the importance of understanding coiled-coil orientation and stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A fast and accurate simulator for the design of birdcage coils in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Landini, Luigi; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Positano, Vincenzo

    2002-11-01

    The birdcage coils are extensively used in MRI systems since they introduce a high signal to noise ratio and a high radiofrequency magnetic field homogeneity that guarantee a large field of view. The present article describes the implementation of a birdcage coil simulator, operating in high-pass and low-pass modes, using magnetostatic analysis of the coil. Respect to other simulators described in literature, our simulator allows to obtain in short time not only the dominant frequency mode, but also the complete resonant frequency spectrum and the relevant magnetic field pattern with high accuracy. Our simulator accounts for all the inductances including the mutual inductances between conductors. Moreover, the inductance calculation includes an accurately birdcage geometry description and the effect of a radiofrequency shield. The knowledge of all the resonance modes introduced by a birdcage coil is twofold useful during birdcage coil design: --higher order modes should be pushed far from the fundamental one, --for particular applications, it is necessary to localize other resonant modes (as the Helmholtz mode) jointly to the dominant mode. The knowledge of the magnetic field pattern allows to a priori verify the field homogeneity created inside the coil, when varying the coil dimension and mainly the number of the coil legs. The coil is analyzed using equivalent circuit method. Finally, the simulator is validated by implementing a low-pass birdcage coil and comparing our data with the literature. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. Development of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] trim coil beam tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses ≅9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development

  6. Progress of the ITER Correction Coils in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, J; Han, S; Yu, X; Du, S; Li, C; Fang, C; Wang, L; Zheng, W; Liu, L; Wen, J; Li, H; Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Cormany, C; Sgobba, S

    2014-01-01

    The ITER Correction Coils (CC) include three sets of six coils each, distributed symmetrically around the tokamak to correct error fields. Each pair of coils, located on opposite sides of the tokamak, is series connected with polarity to produce asymmetric fields. The manufacturing of these superconducting coils is undergoing qualification of the main fabrication processes: winding into multiple pancakes, welding helium inlet/outlet on the conductor jacket, turn and ground insulation, vacuum pressure impregnation, inserting into an austenitic stainless steel case, enclosure welding, and assembling the terminal service box. It has been proceeding by an intense phase of R\\&D, trials tests, and final adjustment of the tooling. This paper mainly describes the progress in ASIPP for the CC manufacturing process before and on qualification phase and the status of corresponding equipment which are ordered or designed for each process. Some test results for the key component and procedure are also presented.

  7. An improved asymmetric gradient coil design for high-resolution MRI head imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fangfang; Liu, Feng; Freschi, Fabio; Li, Yu; Repetto, Maurizio; Giaccone, Luca; Wang, Yaohui; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-12-01

    For head magnetic resonance imaging, local gradient coils are often used to achieve high solution images. To accommodate the human head and shoulder, the head gradient coils are usually designed in an asymmetric configuration, allowing the region-of-uniformity (ROU) close to the coil’s patient end. However, the asymmetric configuration leads to technical difficulties in maintaining a high gradient performance for the insertable head coil with very limited space. In this work, we present a practical design configuration of an asymmetric insertable gradient head coil offering an improved performance. In the proposed design, at the patient end, the primary and secondary coils are connected using an additional radial surface, thus allowing the coil conductors distributed on the flange to ensure an improvement in the coil performance. At the service end, the primary and shielding coils are not connected, to permit access to shim trays, cooling system piping, cabling, and so on. The new designs are compared with conventional coil configurations and the simulation results show that, with a similar field quality in the ROU, the proposed coil pattern has improved construction characteristics (open service end, well-distributed wire pattern) and offers a better coil performance (lower inductance, higher efficiency, etc) than conventional head coil configurations.

  8. Optimization of stimulation and cleaning works with coiled tubing equipments in low productivity wells of the Zuata Field, Junin Block Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, H.; Amaya, R.; Bernard, J. St. [PDVSA (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The Zuata Field in the Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela, has important recoverable reserves but faces sand production and low reservoir pressures in many cases. Thus solid removal and cleaning are necessary and increase stimulation time and cost. The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for minimizing the rig time/cost. This new scheme of completion uses a cleaning technology with CCTU WellVac SandVac to clean the filling and remove formation damage from low pressure wells. Field tests were conducted in the Zuata Field on two wells operated by PDVSA. The new methodology proved successful in stimulating low pressure reservoirs and results showed that sediments were removed without significant loss of fluids, the CAPEX/OPEX per well was reduced and profitability in low and medium production wells increased. The methodology proposed herein was shown to be a good alternative for stimulating and cleaning low productivity wells.

  9. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The widespread coiled-coil structural motif in proteins is known to mediate a variety of biological interactions. Recognizing a coiled-coil containing sequence and locating its coiled-coil domains are key steps towards the determination of the protein structure and function. Different...

  10. Calculation of the beam injector steering system using Helmholtz coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passaro, A.; Sircilli Neto, F.; Migliano, A.C.C.

    1991-03-01

    In this work, a preliminary evaluation of the beam injector steering system of the IEAv electron linac is presented. From the existing injector configuration and with the assumptions of monoenergetic beam (100 keV) and uniform magnetic field, two pairs of Helmholtz coils were calculated for the steering system. Excitations of 105 A.turn and 37 A.turn were determined for the first and second coils, respectively. (author)

  11. "Slinky" coils for neuromagnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, K P; Simpson, R K

    1996-04-01

    Future advances in neuromagnetic stimulation depend significantly on the design of coils with improved focality. Although in the absence of internal current sources, no true focusing of magnetically induced currents is possible, improvements in the focality of current concentrations passing through an area of biologic tissue are achievable through variations of the shape, orientation and size of neuromagnetic stimulating coils. The "butterfly" and the "4-leaf" coils are two examples of planar designs which achieve improved focality through centralization of the maximum coil current and peripheral distribution of the return currents. We introduce the "slinky" coil design as a 3-dimensional generalization of the principle of peripheral distribution of return currents and demonstrate its advantages over planar designs.

  12. Thermal analysis of COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Sugimoto, Daichi; Tei, Kazuyoku; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2004-05-01

    Analysis of heat release into operative gas of Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) is discussed. Pooling reaction of oxygen molecules in the excited state, the iodine dissociation process and the interaction of them with water vapor release energy of in the excited state oxygen molecules as heat energy. As results of heat release in the plenum, a rise of the total pressure as a rise of the total temperature is observed, and in the supersonic region a rise of static pressure and a decrease of total pressure as a rise of total temperature are observed. By following our analysis technique regarding pressure data of three different nozzles, the evaluations such as energy loss in a duct from a Singlet delta Oxygen Generator (SOG) and the number of dissipated oxygen molecules for the iodine dissociation can be estimated.

  13. Progress on the Focus Coil for the MICE Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.Q.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S.; Witte, H.; Green, M.A.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the progress on the magnet part of the absorber focus coil module for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channel that is similar to that studied in Feasibility 2 study of a neutrino factory [1]. The MICE absorber focus coil module consists of a pair of superconducting solenoids, mounted on an aluminum mandrel. The coil package is in its own vacuum vessel located around an absorber. The absorber is within a separate vacuum vessel that is within the warm bore of the focusing magnet. The superconducting focus coils may either be run in the solenoid mode (with the two coils at the same polarity) or in the gradient mode (with the coils at opposite polarity, causing the field direction to flip within the magnet bore). The coils will be cooled using a pair of small 4 K coolers. This report discusses the progress on the MICE focusing magnets, the magnet current supply system, and the quench protection system

  14. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  15. Is umbilical coiling genetically determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Nina K; Ernst, Linda M; Miller, Emily S

    2018-02-21

    Abnormal umbilical cord coiling is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes; however, the etiology of the umbilical coiling pattern is poorly understood. Retrospective cohort of all twin deliveries >20 weeks in 2014. Pregnancies were dichotomized by chorionicity and the umbilical coiling index (UCI) and placental cord insertion location were compared. In cases with one or both cords hypercoiled, the direction and pattern of coiling were compared by chorionicity. A similar analysis was performed stratified by zygosity. Three hundred sisty two twin pairs were included; 26 (7.2%) monochorionic and 174 (87.0%) definitively dizygotic. Concordance in the UCI and coiling category were similar between dichorionic and monochorionic as well as dizygous and monozygous gestations, (73.2% vs 80.8%, p = 0.399 and 71.4% vs 80.8%, p = 0.399, respectively). Analyses of the coiling direction and pattern also demonstrated no difference by chorionicity or zygosity. These data do not support a genetic basis for umbilical cord coiling.

  16. Coiled Coils - A Model System for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupas, Andrei N; Bassler, Jens

    2017-02-01

    α-Helical coiled coils were described more than 60 years ago as simple, repetitive structures mediating oligomerization and mechanical stability. Over the past 20 years, however, they have emerged as one of the most diverse protein folds in nature, enabling many biological functions beyond mechanical rigidity, such as membrane fusion, signal transduction, and solute transport. Despite this great diversity, their structures can be described by parametric equations, making them uniquely suited for rational protein design. Far from having been exhausted as a source of structural insight and a basis for functional engineering, coiled coils are poised to become even more important for protein science in the coming decades. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-linking reveals laminin coiled-coil architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armony, Gad; Jacob, Etai; Moran, Toot; Levin, Yishai; Mehlman, Tevie; Levy, Yaakov; Fass, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Laminin, an ∼800-kDa heterotrimeric protein, is a major functional component of the extracellular matrix, contributing to tissue development and maintenance. The unique architecture of laminin is not currently amenable to determination at high resolution, as its flexible and narrow segments complicate both crystallization and single-particle reconstruction by electron microscopy. Therefore, we used cross-linking and MS, evaluated using computational methods, to address key questions regarding laminin quaternary structure. This approach was particularly well suited to the ∼750-Å coiled coil that mediates trimer assembly, and our results support revision of the subunit order typically presented in laminin schematics. Furthermore, information on the subunit register in the coiled coil and cross-links to downstream domains provide insights into the self-assembly required for interaction with other extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins. PMID:27815530

  18. Productive international collaboration in the large coil task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Komarek, P.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT), initiated in 1977, has been very productive of useful technical information about superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil design and manufacture. Moreover, it has demonstrated close international collaboration in fusion technology development, including integration of large components built in four different countries. Each of six 40-t test coils was designed and produced by a major industrial team, with government laboratory guidance, to a common set of specifications. The six were assembled into a toroidal array for testing in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge. Testing was done by a team of representatives of EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, with each participant having full access to all data. Coils were thoroughly instrumented, enabling penetrating analysis of behavior

  19. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  20. Control and monitoring of the Tore Supra toroidal superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prou, M.

    1989-07-01

    Light nuclei controlled fusion reactions are seen as a possible way to produce nuclear energy. For this reason, the interest in hot plasma researches in tokamaks has increased. The Tore Supra main characteristic is related to the superconducting magnet coils. They allow a suitable energy balance, however, they require an accurate and preventive fault detection. The Tore Supra machine and the different methods to detect a transition (from superconducting to normal mode) in the toroidal coils are described. The voltage of the coils, the pressure of the helium superfluid at 1.8 K and the electric current in the circuit parallel resistances, are measured. A computer aided control system allows the toroidal field monitoring (current in the coils, fault detection). The superconducting magnet configuration chosen for Tore Supra seems to be suitable for future large Tokamak devices [fr

  1. A hybrid optimization method for biplanar transverse gradient coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Feng; Tang Xin; Jin Zhe; Jiang Zhongde; Shen Yifei; Meng Bin; Zu Donglin; Wang Weimin

    2007-01-01

    The optimization of transverse gradient coils is one of the fundamental problems in designing magnetic resonance imaging gradient systems. A new approach is presented in this paper to optimize the transverse gradient coils' performance. First, in the traditional spherical harmonic target field method, high order coefficients, which are commonly ignored, are used in the first stage of the optimization process to give better homogeneity. Then, some cosine terms are introduced into the series expansion of stream function. These new terms provide simulated annealing optimization with new freedoms. Comparison between the traditional method and the optimized method shows that the inhomogeneity in the region of interest can be reduced from 5.03% to 1.39%, the coil efficiency increased from 3.83 to 6.31 mT m -1 A -1 and the minimum distance of these discrete coils raised from 1.54 to 3.16 mm

  2. A new twist in the coil: functions of the coiled-coil domain of structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matityahu, Avi; Onn, Itay

    2018-02-01

    The higher-order organization of chromosomes ensures their stability and functionality. However, the molecular mechanism by which higher order structure is established is poorly understood. Dissecting the activity of the relevant proteins provides information essential for achieving a comprehensive understanding of chromosome structure. Proteins of the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family of ATPases are the core of evolutionary conserved complexes. SMC complexes are involved in regulating genome dynamics and in maintaining genome stability. The structure of all SMC proteins resembles an elongated rod that contains a central coiled-coil domain, a common protein structural motif in which two α-helices twist together. In recent years, the imperative role of the coiled-coil domain to SMC protein activity and regulation has become evident. Here, we discuss recent advances in the function of the SMC coiled coils. We describe the structure of the coiled-coil domain of SMC proteins, modifications and interactions that are mediated by it. Furthermore, we assess the role of the coiled-coil domain in conformational switches of SMC proteins, and in determining the architecture of the SMC dimer. Finally, we review the interplay between mutations in the coiled-coil domain and human disorders. We suggest that distinctive properties of coiled coils of different SMC proteins contribute to their distinct functions. The discussion clarifies the mechanisms underlying the activity of SMC proteins, and advocates future studies to elucidate the function of the SMC coiled coil domain.

  3. A continuous winding scheme for superconducting tokamak coils with cable-in-conduit conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-ho; Chung, Kie-hyung; Lee, Deok Kyo

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting magnet coils are essential for steady-state or long-pulse operation of tokamaks. In an advanced tokamak, the central solenoid (CS) coils are usually divided into several pairs of modules to provide for an extra plasma shaping capability in addition to those available from the shaping (poloidal field) coils. In the conventional pancake winding scheme of superconducting coils, each coil consists of separate superconducting 'double-pancake' coils connected together in series; however, such joints are not superconducting, which is one of the major disadvantages, especially in pulsed operations. A new type of winding was adopted for the ITER CS coil, which consists of cylindrical shell 'layers' joined in series. A disadvantage of this layer winding is its inability to yield modular coils that can provide certain degree of plasma shaping. Joints can be removed in a coil winding pack with the conventional pancake winding scheme, if the conductor is sufficiently long and the winding machine is properly equipped. The compactness, however, cannot be preserved with this scheme. The winding compactness is important since the radial build of the CS coils is one of the major parameters that determine the machine size. In this paper, we present a continuous winding scheme that requires no joints, allows coil fabrication at minimum dimension, and meets the flux swing requirement and other practical aspects

  4. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  5. Coil for LEAR extraction septum

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    Which way does the current flow ? This intriguing object is the coil for the LEAR extraction septum. There were two septa, first a thin one, then this one, not so thin, somewhat on the borderline between septum and bending magnet.

  6. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez [Depto. Electromagnetismo y F. de la Materia Facultad de Ciencias University of Granada Avda. Fuentenueva E-18071 (Spain); Power, Henry, E-mail: ccobos@ugr.e [School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-07

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  7. Coilgun Acceleration Model Containing Interactions Between Multiple Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Connie; Polzin, Kurt; Martin, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) accelerators have the potential to fill a performance range not currently being met by conventional chemical and electric propulsion systems by providing a specific impulse of 600-1000 seconds and a thrust-to-power ratio greater than 200 mN/kW. A propulsion system based on EM acceleration of small projectiles has the traditional advantages of using a pulsed system, including precise control over a range of thrust and power levels as well as rapid response and repetition rates. Furthermore, EM accelerators have lower power requirements than conventional electric propulsion systems since no plasma creation is necessary. A coilgun is a specific type of EM device where a high-current pulse through a coil of wire interacts with a conductive projectile via an induced magnetic field to accelerate the projectile. There are no physical or electrical connections to the projectile, which leads to less system degradation and a longer life expectancy. Multi-staging a coilgun by adding multiple turns on a single coil or on the projectile increases the inductance, thus permitting acceleration of the projectile to higher velocities. Previously, a simplified problem of modeling an inductively-coupled, single-coil coilgun using a circuit-based analysis coupled to the one-dimensional momentum equation through Lenz's law was solved; however, the analysis was only conducted on uncoupled coils. The problem is significantly more complicated when multiple, independently-powered coils simultaneously operate and interact with each other and the projectile through induced magnetic fields. This paper presents a multi-coil model developed with the magnetostatic finite element solver QuickField. In the model, mutual inductance values between pairs of conductors were found by first computing the magnetic field energy for different cases where individual coils or multiple coils carry current, then integrating over the entire finite element domain for each case, and finally

  8. A review of the structural aspects of the Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.; Clinard, J.A.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT) was initiated a decade ago by the United States (US), EURATOM (EU), Japan (JA), and Switzerland (CH) under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to develop superconducting magnets for toroidal field coils for tokamak fusion reactors. Under the IEA agreement, EU, JA, and CH each fabricated one coil and shipped it to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), where the coils were assembled, along with three US coils (GD, GE, and WH), in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) which was designed and built at ORNL. In addition to the fact that six widely varying designs are being tested under similar conditions in the same test facility, the LCT project is unique in at least two other aspects. First, these are the largest superconducting (SC) coils fabricated and tested to date for research and development of SC magnets. Second, as the magnets themselves are the experiment, they are each heavily instrumented; consequently, detailed information on thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance has been obtained, some for the first time on SC magnets of any size. This paper concentrates on those aspects of the tests most relevant for fusion reactor magnets: the structural measurements and simulated nuclear heating tests. Data on the US PB coils (GD and GE) and the US FF coil (WH) are used to illustrate the results. All six coils have achieved 100% design current at 8-T field and that in a symmetric torus arrangement all six coils have been simultaneously energized to 8 T

  9. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.

    2002-01-01

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging using multiple coils for mouse brain connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouls, John C; Badea, Alexandra; Anderson, Robert B J; Cofer, Gary P; Allan Johnson, G

    2018-04-19

    The correlation between brain connectivity and psychiatric or neurological diseases has intensified efforts to develop brain connectivity mapping techniques on mouse models of human disease. The neural architecture of mouse brain specimens can be shown non-destructively and three-dimensionally by diffusion tensor imaging, which enables tractography, the establishment of a connectivity matrix and connectomics. However, experiments on cohorts of animals can be prohibitively long. To improve throughput in a 7-T preclinical scanner, we present a novel two-coil system in which each coil is shielded, placed off-isocenter along the axis of the magnet and connected to a receiver circuit of the scanner. Preservation of the quality factor of each coil is essential to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance and throughput, because mouse brain specimen imaging at 7 T takes place in the coil-dominated noise regime. In that regime, we show a shielding configuration causing no SNR degradation in the two-coil system. To acquire data from several coils simultaneously, the coils are placed in the magnet bore, around the isocenter, in which gradient field distortions can bias diffusion tensor imaging metrics, affect tractography and contaminate measurements of the connectivity matrix. We quantified the experimental alterations in fractional anisotropy and eigenvector direction occurring in each coil. We showed that, when the coils were placed 12 mm away from the isocenter, measurements of the brain connectivity matrix appeared to be minimally altered by gradient field distortions. Simultaneous measurements on two mouse brain specimens demonstrated a full doubling of the diffusion tensor imaging throughput in practice. Each coil produced images devoid of shading or artifact. To further improve the throughput of mouse brain connectomics, we suggested a future expansion of the system to four coils. To better understand acceptable trade-offs between imaging throughput and connectivity

  11. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  12. Improvements in or relating to superconductive coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The windings of a superconducting coil may operate under great stress and movement of the conductors under this stress results in energy dissipation and since specific heats are small at the low temperatures required to induce superconductivity the resultant temperature rise may be sufficient to cause the superconducting properties of the conductor to be impaired. The usual solution to the problem is to employ substantial quantities of normal material in parallel with the superconductor to minimise such effects, but such coils are cumbersome and expensive to produce and operate, and are not suitable for generating intense field gradients. It has been proposed, as an alternative solution, to construct the winding so rigidly as to prevent the movement occurring. Simple potting in an epoxy resin is too brittle to withstand the large stresses. Another proposal involves glass fibre interleaving between layers of winding and then potting in epoxy resin, but this is not very satisfactory. In the arrangement described the winding is wrapped in at least one yard of glass fibre wound helically and the whole is impregnated with epoxy resin. A method for producing such a coil is described. (U.K.)

  13. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Condit, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus is described, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed

  14. Flux Redux: The Spinning Coil Comes around Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Daniel; Dietz, Eric; Zou, Xueli; Ard, Christopher; Lee, Jaydie; Kaneshiro, Chris; Blanton, Robert; Sun, Steven

    2017-01-01

    An essential laboratory exercise for our lower-division electromagnetism course involves the measurement of Earth's local magnetic field from the emf induced in a rotating coil of wire. Although many methods exist for the measurement of Earth's field, this one gives our students some practical experience with Faraday's law. The apparatus we had…

  15. Coil supporting device in nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Ryo; Imura, Yasuya.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To secure intermediate fittings with a coil fixed thereon by an insulating tape to a fixed body by means of fittings, thereby supporting the coil in a narrow space. Structure: A coil is secured to intermediate fittings by means of an insulating tape, after which the intermediate fittings is mounted on a fixed body through fittings to support the coil in a narrow clearance portion between a plasma sealed vessel and a main coil. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Design features of the KSTAR in-vessel control coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.K.; Yang, H.L.; Kim, G.H.; Kim, Jin-Yong; Jhang, Hogun; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.

    2009-01-01

    In-vessel control coils (IVCCs) are to be used for the fast plasma position control, field error correction (FEC), and resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The IVCC system comprises 16 segments to be unified into a single set to achieve following remarkable engineering advantages; (1) enhancement of the coil system reliability with no welding or brazing works inside the vacuum vessel, (2) simplification in fabrication and installation owing to coils being fabricated outside the vacuum vessel and installed after device assembly, and (3) easy repair and maintenance of the coil system. Each segment is designed in 8 turns coil of 32 mm x 15 mm rectangular oxygen free high conductive copper with a 7 mm diameter internal coolant hole. The conductors are enclosed in 2 mm thick Inconel 625 rectangular welded vacuum jacket with epoxy/glass insulation. Structural analyses were implemented to evaluate structural safety against electromagnetic loads acting on the IVCC for the various operation scenarios using finite element analysis. This paper describes the design features and structural analysis results of the KSTAR in-vessel control coils.

  17. Design of an 18 Tesla, tandem mirror, fusion reactor, hybrid choke coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Agarwal, K.; Gurol, H.; Mancuso, A.; Michels, P.H.; Peck, S.D.; Burgeson, J.; Dalder, E.N.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid, part normal part superconducting 18-Tesla solenoid choke coil is designed for a tandem mirror fusion reactor. The present state of the art is represented by the 12-Tesla, superconducting NbSn coil. Future applications other than tandem mirror fusion devices needing high field solenoids might require hybrid magnets of the type described herein. The hybrid design was generated because of critical field performance limitations on present, practical superconducting wires. A hybrid design might be required (due to structural limits) even if the critical field were higher. Also, hybrids could be a cost-effective way of getting very high fields for certain applications. The 18-Tesla solenoid described is composed of an inner coil made of water-cooled, high-strength zirconium copper which generates 3 Tesla. A superconducting NbSn background coil contributes the remaining 15 Tesla. The focus of the design study was on the inner coil. Demonstration fabrication and testing was performed

  18. Results of the international Large Coil Task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W.A.; Gauss, S.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an international development effort involving the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. The full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  19. On modular stellarator coils of the W VII-AS type with reactor dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modular Stellarator coil systems of the W VII-AS type with reactor dimensions are investigated. They comprise 5 field periods with 6 to 18 coils within each. Two groups of configurations are compared. The first group is characterized by the major torus radius of R 0 = 25.5 m and a distance between plasma and coils of ccdcc 1.8 m. The field on plasma axis amounts to B 3 = 5.3 T. In the second group the geometric dimensions are decreased. The major torus radius amounts to R 3 = 15.2 m, and a distance of about 1.2 m is chosen between plasma and coils. The field on plasma axis is enlarged to B 3 = 7 T. The total stored magnetic energy of the coil systems and the maximum magnetic flux density at the coils are calculated. Furthermore, the magnetic forces and mechanical stresses are evaluated, and two different support concepts for the coils are investigated: A single coil support scheme (outer and lateral support elements plus elastic padding), as well as a novel scheme of mutual coil support

  20. Electromagnetic-thermal-structural coupling analysis of the ITER edge localized mode coil with flexible supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanwen; Song, Yuntao; Tang, Linlin; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang; Du, Shuangsong

    2017-05-01

    In a fusion reactor, the edge localized mode (ELM) coil has a mitigating effect on the ELMs of the plasma. The coil is placed close to the plasma between the vacuum vessel and the blanket to reduce its design power and improve its mitigating ability. The coil works in a high-temperature, high-nuclear-heat and high-magnetic-field environment. Due to the existence of outer superconducting coils, the coil is subjected to an alternating electromagnetic force induced by its own alternating current and the outer magnetic field. The design goal for the ELM coil is to maintain its structural integrity in the multi-physical field. Taking as an example the middle ELM coil (with flexible supports) of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor), an electromagnetic-thermal-structural coupling analysis is carried out using ANSYS. The results show that the flexible supports help the three-layer casing meet the static and fatigue design requirements. The structural design of the middle ELM coil is reasonable and feasible. The work described in this paper provides the theoretical basis and method for ELM coil design.

  1. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar I; Mandija, Stefano; Sommer, Iris E C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-01-01

    Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM), there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations. We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations. Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation. TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation.

  2. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar I Petrov

    Full Text Available Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM, there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations.We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations.Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation.TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation.

  3. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, Stefano; Sommer, Iris E. C.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM), there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations. Methods We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations. Results Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation. Conclusion TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation PMID:28640923

  4. Ring Coils on the Endcap Yoke of a CLIC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gerwig, H

    2011-01-01

    Ring coils on the endcap return yoke can be useful in several ways. Depending on their size and the current chosen, they may either be used to reduce the fringe-field outside the return yoke of a detector, or to reduce considerably the thickness of the endcap yoke. The main focus of this note is the analysis of the ring coils, with the aim to reduce the overall length of the CLIC_ILD detector. In addition, some results concerning the fringe field in the vicinity of the detector are shown.

  5. Single-molecule observation of helix staggering, sliding, and coiled coil misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Gao, Ying; Sirinakis, George; Guo, Honglian; Zhang, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The biological functions of coiled coils generally depend on efficient folding and perfect pairing of their α-helices. Dynamic changes in the helical registry that lead to staggered helices have only been proposed for a few special systems and not found in generic coiled coils. Here, we report our observations of multiple staggered helical structures of two canonical coiled coils. The partially folded structures are formed predominantly by coiled coil misfolding and occasionally by helix sliding. Using high-resolution optical tweezers, we characterized their energies and transition kinetics at a single-molecule level. The staggered states occur less than 2% of the time and about 0.1% of the time at zero force. We conclude that dynamic changes in helical registry may be a general property of coiled coils. Our findings should have broad and unique implications in functions and dysfunctions of proteins containing coiled coils. PMID:22451899

  6. Designed Coiled Coils Promote Folding of a Recombinant Bacterial Collagen*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Fletcher, Jordan M.; Yu, Zhuoxin; Persikov, Anton V.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Boyle, Aimee L.; Vincent, Thomas L.; Woolfson, Derek N.; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Collagen triple helices fold slowly and inefficiently, often requiring adjacent globular domains to assist this process. In the Streptococcus pyogenes collagen-like protein Scl2, a V domain predicted to be largely α-helical, occurs N-terminal to the collagen triple helix (CL). Here, we replace this natural trimerization domain with a de novo designed, hyperstable, parallel, three-stranded, α-helical coiled coil (CC), either at the N terminus (CC-CL) or the C terminus (CL-CC) of the collagen domain. CD spectra of the constructs are consistent with additivity of independently and fully folded CC and CL domains, and the proteins retain their distinctive thermal stabilities, CL at ∼37 °C and CC at >90 °C. Heating the hybrid proteins to 50 °C unfolds CL, leaving CC intact, and upon cooling, the rate of CL refolding is somewhat faster for CL-CC than for CC-CL. A construct with coiled coils on both ends, CC-CL-CC, retains the ∼37 °C thermal stability for CL but shows less triple helix at low temperature and less denaturation at 50 °C. Most strikingly however, in CC-CL-CC, the CL refolds slower than in either CC-CL or CL-CC by almost two orders of magnitude. We propose that a single CC promotes folding of the CL domain via nucleation and in-register growth from one end, whereas initiation and growth from both ends in CC-CL-CC results in mismatched registers that frustrate folding. Bioinformatics analysis of natural collagens lends support to this because, where present, there is generally only one coiled-coil domain close to the triple helix, and it is nearly always N-terminal to the collagen repeat. PMID:21454493

  7. Computational analysis of residue contributions to coiled-coil topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jorge; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-01-01

    A variety of features are thought to contribute to the oligomeric and topological specificity of coiled coils. In previous work, we examined the determinants of oligomeric state. Here, we examine the energetic basis for the tendency of six coiled-coil peptides to align their α-helices in antiparallel orientation using molecular dynamics simulations with implicit solvation (EEF1.1). We also examine the effect of mutations known to disrupt the topology of these peptides. In agreement with experiment, ARG or LYS at a or d positions were found to stabilize the antiparallel configuration. The modeling suggests that this is not due to a–a′ or d–d′ repulsions but due to interactions with e′ and g′ residues. TRP at core positions also favors the antiparallel configuration. Residues that disfavor parallel dimers, such as ILE at d, are better tolerated in, and thus favor the antiparallel configuration. Salt bridge networks were found to be more stabilizing in the antiparallel configuration for geometric reasons: antiparallel helices point amino acid side chains in opposite directions. However, the structure with the largest number of salt bridges was not always the most stable, due to desolvation and configurational entropy contributions. In tetramers, the extent of stabilization of the antiparallel topology by core residues is influenced by the e′ residue on a neighboring helix. Residues at b and c positions in some cases also contribute to stabilization of antiparallel tetramers. This work provides useful rules toward the goal of designing coiled coils with a well-defined and predictable three-dimensional structure. PMID:21858887

  8. The Calculated and Measured Resistance for Splices between Conductors in a MICE Superconducting Coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Dietderich, Dan; Higley, Hugh; Pan, Heng; Tam, Darren; Trillaud, Federic; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Xu, Feng Yu

    2009-03-19

    The resistance of superconducting joints within MICE coils is an important issue particularly for the coupling coils. The MICE tracker solenoids have only two superconducting joints in the three spectrometer set (end coil 1, the center coil and end coil 2). The AFC magnets may have only a single joint within the coil. The coupling coils may have as many as fifteen joints within the coil, due to relatively short piece lengths of the superconductor. LBNL and ICST looked at three types of coil joints. They are: (1) cold fusion butt joints, (2) side-by-side lap joints, and (3) up-down lap joints. A theoretical calculation of the joint resistance was done at LBNL and checked by ICST. After looking at the theoretical resistance of the three types of joints, it was decided that the cold welded butt joint was not an attractive alternative for joints within a MICE superconducting magnet coil. Side-by-side and up-down lap joints were fabricated at ICST using two types of soft solder between the conductors. These conductor joints were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields. The joint resistance was compared with the theoretical calculations. Measurements of splice strength were also made at 300 K and 77 K.

  9. Efficiency evaluation of a 13C Magnetic Resonance birdcage coil: Theory and comparison of four methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    .Coil efficiency, defined as the B1 magnetic field induced at a given point on the square root of supplied power P, is an important parameter that characterizes coil performance, since by maximizing efficiency will also maximize the signal-to-noise ratio.This work describes and compares four methods for coil...... efficiency estimation, based on different theoretical approaches. Three methods allow efficiency measurement by using “probe techniques” (perturbing loop, perturbing sphere and pick-up coil), which can be used both on the bench and inside the scanner, while an “NMR technique” has been employed for comparison...

  10. Self-assembled artificial viral capsids bearing coiled-coils at the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Seiya; Matsuura, Kazunori

    2017-06-14

    In order to construct artificial viral capsids bearing complementary dimeric coiled-coils on the surface, a β-annulus peptide bearing a coiled-coil forming sequence at the C-terminus (β-annulus-coiled-coil-B) was synthesized by a native chemical ligation of a β-annulus-SBn peptide with a Cys-containing coiled-coil-B peptide. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that the β-annulus-coiled-coil-B peptide self-assembled into spherical structures of about 50 nm in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated the formation of the complementary coiled-coil structure on the spherical assemblies. Addition of 0.25 equivalent of the complementary coiled-coil-A peptide to the β-annulus-coiled-coil-B peptide showed the formation of spherical assemblies of 46 ± 14 nm with grains of 5 nm at the surface, whereas addition of 1 equivalent of the complementary coiled-coil-A peptide generated fibrous assemblies.

  11. Coiled-coil domains enhance the membrane association of Salmonella type III effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodler, Leigh A; Ibarra, J Antonio; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Yip, Calvin K; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2011-10-01

    Coiled-coil domains in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins contribute to diverse structural and regulatory functions. Here we have used in silico analysis to predict which proteins in the proteome of the enteric pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, harbour coiled-coil domains. We found that coiled-coil domains are especially prevalent in virulence-associated proteins, including type III effectors. Using SopB as a model coiled-coil domain type III effector, we have investigated the role of this motif in various aspects of effector function including chaperone binding, secretion and translocation, protein stability, localization and biological activity. Compared with wild-type SopB, SopB coiled-coil mutants were unstable, both inside bacteria and after translocation into host cells. In addition, the putative coiled-coil domain was required for the efficient membrane association of SopB in host cells. Since many other Salmonella effectors were predicted to contain coiled-coil domains, we also investigated the role of this motif in their intracellular targeting in mammalian cells. Mutation of the predicted coiled-coil domains in PipB2, SseJ and SopD2 also eliminated their membrane localization in mammalian cells. These findings suggest that coiled-coil domains represent a common membrane-targeting determinant for Salmonella type III effectors. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  13. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi [University of Patras, 26505 Rio, Patras (Greece); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  14. Role of the large coil program in the development of superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three U.S. industrial teams are designing and will build one coil each to a common set of specifications. Coil specifications and test conditions were chosen to insure maximum relevance to fusion program needs. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape bore, will contain about 7 MA-turns, and must operate at a peak field of 8 T while subjected to pulsed fields up to 0.14 T in a test stand that can accommodate up to 6 coils in a compact toroidal array. Coils by General Dynamics/Convair and General Electric will use different NbTi conductors cooled by pool-boiling helium. The Westinghouse coil will use Nb 3 Sn cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. These coils will be delivered in 1980 and 1981 for testing in the Large Coil Test Facility at Oak Ridge in a compact toroidal array with three coils from outside the U.S. These will be produced by EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland for testing under an International Energy Agency agreement

  15. Structural and biochemical characterizations of an intramolecular tandem coiled coil protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghyuk; Kim, Gwanho; Kim, Gyuhee; Zheng, Xu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Lee, Sangho

    2014-12-12

    Coiled coil has served as an excellent model system for studying protein folding and developing protein-based biomaterials. Most designed coiled coils function as oligomers, namely intermolecular coiled coils. However, less is known about structural and biochemical behavior of intramolecular coiled coils where coiled coil domains are covalently linked in one polypeptide. Here we prepare a protein which harbors three coiled coil domains with two short linkers, termed intramolecular tandem coiled coil (ITCC) and characterize its structural and biochemical behavior in solution. ITCC consists of three coiled coil domains whose sequences are derived from Coil-Ser and its domain swapped dimer. Modifications include positioning E (Glu) residue at "e" and K (Lys) at "g" positions throughout heptad repeats to enhance ionic interaction among its constituent coiled coil domains. Molecular modeling of ITCC suggests a compact triple helical bundle structure with the second and the third coiled coil domains forming a canonical coiled coil. ITCC exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric species in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals ellipsoidal molecular envelopes for both dimeric and monomeric ITCC in solution. The theoretically modeled structures of ITCC dock well into the envelopes of both species. Higher ionic strength shifts the equilibrium into monomer with apparently more compact structure while secondary structure remains unchanged. Taken together, our results suggest that our designed ITCC is predominantly monomeric structure through the enhanced ionic interactions, and its conformation is affected by the concentration of ionic species in the buffer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anharmonic Oscillations of a Spring-Magnet System inside a Magnetic Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear oscillations of a simple spring-magnet system that oscillates in the magnetic field of an inductive coil excited with a dc current. Using the relations for the interaction of a coil and a magnet we obtain the motion equation of the system. The relative strengths of the terms of this equation can be adjusted easily by…

  17. A 2-in-1 single-element coil design for transcranial magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai; Wang, Shumin

    2018-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of turning transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil for MRI signal reception. A critically coupled network was formed by using a resonated turn of TMS coil as the secondary and a regular radiofrequency (RF) coil as the primary. A third coil was positioned between the two coils for detuning during RF transmission. Bench measurement, numerical simulation, and MRI experiment were performed for validation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the proposed 2-in-1 coil is 35% higher in its field of view, compared with a MRI-only reference coil of the same size, made by the same material, and backed up by an untuned TMS coil, but lower than a RF surface coil of the same size without any TMS coil nearby. Spin-echo images of the human brain further validated its performance. The proposed method can transform TMS coil for MRI signal acquisition with virtually no modifications on the TMS side. It not only enables flexible and close positioning of TMS coil inside MRI scanner, but also improves the signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional implementations. It can be applied as a building block for developing advanced concurrent TMS/MRI hardware. Magn Reson Med 79:582-587, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Comprehensive Survey on Improved Focality and Penetration Depth of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Employing Multi-Coil Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xile Wei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-coil arrays applied in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS are proposed to accurately stimulate brain tissues and modulate neural activities by an induced electric field (EF. Composed of numerous independently driven coils, a multi-coil array has alternative energizing strategies to evoke EFs targeting at different cerebral regions. To improve the locating resolution and the stimulating focality, we need to fully understand the variation properties of induced EFs and the quantitative control method of the spatial arrangement of activating coils, both of which unfortunately are still unclear. In this paper, a comprehensive analysis of EF properties was performed based on multi-coil arrays. Four types of planar multi-coil arrays were used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of EFs and the structure of stimuli coils. By changing coil-driven strategies in a basic 16-coil array, we find that an EF induced by compactly distributed coils decays faster than that induced by dispersedly distributed coils, but the former has an advantage over the latter in terms of the activated brain volume. Simulation results also indicate that the attenuation rate of an EF induced by the 36-coil dense array is 3 times and 1.5 times greater than those induced by the 9-coil array and the 16-coil array, respectively. The EF evoked by the 36-coil dispense array has the slowest decay rate. This result demonstrates that larger multi-coil arrays, compared to smaller ones, activate deeper brain tissues at the expense of decreased focality. A further study on activating a specific field of a prescribed shape and size was conducted based on EF variation. Accurate target location was achieved with a 64-coil array 18 mm in diameter. A comparison between the figure-8 coil, the planar array, and the cap-formed array was made and demonstrates an improvement of multi-coil configurations in the penetration depth and the focality. These findings suggest

  19. Open-coil retraction spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2011-01-01

    Sliding mechanic has become a popular method for space closure with developments in preadjusted edgewise appliance. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and evaluated extensively for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low-load deflection rate (LDR)/force decay. With the advent of NiTi springs in orthodontics, LDRs have been markedly reduced. For use of NiTi, clinician has to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. "Open Coil Retraction Spring (OCRS)" is developed utilizing NiTi open-coil spring for orthodontic space closure. This paper describes fabrication and clinical application of OCRS which have number of advantages. It sustains low LDR with optimum force magnitude. Its design is adjustable for desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (i.e., it cannot be over activated, and decompression limit of open coil is also controlled by the operator, resp.). A possibility to offset the OCRS away from mucosa helps to reduce its soft-tissue impingement.

  20. Open-Coil Retraction Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mechanic has become a popular method for space closure with developments in preadjusted edgewise appliance. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and evaluated extensively for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low-load deflection rate (LDR/force decay. With the advent of NiTi springs in orthodontics, LDRs have been markedly reduced. For use of NiTi, clinician has to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. “Open Coil Retraction Spring (OCRS” is developed utilizing NiTi open-coil spring for orthodontic space closure. This paper describes fabrication and clinical application of OCRS which have number of advantages. It sustains low LDR with optimum force magnitude. Its design is adjustable for desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (i.e., it cannot be over activated, and decompression limit of open coil is also controlled by the operator, resp.. A possibility to offset the OCRS away from mucosa helps to reduce its soft-tissue impingement.

  1. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  2. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  3. Multi-turn transmit coil to increase b1 efficiency in current source amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudino, N; Griswold, M A

    2013-04-01

    A multi-turn transmit surface coil design was presented to improve B1 efficiency when used with current source amplification. Three different coil designs driven by an on-coil current-mode class-D amplifier with current envelope feedback were tested on the benchtop and through imaging in a 1.5 T scanner. Case temperature of the power field-effect transistor at the amplifier output stage was measured to evaluate heat dissipation for the different current levels and coil configurations. In addition, a lower power rated device was tested to exploit the potential gain in B1 obtained with the multi-turn coil. As shown both on the benchtop and in a 1.5 T scanner, B1 was increased by almost 3-fold without increasing heat dissipation on the power device at the amplifier's output using a multi-turn surface coil. Similar gain was obtained when connecting a lower power rated field-effect transistor to the multi-turn coil. In addition to reduce heat dissipation per B1 in the device, higher B1 per current efficiency allows the use of field-effect transistors with lower current ratings and lower port capacitances, which could improve the overall performance of the on-coil current source transmit system. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Pla...

  5. Are coiled-coils of dimeric kinesins unwound during their walking on microtubule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Xie, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2012-01-01

    Dimeric kinesin motor proteins such as homodimeric kinesin-1, homodimeric Ncd and heterodimeric Kar3/Vik1are composed of two head domains which are connected together by a rod-shaped, coiled-coil stalk. Despite the extensive and intensive studies on structures, kinetics, dynamics and walking mechanism of the dimers, whether their coiled-coils are unwound or not during their walking on the microtubule is still an unclear issue. Here, we try to clarify this issue by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulation results showed that, for Ncd, a large change in potential of mean force is required to unwind the coiled-coil by only several pairs of residues. For both Ncd and kinesin-1, the force required to initiate the coiled-coil unwinding is larger than that required for unfolding of the single [Formula: see text]-helix that forms the coiled-coil or is larger than that required to unwind the DNA duplex, which is higher than the unbinding force of the kinesin head from the microtubule in strong microtubule-binding states. Based on these results and the comparison of the sequence between the coiled-coil of Kar3/Vik1 and those of Ncd and kinesin-1, it was deduced that the coiled-coil of the Kar3/Vik1 should also be very stable. Thus, we concluded that the coiled-coils of kinesin-1, Ncd and Kar3/Vik1 are almost impossible to unwind during their walking on the microtubule.

  6. Novel TMS coils designed using an inverse boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos Sánchez, Clemente; María Guerrero Rodriguez, Jose; Quirós Olozábal, Ángel; Blanco-Navarro, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new method to design TMS coils is presented. It is based on the inclusion of the concept of stream function of a quasi-static electric current into a boundary element method. The proposed TMS coil design approach is a powerful technique to produce stimulators of arbitrary shape, and remarkably versatile as it permits the prototyping of many different performance requirements and constraints. To illustrate the power of this approach, it has been used for the design of TMS coils wound on rectangular flat, spherical and hemispherical surfaces, subjected to different constraints, such as minimum stored magnetic energy or power dissipation. The performances of such coils have been additionally described; and the torque experienced by each stimulator in the presence of a main magnetic static field have theoretically found in order to study the prospect of using them to perform TMS and fMRI concurrently. The obtained results show that described method is an efficient tool for the design of TMS stimulators, which can be applied to a wide range of coil geometries and performance requirements.

  7. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  8. The umbilical coiling index in normal pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diik, C. C.; Franx, A.; de Laat, M. W. M.; Bruinse, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Nikkels, P. G. J.

    2002-01-01

    To provide reference values for the umbilical coiling index in uncomplicated pregnancy. Umbilical cords were collected from livebom singleton infants born after uncomplicated pregnancies. The umbilical coiling index (UCI) was calculated as the number of coils divided by the cord length in

  9. The umbilical coiling index in complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; van Alderen, Elise D.; Franx, Arie; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Bots, Michiel L.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate umbilical cord coiling in pregnancies with adverse outcome. Umbilical cords and hospital records of 565 consecutive cases with an indication for histological examination of the placenta were studied. The umbilical coiling index (UCI) was determined as the number of complete coils divided

  10. Development of SMART CRDM Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Suhn; Park, Hee June

    2011-01-01

    A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is an electromagnetic device which drives a control rod assembly linearly to regulate reactivity of a nuclear core. Driving force is electromagnetic force generated from coils installed outside of a motor housing. The magnetic parts of a motor assembly installed inside of a motor housing are magnetized when a coil is activated, and adhere to each other to produce latching or driving force as a result. A coil assembly consists of a lifting coil, a movable latch coil and a stationary latch coil as shown in Fig. 1. The latch coils make a drive shaft engaged with or released from latches, and the lift coil makes a drive shaft and a control rod assembly move up or drop. A CRDM control system supplies controlled electric current to a specified coil in order, and then a control rod assembly moves up or down. The coil assembly for SMART CRDM has been developed based on the design concept of a coil assembly for control element drive mechanism (CEDM) of the OPR1000, and modified to satisfy dedicated design requirements for SMART reactor. Some of representative design requirements are the lifting capacity of 3200N which is greater, the lifting step of 15.875mm which is longer than that for CEDM, and one step driving instead of two step driving. Design process through an electromagnetic analysis for a lift coil is described herein as a representative example, and representative results of the analysis are presented

  11. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Sumit; Weijun, Shen; Yager, Billy

    1994-01-01

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet having a relaely dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel.

  12. Optimal position of the transmitter coil for wireless power transfer to the implantable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinghui Jian; Stanaćević, Milutin

    2014-01-01

    The maximum deliverable power through inductive link to the implantable device is limited by the tissue exposure to the electromagnetic field radiation. By moving away the transmitter coil from the body, the maximum deliverable power is increased as the magnitude of the electrical field at the interface with the body is kept constant. We demonstrate that the optimal distance between the transmitter coil and the body is on the order of 1 cm when the current of the transmitter coil is limited to 1 A. We also confirm that the conditions on the optimal frequency of the power transmission and the topology of the transmission coil remain the same as if the coil was directly adjacent to the body.

  13. Experience highlights from the design and manufacture of US LCT coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbe, R.K.; Amonett, C.M.; Benson, R.D.; Hussung, R.O.; Shipley, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The international Large Coil Task (LCT) is a major activity in the development of superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for tokamak fusion reactors. The technical objective of this program is to design, build, and test six large TF coils, thereby producing information and data that can be used directly by program planners and designers of tokamak reactors. After an intensive competitive bidding cycle, contracts were awarded in 1977 to three US industrial firms for the design and manufacture of test coils. Subsequently Japan, EURATOM, and Switzerland agreed to supply one coil each. External dimensions and minimum performance requirements are identical but freedom was allowed in the choice of internal design and manufacturing techniques. All six coils will be tested in a compact toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. With the coil fabrication phase approaching completion, it is an appropriate time to review the major technical challenges and lessons from the design and manufacture of the three US LCT coils

  14. An insertable nonlinear gradient coil for phase compensation in SEA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, John C; McDougall, Mary Preston; Wright, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging with array coils with many elements, as the radiofrequency (RF) coil dimensions approach the voxel dimensions, the phase gradient due to the magnetic field pattern of the coil causes signal cancellation within each voxel. In single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging with coil arrays, a gradient pulse can be applied to compensate for this effect. However, because RF coil phase varies with distance from the array and reverses on opposite sides of a dual-sided array, this method of phase compensation can be optimized for only a single slice at a time. In this study, a nonlinear gradient coil was implemented to provide spatially varying phase compensation to offset the coil phase with slice position for dual-sided arrays of narrow coils. This nonlinear gradient coil allows the use of one phase compensation pulse for imaging multiple slices through a slab, and, importantly, is shown to enable simultaneous SEA imaging from opposite sides of a sample using a dual-sided receive array.

  15. An improved current potential method for fast computation of stellarator coil shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreman, Matt

    2017-04-01

    Several fast methods for computing stellarator coil shapes are compared, including the classical NESCOIL procedure (Merkel 1987 Nucl. Fusion 27 867), its generalization using truncated singular value decomposition, and a Tikhonov regularization approach we call REGCOIL in which the squared current density is included in the objective function. Considering W7-X and NCSX geometries, and for any desired level of regularization, we find the REGCOIL approach simultaneously achieves lower surface-averaged and maximum values of both current density (on the coil winding surface) and normal magnetic field (on the desired plasma surface). This approach therefore can simultaneously improve the free-boundary reconstruction of the target plasma shape while substantially increasing the minimum distances between coils, preventing collisions between coils while improving access for ports and maintenance. The REGCOIL method also allows finer control over the level of regularization, it preserves convexity to ensure the local optimum found is the global optimum, and it eliminates two pathologies of NESCOIL: the resulting coil shapes become independent of the arbitrary choice of angles used to parameterize the coil surface, and the resulting coil shapes converge rather than diverge as Fourier resolution is increased. We therefore contend that REGCOIL should be used instead of NESCOIL for applications in which a fast and robust method for coil calculation is needed, such as when targeting coil complexity in fixed-boundary plasma optimization, or for scoping new stellarator geometries.

  16. Modular assembly of a protein nanotriangle using orthogonally interacting coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won Min; Bedewy, Mostafa; Berggren, Karl K; Keating, Amy E

    2017-09-05

    Synthetic protein assemblies that adopt programmed shapes would support many applications in nanotechnology. We used a rational design approach that exploits the modularity of orthogonally interacting coiled coils to create a self-assembled protein nanotriangle. Coiled coils have frequently been used to construct nanoassemblies and materials, but rarely with successful prior specification of the resulting structure. We designed a heterotrimer from three pairs of heterodimeric coiled coils that mediate specific interactions while avoiding undesired crosstalk. Non-associating pairs of coiled-coil units were strategically fused to generate three chains that were predicted to preferentially form the heterotrimer, and a rational annealing process led to the desired oligomer. Extensive biophysical characterization and modeling support the formation of a molecular triangle, which is a shape distinct from naturally occurring supramolecular nanostructures. Our approach can be extended to design more complex nanostructures using additional coiled-coil modules, other protein parts, or templated surfaces.

  17. The clear and dark sides of water: influence on the coiled coil folding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Tamás; Perczel, András

    2016-06-01

    The essential role of water in extra- and intracellular coiled coil structures of proteins is critically evaluated, and the different protein types incorporating coiled coil units are overviewed. The following subjects are discussed: i) influence of water on the formation and degradation of the coiled coil domain together with the stability of this conformer type; ii) the water's paradox iii) design of coiled coil motifs and iv) expert opinion and outlook is presented. The clear and dark sides refer to the positive and negative aspects of the water molecule, as it may enhance or inhibit a given folding event. This duplicity can be symbolized by the Roman 'Janus-face' which means that water may facilitate and stimulate coiled coil structure formation, however, it may contribute to the fatal processes of oligomerization and amyloidosis of the very same polypeptide chain.

  18. Scaffolds, levers, rods and springs: diverse cellular functions of long coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A; Meier, I

    2004-08-01

    Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in a variety of organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems, motors, levers, rotating arms and possibly springs. A growing number of human diseases are found to be caused by mutations in long coiled-coil proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the multifaceted group of long coiled-coil proteins in the cytoskeleton, nucleus, Golgi and cell division apparatus. The biophysical features of coiled-coil domains provide first clues toward their contribution to the diverse protein functions and promise potential future applications in the area of nanotechnology. Combining the power of fully sequenced genomes and structure prediction algorithms, it is now possible to comprehensively summarize and compare the complete inventory of coiled-coil proteins of different organisms.

  19. Non-uniformity of Clinical Head, Head and Neck, and Body Coils in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nazarpoor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Signal intensity uniformity in a magnetic resonance (MR image indicates how well the MR imaging (MRI system represents an object. One of the major sources of image non-uniformity in high-field MRI scanners is inhomogeneity of radio-frequency coil. The aim of this study was to investigate non-uniformity in head, head and neck, and body coils and compare the obtained results to determine the best clinical coil for future clinical application. Materials and Methods A phantom was designed to investigate the non-uniformity of coils. All evaluations were carried out using a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. T1-weighted inversion recovery sequence (linear phase encoding and turbo fast low angle shot (TurboFLASH images were used to find non-uniformity in the clinical coils. For testing the uniformity of coils, signal intensity profiles in parts of the coronal image of phantom were measured over X and Y axes. Results The results showed that body coil was the most uniform coil of all; in addition, the head and neck coil was more uniform than the head coil. The results also indicated that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the head and neck coil was higher than the head and body coils. Moreover, SNR of the head coil was higher than that of the body coil. Conclusion In order to accurately find or apply an image signal intensity for measuring organ blood flow or perfusion, coil non-uniformity corrections are required.

  20. Electromagnetic flat sheet forming by spiral type actuator coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, S.; Aleem, M. A.; Sarwar, M. N.; Zillohu, A. U.; Awan, M. S.; Haider, A.; Ahmad, Z.; Akhtar, S.; Farooque, M.

    2016-08-01

    Focus of present work is to develop a setup for high strain rate electromagnetic forming of thin aluminum sheets (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) and optimization of forming parameters. Flat spiral coil of 99.9% pure Cu strip (2.5x8.0 mm) with self-inductance 11 μH, 13 no. of turns and resultant outer diameter of 130mm has been fabricated and was coupled to a capacitor bank of energy, voltage and capacitance of 9 kJ, 900 V and 22.8 mF, respectively. To optimize the coil design, a commercially available software FEMM-4.2 was used to simulate the electromagnetic field profile generated by the coils of different pitch but same number of turns. Results of electromagnetic field intensity proposed by simulation agree in close proximity with those of theoretical as well as experimental data. The calculation of electromagnetic force and magnetic couplings between the coil and metal sheet are made. Forming parameters were optimized for different sheet thicknesses. Electromagnetic field intensity's profile plays a principal role in forming of typical shapes and patterns in sheets.

  1. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  2. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-12-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at - 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at - 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  3. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  4. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  5. In-line evanescent-wave microfluidic absorption sensor based on an embedded optical microfiber coil

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzi, R.; Jung, Y.; Brambilla, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the absorption spectra collected with an evanescent-field absorption sensor. The device comprises an active fluidic channel with an embedded microfiber coil resonator. Deviations from Beer-Lambert law will be discussed in terms of adsorption mechanism.

  6. A Birdcage Coil Tuned by RF Shielding for Application at 9.4 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Li, Shizhe; Collins, Christopher M.; Williams, Gerald D.; Smith, Michael B.

    1998-03-01

    The design and performance of an inductively fed low-pass birdcage radiofrequency (RF) coil for applications at 9.4 T are described where tuning is accomplished by mechanically moving a concentric RF shield about the longitudinal axis of an RF coil. Moving the shield about the RF coil effectively changes the mutual inductance of the system, providing a mechanism for adjusting the resonant frequency. RF shield tuning eliminates adjustable capacitors on the legs of the RF coil, eliminates current imbalances and field distortions, and results in improvedB1field homogeneity and high quality (Q) factors. RF shield tuning and inductive matching provide an isolated resonance structure which is both physically and electrically unattached. Experimental analysis of shield position on bothB1field homogeneity and resonant frequency is provided. Computer simulations ofB1field homogeneity as a function of shield position and shield diameter are also presented. Magnetic resonance microimaging substantiates the usefulness of this design.

  7. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  8. Convergently-evolved structural anomalies in the coiled coil domains of insect silk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Tara D; Trueman, Holly E; Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Campbell, Peter M; Dong, Zhaoming; Huson, Mickey G; Woodhead, Andrea L; Church, Jeffrey S

    2014-06-01

    The use of coiled coil proteins as the basis of silk materials is an engineering solution that has evolved convergently in at least five insect lineages-the stinging hymenopterans (ants, bees, hornets), argid sawflies, fleas, lacewings, and praying mantises-and persisted throughout large radiations of these insect families. These coiled coil silk proteins share a characteristic distinct from other coiled coil proteins, in that they are fabricated into solid materials after accumulating as highly concentrated solutions within dedicated glands. Here, we relate the amino acid sequences of these proteins to the secondary and tertiary structural information available from biophysical methods such as X-ray scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. We investigate conserved and convergently evolved features within these proteins and compare these to the features of classic coiled coil proteins including tropomyosin and leucine zippers. Our analysis finds that the coiled coil domains of insect silk proteins have several common structural anomalies including a high prevalence of alanine residues in core positions. These atypical features of the coiled coil fibrous proteins - which likely produce deviations from canonical coiled-coil structure - likely exist due to selection pressures related to the process of silk fabrication and the final function of the proteins. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural implications of conserved aspartate residues located in tropomyosin's coiled-coil core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey R; Li, Xiaochuan; Nirody, Jasmine; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2011-09-01

    Polar residues lying between adjacent α-helical chains of coiled-coils often contribute to coiled-coil curvature and flexibility, while more typical core hydrophobic residues anneal the chains together. In tropomyosins, ranging from smooth and skeletal muscle to cytoplasmic isoforms, a highly conserved Asp at residue 137 places negative charges within the tropomyosin coiled-coil core in a position which may affect the conformation needed for tropomyosin binding and regulatory movements on actin. Proteolytic susceptibility suggested that substituting a canonical Leu for the naturally occurring Asp at residue 137 increases inter-chain rigidity by stabilizing the tropomyosin coiled-coil. Using molecular dynamics, we now directly assess changes in coiled-coil curvature and flexibility caused by such mutants. Although the coiled-coil flexibility is modestly diminished near the residue 137 mutation site, as expected, a delocalized increase in flexibility along the overall coiled-coil is observed. Even though the average shape of the D137L tropomyosin is straighter than that of wild-type tropomyosin, it is still capable of binding actin due to this increase in flexibility. We conclude that the conserved, non-canonical Asp-137 destabilizes the local structure resulting in a local flexible region in the middle of tropomyosin that normally is important for tropomyosin steady-state equilibrium position on actin.

  10. Exploring alternate states and oligomerization preferences of coiled-coils by de novo structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    Homomeric coiled-coils can self-assemble into a wide range of structural states with different helix topologies and oligomeric states. In this study, we have combined de novo structure modeling with stability calculations to simultaneously predict structure and oligomeric states of homomeric coiled-coils. For dimers an asymmetric modeling protocol was developed. Modeling without symmetry constraints showed that backbone asymmetry is important for the formation of parallel dimeric coiled-coils. Collectively, our results demonstrate that high-resolution structure of coiled-coils, as well as parallel and antiparallel orientations of dimers and tetramers, can be accurately predicted from sequence. De novo modeling was also used to generate models of competing oligomeric states, which were used to compare stabilities and thus predict the native stoichiometry from sequence. In a benchmark set of 33 coiled-coil sequences, forming dimers to pentamers, up to 70% of the oligomeric states could be correctly predicted. The calculations demonstrated that the free energy of helix folding could be an important factor for determining stability and oligomeric state of homomeric coiled-coils. The computational methods developed here should be broadly applicable to studies of sequence-structure relationships in coiled-coils and the design of higher order assemblies with improved oligomerization specificity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Growth Factor Identity Is Encoded by Discrete Coiled-Coil Rotamers in the EGFR Juxtamembrane Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, Amy; Scheck, Rebecca; Schepartz, Alanna

    2015-06-18

    Binding of transforming growth factor α (TGF-α) to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) extracellular domain is encoded through the formation of a unique antiparallel coiled coil within the juxtamembrane segment. This new coiled coil is an "inside-out" version of the coiled coil formed in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). A third, intermediary coiled-coil interface is formed in the juxtamembrane region when EGFR is stimulated with betacellulin. The seven growth factors that activate EGFR in mammalian systems (EGF, TGF-α, epigen, epiregulin, betacellulin, heparin-binding EGF, and amphiregulin) fall into distinct categories in which the structure of the coiled coil induced within the juxtamembrane region correlates with cell state. The observation that coiled-coil state tracks with the downstream signaling profiles for each ligand provides evidence for growth factor functional selectivity by EGFR. Encoding growth factor identity in alternative coiled-coil rotamers provides a simple and elegant method for communicating chemical information across the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A repeated coiled-coil interruption in the Escherichia coli condensin MukB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Christopher S; Waldman, Vincent M; Graham, Travis A; Oakley, Martha G

    2011-12-09

    MukB, a divergent structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein, is important for chromosome segregation and condensation in Escherichia coli and other γ-proteobacteria. MukB and canonical SMC proteins share a common five-domain structure in which globular N- and C-terminal regions combine to form an ATP-binding-cassette-like ATPase domain. This ATPase domain is connected to a central, globular dimerization domain by a long antiparallel coiled coil. The structures of both globular domains have been solved recently. In contrast, little is known about the coiled coil, in spite of its clear importance for SMC function. Recently, we identified interacting regions on the N- and C-terminal halves of the MukB coiled coil through photoaffinity cross-linking experiments. On the basis of these low-resolution experimental constraints, phylogenetic data, and coiled-coil prediction analysis, we proposed a preliminary model in which the MukB coiled coil is divided into multiple segments. Here, we use a disulfide cross-linking assay to detect paired residues on opposite strands of MukB's coiled coil. This method provides accurate register data and demonstrates the presence of at least five coiled-coil segments in this domain. Moreover, these studies show that the segments are interrupted by a repeated, unprecedented deviation from canonical coiled-coil structure. These experiments provide a sufficiently detailed view of the MukB coiled coil to allow rational manipulation of this region for the first time, opening the door for structure-function studies of this domain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Design of a coil sensor for time domain electromagnetic system for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshwani, R.T.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2011-01-01

    Time domain electromagnetic system is used for exploration of deep seated deposits under the Earth surface. The basic principle is to set up eddy currents in conductors using pulsed excited transmitter coil during on time of a pulse. The decay time of eddy currents during off time of a pulse is a function conductivity, permeability and depth of conductor located under the Earth surface. The technology is being developed to carry out exploration of mineral deposits (basically uranium) under the Earth surface. The decay of eddy currents is eddy using J coil sensor located coplanar with the transmitter coil. The depth upto which successful exploration can be carried is strong function of design of receiver coil. The design parameters include number of turns, bandwidth, stray capacitance and resistance of a coil. This paper describes various designs tried out and their characterization results. Field results for a ground based system developed are also described. (author)

  14. Eddy Current Signal Analysis for Transmit-Receive Pancake Coil on ECT Array Probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Beom

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the eddy current signals come from a pair of transmit-receive (T/R) pancake coil on ECT array Probe are analyzed with the variations of the lift-of and of the distance between transmit and receive coils. To obtain the electromagnetic characteristics of the probes, the governing equation describing the eddy current problems is derived from Maxwell's equation and is solved using three-dimensional finite element method. Eddy current signals from T/R coils on ECT array probe have quite different characteristics compared with ones from impedance coil on rotating pancake coil probe. The results in this paper ran be helpful when the field eddy current signals from ECT array probe are evaluated

  15. Analysis of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter with pancake coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shizhuo; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Qingquan; Zhang, Guomin

    2017-10-01

    The characteristics of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter (SFCL) with pancake coils are investigated in this paper. The conventional double-wound non-inductive pancake coil used in AC power systems has an inevitable defect in Voltage Sourced Converter Based High Voltage DC (VSC-HVDC) power systems. Due to its special structure, flashover would occur easily during the fault in high voltage environment. Considering the shortcomings of conventional resistive SFCLs with non-inductive coils, a novel flux-coupling type SFCL with pancake coils is carried out. The module connections of pancake coils are performed. The electromagnetic field and force analysis of the module are contrasted under different parameters. To ensure proper operation of the module, the impedance of the module under representative operating conditions is calculated. Finally, the feasibility of the flux-coupling type SFCL in VSC-HVDC power systems is discussed.

  16. Real-time protection of the Ohmic heating coil force limits in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broesch, J.D.; Scoville, J.T.; Hyatt, A.W.; Coon, R.M.

    1997-11-01

    The maximum safe operating limits of the DIII-D tokamak are determined by the force produced in the ohmic heating coil and the toroidal field coil during a plasma pulse. This force is directly proportional to the product of the current in the coils. Historically, the current limits for each coil were set statically before each pulse without regard for the time varying nature of the currents. In order to allow the full time-dependent capability of the ohmic coil to be used, a system was developed for monitoring the product of the currents dynamically and making appropriate adjustments in real time. This paper discusses the purpose, implementation, and results of this work

  17. Spatial selectivity of the surface coils used in-vivo in NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, M.; Decorps, M.; Chaillout, J.J.; Confort, S.

    1984-05-01

    Surface coils are being to be of current use in ''in vivo'' NMR spectroscopy. This kind of resonator yields indeed a very good signal to noise ratio when applied to the examination of limited and superficial regions of large organs. But to allow the biological analysis of detected signals, knowledge of the spatial response is necessary. Radiofrequency isofield surfaces, associated with sensitivity curve computed along the coil axis, give a good idea of analysed volume by surface coils. On the other hand, saturation sequence previously applied to excitation pulse is suggested to make the spatial response of surface coil independant of T 1 relaxation time constant of different chemical species within the sample. A short survey on chemical shift imaging either with surface coils or with uniform radiofrequency field resonator is presented in conclusion [fr

  18. Neutron resonance spin flippers: Static coils manufactured by electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Wagner, J. N.; Dogu, M.; Fuchs, C.; Kredler, L.; Böni, P.; Häußler, W.

    2014-07-01

    Radiofrequency spin flippers (RFSF) are key elements of Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometers, which allow performing controlled manipulations of the beam polarization. We report on the design and test of a new type of RFSF which originality lies in the new manufacturing technique for the static coil. The largely automated procedure ensures reproducible construction as well as an excellent homogeneity of the neutron magnetic resonance condition over the coil volume. Two salient features of this concept are the large neutron window and the closure of the coil by a μ-metal yoke which prevents field leakage outside of the coil volume. These properties are essential for working with large beams and enable new applications with coils tilted with respect to the beam axis such as neutron Larmor diffraction or the study of dispersive excitations by inelastic NRSE.

  19. Neutron resonance spin flippers: Static coils manufactured by electrical discharge machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, N.; Kredler, L.; Häußler, W.; Wagner, J. N.; Dogu, M.; Fuchs, C.; Böni, P.

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency spin flippers (RFSF) are key elements of Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometers, which allow performing controlled manipulations of the beam polarization. We report on the design and test of a new type of RFSF which originality lies in the new manufacturing technique for the static coil. The largely automated procedure ensures reproducible construction as well as an excellent homogeneity of the neutron magnetic resonance condition over the coil volume. Two salient features of this concept are the large neutron window and the closure of the coil by a μ-metal yoke which prevents field leakage outside of the coil volume. These properties are essential for working with large beams and enable new applications with coils tilted with respect to the beam axis such as neutron Larmor diffraction or the study of dispersive excitations by inelastic NRSE

  20. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed

  1. A resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil employing a fractal capacitor bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James E

    2013-09-01

    The design and construction of a series resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil for the production of magnetic fields as large as 500 G in the range of 100-2500 Hz is described. Important aspects of ac coil design are discussed, including: minimizing power losses due to the expected Joule heating, self-induced eddy currents, and skin resistance; controlling the stray capacitance; maximizing field homogeneity; and keeping peak voltages at acceptable levels. The design and construction of a computer-controlled, optically isolated fractal capacitor bank is then treated, and various aspects of capacitor selection and characterization were discussed. The system performance is demonstrated, including stability and the possibility of field component dephasing with typical magnetic samples.

  2. Combining rotating-coil measurements of large-aperture accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089510

    2016-10-05

    The rotating coil is a widely used tool to measure the magnetic field and the field errors in accelerator magnets. The coil has a length that exceeds the entire magnetic field along the longitudinal dimension of the magnet and gives therefore a two-dimensional representation of the integrated field. Having a very good precision, the rotating coil lacks in versatility. The fixed dimensions make it impractical and inapplicable in situations, when the radial coil dimension is much smaller than the aperture or when the aperture is only little covered by the coil. That being the case for rectangular apertures with large aspect ratio, where a basic measurement by the rotating coil describes the field only in a small area of the magnet. A combination of several measurements at different positions is the topic of this work. Very important for a combination is the error distribution on the measured field harmonics. To preserve the good precision of the higher-order harmonics, the combination must not rely on the main ...

  3. Status report on the 12T split coil test facility SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, B.; Aebli, E.; Jakob, B.; Pasztor, G.; Vecsey, G.; della Corte, A.; Pasotti, G.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1992-01-01

    The third phase of upgrading of the superconductor test facility SULTAN into a split coil system (SULTAN III) is in progress. SULTAN III a join project of ENEA (Italy) and PSI (Switzerland) consists of two coil packages, each containing three concentrically mounted superconducting solenoids. Together they will produce a field of nearly 12T between the two coil packages, inside a solenoid bore of 58 cm. The outermost 6T coils have NbTi conductors, whereas the inner 9T and 12T coils are made of A-15 cables. All Nb 3 Sn coils are manufactured by the react-and-wind technique. The split coil arrangement, in connection with a sophisticated sample insert containing a 50 kA superconducting transformer, will allow testing of short samples of high current carrying superconductors, e.g. for fusion applications. The sample insert was designed to allow changing the samples within a few hours without warming up the whole magnet system. This paper deals with the present status and potential of the Split Coil Test Facility SULTAN III

  4. submitter 16 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Racetrack Model Coil Test Result

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J C; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Bordini, B; Chiuchiolo, A; De Rijk, G; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Grosclaude, P; Juchno, M; Rochepault, E; Rysti, J; Sarasola, X

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European project EuCARD, the High Field Magnet project, led by a CERN-CEA collaboration, implied the development of a large aperture $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole magnet called FRESCA2. The magnet uses four double-pancake block-type coils, each about 1.5 m long. In order to characterize strand and cable properties, as well as to qualify the coil fabrication process, CERN started in 2012 the design and fabrication of the Racetrack Model Coil (RMC) magnet, a short model magnet using the same cable as FRESCA2 magnet with only two flat double-pancake coils about 0.8 m long. In 2013, two superconducting coils have been fabricated, making use of two different types of superconductor. In 2014 and 2015, the coils were tested both in a single and in a double-coil configuration in a support structure based on an external aluminum shell pre-loaded with water-pressurized bladders. In this paper, we describe the design of the RMC magnet and its coils, provide the main parameters of the superconductor, and repo...

  5. Enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities with synergy spine coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2002-01-01

    A synergy spine coil is a phased-array coil designed for spine imaging. The coil's sensitive area is narrow in both the x-axis and y-axis directions but very wide in the z-axis direction. It is therefore suitable for using in long parts of the body, such as the spine. We used the coil for enhanced MR angiography in the lower extremities, which requires a very long field of view on the z-axis direction. Using on the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) standard test for special-purpose coils, the sensitive volume of the synergy spine coil was first measured by using a phantom. It was found that the sensitive lengths along x-axis and y-axis were 300 mm and 120 mm, respectively, while that along z-axis could set at any length required for the examination by modifying the element number. The above area was confirmed to be sufficient for obtaining enhanced MR angiograms of the lower extremities. The results of this study showed the use of the synergy spine coil in enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities is superior to the use of a conventional whole body coil for obtaining good MR angiograms with a good single-to-noise ratio (SNR). (author)

  6. Pulsed magnetic field hybrid system at the A. Mickiewicz University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, M.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid system consisting of three coils: inner-steel coil, middle-beryllium-cooper coil, and outer-copper coil, separately supplied by three capacitor banks, is described. The hybrid system produces a megagauss pulsed field in the volume of the 6 mm inner diameter 11 turns steel coil. The duration of the peak field is of the order of 20 μs

  7. Making an Inexpensive Electromagnetic Wiggler Using Sheet Materials for the Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Herman-Biallas, George; Hiatt, Thomas; Neil, George; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An inexpensive electromagnetic wiggler, made with twenty-eight, 4 cm periods with a K of 1 and gap of 2.6 cm was made within 10 weeks after receipt of order by an industrial machine shop. The coil design used sheet and plate materials cut to shapes using water jet cutting and was assembled in a simple stack design. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The coils are conduction cooled to imbedded cooling plates. The wiggler features graded end pole fields, trim coil compensation for end field errors and mirror plates on the ends to avoid three dimensional end field effects. Details of the methods used in construction and the wiggler performance are presented.

  8. The coiled coils of cohesin are conserved in animals, but not in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn E White

    Full Text Available The SMC proteins are involved in DNA repair, chromosome condensation, and sister chromatid cohesion throughout Eukaryota. Long, anti-parallel coiled coils are a prominent feature of SMC proteins, and are thought to serve as spacer rods to provide an elongated structure and to separate domains. We reported recently that the coiled coils of mammalian condensin (SMC2/4 showed moderate sequence divergence (approximately 10-15% consistent with their functioning as spacer rods. The coiled coils of mammalian cohesins (SMC1/3, however, were very highly constrained, with amino acid sequence divergence typically <0.5%. These coiled coils are among the most highly conserved mammalian proteins, suggesting that they make extensive contacts over their entire surface.Here, we broaden our initial analysis of condensin and cohesin to include additional vertebrate and invertebrate organisms and multiple species of yeast. We found that the coiled coils of SMC1/3 are highly constrained in Drosophila and other insects, and more generally across all animal species. However, in yeast they are no more constrained than the coils of SMC2/4 and Ndc80/Nuf2p, suggesting that they are serving primarily as spacer rods.SMC1/3 functions for sister chromatid cohesion in all species. Since its coiled coils apparently serve only as spacer rods in yeast, it is likely that this is sufficient for sister chromatid cohesion in all species. This suggests an additional function in animals that constrains the sequence of the coiled coils. Several recent studies have demonstrated that cohesin has a role in gene expression in post-mitotic neurons of Drosophila, and other animal cells. Some variants of human Cornelia de Lange Syndrome involve mutations in human SMC1/3. We suggest that the role of cohesin in gene expression may involve intimate contact of the coiled coils of SMC1/3, and impose the constraint on sequence divergence.

  9. Critical evaluation of in silico methods for prediction of coiled-coil domains in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Ching Han Chang, Catherine; Nagel, Jeremy; Porebski, Benjamin T; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-03-01

    Coiled-coils refer to a bundle of helices coiled together like strands of a rope. It has been estimated that nearly 3% of protein-encoding regions of genes harbour coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Experimental studies have confirmed that CCDs play a fundamental role in subcellular infrastructure and controlling trafficking of eukaryotic cells. Given the importance of coiled-coils, multiple bioinformatics tools have been developed to facilitate the systematic and high-throughput prediction of CCDs in proteins. In this article, we review and compare 12 sequence-based bioinformatics approaches and tools for coiled-coil prediction. These approaches can be categorized into two classes: coiled-coil detection and coiled-coil oligomeric state prediction. We evaluated and compared these methods in terms of their input/output, algorithm, prediction performance, validation methods and software utility. All the independent testing data sets are available at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/coiledcoil/. In addition, we conducted a case study of nine human polyglutamine (PolyQ) disease-related proteins and predicted CCDs and oligomeric states using various predictors. Prediction results for CCDs were highly variable among different predictors. Only two peptides from two proteins were confirmed to be CCDs by majority voting. Both domains were predicted to form dimeric coiled-coils using oligomeric state prediction. We anticipate that this comprehensive analysis will be an insightful resource for structural biologists with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools, and for bioinformaticians who are interested in designing novel approaches for coiled-coil and its oligomeric state prediction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-01-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at − 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at − 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  11. Power loss problems in EXTRAP coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-02-01

    The Ohmic power loss in the coils of external ring traps is minimized with respect to the thermonuclear power production. In the case of the DT-reaction this leads to dimensions and power densities being relevant to full-scale reactors. Not only superconducting or refrigerated coil windings can thus be used, but also hot-coil systems which are operated at several hundred degrees centrigrade and form part of a steam cycle and power extraction system. For hot coils the problems of void formation and tritium regeneration have to be further examined. The high beta value leads to moderately large coil stresses. Finally, replacement and repair become simplified by the present coil geometry. (Auth.)

  12. Radiative MRI Coil Design Using Parasitic Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Avendal, Johan; Bibic, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    allows for antenna design techniques to be adapted to RF coil designs. This study proposes the use of parasitic scatterers to improve the performance of an existing 7T MRI coil called the single-sided adapted dipole (SSAD) antenna. The results reveal that scatterers arranged in a Yagi fashion can...... suitable for use in high density arrays. These findings show the potential of parasitic scatterers as an effective method to improve the performance of existing radiative MRI coils....

  13. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-11-01

    GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin-Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  14. Some aspects of the design of the ITER NBI Active Correction and Compensation Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Javier, E-mail: javier.alonso@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barrera, Germán; Cabrera, Santiago; Rincón, Esther; Ríos, Luis; Soleto, Alfonso [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-Ouazzani, Anass; Graceffa, Joseph; Shah, Darshan; Urbani, Marc [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3 – 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Water cooled coil design. • Magnetic shielding of the plasma heating Neutral Beam Injection System. • Active coils for magnetic field compensation. - Abstract: The neutral beam system for ITER consists of two heating and current drive injectors plus a diagnostic neutral beam injector. The proposed physical plant layout allows for a possible third heating injector to be installed later. For correct operation of the beam source, and to avoid deflections of the charged fraction of the beam, the magnetic field along the beam path must be very low. To minimize the stray ITER field in critical areas (ion source, acceleration grids, neutralizer, residual ion dump), a Magnetic Field Reduction System will envelop the beam vessels and the high voltage transmission lines to ion source. This whole system comprises the Passive Magnetic Shield, a set of thick steel plates, and the Active Correction and Compensation Coils, a set of coils carrying currents which depend on the tokamak stray field. This paper describes the status of the coil design, terminals and support structures, as well as a description of the calculations carried out. Most coils are suitable for removal from their final position to be replaced in case of a fault. Conclusions of the chosen design highlight the strategy for the system feasibility.

  15. Manufacturing development of the Westinghouse Nb3Sn coil for the Large Coil Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.L.; Vota, T.L.; Singh, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    The Westinghouse Nb 3 Sn Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program (LCP) is currently well into the manufacturing phase. This paper identifies the manufacturing processes and development tasks for his unique, advanced coil

  16. Effects of five-membered ring amino acid incorporation into peptides for coiled coil formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Makoto; Ito, Chika; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2018-03-01

    A five-membered ring amino acid (Ac 5 c), the peptides of which exhibit a preference for helical secondary structures, was introduced into peptides for the purpose of designing coiled coil peptides with high binding affinities. We prepared five types of peptides containing Ac 5 c with different numbers or at different positions. The incorporation of Ac 5 c into peptides enhanced their α-helicities; however, in contrast to our expectations, it did not result in stable coiled coil formation. The structures of side chains in hydrophobic amino acids, not α-helicities appeared to be important for stable hydrophobic interactions between peptides. Although we were unable to develop coiled coil peptides with high binding affinities, the present results will be useful for designing novel coiled coil peptides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Pak-Yan P; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  18. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, L.

    1992-01-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire reg-sign technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC

  19. A Comparative Study of Orthodontic Coil Springs

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Kumar Agarwal; Anup Razdan; Abhishek Agarwal; Preeti Bhattacharya; Ankur Gupta; D N Kapoor

    2011-01-01

    Several types of force delivering system are used to carry out tooth movement in orthodontics. Coil springs being one of them are used for the same thus requiring minimal operator manipulation. Aims and objectives : The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of wire diameter, lumen size and length of coil spring on the load produced as a function of displacement of SS and NiTi coil spring. Materials and methods : The study consisted of 60 samples of open and closed coil sprin...

  20. Thomson's Jumping Ring Over a Long Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2018-03-01

    The classic jumping ring apparatus consists of a coil with an iron core that extends out of the coil. A copper or aluminum ring placed over the iron core jumps upward when AC power is applied to the coil. In this paper we will examine a modified design of the jumping ring apparatus, called the "long-coil design." It allows the ring to jump upward or downward, depending on the starting position of the ring. These features shed significant light on the study of the force that causes the ring to jump.

  1. Status report of the CMS superconducting coil project

    CERN Document Server

    Campi, D; Hervé, A; Horváth, I L; Kircher, F

    2001-01-01

    The CMS superconducting coil is designed for one of the two large experiments of LHC at CERN. This coil 12.5 m long, 6 m diameter and 2.7 GJ stored energy is a common project of the CMS Collaboration. It is a four-layer coil, equipped with a self-supporting conductor capable of carrying 20 kA to reach the maximum potential field of 4 T. It has been designed with a considerable contribution from CEA- Saclay for the engineering, ETH-Zurich for the conductor, INFN-Genova for the winding and CERN for the general coordination and construction of the ancillaries. The project entered the construction phase one year ago. The civil engineering is well advanced and ready to accept part of the yoke components already built. The coil itself has finished the pre-industrialization phase and the construction is beginning in industry. Most of the important contracts have been awarded and the foreseen schedule is now based on contractual engagements. A quick overview of the features of the project as well as a status report o...

  2. Coiled-coil driven membrane fusion: zipper-like vs. non-zipper-like peptide orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Frank; Dominguez, Juan; Voskuhl, Jens; Kros, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in biological processes such as neurotransmission and exocytosis. An important class of proteins that induce membrane fusion are called SNARE (soluble N-ethyl malemeide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) proteins. To induce membrane fusion, two SNARE proteins embedded in opposing membranes form a four-helix coiled-coil motif together with a third, cytoplasmic, SNARE protein. Coiled-coil formation brings the two membranes into close proximity allowing fusion to occur. Importantly, structural investigations have demonstrated that native membrane fusion only occurs when the orientation of the coiled-coil motif resembles that of a zipper. The zipper orientation arises when parallel coiled-coil formation takes place between peptides that are anchored into apposing membranes at identical termini, thereby forcing the membranes into close contact. Recently, we have designed a synthetic model for membrane fusion, which is based on a set of lipidated coiled-coil forming peptide pairs which are denoted E-K. When incorporated into liposomal membranes, coiled-coil formation between these lipidated peptides induces targeted and efficient membrane fusion of liposomes. Our model system mimics SNARE-driven membrane fusion, as it contains a coiled-coil motif which has a zipper-like orientation, similar to that of the SNARE proteins. Here we investigate whether the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil motifs is a prerequisite for membrane fusion in our model system. Our strategy is based on conjugation of the transmembrane anchor to either the N- or the C-terminus of peptides E and K. Whereas the use of a set of complementary peptides with the membrane anchor on identical peptide termini yields the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil complex, membrane anchors on opposite peptide termini results in a non-zipper-like coiled-coil orientation. Surprisingly, it was observed that efficient and targeted membrane fusion was

  3. Effect of electromagnetic radiation on the coils used in aneurysm embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xianli; Wu, Zhongxue; Li, Youxiang

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of electromagnetic radiation in our daily lives on the coils used in aneurysm embolization. Faraday's electromagnetic induction principle was applied to analyze the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the coils used in aneurysm embolization. To induce a current of 0.5mA in less than 5 mm platinum coils required to stimulate peripheral nerves, the minimum magnetic field will be 0.86 μT. To induce a current of 0.5 mA in platinum coils by a hair dryer, the minimum aneurysm radius is 2.5 mm (5 mm aneurysm). To induce a current of 0.5 mA in platinum coils by a computer or TV, the minimum aneurysm radius is 8.6 mm (approximate 17 mm aneurysm). The minimum magnetic field is much larger than the flux densities produced by computer and TV, while the minimum aneurysm radius is much larger than most aneurysm sizes to levels produced by computer and TV. At present, the effects of electromagnetic radiation in our daily lives on intracranial coils do not produce a harmful reaction. Patients with coiled aneurysm are advised to avoid using hair dryers. This theory needs to be proved by further detailed complex investigations. Doctors should give patients additional instructions before the procedure, depending on this study.

  4. A Non-perturbing Probe of Coiled Coil Formation Based on Electron Transfer Mediated Fluorescence Quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D; Peran, Ivan; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2016-07-05

    Coiled coils are abundant in nature, occurring in ∼3% of proteins across sequenced genomes, and are found in proteins ranging from transcription factors to structural proteins. The motif continues to be an important model system for understanding protein-protein interactions and is finding increased use in bioinspired materials and synthetic biology. Knowledge of the thermodynamics of self-assembly, particularly the dissociation constant KD, is essential for the application of designed coiled coils and for understanding the in vivo specificity of natural coiled coils. Standard methods for measuring KD typically rely on concentration dependent circular dichroism (CD). Fluorescence methods are an attractive alternative; however Trp is rarely found in an interior position of a coiled coil, and appending unnatural fluorophores can perturb the system. We demonstrate a simple, non-perturbing method to monitor coiled coil formation using p-cyanophenylalanine (FCN) and selenomethionine (MSe), the Se analogue of Met. FCN fluorescence can be selectively excited and is effectively quenched by electron transfer with MSe. Both FCN and MSe represent minimally perturbing substitutions in coiled coils. MSe quenching of FCN fluorescence is shown to offer a non-perturbing method for following coiled coil formation and for accurately determining dissociation constants. The method is validated using a designed heterodimeric coiled coil. The KD deduced by fluorescence monitored titration is in excellent agreement with the value deduced from concentration dependent CD measurements to within the uncertainty of the measurement. However, the fluorescence approach requires less protein, is less time-consuming, can be applied to lower concentrations and could be applied to high throughput screens.

  5. Moving coil-based actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Edward A.

    2002-09-01

    SMAC Corporation manufactures a wide variety of moving coil based electric servo actuators. These actuators were developed with a specific purpose in mind: To produce tools that would make the automation of assembly easier to accomplish, tools that could perform work in much the same manner as fingers but with more precision. The design targets were: A. Variable programmable accurate positioning down to sub-micron level. B. Variable programmable accurately controlled speeds. C. Variable programmable forces from grams to kilograms. D. Multiple axis configurations to increase degrees of freedom hence flexibility. E. The ability to perform work and verify its success at the same time. F. A low cost design that could eventually compete with pneumatic devices. (SMAC is related to two large pneumatic manufacturers: SMC Corp. and Mac Valve, Inc.) It should be noted that in the past a number of designers have developed voice coil based actuators, the Stout design and patent, with its discussion of programmable force was an early inspiration. SMAC's basic electro/mechanical and software design patents number 20.

  6. Second Generation Coil Design of the Nb3Sn low-beta Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Ballarino, A; Cavanna, E; Bossert, R; Cheng, D; Dietderich, D; Ferracin, P; Ghosh, A; Hagen,P; Holik, E; Perez, J C; Rochepault, E; Schmalzle, J; Todesco, E; Yu, M

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider Luminosity upgrade (HiLumi-LHC) program, the US LARP collaboration and CERN are working together to design and build a 150 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupole for the LHC interaction regions. A first series of 1.5 m long coils were fabricated and assembled in a first short model. A detailed visual inspection of the coils was carried out to investigate cable dimensional changes during heat treatment and the position of the windings in the coil straight section and in the end region. The analyses allow identifying a set of design changes which, combined with a fine tune of the cable geometry and a field quality optimization, were implemented in a new, second-generation, coil design. In this paper we review the main characteristics of the first generation coils, describe the modification in coil lay-out, and discuss their impact on parts design and magnet analysis.

  7. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS FORMULATION FOR A COOLING COIL GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Erich Hansen, E

    2008-05-23

    The Tank Closure and Technology Development Groups are developing a strategy for closing the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two Type IV tanks, 17 and 20 in the F-Area Tank Farm, have been successfully filled with grout. Type IV tanks at SRS do not contain cooling coils; on the other hand, the majority of the tanks (Type I, II, III and IIIA) do contain cooling coils. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with cooling coils is to pump grout into the cooling coils to prevent pathways for infiltrating water after tank closure. This task addresses the use of grout to fill intact cooling coils present in most of the remaining HLW tanks on Site. The overall task was divided into two phases. Phase 1 focused on the development of a grout formulation (mix design) suitable for filling the HLW tank cooling coils. Phase 2 will be a large-scale demonstration of the filling of simulated cooling coils under field conditions using the cooling coil grout mix design recommended from Phase 1. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1, the development of the cooling coil grout formulation. A grout formulation is recommended for the full scale testing at Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory (CETL) that is composed by mass of 90% Masterflow (MF) 816 (a commercially available cable grout) and 10% blast furnace slag, with a water to cementitious material (MF 816 + slag) ratio of 0.33. This formulation produces a grout that meets the fresh and cured grout requirements detailed in the Task Technical Plan (2). The grout showed excellent workability under continuous mixing with minimal change in rheology. An alternative formulation using 90% MF 1341 and 10% blast furnace slag with a water to cementitious material ratio of 0.29 is also acceptable and generates less heat per gram than the MF 816 plus slag mix. However this MF 1341 mix has a higher plastic viscosity than the MF 816 mix due to the presence of sand in the MF 1341 cable grout and a

  8. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Jeremy D., E-mail: jwilbur@msg.ucsf.edu [Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hwang, Peter K. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Brodsky, Frances M. [The G. W. Hooper Foundation, Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Fletterick, Robert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  9. Natural templates for coiled-coil biomaterials from praying mantis egg cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Kameda, Tsunenori; Sutherland, Tara D

    2012-12-10

    Whereas there is growing interest in producing biomaterials containing coiled-coils, relatively few studies have made use of naturally occurring fibrous proteins. In this study, we have characterized fibrous proteins used by mother praying mantises to produce an extensive covering for their eggs called an ootheca and demonstrate the production of artificial ootheca using recombinantly produced proteins. Examination of natural oothecae by infrared spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance revealed the material to consist of proteins organized predominately as coiled-coils. Two structural proteins, Mantis Fibroin 1 and Mantis Fibroin 2, were identified in ootheca from each of three species. Between species, the primary sequences of both proteins had diverged considerably, but other features were tightly conserved, including low molecular weight, high abundance of Ala, Glu, Lys, and Ser, and a triblock-like architecture with extensive central coiled-coil domain. Mantis fibroin hydrophobic cores had an unusual composition containing high levels of alanine and aromatic residues. Recombinantly produced mantis fibroins folded into coiled-coils in solution and could be fabricated into solid materials with high coiled-coil content. The structural features of mantis fibroins and their straightforward recombinant production make them promising templates for the production of coiled-coil biomimetics materials.

  10. Modulation of Coiled-Coil Dimer Stability through Surface Residues while Preserving Pairing Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnak, Igor; Gradišar, Helena; Ljubetič, Ajasja; Merljak, Estera; Jerala, Roman

    2017-06-21

    The coiled-coil dimer is a widespread protein structural motif and, due to its designability, represents an attractive building block for assembling modular nanostructures. The specificity of coiled-coil dimer pairing is mainly based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between residues at positions a, d, e, and g of the heptad repeat. Binding affinity, on the other hand, can also be affected by surface residues that face away from the dimerization interface. Here we show how design of the local helical propensity of interacting peptides can be used to tune the stabilities of coiled-coil dimers over a wide range. By designing intramolecular charge pairs, regions of high local helical propensity can be engineered to form trigger sequences, and dimer stability is adjusted without changing the peptide length or any of the directly interacting residues. This general principle is demonstrated by a change in thermal stability by more than 30 °C as a result of only two mutations outside the binding interface. The same approach was successfully used to modulate the stabilities in an orthogonal set of coiled-coils without affecting their binding preferences. The stability effects of local helical propensity and peptide charge are well described by a simple linear model, which should help improve current coiled-coil stability prediction algorithms. Our findings enable tuning the stabilities of coiled-coil-based building modules match a diverse range of applications in synthetic biology and nanomaterials.

  11. LOGICOIL--multi-state prediction of coiled-coil oligomeric state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Thomas L; Green, Peter J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2013-01-01

    The coiled coil is a ubiquitous α-helical protein-structure domain that directs and facilitates protein-protein interactions in a wide variety of biological processes. At the protein-sequence level, the coiled coil is readily recognized via a conspicuous heptad repeat of hydrophobic and polar residues. However, structurally coiled coils are more complicated, existing in a wide range of oligomer states and topologies. As a consequence, predicting these various states from sequence remains an unmet challenge. This work introduces LOGICOIL, the first algorithm to address the problem of predicting multiple coiled-coil oligomeric states from protein-sequence information alone. By covering >90% of the known coiled-coil structures, LOGICOIL is a net improvement compared with other existing methods, which achieve a predictive coverage of ∼31% of this population. This leap in predictive power offers better opportunities for genome-scale analysis, and analyses of coiled-coil containing protein assemblies. LOGICOIL is available via a web-interface at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/LOGICOIL. Source code, training sets and supporting information can be downloaded from the same site.

  12. Coiled-coil formation on lipid bilayers--implications for docking and fusion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähler, Gesa; Panse, Cornelia; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas

    2012-12-05

    Coiled-coil formation of four different oligopeptides was characterized in solution, on hydrogels, and on membranes by employing circular dichroism spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. Peptide sequences rich in either glutamic acid (E: E3Cys, i-E3Cys) or lysine (K: K3Cys, i-K3Cys) were used to represent minimal mimics of eukaryotic SNARE motifs. Half of the peptides were synthesized in reverse sequence, so that parallel and antiparallel heptad coiled-coil structures were formed. Either E-peptides or K-peptides were attached covalently to phospholipid anchors via maleimide chemistry, and served as receptors for the recognition of the corresponding binding partners added to solution. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of single bilayers confirmed the formation of coiled-coil complexes at the membrane interface. Coiled-coil formation in solution, as compared with association at the membrane surface, displays considerably larger binding constants that are largely attributed to loss of translational entropy at the interface. Finally, the fusogenicity of the various coiled-coil motifs was explored, and the results provide clear evidence that hemifusion followed by full fusion requires a parallel orientation of α-helices, whereas antiparallel oriented coiled-coil motifs display only docking. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coiled-Coil Formation on Lipid Bilayers—Implications for Docking and Fusion Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähler, Gesa; Panse, Cornelia; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Coiled-coil formation of four different oligopeptides was characterized in solution, on hydrogels, and on membranes by employing circular dichroism spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. Peptide sequences rich in either glutamic acid (E: E3Cys, i-E3Cys) or lysine (K: K3Cys, i-K3Cys) were used to represent minimal mimics of eukaryotic SNARE motifs. Half of the peptides were synthesized in reverse sequence, so that parallel and antiparallel heptad coiled-coil structures were formed. Either E-peptides or K-peptides were attached covalently to phospholipid anchors via maleimide chemistry, and served as receptors for the recognition of the corresponding binding partners added to solution. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of single bilayers confirmed the formation of coiled-coil complexes at the membrane interface. Coiled-coil formation in solution, as compared with association at the membrane surface, displays considerably larger binding constants that are largely attributed to loss of translational entropy at the interface. Finally, the fusogenicity of the various coiled-coil motifs was explored, and the results provide clear evidence that hemifusion followed by full fusion requires a parallel orientation of α-helices, whereas antiparallel oriented coiled-coil motifs display only docking. PMID:23283228

  14. Structural characteristics of the redox-sensing coiled coil in the voltage-gated H+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-06-21

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H(+) (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome.

  15. The Search-Coil Magnetometer for MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Leroy, P.; Roux, A.; Coillot, C.; Alison, D.; Bouabdellah, A.; Mirioni, L.; Meslier, L.; Galic, A.; Vassal, M. C.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, J.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Ergun, R. E.; Westfall, J.; Summers, D.; Wallace, J.; Magnes, W.; Valavanoglou, A.; Olsson, G.; Chutter, M.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Turco, S.; Nolin, J.; Bodet, D.; Rowe, K.; Tanguy, M.; de la Porte, B.

    2016-03-01

    The tri-axial search-coil magnetometer (SCM) belongs to the FIELDS instrumentation suite on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission (Torbert et al. in Space Sci. Rev. (2014), this issue). It provides the three magnetic components of the waves from 1 Hz to 6 kHz in particular in the key regions of the Earth's magnetosphere namely the subsolar region and the magnetotail. Magnetospheric plasmas being collisionless, such a measurement is crucial as the electromagnetic waves are thought to provide a way to ensure the conversion from magnetic to thermal and kinetic energies allowing local or global reconfigurations of the Earth's magnetic field. The analog waveforms provided by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the digital signal processor (DSP), within the Central Electronics Box (CEB), together with the electric field data provided by the spin-plane double probe (SDP) and the axial double probe (ADP). On-board calibration signal provided by DSP allows the verification of the SCM transfer function once per orbit. Magnetic waveforms and on-board spectra computed by DSP are available at different time resolution depending on the selected mode. The SCM design is described in details as well as the different steps of the ground and in-flight calibrations.

  16. Electromagnetic-coil (EM-coil) measurement technique to verify presence of metal/absence of oxide attribute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.L.; Hockey, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    range between 10 -6 and 10 -20 mhos/meter, while the metals and alloys typically span a range between 7x10 7 and 5x10 5 mhos/meter. Measurements have been made using materials spanning both ends of each range. The EM coil method operates on the basis of Faraday's Law of induction. An alternating low-voltage signal is applied to an encircling coil at a selected frequency, generating a magnetic field at a storage containers surface. An electric field, of the same frequency, is generated in all metal objects placed inside the coil. The intensity of this electric field diminishes with depth into a metal. This electric field then causes electric current (commonly referred to as eddy current) to flow throughout conductive objects. As these induced currents flow they also generate a secondary magnetic field causing the coils impedance to change in proportion to the total magnetic field passing through the coil. A high-precision, impedance measuring device can monitor the coil's impedance and thus obtain an electromagnetic signature for all conductive objects placed inside the coil. The EM-coil is inherently less intrusive than a radiation measurement since it is sensitive to the combination of configuration and composition. On a mathematical basis, component information cannot be extracted from this measurement because the coil impedance is a two-parameter quantity and the number of parameters affecting the coil impedance is much greater than two. The EM-coil method can make a determination that a container does or does not enclose metal in the expected configuration. Radiation detection methods on the other hand may only be able to establish the lack of oxide, which thereby implies the presence of metal, a weaker statement. The EM-coil data analysis is extremely simple, requiring the definition of a region of interest in a two- dimensional plot. The EM-coil method is able to make a measurement in less than a minute, whereas radiation measurement methods demonstrated to

  17. Construction of a 13 kG magnetic coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.O.; Aso, Y.; Castro, P.J.; Barroso, J.J.; Ludwig, G.O.; Montes, A.; Nono, M.C.A.; Correa, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    The construction of magnetic coil system for a 35 GHz gyrotron is reported in great detail. This system is designed to generate a magnetic induction of 13,2 kG over an extension of 13 cm. By using an operating current of about 100 A, it was verified that both the axial magnetic field profile and the spatial non-uniformity are in close agreement with those theoretically predicted. (author)

  18. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso, E-mail: malt.marcos@gmail.com [Ingeniería Biomédica, Dirección de Planeación, Servicios de Salud de Durango. Cuauhtémoc 225 Norte, Durango, Durango 34000 (Mexico); Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique, E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  19. Outcomes with single-coil versus dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Nicholas; Kaura, Amit; Murgatroyd, Francis; Dhillon, Para; Scott, Paul A

    2018-03-01

    Dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads have traditionally been used over single-coil leads due to concerns regarding high defibrillation thresholds (DFT) and consequent poor shock efficacy. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this position may be unfounded and that dual-coil leads may also be associated with higher complication rates during lead extraction. This meta-analysis collates data comparing dual- and single-coil ICD leads. Electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-randomized studies comparing single-coil and dual-coil leads. The mean differences in DFT and summary estimates of the odds-ratio (OR) for first-shock efficacy and the hazard-ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated using random effects models. Eighteen studies including a total of 138,124 patients were identified. Dual-coil leads were associated with a lower DFT compared to single coil leads (mean difference -0.83J; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.39--0.27; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the first-shock success rate with dual-coil compared to single-coil leads (OR 0.74; 95%CI 0.45-1.21; P=0.22). There was a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality associated with single-coil leads (HR 0.91; 95%CI 0.86-0.95; P dual-coil leads. The mortality benefit with single-coil leads most likely represents patient selection bias. Given the increased risk and complexity of extracting dual-coil leads, centres should strongly consider single-coil ICD leads as the lead of choice for routine new left-sided ICD implants. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. HydroCoil as an adjuvant to bare platinum coil treatment of 100 cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, Noel F.; Berentei, Zsolt; Brennan, Paul R.; Thornton, John

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The overall safety of the HydroCoil, an expansile hybrid hydrogel-platinum coil, is unknown. We report a prospective observational study of our first 100 cerebral aneurysms treated with HydroCoils, focusing on safety and initial efficacy.Methods Indications, procedural complications, clinical and angiographic outcomes were recorded. Packing density, number of coils deployed and angiographic results were compared with those in a matched control group of 100 aneurysms treated solely with bare platinum coils. HydroCoil complication rates were compared to bare platinum coil rates at our institution and in published series. Results Adjuvant HydroCoil treatment led to increased mean percentage aneurysm filling compared to controls (50 ± 21% versus 27 ± 13%, P < 0.001). Immediate posttreatment angiographic results showed significantly (P < 0.001) more complete occlusions and fewer incomplete (<95%) occlusions compared to controls. Intermediate follow-up angiograms (median 7.5 months) in 63 aneurysms showed a trend towards fewer incomplete occlusions with HydroCoil treatment. There were significantly fewer major recurrences with HydroCoil treatment compared to the control treatment (9.5% versus 22.6%, P 0.046). In the adjuvant HydroCoil group, major recurrent aneurysms had significantly less percentage volume packing with HydroCoils than non-recurrent aneurysms (50.3 ± 5.0% versus 65.3 ± 18.0%, P = 0.04). There was a 12% procedural complication rate, 6% procedural morbidity and 1% mortality rate, similar to institutional and reported bare platinum coil complication rates.Conclusion HydroCoils can be safely deployed with a similar complication rate to bare platinum coils. They result in improved aneurysm filling. Intermediate follow-up angiography showed significantly fewer major recurrences. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm initial improved stability. (orig.)

  1. Designed Coiled-Coil Peptides Inhibit the Type Three Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzábal, Mariano; Mercado, Elsa C.; Vilte, Daniel A.; Salazar-González, Hector; Cataldi, Angel; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are two categories of E. coli strains associated with human disease. A major virulence factor of both pathotypes is the expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS), responsible for their ability to adhere to gut mucosa causing a characteristic attaching and effacing lesion (A/E). The TTSS translocates effector proteins directly into the host cell that subvert mammalian cell biochemistry. Methods/Principal Findings We examined synthetic peptides designed to inhibit the TTSS. CoilA and CoilB peptides, both representing coiled-coil regions of the translocator protein EspA, and CoilD peptide, corresponding to a coiled–coil region of the needle protein EscF, were effective in inhibiting the TTSS dependent hemolysis of red blood cells by the EPEC E2348/69 strain. CoilA and CoilB peptides also reduced the formation of actin pedestals by the same strain in HEp-2 cells and impaired the TTSS-mediated protein translocation into the epithelial cell. Interestingly, CoilA and CoilB were able to block EspA assembly, destabilizing the TTSS and thereby Tir translocation. This blockage of EspA polymerization by CoilA or CoilB peptides, also inhibited the correct delivery of EspB and EspD as detected by immunoblotting. Interestingly, electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with the CoilA peptide showed a reduction of the length of EspA filaments. Conclusions Our data indicate that coiled-coil peptides can prevent the assembly and thus the functionality of the TTSS apparatus and suggest that these peptides could provide an attractive tool to block EPEC and EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:20140230

  2. Magnetoelectric excitations in hexaferrites utilizing solenoid coil for sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine, E-mail: c.vittoria@neu.edu

    2015-11-01

    We have developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric hexaferrite materials in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Novel excitation method incorporating solenoid coils and single and multi-capacitor banks were developed and tested for sensor detections. For H-field sensing we obtained sensitivity of about 3000 V/mG and for E-field sensing the sensitivity was 10{sup −4} G/Vm{sup −1}. Tunability of about 0.1% was achieved for tunable inductor applications. However, the proposed designs lend themselves to significant (~10{sup 6}) improvements in sensitivity and tunability.

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C MRS surface coil: design and signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Menichetti, Luca; Milanesi, Matteo; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; De Marchi, Daniele; Hartwig, Valentina; Positano, Vincenzo; Landini, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Santarelli, Maria Filomena

    2010-10-01

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a novel and powerful tool for exploring the metabolic state of tissue, but a number of technological problems still limit this technology and need innovative solutions. In particular, the low molar concentration of derivate metabolites give rise to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which makes the design and development of dedicated RF coils a task of fundamental importance. In this article, the authors describe the simulation and the design of a dedicated 13C surface coil for cardiac metabolism assessment in pig models. A SNR model for a circular loop is presented and applied to the design of a 13C coil which guarantees the desired field-of-view and provides high SNR with a good penetration in deep sample regions. The coil resistance was calculated from Ohm's law and the magnetic field pattern was calculated using Biot-Savart law, while the sample induced resistance was calculated using a numerical finite-difference time-domain algorithm. Successively, a prototype of the coil was built and tested on the workbench and by acquisition of MR data. The comparison of SNR-vs-depth profiles between the theoretical SNR model and the experimental SNR extracted from the phantom chemical shift image (CSI) showed the accuracy of the authors' model. Moreover, the authors demonstrated the use of the coil for the acquisition of a CSI of a hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate phantom. The results demonstrated the design trade-offs to successfully design a dedicated coil for cardiac imaging in the pig with hyperpolarized 13C by developing a SNR model which allows the prediction of the coil performance. This approach can be employed for deriving SNR formulations for coil with more complex geometries.

  4. Coil Optimization for High Temperature Superconductor Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents topology optimization of HTS racetrack coils for large HTS synchronous machines. The topology optimization is used to acquire optimal coil designs for the excitation system of 3 T HTS machines. Several tapes are evaluated and the optimization results are discussed...

  5. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  6. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  7. Functional investigation of the plant-specific long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC and PICC-LIKE (PICL in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Venkatakrishnan

    Full Text Available We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC and PICC-LIKE (PICL. PICC (147 kDa and PICL (87 kDa are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC, with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response.

  8. Functional investigation of the plant-specific long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response.

  9. Functional Investigation of the Plant-Specific Long Coiled-Coil Proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response. PMID:23451199

  10. Thermomechanical properties of the coil of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Couturier, K; Ferracin, P; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio; Tommasini, D

    2002-01-01

    The correct definition and measurement of the thermomechanical properties of the superconducting cable used in high-field magnets is crucial to study and model the behavior of the magnet coil from assembly to the operational conditions. In this paper, the authors analyze the superconducting coil of the main dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider. They describe an experimental setup for measuring the elastic modulus at room and at liquid nitrogen temperature and for evaluating the thermal contr...

  11. Plasma response based RMP coil geometry optimization for an ITER plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yueqiang; Liu, Yue; Yang, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Based on an ITER 15MA Q  =  10 inductive scenario, a systematic numerical investigation is carried out in order to understand the effect of varying the geometry of the magnetic coils, used for controlling the edge localized modes in tokamaks, on the plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields produced by these coils. Toroidal computations show that both of the plasma response based figures of merit—one is the pitch resonant radial field component near the plasma edge and the other is the plasma displacement near the X-point of the separatrix—consistently yield the same prediction for the optimal coil geometry. With a couple of exceptions, the presently designed poloidal location of the ITER upper and lower rows of RMP coils is close to the optimum, according to the plasma response based criteria. This holds for different coil current configurations with n  =  2, 3, 4, as well as different coil phasing between the upper and lower rows. The coils poloidal width from the present design, on the other hand, is sub-optimal for the upper and lower rows. Modelling also finds that the plasma response amplitude sharply decreases by moving the middle row RMP coils of ITER from the designed radial location (just inside the inner vacuum vessel) outwards (outside the outer vacuum vessel). The decay rate is sensitively affected by the middle row coils’ poloidal coverage for low-n (n  =  1, 2) RMP fields, but not for high-n (n  =  4) fields.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study on the magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaghi, T.; Miya, K.; Yamada, H.; Takagi, T.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a magnetic fusion reactor was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Deformations of straight and torus type helical coils were caused due to static electromagnetic forces in the liquid helium cryostat and were analysed with the finite element computer code made here. Despite of a large scatter of experimental data due to a non-uniform friction force between the helical coil and the torus of stainless steel, the numerical results are very close to the mean value of the data. Numerical analysis of the force distribution acting on the helical coils was also performed for a Heliotron's coil system to characterize its nature. The force could be categorized conveniently as an extensional force, a tangential force and a toroidal force which correspond respectively to the kind of forces acting on toroidal field coils. Additionally, the effect of mechanical constraint on the magnetomechanical behavior is discussed and shows that the location of the constraint significantly affects the stress distributions in the coils. (orig.)

  13. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TEST OF THE REACT AND WIND, NB(3)SN, LDX FLOATING COIL CONDUCTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, B.A.; MICHAEL, P.C.; MINERVINI, J.V.; TAKAYASU, M.; SCHULTZ, J.H.; GREGORY, E.; PYON, T.; SAMPSON, W.B.; GHOSH, A.; SCANLAN, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a novel approach for studying magnetic confinement of a fusion plasma. In this approach, a superconducting ring coil is magnetically levitated for up to 8 hours a day in the center of a 5 meter diameter vacuum vessel. The levitated coil, with on-board helium supply, is called the gloating Coil (F-Coil). Although the maximum field at the coil is only 5.3 tesla, a react-and-wind Nb 3 Sn conductor was selected because the relatively high critical temperature will enable the coil to remain levitated while it warms from 5 K to 10 K. Since pre-reacted Nb 3 Sn tape is no longer commercially available, a composite conductor was designed that contains an 18 strand Nb 3 Sn Rutherford cable. The cable was reacted and then soldered into a structural copper channel that completes the conductor and also provides quench protection. The strain state of the cable was continuously controlled during fabrication steps such as: soldering into the copper channel, spooling, and coil winding, to prevent degradation of the critical current. Measurements of strand and cable critical currents are reported, as well as estimates of the effect of fabrication, winding and operating strains on critical current

  14. Manufacturing and test of 2G-HTS coils for rotating machines: Challenges, conductor requirements, realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oomen, Marijn; Herkert, Werner; Bayer, Dietmar; Kummeth, Peter; Nick, Wolfgang; Arndt, Tabea

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the use of 2nd-generation High-Temperature Superconductors (2G-HTSs) in the rotors of electrical motors and generators. For these devices the conductor must be wound into robust impregnated coils, which are operated in vacuum at temperatures around 30 K, in strong magnetic fields of about 2T. Differences in thermal contraction between the coil former, conductor constituents, impregnation resin, bandage and heat-sink materials (assembled at room temperature) cause mechanical stresses at operating temperature. Rotating-machine operation adds Lorentz forces and challenging centripetal accelerations up to thousands of g. Second generation-HTS conductors withstand large tensile stresses in axial direction and compression in normal direction. However, shear stresses, axial compression, and tension normal to the conductor can cause degradation in superconducting properties. Such stresses can be mitigated by correct choice of materials, coil lay-out and manufacturing process. A certain stress level will remain, which the conductor must withstand. We have manufactured many impregnated round and race-track coils, using different 2G-HTS conductors, and tested them at temperatures from 25 K to 77 K. Degradation of the superconductor in early coils was traced to the mentioned differences in thermal contraction, and was completely avoided in coils produced later. We will discuss appropriate coil-winding techniques to assure robust and reliable superconductor performance.

  15. Compression and heating of a laser-produced plasma using single and double induction coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, J. R.; Lunney, J. G.

    2018-02-01

    The results of an experiment on magnetohydrodynamic compression and heating of a laser-produced plasma in vacuum are described. The plasma was produced by laser ablation of copper at 2 J cm-2. A pulsed magnetic field, with an amplitude of 0.3 T and a period of 2.2 µs, was produced by a three-turn spiral induction coil placed 10 mm above the ablation spot. Time-resolved imaging revealed that the magnetic field had a strong influence on both the plasma between the coil and the target, and on the plasma which flows through the aperture in the coil. The plasma flow through the coil aperture is strongly pinched due to the Lorentz interaction of the induced current and the coil magnetic field. Heating of the plasma is evidenced by strong enhancement of the overall visible light emission and the appearance of Cu+ line emission. Magnetic compression and plasma heating were also observed in a setup using two induction coils separated by 10 mm. This technique could be used to enhance the sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, increase the ion yield in laser plasma ion sources, or control the ablation plume expansion in pulsed laser deposition.

  16. Design and Simulation of a Birdcage Coil using CST Studio Suite for Application at 7T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas, Bernat Palau; Li, Houmin; Anjum, M R

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the study of coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. The principal objective is the design of a birdcage Radio Frequency (RF) coil to use in a 7 Tesla (7T) scanner. Higher strength field generates a better SNR and increased chemical shift effect, improving spectral fat suppression and spectroscopy. Moreover, a better SNR increases the spatial resolution or reduces the imaging time. This research work presented recent developments based on high field 7T design using CST studio. The birdcage coil achieves circular polarization and generates a high homogeneous radio frequency magnetic field under many conditions. Design of a Birdcage coil for a 7T to obtain the images from s mall animals (i.e. mouse). It opens the door to design and construct a Birdcage coil for a 7T to obtain human brain images. Firstly we design a birdcage coil then the results are obtained with simulator CST Wave Studio, creating a 3D model and generating a simulation. Finally the parameters are re adjusted to obtain our desired Larmor frequency 298.2 MHz for a correct operation in 7T. This research work demonstrates the theoretical results from our design and shows the designed antenna behavior

  17. Performance of cold compressors in a cooling system of an R and D superconducting coil cooled with subcooled helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Takahata, K.; Maekawa, R.; Mito, T.

    2006-01-01

    The helical coils of large helical device (LHD) have been operated in saturated helium at 4.4 K and plasma experiments have been carried out at magnetic fields lower than 3 T for 8 years. Now, it is considered that the cooling system of helical coils will be improved to enhance magnetic fields in 2006. In the improvement, the helical coils will be cooled with subcooled helium and the operating temperature of helical coils will be lowered to achieve the designed field of 3 T and enhance cryogenic stabilities. Two cold compressors will be used in the cooling system of helical coils to generate subcooled helium. In the present study, the performance of cold compressors has been investigated, using a cooling system of R and D coil, to apply cold compressors to the cooling system of helical coils. Actual surge lines of cold compressors were observed and the stable operation area was obtained. Automatic operations were also performed within the area. In the automatic operations, the suitable pressure of a saturated helium bath, calculated from the rotation speed of the 1st cold compressor, was regulated by bypass valve. From these results, stable operations will be expected in the cooling system of helical coils

  18. Simultaneous formation of right- and left-handed anti-parallel coiled-coil interfaces by a coil2 fragment of human lamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Burkhard, Peter; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2011-04-22

    The elementary building block of all intermediate filaments (IFs) is a dimer featuring a central α-helical rod domain flanked by the N- and C-terminal end domains. In nuclear IF proteins (lamins), the rod domain consists of two coiled-coil segments, coil1 and coil2, that are connected by a short non-helical linker. Coil1 and the C-terminal part of coil2 contain the two highly conserved IF consensus motifs involved in the longitudinal assembly of dimers. The previously solved crystal structure of a lamin A fragment (residues 305-387) corresponding to the second half of coil2 has yielded a parallel left-handed coiled coil. Here, we present the crystal structure and solution properties of another human lamin A fragment (residues 328-398), which is largely overlapping with fragment 305-387 but harbors a short segment of the tail domain. Unexpectedly, no parallel coiled coil forms within the crystal. Instead, the α-helices are arranged such that two anti-parallel coiled-coil interfaces are formed. The most significant interface has a right-handed geometry, which is accounted for by a characteristic 15-residue repeat pattern that overlays with the canonical heptad repeat pattern. The second interface is a left-handed anti-parallel coiled coil based on the predicted heptad repeat pattern. In solution, the fragment reveals only a weak dimerization propensity. We speculate that the C-terminus of coil2 might unzip, thereby allowing for a right-handed coiled-coil interface to form between two laterally aligned dimers. Such an interface might co-exist with a heterotetrameric left-handed coiled-coil assembly, which is expected to be responsible for the longitudinal A(CN) contact. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. N@a and N@d: Oligomer and Partner Specification by Asparagine in Coiled-Coil Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jordan M; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Danon, Jonathan J; Rush, Laura E; Lupas, Andrei N; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-02-17

    The α-helical coiled coil is one of the best-studied protein-protein interaction motifs. As a result, sequence-to-structure relationships are available for the prediction of natural coiled-coil sequences and the de novo design of new ones. However, coiled coils adopt a wide range of oligomeric states and topologies, and our understanding of the specification of these and the discrimination between them remains incomplete. Gaps in our knowledge assume more importance as coiled coils are used increasingly to construct biomimetic systems of higher complexity; for this, coiled-coil components need to be robust, orthogonal, and transferable between contexts. Here, we explore how the polar side chain asparagine (Asn, N) is tolerated within otherwise hydrophobic helix-helix interfaces of coiled coils. The long-held view is that Asn placed at certain sites of the coiled-coil sequence repeat selects one oligomer state over others, which is rationalized by the ability of the side chain to make hydrogen bonds, or interactions with chelated ions within the coiled-coil interior of the favored state. We test this with experiments on de novo peptide sequences traditionally considered as directing parallel dimers and trimers, and more widely through bioinformatics analysis of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures. We find that when located centrally, rather than near the termini of such coiled-coil sequences, Asn does exert the anticipated oligomer-specifying influence. However, outside of these bounds, Asn is observed less frequently in the natural sequences, and the synthetic peptides are hyperthermostable and lose oligomer-state specificity. These findings highlight that not all regions of coiled-coil repeat sequences are equivalent, and that care is needed when designing coiled-coil interfaces.

  20. Database system for analysing and managing coiled tubing drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.; Choe, J.

    2009-05-01

    This study present a prototype of database system for analysing and managing petrophysical data from coiled tubing drilling in the oil and gas industry. The characteristics of coiled tubing drilling data from cores were analyzed and categorized according to the whole drilling process and data modeling including object relation diagram, class diagram was carried out to design the schema of effective database system such as the relationships between tables and key index fields to create the relationships. The database system called DrillerGeoDB consists of 22 tables and those are classified with 4 groups such as project information, stratum information, drilling/logging information and operation evaluate information. DrillerGeoDB provide all sort of results of each process with a spreadsheet such as MS-Excel via application of various algorithm of logging theory and statistics function of cost evaluation. This presentation describes the details of the system development and implementation.