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Sample records for fetc crada pc96-004

  1. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called 'greenhouse gases.' Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth's atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide

  2. FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. Quarterly technical report, July 1-September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, E.; Tillman, D.

    1997-12-01

    The FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Program has completed one year of activity, accelerating the pace of cofiring development. Cofiring tests were completed at the Seward Generating Station of GPU Genco and at the Michigan City Generating Station of NIPSCO. The NYSEG work at Greenidge Station resulted in a workable, low cost method for injecting biofuels into coal-fired PC boilers. Support studies and modeling continued to provide analytics for the cofiring program. This report summarizes the activities during the fourth quarter of the FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. It focuses upon the results of testing in order to highlight the progress at utilities.

  3. FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. Quarterly technical report, April 1-June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, E.; Tillman, D.

    1997-12-01

    The FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Program has accelerated the pace of cofiring development by increasing the testing activities plus the support activities for interpreting test results. Past tests conducted and analyzed include the Allen Fossil Plant and Seward Generating Station programs. On-going tests include the Colbert Fossil Plant precommercial test program, the Greenidge Station commercialization program, and the Blount St. Station switchgrass program. Tests in the formative stages included the NIPSCO cofiring test at Michigan City Generating Station. Analytical activities included modeling and related support functions required to analyze the cofiring test results, and to place those results into context. Among these activities is the fuel availability study in the Pittsburgh, PA area. This study, conducted for Duquesne Light, supports their initial investigation into reburn technology using wood waste as a fuel. This Quarterly Report, covering the third quarter of the FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Program, highlights the progress made on the 16 projects funded under this cooperative agreement.

  4. Butanol / Honda CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Yorktown, VA. Test data consisted of environmental data, engine/fuel system data, fuel chemistry , and crew observations. In addition, Oak Ridge...engines in cold weather was experienced, which the test team attributed to test fuel chemistry Butanol / Honda CRADA Report UNCLAS//Public | CG...8217:atE!ja:l ;¥5~1 TeSI iUEt =· Ge-salbi"l: : li:d~iEr:E b. €10 Sa$E G~~:r.e: 1t’!dGie~~e. Etl’!~cJ : ~t:v@!dfro1~ ;liat’IU M::::l~g ratio: lU-..-c

  5. Biodiesel/Cummins CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    add CO2 to the atmosphere, but recycles existing atmospheric CO2. The use of fossil fuels on the other hand, releases carbon that has been stored...in this test was made from recycled greases (used cooking and frying oils). 2.1.2 Test Platform and Location The RDC selected the 49’ Buoy Utility... polypropylene ) over time, so these should not be used in fuel storage and transfer systems. Biodiesel/Cummins CRADA Report 5 UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R&DC

  6. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1998-02-10

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies have to be able to respond quickly with improved, high quality, cost efficient products. Because companies and their suppliers are geographically distributed, rapid product realization is dependent on the development of a secure integrated concurrent engineering environment operating across multiple business entities. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies implemented in a secure environment. This documents the work done under this CRADA to develop capabilities, which permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), through a CRADA with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), worked within a consortium of major industrial firms--Ford, General Motors, Texas Instruments, United Technologies, and Eastman Kodak--and several small suppliers of advanced manufacturing technology--MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., Teknowledge Corp., Cimplex Corp., Concentra, Spatial Technology, and Structural Dynamics Research Corp. (SDRC)--to create infrastructure to support the development and implementation of secure engineering environments for Rapid Response Manufacturing. The major accomplishment achieved under this CRADA was the demonstration of a prototypical implementation of a broad-based generic framework for automating and integrating the design-to-manufacturing activities associated with machined parts in a secure NWC compliant environment. Specifically, methods needed to permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process were developed and demonstrated. An important aspect of this demonstration was

  7. Development of Charge Drain Coatings: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-17

    The primary goal of this CRADA project was to develop and optimize tunable resistive coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as charge-drain coatings on the KLA-Tencor digital pattern generators (DPGs).

  8. CRADA Payment Options | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY).

  9. Phase I ResonantSonic CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richterich, L.R.; Amos, L.O.; Fancher, J.D.; McLellan, G.W.; Setzer, W.V.; Tuttle, B.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Hockey, R.L.; Ferris, R.H.; Riechers, D.M.; Pitman, S.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-03-28

    This test report describes the Phase 1 testing and results of the ResonantSonic drilling method. This effort was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate the Water Development Corporation`s ResonantSonic drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the ResonantSonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex and private industry. Initially, the ResonantSonic drill was used to drill several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site to assess the feasibility of drilling vertical and angle holes. After this initial phase, a 45 degree angle vapor extraction well was drilled to a depth of 168 feet at the 200 West Carbon Tetrachloride Site. This well was drilled and completed in nine days. Extensive geologic and vapor sampling were conducted while drilling this well. In addition, testing was also conducted at the test site to evaluated drilling with larger diameter casing (8 5/8 inch). Evaluation of the Resonant Sonic drilling method will be continued during the Phase 2 portion of testing to determine if improvements to the ResonantSonic system will make it a more viable method for drilling and sampling.

  10. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pigoski, T.M. [Merrit Systems, Inc. (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  11. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, D.C.; Pigoski, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors

  12. Phase I ResonantSonic CRADA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richterich, L.R.; Amos, L.O.; Fancher, J.D.; McLellan, G.W.; Setzer, W.V.; Tuttle, B.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Ferris, R.H.; Riechers, D.M.; Pitman, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    This test report describes the Phase 1 testing and results of the ResonantSonic drilling method. This effort was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate the Water Development Corporation's ResonantSonic drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the ResonantSonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex and private industry. Initially, the ResonantSonic drill was used to drill several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site to assess the feasibility of drilling vertical and angle holes. After this initial phase, a 45 degree angle vapor extraction well was drilled to a depth of 168 feet at the 200 West Carbon Tetrachloride Site. This well was drilled and completed in nine days. Extensive geologic and vapor sampling were conducted while drilling this well. In addition, testing was also conducted at the test site to evaluated drilling with larger diameter casing (8 5/8 inch). Evaluation of the Resonant Sonic drilling method will be continued during the Phase 2 portion of testing to determine if improvements to the ResonantSonic system will make it a more viable method for drilling and sampling

  13. Power generation systems for NOx reduction. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1292-0111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.J. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berenyi, S.G. [General Motors Corp., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Allison Gas Turbine Div.

    1996-04-30

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. Y1292-0111, between Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors Corporation and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, under contract to the US Department of Energy, is entitled ``Power Generation Systems for NOx Reduction``. The objective of this effort was to design, develop, and demonstrate an integrated turbine genset suitable for high efficiency power generation requirements. The result of this effort would have been prototype generator hardware including controllers for testing and evaluation by Allison Gas Turbine Division. The generator would have been coupled to a suitably sized and configured gas turbine engine, which would operate on a laboratory load bank. This effort leads to extensive knowledge and design capability in the most efficient and high power density generator design for mobile power generation and potentially to commercialization of these advanced technologies.

  14. Surface Inspection Machine Infrared (SIMIR). Final CRADA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.L.; Neu, J.T.; Beecroft, M.

    1997-01-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was a one year effort to make the surface inspection machine based on diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (Surface Inspection Machine-Infrared, SIMIR), being developed by Surface Optics Corporation, perform to its highest potential as a practical, portable surface inspection machine. The design function of the SIMIR is to inspect metal surfaces for cleanliness (stains). The system is also capable of evaluating graphite-resin systems for cure and heat damage, and for measuring the effects of moisture exposure on lithium hydride, corrosion on uranium metal, and the constituents of and contamination on wood, paper, and fabrics. Over the period of the CRADA, extensive experience with the use of the SIMIR for surface cleanliness measurements have been achieved through collaborations with NASA and the Army. The SIMIR was made available to the AMTEX CRADA for Finish on Yarn where it made a very significant contribution. The SIMIR was the foundation of a Forest Products CRADA that was developed over the time interval of this CRADA. Surface Optics Corporation and the SIMIR have been introduced to the chemical spectroscopy on-line analysis market and have made staffing additions and arrangements for international marketing of the SIMIR as an on-line surface inspection device. LMES has been introduced to a wide range of aerospace applications, the research and fabrication skills of Surface Optics Corporation, has gained extensive experience in the areas of surface cleanliness from collaborations with NASA and the Army, and an extensive introduction to the textile and forest products industries. The SIMIR, marketed as the SOC-400, has filled an important new technology need in the DOE-DP Enhanced Surveillance Program with instruments delivered to or on order by LMES, LANL, LLNL, and Pantex, where extensive collaborations are underway to implement and improve this technology

  15. Development of an X-Ray Catheter Final Report CRADA No. TC-1265-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebes, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schlossberg, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Toe goal of this CRADA project was to develop a catheter-based x-ray source to provide treatment of restenosis in arteries with a radiation source which can be precisely controlled and turned on and off at will.

  16. Pulse Combustor CRADA PC91-001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1992-08-31

    As outlined in the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between BO Technical Developments, Ltd. (BO Tech) and the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Combustion Division, a BO Tech designed pulse-blade combustor was studied at PETC. Phase 1 involved limited tests of a single-blade pulsed-combustor module to evaluate the suitability of a gas-designed unit for firing coal for use in residential, commercial, or industrial sectors. During the course of the project, three different pulsed blade burners were designed and fabricated by BO Tech and subsequently delivered to PETC for evaluation. These units were designed to allow modification of the furnace dimensions, which would give PETC a means to take simple steps to improve coal firing performance is required. No major furnace design changes were to be included as part of the phase 1 activities.

  17. Development of a Commercial Prototype of the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02077-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haigh, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and GE Ion Track, Inc. (GEIT) to develop a commercial prototype of the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS), an instrument that monitors the air for all three biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses and toxins). This was originally a one year CRADA project, with the cost of the work at LLNL being funded by the Department of Homeland Security's Office of National Laboratories. The original project consisted of five major tasks and deliverables. The CRADA was then amended, converting the CRADA from a programmatically funded CRADA to a funds-in CRADA, extending the project for an additional 14 months, and adding four new tasks and deliverable to the project.

  18. A national laboratory/private industry cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the history and process of establishing a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories and Magnavox Electronic Systems Company for the design, development, and testing of a 360-degree scanning, imaging, intrusion detection sensor. The subject of the CRADA is the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). It is intended for exterior use at ranges from 50 to 1,500 meters and uses a combination of three sensing technologies (infrared, visible, and radar) and a new data processing method to provide low false-alarm intrusion detection and tracking combined with immediate visual assessment. The establishment of this CRADA represents a new paradigm in the cooperation between the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Laboratories and Private Industry. Although a formal document has now been executed, a CRADA is, nonetheless, primarily an agreement to work with each other to achieve goals that might otherwise be unattainable. For the DoD, a program continues in the face of uncertain funding. For the DOE, a CRADA is in place that meets congressionally mandated guidelines. For Sandia, sponsors are in agreement on requirements and synergistic funding. And for Magnavox, an opportunity is in hand to work with researchers in developing advanced security technology

  19. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-10-02991 "Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Precursors and Conversion Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Rober [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix [ORNL; Naskar, Amit [ORNL; Kaufman, Michael [ORNL; Yarborough, Ken [ORNL; Derstine, Chris [The Dow Chemical Company

    2013-10-01

    The overall objective of the collaborative research performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Dow Chemical Company under this Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA NFE-10-02991) was to develop and establish pathways to commercialize new carbon fiber precursor and conversion technology. This technology is to produce alternative polymer fiber precursor formulations as well as scaled energy-efficient advanced conversion technology to enable continuous mode conversion to obtain carbonized fibers that are technically and economically viable in industrial markets such as transportation, wind energy, infrastructure and oil drilling applications. There have been efforts in the past to produce a low cost carbon fiber. These attempts have to be interpreted against the backdrop of the market needs at the time, which were strictly military aircraft and high-end aerospace components. In fact, manufacturing costs have been reduced from those days to current practice, where both process optimization and volume production have enabled carbon fiber to become available at prices below $20/lb. However, the requirements of the lucrative aerospace market limits further price reductions from current practice. This approach is different because specific industrial applications are targeted, most specifically wind turbine blade and light vehicle transportation, where aircraft grade carbon fiber is not required. As a result, researchers are free to adjust both manufacturing process and precursor chemistry to meet the relaxed physical specifications at a lower cost. This report documents the approach and findings of this cooperative research in alternative precursors and advanced conversion for production of cost-effective carbon fiber for energy missions. Due to export control, proprietary restrictions, and CRADA protected data considerations, specific design details and processing parameters are not included in this report.

  20. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schweizer, K.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Honeycutt, J.D. [BIOSYM Technologies, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  1. Development of a Landmine Detection Sensor Final Report CRADA No. TC02133.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheppard, C. [First Alliance Technologies, LLC, San Ramon, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was one of two CRADAs between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and First Alliance Technologies, LLC (First Alliance), to conduct research and development activity toward an integrated system for the detecting, locating, and destroying of landmines and unexploded ordinance using a laser to destroy landmines and unexploded ordinance and First Alliance’s Land Mine Locator (LML) system. The focus of this CRADA was on developing a sensor system that accurately detects landmines, and provides exact location information in a timely manner with extreme reliability.

  2. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Adelman, Brad [Navistar; Derybowski, Edward [Navistar

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure

  3. Hyperspectral Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TC02173.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sauvageau, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), National Security Space Operations/SRBU, to develop longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for airborne and potentially ground and space, platforms. LLNL has designed and developed LWIR HSI sensors since 1995. The current generation of these sensors has applications to users within the U.S. Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community. User needs are for multiple copies provided by commercial industry. To gain the most benefit from the U.S. Government’s prior investments in LWIR HSI sensors developed at LLNL, transfer of technology and know-how from LLNL HSI experts to commercial industry was needed. The overarching purpose of the CRADA project was to facilitate the transfer of the necessary technology from LLNL to SAIC thereby allowing the U.S. Government to procure LWIR HSI sensors from this company.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues Final Report – CRADA #PNNL/277

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Fjare, K. A.; Dunn, B. C.; McDonald, S. L.; Dassor, G.

    2010-07-28

    This project was performed as a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the participants: Archer-Daniels-Midland Company (ADM), ConocoPhillips (COP), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Funding from the federal government was provided by the Office of the Biomass Program within the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy assistant secretariat as part of the Thermochemical Conversion Platform. The three-year project was initiated in August 2007 with formal signing of the CRADA (#PNNL/277) in March 3, 2008 with subsequent amendments approved in November of 2008 and August of 2009. This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL and the CRADA partners ADM and COP. It is considered Protected CRADA Information and is not available for public disclosure. The work conducted during this project involved developing process technology at PNNL for hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of agricultural and biorefinery residues and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) of the aqueous byproduct from the liquefaction step. Related work performed by the partners included assessment of aqueous phase byproducts, hydroprocessing of the bio-oil product and process analysis and economic modeling of the technology.

  5. Brain Implants for Prediction and Mitigation of Epileptic Seizures - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa

    2016-09-29

    This is a CRADA final report on C0100901 between Argonne National Laboratory and Flint Hills Scientific, LLC of Lawrence, Kansas. Two brain implantable probes, a surface acoustic wave probe and a miniature cooling probe, were designed, built, and tested with excellent results.

  6. Complex Multi-Chamber Airbag Performance Simulation Final Report CRADA No. TSB-961-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kithil, Philip [Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI), Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The purpose of this small business CRADA was to evaluate the performance of new airbag concepts which were developed by the Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI). These new airbag concepts, if successful, could have major potential savings to society in terms of fewer injuries, lost time and lives.

  7. First Principles Diffusion Modeling Final Report CRADA No. TC-1540-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    delaRubia, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Giles, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The CRADA participants built on the capabilities LLNL had already developed for ab initio diffusion modeling, extending them to higher doping and damage levels, and applying them to improve the understanding of implant and annealing tradeoffs for technology-relevant conditions. The calculation results and some of the simulation capabilities developed here were transferred to Intel and Applied Materials.

  8. Development of YBCO Superconductor for Electric Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2013-03-01

    The proposed project will be collaborative in exploration of high temperature superconductor oxide films between SuperPower, Inc. and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This CRADA will attempt to develop YBCO based high temperature oxide technology.

  9. Improved catalyst materials and emission control systems. CRADA final report for CRADA Number ORNL 92-0115

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; Domingo, N.; Storey, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); LaBarge, W.; Beckmeyer, R.F.; Theis, J.R. [Delphi Automotive Systems, Flint, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The overall goal of this CRADA was the improvement of performance and/or development of alternate systems for conventional fuel, flex-fuel, and alternate fuel vehicles in order to meet stringent future emission standards. The objectives had three major thrusts: (1) the characterization of the structural and chemical evolution of the precious metals and washcoat during aging under bench flow reactor, engine dynamometer, and vehicle conditions; (2) the correlation of measured catalyst performance and degradation over time with details of microstructural changes under bench flow reactor and engine dynamometer conditions; and (3) the simulation and testing of an in-cylinder catalyst system to determine the effect on emissions of a single-cylinder engine. Catalyst formulations for both gasoline and natural gas applications were studied. The emission testing and structural characterization were performed on alternate formulations and processing variables in order to evaluate the relative conversion efficiency, lifetime, and stability. The aging parameters were correlated with the evolving structure and properties of the tested catalytic converters. A major portion of the second thrust area was the construction and validation of both the bench flow reactor and engine dynamometer test facility and the identification of deactivation/regeneration mechanisms associated with alternative fuels relative to those for conventional fuel. A number of microstructural changes were identified that could contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst during aging. The stability of several catalyst formulations and alternate processing procedures relative to these microstructural changes and changes in conversion efficiency and lifetime were studied.

  10. Growth of large detector crystals. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatner, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Samuelson, S. [Deltronic Crystal Industries, Dover, NJ (United States)

    1997-06-18

    In the course of a collaborative research effort between L.A. Boatner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Prof. Alex Lempicki of the Department of Chemistry of Boston University, a new highly efficient and very fast scintillator for the detection of gamma-rays was discovered. This new scintillator consists of a single crystal of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO{sub 4}) to which a small percentage of trivalent cerium is added as an activator ion. The new lutetium orthophosphate-cerium scintillator was found to be superior in performance to bismuth germanium oxide--a material that is currently widely used as a gamma-ray detector in a variety of medical, scientific, and technical applications. Single crystals of LuPO{sub 4} and related rare-earth orthophosphates had been grown for a number of years in the ORNL Solid State Division prior to the discovery of the efficient gamma-ray-scintillation response of LuPO{sub 4}:Ce. The high-temperature-solvent (flux-growth) method used for the growth of these crystals was capable of producing crystals in sizes that were adequate for research purposes but that were inadequate for commercial-scale production and widespread application. The CRADA between ORNL and Deltronic Crystal Industries of Dover, NJ was undertaken for the purpose of investigating alternate approaches, such as top-seeded-solution growth, to the growth of LuPO{sub 4}:Ce scintillator crystals in sizes significantly larger than those obtainable through the application of standard flux-growth methods and, therefore, suitable for commercial sales and applications.

  11. SWAY/NREL Collaboration on Offshore Wind System Testing and Analysis: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-459

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and SWAY. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA agreement, NREL and SWAY will collaborate on the SWAY 1/5th-scale floating wind turbine demonstration project in Norway. NREL and SWAY will work together to obtain measurement data from the demonstration system to perform model validation.

  12. Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

    2012-08-27

    Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The

  13. Micromagnetic Code Development of Advanced Magnetic Structures Final Report CRADA No. TC-1561-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerjan, Charles J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shi, Xizeng [Read-Rite Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The specific goals of this project were to: Further develop the previously written micromagnetic code DADIMAG (DOE code release number 980017); Validate the code. The resulting code was expected to be more realistic and useful for simulations of magnetic structures of specific interest to Read-Rite programs. We also planned to further the code for use in internal LLNL programs. This project complemented LLNL CRADA TC-840-94 between LLNL and Read-Rite, which allowed for simulations of the advanced magnetic head development completed under the CRADA. TC-1561-98 was effective concurrently with LLNL non-exclusive copyright license (TL-1552-98) to Read-Rite for DADIMAG Version 2 executable code.

  14. Trinitromethyl Heterocyclic Oxidizers as a Solid Propellant Ingredient Final Report CRADA No TC02146.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis of two novel energetic heterocyclic oxidizers as possible replacements for ammonium perchlorate (AP) in rocket propellant formulations. This CRADA resulted from the award of the Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) from DOD. The CRADA consisted of two phases. The goal for Phase 1 was to produce a new oxidizer called TNMDNP. Phase 2 is optional (based on the success of Phase 1) and the goal of Phase 2 (optional) was to produce a new oxidizer called TNMDNT. Phase 2 tasks would be performed based on the successful results of Phase 1.

  15. Nano-Filament Field Emission Cathode Development Final Report CRADA No. TSB-0731-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, Tony [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fahlen, Ted [Candescent Technologies Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2018-01-17

    At the time the CRADA was established, Silicon Video Corporation, of Cupertino, CA was a one-year-old rapidly growing start-up company. SVC was developing flat panel displays (FPDs) to replace Cathode Ray Terminals (CRTs) for personal computers, work stations and televisions. They planned to base their products on low cost and energy efficient field emission technology. It was universally recognized that the display was both the dominant cost item and differentiating feature of many products such as laptop computers and hand-held electronics and that control of the display technology through U.S. sources was essential to success in these markets. The purpose of this CRADA project was to determine if electrochemical planarization would be a viable, inexpensive alternative to current optical polishing techniques for planarizing the surface of a ceramic backplate of a thin film display.

  16. Agreement Execution Process Study: CRADAs and NF-WFO Agreements and the Speed of Business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, Bruce J.; Cejka, Cheryl L.; Macklin, Richard; Miksovic, Ann

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a study on the execution of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and Non-Federal Work for Others (NF-WFO) agreements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory complex. The study provides quantitiative estimates of times required to negotiate and execute these agreements across the DOE complex. It identifies factors impacting on cycle times and describes best practicies used at various laboratories and site offices that reduce cycle times.

  17. Development of a Laser for Landmine Destruction Final Report CRADA No. TC02126.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheppard, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    This was one of two CRADAs between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and First Alliance Technologies, LLC (First Alliance), to conduct research and development activity toward an integrated system for the detecting, locating, and destroying of landmines and unexploded ordinance using a laser to destroy landmines and unexploded ordinance and First Alliance’s Land Mine Locator (LML) system.

  18. Manufacturing and Characterization of Ultra Pure Ferrous Alloys Final Report CRADA No. TC02069.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McGreevy, T. E. [Caterpillar Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This CRADA was a.collaborative effort between the Lawrence Livermore National Security LLC (formerly University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL),and Caterpillar Inc. (CaterpiHar), to further advance levitation casting techniques (developed at the Central Research Institute for Material (CRIM) in St. Petersburg, Russia) for use in manufacturing high purity metal alloys. This DOE Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP) project was to develop and demonstrate the levitation casting technology for producing ultra-pure alloys.

  19. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging Final Report CRADA No. TC-609-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mondt, William [RIMtech, Inc., Westminster, CO (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop a useful and commercially viable version of ERT technology for use in the oil, mining, engineering, and geotechnical industries. The goals required to accomplish these tasks included (1) developing commercial-grade data-acquisition systems and data analysis software, and (2) completing transfer of the state-of-the-art know-how, held by LLNL scientists and engineers, to personnel at RIMtech, Inc.

  20. Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot's performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B ampersand R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding

  1. High Density, Insensitive Oxidizer With RDX Performance Final Report CRADA No. TC02178.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Preda, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis and evaluate a novel high density, insensitive oxidizer with RDX performance. This CRADA resulted from the award of a Phase I STTR ("STTR") from DOD. In recent years, the synthesis of new energetic heterocyclic compounds to replace the energetic materials currently in the stockpile has received a great amount of attention. The Office of the Secretary of Defense has identified that there is a need to incorporate new energetic materials in current and future weapon systems in an effort to increase performance and decrease sensitivity. For many of the future weapon systems, incorporation of energetic compounds currently in the stockpile will not provide the desired performance and sensitivity goals. The success of this CRADA may lead to a Phase I option STTR from DOD and to a Phase II STTR from DOD. The goal of this CRADA was to produce and test a novel oxidizer, 2,5,8-trinitroheptazine (TNH).

  2. Centralized Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment - CRADA Final Report For CRADA Number NFE-11-03562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, R. K. [ORNL; Peters, Scott [Sypris Electronics, LLC

    2014-05-28

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  3. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  4. Non-Invasive Pneumothorax Detector Final Report CRADA No. TC02110.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Purcell, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and ElectroSonics Medical Inc. (formerly known as BIOMEC, Inc.), to develop a non-invasive pneumothorax detector based upon the micropower impulse radar technology invented at LLNL. Under a Work for Others Subcontract (L-9248), LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a novel device for non-invasive detection of pneumothorax for emergency and long-term monitoring. The device is based on Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology. Phase I experimental results were promising, showing that a pneumothorax volume even as small as 30 ml was clearly detectable from the MIR signals. Phase I results contributed to the award of a National Institute of Health (NIH) SBIR Phase II grant to support further research and development. The Phase II award led to the establishment of a LLNL/ElectroSonics CRADA related to Case No. TC02045.0. Under the subsequent CRADA, LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the pneumothorax detection in human subject research trials. Under this current CRADA TC02110.0, also referred to as Phase II Type II, the project scope consisted of seven tasks in Project Year 1; five tasks in Project Year 2; and four tasks in Project Year 3. Year 1 tasks were aimed toward the delivery of the pneumothorax detector design package for the pre-production of the miniaturized CompactFlash dockable version of the system. The tasks in Project Years 2 and 3 critically depended upon the accomplishments of Task 1. Since LLNL’s task was to provide subject matter expertise and performance verification, much of the timeline of engagement by the LLNL staff depended upon the overall project milestones as determined by the lead organization ElectroSonics. The scope of efforts were subsequently adjusted accordingly to commensurate with funding

  5. Laser Shot Peening System Final Report CRADA No. TC-1369-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, B. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harris, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This CRADA project was established with a primary goal to develop a laser shot peening system which could operate at production throughput rates and produce the desired depth and intensity of induced shots. The first objective was to understand all parameters required for acceptable peening, including pulse energy, pulse temporal format, pulse spatial format, sample configuration and tamping mechanism. The next objective was to demonstrate the technique on representative samples and then on representative parts. The final objective was to implement the technology into a meaningful industrial peen.

  6. Development of Personal Decontamination System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02078-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Dell, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and O’Dell Engineering, Ltd. (O’Dell) to develop an improved low-cost personal decontamination system for Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) and chemical agents. The significant change to the project was that COTS (Commercial Off-the Shelf Components) were identified that performed as well, or better than, the proprietary materials created and tested as part of this CRADA. These COTS components were combined to create a new LPDS (low-cost personal decontamination system) that met all specifications.

  7. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  8. Prevention of iron-sulfide deposition in petroleum processing. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, R. D.; Panchal, C. B.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-25

    The purpose of this CRADA extension which effectively ended in 2003 was to quantify the effect of iron-sulfide formation on the fouling propensity of crude oil. The specific objectives are focused on fouling of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU-1) at the Shell Refinery in Mobile, Alabama. The technical approach consists of analyzing the plant data, chemical analysis of crude oil to detect key precursors, performing refinery tests using the Argonne Field Fouling Unit, and verifying the effectiveness of a physical device of tube insert and enhanced tubes to change threshold conditions and thereby reducing fouling.

  9. Improved Advanced Actuated Hybrid Mirrors Final Report CRADA No. TC02130.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ealey, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort to develop and demonstrate an improved Advanced Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AAHM) for commercial or Government purposes. The AAHM consists of a nanolaminate film replicating a precision optical surface bonded to a Silicon Carbide (SiC) substrate with active figure control capability. The goal of this project was to further the development of specific AAHM technologies. The intent of the CRADA was to combine the expertise of LLNL and NG Xinetics in the manufacture and test of a very high quality AAHM, incorporating lessons learned from earlier joint efforts.

  10. EnergyPlus Hysteresis PCM Model: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-639

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edwin S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Under the CRADA, NREL will provide assistance to NRGsim to debug and convert the EnergyPlus Hysteresis Phase Change Material ('PCM') model to C++ for adoption into the main code package of the EnergyPlus simulation engine.

  11. Development of a Multi-Sensor Cancer Detection Probe Final Report CRADA No. TC-2026-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hular, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This collaboration continued work started under a previous CRADA (TSB-2023-00) to take a detailed concept specification for a multi-sensor needle/probe suitable for breast cancer analysis and produce a prototype system suitable for human FDA trials.

  12. High Performance Parallel Processing (HPPP) Finite Element Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions Final Report CRADA No. TC-0824-94-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ziegler, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This project was a muki-partner CRADA. This was a partnership between Alcoa and LLNL. AIcoa developed a system of numerical simulation modules that provided accurate and efficient threedimensional modeling of combined fluid dynamics and structural response.

  13. Advanced Analog Signal Processing for Fuzing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1306-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, C. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spencer, D. [Raymond Engineering, Middletown, CT (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The purpose of this CRADA between LLNL and Kaman Aerospace/Raymond Engineering Operations (Raymond) was to demonstrate the feasibility of using Analog/Digital Neural Network (ANN) Technology for advanced signal processing, fuzing, and other applications. This cooperation sought to Ieverage the expertise and capabilities of both parties--Raymond to develop the signature recognition hardware system, using Raymond’s extensive experience in the area of system development plus Raymond’s knowledge of military applications, and LLNL to apply ANN and related technologies to an area of significant interest to the United States government. This CRADA effort was anticipated to be a three-year project consisting of three phases: Phase I, Proof-of-Principle Demonstration; Phase II, Proof-of-Design, involving the development of a form-factored integrated sensor and ANN technology processo~ and Phase III, Final Design and Release of the integrated sensor and ANN fabrication process: Under Phase I, to be conducted during calendar year 1996, Raymond was to deliver to LLNL an architecture (design) for an ANN chip. LLNL was to translate the design into a stepper mask and to produce and test a prototype chip from the Raymond design.

  14. Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Maley

    2004-03-31

    Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because

  15. Data summary report for M.W. Kellogg Z-sorb sorbent tests. CRADA 92-008 Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, C E; Monaco, S J

    1994-05-01

    A series of tests were undertaken from August 6, 1992 through July 6, 1993 at METC`s High Pressure Bench-Scale Hot Gas Desulfurization Unit to support a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between METC`s Sorbent Development Cluster and M.W. Kellogg. The M.W. Kellogg Company is currently developing a commercial offering of a hot gas clean-up system to be used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The intent of the CRADA agreement was to identify a suitable zinc-based desulfurization sorbent for the Sierra Pacific Power Company Clean Coal Technology Project, to identify optimum operating conditions for the sorbent, and to estimate potential sorbent loss per year. This report presents results pertaining to Phillips Petroleum`s Z-Sorb III sorbent.

  16. Development of improved x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeams. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1294-0283

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.; Gao, N.; Xiao, Q.F.; Ponomarev, I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop improved glass capillary, x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeam applications. X-Ray Optical Systems, Inc. (XOS) designed and fabricated capillary optics and LMES tested those optics for x-ray microanalytical applications using its unique X-Ray Microprobe. Tapered capillaries with 3-microm and 8-microm output openings were fabricated and tested. The tapered capillaries had better spectral quality for x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis, than non-tapered, straight capillaries that are currently used in the system. X-ray beam count-rates for the tapered capillaries were also greater than the straight capillaries. Two monolithic, polycapillary optics were fabricated and tested. The polycapillary optics produced focal spots of 40 and 100 microm. Beam intensities for the polycapillaries were, respective, 44 and 18 times the intensities found in straight 50-microm and 100-microm capillaries. High-sensitivity scanning will be possible because of the enhanced intensity of the polycapillary optic. LMES and the DP program will benefit from improved capabilities for nondestructive x-ray microanalysis, while XOS will benefit from test results that will enhance the marketability of their products

  17. Characterization of the Tribological Behavior of Oxide-Based NanoMaterials: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Under the Argonne/Pixelligent cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA – C1200801), Argonne performed labscale tribological tests on proprietary nano-sized ZrO2 material developed by Pixelligent. Pixelligent utilized their proprietary process to prepare variants with different surfactants at different loadings in different carrier fluids for testing and evaluation at Argonne. Argonne applied a range of benchtop tribological test rigs to evaluate friction and wear under a range of conditions (contact geometry, loads, speeds, and temperature) that simulated a broad range of conditions experienced in engines and driveline components. Post-test analysis of worn surfaces provided information on the structure and chemistry of the tribofilms produced during the tests.

  18. Laser Materials Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1526-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehane, C. J. [United Technologies Corp., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This CRADA project was a joint effort between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and United Technologies Corporation (UTC)/Pratt & Whitney (P&W) to demonstrate process capability for drilling holes in turbine airfoils using LLNL-developed femtosecond laser machining technology. The basis for this development was the ability of femtosecond lasers to drill precision holes in variety of materials with little or no collateral damage. The ultimate objective was to develop a laser machine tool consisting of an extremely advanced femtosecond laser subsystem to be developed by LLNL on a best-effort basis and a drilling station for turbine blades and vanes to be developed by P&W. In addition, P&W was responsible for commercializing the system. The goal of the so called Advanced Laser Drilling (ALD) system was to drill specified complex hole-shapes in turbine blades and vanes with a high degree precision and repeatability and simultaneously capable of very high speed processing.

  19. Low Voltage Electron Beam Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-645-93-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wakalopulos, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This CRADA project was established to develop a small, inexpensive sealed-tube electron beam processing system having immediate applications in industrial, high speed manufacturing processes, and in the Department of Energy (DOE) waste treatment/cleanup operations. The technical work involved the development and demonstration of a compact, sealed, 50-75 kilovolt (kV) EB generator prototype, including controls and power supply. The specific goals of this project were to develop a low cost vacuum tube capable of shooting an electron beam several inches into the air, and to demonstrate that wide area materials processing is feasible by stacking the tubes to produce continuous beams. During the project, we successfully demonstrated the producibility of a low cost electron beam system and several material processing operations of interest to US industry, DOE and, since September 11, 2001, the Homeland Security.

  20. Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pocha, Michael D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carey, Kent [Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Agilent Technologies

    2017-11-09

    The information age was maturing, and photonics was emerging as a significant technology with important'national security and commercial implications at the time of the CRADA. This was largely due to the vast information carrying capacity of optical beams and the availability of cheap.and effective optical fiber waveguides to guide the light. However, a major limitation to the widespread deployment of photonic systems was the high-cost (in an economic and performance sense) associated with coupling optical power between optoelectronic waveguide devices or between a device and an optical fiber. The problem was critical in the case of single-mode waveguide devices. Mitigating these costs would be a significant and pervasive enabler of the technology for a wide variety of applications that would have crucial defense and economic impact. The partners worked together to develop optical mode size converters on silicon substrates. Silicon was chosen because of its compatibility with the required photolithographic and micromachining techniques. By choosing silicon, these techniques could enable the close coupling of high-speed, high density silicon electronic circuitry to efficient low-cost photonics. The efficient coupling of electronics and photonics technologies would be important for many information age technologies. The joint nature of this project was intended to allow HP to benefit from some unique LLNL capabilities, and LLNL would be in a position to learn from HP and enhance its value to fundamental DP missions. Although the CRADA began as a hardware development project to develop the mode converter, it evolved into a software development venture. LLNL and HP researchers examined literature, performed some preliminary calculations, and evaluated production trade-offs of several known techniques to determine the best candidates for an integrated system.

  1. Recycling end-of-life vehicles of the future. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Daniels, E.; Energy Systems

    2010-01-14

    Argonne National Laboratory (the Contractor) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the following Participants: Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC (VRP, which consists of General Motors [GM], Ford, and Chrysler), and the American Chemistry Council - Plastics Division (ACC-PD). The purpose of this CRADA is to provide for the effective recycling of automotive materials. The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use of advanced lightweighting materials or systems in future vehicles. The issues, technical requirements, and cost and institutional considerations in achieving that goal are complex and will require a concerted, focused, and systematic analysis, together with a technology development program. The scope and tasks of this program are derived from 'A Roadmap for Recycling End-of-Life Vehicles of the Future,' prepared in May 2001 for the DOE Office of Energy, Efficiency, and Renewable Energy (EERE)-Vehicle Technologies Program. The objective of this research program is to enable the maximum recycling of automotive materials and obsolete vehicles through the development and commercialization of technologies for the separation and recovery of materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). The long-term goals are to (1) enable the optimum recycling of automotive materials, thereby obviating the need for legislative mandates or directives; (2) enable the recovery of automotive materials in a cost-competitive manner while meeting the performance requirements of the applications and markets for the materials; and (3) remove recycling barriers/reasons, real or perceived, to the use

  2. The Use of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide for Building Decontamination Final Report CRADA No. TC-2053-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verce, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schwartz, L. I. [Strategic Technology Enterprises, Inc., Mentor, OH (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between LLNL and STE to investigate the use of vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP®) to decontaminate spore-contaminated heating, ventilation, and cooling (HV AC) systems in a trailer sized room. LLNL's effort under this CRADA was funded by DOE's Chemical and Biological National Security Program (CBNP), which later became part of Department of Homeland Security in 2004.

  3. Fiber Based Optical Amplifier for High Energy Laser Pulses Final Report CRADA No. TC02100.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerly, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cunningham, P. [Boeing Company, Springfield, VA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and The Boeing Company to develop an optical fiber-based laser amplifier capable of producing and sustaining very high-energy, nanosecond-scale optical pulses. The overall technical objective of this CRADA was to research, design, and develop an optical fiber-based amplifier that would meet specific metrics.

  4. Pulsed Plasma Processing of Diesel Engine Exhaust Final Report CRADA No. TC-0336-92-1-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, Bernard T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Broering, Louis [Cummins Engine Company, Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The goal was to develop an exhaust-gas treatment process for the reduction of NOx and hydrocarbon from diesel engines. The project began believing that direct chemical reduction on NOx was possible through the use of non-thermal plasmas. The original CRADA began in 1993 and was scheduled to finish in 1996. It had as its goals three metrics: 1) remove two grams/brake-horse-power-hour of NOx, 2) have no more than five percent energy penalty, and 3) cost no more than ten percent of the engine cost. These goals were all aimed at heavy-duty diesel trucks. This CRADA had its Defense Program funding eliminated by DOE prior to completion in 1995. Prior to loss of funding from DOE, LLNL discovered that due to the large oxygen content in diesel exhaust, direct chemical reduction was not possible. In understanding why, a breakthrough was achieved that combined the use of a non-thermal plasma and a catalyst. This process was named Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reduction (P ACR). Because of this breakthrough, the CRADA became a funds-in only CRADA, once DOE DP funding ended. As a result, the funding decreased from about 1M dollars per year to about $400k per year. Subsequently, progress slowed as well. The CRADA was amended several times to reflect the funds-in nature. At each amendment, the deliverables were modified; the goals remained the same but the focus changed from heavy-duty to lightduty to SUVs. The diesel-engine NOx problem is similar to the furnace and boiler NOx emission problem with the added constraint that ammonia-like additives are impractical for a mobile source. Lean-burning gasoline engines are an additional area of application because the standard three-way catalyst is rendered ineffective by the presence of oxygen. In the P ACR process an electrical discharge is used to create a non-thermal plasma that contains oxidative radicals O and OH. These oxidative radicals convert NO to NO2. Selective catalytic

  5. Advanced compact laser scanning system enhancements for gear and thread measurements. Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeethan, W.M.; Maxey, L.C.; Bernacki, B.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Castore, G. [Apeiron, Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1997-04-04

    The measurement, or metrology, of physical objects is a fundamental requirement for industrial progress. Dimensional measurement capability lies at the heart of ones ability to produce objects within the required technical specifications. Dimensional metrology systems are presently dominated by touch-probe technologies, which are mature and reliable. Due to the intricate geometries required in certain fields of manufacturing, these contract probes cannot be physically brought in proximity to the measurement surface, or lack sufficient lateral resolution to satisfactorily determine the surface profile, which can occur in the measurement of gears, splines and thread. Optical probes are viable candidates to supplement the contact probes, since light can be focused to less than one micron (40 microinches), no contact occurs that can mar highly finished surfaces, and no probes must be replaced due to wear. However, optical probes typically excel only on one type of surface: mirror-like or diffuse, and the optical stylus itself is oftentimes not as compact as its contact probe counterpart. Apeiron, Inc. has pioneered the use of optical non-contact sensors to measure machined parts, especially threads, gears and splines. The Oak Ridge Metrology Center at Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are world-class experts in dimensional metrology. The goal of this CRADA is to tap the expertise in Oak Ridge to evaluate Apeiron`s platform, and to suggest new or novel methods of optical surface sensing, if appropriate.

  6. Predictive Model and Methodology for Heat Treatment Distortion Final Report CRADA No. TC-298-92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkel, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCabe, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This project was a multi-lab, multi-partner CRADA involving LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems and the industrial partner, The National Center of Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS). A number of member companies of NCMS participated including General Motors Corporation, Ford Motor Company, The Torrington Company, Gear Research, the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute, and Deformation Control Technology •. LLNL was the lead laboratory for metrology technology used for validation of the computational tool/methodology. LLNL was also the lead laboratory for the development of the software user interface , for the computational tool. This report focuses on the participation of LLNL and NCMS. The purpose of the project was to develop a computational tool/methodology that engineers would use to predict the effects of heat treatment on the _size and shape of industrial parts made of quench hardenable alloys. Initially, the target application of the tool was gears for automotive power trains.

  7. Atrial Model Development and Prototype Simulations: CRADA Final Report on Tasks 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Villongco, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lightstone, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The goal of this CRADA was to develop essential tools needed to simulate human atrial electrophysiology in 3-dimensions using an anatomical image-based anatomy and physiologically detailed human cellular model. The atria were modeled as anisotropic, representing the preferentially longitudinal electrical coupling between myocytes. Across the entire anatomy, cellular electrophysiology was heterogeneous, with left and right atrial myocytes defined differently. Left and right cell types for the “control” case of sinus rhythm (SR) was compared with remodeled electrophysiology and calcium cycling characteristics of chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF). The effects of Isoproterenol (ISO), a beta-adrenergic agonist that represents the functional consequences of PKA phosphorylation of various ion channels and transporters, was also simulated in SR and cAF to represent atrial activity under physical or emotional stress. Results and findings from Tasks 3 & 4 are described. Tasks 3 and 4 are, respectively: Input parameters prepared for a Cardioid simulation; Report including recommendations for additional scenario development and post-processing analytic strategy.

  8. Development of HANAA to Achieve Commercialization Final Report CRADA No. TC-2025-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schmidt, J. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The objective of this project was to provide DOD and the intelligence agencies with highly portable, advanced, bio-detection instruments and to further the DOE objective of putting advanced instrumentation for the detection of biological terrorism agents into the hands of first responders. All sponsors of the HANAA development work at LLNL believed that the technology must be commercialized to fully contribute to their missions. Intelligence organizations, military teams, and first responders must be able to purchase the instruments for a reasonable price and obtain maintenance services and support equipment from a reliable supplier in order for the instrument to be useful to them. The goal was to efficiently transfer HANAA technology from LLNL to ETG, a company that would manufacture the instrument and make it commercially available to the constituencies important to our sponsors. This was to include a current beta test instrument and all knowledge of problems with the instrument and recommendations for solving those problems in a commercial version. The following tasks were to be completed under this CRADA.

  9. High Temperature Catalytic Combustion Suppports Final Report CRADA No. TSB-0841-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hair, Lucy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magno, Scott [Catalytic Combustion Systems, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    This Small Business CRADA between LLNL and Catalytica was executed on January 25, 1995. The total estimated cost of this project was 113K. LLNL's contribution was estimated at $50K funded under the DOE/Defense Program Small Business Initiative. Catalytica's in-kind contribution was estimated at 63K. Catalytic combusion catalyst systems operate at temperatures from 600°C to above 1300°C. Catalytica has developed technology that limits the catalyst temperature to below 1000°C. At temperatures in the range of 850 to 1000°C, the thermal stability of the catalyst is an important issue. Typical supports such as stabilized aluminas, hexaluminates, zirconia and stabilized zirconia supports are typically used but lack either thermal stability or other desirable properties. Catalytica had developed a new concept for thermally stable mixed oxide supports but this concept required the preparation of molecularly uniform precursors; that is, prior to high temperature treatment of these materials, the elements that make up the mixed oxide must be as nearly uniform as possible on a molecular level. The technique of sol gel processing appeared to be the preferred technique to make these molecularly uniform precursors, and a cooperative program with LLNL was established to prepare and test the proposed compounds. Catalytica proposed the composition and concentration levels for the materials to be prepared.

  10. Development of Operational Free-Space-Optical (FSO) Laser Communication Systems Final Report CRADA No. TC02093.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Orgren, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This project was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and LGS Innovations, LLC (formerly Lucent Technologies, Inc.), to develop long-range and mobile operational free-space optical (FSO) laser communication systems for specialized government applications. LLNL and LGS Innovations formerly Lucent Bell Laboratories Government Communications Systems performed this work for a United States Government (USG) Intelligence Work for Others (I-WFO) customer, also referred to as "Government Customer", or "Customer" and "Government Sponsor." The CRADA was a critical and required part of the LLNL technology transfer plan for the customer.

  11. Development of New Absorber Materials to Achieve Organic Photovoltaic Commercial Modules with 15% Efficiency and 20 Years Lifetime: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, D.

    2014-08-01

    Under this CRADA the parties will develop intermediates or materials that can be employed as the active layer in dye sensitized solar cells printed polymer systems, or small molecule organic photovoltaics.

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicles - CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

    2016-06-20

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a paradigm shift in electric-vehicle (EV) charging that offers the consumer an autonomous, safe, and convenient option to conductive charging and its attendant need for cables. With WPT, charging process can be fully automated due to the vehicle and grid side radio communication systems, and is non-contacting; therefore issues with leakage currents, ground faults, and touch potentials do not exist. It also eliminates the need for touching the heavy, bulky, dirty cables and plugs. It eliminates the fear of forgetting to plug-in and running out of charge the following day and eliminates the tripping hazards in public parking lots and in highly populated areas such as shopping malls, recreational areas, parking buildings, etc. Furthermore, the high-frequency magnetic fields employed in power transfer across a large air gap are focused and shielded, so that fringe fields (i.e., magnetic leakage/stray fields) attenuate rapidly over a transition region to levels well below limits set by international standards for the public zone (which starts at the perimeter of the vehicle and includes the passenger cabin). Oak Ridge National Laboratory s approach to WPT charging places strong emphasis on radio communications in the power regulation feedback channel augmented with software control algorithms. The over-arching goal for WPT is minimization of vehicle on-board complexity by keeping the secondary side content confined to coil tuning, rectification, filtering, and interfacing to the regenerative energy-storage system (RESS). This report summarizes the CRADA work between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Toyota Research Institute of North America, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (TEMA) on the wireless charging of electric vehicles which was funded by Department of Energy under DE-FOA-000667. In this project, ORNL is the lead agency and Toyota TEMA is one of the major partners. Over the course of the project

  13. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  14. Catalytic Conditioning and Conversion of Bio-Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magrini, Kim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    There is a critical need to increase the carbon yield of the gasification process. To this end, it has been suggested that tars and chars formed as by-products of gasification be re-injected into the gasifier. In this CRADA work facile and inexpensive methods of modifying chars and tars received from Enerkem are studied with the aim of increasing their gasification rate upon re-injection into the gasifier. Adding iron to the char, both in nitrate form and in clay form, speeds the CO2 gasification of the char (CO2 + C --> 2CO). It has been more difficult to speed the gasification of tar mixed with char, likely due to clogging of pores, resulting in a reduced accessible surface area.

  15. Development of Optical Diagnostic Probes to Enhance Minimally Invasive Surgical Systems: Final Report CRADA No. TC-1085-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Dennis [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Barbara [Conversion Energy Enterprises, Spring Valley, NY (United States)

    2000-11-28

    The purpose of this project was to develop optical probes that would identify tissue conditions and tissue type while the tissue was being subjected to therapeutic energy delivery systems (EDSs). These systems included electrosurgical, optical and thermal sources. Feedback from the probe would be given directly to the EDS leading to "smart" instruments which would automatically adjust energy delivery parameters to obtain optimal tissue welding, coagulation, and cutting. The project was scheduled to be a three-year effort. The initial three-year project was extended another two years with a first amendment of the work statement (Appendix A of the CRADA). A second and then third amendment extended the work statement two additional years.

  16. Commercialization of Ultra-Hard Ceramics for Cutting Tools Final Report CRADA No. TC0279.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landingham, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neumann, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Greenleaf Corporation (Greenleaf) to develop the technology for forming unique precursor nano-powders process that can be consolidated into ceramic products for industry. LLNL researchers have developed a solgel process for forming nano-ceramic powders. The nano powders are highly tailorable, allowing the explicit design of desired properties that lead to ultra hard materials with fine grain size. The present CRADA would allow the two parties to continue the development of the sol-gel process and the consolidation process in order to develop an industrially sound process for the manufacture of these ultra-hard materials.

  17. AIST-NREL Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Demonstration. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-402

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-05-11

    The purpose of the project is to demonstrate and quantitatively compare performance of CPV systems installed in Japan and in the United States. The deployment conditions (e.g. spectrum and temperature) are site dependent and the optimal design of the system may vary with location. The CPV systems will use multi-junction concentrator cells for the conversion of sunlight into electricity. The optimal design of the cell may depend on the location at which a CPV system is installed. Thus, the systems in Japan and in the U.S. will all use a combination of concentrator cells obtained from three different vendors. This CRADA pertains only to the equipment that will be installed in the U.S. This effort is a collaborative project between AIST and NREL.

  18. Development of a Delivery System for Treating Cerebrovascular Aneurysms Final Report CRADA No. TC-1440-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Derbin, J. T. [Micrus Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The objective of the project was to develop a system for delivering an implantable medical device used to treat cerebrovascular aneurysms, which can cause disability or hemorrhagic stroke (over 15,000 strokes in the U.S. each year are caused by ruptured aneurysms). Micrus has developed an implantable device with the potential to significantly improve the treatment of cerebrovascular aneurysms. This implantable device should significantly reduce the number of hemorrhagic strokes. LLNL has performed proof-of-concept experiments for a delivery system that could be modified to deploy the Micrus device into aneurysms. The purpose of this CRADA was to complete development of the LLNL delivery system and to integrate it with the Micrus device. The goal of the project was to develop an integrated minimally-invasive medical device for treating cerebrovascular aneurysms. The device was designed to access aneurysms through commercially-available catheters which are introduced into the patient through a small incision in the leg.

  19. Scale Up of Malonic Acid Fermentation Process: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-612

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The goal of this work is to use the large fermentation vessels in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) to scale-up Lygos' biological-based process for producing malonic acid and to generate performance data. Initially, work at the 1 L scale validated successful transfer of Lygos' fermentation protocols to NREL using a glucose substrate. Outside of the scope of the CRADA with NREL, Lygos tested their process on lignocellulosic sugars produced by NREL at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Advanced Biofuels Process Development Unit (ABPDU). NREL produced these cellulosic sugar solutions from corn stover using a separate cellulose/hemicellulose process configuration. Finally, NREL performed fermentations using glucose in large fermentors (1,500- and 9,000-L vessels) to intermediate product and to demonstrate successful performance of Lygos' technology at larger scales.

  20. In-service testing of Ni{sub 3}Al coupons and trays in carburizing furnaces at Delphi Saginaw. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Santella, M.L.; Viswanathan, S.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, M. [General Motors Corporaion, Saginaw Division (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) report deals with the development of nickel aluminide alloy for improved longer life heat-resistant fixture assemblies for batch and continuous pusher carburizing furnaces. The nickel aluminide development was compared in both coupon and component testing with the currently used Fe-Ni-Cr heat-resisting alloy known as HU. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) casting process development, (2) characterization and possible modification of the alloy composition to optimize its manufacturing ability and performance under typical furnace operating conditions, and (3) testing and evaluation of specimens and prototype fixtures. In support of the CRADA objectives, coupons of nickel aluminide and the HU alloy were installed in both batch and pusher furnaces. The coupons were taken from two silicon levels and contained welds made with two different filler compositions (IC-221LA and IC-221W). Both nickel-aluminide and HU coupons were removed from the batch and pusher carburizing furnace at time intervals ranging from one month to one year. The exposed coupons were cut and mounted for metallographic, hardness, and microprobe analysis. The results of the microstructural analysis have been transmitted to General Motors Corporation, Saginaw Division (Delphi Saginaw) through reports that were presented at periodic CRADA review meetings. Based on coupon testing and verification of the coupon results with the testing of trays, Delphi Saginaw moved forward with the use of six additional trays in a batch furnace and two assemblies in a pusher furnace. Fifty percent of the trays and fixtures are in the as-cast condition and the remaining trays and fixtures are in the preoxidized condition. The successful operating experience of two assemblies in the pusher furnace for nearly a year formed the basis for a production run of 63 more assemblies. The production run required melting of 94 heats weighing 500 lb. each. Twenty

  1. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening, Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-07-01081

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip [ORNL; Bush, John [Battelle Memorial Institute; Bowerman, Biays [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Cespedes, Ernesto [Idaho National Laboratory; White, Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2004-12-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009.

  2. High Specific Stiffness Shafts and Advanced Bearing Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines Final Report CRADA No. TC-1089-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, Troy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chin, Herbert [United Technologies Corporation, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-11-09

    At the time of the CRADA, the largest in-service gas-turbine aircraft engines strove for increased thrust and power density to meet the requirements for take-off thrust, given the increase in take-off gross weight (TOGW) associated with longer range transport requirements. The trend in modem turbo shaft engines was toward turbine shafts with higher and higher length-to-diameter ratios, which reduced the shaft critical speed. Using co nventional shaft materials, this lead to shafts that needed to operate near or above sensitive shaft bending critical speeds, therefore requiring multiple bearings and/ or multiple squeeze-film dampers to control the dynamic response. Using new materials and d esign concepts this project demonstrated the use of new shaft materials which could provide increased shaft speed range above existing maximum engine speeds without encountering a critic al speed event and high vector deflections. This increased main shaft speed also resulted in decreased bearing life associated with lower heat dissipation and higher centrifugal forces. Thus, a limited effort was devoted to feasibility of higher performance bearing coatings to mitigate the speed effects.

  3. CENER/NREL Collaboration in Testing Facility and Code Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-207

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, P.

    2014-11-01

    Under the funds-in CRADA agreement, NREL and CENER will collaborate in the areas of blade and drivetrain testing facility development and code development. The project shall include NREL assisting in the review and instruction necessary to assist in commissioning the new CENER blade test and drivetrain test facilities. In addition, training will be provided by allowing CENER testing staff to observe testing and operating procedures at the NREL blade test and drivetrain test facilities. CENER and NREL will exchange blade and drivetrain facility and equipment design and performance information. The project shall also include exchanging expertise in code development and data to validate numerous computational codes.

  4. Conversion of Indigenous Agricultural Waste Feedstocks to Fuel Ethanol. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-504

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-27

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a world leader in biomass conversion research and Ecopetrol American Inc., Ecopetrol S.A.'s U.S. subsidiary. The research and development efforts described in the Joint Work Statement (JWS) will take advantage of the strengths of both parties. NREL will use its Integrated Biorefinery Facility and vast experience in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuel ethanol to develop processes for the conversion of Ecopetrol's feedstocks. Ecopetrol will establish the infrastructure in Columbia to commercialize the conversion process.

  5. Advanced BorobondTM Shields for Nuclear Materials Containment and BorobondTM Immobilization of Volatile Fission Products - Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Borobond is a company-proprietary material developed by the CRADA partner in collaboration with Argonne, and is based on Argonne's Ceramicrete technology. It is being used by DOE for nuclear materials safe storage, and Boron Products, LLC is the manufacturer and supplier of Borobond. The major objective of this project was to produce a more versatile composition of this material and find new applications. Major target applications were use for nuclear radiation shields, such as in dry storage casks; use in immobilization of most difficult waste streams, such as Hanford K-Basin waste; use for soluble and volatile fission products, such as Cs, Tc, Sr, and I; and use for corrosion and fire protection applications in nuclear facilities.

  6. Development of a General-Purpose Analysis System Based on a Programmable Fluid Processor Final Report CRADA No. TC-2027-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gascoyne, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The purpose ofthis project was to develop a general-purpose analysis system based on a programmable fluid processor (PFP). The PFP is an array of electrodes surrounded by fluid reservoirs and injectors. Injected droplets of various reagents are manjpulated and combined on the array by Dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The goal was to create a small handheld device that could accomplish the tasks currently undertaken by much larger, time consuming, manual manipulation in the lab. The entire effo1t was funded by DARPA under the Bio-Flips program. MD Anderson Cancer Center was the PI for the DARPA effort. The Bio-Flips program was a 3- year program that ran from September 2000 to September 2003. The CRADA was somewhat behind the Bi-Flips program running from June 2001 to June 2004 with a no cost extension to September 2004.

  7. Laboratory Testing of the Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer Rotational Filter Systems, NETL-Innovatech, Inc., CRADA 98-F026, Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-01-01

    A patented dynamic mechanical filter developed by InnovaTech was previously shown to remove fine particulate matter from industrial process gas streams at ambient temperatures and pressures. An all-metal, high-temperature version of this novel media-less filter was fabricated under this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE/NETL-Morgantown for hot gas testing of the device. The technology is entirely different in both concept and design from conventional vortex separators, cyclones, or porous media filters. This new filtration concept is capable of separating heavy loading of fine particles without blinding, fouling or bridging, and would require minimal operational costs over its anticipated multi-year service life. The all-metal filter design eliminates thermal stress cracking and premature failure prevalent in conventional porous ceramic filters. In contrast, conventional porous media filters (i.e., ceramic cross-flow or candles) easily foul, require periodic cleaning (typically backpulsing), frequent replacement and subsequent disposal

  8. Particulate Emissions Control using Advanced Filter Systems: Final Report for Argonne National Laboratory, Corning Inc. and Hyundai Motor Company CRADA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Hee Je [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Choi, Seungmok [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-09

    This is a 3-way CRADA project working together with Corning, Inc. and Hyundai Motor Co. (HMC). The project is to understand particulate emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines (GDI) and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, this project focuses on providing fundamental information about filtration and regeneration mechanisms occurring in gasoline particulate filter (GPF) systems. For the work, Corning provides most advanced filter substrates for GPF applications and HMC provides three-way catalyst (TWC) coating services of these filter by way of a catalyst coating company. Then, Argonne National Laboratory characterizes fundamental behaviors of filtration and regeneration processes as well as evaluated TWC functionality for the coated filters. To examine aging impacts on TWC and GPF performance, the research team evaluates gaseous and particulate emissions as well as back-pressure increase with ash loading by using an engine-oil injection system to accelerate ash loading in TWC-coated GPFs.

  9. Assessment of Veritainer's Spreader-Bar-Mounted Radiation Detection Systems Final Report CRADA No. TC02150.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labov, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alioto, J. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and VeriTainer Corporation, to develop algorithms and testing of VeriTainer’s spreader-bar mounted radiation detection system, the VeriSpreader™. The goal of the project was to improve the VeriSpreader™ System to the point where it would meet or exceed "DOE Guidance" for radiation detection, in order to be deployed for commercial and government applications. The VeriSpreader™ had gone through several rounds of testing by DHS and DOE. NNSA had requested that VeriTainer engage in a CRADA with a national lab in order to further develop and test the VeriSpreader™ System.

  10. Laboratory Testing of the Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer Rotational Filter Systems, NETL-Innovatech, Inc., CRADA 98-F026, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-22

    A patented dynamic mechanical filter developed by InnovaTech was previously shown to remove fine particulate matter from industrial process gas streams at ambient temperatures and pressures. An all-metal, high-temperature version of this novel media-less filter was fabricated under this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE/NETL-Morgantown for hot gas testing of the device. The technology is entirely different in both concept and design from conventional vortex separators, cyclones, or porous media filters. This new filtration concept is capable of separating heavy loading of fine particles without blinding, fouling or bridging, and would require minimal operational costs over its anticipated multi-year service life. The all-metal filter design eliminates thermal stress cracking and premature failure prevalent in conventional porous ceramic filters. In contrast, conventional porous media filters (i.e., ceramic cross-flow or candles) easily foul, require periodic cleaning (typically backpulsing), frequent replacement and subsequent disposal.

  11. Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts

  12. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Cummins, Incorporated (CRADA No.PNNL/283): “Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szanyi, Janos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peden, Charles HF [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Howden, Ken [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Currier, Neal [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Kamasamudram, Krishna [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Kumar, Ashok [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Li, J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Stafford, R. J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Yezerets, Aleksey [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Luo, J. [Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Chen, H. Y. [Johnson Matthey Company, Royston (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    of the most daunting challenges in R&D on new catalyst materials and processes that can effectively eliminate emissions at these quite low exhaust temperatures. This project has two clear focuses: (1) development of potassium-based high-temperature NSR materials, and studying their key causes of deactivation and methods of regeneration. By comparing results obtained on ‘Simple Model’ Pt-K/Al2O3 with ‘Enhanced Model’ Pt-K/ MgAlOx and Pt-K/TiO2 materials, we have developed an understanding of the role of various additives on the deactivation and regeneration processes. Studies have also been performed on the real commercial samples being used in a Dodge Ram truck with a Cummins diesel emission control system. However, the results about these ‘commercial samples’ will not be covered in this report. Following a brief description of our experimental approach, we will present a few highlights from some of the work performed in this CRADA with more details about these results provided in publications/reports/presentations lists presented at the end of the report. (2) for the Cu and Fe/Chabazite SCR catalysts, since these are so newly developed and references from open literature and industry are nearly absent, our work started from zeolite synthesis and catalyst synthesis methodology development, before research on their low- and high-temperature performance, deactivation, regeneration, etc. was conducted. Again, most work reported here is based on our “model” catalysts synthesized in-house. Work done on the ‘commercial samples’ will not be covered in this report.

  13. METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/Shell CRADA 93-011. Online particulate monitoring began in August 1993 and ended in October 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in six MGCR runs (No. 5 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.07 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, (Modular Gas Cleanup Rig), from the FBG, pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit.

  14. Plug and Play Solar Power: Simplifying the Integration of Solar Energy in Hybrid Applications; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-523

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Blake R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-07-05

    The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is Australia's national science agency. CSIRO received funding from the Australian Solar Institute (ASI) for the United States-Australia Solar Energy Collaboration (USASEC) project 1-USO032 Plug and Play Solar Power: Simplifying the Integration of Solar Energy in Hybrid Applications (Broader Project). The Australian Solar Institute (ASI) operated from August 2009 to December 2012 before being merged into the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). The Broader Project sought to simplify the integration, accelerate the deployment, and lower the cost of solar energy in hybrid distributed generation applications by creating plug and play solar technology. CSIRO worked with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as set out in a Joint Work Statement to review communications protocols relevant to plug-and-play technology and perform prototype testing in its Energy System Integration Facility (ESIF). For the avoidance of doubt, this CRADA did not cover the whole of the Broader Project and only related to the work described in the Joint Work Statement, which was carried out by NREL.

  15. Concepts for the Design of a Diagnostic Device to Detect Malignancies in Human Tissues Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2023-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DaSilva, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marion, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chase, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    BioLuminate, Inc. planned to develop, produce and market a revolutionary diagnostic device for early breast cancer diagnosis. The device was originally invented by NASA; and exclusively licensed to BioLuminate for commercialization. At the time of the CRADA, eighty-five percent (85%) of all biopsies in the United States were found negative each year. The number of biopsies cost the health care system $23 billio n annually. A multi-sensor probe would allow surgeons to improve breast cancer scre ening and significantly reduce the number of biopsies. BioLuminate was developing an in-vivo system for the detection of cancer using a multi-sensor needle/probe. The first system would be developed for the detection of breast cancer. LLNL, in collaboration with BioLuminate worked toward a detailed concept specification for the prototype multi-sensor needle/probe suitable for breast cancer analysis. BioLuminate in collaboration with LLNL, worked to develop a new version of the needle probe that would be the same size as needles commonly used to draw blood.

  16. Equipment Loan for Concentrated PV Cavity Converter (PVCC) Research: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-285

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netter, Judy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Interest in High Concentration Photovoltaics (HCPV) for terrestrial applications has significantly grown in recent years. A major driver behind this growth trend is the availability of high efficiency multi-junction (MJ) cells that promise reliable operation under high concentrations (500 to 1000 suns). The primary impact of HCPV on the solar electricity cost is the dramatic reduction in cell cost. For terrestrial HCPV systems, operating at concentrations ≥ 500 suns, the expensive MJ cells are marginally affordable. Most recently, triple-junction test cells have achieved a conversion efficiency of over 40% under concentrated sunlight. Photovoltaic Cavity Converter (PVCC) is a multi-bandgap, high concentration PV device developed by United Innovations, Inc., under subcontract to NREL. The lateral- (2- dimensional) structure of PVCC, as opposed to vertical multi-junction (MJ) structure, helps to circumvent most of the developmental challenges MJ technology has yet to overcome. This CRADA will allow the continued development of this technology by United Innovations. This project was funded by the California Energy Commission and is the second phase of a twopart demonstration program. The key advantage of the design was the use of a PVCC as the receiver. PVCCs efficiently process highly concentrated solar radiation into electricity by recycling photons that are reflected from the surface of the cells. Conventional flat, twodimensional receivers cannot recycle photons and the reflected photons are lost to the conversion process.

  17. CRADA with Beckman Instruments and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-013): Development and commercialization of the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA) using characterization of aridisols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and commercialize a technology conceived by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and manufactured by Beckman Instruments, Inc. (Beckman), and to apply this technology to the characterization of and soils. The technology is the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The UFA provides a highly efficient method of direct, rapid measurement of hydraulic conductivity and other flow properties according to Darcy-Buckingham principles because the operator controls both the fluid driving force, using an ultracentrifuge, and the flow into the sample while it is spinning, with a rotating seal assembly. The concept of using centrifugation to significantly decrease the time needed, from years or months to days, for study of subsurface transport, particularly under unsaturated conditions, was conceived by James Conca, Ph.D., and Judith Wright, Ph.D., in 1986. The prototype UFA was developed in 1988 because there was a need to rapidly and accurately determine transport parameters in soils, sediments, and rocks for the Grout Waste Disposal Program. Transport parameters are critical to modeling outcomes for site-specific solutions to environmental remediation and waste disposal problems.

  18. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/3M CRADA 94024. Online particulate monitoring began in June 1994 and ended in October, 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in four MGCR runs (No. 7 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.0 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, Modular Gas Cleanup Rig, from the FBG, pressurized Fluidized-Bed Gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit. The alkali monitor unit was not used during runs No. 7 through No. 10.

  19. Reconciling Basin-Scale Top-Down and Bottom-Up Methane Emission Measurements for Onshore Oil and Gas Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-572

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Garvin A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-04

    The overall objective of the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA)-funded research project is to develop independent estimates of methane emissions using top-down and bottom-up measurement approaches and then to compare the estimates, including consideration of uncertainty. Such approaches will be applied at two scales: basin and facility. At facility scale, multiple methods will be used to measure methane emissions of the whole facility (controlled dual tracer and single tracer releases, aircraft-based mass balance and Gaussian back-trajectory), which are considered top-down approaches. The bottom-up approach will sum emissions from identified point sources measured using appropriate source-level measurement techniques (e.g., high-flow meters). At basin scale, the top-down estimate will come from boundary layer airborne measurements upwind and downwind of the basin, using a regional mass balance model plus approaches to separate atmospheric methane emissions attributed to the oil and gas sector. The bottom-up estimate will result from statistical modeling (also known as scaling up) of measurements made at selected facilities, with gaps filled through measurements and other estimates based on other studies. The relative comparison of the bottom-up and top-down estimates made at both scales will help improve understanding of the accuracy of the tested measurement and modeling approaches. The subject of this CRADA is NREL's contribution to the overall project. This project resulted from winning a competitive solicitation no. RPSEA RFP2012UN001, proposal no. 12122-95, which is the basis for the overall project. This Joint Work Statement (JWS) details the contributions of NREL and Colorado School of Mines (CSM) in performance of the CRADA effort.

  20. Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    was powered down by opening the circuit breaker, rather than via the computer operating system, it froze upon startup. To restart the system, the...after years of use, the fuel tank hose had absorbed the dye, and subsequently the dye leached out to color the BU16 upon delivery. To avoid this

  1. University of Washington/ Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Tidal Current Technology Test Protocol, Instrumentation, Design Code, and Oceanographic Modeling Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Frederick R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The University of Washington (UW) - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UW-NNMREC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will collaborate to advance research and development (R&D) of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) renewable energy technology, specifically renewable energy captured from ocean tidal currents. UW-NNMREC is endeavoring to establish infrastructure, capabilities and tools to support in-water testing of marine energy technology. NREL is leveraging its experience and capabilities in field testing of wind systems to develop protocols and instrumentation to advance field testing of MHK systems. Under this work, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to develop a common instrumentation system and testing methodologies, standards and protocols. UW-NNMREC is also establishing simulation capabilities for MHK turbine and turbine arrays. NREL has extensive experience in wind turbine array modeling and is developing several computer based numerical simulation capabilities for MHK systems. Under this CRADA, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to augment single device and array modeling codes. As part of this effort UW NNMREC will also work with NREL to run simulations on NREL's high performance computer system.

  2. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div., TN (United States); Abramowicz, D.A. [General Electric Co. Corporate Research and Development, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  3. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several drawbacks, particularly in the extraction phase. One general disadvantage of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide must be produced at large centralized plants where it is concentrated to 70% by distillation and transported to the users plant sites where it is diluted before use. Advanced membranes have the potential to enable more efficient, economic, and safe manufacture of hydrogen peroxide. Advanced membrane technology would allow filtration-based separation to replace the difficult liquid-liquid extraction based separation step of the hydrogen peroxide process. This would make it possible for hydrogen peroxide to be produced on-site in mini-plants at 30% concentration and used at the same plant location without distillation and transportation. As a result, production could become more cost-effective, safe and energy efficient.

  4. Rapid Response Manufacturing (RRM). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-08-28

    A major accomplishment of the Rapid Response Manufacturing (RRM) project was the development of a broad-based generic framework for automating and integrating the design-to-manufacturing activities associated with machined part products. Key components of the framework are a manufacturing model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering working environment, knowledge-based software systems for design, process planning, and manufacturing and new production technologies for making products directly from design application software.

  5. CRADA Final Report: Weld Predictor App

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Welding is an important manufacturing process used in a broad range of industries and market sectors, including automotive, aerospace, heavy manufacturing, medical, and defense. During welded fabrication, high localized heat input and subsequent rapid cooling result in the creation of residual stresses and distortion. These residual stresses can significantly affect the fatigue resistance, cracking behavior, and load-carrying capacity of welded structures during service. Further, additional fitting and tacking time is often required to fit distorted subassemblies together, resulting in non-value added cost. Using trial-and-error methods to determine which welding parameters, welding sequences, and fixture designs will most effectively reduce distortion is a time-consuming and expensive process. For complex structures with many welds, this approach can take several months. For this reason, efficient and accurate methods of mitigating distortion are in-demand across all industries where welding is used. Analytical and computational methods and commercial software tools have been developed to predict welding-induced residual stresses and distortion. Welding process parameters, fixtures, and tooling can be optimized to reduce the HAZ softening and minimize weld residual stress and distortion, improving performance and reducing design, fabrication and testing costs. However, weld modeling technology tools are currently accessible only to engineers and designers with a background in finite element analysis (FEA) who work with large manufacturers, research institutes, and universities with access to high-performance computing (HPC) resources. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the US do not typically have the human and computational resources needed to adopt and utilize weld modeling technology. To allow an engineer with no background in FEA and SMEs to gain access to this important design tool, EWI and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) developed the online weld application software tool “WeldPredictor” ( https://eweldpredictor.ewi.org ). About 1400 users have tested this application. This project marked the beginning of development on the next version of WeldPredictor that addresses many outstanding features of the original, including 3D models, allow more material hardening laws, model material phase transformation, and uses open source finite element solvers to quickly solve problems (as opposed to expensive commercial tools).

  6. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Abramowicz, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL's effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site

  7. Final report on the Vitro CRADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    ORNL and Vitro investigated the application of advanced Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies to site characterization and environmental remediation work. The six tasks were to do feasibility studies for integrating GIS tools with DBMS, graphics, and other packages to aid in environmental analyses, develop environmental and geographic data standards and guidelines including data structures/quality assurance practices/metadata, investigate environmental and remediation predictive modeling and their integration with GIS, study remote sensing techniques including Global Positioning Systems techniques, and investigate display enhancement techniques including 2D/3D visualization coupled with GIS data bases

  8. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-08-01671 Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P. J. [ORNL; Wilson, M. [Honeywell

    2014-11-28

    Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oC and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.

  9. CRADA Carbon Sequestration in Soils and Commercial Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, G.K.

    2002-01-31

    ORNL, through The Consortium for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE), collaborated with The Village Botanica, Inc. (VB) on a project investigating carbon sequestration in soils and commercial products from a new sustainable crop developed from perennial Hibiscus spp. Over 500 pre-treated samples were analyzed for soil carbon content. ORNL helped design a sampling scheme for soils during the planting phase of the project. Samples were collected and prepared by VB and analyzed for carbon content by ORNL. The project did not progress to a Phase II proposal because VB declined to prepare the required proposal.

  10. High Resolution Characterization of Biological Matrices: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabacker, Daniel S.

    2016-10-27

    In the three-year period of performance, we used our methodology to analyze biological threat agents supplied by the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center (NBACC), University of Chicago, Northwestern University and Loyola University. Using our methodology and newly developed software at Argonne we were able to discern the institution where the material was cultured along with the growth conditions.

  11. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  12. Novel CO{sub 2} capture. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this work was to use electrochemically driven pH control to develop a second generation, enzyme-based contained liquid membrane (CLM) permeator to extract CO{sub 2} from a variety of coal-based flue gas streams more efficiently than does the CLM current design, while achieving performance coincident with DOE targets of less than 45% Cost of electricity (COE) in 2007 and less than 20% COE in 2012. Central to this goal the CLM would be alkaline (>pH 8) at the feed gas side and acid (

  13. Li-FSI Impurity Impact Study: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupek, Krzysztof [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dzwiniel, Trevor [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krumdick, Gregory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI ) as an alternative to LiPF6 and as an additive to electrolytes used in lithium-ion cells. LiFSI has attracted attention because it is reported to have higher ionic conductivity, better high temperature stability, and enhanced stability toward hydrolysis, Also, LiFSI additive to electrolytes can bring benefits of improved storage properties and reduced gas evolution in the cells. Different levels of different electrochemically active impurities could affect the performance of LiFSI as an electrolyte salt for Li-ion batteries, generating inconsistent and conflicting interpretations of the experimental data.

  14. New Materials for Electric Drive Vehicles - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-18

    This project was sponsored by the US DOE Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention. The object was for Ukrainian and US partners, including Argonne, AETC, and Dontech to develop special carbon materials and factory production equipment with the goal of making better car batteries to achieve DOE's goals for all-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Carbon materials are used in designs for lithium-ion batteries and metal-air batteries, both leading contenders for future electric cars. Specifically, the collaborators planned to use the equipment derived from this project to develop a rechargeable battery system that will use the carbon materials produced by the innovative factory process equipment. The final outcome of the project was that the Ukrainian participants consisting of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), the Institute of Gas of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Materials Research Center, Ltd. designed, built, tested and delivered 14 pieces of processing equipment for pilot scale carbon production lines at the AETC, Arlington Heights facilities. The pilot scale equipment will be used to process materials such as activated carbon, thermally expanded graphite and carbon coated nano-particles. The equipment was shipped from Ukraine to the United States and received by AETC on December 3, 2013. The equipment is on loan from Argonne, control # 6140. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and all-electric vehicles have already demostrated success in the U.S. as they begin to share the market with older hybrid electric designs. When the project was conceived, PHEV battery systems provided a ~40 mile driving range (2011 figures). DOE R&D targets increased this to >100 miles at reduced cost less than $250/kWh (2011 figures.) A 2016 Tesla model S has boasted 270 miles. The project object was to develop pilot-production line equipment for advanced hybrid battery system that achieves cycle life of 1000, an energy density of 280 Wh/kg and specific density of 600Wh/l. This project delivers factory equipment to produce these advanced battery materials.

  15. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL98-0521 : Development of an Electric Bus Inverter Based on ORNL Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART) Soft-Switching Technology; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for many years been developing technologies for power converters for motor drives and many other applications. Some of the research goals are to improve efficiency and reduce audible and electromagnetic interference noise generation for inverters and the driven loads. The converters are being required to produce more power with reduced weight and volume, which requires improvements in heat removal from the electronics, as well as improved circuit designs that have fewer electrical losses. PEEMRC has recently developed and patented a soft-switching inverter topology called an Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART), and this design has been tested and proven at ORNL using a 10-kW laboratory prototype. The objective of this project was to develop, test, and install the ART inverter technology in an electric transit bus with the final goal of evaluating performance of the ORNL inverter under field conditions in a vehicle. A scaled-up inverter with the capacity to drive a 22-e bus was built based on the 10-kW ORNL laboratory prototype ART soft-switching inverter. Most (if not all) commercially available inverters for traction drive and other applications use hard-switching inverters. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with the Chattanooga Area Regional Transit Authority (CARTA), the Electric Transit Vehicle Institute (ETVI), and Advanced Vehicle Systems (AVS), all of Chattanooga, along with ORNL. CARTA, which maintains and operates the public transit system in Chattanooga, provided an area for testing the vehicle alongside other similar vehicles in the normal operating environment. ETVI offers capabilities in standardized testing and reporting and also provides exposure in the electric transit vehicle arena for ORNL's technologies. The third Chattanooga partner, (AVS) manufactures all-electric and hybrid electric transit buses using inverter drive systems from several manufacturers. AVS provided help in field installation, and parts for laboratory testing. A 100-kW field-ready unit was developed, tested in an ORNL laboratory, and installed and successfully operated in a CARTA bus in Chattanooga. The tests on the vehicle were performed at a CARTA maintenance facility and at a l-mile test track in Chattanooga managed by CARTA

  16. Optical Encoding Technology for Viral Screening Panels Final Report CRADA No TC02132.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhoff, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haushalter, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Parallel Synthesis Technologies, Inc. (PSTI), to develop Optical Encoding Technology for Viral Screening Panels. The goal for this effort was to prepare a portable bead reader system that would enable the development of viral and bacterial screening panels which could be used for the detection of any desired set of bacteria or viruses in any location. The main objective was to determine if the combination of a bead-based, PCR suspension array technology, formulated from Parallume encoded beads and PSTI’s multiplex assay reader system (MARS), could provide advantages in terms of the number of simultaneously measured samples, portability, ruggedness, ease of use, accuracy, precision or cost as compared to the Luminexbased system developed at LLNL. The project underwent several no cost extensions however the overall goal of demonstrating the utility of this new system was achieved. As a result of the project a significant change to the type of bead PSTI used for the suspension system was implemented allowing better performance than the commercial Luminex system.

  17. Rapid Assessment of Individual Soldier Operational Readiness Final Report CRADA No. TC02104.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mapes, J. [Rules Based Medicine, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security (LLNS) (formerly The Regents of the University of California), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rules Based Medicine, Inc. {RBM), to identify markers in blood that would be candidates for determining the combat readiness of troops.

  18. Artificial Retina Project: Final Report for CRADA ORNL 01-0625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E; Little, J [Second Sight Medical Products

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Artificial Retina Project is a collaborative, multi-institutional effort to develop an implantable microelectronic retinal prosthesis that restores useful vision to people blinded by retinal diseases. The ultimate goal of the project is to restore reading ability, facial recognition, and unaided mobility in people with retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The project taps into the unique research technologies and resources developed at DOE national laboratories to surmount the many technical challenges involved with developing a safe, effective, and durable product. The research team includes six DOE national laboratories, four universities, and private industry.

  19. Small Business Voucher CRADA Report: Natural Gas Powered HVAC System for Commercial and Residential Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betts, Daniel [Be Power Tech, Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mudiraj, Shyam [Be Power Tech, Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Tilghman, Matthew [Be Power Tech, Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Graham, Matthew [Be Power Tech, Deerfield Beach, FL (United States)

    2017-04-30

    Be Power Tech is commercializing BeCool, the first integrated electricity-producing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system using a non-vapor compression cycle (VCC), packaged rooftop HVAC unit that also produces base-load electricity, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. BeCool is a distributed energy resource with energy storage that eliminates the tremendous peak electricity demand associated with commonly used electricity-powered vapor compression air conditioning systems.

  20. NCD Diamond Semiconductor System for Advanced Power Electronics Systems Integration : CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha [AKHAN Semiconductor, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2016-07-22

    The integration of 2D materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) with diamond (3D) was achieved by forming an heterojunction between these two materials and its electrical performance was studied experimentally. The device charactertics did show good rectifying nature when p-type single crystal diamond was integrated with n-type MoS2. These results are very encouraging indicating possible applications in semiconductor electronics, however further studies are required for a detailed understanding of the transport phenomena at the MoS2/diamond interface.

  1. CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, M Parans [ORNL

    2016-09-29

    The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal was to fabricate large area NdFeB composite magnets at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF). The goal was to distribute domestically produced isotropic and highly anisotropic high energy density magnetic particles throughout the composite structure in order to enable site specific placement of magnetic phases and minimize the generated waste associated with permanent magnet manufacturing. Big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) and magnet composite fabrication methods were used in this study. BAAM was used to fabricate 65 vol % isotropic MQP NdFeB magnets in nylon polymer matrix. BAAM magnet cylinder was sliced to two magnetic arc-shaped braces. The density of the small BAAM magnet pieces reached 4.1 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.8 kOe, Remanence Br = 4.2 kG, and energy product (BH)max = 3.7 MGOe. Also, 1.5” x 1.5” composite magnets with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet in a resin were also fabricated under magnetic field. The unaligned sample had a density of 3.75 g/cm3. However, aligned sample possessed a density of 4.27 g/cm3. The magnetic properties didn’t degrade during this process. This study provides a pathway for preparing composite magnets for various magnetic applications.

  2. Solidification Technologies for Radioactive and Chemical Liquid Waste Treatment - Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglioni, Andrew J.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2016-01-01

    This project, organized under DOE/NNSA's Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program, joined Russian and DOE scientists in developing more effective solidification and storage technologies for liquid radioactive waste. Several patent applications were filed by the Russian scientists (Russia only) and in 2012, the technology developed was approved by Russia's Federal State Unitary Enterprise RADON for application throughout Russia in cleaning up and disposing of radioactive waste.

  3. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  4. Rapidly Deployable Security System Final Report CRADA No. TC-2030-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlhepp, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whiteman, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKibben, M. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The ultimate objective of the LEADER and LLNL strategic partnership was to develop and commercialize_a security-based system product and platform for the use in protecting the substantial physical and economic assets of the government and commerce of the United States. The primary goal of this project was to integrate video surveillance hardware developed by LLNL with a security software backbone developed by LEADER. Upon completion of the project, a prototype hardware/software security system that is highly scalable was to be demonstrated.

  5. Laser Shot Peening Final Report CRADA No. TC-02059-03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, B. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Metal Improvement Company, Inc. (MIC), to further develop the laser shot peening technology. This project had an emphasis on laser development and government and military applications including DOE’s natural gas and oil technology program (NGOTP), Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), F-22 Fighter, etc.

  6. 78 FR 57401 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ..., and experience in preparing dogs for consignment evaluations by TSA/OLE-FAMS, and other DHS... other data to [email protected] . The preferred method of communication for this Notice is through... areas. 2. Should have experience and knowledge in how to properly rear a dog from birth to a year of age...

  7. Mosaic Transparent Armor System Final Report CRADA No. TC02162.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Breslin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and The Protective Group, Inc. (TPG) to improve the performance of the mosaic transparent armor system (MTAS) for transparent armor applications, military and civilian. LLNL was to provide the unique MTAS technology and designs to TPG for innovative construction and ballistic testing of improvements needed for current and near future application of the armor windows on vehicles and aircraft. The goal of the project was to advance the technology of MTAS to the point that these mosaic transparent windows would be introduced and commercially manufactured for military vehicles and aircraft.

  8. 78 FR 71632 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Electronic Conveyance Security Device (RECONS) Solutions AGENCY: Borders and Maritime Security Division (BMD... under development for reusable electronic conveyance security devices (RECONS). The RECONS Standard will... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2013-0078] Cooperative Research and Development...

  9. Algorithms and Architectures for Elastic-Wave Inversion Final Report CRADA No. TC02144.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindtjorn, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Schlumberger Technology Corporation (STC), to perform a computational feasibility study that investigates hardware platforms and software algorithms applicable to STC for Reverse Time Migration (RTM) / Reverse Time Inversion (RTI) of 3-D seismic data.

  10. Microwave Sintering of Ceramic Materials for Industrial Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1116-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tandon, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callis, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to develop the commercial capability in the US to sinter alumina oxide ceramic parts for the semiconductor manufacturing equipment industry. We planned to use the millimeter microwave (30 GHz) sintering system first developed by IAP in Russia.

  11. Radiation Hardened Telerobotic Dismantling System Development Final Report CRADA No. TC-1340-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lightman, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This project was a collaborative effort between the University of California, LLNL and RedZone Robotics, Inc. for the development of radiation-hardened telerobotic dismantling systems for use in applications such as nuclear facility remediation, nuclear accident response, and Chemobyltype remediation. The project supported the design, development, fabrication and testing of a Ukrainian robotic systems. The project was completed on time and within budget. All deliverables were completed. The final project deliverables were consistent with the plans developed in the original project with the exception that the fabricated systems remained in Ukraine.

  12. Electromagnetic Simulations for Aerospace Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-0376-92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meredith, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Electromagnetic (EM) simulation tools play an important role in the design cycle, allowing optimization of a design before it is fabricated for testing. The purpose of this cooperative project was to provide Lockheed with state-of-the-art electromagnetic (EM) simulation software that will enable the optimal design of the next generation of low-observable (LO) military aircraft through the VHF regime. More particularly, the project was principally code development and validation, its goal to produce a 3-D, conforming grid,time-domain (TD) EM simulation tool, consisting of a mesh generator, a DS13D-based simulation kernel, and an RCS postprocessor, which was useful in the optimization of LO aircraft, both for full-aircraft simulations run on a massively parallel computer and for small scale problems run on a UNIX workstation.

  13. Development of DNA Pillar Chip Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2035-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, K. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Long, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Tetracore, to demonstrate a proof of principal device for the capture and controlled release of DNA moving within a flow stream.

  14. West Virginia Diesel Study, CRADA MC96-034, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gautam

    1998-08-05

    The global objective of the recently completed Phase 1 of the West Virginia Diesel Study, at West Virginia University, was to evaluate mass emission rates of exhaust emissions from diesel powered equipment specified by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission. The experimental data generated in this study has been utilized by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission to promulgate initial rules, requirements and standards governing the operation of diesel equipment in underground coal mines.

  15. Improved Fiber Optics Final Report CRADA No. TSB-957-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Glenn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Wilford, Sandy [Lumenyte futemational Corporation (LIC), Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The existing chemistry of Lumenyte® (an illumination fiber optic developed by LIC) was such that the component monomers inherently polymerized to a very hard mass if exposed to environmental IR, UV, or a combination of these frequencies. Lumenyte optic also would cure to a hard mass by exposure to the UV & IR generated by the illuminating lamps-although this could occur at a much slower rate, and the hardening could occur even when the adverse frequencies were filtered. The resultant product did not have the flexibility for the required applications. LIC's objective was to include other monomeric components in the formulation to impart permanent flexibility. LIC sought the expertise and the use of the facilities in the Polymeric Materials Section at LLNL to achieve this objective.

  16. Numerical Simulations of 3D Seismic Data Final Report CRADA No. TC02095.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kostov, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of Califomia)/Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR), to develop synthetic seismic data sets and supporting codes.

  17. Ozone/UV treatment to enhance biodegradation of surfactants in industrial wastewater. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sullivan, P.F. [Specialty Industrial Products, Inc., Spartanburg, SC (United States); Lovejoy, M.A.; Collier, J. [Sun River Innovations, Ltd., Lexington, KY (United States); Adams, C.D. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The new owners of a surfactant manufacturing plant wanted to triple production but were limited by the plant`s wastewater treatment capacity. Mass balance calculations indicated that little aerobic biodegradation was occurring in the plant`s wastewater treatment system. Literature reviews and laboratory tests confirmed that as much as 60% of the plant`s products might resist aerobic biodegradation. Overall chemical losses, both solid and aqueous, were estimated at 3.8% of theoretical. Organic loadings to the wastewater treatment system were 170 kg/d of which 50 kg/d reached the biological treatment system. Pollution prevention measures have allowed a > 20% increase in production levels with a > 30% decrease in effluent volume and no increase in discharge of chemical oxygen demand (COD). A new dissolved air flotation (DAF) system removes 70% of the organic loading. Sludge volumes are lower by an order of magnitude than with the clarifier/drum-filter process it replaced.

  18. Investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scarcelli, Riccardo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Anqi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sevik, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Biruduganti, Munidhar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bihari, Bipin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Matusik, Katarzyna E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Duke, Daniel J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Powell, Christopher F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kastengren, Alan L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition was performed with the objective to overcome the barrier presented by limited knowledge and characterization of nonequilibrium plasma ignition for realistic internal combustion engine applications (be it in the automotive or power generation field) and shed light on the mechanisms which improve the performance of the advanced TPS ignition system compared to conventional state-of-the-art hardware. Three main tasks of the research included experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder stationary natural gas engine and energy quantification using x-ray diagnostics.

  19. Heart pathology determination from electrocardiogram signals by application of deterministic chaos mathematics. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stickney, R.E. [Physio-Control Corp., Redmond, WA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    It is well known that the electrical signals generated by the heart exhibit nonlinear, chaotic dynamics. A number of heart pathologies alter heartbeat dynamics and/or the electrical properties of the heart, which, in turn, alter electrocardiogram signals. Electrocardiogram techniques in common use for diagnosing pathologies have limited sensitivity and specificity. This leads to a relatively high misdiagnosis rate for ventricular fibrillation. It is also known that the linear analysis tools utilized (such as fast Fourier transforms and linear statistics) are limited in their ability to find subtle changes or characteristic signatures in nonlinear chaotic electrocardiogram signals. In contrast, the authors` research indicates that chaotic time-series analysis tools that they have developed allow quantification of the nonlinear nature of dynamic systems in the form of nonlinear statistics, and also enable characteristic signatures to be identified. The goal of this project is to modify these tools to increase and enhance the medically useful information obtained from electrocardiogram signals through the application of chaotic time series analysis tools. In the one year of the project, the tools have been extended to enhance the capabilities for detecting ventricular fibrillation. Chaotic time-series analysis provides a means to increase sensitivity in detecting general heart dynamics. Oak Ridge National Laboratory specialists have worked with Physio-Control and their medical collaborators to extend the capabilities of state-of-the-art electrocardiogram systems and interpretation of results.

  20. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wierman, C. [Boise Cascade Corp., Wallula, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  1. Development of Weldable Superplastic Forming Aluminum Alloy Sheet Final Report CRADA No. TC-1086-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, T. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Numerous applications could exist for superplastic formable, weldable aluminum alloys in the automotive, aerospace, architectural, and construction industries. In this project, LLNL and Kaiser worked with the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems to develop and evaluate weldable superplastic alloys.

  2. Infrared Imaging Camera Final Report CRADA No. TC02061.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nebeker, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cordin Company (Cordin) to enhance the U.S. ability to develop a commercial infrared camera capable of capturing high-resolution images in a l 00 nanoseconds (ns) time frame. The Department of Energy (DOE), under an Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) project, funded the Russian Federation Nuclear Center All-Russian Scientific Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) in Sarov. VNIIEF was funded to develop a prototype commercial infrared (IR) framing camera and to deliver a prototype IR camera to LLNL. LLNL and Cordin were partners with VNIIEF on this project. A prototype IR camera was delivered by VNIIEF to LLNL in December 2006. In June of 2007, LLNL and Cordin evaluated the camera and the test results revealed that the camera exceeded presently available commercial IR cameras. Cordin believes that the camera can be sold on the international market. The camera is currently being used as a scientific tool within Russian nuclear centers. This project was originally designated as a two year project. The project was not started on time due to changes in the IPP project funding conditions; the project funding was re-directed through the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), which delayed the project start by over one year. The project was not completed on schedule due to changes within the Russian government export regulations. These changes were directed by Export Control regulations on the export of high technology items that can be used to develop military weapons. The IR camera was on the list that export controls required. The ISTC and Russian government, after negotiations, allowed the delivery of the camera to LLNL. There were no significant technical or business changes to the original project.

  3. Automotive Airbag Safety Enhancement Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1165-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutting, Jack [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Durrell, Robert [Quantic Industries, Inc., San Carlos, CA (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The Vehicle Safety systems (VSS) Division of Quantic Industries, Inc. (QII) manufactured automotive airbag components. When both the driver and the passenger side airbags inflated in a tightly sealed passenger compartment, the compression of the surrounding air could and, in some instances, would cause damage to the eardrums of the occupants. The Aerospace and Division (ADD) of QII had partially developed the technology to fracture the canopy of a jet aircraft at the time of pilot ejection. The technical problem was how to adapt the canopy fracturing technology to the rear window of a motor vehicle in a safe and cost effective manner. The existing approach was to replace the embedded rear window defroster with a series-parallel network of exploding bridge wires (EBWs). This would still provide the defrost function at low voltage/ current, but would cause fracturing of the window when a high current/voltage pulse was applied without pyrotechnics or explosives. The elements of this system were the embedded EBW network and a trunk-mounted fireset. The fireset would store the required energy to fire the network upon the receipt of a trigger signal from the existing air bag crash sensor.

  4. Ceramic High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Final Report CRADA No. TC02102.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morse, T. [Flanders Corp., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermor e National Laboratory (LLNL) and Flanders-Precisionaire (Flanders), to develop ceramic HEP A filters under a Thrust II Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) project. The research was conducted via the IPP Program at Commonwe alth of Independent States (CIS) Institutes, which are handled under a separate agreement. The institutes (collectively referred to as "CIS Institutes") involved with this project were: Bochvar: Federal State Unitarian Enterprise All-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (FSUE VNIINM); Radium Khlopin: Federal State Unitarian Enterprise NPO Radium Institute named (FSUE NPO Radium Institute); and Bakor: Science and Technology Center Bakor (STC Bakor).

  5. Development of Physics Package Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TC02094.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpenko, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmon, J. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    The goal of this project was to work together through the project phases to conceive, demonstrate, and produce concepts for detecting, locating, tracking, imaging, and assessing emissions passively or actively. The initial Sensor Concept Exploration Phase was postulated and assessed concepts at a first-order level to ascertain whether the parties’ concepts (either separately developed or jointly developed) had merit for missile defense and homeland security applications

  6. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  7. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K.

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ , suggesting that Fe 3+ and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass

  8. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenhua [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); France, David M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  9. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  10. Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, G. Patrick [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Browne, Jolyon [Advanced Research & Applications Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The development of an Image Matrix Processor (IMP) was proposed that would provide an economical means to perform rapid ray-tracing processes on volume "Giga Voxel" data sets. This was a multi-phased project. The objective of the first phase of the IMP project was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a workstation-based Image Matrix Processor for use in volumetric reconstruction and rendering using hardware simulation techniques. Additionally, ARACOR and LLNL worked together to identify and pursue further funding sources to complete a second phase of this project.

  11. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  12. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

  13. Development and Demonstration of Carbon Fuel Cell Final Report CRADA No. TC02091.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berner, J. K. [Contained Energy, Inc., Shaker Heights, OH (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Contained Energy, Inc. (CEI), to conduct necessary research and to develop, fabricate and test a multi-cell carbon fuel cell.

  14. Solutions for Digital Video Transmission Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC02068.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rivers, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This Project aimed at development of software for seismic data processing based on the Geotool code developed by the American company Multimax., Inc. The Geotool code was written in early 90-es for the UNIX platform. Under Project# 2821, functions of the old Geotool code were transferred into a commercial version for the Microsoft XP and Vista platform with addition of new capabilities on visualization and data processing. The developed new version of the Geotool+ was implemented using the up-to-date tool Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and uses capabilities of the .NET platform. C++ was selected as the main programming language for the Geotool+. The two-year Project was extended by six months and funding levels increased from 600,000 to $670,000. All tasks were successfully completed and all deliverables were met for the project even though both the industrial partner and LLNL principal investigator left the project before its final report.

  15. Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices, CRADA Number CRD-14-566

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-13

    Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) proposes a project to develop and test innovative second-generation power take-off (PTO) components for the U.S. Department of Energy's 2013 FOA: Marine and Hydrokinetic System Performance Advancement, Topic Area 2 (Project). Innovative PTO components will include new and improved designs for bearings, couplings and a subsea electrical generator. Specific project objectives include the following: (1) Develop components for an advanced PTO suitable for MHK devices; (2) Bench test these components; (3) Assess the component and system performance benefits; (4) Perform a system integration study to integrate these components into an ORPC hydrokinetic turbine. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will participate on the ORPC lead team to review design of the generator and will provide guidance on the design. Based on inputs from the project team, NREL will also provide an economic analysis of the impacts of the proposed system performance advancements.

  16. Ceramic High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Final Report CRADA No. TC02160.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    The technical objective of this project was to develop a ceramic HEPA filter technology, by initially producing and testing coupon ceramics, small scale prototypes, and full scale prototype HEPA filters, and to address relevant manufacturing and commercialization technical issues.

  17. ALPHA SMP SYSTEM(S) Final Report CRADA No. TC-1404-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beaudet, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Within the scope of this subcontract, Digital Equipment Corporation (DIGITAL) and the University, through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), engaged in joint research and development activities of mutual interest and benefit. The primary objectives of these activities were, for LLNL to improve its capability to perform its mission, and for DIGITAL to develop technical capability complimentary to this mission. The collaborative activities had direct manpower investments by DIGITAL and LLNL. The project was divided into four areas of concern, which were handled concurrently. These areas included Gang Scheduling, Numerical Methods, Applications Development and Code Development Tools.

  18. Inverter Load Rejection Over-Voltage Testing: SolarCity CRADA Task 1a Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hoke, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chebahtah, J. [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Wang, T. [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Zimmerly, B. [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Various interconnection challenges exist when connecting distributed PV into the electrical distribution grid in terms of safety, reliability, and stability of electric power systems. One of the urgent areas for additional research - as identified by inverter manufacturers, installers, and utilities - is the potential for transient over-voltage from PV inverters. In one stage of a cooperative tests were repeated a total of seven times. The maximum over-voltage measured in any test did not exceed 200% of nominal, and typical over-voltage levels were significantly lower. The total voltage duration and the maximum continuous time above each threshold are presented here, as well as the time to disconnect for each test. Finally, we present a brief investigation into the effect of DC input voltage as well as a series of no-load tests. This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient over-voltages created by several commercial PV inverters during load-rejection conditions. For this work, a test plan that is currently under development by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Through a cooperative research and development agreement, NREL is working with SolarCity to address two specific types of transient overvoltage: load rejection overvoltage (LRO) and ground fault overvoltage (GFO). Additional partners in this effort include the Hawaiian Electric Companies, Northern Plains Power Technologies, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  19. Electrically Heated Afterburner Final Report CRADA No. TC-0537-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernazza, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gehrman, F. H. [Retech Services, Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This project was established as a three-year collaboration to develop and improve an innovative hazardous waste-processing system via the addition of an electrically heated afterburner. The fundamental objective of this project was comprehensive engineering of a plasma-fired afterburner with the goal of delivering a scaled demonstration model to process the gaseous effluent from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. The first stage PACT technology has been already well developed by Retech Services, Inc. (Retech).

  20. Development of CVD Diamond for Industrial Applications Final Report CRADA No. TC-2047-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jory, H. [Communications and Power Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vikharov, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-09-08

    This project was a collaborative effort to develop and demonstrate a new millimeter microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition(CVD) process for manufacturing large diamond disks with greatly reduced processing times and costs from those now available. In the CVD process, carbon based gases (methane) and hydrogen are dissociated into plasma using microwave discharge and then deposited layer by layer as polycrystalline diamond onto a substrate. The available low frequency (2.45GHz) microwave sources used elsewhere (De Beers) result in low density plasmas and low deposition rates: 4 inch diamond disks take 6-8 weeks to process. The new system developed in this project uses a high frequency 30GHz Gyrotron as the microwave source and a quasi-optical CVD chamber resulting in a much higher density plasma which greatly reduced the diamond processing times (1-2 weeks)

  1. Field Emission Cathode Based X-Ray Source Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1456-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turner, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    To characterize the aging mechanisms of the nuclear stockpile, sensors and diagnostics were required for identifying the precursors to degradation of the materials and components. Existing approaches utilized an invasive sampling of the vacuum system surrounding the components to identify the presence of any chemicals that could outgas from the components by techniques such as ion mass spectrometry. This resulted in the inactivation of the system for a period of time, and possibly the destruction of the system as well. Furthermore, this approach did not allow for real time monitoring in order to determine rates of degradation. Instead, it provided an integration of the amount of degradation over the sample period.

  2. Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian metallurgical industry) and supplied to the partner for tests in a stack of fuel cells. A feasibility study on the cost of the Russian material for a BSP is to be done on Tasks 1, 2 in case the annual order makes up 400,000 sheets. The goal of Task 3 of the project is to research on possible implementation of cermet compositions on the basis of LiAlO{sub 2}, TiN, B{sub 4}C, ceramics with Ni and Ni-Mo binders. BaCeO{sub 3} conductive ceramics with metal binders of Ni, Ni-Cr etc. were also planned to be studied. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of samples is to be made and passed to FCE for tests. The goal of Task 4 of the Project is development of a new alloy or alloys with a ceramic coating that will have upgraded corrosion stability in operation within a SOFC. A new alloy was to be worked out by the way of modification of compositions of industrial alloys. Ceramic coatings are to be applied onto ferrite steel produced serially by iron and steel industry of Russia as sheet iron.

  3. Textile Resource Conservation Final Report CRADA No. TC-0699-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCreight, Dan J. [Institute of Textile Technology, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    This project was undertaken to develop and demonstrate on a pilot scale the use of electro-osmotic transport to increase the efficiency of textiles wet processing operations. In particular, we sought to develop a means of rinsing textiles to remove material entrapped between the individual fibers that constitute a yarn. Material trapped within the yarn is slow to exchange with rinse water flowing primarily in the open weave are abetween the yarns. The application of an external field (strength, 5-50 kV /m) requires only a few volts for most fabric thicknesses. This field is sufficient to promote a rapid exchange of material to enhance rinsing and reduce the water required for rinsing from about 20 kg/kg-fabric to 3-6 kg/kg-fabric. We successfully developed technical and economic models of application of the process to the rinsing of many materials of industrial importance, including dyes, tints, chemicals, detergents and dye electrolytes. We demonstrated the process on a pilot plant scale using a translator designed in cooperation with Milliken and Company (Spartanburg, SC).

  4. Laser Drilling Development Trial Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1538-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hebbar, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    This project performed various laser drilling tests to demonstrate femtosecond laser drilling of fuel injector nozzles with minimal recast, minimal heat affected zone and no collateral damage. LLNL had extensive experience in ultra short-pulse laser systems and developed specialized hardware for these applications.

  5. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T.; Ludtka, G.M.; Bjerke, M.A.; Gray, W.H.

    1997-12-01

    The overall scope of this endeavor was to develop an integrated computer system, running on a network of heterogeneous computers, that would allow the rapid development of tool designs, and then use process models to determine whether the initial tooling would have characteristics which produce the prototype parts. The major thrust of this program for ORNL was the definition of the requirements for the development of the integrated die design system with the functional purpose to link part design, tool design, and component fabrication through a seamless software environment. The principal product would be a system control program that would coordinate the various application programs and implement the data transfer so that any networked workstation would be useable. The overall system control architecture was to be required to easily facilitate any changes, upgrades, or replacements of the model from either the manufacturing end or the design criteria standpoint. The initial design of such a program is described in the section labeled ``Control Program Design``. A critical aspect of this research was the design of the system flow chart showing the exact system components and the data to be transferred. All of the major system components would have been configured to ensure data file compatibility and transferability across the Internet. The intent was to use commercially available packages to model the various manufacturing processes for creating the die and die inserts in addition to modeling the processes for which these parts were to be used. In order to meet all of these requirements, investigative research was conducted to determine the system flow features and software components within the various organizations contributing to this project. This research is summarized.

  6. Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) Final Report CRADA No. TO-4013-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-03-23

    Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) was a multiyear DOE/DP program, involving multiple DOE laboratories and production facilities, focused on improving the manufacturing capabilities of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) through the application of modem information technologies. AM-NII's published mission states: "In partnership with the manufacturing business sector, AMNII will leverage DOE capabilities to develop, demonstrate, and pilot industrial information infrastructure and applications that enhance national security." LLNL's AM-NII project targeted two opportunities for improving NWC manufacturing capabilities. First was the link between the NWC and its outside suppliers of manufactured parts - web-based supply-chain integration. Second was the cross-site enterprise integration (EI) within the Complex itself. The general approach to supply-chain integration was to leverage the National Information Infrastructure (including Internet) to demonstrate the procurement of fabricated electrical and mechanical parts using a completely paperless procurement process. The general approach to NWC enterprise integration was to utilize SecureNet, a network that provides a secure, high-speed data link among the various NWC sites. If one looks at SecureNet as "the track," our goal was to get the trains running. Cross-site enterprise integration presupposes there is some level of local integration, so we worked both local and cross-site is sues simultaneously. Our EI work was in support of the LLNL Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs), the Submarine Launch Ballistic Missile Warhead Protection Program (SWPP), and the Laser Cutter Workstation installed at Y-12.

  7. 78 FR 28866 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ...-Mouth Disease 3ABC ELISA Diagnostic Kit AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal... Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), through its Plum Island Animal Disease... differentiate infected from vaccinated, non-infected animals (DIVA). The role of the industry collaborator(s) in...

  8. Interventional Application of Shape Memory Polymer Foam Final Report CRADA No. TC-02067-03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Metzger, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sierra Interventions, LLC, to develop shape memory polymer foam devices for treating hemorrhagic stroke.

  9. Fuel Testing for Sylvatex: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-636

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Jonathan L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-07

    Sylvatex is a green nano-chemistry company that has developed a platform technology utilizing renewable, non-toxic inputs to create a stable nanoparticle that can be used in multiple applications. Their mission is to increase the use of renewables globally, to empower a cleaner and healthier future. The main application is a fuel technology product - MicroX - that utilizes proprietary knowledge to scale low-cost, cleaner-burning renewable diesel fuel and additives by using a co-location commercial model. The aspects of this project will include testing of two Sylvatex MicroX fuels on an engine dynamometer platform. Industry standard ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) B3 fuel and a ULSD B20 will both be used for comparison of the Sylvatex fuels (U.S. standard diesel fuel at the pump contains an average of approximately 3% biodiesel; this is why B3 would be used as a baseline comparison). Sylvatex is currently using a prototype formulation (MicroX 1) that applies a high cost surfactant. An experimental formulation (MicroX 2) that uses lower cost materials is under development. The MicroX 1 will be blended at a 10% level into the B3 ULSD fuel and the MicroX 2 will be blended at a 10% level into both the B3 and the B20 ULSD fuels for study on the engine dynamometer test platform. All fuel blends will be tested over the FTP transient engine test cycle and a steady state ramped modal engine test cycle. Each test cycle will be performed a minimum of 3 times for each fuel. Tailpipe and/or engine out gaseous exhaust emissions (CO2, CO, NOx, THC, O2,), engine out PM emissions, and brake-specific fuel consumption rates will be evaluated for all test cycles.

  10. Evaluation of Aerogel Clad Optical Fibers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1448-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, Duncan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Droege, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Fiber-optic based sensors will be needed for in situ monitoring of degradation products in various components of nuclear weapons. These sensors typically consist of a transducer located at the measurement site whose optical properties are modulated by interaction with the targeted degradation product. The interrogating light source and the detector for determining sensor response are located remotely. These two subsystems are connected by fiber optic cables. LLNL has developed a new technology, aerogel clad optical fibers, that have the advantage of accepting incident rays over a much wider angular range than normal glass clad fibers. These fibers are also capable of transmitting light more efficiently. These advantages can lead to a factor of 2-4 improvement in sensitivity and detection limit.

  11. Miniature CCD X-Ray Imaging Camera Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC-773-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mummolo, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of the project was to develop a compact, large active area, high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating X-rays. The camera head and controller needed to be capable of operation within a vacuum environment and small enough to be fielded within the small vacuum target chambers at LLNL.

  12. Modification of Color Centers by Electron Bombardment: Final Report CRADA No. TC-0460-93-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bibber, Karl [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alger, Don M. [Quali-Tech, Inc., Columbia, MO (United States)

    2000-11-30

    The purpose of the project was to: Identify those electron beam irradiation parameters most relevant to process quality and efficiency, to producing and modifying color centers in topaz. Develop and test improved radiation processing techniques, and evaluate their potential applicability to other types of semi-precious gems. Develop an optimized data base for the process and procedures for identifying and characterizing material from new and diverse sources. Transfer new processing technology to the private sector, and, until they are implemented industrially, to perform radiation dosing to partially satisfy existing excess demand. We planned to define the interaction between sample purity level, the physics of irradiation to achieve color cent-er modification on a reproducible basis and demonstration of the resulting process on a commercially viable basis. The primary deliverable was the increased knowledge base in terms of expanded understanding of the systematics of color center modification in materials, and an extensive database of electron beam parameters which would optimize the efficiency and quality of radiation processing of topaz from diverse sources. The radiation processing of these stones constitutes a deliverable to Quali-Tech by LLNL.

  13. Technology Assessment for Powertrain Components Final Report CRADA No. TC-1124-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarz, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gough, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    LLNL utilized its defense technology assessment methodologies in combination with its capabilities in the energy; manufacturing, and transportation technologies to demonstrate a methodology that synthesized available but incomplete information on advanced automotive technologies into a comprehensive framework.

  14. Laser Texturing of Magnetic Recording Media Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1298-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marshall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The Commercial Laser Systems Group at LLNL developed a concept for patterning of computer magnetic recording discs. Magnetic recording media require texturing over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate was polished to a specular finish then a mechanical means was used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. In a previous patent (US Patent 5,062,021) it was proposed that the focused output of a low power laser with short pulse length could be used to generate the textured pattern. However, the patterned area typically required 75,000 textured spots that needed to be rapidly (less than 10 seconds) printed with good uniformity. A means to achieve the accurate placement and uniform profile, as well as a meaningfully rapid process time, was not discussed in the referenced patent. The LLNL team devised a system that could rapidly and inexpensively accomplish the texturing.

  15. Low Temperature Metal Coating Method Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1155-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang-Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gabel, Howard [Innovative Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    A new metal coating method, cidled KEM (kinetic energy metal.lization), demonstrated in the laboratory by lnovati, utilized fast-moving solid particIes entrained in a gas that are caused to fiow through a nozzIe to effect particle deposition on metal surfaces at room temperature conditions. This method (US Patent 5,795,626) was an attractive and viabIe alternative to the currentIy available high-temperature coating methods avaiIabIe. Since it differs significantly from existing metal coating technologies, a brief description of the method is incIuded here. The proposed method, KEM, achieves cohesive and adhesive metallurgical bonding through the high-speed coUision of powder with a substrate and the subsequent discharge of electrical charge at the substrate. Such coating is effected by entraining metal powder in a gas and accelerating this mixture through a supersonic nozzle. The gas/powder is directed towards the substrate to be coated. Collisions occur, initiaIly between the powder and the substrate, and, as the first Iayer of the coating forms, between the powder and the coating. During these collisions the powder is rapidly deformed, causing the exposure of fresh (oxide free) active metal surface. When these’active surfaces contact one another, they agglomerate and form true metaIIurgicaI bonds. The resultant coating has Iow porosity and high adhesive and cohesive strength. The formation of metaIIurgicaI bonds is potentiated by the discharge of electrical energy. This electrical energy is the result of triboeIectric charging of the particIes during acceleration and transit to the nozzIe. An advantage of the method is that it does not raise the temperature of the powder being appLiedor that of the substrate. Consequently, materials sensitive to high temperature may be applied without changing Me properties of the materkd or substrate.

  16. Tosoh SMD, Inc./Production of High-Quality Tantalum: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-26

    The objectives of the proposed program are: (1) to produce Ta ingot with very high purity (> 99.99% overall, with ppm-level allowable for specific impurity elements); and (2) to provide requisite grain structure in the ingot with special metallurgical processing. We believe this research and development has a high potential to keep Tosoh competitive as the future continues to demand better performance from sputtering sources. We encourage further R&D activities and are looking forward to continued interaction.

  17. Breast Cancer Diagnostic System Final Report CRADA No. TC02098.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DaSilva, L. B. [BioTelligent, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Liver more National Laboratory (LLNL) and BioTelligent, Inc. together with a Russian Institution (BioFil, Ltd.), to develop a new system ( diagnostic device, operating procedures, algorithms and software) to accurately distinguish between benign and malignant breast tissue (Breast Cancer Diagnostic System, BCDS).

  18. 77 FR 48165 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Enterprise in protecting the United States from internal and external foreign animal disease threats and... Security for the Efficacy Testing of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) and Chlorine Dioxide (ClO 2 ) Against... Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of intent...

  19. Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Crosson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    One of the difficulties in fabricating an inexpensive angular rate or rotation sensor is producing a device that is insensitive to acceleration, including the constant acceleration of gravity. The majority of rate sensors are either tuning fork type devices sensing a relatively weak force (i.e., Coriolis effect) and thus not very sensitive, or gyroscopes (either rotating or fiber optic based) that are large, consume lots of power and are expensive. This project was a collaborative effort between LLNL and The Fredericks Company to develop a rotational sensor as a standardized, commercial product. The Fredericks Company possessed expertise and capabilities in the technical aspects of manufacturing this type of sensor, and they were interested in collaborating with LLNL to manufacture the rotational rate sensors as a commercial product.

  20. Plastic Substrate Active Matrix Displays Final Report CRADA No. TC-2011-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This project was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and FlexICs, Inc. to develop thin film transistor (TFT) electronics for active matrix displays.

  1. HCCI Combustion Engines Final Report CRADA No. TC02032.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lyford-Pike, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cummins Engine Company (Cwnmins), to advance the state of the art on HomogeneousCharge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines, resulting in a clean, high-efficiency alternative to diesel engines.

  2. Ceramicrete stabilization of radioactive-salt-containing liquid waste and sludge water. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-04

    It was found that the Ceramicrete Specimens incorporated the Streams 1 and 2 sludges with the adjusted loading about 41.6 and 31.6%, respectively, have a high solidity. The visible cracks in the matrix materials and around the anionite AV-17 granules included could not obtain. The granules mentioned above fixed by Ceramicrete matrix very strongly. Consequently, we can conclude that irradiation of Ceramecrete matrix, goes from the high radioactive elements, not result the structural degradation. Based on the chemical analysis of specimens No.462 and No.461 used it was shown that these matrix included the formation elements (P, K, Mg, O), but in the different samples their correlations are different. These ratios of the content of elements included are about {+-} 10%. This information shows a great homogeneity of matrix prepared. In the list of the elements founded, expect the matrix formation elements, we detected also Ca and Si (from the wollastonite - the necessary for Ceramicrete compound); Na, Al, S, O, Cl, Fe, Ni also have been detected in the Specimen No.642 from the waste forms: NaCl, Al(OH){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fe(OH){sub 3}, nickel ferrocyanide and Ni(NO{sub 3})2. The unintelligible results also were found from analysis of an AV-17 granules, in which we obtain the great amount of K. The X-ray radiographs of the Ceramicrete specimens with loading 41.4 % of Stream 1 and 31.6% of Stream 2, respectively showed that the realization of the advance technology, created at GEOHKI, leads to formation of excellent ceramic matrix with high amount of radioactive streams up to 40% and more. Really, during the interaction with start compounds MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with the present of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and Wollastonite this process run with high speed under the controlled regimes. That fact that the Ceramicrete matrix with 30-40% of Streams 1 and 2 have a crystalline form, not amorphous matter, allows to permit that these matrix should be very stable, reliable for incorporation of a radionuclides.

  3. LST CGM Generator and Viewer Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1558-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, Don [Larson Software Technology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The purpose of this project was to jointly develop and test a software plug-in that would convert native Pro /ENGINEER digital engineering drawings to Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) format. If it was not feasible to convert the Pro/ENGINEER files, we planned to develop and test a similar conversion of native AutoCAD engineering drawings to CGM. CGM viewer plug-ins were developed as needed. There were four main tasks in this project: 1. Requirements for CGM Plug-in 2. Product Evaluation 3. Product Development Feasibility Study 4. Developing a "Plug-In" Application.

  4. Biodiesel Performance with Modern Engines. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-153

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-29

    NREL and the National Biodiesel Board (NBB) will work cooperatively to assess the effects of biodiesel blends on the performance of modern diesel engines and emissions control systems meeting increasingly strict emissions standards. This work will include research to understand the impact of biodiesel blends on the operation and durability of particle filters and NOx control sorbents/catalysts, to quantify the effect on emission control systems performance, and to understand effects on engine component durability. Work to assess the impact of biodiesel blends on real world fleet operations will be performed. Also, research to develop appropriate ASTM standards for biodiesel quality and stability will be conducted. The cooperative project will involve engine testing and fleet evaluation studies at NREL using biodiesel from a variety of sources. In addition, NREL will work with NBB to set up an Industrial Steering Committee to design the scope for the various projects and to provide technical oversight to these projects. NREL and NBB will cooperatively communicate the study results to as broad an audience as possible.

  5. CRADA Final Report: Thermal Design and Analysis Tools for Dense-Wavelength-Division-Multiplexed (DWDM) Optical Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Deborah

    2005-01-31

    The current project originated from discussions with designers and engineers in the opto-electronics industry who sought help from LBNL in identifying effective thermal-management strategies for optical-network components and systems. Miniaturization of opto-electronic components exacerbates the thermal management problem because it allows a greater number of temperature-sensitive components to be fit into less space. Measurement techniques are required to evaluate emerging technologies, test prototype designs, and provide data that can be used to calibrate and validate models. To address these needs, LBNL and project partners developed a test station that allows experiments to be performed under tightly controlled conditions. The central component of the testing device is a "guarded" hot plate that enables high-precision temperature measurements, allowing forced-convection cooling devices to be evaluated. The device is so named because guard plates are used to eliminate heat flow and ensure that heat is not dissipated through the cooling device under investigation. This tool not only allows characterization of emerging technologies and materials, but also allows collection of high-resolution data that can be used to validate and improve simulation tools used to develop next-generation cooling devices for telecommunication systems. The ability to measure and analyze thermal performance benefits the photonics and optical-network industry by reducing development costs and time to market.

  6. Flexible CdTe Solar Cells and Modules: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-548

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Lucintech and NREL will collaborate to develop flexible CdTe solar cells on flexible glass using sputtering and other deposition technologies. This initial work will be conducted under the DOE funded Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (FPACE) 1 project, and the interaction with Lucintech will focus on scaling up and transferring the high efficiency cell processes to module production on a pilot line.

  7. Optimization of Diode Laser System to Treat Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1154-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Richard A [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, Mark [Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a pervasive condition of enlargement of the male prostate gland which leads to several urinary difficulties ranging from hesitancy to incontinence to kidney dysfunction in severe cases. Currently the most common therapy is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) utilizing an electrosurgical device. Although TURP is largely successful, new BPH therapy methods are desired to reduce the cost and recovery time, improve the success rate, and reduce side effects. Recently, lasers have been introduced for this purpose. Indigo Medical Inc. is currently engaged in the development, testing, and preparation for sales of a new diode laser based BPH therapy system. The development is based on laboratory experiments, animal studies, and a limited FDA-approved clinical trial in the US and in other countries. The addition of sophisticated numerical modeling, of the sort that has been highly developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, can greatly aid in the design of the system and treatment protocol. The benefits to DOE include the maintenance and advancement of numerical modeling expertise in radiation-matter interactions of the sort essential for the stockpile stewardship, inertial confinement fusion, and advanced manufacturing, and the push on advanced scientific computational methods, ultimately in areas such as 3-D transport.

  8. A Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TC-02081-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    The Phase I STTR research project was targeted at meeting the objectives and requirements stated in STTR solicitation A04-T028 for a Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring. In accordance with the requirements for STTR programs, collaboration was formed between a small business, Kionix, Inc., and The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The collaboration included CytoDiscovery, Inc. (CDI) which, in collaboration with Kionix, provided access to membrane chip technology and provided program support and coordination. The objective of the overall program (excerpted from the original solicitation) was: “To develop a small, portable cell maintenance system for the transport, storage, and monitoring of viable vertebrate cells and tissues.” The goal of the Phase I project was to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the program objectives utilizing a system comprised of a small-size, microfluidic chip-based cell maintenance cartridge (CMC) and a portable cell maintenance system (CMS) capable of housing a minimum of four CMCs. The system was designed to be capable of optimally maintaining multiple vertebrate cell types while supporting a wide variety of cellular assays.

  9. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  10. Research and Development of Zinc Air Fuel Cell To Achieve Commercialization Final Report CRADA No. TC-1544-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haley, H. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The specific goal of this project was to advance the development of the zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) towards commercial readiness in different mobile applications, including motor bikes, passenger cars, vans, buses and off-road vehicles (golf carts, factory equipment), and different stationary applications including generator sets, uninterruptible power systems and electric utility loading leveling and distributive power.

  11. Development of Advanced Materials for Electro-Ceramic Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1331-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McMillan, L. [Symetrix International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Tulupov, A. [Soliton-NTT, Moscow (Russia)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to further develop and characterize the electrochemical methods originating in Russia for producing ultra high purity organometallic compounds utilized as precursors in the production of high quality electro-ceramic materials. Symetrix planned to use electro-ceramic materials with high dielectric constant for microelectronic memory circuit applications. General Atomics planned to use the barium titanate type ceramics with low loss tangent for producing a high power ferroelectric tuner used to match radio frequency power into their Dill-D fusion machine. Phase I of the project was scheduled to have a large number of organometallic (alkoxides) chemical samples produced using various methods. These would be analyzed by LLNL, Soliton and Symetrix independently to determine the level of chemical impurities thus verifying each other's analysis. The goal was to demonstrate a cost-effective production method, which could be implemented in a large commercial facility to produce high purity organometallic compounds. In addition, various compositions of barium-strontium-titanate ceramics were to be produced and analyzed in order to develop an electroceramic capacitor material having the desired characteristics with respect to dielectric constant, loss tangent, temperature characteristics and non-linear behavior under applied voltage. Upon optimizing the barium titanate material, 50 capacitor preforms would be produced from this material demonstrating the ability to produce, in quantity, the pills ultimately required for the ferroelectric tuner (approx 2000-3000 ceramic pills).

  12. Evaluation of SAGE Electrochromic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-15-579

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenent, Robert C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-06

    NREL will conduct durability testing of Sage Electrochromics dynamic windows products using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods and drive parameters as defined by Sage. Window units will be tested and standard analysis performed. Data will be summarized and reported back to Sage at the end of the testing period.

  13. Analysis and Design of a Fiber-optic Probe for DNA Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1147-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molau, Nicole [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vail, Curtis [Accu.Photonics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-01-24

    In 1995, a challenge in the field of genetics dealt with the acquisition of efficient DNA sequencing techniques for reading the 3 billion base-pairs that comprised the human genome. AccuPhotonics, Inc. proposed to develop and manufacture a state-of-the-art near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) fiber-optic probe that was expected to increase probe efficiency by two orders of magnitude over the existing state-of-the-art and to improve resolution to 10Å. The detailed design calculation and optimization of electrical properties of the fiber-optic probe tip geometry would be performed at LLNL, using existing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic (EM) codes.

  14. Design of 3x3 Focusing Array for Heavy Ion Driver Final Report on CRADA TC-02082-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This memo presents a design of a 3x3 quadrupole array for HIF. It contains 3 D magnetic field computations of the array build with racetrack coils with and without different shields. It is shown that it is possible to have a low error magnetic field in the cells and shield the stray fields to acceptable levels. The array design seems to be a practical solution to any size array for future multi-beam heavy ion fusion drivers.

  15. Manufacturing Steps for Commercial Production of Nano-Structure Capacitors Final Report CRADA No. TC02159.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schena, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and TroyCap LLC, to develop manufacturing steps for commercial production of nano-structure capacitors. The technical objective of this project was to demonstrate high deposition rates of selected dielectric materials which are 2 to 5 times larger than typical using current technology.

  16. Sperm Scoring Using Multi-Spectral Flow Imaging and FISH-IS Final Report CRADA No. TC02088.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morrissey, P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was to be a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Amnis Corporation, to develop an automated system for scoring sperm interphase cells for the presence of chromosomal abnormalities using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the Amnis ImageStream technology platform.

  17. Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-291

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfrum, E.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

  18. Compiling for Application Specific Computational Acceleration in Reconfigurable Architectures Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2033-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Supinski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caliga, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The primary objective of this project was to develop memory optimization technology to efficiently deliver data to, and distribute data within, the SRC-6's Field Programmable Gate Array- ("FPGA") based Multi-Adaptive Processors (MAPs). The hardware/software approach was to explore efficient MAP configurations and generate the compiler technology to exploit those configurations. This memory accessing technology represents an important step towards making reconfigurable symmetric multi-processor (SMP) architectures that will be a costeffective solution for large-scale scientific computing.

  19. Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1364-96: Phase I SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This project was a relationship between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Biological Detection, Inc. (now known as Cellomics, Inc.) It was funded as a Phase I SBIR from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded to Cellomics, Inc. with a subcontract to LLNL.

  20. Medical Isotope Program: O-18, C-13, and Xe-129 Final Report CRADA No. TC-2043-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibner, K. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fought, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Spectra Gases, Inc., to develop new and cheaper sources of Oxgyen-18 (O-18), Carbon-13 (C-13), and Xenon-129 (Xe-129), and to develop new applications of these stable medical isotopes in medicine resulting in a substantial increase in stable isotopes that are important to human health sciences.

  1. Hazardous and Medical Waste Destruction Using the AC Plasmatron Final Report CRADA No. TC-1560-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bucher, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tulupov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The goal of this project was to develop a prototype medical waste destruction facility based on the AC plasma torch capable of processing 150 kg of waste per hour while satisfying US EPA emission standards. The project was to provide the first opportunity for a joint U.S.-Russian project using an AC Plasma Torch in a hazardous waste destruction system to be assembled and operated in the U.S. thus promoting the commercialization in the U.S. of this joint U.S.-Russian developed technology. This project was a collaboration between the Russian Institute Soliton- NTT, the U.S industrial partner Scientific Utilization Inc. (SUI) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ( LLNL). The project was funded by DOE for a total of $1.2 million with $600K for allocated for Phase I and $600K for Phase II. The Russian team received about $800K over the two (2) year period while LLNL received $400K. SUI was to provide in kind matching funds totaling $1.2 million.

  2. CRADA/NFE-15-05761 Report: Additive Manufacturing of Isotropic NdFeB Bonded Permanent Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, M Parans [ORNL

    2016-07-18

    The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal is to fabricate net shape isotropic NdFeB bonded magnets utilizing additive manufacturing technologies at the ORNL MDF. The goal is to form complex shapes of thermoplastic and/or thermoset bonded magnets without expensive tooling and with minimal wasted material. Two additive manufacturing methods; the binder jet process; and big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) were used. Binder jetting produced magnets with the measured density of the magnet of 3.47 g/cm3, close to 46% relative to the NdFeB single crystal density of 7.6 g/cm3 were demonstrated. Magnetic measurements indicate that there is no degradation in the magnetic properties. In addition, BAAM was used to fabricate isotropic near-net-shape NdFeB bonded magnets with magnetic and mechanical properties comparable or better than those of traditional injection molded magnets. The starting polymer magnet composite pellets consist of 65 vol% isotropic NdFeB powder and 35 vol% polyamide (Nylon-12). The density of the final BAAM magnet product reached 4.8 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.65 kOe, Remanence Br = 5.07 kG, and energy product (BH)max = 5.47 MGOe (43.50 kJ/m3). This study provides a new pathway for preparing near-net shape bonded magnets for various magnetic applications.

  3. Accelerator-Detector Complex for Photonuclear Detection of Hidden Explosives Final Report CRADA No. TC2065.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brothers, L. J. [Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., Covington, KY (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort by Lawrence Livermore National Security (formerly the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc., and the following Russian Institutes: P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Innovative Technologies Center.(AUO CIT), Central Design Bureau-Almas (CDB Almaz), Moscow Instrument Automation Research Institute, and Institute for High Energy Physics (IBEP) to develop equipment and procedures for detecting explosive materials concealed in airline checked baggage and cargo.

  4. Process Parameter Evaluation and Optimization for Advanced Material Development Final Report CRADA No. TC-1234-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubesh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McGann, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This project was established as a three-year collaboration to produce and characterize · silica aerogels prepared by a Rapid Supercritical Extraction (RSCE) process to meet . BNA, Inc. application requirements. The objectives of this project were to study the parameters necessary to produce optimized aerogel parts with narrowly specified properties and establish the range and limits of the process for producing such aerogels. The project also included development of new aerogel materials useful for high temperature applications. The results of the project were expected to set the conditions necessary to produce quantities of aerogels having particular specifications such as size, shape, density, and mechanical strength. BNA, Inc. terminated the project on April 7, 1999, 10-months prior to the anticipated completion date, due to termination of corporate funding for the project. The technical accomplishments achieved are outlined in Paragraph C below.

  5. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  6. Community Energy Storage Thermal Analysis and Management: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-445

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-09

    The goal of this project is to create thermal solutions and models for community energy storage devices using both purpose-designed batteries and EV or PHEV batteries. Modeling will be employed to identify major factors of a device's lifetime and performance. Simultaneously, several devices will be characterized to determine their electrical and thermal performance under controlled conditions. After the factors are identified, a variety of thermal design approaches will be evaluated to improve the performance of energy storage devices. Upon completion of this project, recommendations for community energy storage device enclosures, thermal management systems, and/or battery sourcing will be made. NREL's interest is in both new and aged batteries.

  7. A study of Multistage/Multifunction Column for Fine Coal Cleaning CRADA PC93-005, Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph Lai; Shiao-Hung Chiang; Daxin He; Yuru Feng

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of the this research project is to explore the potential applicability of a multistage column for fine coal cleaning and other applications in fluid particle separation. The research work identifies the design parameters and their effects on the performance of the separation device. The results of this study provide an engineering data basis for further development of this technology in coal cleaning and in general areas of fluid and particle separations

  8. Modeling Parasitic Energy Losses and the Impact of Advanced Tribological Concepts on Fuel Efficiency - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Our primary task for this project was to perform FMEP calculations for a broad range of parameters including engine type [spark ignition (SI) or compression ignition (CI)], engine size, engine mode (speed and load), lubricant viscosity, asperity friction, surface finish, oil type (mineral or synthetic), and additive (friction modifier), as discussed previously [1–3]. The actual analysis was limited to a large diesel engine and it included both load and speed dependencies as well as lubricant viscosity and speed.

  9. Graded Reflectivity Mirror for the Solid State Heat Capacity Laser Final Report CRADA No. TC-2085-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Boeing Company, to develop a Graded Reflectivity Mirror (GRM) to achieve improved near field fill and higher brightness in the far field output of LLNL’s Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL).

  10. High-Temperature Thermochemical Storage with Redox-Stable Perovskites for Concentrating Solar Power, CRADA Number: CRD-14-554

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    As part of a Federal Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Award, the project will be led by Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to explore and demonstrate the efficacy of highly reducible, redox-stable oxides to provide efficient thermochemical energy storage for heat release at temperatures of 900 degrees Celcius or more. NREL will support the material development for its application in a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant. In the project, NREL will provide its inventive system design, chemical looping for CSP, and use it as a platform to accommodate the chemical processes using a cost effective perovskite materials identified by CSM. NREL will design a 5-10kW particle receiver for perovskite reduction to store solar energy and help the development of a fluidized-bed reoxidation reactor and system integration. NREL will develop the demonstration receiver for on-sun test in the 5-10 kWt range in NREL's high flux solar furnace. NREL will assist in system analysis and provide techno-economic inputs for the overall system configuration.

  11. Rapid Tooling for Functional Prototype of Metal Mold Processes Final Report CRADA No. TC-1032-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heestand, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jaskolski, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Production inserts for die-casting were generally fabricated from materials with sufficient strength and· good wear properties at casting temperatures for long life. Frequently tool steels were used and machining was done with a combination of. conventional and Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) with some handwork, an expensive and time consuming process, partilly for prototype work. We proposed electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) as a process for rapid fabrication of dies. Metals, ranging from low melting point to refractory metals (Ta, Mo, etc.), would be evaporated and deposited at high rates (-2mm/hr.). Alloys could be easily evaporated and deposited if their constituent vapor pressures were similar and with more difficulty if they were not. Of course, layering of different materials was possible if required for a specific application. For example, a hard surface layer followed by a tough steel and backed by a high thermal conductivity (possibly cooled) copper layer could be fabricated. Electron-beam deposits exhibited 100% density and lull strength when deposited at a substrate (mandrel) temperature that was a substantial fraction of the deposited material's melting point. There were several materials that could have the required high temperature properties and ease of fabrication required for such a mandrel. We had successfully used graphite, machined from free formed objects with a replicator, to produce aluminum-bronze test molds. There were several parting layer materials of interest, but the ideal material depended upon the specific application.

  12. Phase II, Compact AMS System for Biological Tracer Detection Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1533-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamm, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this collaboration between LLNL and AccSys Technology, Inc. of Pleasanton, California was to build and demonstrate a low cost, compact tritium (3H) Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) system matched to the requirements of biomedical research.

  13. Development of Electrodeposited CIGS Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    At present, most PV materials are fabricated by vacuum technologies. Some of the many disadvantages of vacuum technology are complicated instrumentation, material waste, high cost of deposition per surface area, and instability of some compounds at the deposition temperature. Solution-based approaches for thin-film deposition on large areas are particularly desirable because of the low capital cost of the deposition equipment, relative simplicity of the processes, ease of doping, uniform deposition on a variety of substrates (including interior and exterior of tubes and various nonplanar devices), and potential compatibility with high-throughput (e.g., roll-to-roll) processing. Of the nonsilicon solar photovoltaic device modules that have been deployed to date, those based on the n-CdS/p-CdTe is a leading candidate. Two features in the optical characteristics of CdTe absorber are particularly attractive for photovoltaic conversion of sunlight; (a) its energy bandgap of 1.5 eV, which provides an optimal match with the solar spectrum and thus facilitates its efficient utilization and (b) the direct mode of the main optical transition which results in a large absorption coefficient and turn permits the use of thin layer (1-2 um) of active material. Thin films of CdTe required for these devices have been fabricated by a variety of methods (e.g., vapor transport deposition, vacuum deposition, screen printing and close-spaced sublimation). Electrodeposition is another candidate deserves more attention. This project will focus on delivering low-cost, high efficiency electrodeposited CdTe-based device.

  14. Phase II: Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1554-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cellomics, Inc. (formerly BioDx and Biological Detection, Inc.) to develop an automated system for detecting human sperm aneuploidy. Aneuploidy (an abnormal number of chromosomes) is one of the major categories of chromosomally abnormal sperm, which results in chromosomally defective pregnancies and babies. An automated system would be used for testing the effects of toxic agents and for other research and clinical applications. This collaborated effort was funded by a National Institutes of Environmental Health Services, Phase II, Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) grant to Cellornics (Contract No. N44-ES-82004).

  15. Reliability Evaluation of Next Generation Inverter: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-478

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paret, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will conduct thermal and reliability modeling on three sets of power modules for the development of a next generation inverter for electric traction drive vehicles. These modules will be chosen by General Motors (GM) to represent three distinct technological approaches to inverter power module packaging. Likely failure mechanisms will be identified in each package and a physics-of-failure-based reliability assessment will be conducted.

  16. Flow Visualization Studies in the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System CRADA PC91-002, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovetz, H.S.; Shaffer, F.; Schaub, R.; Lund, L.; Woodard, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of experiments to visualize and measure flow fields in the Novacor left ventricular assist system (LVAS). The experiments utilize a multiple exposure, optical imaging technique called fluorescent image tracking velocimetry (FITV) to hack the motion of small, neutrally-buoyant particles in a flowing fluid.

  17. Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-376

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, Barry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The objective of this project is to use field verification to improve DOE’s ability to model and understand the impacts of, as well as develop solutions for, high penetration PV deployments in electrical utility distribution systems. The Participant will work with NREL to assess the existing distribution system at SCE facilities and assess adding additional PV systems into the electric power system.

  18. Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal Final Report CRADA No. TC02009.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barker, J. [Halliburton Energy Services, Alvarado, TX (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (formerly the University of California) and Jet Research Center, a wholly owned division of Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. to design and prototype an improved explosive cutter for cutting the support legs of offshore oil and gas platforms.

  19. Extraction of Iodine from Source Rock and Oil for Radioiodine Dating Final Report CRADA No. TC-1550-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Summa, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Exxon Production Research Company (EPR) to develop improved techniques for extracting, concentrating, and measuring iodine from large volumes of source rock and oil. The purpose of this project was to develop a technique for measuring total iodine extracted from rock, obtain isotopic ratios, and develop age models for samples provided by EPR.

  20. Development of Chemically Amplified Optical Sensors for Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1162-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Stephen M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Mastrototaro, John J. [Minimed Technologies, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects 14 million people in the U.S. and more than 110 million people worldwide. Each year in this country 27,000 diabetic patients become blind, 15,000 have kidney failure, and over 54,000 have peripheral limb amputations. In 1992, total healthcare costs in the U.S. for diabetes were more than $105 billion, approximately 15% of our healthcare budget. Conventional therapy for the most severe form of diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or Type I diabetes, is to administer one or two injections per day of various forms of insulin while monitoring blood glucose levels twice or three times daily with commercial glucometers that require blood samples. Near normal blood sugar levels (glycemic control) is difficult to achieve with conventional therapy. In the fall of 1993, the results of the 10-year $165 million Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were published which showed that intensive insulin management would lead to dramatically fewer cases of retinopathy (which leads to blindness), nephropathy (which leads to kidney failure), and neuropathy (which can lead to limb amputations) [New England Journal of Medicine, Vo1239, No.14 977-986 (1993)]. If existing commercial insulin pumps could be combined with a continuous glucose sensor, a more physiological and fine-tuned therapy could be provided - in effect, an artificial biomechanical pancreas would be available. Existing research suggested that such a development would dramatically improve glucose control, thus greatly reducing morbidity and mortality from this disease. MiniMed Technologies in Sylmar, CA, identified a number of optically based sensor strategies as well as candidate chemical reactions that could be used to implement a minimally invasive opto-chemical glucose sensor. LLNL evaluated these sensor strategies and chemical reactions. These evaluations were the first steps leading to development of a sensor of considerable importance that could maintain near normal physiological glycemic levels, thus dramatically reducing the risk of the microvascular complications mentioned above.

  1. Public Key-Based Need-to-Know Authorization Engine Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1553-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The goals of this project were to develop a public key-based authentication service plug-in based on LLNL's requirements, integrate the public key-based authentication with the Intra Verse authorization service adn the LLNL NTK server by developing a full-featured version of the prototyped Intra Verse need-to-know plug in; and to test the authorization and need-to-know plug-in in a secured extranet prototype among selected national Labs.

  2. Tracking of Polycarbonate Films using Low-energy Ions Final Report CRADA No. TC-774-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musket, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Ion tracking is performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping. For the present study, we have examined the results of etching ion tracks created by ions bombarding polycarbonate films with energies corresponding to stopping well below the maximum and just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV /amu and fluences of about 108/cm2 were used to examine the limits for producing etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., -20 nm < SEM hole diameter < -100 nm), we can directly relate the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion to the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results will be discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness the films. These results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications.

  3. ISO 14000 information platform. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    GETE, through its ISO 14000 Information Platform, globeNet{trademark} (www.iso14000.net), seeks to provide FETC and the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a timely, accurate, and reliable information resource on the issue of environmental management standards. This resource allows FETC to keep track of the latest developments in the ISO 14000 arena, in DOE as well as throughout the federal complex and industry. Utilizing this information, FETC and DOE can make critical decisions on their own use and implementation of the ISO 14000 standards. The information platform also provides FETC with a forum to present information on its activities, such as the DOE ISO 14000 Pilot Projects, and as an information gathering and dissemination resource for its publications. GETE works with an array of national and international contacts and content sources to gather information and provide daily updates on ISO 14000 and related environmental management issues.

  4. How You Can Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge: CRADA, MTA, collaboration, agreement, CTA, Materials-CRADA

  5. Feasibility of integrating other federal information systems into the Global Network of Environment and Technology, GNET{reg_sign}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Global Environment and Technology Enterprise (GETE) of the Global Environment and Technology Foundation (GETF) has been tasked by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to assist in reducing DOE`s cost for the Global Network of Environment and Technology (GNET{reg_sign}). As part of this task, GETE is seeking federal partners to invest in GNET{reg_sign}. The authors are also seeking FETC`s commitment to serve as GNET`s federal agency champion promoting the system to potential agency partners. This report assesses the benefits of partnering with GNET{reg_sign} and provides recommendations for identifying and integrating other federally funded (non-DOE) environmental information management systems into GNET{reg_sign}.

  6. OCP TECD Report - TARDEC Blast Mitigation Program (BMP) and National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Michigan (MI) Chapter Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Report- U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center Detroit Arsenal Warren, Michigan 48397-5000 UNCLASSIFIED...Mile Road , Warren, MI 48397-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 29521 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING... Engineering Center (TARDEC) Blast Mitigation Program and the Michigan Chapter of the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) was created based

  7. CRADA with United Solar Technologies and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL-021): Thin film materialsfor low-cost high performance solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. M.; Affinito, J. D.; Gross, M. E.; Bennett, W. D.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop and evaluate promising low-cost dielectric and polymer-protected thin-film reflective metal coatings to be applied to preformed continuously-curved solar reflector panels to enhance their solar reflectance, and to demonstrate protected solar reflective coatings on preformed solar concentrator panels. The opportunity for this project arose from a search by United Solar Technologies (UST) for organizations and facilities capable of applying reflective coatings to large preformed panels. PNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this collaborative project.

  8. Electric Drive Dynamic Thermal System Model for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-360

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Electric drive systems, which include electric machines and power electronics, are a key enabling technology for advanced vehicle propulsion systems that reduce the dependence of the U.S. transportation sector on petroleum. However, to penetrate the market, these electric drive technologies must enable vehicle solutions that are economically viable. The push to make critical electric drivesystems smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective brings respective challenges associated with heat removal and system efficiency. In addition, the wide application of electric drive systems to alternative propulsion technologies ranging from integrated starter generators, to hybrid electric vehicles, to full electric vehicles presents challenges in terms of sizing critical components andthermal management systems over a range of in-use operating conditions. This effort focused on developing a modular modeling methodology to enable multi-scale and multi-physics simulation capabilities leading to generic electric drive system models applicable to alternative vehicle propulsion configurations. The primary benefit for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the abilityto define operating losses with the respective impact on component sizing, temperature, and thermal management at the component, subsystem, and system level. However, the flexible nature of the model also allows other uses related to evaluating the impacts of alternative component designs or control schemes depending on the interests of other parties.

  9. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Lignin with Heterogeneous Catalysts: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-04

    We will synthesize and screen solid catalysts for the depolymerization of lignin to monomeric and oligomeric oxygenated species, which could be fractionated and integrated into refinery intermediate streams for selective upgrading, or catalytically upgraded to fuels and chemicals. This work will primarily focus on the synthesis and application of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for depolymerization of lignin model compounds and softwood lignin. LDHs have been shown in our group to offer good supports and catalysts to promote base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin model compounds and in preliminary experiments for the depolymerization of lignin from an Organosolv process. We will also include additional catalyst supports such as silica, alumina, and carbon as identified in ongoing and past efforts at NREL. This work will consist of two tasks. Overall, this work will be synergistic with ongoing efforts at NREL, funded by the DOE Biomass Program, on the development of catalysts for lignin depolymerization in the context of biochemical and thermochemical conversion of corn stover and other biomass feedstocks to advanced fuels and chemicals.

  10. Development of Carbon-14 Waste Destruction and Recovery System Using AC Plasma Torch Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC02108.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKannay, R. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and ISOFLEX USA (ISOFLEX), to 1) develop and test a prototype waste destruction system ("System") using AC plasma torch technology to break down and drastically reduce the volume of Carbon-14 (C-14) contaminated medical laboratory wastes while satisfying all environmental regulations, and 2) develop and demonstrate methods for recovering 99%+ of the carbon including the C-14 allowing for possible re-use as a tagging and labeling tool in the biomedical industry.

  11. Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2013-11-01

    This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

  12. Biomass Pyrolysis to Hydrocarbon Fuels in the Petroleum Refining Context: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, Helena L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on developing a thermochemical route to produce biofuels from agricultural wastes such as sugar cane bagasse, wood chips or corn stover; more specifically it intends to develop the biomass pyrolysis route, which produces bio-oils. Production of bio-oils by pyrolysis is a commercial technology. However, bio-oils are currently not being used for liquid fuels production. Although bio-oils can be produced by high-pressure liquefaction, pyrolysis is a less expensive technology. Nevertheless, bio-oils cannot be used directly as a transportation fuel without upgrading, since they are generally unstable, viscous, and acidic. Thus NREL and Petrobras intend to use their combined expertise to develop a two-step route to biofuels production: in the first step, a stable bio-oil is produced by NREL biomass pyrolysis technology, while in the second step it is upgraded by using two distinct catalytic processes under development by Petrobras. The first process converts bio-oil into gasoline, LPG, and fuel oil using the catalytic cracking process, while the second one, converts bio-oil into synthesis gas. Syngas gasification catalysts provided by both NREL and Petrobras will be tested. The work includes experiments at both sites to produce bio-oil and then biofuels, life-cycle analysis of each route, personnel training and development of analytical methods with a duration time of two years.

  13. Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Monitoring and Verifying CO2 Containment Final Report CRADA No. TC-2036-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ebrom, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This collaborative effort was in support of the CO2 Capture Project (CCP), to develop techniques that integrate overhead images of plant species, plant health, geological formations, soil types, aquatic, and human use spatial patterns for detection and discrimination of any CO2 releases from underground storage formations. The goal of this work was to demonstrate advanced hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing methods to assess potential leakage of CO2 from underground storage. The timeframes and scales relevant to the long-term storage of CO2 in the subsurface make remote sensing methods attractive. Moreover, it has been shown that individual field measurements of gas composition are subject to variability on extremely small temporal and spatial scales. The ability to verify ultimate reservoir integrity and to place individual surface measurements into context will be crucial to successful long-term monitoring and verification activities. The desired results were to produce a defined and tested procedure that could be easily used for long-term monitoring of possible CO2 leakage from underground CO2 sequestration sites. This testing standard will be utilized on behalf of the oil industry.

  14. Synthesis of a Novel Energetic Heterocyclic Oxidizer with Higher Energy and Lower Sensitivity (Phase 2) Final Report CRADA No. TC02125.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This project was a continuation of work originally performed under a Phase 1 of the Small Business Technology Transfer (STIR). The success of the Phase 1 led to the award of a Phase 2 of the STIR. In Phase 1 of the STIR, the target energetic compound, 3,4-bis(4-nitro-l,2,5- oxadiazol-3yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-l-oxide (DNTF), was synthesized at the 5g scale and small-scale safety tests were performed. DNTF showed promising performance· and safety properties. DNTF was shown to be relatively insensitive while performing better than the current industry standard, H1vIX, in solid propellant formulations. Because of the successful research and development project involving PSI, LLNL and Aerojet in Phase I of the STIR, the sponsors wanted to obtain larger quantities of DNTF for further testing.

  15. Portfolio-Scale Optimization of Customer Energy Efficiency Incentive and Marketing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-535

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackney, Larry J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-17

    North East utility National Grid (NGrid) is developing a portfolio-scale application of OpenStudio designed to optimize incentive and marketing expenditures for their energy efficiency (EE) programs. NGrid wishes to leverage a combination of geographic information systems (GIS), public records, customer data, and content from the Building Component Library (BCL) to form a JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) input file that is consumed by an OpenStudio-based expert system for automated model generation. A baseline model for each customer building will be automatically tuned using electricity and gas consumption data, and a set of energy conservation measures (ECMs) associated with each NGrid incentive program will be applied to the model. The simulated energy performance and return on investment (ROI) will be compared with customer hurdle rates and available incentives to A) optimize the incentive required to overcome the customer hurdle rate and B) determine if marketing activity associated with the specific ECM is warranted for that particular customer. Repeated across their portfolio, this process will enable NGrid to substantially optimize their marketing and incentive expenditures, targeting those customers that will likely adopt and benefit from specific EE programs.

  16. Optical Materials, Adhesive and Encapsulant, III-V, and Optical Characterization Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-216

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempe, M.

    2012-11-01

    SolFocus is currently developing solar technology for utility scale application using Winston collector based concentrating photovoltaics (CPV). Part of that technology development includes small mirror dishes and front surface reflectors, and bonding the separate parts to the assembly. Mirror panels must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. The reflective surfaces must demonstrate long term durability and maintain high reflectivity. Some bonded surfaces must maintain adhesion and transparency under high concentrations and high temperatures. Others will experience moderate temperatures and do not require transparency. NREL researchers have developed methods and tools that address these related areas.

  17. Development of a Bio-Equivalent Ultraviolet Dosimeter to Monitor the Capacity for Vitamin D Synthesis of Sunlight Final Report CRADA No. TC02086.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wood, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This project represents a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rhyolite Technology Group, Inc. (Rhyolite) to develop concepts and designs for a consumer ultraviolet (UV) biodosimeter based on the human biochemistry of Vitamin D synthesis. Rhyolite was established to engage in product development, licensing and consulting for the manufacture and supply of new products worldwide. Rhyolite worked jointly with LLNL and the Kiev Institute of Physics (KIP) in Ukraine to leverage previously developed UV sensor technologies by extending the previous work into commercially viable products. The project consisted primarily of the scientific, engineering and business activities needed to develop the UV bio-dosimeter for applications that include health and industrial measurement of ultraviolet radiation.

  18. Commercialization of LLNL Zinc Air Fuel Cell Technology For Stationary And Mobile Applications And Electromechanical Battery For Mobile Applications Final Report CRADA No. TC-1420-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarz, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cooper, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haley, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Utility deregulation is occurring throughout the world. Energy storage, peak demand leveling and power quality are becoming increasingly important. New, innovative costeffective methods are critical to the financial success or failure of utility companies in the new free market environment. The implementation of energy storage gives a utility the ability to better utilize existing generating capacity. Energy is stored in the periods of low overall demand and then the stored energy is connected to the power grid during peak demand periods. Storing energy in this manner will lead to significant economic benefits to utilities as well as their customers. Furthermore, because the utility's system is operated more efficiently there is a direct reduction in atmospheric pollutants including greenhouse gases.

  19. Evaluation of Novel Semiconductor Materials Potentially Useful in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, J.

    2010-07-01

    Evaluation of novel semiconductor materials potentially useful in solar cells. NREL will fabricate, test and analyze solar cells from EpiWorks' wafers produced in 2-3 separate growth campaigns. NREL will also characterize material from 2-3 separate EpiWorks material development campaigns. Finally, NREL will visit EpiWorks and help establish any necessary process, such as spectral CV measurements and III-V on Si metalization processes and help validate solar cell designs and performance.

  20. The Google High Power Density Inverter Prize: Innovation in PV Inverter Power Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-14-568

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Blake [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-08

    Google is encouraging development of advanced photovoltaic inverters with high power density by holding a public competition and offering a prize for the best performing high power developed. NREL will perform the performance and validation for all inverters entered into the competition and provide results to Google.

  1. Development and Demonstration of Grid Integration System for PEVs, ESS, and RE: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-515

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, Tony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    NREL and Ideal Power Converters (IPC) will jointly develop and demonstrate a hybrid power converter system integrating bi-directional electric vehicle charging, photovoltaic generation, and stationary battery storage using IPC's 3-Port Hybrid Converter. The organizations will also jointly investigate synergies in tightly integrating these separate power conversion systems.

  2. Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) with Industry as a Value Enhancing Asset in the Academic/Research Environment. A Case Study at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferraris, Guillermo L

    2005-01-01

    .... Although not technically a research laboratory, the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) is a federally funded research university that has developed an extensive sponsored program of Technology Transfer (T2...

  3. University of Colorado - Center for Research and Education in Wind (CREW): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-446

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Michael A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Enabled by petascale supercomputing, the next generation of computer models for wind energy will simulate a vast range of scales and physics, spanning from turbine structural dynamics and blade-scale turbulence to mesoscale atmospheric flow. A single model covering all scales and physics is not feasible. Thus, these simulations will require the coupling of different models/codes, each for different physics, interacting at their domain boundaries.

  4. Infrastructure, Components and System Level Testing and Analysis of Electric Vehicles: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-353

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J.

    2013-05-01

    Battery technology is critical for the development of innovative electric vehicle networks, which can enhance transportation sustainability and reduce dependence on petroleum. This cooperative research proposed by Better Place and NREL will focus on predicting the life-cycle economics of batteries, characterizing battery technologies under various operating and usage conditions, and designing optimal usage profiles for battery recharging and use.

  5. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate potentialities in terms of technology, raw materials and material and technical basis to set up a production of effective anti-corrosion preparations of new generation in Russia. During the four years of the project 228 compounds and formulations were synthesized and studied in respect to their corrosion inhibiting activity. A series of compounds which were according to the Bubble tests more efficient (by a factor of 10-100) than the reference inhibitor SXT-1102, some possessing the similar activity or slightly better activity than new inhibitor ??-1154? (company ONDEO/Nalco). Two synthetic routes for the synthesis of mercaptopyrimidines as perspective corrosion inhibitors were developed. Mercaptopyrimidine derivatives can be obtained in one or two steps from cheap and easily available precursors. The cost for their synthesis is not high and can be further reduced after the optimization of the production processes. A new approach for lignin utilization was proposed. Water-soluble derivative of lignin can by transformed to corrosion protective layer by its electropolymerization on a steel surface. Varying lignosulfonates from different sources, as well as conditions of electrooxidation we proved, that drop in current at high anodic potentials is due to electropolymerization of lignin derivative at steel electrode surface. The electropolymerization potential can be sufficiently decreased by an increase in ionic strength of the growing solution. The lignosulfonate electropolymerization led to the considerable corrosion protection effect of carbon steel. More than three times decrease of corrosion rate on steel surface was observed after lignosulfonate electropolymerization, exceeding protective effect of standard commercially available corrosion inhibitor. Solikamsky lignin could be a promising candidate as a base for the development of the future green corrosion inhibitor. A protective effect of isothiazolones in compositions with other biocides and inhibitors was investigated. Additionally to high biocidal properties, combination of kathon 893 and copper sulfate may also produce a strong anticorrosion effect depending on concentrations of the biocides. Based on its joint biocidal and anticorrosion properties, this combination can be recommended for protection of pipelines against carbon dioxide-induced corrosion. By means of linear polarization resistance test, corrosion properties of biocides of different classes were studied. Isothiazolones can be recommended for treating oil-processing waters in Tatarstan to curb carbon dioxide - induced corrosion. A laboratory research on evaluation of the efficiency of biocides, inhibitors and penetrants by biological and physical-and-chemical methods has been carried out. It was shown that action of corrosion inhibitors and biocides strongly depends on character of their interaction with mineral substances available in waters on oil-exploration sites. It was found that one of approaches to designing environmentally safe ('green') antimicrobial formulations may be the use of synergetic combinations, which allow one to significantly decrease concentrations of biocides. It was shown that the efficacy of biocides and inhibitors depends on physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Anticorrosion and antimicrobial effects of biocides and inhibitors depended in much on the type of medium and aeration regimen. Effects of different biocides, corrosion inhibitors. penetrants and their combinations on the biofilm were investigated. It has been shown that minimal inhibiting concentrations of the reagents for the biofilm are much higher than those for aquatic microorganisms. Results obtained from the research in stationary conditions have been confirmed with data from experiments carried out in hydrodynamic conditions. New approaches to the investigation of biocorrosive processes on the basis of bioluminescent method of intracellular ATP determination have been developed. Approaches and methods developed on the basis of bioluminescent method could significantly simplify the analysis of biocorrosion processes and allow to conduct the analysis directly under the field conditions in situ. An express method to assess biogenic sulfate reduction in soil and water samples has been elaborated. The method intends for field application and allows one to no-problem assess action of such harmful and corrosion provoking microorganisms, as sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  6. Demonstration of Laser Plasma X-Ray Source with X-Ray Collimator Final Report CRADA No. TC-1564-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Forber, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and JMAR Research, Inc. (JRI), was to demonstrate that LLNL x-ray collimators can effectively increase the wafer throughput of JRI's laser based x-ray lithography systems. The technical objectives were expected to be achieved by completion of the following tasks, which are separated into two task lists by funding source. The organization (LLNL or JMAR) having primary responsibility is given parenthetically for each task.

  7. A Compact, Portable, Reduced-Cost, Gamma Ray Spectroscopic System for Nuclear Verification Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1551-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavietes, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kalkhoran, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a compact gamma-ray spectroscopic system with better energy resolution and lower costs than scintillator-based detector systems for uranium enrichment analysis applications.

  8. Catalytic Depolymerization and Upgrading of Lignin for Vanillin Production: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-545

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Examine catalytic conversion of lignin using multifunctional catalysts that are able to depolymerize and oxidize lignin to a vanillin-rich stream. Examine separation processes for isolation of vanillin from product mixtures. Conduct preliminary experiments to determine if deconstructed lignin streams can be metabolized by Pseudomonas putida.

  9. Development of an Industry Dynamometer/Spin Test Facility--Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-164

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDade, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) owns and operates a megawatt-scale dynamometer used for testing wind turbine drive trains up to 1.5 megawatt (MW) in rated capacity. At this time, this unit is the only unit of its type in the United States, available for use by the American Wind Industry. Currently this dynamometer is heavily backlogged and unavailable to provide testing needed by various wind industry members. DOE/NREL is in possession of two critical pieces of equipment that may be used to develop an alternative Dynamometer facility, but does not have the funds or other resources necessary to develop such a facility. The Participant possesses complimentary facilities and infrastructure that when combined with the NREL equipment can create such a test facility. The Participant is also committed to expending funds to develop and operate such a facility to the subsequent benefit of the Wind Industry and DOE Wind Energy program. In exchange for DOE/NREL providing the critical equipment, the Participant will grant DOE/NREL a minimum of 90 days of testing time per year in the new facility while incurring no facilities fees.

  10. High Penetration Photovoltaic Power Electronics and Energy Management Technology Research, Development and Demonstration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-517

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudgins, Andrew P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., will partner with DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct research and development to demonstrate technologies that will increase the penetration of photovoltaic (PV) technologies for commercial and utility applications. Standard PV power control systems use simple control techniques that only provide real power to the grid. A focus of this partnership is to demonstrate how state of the art control and power electronic technologies can be combined to create a utility interactive control platform.

  11. Synthesis of a Novel Energetic Heterocyclic Oxidizer with Higher Energy and Lower Sensitivity Final Report CRADA No. TC02099.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Racoveanu, A. [Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MD (United States)

    2017-09-08

    The project involved the synthesis of 5g of a target energetic compound, 3,4-bis(5-nitro-1,2,5- oxadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-1-oxide (DNTF. The deliverables were the synthesis of 5g of DNTF along with quantities of the precursor compounds. In addition, small-scale safety tests on DNTF were performed, which to confirmed that DNTF has no undesirable safety properties before scaling up the synthesis in Phase II of this project.

  12. CRADA Final Report for NFE-08-01826: Development and application of processing and processcontrol for nano-composite materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, C.; Armstrong, B.; Maxey, C.; Sabau, A.; Wang, H.; Hagans, P. (A123 Systems, Inc.); and Babinec, S. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

    2012-12-15

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and A123 Systems, Inc. collaborated on this project to develop a better understanding, quality control procedures, and safety testing for A123 System’s nanocomposite separator (NCS) technology which is a cell based patented technology and separator. NCS demonstrated excellent performance. x3450 prismatic cells were shown to survive >8000 cycles (1C/2C rate) at room temperature with greater than 80% capacity retention with only NCS present as an alternative to conventional polyolefin. However, for a successful commercialization, the coating conditions required to provide consistent and reliable product had not been optimized and QC techniques for being able to remove defective material before incorporation into a cell had not been developed. The work outlined in this report addresses these latter two points. First, experiments were conducted to understand temperature profiles during the different drying stages of the NCS coating when applied to both anode and cathode. One of the more interesting discoveries of this study was the observation of the large temperature decrease experienced by the wet coating between the end of the infrared (IR) drying stage and the beginning of the exposure to the convection drying oven. This is not a desirable situation as the temperature gradient could have a deleterious effect on coating quality. Based on this and other experimental data a radiative transfer model was developed for IR heating that also included a mass transfer module for drying. This will prove invaluable for battery coating optimization especially where IR drying is being employed. A stress model was also developed that predicts that under certain drying conditions tensile stresses are formed in the coating which could lead to cracking that is sometimes observed after drying is complete. Prediction of under what conditions these stresses form is vital to improving coating quality. In addition to understanding the drying process other parameters such as slurry quality and equipment optimization were examined. Removal of particles and gels by filtering, control of viscosity by %solids and mixing adjustments, removal of trapped gas in the slurry and modification of coater speed and slot die gap were all found to be important for producing uniform and flaw-free coatings. Second, an in-line Hi-Pot testing method has been developed specifically for NCS that will enable detection of coating flaws that could lead to soft or hard electrical shorts within the cell. In this way flawed material can be rejected before incorporation into the cell thus greatly reducing the amount of scrap that is generated. Improved battery safety is an extremely important benefit of NCS. Evaluation of battery safety is usually accomplished by conducting a variety of tests including nail penetration, hot box, over charge, etc. For these tests entire batteries must be built but the resultant temperature and voltage responses reveal little about the breakdown mechanism. In this report is described a pinch test which is used to evaluate NCS quality at various stages including coated anode and cathode as well as assembled cell. Coupled with post-microscopic examination of the damaged ‘pinch point’ test data can assist in the coating optimization from an improved end-use standpoint. As a result of this work two invention disclosures, one for optimizing drying methodology and the other for an in-line system for flaw detection, have been filed. In addition, 2 papers are being written for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

  13. CRADA with Teledyne Electronic Technologies and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-096): The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system. Final letter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the ``Exposure-to- Risk`` monitoring system in an actual occupational environment. The system is a unique combination of existing hardware with proprietary software to create an integrated means of assessing occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds. One component of this system utilizes a portable mass spectrometer developed by Teledyne Electronic Technologies. Integration of the system was accomplished under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. Commercialization of the system will take place following demonstration in an actual occupational environment, and will include, in part, Teledyne Electronic Technologies. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system will benefit DOE by overcoming present-day limitations in worker health protection monitoring. There are numerous sites within the` DOE complex where many different hazardous chemicals are used on a routine basis. These chemicals range from paint stripers and cleaning solvents to chemical warfare agents, each having its own degree of potential adverse health risk to a worker. Thus, a real concern for DOE is to ensure that a worker is properly monitored to assess any adverse health risk from exposure to potentially hazardous chemicals. With current industrial hygiene technologies, this is an arduous task. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system integrates a patented breath-inlet device connecting a subject`s exhaled breath directly with a field-portable mass spectrometer with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to estimate the target tissue dose following a chemical exposure. Estimation of the adverse health risk prediction follows from the exposure/dose calculation based on currently accepted methodologies. This new system can determine, in the field, the possible adverse health risks on a daily basis to an individual worker.

  14. Experimental investigation of in situ cleanable HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), High Level Waste Division, Tanks Focus Area, and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have been investigating high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters which can be regenerated or cleaned in situ as an alternative to conventional disposable HEPA filters. This technical report documents concerns pertaining to conventional HEPA filters

  15. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1998-01-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)

  16. Proceedings of the Conference on Industry Partnerships to Deploy Environmental Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-01-01

    Three goals were accomplished at the meeting: review of the latest environmental and waste-management technologies being developed under FETC sponsorship; addressing the accomplishments in, and barriers affecting, private-sector development of these technologies; and laying the groundwork for future technology development initiatives and opportunities.

  17. High Performance Parallel Processing Project: Industrial computing initiative. Progress reports for fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koniges, A.

    1996-02-09

    This project is a package of 11 individual CRADA`s plus hardware. This innovative project established a three-year multi-party collaboration that is significantly accelerating the availability of commercial massively parallel processing computing software technology to U.S. government, academic, and industrial end-users. This report contains individual presentations from nine principal investigators along with overall program information.

  18. 78 FR 8544 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS): Cooperative Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... studies, long term toxicity studies, process chemistry and other pre-clinical development studies needed...): Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) and Licensing Opportunity for Small Molecule Agonists... seeking Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners to collaborate in the final stages...

  19. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Fourth Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-12-02

    This quarterly report summarizes the status of the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The final CRADA documents processed by PNNL’s Legal Services were submitted to all the parties for signatures.

  20. Energy and Technology Review, August--September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, J A [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review focuses on cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs)-one of the Laboratory's most effective means of technology transfer. The first article chronicles the legislative evolution of these agreements. The second article examines the potential beneficial effects of CRADAs on the national economy and discusses their role in the development and marketing of Laboratory technologies. The third article provides information on how to initiate and develop CRADAs at LLNL, and the fourth and fifth articles describe the Laboratory's two most prominent technology transfer projects. One is a 30-month CRADA with General Motors to develop advanced lasers for cutting, welding, and heat-treating operations. The cover photograph shows this laser cutting through a piece of steel 1/16 of an inch thick. The other project is a three-year CRADA with Amoco, Chevron-Conoco, and Unocal to refine our oil shale retorting process.

  1. CRADA final report: Technical assessment of roll-to-roll operation of lamination process, thermal treatment, and alternative carbon fiber precursors for low-cost, high-efficiency manufacturing of flow battery stacks and other energy devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Madden, Thomas [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Wood III, David L [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Warrington, Curtis [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL; Manson, Hunter [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Smith, Mark A [ORNL; Lu, Yuan [ORNL; Loretz, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2015-09-23

    Among the various stationary-storage technologies under development, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer the greatest potential to deliver inexpensive, scalable, and efficient grid-scale electrical-energy storage. Unlike traditional sealed batteries, in a flow battery power and energy are decoupled. Cell area and cell count in the stack determine the device power, and the chemical storage volume determines the total energy. Grid-scale energy-storage applications require megawatt-scale devices, which require the assembly of hundreds of large-area, bipolar cells per power plant. The cell-stack is the single system component with the largest impact on capital cost (due to the large number of highly engineered components) and operating costs (determined by overall round-trip efficiency).

  2. Mitigating Interconnection Challenges of the High Penetration Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic (PV) in the Electrical Distribution Systems: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-563

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Various interconnection challenges exist when connecting distributed PV into the electrical distribution grid in terms of safety, reliability, and stability of the electric power systems. Some of the urgent areas for research, as identified by inverter manufacturers, installers and utilities, are potential for transient overvoltage from PV inverters, multi-inverter anti-islanding, impact of smart inverters on volt-VAR support, impact of bidirectional power flow, and potential for distributed generation curtailment solutions to mitigate grid stability challenges. Under this project, NREL worked with SolarCity to address these challenges through research, testing and analysis at the Energy System Integration Facility (ESIF). Inverters from different manufacturers were tested at ESIF and NREL's unique power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) capability was utilized to evaluate various system-level impacts. Through the modeling, simulation, and testing, this project eliminated critical barriers on high PV penetration and directly supported the Department of Energy's SunShot goal of increasing the solar PV on the electrical grid.

  3. Closeout of CRADA JSA 2012S004: Chapter 5, Integrated Control System, of the document of the ESS Conceptual Design Report, publicly available at https://europeanspallationsource.se/accelerator-documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-04-22

    The integrated control system (ICS) is responsible for the whole ESS machine and facility: accelerator, target, neutron scattering instruments and conventional facilities. This unified approach keeps the costs of development, maintenance and support relatively low. ESS has selected a standardised, field-proven controls framework, the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which was originally developed jointly by Argonne and Los Alamos National Laboratories. Complementing this selection are best practices and experience from similar facilities regarding platform standardisation, control system development and device integration and commissioning. The components of ICS include the control system core, the control boxes, the BLED database management system, and the human machine interface. The control system core is a set of systems and tools that make it possible for the control system to provide required data, information and services to engineers, operators, physicists and the facility itself. The core components are the timing system that makes possible clock synchronisation across the facility, the machine protection system (MPS) and the personnel protection system (PPS) that prevent damage to the machine and personnel, and a set of control system services. Control boxes are servers that control a collection of equipment (for example a radio frequency cavity). The integrated control system will include many control boxes that can be assigned to one supplier, such as an internal team, a collaborating institute or a commercial vendor. This approach facilitates a clear division of responsibilities and makes integration much easier. A control box is composed of a standardised hardware platform, components, development tools and services. On the top level, it interfaces with the core control system components (timing, MPS, PPS) and with the human-machine interface. At the bottom, it interfaces with the equipment and parts of the facility through a set of analog and digital signals, real-time control loops and other communication buses. The ICS central data management system is named BLED (beam line element databases). BLED is a set of databases, tools and services that is used to store, manage and access data. It holds vital control system configuration and physics-related (lattice) information about the accelerator, target and instruments. It facilitates control system configuration by bringing together direct input-output controller (IOC) con guration and real-time data from proton and neutron beam line models. BLED also simplifies development and speeds up the code-test-debug cycle. The set of tools that access BLED will be tailored to the needs of different categories of users, such as ESS staff physicists, engineers, and operators; external partner laboratories; and visiting experimental instrument users. The human-machine interface is vital to providing a high-quality experience to ICS users. It encompasses a wide array of devices and software tools, from control room screens to engineer terminal windows; from beam physics data tools to post-mortem data analysis tools. It serves users with a wide range of skills from widely varied backgrounds. The Controls Group is developing a set of user profiles to accommodate this diverse range of use-cases and users.

  4. 32 X 2.5 Gb/s Optical Code Division Multiplexing (O-CDM) For Agile Optical Networking (Phase II) Final Report CRADA No. TC02051.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mendez, A. J. [Mendez R & D Associates, El Segundo, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Mendez R & D Associates (MRDA) to develop and demonstrate a reconfigurable and cost effective design for optical code division multiplexing (O-CDM) with high spectral efficiency and throughput, as applied to the field of distributed computing, including multiple accessing (sharing of communication resources) and bidirectional data distribution in fiber-to-the-premise (FTTx) networks.

  5. Micro-fluidic (Lab-on the- Chip) PCR Array Cartridge for Biological Screening in a Hand Held Device: FInal Report for CRADA no 264. PNNL-T2-258-RU with CombiMatrix Corp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.

    2010-10-31

    The worldwide emergence of both new and old diseases resulting from human expansion and also human and materials mobility has and will continue to place stress on both medical and clinical diagnostics. The classical approach to bioagents detection involves the use of differential metabolic assays to determine species type in the case of most bacteria, or the use of cell culture and electron microscopy to diagnose viruses and some bacteria that are intracellular parasites. The long-term goal in bioagent detection is to develop a hand-held instrument featuring disposable cartridges which contain all the necessary reagents, reaction chambers, waste chambers, and micro-fluidics to extract, concentrate, amplify, and analyze nucleic acids. This GIPP project began development of a sensory platform using nucleic-acid based probes. Although research was not completed, initial findings indicated that an advanced sensing device could theoretically be built on a DNA/RNA-based technology platform.

  6. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantage Jet Fuel: Catalytic Conversion of Corn Stover to Energy Dense, Low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Rick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-04

    NREL will provide scientific and engineering support to Virent Energy Systems in three technical areas: Process Development/Biomass Deconstruction; Catalyst Fundamentals; and Technoeconomic Analysis. The overarching objective of this project is to develop the first fully integrated process that can convert a lignocellulosic feedstock (e.g., corn stover) efficiently and cost effectively to a mix of hydrocarbons ideally suited for blending into jet fuel. The proposed project will investigate the integration of Virent Energy System’s novel aqueous phase reforming (APR) catalytic conversion technology (BioForming®) with deconstruction technologies being investigated by NREL at the 1-500L scale. Corn stover was chosen as a representative large volume, sustainable feedstock.

  7. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  8. Galfenol Energy Harvesting Device Proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lograsso, Thomas [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Jones, Lawrence [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Xing, Qingfeng [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-06-29

    This CRADA involved an integrated approach of synthesizing Fe-Ga (Galfenol) powder using high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) and 3D printing via laser engineered net shaping (LENS) processing to produce free standing magnetostricitve sensors.

  9. Ion Implantation Processing Technologies for Telecommunications Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, T E

    2000-05-01

    The subject CRADA was a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies (formerly AT and T Bell Laboratories) to explore the development of ion implantation technologies for silicon integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing.

  10. GREEN REACTION CHEMISTRIES PERFORMED IN THE SST REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Kreido Laboratories have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) collaboration, to develop and commercialize green and sustainable chemistries in the area of industrial chemical synthesis. Uti...

  11. GREEN REACTION CHEMISTRIES PERFORMED IN THE SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE (STT) REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Kreido Laboratories have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) collaboration, to develop and commercialize green and sustainable chemistries in the area of industrial chemical synthesis. Utilizi...

  12. The Federal Energy Technology Center annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-31

    A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at environmental, safety, and health requirements and risks was initiated in 1997 and will be completed in late 1999 or early 2000. The primary objective of the program is to identify or develop a set of standards that, when implemented, provides reasonable assurance that the health and safety of the workers, public, and the environment will be protected during the performance of the work. In conjunction with the Directives Program, the use of the voluntary environmental management system, ISO 14000, was evaluated. This includes the only environmental management standard to which an entity can be registered. Plans are to consider the specifications and guidance from this standard in the identification of an effective environmental management system for the merged FETC sites. A performance measurement system continued to be maintained during 1998 to assist in evaluating how effectively activities at FETC meet mission-critical goals and how well missions and strategies are connected in the DOE strategic plan. This system also provides data to assist in gauging performance against the DOE critical success factors, that is, performance against technical objectives. Various environmental milestones can be tracked to completion, thus giving the FETC measures by which to gauge the site's goals of remaining in regulatory compliance and achieving best-in-class environmental performance.

  13. Technology Transfer Opportunities: On-Demand Printing in Support of National Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the 3M Company of St. Paul, Minnesota, have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to investigate maps-on-demand technology to support the production of USGS mapping products. The CRADA will potentially help the USGS to develop on-demand alternatives to lithographic maps and help 3M to develop a series of commercial instant map-printing systems.

  14. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  15. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Third Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-08-06

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The CRADA documents have been processed by PNNL Legal Services that is also coordinating the revision effort with the industrial parties to address DOE’s comments.

  16. Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-19

    DOE established policies to ensure that Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) enhance US competitiveness in the world economy, provide a reasonable return on resources invested, and enable successful commercialization of technologies developed. DOE`s Office of Technology Partnerships issued a General Guidance Memorandum to DOE operations offices establishing policy goals for technology transfer programs, including CRADAS. Our audit disclosed that efforts to manage CRADAs at three national laboratories did not fully achieve DOE`s policy goals outlined in the General Guidance Memorandum. Specifically, the audit showed that: (1) joint work statements did not always contain clearly defined information that allowed DOE to facilitate technology transfer or to evaluate CRADAs potential benefits; (2) CRADA statements of work did not always contain adequate documentation or address potential benefits; (3) the national laboratories reviewed did not have effective mechanisms for continuous self-appraisal or measures of overall program success; and (4) CRADA provisions did not exist to ensure an accurate evaluation of partner contributions.

  17. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-01

    The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of automated fault de4tection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction, and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: 1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, 2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and 3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations.

  18. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    1999-07-29

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  19. Desulfurization Sorbents for Transport-Bed Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Vierheilig, Albert A.

    1997-01-01

    This project extends the prior work on the development of fluidizable zinc titanate particles using a spray-drying technique to impart high reactivity and attrition resistance. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop highly reactive and attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbents in 40- to 150-(micro)m particle size range for transport reactor applications; (2) To transfer sorbent production technology to private sector; and (3) To provide technical support to Sierra Pacific Clean Coal Technology Demonstration plant and FETC's Hot-Gas Desulfurization Process Development Unit (PDU), both employing a transport reactor system

  20. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  1. Feasability Study and Protocol Development for Manufacturing of a Veterinarian Drug Using Local Plant Sources as Raw Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, B. H.; Kuritz, T.

    2006-08-28

    This CRADA was a collaborative effort between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sass & Sass, Inc. It also had involvement with the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) The CRADA focused on the development and commercialization in the U.S. of the substance developed in Russia with potential veterinary applications. The project addressed validation and further characterization of the lead substance necessary for its commercialization in the U.S. market as a veterinarian biologic and at the commercialization of the product for the Russian market, by the Russian group establishing of sustainability of the Russian research groups.

  2. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  3. Automated feature extraction and classification from image sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Unisys Corporation have completed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to explore automated feature extraction and classification from image sources. The CRADA helped the USGS define the spectral and spatial resolution characteristics of airborne and satellite imaging sensors necessary to meet base cartographic and land use and land cover feature classification requirements and help develop future automated geographic and cartographic data production capabilities. The USGS is seeking a new commercial partner to continue automated feature extraction and classification research and development.

  4. Isolation, Preliminary Characterization and Preliminary Assessment of Scale-Up Potential of Photosynthetic Microalgae for the Production of Both Biofuels and Bio-Active Molecules in the U.S. and Canada: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-372

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienkos, P.

    2012-09-01

    Combustion flue gases are a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere, a factor that has been linked to the possible global climate change. It is, therefore, critical to begin thinking seriously about ways to reduce this influx into the atmosphere. Using carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion as a feedstock for the growth, photosynthetic microorganisms can provide a large sink for carbon assimilation as well as a feedstock for the production of significant levels of biofuels. Combining microalgal farming with fossil fuel energy production has great potential to diminish carbon dioxide releases into the atmosphere, as well as contribute to the production of biofuels (e.g., biodiesel, renewable diesel and gasoline and jet fuel) as well as valuable co-products such as animal feeds and green chemicals. CO2 capture may be a regulatory requirement in future new coal or natural gas power plants and will almost certainly become an opportunity for commerce, the results of such studies may provide industries in the US and Canada with both regulatory relief and business opportunities as well as the ability to meet environmental and regulatory requirements, and to produce large volumes of fuels and co-products.

  5. Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

    1997-12-31

    Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science {ampersand} Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997.

  6. DOE EM industry programs robotics development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staubly, R.; Kothari, V.

    1998-01-01

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) manages an aggressive program for RD and D, as well as testing and evaluation for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) organization. The goal is to develop new and improved environmental restoration and waste management technologies to clean up the inventory of the DOE weapons complex faster, safer, and cheaper than is possible with currently available technologies. Robotic systems reduce worker exposure to the absolute minimum, while providing proven, cost-effective, and, for some applications, the only acceptable technique for addressing challenging problems. Development of robotic systems for remote operations occurs in three main categories: tank waste characterization and retrieval; decontamination and dismantlement; and characterization, mapping, and inspection systems. In addition, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has some other projects which fall under the heading of supporting R and D. The central objective of all FETC robotic projects is to make robotic systems more attractive by reducing costs and health risks associated with the deployment of robotic technologies in the cleanup of the nuclear weapons complex. This will be accomplished through development of robots that are cheaper, faster, safer, and more reliable, as well as more straightforward to modify/adapt and more intuitive to operate with autonomous capabilities and intelligent controls that prevent accidents and optimize task execution

  7. Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

    1997-01-01

    Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science ampersand Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997

  8. Virginia Tech, Navy center sign cooperative research and development agreement

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Almost a year of discussions has resulted in a five-year, $7.5 million indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Virginia Tech and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD).

  9. 77 FR 1708 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Technology To Provide Wireless Precise Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... ``Actions'' column. If you do not have access to the Internet, you may view the docket online by visiting... technology or services. Since the goal of this CRADA is to identify and investigate the advantages, disadvantages, performance, costs, and other issues associated with using alternative wireless time technology...

  10. 78 FR 52941 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Next Generation Arctic Navigational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2013-0799] Cooperative Research and... to enter into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Marine Exchange of Alaska... their voyage risks, as they transit the remote and hostile waters of the U.S. Arctic Exclusive Economic...

  11. The Use of Adjuvant Nutrition to Preserve and Increase Lean Body Mass in AIDS Patients with Muscle Wasting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-01-03

    The studies conducted under this CRADA were aimed at determining if nutritional supplementation with HMb, in combination with glutamine and arginine can ameliorate the AIDS-associated wasting syndrome and in turn improve the clinical course of the disease.

  12. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    PI Dr. Douglas Knittel o Andrews Air Force Base, Site PI Dr. Katie Kanzler o Fort Campbell, Site PI Dr. Joseph Wise  The IRB and CRADA processes...Festinger, D.S., Kirby , K.C., Rubenstein, D.F., Platt, J.J., 1998. Congruence of the MCMI-II and MCMI-III in cocaine dependence. Journal of Personality

  13. Glycobiology in yeast: production of bio-ative biopolymers and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheller, Henrik [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The accomplished goals of the CRADA were the establishment of a yeast strain capable of producing levels of vanillin suitable for commercial production and the identification of novel glycosyltransferases to construct the biosynthetic pathway of a gum Arabic-variant in yeast.

  14. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 605 - The Energy Research Program Office Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. (f) Advanced Energy Projects The...; and cost-shared technology research, especially CRADAs to advance precompetitive research projects to... plasma pressure; the investigation of plasma interaction with radio-frequency waves; and the study and...

  15. SUPPORT FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE ARM PROJECT AND DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE GWIS MODEL FOR A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. DAVID MARTIN; MARK B. MURPHY - STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES, LLC

    1999-12-31

    Strategic Technology Resources, L.L.C. (STR) provided work for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in response to Request for Proposal 005BZ0019-35. The objectives of the work in this project were to: (1) support the completion of the Advanced Reservoir Management (ARM) cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) LA9502037, and (2) support the development of a field demonstration of the LANL-developed Global Weapons Information System (GWIS) model for virtual enterprises. The second objective was contingent upon DOE approval of the Advanced Information Management (AIM) CRADA. At the request of the LANL Technical Representative, the project was granted a no-cost extension to November 30, 1999. As part of the project, STR provided managerial support for the ARM CRADA by: (1) assessing the data resources of the participating companies, (2) facilitating the transfer of technical data to LANL, (3) preparing reports, (4) managing communications between the parties to the ARM CRADA, and (5) assisting with the dissemination of information between the parties to technical professional societies and trade associations. The first phase of the current project was to continue to engage subcontractors to perform tasks in the ARM CRADA for which LANL expertise was lacking. All of the ARM field studies required of the project were completed, and final reports for all of the project studies are appended to this final report. The second phase of the current project was to support the field demonstration of the GWIS model for virtual enterprises in an oilfield setting. STR developed a hypertext Webpage that describes the concept and implementation of a virtual enterprise for reservoir management in the petroleum industry. Contents of the hypertext document are included in this report on the project.

  16. Rotary peening with captive shot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    Roto Peen with captive shot removes coatings and surface contamination from concrete floors. The objective of treating radioactively contaminated concrete floors during the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) process is to reduce the surface contamination levels to meet regulatory criteria for unrestricted use. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Chicago Operations office and DOE's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) jointly sponsored a Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial D and D technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. As part of the LSDP, roto Peen with captive shot was demonstrated March 17--20, 1997, to treat a 20 x 25 ft area of radioactively contaminated concrete floor on the service level of the CP-5 building

  17. SYNTHESIS OF METHACRYLATES FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, B.W.L.; Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.

    1999-12-01

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel have developed a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy/Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC). This project has resulted in five US patents (four already published and one pending publication). It has served as the basis for the technical and economic assessment of the production of this high-volume intermediate from coal-derived synthesis gas. The three-step process consists of the synthesis of a propionate from ethylene carbonylation using coal-derived CO, condensation of the propionate with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA); and esterification of MAA with methanol to yield MMA. The first two steps, propionate synthesis and condensation catalysis, are the key technical challenges and the focus of the research presented here.

  18. Aperture center energy showcase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  19. Results of combustion and emissions testing when co-firing blends of binder-enhanced densified refuse-derived fuel (b-dRDF) pellets and coal in a 440 MW{sub e} cyclone fired combustor. Volume 3: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, O.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the data resulting from the co-firing of b-dRDF pellets and coal in a 440-MW{sub e} cyclone-fired combustor. These tests were conducted under a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The CRADA partners included the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Otter Tail Power Company, Green Isle Environmental, Inc., XL Recycling Corporation, and Marblehead Lime Company. The report is made up of three volumes. This volume contains other supporting information, along with quality assurance documentation and safety and test plans. With this multi-volume approach, readers can find information at the desired level of detail, depending on individual interest or need.

  20. Follow-On Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: MFIX to FLUENT Technology Transfer and Validation Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamlal, Madhava [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Guenther, Chris [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); O' Brien, Thomas J. [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Benyahia, Sofiane [Fluent Inc., New York, NY (United States); Shi, Shaoping [Fluent Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes the effort by NETL and Fluent on the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement No. 00-F039 signed in May 2000. The objective of the CRADA was to transfer technology from NETL's MFIX code into the commercial software FLUENT so as to increase the computational speed, accuracy, and utility of FLUENT. During the period of this CRADA MFIX was used to develop granular flow theories and used for simulating gas-solids chemical reactors. The FLUENT and MFIX predictions were compared with each other and with experimental data generated at NETL. The granular kinetic theory in FLUENT was improved as a result of this work, and a gas-solids reaction (ozone decomposition) was used as a test case for the gas-solids chemical reaction capability in FLUENT. Also, under a separate project, work has begun to transfer the coal combustion and gasification model in MFIX to FLUENT.

  1. Physical and Chemical Sciences Center: Research briefs. Volume 9-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vook, F.L.; Samara, G.A. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    As Sandia National Laboratories and the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center develop an increasingly diverse set of customers, research partners, and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s) with industry, there is a need for providing more concise information describing the technical achievements and capabilities. This publication, Research Briefs, is designed to inform the present and potential partners in research and technology advancement. The research emphasizes semiconductor physics, electronic materials, surface physics and chemistry, plasma and chemical processing sciences, lasers and optics, vision science, ion-solid interactions and defect physics, and advanced materials physics. The specific programs pursued are driven by the research goals which are greatly influenced by interactions with the government and industrial customers.

  2. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1 was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  3. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-05-30

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to complete all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the second quarter (1/1/2013 to 3/31/2013), all the technical and legal documents for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. The revised CRADA documents were sent to DOE, Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners’ Legal counterparts for completing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was revised and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  4. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-04-04

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to initiate all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the first quarter (10/1/2012 to 12/31/2012), the statements of work (SOW) for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. A draft of the CRADA SOW was sent to Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners’ Legal counterparts for preparing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was drafted and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  5. Development of a modular integrated control architecture for flexible manipulators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Battiston, G.

    1994-01-01

    In April 1994, ORNL and SPAR completed the joint development of a manipulator controls architecture for flexible structure controls under a CRADA between the two organizations. The CRADA project entailed design and development of a new architecture based upon the Modular Integrated Control Architecture (MICA) previously developed by ORNL. The new architecture, dubbed MICA-II, uses an object-oriented coding philosophy to provide a highly modular and expandable architecture for robotic manipulator control. This architecture can be readily ported to control of many different manipulator systems. The controller also provides a user friendly graphical operator interface and display of many forms of data including system diagnostics. The capabilities of MICA-II were demonstrated during oscillation damping experiments using the Flexible Beam Experimental Test Bed at Hanford

  6. Embedding Cognitive Systems into Systems Engineering Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Task Analysis • Hi-Lo • Interacting Cognitive Subsystems Analysis • KADS • PARI • RPD • Semiotic Models • Skill-Based CTA • Sub-Goal Template...CRADA abandoned on Navy side. Andre Valente, PhD Chief Operating Officer Tactical Language and Culture Dr. Valente was interested in exploring...Winters Impacts of education and training segregation on language and practice Methods for successfully bridging the multiple disciplines (domains

  7. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  8. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  9. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None listed

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  10. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  11. Assessment of Asphalt Concrete Reinforcement Grid in Flexible Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials CBR California Bearing Ratio CRREL Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory CRADA...strength correlated to the California Bearing Ratio (CBR), as shown in Figure 16. The CBR data is plotted with depth to determine soil strength and the...investigation and non- destructive testing using a falling weight deflectometer. Field testing was conducted when both air temperatures were above 50°F

  12. Value Proposition of Department of Defense Domestic Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Diathermy Naval Medical Research Center ReGear Life Sciences, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA CRADA/PLA Complete Replacement Chassis Stock System for Firearms...Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Sage International, Ltd., Oscoda, MI PLA Complete Retractable Grappling Hook Army Natick Soldier Research...Laser Technology Army Night Vision Laboratory Scientific Materials (now owned by FLIR Systems), Bozeman, MT PLA Replacement Chassis Stock System for

  13. Advanced high temperature superconductor film-based process using RABiTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, A.; Hawsey, R.A.; Hack, J.; Moon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor), Managing contractor for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Midwest Superconductivity, Inc. (MSI) and Westinghouse Science and Electric Company (WEC) was to develop the basis for a commercial process for the manufacturing of superconducting tape based on the RABiTS technology developed at ORNL. The chosen method for deposition of YBCO films on RABiTS was Metal Organic chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD)

  14. Develop Roll-to-Roll Manufacturing Process of ZrO2 Nanocrystals/Acrylic Nanocomposites for High Refractive Index Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Pooran C [ORNL; Compton, Brett G [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and evaluate ZrO2/acrylic nanocomposite coatings for integrated optoelectronic applications. The formulations engineered to be compatible with roll-to-roll process were evaluated in terms of optical and dielectric properties. The uniform distribution of the ZrO2 nanocrystals in the polymer matrix resulted in highly tunable refractive index and dielectric response suitable for advanced photonic and electronic device applications.

  15. Military Children’s Perceptions of Parents’ Frequent Missile Base Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP); Defense Medical Research & Development Program (DMRDP): NIH; Congressionally Directed Medical Research...PUBLICATION OR PRESENTATION THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (CRADA), MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT (MTA), INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY...8217• ·𔃻~ ti1ci’’-" Missile Base Deployments: Impact on Military Children Col Deborah Jones, CPNP; Sandra Thomas, PhD,RN, FAAN; Col Brenda Morgan

  16. New Aqueous Binders for Lithium-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Andrew N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Krumdick, Gregory K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Trask, Stephen E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Polzin, Bryant J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Lu, Wenquan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Kahvecioglu Feridun, Ozge [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Hellring, Stuart D. [PPG Industries, Inc., Allison Park, PA (United States); Stewart, Matthew [PPG Industries, Inc., Allison Park, PA (United States); Kornish, Brian [PPG Industries, Inc., Allison Park, PA (United States)

    2016-12-22

    This final report summarizes the research effort of the CRADA between PPG Industries and Argonne National Laboratory (CRADA # C1400501 and Amendment 1 - ACK 85C11, Rev. 1), and completes the requirements of Task #5 in the CRADA. The results from Argonne represent a combined effort between the MERF and CAMP Facility (Materials Engineering Research Facility and the Cell Analysis, Modeling and Prototyping Facility). The key points of this report can be briefly summarized as: The multicomponent aqueous binder for NCM cathodes developed by PPG shows promising results when used on the CAMP Facility’s pilot-scale coater; NCM523 cathode electrodes exposed to water exhibit a voltage anomaly in the first two formation cycles that appears to have little effect on the material capacity, but needs to be explored further; the experimental LFP electrode produced by PPG does cycle electrochemically, but with reduced capacity and an uncharacteristic voltage profile; there is no obvious correlation between the pH and zeta-potential of materials that are commonly used in the lithium-ion battery; lithium ions are more readily dissolved out of NCM523 by water than the transition metals (by two orders of magnitude), and suggests that the plating bath may need to be spiked with a lithium salt; the approach of creating sub-micron size NCM523 particles via ball milling results in a cathode material with poor electrochemical performance.

  17. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  18. LiverTox: Advanced QSAR and Toxicogeomic Software for Hepatotoxicity Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P-Y.; Yuracko, K. (YAHSGS, LLC)

    2011-02-25

    YAHSGS LLC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established a CRADA in an attempt to develop a predictive system using a pre-existing ORNL computational neural network and wavelets format. This was in the interest of addressing national needs for toxicity prediction system to help overcome the significant drain of resources (money and time) being directed toward developing chemical agents for commerce. The research project has been supported through an STTR mechanism and funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences beginning Phase I in 2004 (CRADA No. ORNL-04-0688) and extending Phase II through 2007 (ORNL NFE-06-00020). To attempt the research objectives and aims outlined under this CRADA, state-of-the-art computational neural network and wavelet methods were used in an effort to design a predictive toxicity system that used two independent areas on which to base the system’s predictions. These two areas were quantitative structure-activity relationships and gene-expression data obtained from microarrays. A third area, using the new Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) technology to assess gene expression, also was attempted but had to be dropped because the company holding the rights to this promising MPSS technology went out of business. A research-scale predictive toxicity database system called Multi-Intelligent System for Toxicogenomic Applications (MISTA) was developed and its feasibility for use as a predictor of toxicological activity was tested. The fundamental focus of the CRADA was an attempt and effort to operate the MISTA database using the ORNL neural network. This effort indicated the potential that such a fully developed system might be used to assist in predicting such biological endpoints as hepatotoxcity and neurotoxicity. The MISTA/LiverTox approach if eventually fully developed might also be useful for automatic processing of microarray data to predict modes of action. A technical paper describing the

  19. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, S.; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-30

    Operational faults are pervasive across the commercial buildings sector, wasting energy and increasing energy costs by up to about 30% (Mills 2009, Liu et al. 2003, Claridge et al. 2000, Katipamula and Brambley 2008, and Brambley and Katipamula 2009). Automated fault detection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools provide capabilities essential for detecting and correcting these problems and eliminating the associated energy waste and costs. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technology Program (BTP) has previously invested in developing and testing of such diagnostic tools for whole-building (and major system) energy use, air handlers, chillers, cooling towers, chilled-water distribution systems, and boilers. These diagnostic processes can be used to make the commercial buildings more energy efficient. The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of AFDD tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: (1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, (2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and (3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations. PNNL has previously developed two diagnostic tools: (1) whole building energy (WBE) diagnostician and (2) outdoor air/economizer (OAE) diagnostician. WBE diagnostician is currently licensed non-exclusively to one company. As part of this CRADA, PNNL developed implementation documentation and provided technical support to KGS to implement the tool into their software suite, Clockworks

  20. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  1. Investigation of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} production and mitigation in compressed SF{sub 6}-insulated power systems. Final report, Volume 1: Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauers, I.; Griffin, G.D.; James, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brunt, R.J. Van; Olthoff, J.K.; Stricklett, K.L. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Morrison, H.D.; Chu, F.Y. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Frechette, M.F. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    A CRADA was established in 1991 to study the production and mitigation of S{sub 2}F{sub 10}, one of a number of toxic by-products formed by electrical discharges in the insulating gas SF{sub 6}. Since compressed SF{sub 6} is extensively used as an insulation and current interruption medium in electric power equipment, ensuring the safe operation and maintenance of this equipment is an important issue for utilities, government agencies, and manufacturers. Each of the three research laboratories developed a highly sensitive detection method for S{sub 2}F{sub 10}: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gas chromatography/cryogenic enrichment (less than 10 ppbv sensitivity); (2) National Institute of Standards and Technology, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/thermal conversion (less than 10 ppbv); (3) Ontario Hydro Technologies, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) (less than 100 ppbv). Studies showed that S{sub 2}F{sub 10} can be produced in the laboratory by corona, spark, and power arc discharges and that the production rates for each type of discharge decrease in that same respective order. In power arcs, SOF{sub 2} is by far the dominant species. The field survey provided baseline data and demonstrated the feasibility of taking and analyzing field samples using the techniques developed under this CRADA. It was found that in power arcs the amount of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} produced is relatively insignificant compared to the amount of the SOF{sub 2} produced. The knowledge gained from this CRADA should also be beneficial for the development of routine procedures for gas analysis, so that analysis of the decomposition products of SF{sub 6} will become a standard method for addressing the issues of health and safety, equipment reliability and aging, and diagnostics for GIS (Gas-Insulated Substations).

  2. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  3. Graphical Environmental Tools for Application to Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radford, D.C.; Blair, M.; Pauly, S., Todd, R.

    2007-05-25

    In this CRADA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assisted RIS Corporation of Knoxville, TN, in the development of graphical environment tools for the development and programming of high speed real-time algorithms to be implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The primary application was intended to be digital signal processing for gamma-ray spectroscopy, in particular for Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays such as the GRETINA project. Key components of this work included assembling an evaluation platform to verify designs on actual hardware, and creating various types of Simulink functional blocks for peak-shaping and constant-fraction discrimination.

  4. Staff exchange with Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute (SIRTI), final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in U.S. industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms.

  5. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Final Report for Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Number ORNL93-0237 Adhesive Bonding Technologies for Automotive Structural Composites; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. The research undertaken under this CRADA addresses the following areas of importance: bulk material characterization, structural fracture mechanics, modeling/characterization, process control and nondestructive evaluation (PC/NDE), manufacturing demonstration, and advanced processing. For the bulk material characterization task, the individual material properties of the adherends and adhesives were characterized. This included generating a database of mechanical and physical properties, after identifying and developing standard test methods to obtain properties. The structural fracture mechanics task concentrated on test development to characterize the fracture toughness of adhesively bonded joints subjected to Mode I, Mode II and mixed-mode conditions. Standard test procedures for quantifying an adhesive/adherend system's resistance to crack growth were developed for use by industry. In the modeling/characterization task, fracture mechanics-based design guidelines and predictive methodologies have been developed which will facilitate iteration on design concepts for bonded joints while alleviating the need for extensive testing

  6. Alloy design of Nd2, Fe14B permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.A.; Herchenroeder, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted as part of CRADA ORNL94-0279 between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Magnequench International, Inc. The objective was to gain a better understanding of the fracture process in the rare earth based permanent magnets in order to possibly improve the mechanical properties of these inherently brittle intermetallics. The first part of the study established a technique for measuring a critical property, fracture toughness, and surveying currently available commercial material made by a number of different processes

  7. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Kenneth T; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  8. KJRR-FAI Hydraulic Flow Testing Input Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; D.B. Chapman

    2013-12-01

    The INL, in cooperation with the KAERI via Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA), undertook an effort in the latter half of calendar year 2013 to produce a conceptual design for the KJRR-FAI campaign. The outcomes of this effort are documented in further detail elsewhere [5]. The KJRR-FAI was designed to be cooled by the ATR’s Primary Coolant System (PCS) with no provision for in-pile measurement or control of the hydraulic conditions in the irradiation assembly. The irradiation assembly was designed to achieve the target hydraulic conditions via engineered hydraulic losses in a throttling orifice at the outlet of the irradiation vehicle.

  9. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  11. Proceedings of the Fuel Cells `97 Review Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-01-01

    The Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) sponsored the Fuel Cells '97 Review Meeting on August 26-28, 1997, in Morgantown, West Virginia. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an annual forum for the exchange of ideas and discussion of results and plans related to the research on fuel cell power systems. The total of almost 250 conference participants included engineers and scientists representing utilities, academia, and government from the U.S. and eleven other countries: Canada, China, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Russia, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom. On first day, the conference covered the perspectives of sponsors and end users, and the progress reports of fuel-cell developers. Papers covered phosphoric, carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cells for stationary power applications. On the second day, the conference covered advanced research in solid oxide and other fuel cell developments. On the third day, the conference sponsored a workshop on advanced research and technology development. A panel presentation was given on fuel cell opportunities. Breakout sessions with group discussions followed this with fuel cell developers, gas turbine vendors, and consultants.

  12. Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, O. W.; Carey, T. R.; Lowell, P. S.; Meserole, F. B.; Rhudy, R. G.; Feeley, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project to develop an advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process that has decreased capital and operating costs, higher SO 2 removal efficiency, and better by-product solids quality than existing, commercially available technology. A clear liquor process (which uses a scrubbing liquid with no solids) will be used to accomplish this objective rather than a slurry liquor process (which contains solids). This clear liquor scrubbing (CLS) project is focused on three research areas: (1) Development of a clear liquor scrubbing process that uses a clear solution to remove SO 2 from flue gas and can be operated under inhibited-oxidation conditions; (2) Development of an anhydrite process that converts precipitated calcium sulfite to anhydrous calcium sulfate (anhydrite); and (3) Development of an alkali/humidification process to remove HCl from flue gas upstream of the FGD system. The anhydrite process also can be retrofit into existing FGD systems to produce a valuable by-product as an alternative to gypsum. This fits well into another of FETC's PRDA objectives of developing an advanced byproduct recovery subsystem capable of transforming SO 2 into a useable byproduct or high-volume valuable commodities of interest. This paper describes the proposed processes, outlines the test approach, and preliminary Phase I test results

  13. Dual Arm Work Platform teleoperated robotics system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) demonstration focused on the use of the DAWP to segment and dismantle the CP-5 reactor tank and surrounding bio-shield components (including the graphite block reflector, lead and boral sheeting) and performing some minor tasks best suited for the use of teleoperated robotics that were not evaluated in this demonstration. The DAWP system is not a commercially available product at this time. The CP-5 implementation was its first D and D application. The demonstration of the DAWP was to determine the areas on which improvements must be made to make this technology commercially viable. The results of the demonstration are included in this greenbook. It is the intention of the developers to incorporate lessons learned at this demonstration and current technological advancements in robotics into the next generation of the DAWP

  14. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-06-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

  15. Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{reg_sign}) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th{sub 230}, U{sub 235}, Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and Pu{sup 239}), and dioxins/furans.

  16. A market-driven commercialization strategy for gasification-based technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klara, J.M.; Tomer, B.J.; Stiegel, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the wake of deregulation of power generation in the US, market-based competition is driving electricity generators to low-cost risk system. In such an environment, gasification-based technologies will not be competitive with low capital cost, efficient, and reliable natural gas-fired facilities for baseload power generation in the foreseeable future. The lack of a near-term market application poses a serious threat to the progress of gasification technology. With a reduction in direct federal funding of large-scale demonstration plants as the trend to reduce the size of government continues, an alternate approach to commercialize gasification-based technologies has been developed at DOE/FETC. This new strategy employs gasification in near-term markets where, due to its ability to coproduce a wide variety of commodity and premium products to meet market requirements, it is an attractive alternative. By obtaining operating experience in near-term coproduction applications, gasification system modules can be refined and improved leading to commercial guarantees and acceptance of gasification technology as a cost-effective technology for baseload power generation when this market begins to open domestically, sometime after 2005

  17. Dual Arm Work Platform teleoperated robotics system. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) demonstration focused on the use of the DAWP to segment and dismantle the CP-5 reactor tank and surrounding bio-shield components (including the graphite block reflector, lead and boral sheeting) and performing some minor tasks best suited for the use of teleoperated robotics that were not evaluated in this demonstration. The DAWP system is not a commercially available product at this time. The CP-5 implementation was its first D and D application. The demonstration of the DAWP was to determine the areas on which improvements must be made to make this technology commercially viable. The results of the demonstration are included in this greenbook. It is the intention of the developers to incorporate lessons learned at this demonstration and current technological advancements in robotics into the next generation of the DAWP.

  18. Proceedings of the 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    2000-06-05

    The 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It was held August 3 to 5 in Chicago, Illinois. The goal of this conference was to provide a forum for reviewing fuel cell research and development (R&D) programs, assist in strategic R&D planning, promote awareness of sponsor activities, and enhance interactions between manufacturers, researchers, and stakeholders. This conference was attended by over 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, gas and electric utilities, DOE, and other Government agencies. The conference agenda included a keynote session, five presentation sessions, a poster presentation reception, and three breakout sessions. The presentation session topics were DOD Fuel Cell Applications, Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, Low-Temperature Component Research, High-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, and High-Temperature Component Research; the breakout session topics were Future R&D Directions for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells, Future R&D Directions for High-Temperature Fuel Cells, and a plenary summary session. All sessions were well attended.

  19. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  20. Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS reg-sign) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th 230 , U 235 , Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and Pu 239 ), and dioxins/furans

  1. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1998-03-01

    Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

  2. Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    2000-04-12

    The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

  3. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF

  4. Pipe Explorer surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer trademark system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals

  5. Prodiag--a hybrid artificial intelligence based reactor diagnostic system for process faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Vitela, J.E.; Applequist, C. A.; Chasensky, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are collaborating on a DOE-sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), project to perform feasibility studies on a novel approach to Artificial Intelligence (Al) based diagnostics for component faults in nuclear power plants. Investigations are being performed in the construction of a first-principles physics-based plant level process diagnostic expert system (ES) and the identification of component-level fault patterns through operating component characteristics using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The purpose of the proof-of-concept project is to develop a computer-based system using this Al approach to assist process plant operators during off-normal plant conditions. The proposed computer-based system will use thermal hydraulic (T-H) signals complemented by other non-T-H signals available in the data stream to provide the process operator with the component which most likely caused the observed process disturbance.To demonstrate the scale-up feasibility of the proposed diagnostic system it is being developed for use with the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) of a nuclear power plant. A full-scope operator training simulator representing the Commonwealth Edison Braidwood nuclear power plant is being used both as the source of development data and as the means to evaluate the advantages of the proposed diagnostic system. This is an ongoing multi-year project and this paper presents the results to date of the CRADA phase

  6. High Efficiency Water Heating Technology Development Final Report. Part I, Lab/Field Performance Evaluation and Accelerated Life Testing of a Hybrid Electric Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Murphy, Richard W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linkous, Randall Lee [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    DOE has supported efforts for many years with the objective of getting a water heater that uses heat pump technology (aka a heat pump water heater or HPWH) successfully on the residential equipment market. The most recent previous effort (1999-2002) produced a product that performed very well in ORNL-led accelerated durability and field tests. The commercial partner for this effort, Enviromaster International (EMI), introduced the product to the market under the trade name Watter$aver in 2002 but ceased production in 2005 due to low sales. A combination of high sales price and lack of any significant infrastructure for service after the sale were the principal reasons for the failure of this effort. What was needed for market success was a commercial partner with the manufacturing and market distribution capability necessary to allow economies of scale to lead to a viable unit price together with a strong customer service infrastructure. General Electric certainly meets these requirements, and knowing of ORNL s expertise in this area, approached ORNL with the proposal to partner in a CRADA to produce a high efficiency electric water heater. A CRADA with GE was initiated early in Fiscal Year, 2008. GE initially named its product the Hybrid Electric Water Heater (HEWH).

  7. EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. The NOAA Big Data Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a Big Data producer, generating tens of terabytes per day from hundreds of sensors on satellites, radars, aircraft, ships, and buoys, and from numerical models. These data are of critical importance and value for NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts. In order to facilitate extracting additional value from this information, NOAA has established Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with five Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) providers — Amazon, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Open Cloud Consortium — to determine whether hosting NOAA data in publicly-accessible Clouds alongside on-demand computational capability stimulates the creation of new value-added products and services and lines of business based on the data, and if the revenue generated by these new applications can support the costs of data transmission and hosting. Each IaaS provider is the anchor of a "Data Alliance" which organizations or entrepreneurs can join to develop and test new business or research avenues. This presentation will report on progress and lessons learned during the first 6 months of the 3-year CRADAs.

  9. Advanced weigh-in-motion system for weighing vehicles at high speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beshears, D.L.; Muhs, J.D.; Scudiere, M.B. [and others

    1998-02-01

    A state-of-the-art, Advanced Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system has been designed, installed, and tested on the west bound side of Interstate I-75/I-40 near the Knox County Weigh Station. The project is a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Road Dynamics, Inc. (IRD) sponsored by the Office of Uranium Programs, Facility and Technology Management Division of the Department of Energy under CRADA No. ORNL95-0364. ORNL, IRD, the Federal Highway Administration, the Tennessee Department of Safety and the Tennessee Department of Transportation have developed a National High Speed WIM Test Facility for test and evaluation of high-speed WIM systems. The WIM system under evaluation includes a Single Load Cell WIM scale system supplied and installed by IRD. ORNL developed a stand-alone, custom data acquisition system, which acquires the raw signals from IRD`s in-ground single load cell transducers. Under a separate contract with the Federal Highway Administration, ORNL designed and constructed a laboratory scale house for data collection, analysis and algorithm development. An initial advanced weight-determining algorithm has been developed. The new advanced WIM system provides improved accuracy and can reduce overall system variability by up to 30% over the existing high accuracy commercial WIM system.

  10. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  11. Frictional behavior of automotive brake materials under wet and dry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Weintraub, M.H.; Jang, Ho; Donlon, W. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1996-12-15

    The purpose of this effort was to develop an improved understanding of the relationship between the structure and frictional behavior of materials in the disc brake/rotor interface with a view toward improving the performance of automotive disc brakes. The three tasks involved in this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were as follows: Task 1. Investigation of Brake Pads and Rotors. Characterize surface features of worn brake pads and rotors, with special attention to the transfer film which forms on them during operation. Ford to supply specimens for examination and other supporting information. Task 2. Effects of Atmosphere and Repeated Applications on Brake Material Friction. Conduct pin-on-disk friction tests at ORNL under controlled moisture levels to determine effects of relative humidity on frictional behavior of brake pad and rotor materials. Conduct limited tests on the characteristics of friction under application of repeated contacts. Task 3. Comparison of Dynamometer Tests with Laboratory Friction Tests. Compare ORNL friction data with Ford dynamometer test data to establish the degree to which the simple bench tests can be useful in helping to understand frictional behavior in full-scale brake component tests. This final report summarizes work performed under this CRADA.

  12. Development of metal-clad filled evacuated panel superinsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.; Strizak, J.P.; Weaver, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Besser, J.E.; Smith, D.L. [Aladdin Industries, Inc. (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was between Aladdin Industries, Inc. and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. The purpose of the CRADA was to determine the thermal performance of various metal claddings used to encapsulate Filled Evacuated Panel (FEP) superinsulation and to optimize the cost versus thermal performance of the claddings. A FEP superinsulation is a new type of superinsulation with the potential for saving large amounts of energy in buildings, building equipment, transportation (refrigerated railcars and trucks), industrial applications, etc. The major disadvantage of metal claddings for FEPs is the heat loss through the cladding caused by the high thermal conductivity of most metals. In smaller FEPs, this heat loss can degrade the overall performance of the FEP by factors of two or more as compared with polymer-clad FEPs. On the other hand, metal claddings are essentially impermeable to ambient air, whereas polymer claddings are not. Thus, the longevity and reliability of metal-clad FEPs are much superior to polymer-clad FEPs. In addition, because of the very low vapor pressure of metals as compared to polymers, metal-clad FEPs can achieve and operate at lower internal pressures. These lower pressures allow use of less expensive and/or higher performance filler materials.

  13. Wireless Sensor for Measuring Pump Efficiency: Small Business Voucher Project with KCF Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Koopman, Gary [KCF Technologies; Fugate, David L [ORNL

    2017-01-23

    This document is to fulfill the final report requirements for the Small Business Voucher (SBV) CRADA project with ORNL and KCF Technologies (CRADA/NFE-16-06133). Pumping systems account for nearly 20% of the world’s electrical energy demand and range from 25-50% of the energy usage in many industrial and building power plants. The energy cost is the largest element in the total cost of owning a pump (~40%). In response to a recent DOE mandate for improved pump efficiency pump manufacturers are preparing for the changes that the impending regulations will bring, including design improvements. This mandate also establishes a need for new low cost pump efficiency measurement systems. The standard industry definition of pump efficiency is the mechanical water horsepower delivered divided by the electrical horsepower input to the motor. KCF Technologies has developed a new sensor measurement technique to estimate fluid pump efficiency using a thermodynamic approach. KCF Technologies applied for a SBV grant with ORNL as the research partner. KCF needed a research partner with the proper facilities to demonstrate the efficacy of its wireless sensor unit for measuring pump efficiency. The ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) test resources were used to test and demonstrate the successful measurement of pump efficiency with the KCF sensor technology. KCF is now working on next steps to commercialize this sensing technology.

  14. Cooperative research and development opportunities with the National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybert, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is responsible for negotiating Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), whereby the knowledge resulting from NCI investigators' government-sponsored research is developed in collaboration with universities and/or industry into new products of importance for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The NCI has recently executed a unique 'clinical trials' CRADA and is developing a model agreement based upon it for the development and commercialization of products for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS. NCI drug screening, preclinical testing, clinical trials, and AIDS program capabilities form the basis for this new technology development/technology transfer vehicle. NCI's extensive drug screening program and 'designer foods' program serve as potential sources of investigational new drugs (INDs) and cancer preventatives. Collaborations between NCI and pharmaceutical companies having the facilities, experience, and expertise necessary to develop INDs into approved drugs available to the public are being encouraged where the companies have proprietary rights to INDs, or where NCI has proprietary rights to INDs and invites companies to respond to a collaborator announcement published in the Federal Register. The joint efforts of the NCI and the chosen collaborator are designed to generate the data necessary to obtain pharmaceutic regulatory approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the drugs developed, and thereby make them available to health care providers for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS.

  15. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

  16. Multiscale Toxicology- Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retterer, S. T. [ORNL; Holsapple, M. P. [Battelle Memorial Institute

    2013-10-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established between Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of combining the analytical and synthetic strengths of the National Laboratories with BMI's expertise in basic and translational medical research to develop a collaborative pipeline and suite of high throughput and imaging technologies that could be used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of material and drug toxicology in humans. The Multi-Scale Toxicity Initiative (MSTI), consisting of the team members above, was established to coordinate cellular scale, high-throughput in vitro testing, computational modeling and whole animal in vivo toxicology studies between MSTI team members. Development of a common, well-characterized set of materials for testing was identified as a crucial need for the initiative. Two research tracks were established by BMI during the course of the CRADA. The first research track focused on the development of tools and techniques for understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials, specifically inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). ORNL"s work focused primarily on the synthesis, functionalization and characterization of a common set of NPs for dissemination to the participating laboratories. These particles were synthesized to retain the same surface characteristics and size, but to allow visualization using the variety of imaging technologies present across the team. Characterization included the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical properties of the materials as well as the preliminary assessment of NP toxicity using commercially available toxicity screens and emerging optical imaging strategies. Additional efforts examined the development of high-throughput microfluidic and imaging assays for measuring NP uptake, localization, and

  17. Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E E

    1997-10-01

    cause lateral distribution of the water. The large tank that accommodates the sand bed and the necessary plumbing to simulate various well configurations was received. The monitoring equipment and the sensors are currently being installed. The experimental procedures for Phase II experiments are under further investigation and will be initiated upon installation of CATC and assembly of the monitoring system. Due to insufficient operating funds, the large scale experiments will not be done this year. Task No. 1.3: Technical Support - Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for In Situ Formed Barriers (B. Overbey & D. Locke, BDM Federal): The Operating Permit Renewal Request for bench scale operations in the FETC B-17 building was submitted to the FETC Lab Safety Committee for approval on 8/14/97. A review of the revised NEPA documents prepared last year indicates that these documents are still applicable for the current work. The initial design and specifications for the CATC vessel were prepared. Construction of the CATC was initiated in early July, the vessel was received August 15, 1997, and on-site work was completed this quarter.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    Since approximately 55% of the electrical power produced in the U. S. is generated by coal-based power utility plants, there is serious concern about the massive amounts of coal combustion products emitted into the atmosphere annually. Furthermore, Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) requires the measurement and inventory of a possible 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from any stationary source producing more than 10 tons per year of any one pollutant or more than 25 tons per year of total pollutants. Although power utilities are not presently included on the list of source categories, the CAAA requires the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to carry out a study of emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels. Since many of these HAPs are known to be present in coal derived flue gas, coal-fired electric power utilities may be subject to regulation following these studies if Congress considers it necessary. In a cooperative effort with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) initiated such a study in 1991. DOE-FETC commissioned five primary contractors to conduct emission studies at eight different coal-fired electric utilities. The eight sites represented a cross section of feed coal type, boiler designs, and particulate and gaseous pollutant control technologies. The major goal of these studies was to determine the sampling and analytical methodologies that could be used efficiently to perform these emission tests while producing representative and reliable emission data. The successful methodology could then be recommended to the EPA for use in compliance testing in the event the regulation of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants is implemented. A secondary purpose of the testing was to determine the effectiveness of the control technologies in reducing target hazardous air pollutants. Advanced Technology Systems, Inc

  19. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ''document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.'' This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2's commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2's organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2's strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed

  20. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  1. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  2. DOE-EERC jointly sponsored research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Sondreal, E.A.

    1999-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-93MC30098 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying efficient, nonpolluting energy technologies that can compete effectively in meeting market demands for clean fuels, chemical feedstocks, and electricity in the 21st century. The objective of the JSRP was to advance the deployment of advanced technologies for improving energy efficiency and environmental performance through jointly sponsored research on topics that would not be adequately addressed by the private sector alone. Examples of such topics include the barriers to hot-gas cleaning impeding the deployment of high-efficiency power systems and the search for practical means for sequestering CO{sub 2} generated by fossil fuel combustion. The selection of particular research projects was guided by a combination of DOE priorities and market needs, as provided by the requirement for joint venture funding approved both by DOE and the private sector sponsor. The research addressed many different energy resource and related environmental problems, with emphasis directed toward the EERC's historic lead mission in low-rank coals (LRCs), which represent approximately half of the U.S. coal resources in the conterminous states, much larger potential resources in Alaska, and a major part of the energy base in the former U.S.S.R., East Central Europe, and the Pacific Rim. The Base and JSRP agreements were tailored to the growing awareness of critical environmental issues, including water supply and quality, air toxics (e.g., mercury), fine respirable particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}), and the goal of zero net CO{sub 2} emissions.

  3. Enhanced Control of Mercury and other HAPs by Innovative Modifications to Wet FGD Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, O.W.; Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Skarupa, R.C.; Meserole, F.B.; Rhudy, R.G.; Brown, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to learn more about controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from coal-fired power plants that are equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project was included by FETC as a Phase I project in its Mega-PRDA program. Phase I of this project focused on three research areas. These areas in order of priority were: (1) Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; (2) Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and (3) Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. Mercury can exist in two forms in utility flue gas--as elemental mercury and as oxidized mercury (predominant form believed to be HgCl 2 ). Previous test results have shown that wet scrubbers effectively remove the oxidized mercury from the gas but are ineffective in removing elemental mercury. Recent improvements in mercury speciation techniques confirm this finding. Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury is of interest in cases where a wet scrubber exists or is planned for SO 2 control. If a loW--cost process could be developed to oxidize all of the elemental mercury in the flue gas, then the maximum achievable mercury removal across the existing or planned wet scrubber would increase. Other approaches for improving control of HAPs included a method for improving particulate removal across the FGD process and the use of additives to increase mercury solubility. This paper discusses results related only to catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury

  4. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  5. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLID ELECTROLYTES: FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambabu Bobba; Josef Hormes; T. Wang; Jaymes A. Baker; Donald G. Prier; Tommy Rockwood; Dinesha Hawkins; Saleem Hasan; V. Rayanki

    1997-12-31

    The intent of this project with Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to develop research infrastructure conductive to Fuel Cell research at Southern University and A and M College, Baton Route. A state of the art research laboratory (James Hall No.123 and No.114) for energy conversion and storage devices was developed during this project duration. The Solid State Ionics laboratory is now fully equipped with materials research instruments: Arbin Battery Cycling and testing (8 channel) unit, Electrochemical Analyzer (EG and G PAR Model 273 and Solartron AC impedance analyzer), Fuel Cell test station (Globe Tech), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-10), Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA), Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM), UV-VIS-NIR Absorption Spectrometer, Fluorescence Spectrometer, FT-IR Spectrometer, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurement capability at Center for Advanced Microstructure and Devices (CAMD- a multimillion dollar DOE facility), Glove Box, gas hood chamber, high temperature furnaces, hydraulic press and several high performance computers. IN particular, a high temperature furnace (Thermodyne 6000 furnace) and a high temperature oven were acquired through this project funds. The PI Dr. R Bobba has acquired additional funds from federal agencies include NSF-Academic Research Infrastructure program and other DOE sites. They have extensively used the multimillion dollar DOE facility ''Center'' for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) for electrochemical research. The students were heavily involved in the experimental EXAFS measurements and made use of their DCM beamline for EXAFS research. The primary objective was to provide hands on experience to the selected African American undergraduate and graduate students in experimental energy research.The goal was to develop research skills and involve them in the Preparation and Characterization of Solid

  6. Characterization of radioactive contamination inside pipes with the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, C.D.; Kendrick, D.T.; Lowry, W.; Cramer, E.

    1997-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently in the process of decommissioning and dismantling many of its nuclear materials processing facilities that have been in use for several decades. Site managers throughout the DOE complex must employ the safest and most cost effective means to characterize, remediate and recycle or dispose of hundreds of miles of potentially contaminated piping and duct work. The DOE discovered that standard characterization methods were inadequate for its pipes, drains, and ducts because many of the systems are buried or encased. In response to the DOE`s need for a more specialized characterization technique, Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) developed the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system through a DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) contract administered through the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The purpose of this report is to serve as a comprehensive overview of all phases of the Pipe Explorer{trademark} development project. The report is divided into 6 sections. Section 2 of the report provides an overview of the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system, including the operating principles of using an inverting membrane to tow sensors into pipes. The basic components of the characterization system are also described. Descriptions of the various deployment systems are given in Section 3 along with descriptions of the capabilities of the deployment systems. During the course of the development project 7 types of survey instruments were demonstrated with the Pipe Explorer{trademark} and are a part of the basic toolbox of instruments available for use with the system. These survey tools are described in Section 4 along with their typical performance specifications. The 4 demonstrations of the system are described chronologically in Section 5. The report concludes with a summary of the history, status, and future of the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system in Section 6.

  7. Characterization of radioactive contamination inside pipes with the Pipe Explorer trademark system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.D.; Kendrick, D.T.; Lowry, W.; Cramer, E.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently in the process of decommissioning and dismantling many of its nuclear materials processing facilities that have been in use for several decades. Site managers throughout the DOE complex must employ the safest and most cost effective means to characterize, remediate and recycle or dispose of hundreds of miles of potentially contaminated piping and duct work. The DOE discovered that standard characterization methods were inadequate for its pipes, drains, and ducts because many of the systems are buried or encased. In response to the DOE's need for a more specialized characterization technique, Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) developed the Pipe Explorer trademark system through a DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) contract administered through the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The purpose of this report is to serve as a comprehensive overview of all phases of the Pipe Explorer trademark development project. The report is divided into 6 sections. Section 2 of the report provides an overview of the Pipe Explorer trademark system, including the operating principles of using an inverting membrane to tow sensors into pipes. The basic components of the characterization system are also described. Descriptions of the various deployment systems are given in Section 3 along with descriptions of the capabilities of the deployment systems. During the course of the development project 7 types of survey instruments were demonstrated with the Pipe Explorer trademark and are a part of the basic toolbox of instruments available for use with the system. These survey tools are described in Section 4 along with their typical performance specifications. The 4 demonstrations of the system are described chronologically in Section 5. The report concludes with a summary of the history, status, and future of the Pipe Explorer trademark system in Section 6

  8. In situ groundwater MOP-UP. Topical report, April 12, 1996--May 11, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Under this FETC-funded program, Biopraxis proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of using its new MOP-UP technology for in situ treatment of metal-contaminated groundwater. Instead of optimizing the technology to demonstrate the feasibility of its use at a single site, the final series of tests were designed to showcase the breadth and flexibility of the MOP-UP technology by demonstrating its capabilities in as many different groundwater environments as possible. Sites that were contaminated with metal pollutants of wide-spread concern to DOE were located; and MOP-UP reagents were screened for their ability to treat any or all of these metals--without any attempt to optimize the technology for use with the new target metals and/or for treating these metals under the diverse conditions found at the sites. Groundwater samples exhibiting a wide range of environments were generously provided by DoD, EPA, and private industry as well as DOE for use in these treatability tests. The tests showed that MOP-UP can readily remove all detectable traces of a wide variety of metals, such as Hg, Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr(VI), As, Ba, Zn, and Al, and take U into the low parts per trillions, in heavily polluted groundwater, with little or no effort needed to optimize the reagent formulation. The second goal of the program was to show that the in situ groundwater MOP-UP technology will either be more cost effective than conventional technologies while achieving the same degree of groundwater purification, or be at least as cost effective as conventional technologies while offering superior performance. MOP-UP far surpassed the goals established for this initial feasibility demonstration. This new technology promises to be extremely effective and very economical whether used in a permeable barrier for treating shallow plumes, or a direct injection or pump-and-treat configuration for treating deep-subsurface plumes of heavy metal, radionuclide, or mixed contamination.

  9. Automated baseline change detection - Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byler, E.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust

  10. Neural Network Based Montioring and Control of Fluidized Bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop chaos analysis and neural network-based modeling techniques and apply them to the pressure-drop data obtained from the Fluid Bed Combustion (FBC) system (a small scale prototype model) located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown. The second goal was to develop neural network-based chaos control techniques and provide a suggestive prototype for possible real-time application to the FBC system. The experimental pressure data were collected from a cold FBC experimental set-up at the Morgantown Center. We have performed several analysis on these data in order to unveil their dynamical and chaotic characteristics. The phase-space attractors were constructed from the one dimensional time series data, using the time-delay embedding method, for both normal and abnormal conditions. Several identifying parameters were also computed from these attractors such as the correlation dimension, the Kolmogorov entropy, and the Lyapunov exponents. These chaotic attractor parameters can be used to discriminate between the normal and abnormal operating conditions of the FBC system. It was found that, the abnormal data has higher correlation dimension, larger Kolmogorov entropy and larger positive Lyapunov exponents as compared to the normal data. Chaotic system control using neural network based techniques were also investigated and compared to conventional chaotic system control techniques. Both types of chaotic system control techniques were applied to some typical chaotic systems such as the logistic, the Henon, and the Lorenz systems. A prototype model for real-time implementation of these techniques has been suggested to control the FBC system. These models can be implemented for real-time control in a next phase of the project after obtaining further measurements from the experimental model. After testing the control algorithms developed for the FBC model, the next step is to implement them on hardware and link them to

  11. RGB field system data collection and testing for textile print finishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, K W; Allen, D B; Goddard, J S; Jones, J P; Sitter, D N; Tapp, E R; Turner, J C

    1995-09-01

    The American textile industry has lost an estimated 400,000 jobs to offshore competitors since 1980. If trends continue unchanged, it is predicted they will lost an additional 600,000 jobs by the year 2002. These losses and the resulting economic threat to the U.S. textile industry can be attributed to the low operating costs of their offshore competitors' extensive use of cheap labor. In order to stem these rising losses and gain back lost market shares, the American textile industry has entered into a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in a program called the American Textile Partnership (AMTEX tm).

  12. Design and test of a large plasma torch for environmental recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-01-01

    A 2.5-inch inductive plasma torch has been tested with up to 600 kW rf power and with argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. A complete power balance is obtained from electrical, thermal, and radiation measurements. These data indicate that torch efficiencies of up to 30% are obtained with molecular gases, while efficiencies around 15% are obtained with argon. The efficiencies obtained with molecular gases almost triple earlier torch efficiencies and confirm substantially the predictions of a torch model developed during a previous CRADA. Torch efficiencies of up to 50% could be obtained in future tests with an improved rf power supply, with steam gas, and with larger torch dimensions. Future applications of the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC) process could include the high explosives of DOE's nuclear weapons, chemical and biological remediation, and the treatment and volume reduction of radioactive mixed waste

  13. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  14. Feasibility and Scaling of Composite Based Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttall, David [ORNL; Chen, Xun [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2016-04-27

    Engineers and Researchers at Oak Ridge National Lab s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF) collaborated with Impossible Objects (IO) in the characterization of PEEK infused carbon fiber mat manufactured by means of CBAM composite-based additive manufacturing, a first generation assembly methodology developed by Robert Swartz, Chairman, Founder, and CTO of Impossible Objects.[1] The first phase of this project focused on demonstration of CBAM for composite tooling. The outlined steps focused on selecting an appropriate shape that fit the current machine s build envelope, characterized the resulting form, and presented next steps for transitioning to a Phase II CRADA agreement. Phase I of collaborative research and development agreement NFE-15-05698 was initiated in April of 2015 with an introduction to Impossible Objects, and concluded in March of 2016 with a visitation to Impossible Objects headquarters in Chicago, IL. Phase II as discussed herein is under consideration by Impossible Objects as of this writing.

  15. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  16. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

  17. Smoothing Motion Estimates for Radar Motion Compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Simple motion models for complex motion environments are often not adequate for keeping radar data coherent. Eve n perfect motion samples appli ed to imperfect models may lead to interim calculations e xhibiting errors that lead to degraded processing results. Herein we discuss a specific i ssue involving calculating motion for groups of pulses, with measurements only available at pulse-group boundaries. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report was funded by General A tomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Mission Systems under Cooperative Re search and Development Agre ement (CRADA) SC08/01749 between Sandia National Laboratories and GA-ASI. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), an affilia te of privately-held General Atomics, is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and rel ated mission systems, includin g the Predator(r)/Gray Eagle(r)-series and Lynx(r) Multi-mode Radar.

  18. DOE Building America Technology and Energy Savings Analysis of Two 2721 ft2 Homes in a Mixed Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

    2013-09-01

    The ZEBRAlliance is an opportunity to accelerate progress toward DOE s goal of maximizing cost-effective energy efficiency by investing in a highly leveraged, focused effort to test new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The Alliance integrated efficient components into the construction of four research houses that will be used as test markets to gauge the integral success of the components and houses. These four research houses are expected to be the first houses used to field-test several newly emerging products such as the ClimateMaster ground-source integrated heat pump, factory assembled ZEHcor walls, and one or more new appliances from Whirlpool Corporation.

  19. The AMTEX Partnership. Third quarter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The AMTEX Partnership is a collaborative research and development program among the U.S. Integrated Textile Industry, the Department of Energy, The DOE laboratories, other federal agencies and laboratories, and universities. The goal of AMTEX is to strengthen the competitiveness of this vital U.S. industry and thereby preserve and create American jobs. During the third quarter of 1994 all the Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) were completed and work initiated for three additional projects: Computer Aided Fabric Evaluation (CAFE), Textile Resource Conservation (TReC), and Sensors for Agile Manufacturing (SFAM). The plan for a Cotton Biotechnology project was completed and reviewed by the Industry Technical Advisory Committee. In addition, an `impact study` on the topic of flexible fiber production was conducted by an industry group led by the fiber manufacturers.

  20. USCAR LEP ESST Advanced Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2000-09-25

    The objective of this task was to provide processing information data summaries on powder metallurgy (PM) alloys that meet the partner requirements for the production of low mass, highly accurate, near-net-shape powertrain components. This required modification to existing ISO machinability test procedures and development of a new drilling test procedure. These summaries could then be presented in a web page format. When combined with information generated from the USCAR CRADA this would allow chemical, metallurgical, and machining data on PM alloys to be available to all engineering and manufacturing personnel that have access to in-house networks. The web page format also allows for the additions of other wrought materials, making this a valuable tool to the technical staffs.

  1. Digital X-ray imager

    CERN Document Server

    LLNL &MedOptics Corporation

    1998-01-01

    The global objective of this cooperation was to lower the cost and improve the quality of breast health care in the United States. We planned to achieve it by designing a very high performance digital radiography unit for breast surgical specimen radiography in the operating room. These technical goals needed to be achieved at reasonable manufacturing costs to enable MedOptics to achieve high market penetration at a profit. Responsibility for overall project execution rested with MedOptics. MedOptics fabricated and demonstrated hardware, and selected components and handled the overall integration. After completion of this CRADA, MedOptics worked with collaborators to demonstrate clinical performance and utility. Finally, the company marketed the device. LLNL convened a multi-directorate expert panel for an intensive review of MedOptics point design. A written brief of panel conclusions and recommendations was prepared. In addition, LLNL was responsible for: computationally simulating the effects of varying so...

  2. Organic petrography of coals from a coalbed methane test well, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C. Hackley; Peter D. Warwick [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    In March 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Louisiana Geological Survey, and EnerVest Management Partners Ltd. participated in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to drill and core the Fairbanks Real Estate No. 359 (FRE No. 359) coalbed methane test well in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. This effort was in support of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey investigations into the coal gas potential of the Gulf Coastal Plain. To determine possible relationships between coalbed gas content and coal composition, maceral modes were determined for 17 subsurface coal and carbonaceous shale samples cored and desorbed from the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group. Similar determinations of maceral mode were made on cuttings collected from 5 non-cored coaly intervals in the overlying Eocene Sparta Sand. 22 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Low-Cost Control System Built Upon Consumer-Based Electronics For Supervisory Control Of A Gas-Operated Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetherington Jr, G Randall [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Mahderekal, Isaac [ORNL; Abu-Heiba, Ahmad [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the performance of a consumer-based control system was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Southwest Gas as part of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) authorized by the Department of Energy (DOE) (Mahderekal et al. (2013). The goal of the research was to evaluate the low-cost approach as a solution for implementing a supervisory control system for a residential gas-operated heat pump. The design incorporated two consumer-based micro-controllers; the Arduino Mega-2650 and the BeagleBone (white). Ten five-ton heat pump systems were designed, fabricated, and operationally tested in the Las Vega NV region. A robust data set was produced that allowed detailed assessment of the reliability and the operational perfromance of the newly developed control system. Experiences gained from the test provided important points of improvement for subsequent evolution of the heat pump technology.

  4. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber & Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO`s Decontamination group and Kleiber & Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided.

  5. Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

  6. Shell Measuring Machine. History and Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchler, Wilbur D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Commercialization of the Ring Rotacon Shell Measuring Machine project is a CRADA (NO. LA98C10358) between The University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and Moore Tool Company, Bridgeport, CT. The actual work started on this CRADA in December of 1998. Several meetings were held with the interested parties (Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Moore Tool, and the University of North Carolina). The results of these meetings were that the original Ring Rotacon did not measure up to the requirements of the Department of Energy and private industry, and a new configuration was investigated. This new configuration (Shell Measuring Machine [SMM]) much better fits the needs of all parties. The work accomplished on the Shell Measuring Machine in FY 99 includes the following; Specifications for size and weight were developed; Performance error budgets were established; Designs were developed; Analyses were performed (stiffness and natural frequency); Existing part designs were compared to the working SMM volume; Peer reviews were conducted; Controller requirements were studied; Fixture requirements were evaluated; and Machine motions were analyzed. The consensus of the Peer Review Committee was that the new configuration has the potential to satisfy the shell inspection needs of Department of Energy as well as several commercial customers. They recommended that more analyses be performed on error budgets, structural stiffness, natural frequency, and thermal effects and that operational processes be developed. Several design issues need to be addressed. They are the type of bearings utilized to support the tables (air bearings or mechanical roller type bearings), the selection of the probes, the design of the probe sliding mechanisms, and the design of the upper table positioning mechanism. Each item has several possible solutions, and more work is required to obtain the best design. This report includes the background and technical objectives; minutes of the working

  7. HPCC technology awareness program: Improved economic competitiveness through technology awareness, transfer and application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    A need has been defined by Congress for the DOE National Laboratories to participate in various dual use and technology transfer programs. This requirement has spawned several technology transfer approaches at the DOE laboratories. These programs are designed to encourage large and small business to bring their problems and needs forward, and to allow the labs to transfer effective high performance computing technology to the commercial marketplace. This IG Technologies grant from the DOE was undertaken to address the issues and problems associated with technology transfer between the DOE National Laboratories and commercial industry. The key focus is to gain an understanding of how DOE and industry independently and collectively view the requirements and the missing elements that could allow DOE to facilitate HPCC technology transfer. At issue is HPCC Technology Transfer for the High Performance Computing industry and its relationship to the DOE National Laboratories. Several observations on this are addressed. The issue of a ``Technology Utilization Gap`` between the National Laboratories and Independent Software Vendors is discussed. This study addressed the HPCC Technology Transfer plans of all six DOE National Labs. Study team members briefed numerous industrial users of HPCC technology as to the feasibility of technology transfer for various applications. Significant findings of the effort are that the resistance to technology transfer is much higher than anticipated for both the National Labs and industry. Also, HPCC Technology Transfer is observed to be a large company`s dominion. Small businesses have a difficult time in addressing the requirements of technology transfer using Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s). Large businesses and the DOE National Labs however, often have requirements and objectives which are at cross purposes, making effective technology transfer difficult.

  8. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Huo, X. Sharon [Tennessee Technological University

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  9. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  10. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  11. Final Report for completed IPP Project: Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Ian

    2009-01-01

    ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R and D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good

  12. Transactive Campus Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haack, Jereme N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hao, He [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Woohyun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, Donna J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Akyol, Bora A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Allwardt, Craig H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carpenter, Brandon J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Sen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Guopeng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lutes, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makhmalbaf, Atefe [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ngo, Hung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Somasundaram, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Underhill, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Transactive energy refers to the combination of economic and control techniques to improve grid reliability and efficiency. The fundamental purpose of transactive energy management is to seamlessly coordinate the operation of large numbers of new intelligent assets—such as distributed solar, energy storage and responsive building loads—to provide the flexibility needed to operate the power grid reliably and at minimum cost, particularly one filled with intermittent renewable generation such as the Pacific Northwest. It addresses the key challenge of providing smooth, stable, and predictable “control” of these assets, despite the fact that most are neither owned nor directly controlled by the power grid. The Clean Energy and Transactive Campus (CETC) work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Washington State Department of Commerce (Commerce) through the Clean Energy Fund (CEF). The project team consisted of PNNL, the University of Washington (UW) and Washington State University (WSU), to connect the PNNL, UW, and WSU campuses to form a multi-campus testbed for transaction-based energy management—transactive—solutions. Building on the foundational transactive system established by the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), the purpose of the project was to construct the testbed as both a regional flexibility resource and as a platform for research and development (R&D) on buildings/grid integration and information-based energy efficiency. This report provides a summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  13. New Types of Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle (Contractor) and MDS Sciex (Participant) and ESA, Inc. (Participant) is to research, develop and apply new types of ionization sources and sampling/inlet systems for analytical mass spectrometry making use of the Participants state-of-the-art atmospheric sampling mass spectrometry electrochemical cell technology instrumentation and ancillary equipment. The two overriding goals of this research project are: to understand the relationship among the various instrumental components and operational parameters of the various ion sources and inlet systems under study, the chemical nature of the gases, solvents, and analytes in use, and the nature and abundances of the ions ultimately observed in the mass spectrometer; and to develop new and better analytical and fundamental applications of these ion sources and inlet systems or alternative sources and inlets coupled with mass spectrometry on the basis of the fundamental understanding obtained in Goal 1. The end results of this work are expected to be: (1) an expanded utility for the ion sources and inlet systems under study (such as the analysis of new types of analytes) and the control or alteration of the ionic species observed in the gas-phase; (2) enhanced instrument performance as judged by operational figures-of-merit such as dynamic range, detection limits, susceptibility to matrix signal suppression and sensitivity; and (3) novel applications (such as surface sampling with electrospray) in both applied and fundamental studies. The research projects outlined herein build upon work initiated under the previous CRADA between the Contractor and MDS Sciex on ion sources and inlet systems for mass spectrometry. Specific ion source and inlet systems for exploration of the fundamental properties and practical implementation of these principles are given.

  14. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  15. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sanborn, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Raj N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sangid, Michael D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Xiaoshi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Costa, Franco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gandhi, Umesh N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mori, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, III, Charles L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-19

    The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

  16. Silent Discharge Plasma Technology for the Treatment of Air Toxics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chase, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gross, Michael P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-09-21

    Under this CRADA, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and High Mesa Technologies, Inc. (HMT) carried out a joint project on the development of the silent discharge plasma (SDP) technology for the treatment of hazardous air pollutants and other hazardous or toxic chemicals. The project had two major components: a technology-demonstration part and a scale-up and commercialization part. In the first part, a small-scale, mobile SDP plasma processor, which was being developed under a CRADA with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was the mobile equipment was modified for higher capacity service and employed for an innovative remediation technologies demonstration on soil-vapor extraction off-gases at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, CA. The performance of the SDP system for the variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) encountered at the McClellan site was sufficiently promising to the project HMT and LANL worked together to formulate a scale-up strategy and commercialization/manufacturing plan, and to design a prototype scaled-up SDP unit. HMT and LANL are now in the final stages of completing a licensing agreement for the technology and HMT is in the process of raising funds to engineer and manufacture commercial prototype SDP equipment focused on stack-gas emissions control and environmental remediation. HMT, in collaboration with another Northern New Mexico business, Coyote Aerospace, has also been successful in receiving a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) award from the Army Research Office to develop, design, and construct a small non-thermal plasma reactor for laboratory studies ("Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Control of Fugitive Emissions of Toxic Gases")

  17. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  18. EM TASK 24 - DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN SITU INSTRUMENT FOR MEASURING MERCURY IN A GAS STREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudal, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    As part of its overall Environmental Management Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed thermal and incineration processes for treating hazardous mixed wastes. These mixed wastes often contain mercury that is released into the atmosphere during the incineration process. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as many states, clearly views mercury emissions from incinerators and combustion systems as a potential human health problem (1). Although validated batch measurement methods such as EPA Method 29, the Ontario Hydro mercury speciation method, and EPA Method 101A exist for total and specialted mercury, they are difficult and costly to perform. In addition, the data are not available for use until several days later. Continuous emission monitors (CEMs) are a very attractive option because the data are in near real-time, allowing the data to be used as feedback control for mercury control strategies. Also, a properly designed analyzer should require minimal operator input. However, based on the current state of the art, mercury CEMs are not without problems, as demonstrated in recent field tests (2). In addition, they are often bulky and costly to purchase. Sensor Research and Development Corporation (SRD) was contracted by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (formerly the Federal Energy Technology Center [FETC]) to develop a prototype instrument for thermal treatment process continuous emission monitoring applications. The work by SRD for DOE on the mercury CEM was conducted under two different contracts. Work under the first contract began October 1, 1997, and ended June 2000, with a second contract continuing until June 2001. The SRD process has the potential to be the basis for a very low-cost mercury CEM. The initial cost estimates provided by SRD are an order of magnitude lower than any other proposed mercury CEM. Although the instrument will be low-cost, it still has the potential to detect low limits of mercury

  19. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    Co., Inc. was evaluated. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A Kool-Vest from MicroClimate Systems, Inc. was evaluated during assessment at Beaver, WV from 8/16/99 to 8/17/99. The evaluation was performed in the same manner as the MTR Chemical Protective Suit described above. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A brochure announcing the new Gateway to Environmental Technology (GET) website was produced by FIU-HCET and is being distributed to the D&D community by FETC-DDFA. The website provides links to the TIS and other decision support systems developed at FIU-HCET.

  20. Mobile robot worksystem (Rosie). Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. Rosie is a mobile robot worksystem developed for nuclear facilities D and D. Rosie performs mechanical dismantlement of radiologically contaminated structures by remotely deploying other tools or systems. At the CP-5 reactor site, Rosie is a mobile platform used to support reactor assembly demolition through its long reach, heavy lift capability and its deployment and positioning of a Kraft Predator dexterous manipulator arm. Rosie is a tethered, 50 m (165 ft) long, robotic system controlled via teleoperation from a control console that is located outside of the radiological containment area. The operator uses Rosie to move, lift or offload radioactive materials using its integral lifting hook or to position the Kraft Predator arm in locations where the arm can be used to dismantle parts of the CP-5 reactor. The specific operating areas were concentrated in two high radiation areas, one at the top of the reactor structure atop and within the reactor tank assembly and the second at a large opening on the west side of the reactor`s biological shield called the west thermal column. In the first of these areas, low level radioactive waste size previously segmented or dismantled by the Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) and placed into a steel drum or transfer can were moved to a staging area for manual packaging. In the latter area, the manipulator arm removed and transferred shielding blocks from the west thermal column area of the reactor into waste containers. Rosie can also deploy up to twelve remotely controlled television cameras, some with microphones, which can be used

  1. DECONTAMINATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION RESEARCH PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., PE.

    1998-11-01

    During the five plus years this Cooperative Agreement existed, more than 45 different projects were funded. Most projects were funded for a one year period but there were some, deemed of such quality and importance, funded for multiple years. Approximately 22 external agencies, businesses, and other entities have cooperated with or been funded through the WVU Cooperative Agreement over the five plus years. These external entities received 33% of the funding by this Agreement. The scope of this Agreement encompassed all forms of hazardous waste remediation including radioactive, organic, and inorganic contaminants. All matrices were of interest; generally soil, water, and contaminated structures. Economic, health, and regulatory aspects of technologies were also within the scope of the agreement. The highest priority was given to small businesses funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and Department of Energy (DOE) involved in research and development of innovative remediation processes. These projects were to assist in the removal of barriers to development and commercialization of these new technologies. Studies of existing, underdeveloped technologies, were preferred to fundamental research into remediation technologies. Sound development of completely new technologies was preferred to minor improvements in existing methods. Solid technological improvements in existing technologies or significant cost reduction through innovative redesign were the preferred projects. Development, evaluation, and bench scale testing projects were preferred for the WVU research component. In the effort to fill gaps in current remediation technologies, the worth of the WVU Cooperative Agreement was proven. Two great technologies came out of the program. The Prefabricated Vertical Drain Technology for enhancing soil flushing was developed over the 6-year period and is presently being demonstrated on a 0.10 acre Trichloroethylene contaminated site in Ohio. The Spin

  2. Mobile robot worksystem (Rosie). Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. Rosie is a mobile robot worksystem developed for nuclear facilities D and D. Rosie performs mechanical dismantlement of radiologically contaminated structures by remotely deploying other tools or systems. At the CP-5 reactor site, Rosie is a mobile platform used to support reactor assembly demolition through its long reach, heavy lift capability and its deployment and positioning of a Kraft Predator dexterous manipulator arm. Rosie is a tethered, 50 m (165 ft) long, robotic system controlled via teleoperation from a control console that is located outside of the radiological containment area. The operator uses Rosie to move, lift or offload radioactive materials using its integral lifting hook or to position the Kraft Predator arm in locations where the arm can be used to dismantle parts of the CP-5 reactor. The specific operating areas were concentrated in two high radiation areas, one at the top of the reactor structure atop and within the reactor tank assembly and the second at a large opening on the west side of the reactor's biological shield called the west thermal column. In the first of these areas, low level radioactive waste size previously segmented or dismantled by the Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) and placed into a steel drum or transfer can were moved to a staging area for manual packaging. In the latter area, the manipulator arm removed and transferred shielding blocks from the west thermal column area of the reactor into waste containers. Rosie can also deploy up to twelve remotely controlled television cameras, some with microphones, which can be used

  3. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankura, B. J. [McDermott Technology Inc., Alliance, OH (United States); Kudlac, G. A. [McDermott Technology Inc., Alliance, OH (United States); Bailey, R. T. [McDermott Technology Inc., Alliance, OH (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon ® covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constituents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. The pollutant removal performance and durability of this device is the subject of a USDOE sponsored program to develop this technology. The program was conducted under contract to the United States Department of Energy's Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) and was supported by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) within the Ohio Department of Development, the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center (EPRI-ECTC) and Babcock and Wilcox - a McDermott Company (B&W). This report covers the results of the first phase of this program. This Phase I project has been a two year effort. Phase I includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MWt. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon ® covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. Although soda ash was shown to be the most effective reagent for acid gas absorption, comparative cost analyses suggested that magnesium enhanced lime was the most promising avenue for future study. The durability of the

  4. Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts Arthro

  5. Ultrasensitive microanalytical diagnostic methods for rickettsial pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    A strategic CRADA was established between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston to address pressing needs for US protection against biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and emerging infectious diseases. The combination of unique expertise and facilities at UTMB and SNL enabled interdisciplinary research efforts in the development of rapid and accurate diagnostic methods for early detection of trace priority pathogen levels. Outstanding postdoctoral students were also trained at both institutions to help enable the next generation of scientists to tackle the challenging interdisciplinary problems in the area of biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. Novel approaches to diagnostics were developed and the both the speed of assays as well as the detection sensitivity were improved by over an order of magnitude compared to traditional methods. This is a significant step toward more timely and specific detection of dangerous infections. We developed in situ polymerized porous polymer monoliths that can be used as (1) size exclusion elements for capture and processing of rickettsial infected cells from a sample, (2) photopatternable framework for grafting high densities of functionalized antibodies/fluorescent particles using novel monolith chemistry. Grafting affinity reagents specific to rickettsial particles enables rapid, ultra-sensitive assays by overcoming transport limitations of traditional planar assay approaches. We have selectively trapped particles and bacteria at the cell trap and have also detected picomolar mouse IL-6 captured with only 20 minutes total incubation times using the densely patterned monolith framework. As predicted, the monolith exhibits >10x improvements in both capture speed and capture density compared to traditional planar approaches. The most significant advancements as part of this CRADA is the optimization of techniques allowing the detection of <10 rickettsial

  6. The Savannah River Environmental Technology Field Test Platform: Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Jarosch, T.R.; Looney, B.B.; Raymond, R.

    1995-01-01

    The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The DOE complex has devised several strategies to facilitate this transfer including joint research projects between private industries and government laboratories or universities (CRADAs) and streamlined licensing procedures. One strategy that has been under-utilized is a planned sequence gradually moving from laboratory development and field demonstration to long term evaluation and onsite use. Industrial partnership and commercial production can be initiated at any step based on the performance, market, user needs, and costs associated with the technology. This approach allows use of the technology by onsite groups for compliance monitoring tasks (e.g. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management), while following parallel research and development organizations the opportunity to evaluate the long term performance and to make modifications or improvements to the technology. This probationary period also provides regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology's performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs

  7. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  8. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Simulink/PARS Integration Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacaliuc, B. [ORNL; Nakhaee, N. [Sundance DSP, Inc.

    2013-12-18

    The state of the art for signal processor hardware has far out-paced the development tools for placing applications on that hardware. In addition, signal processors are available in a variety of architectures, each uniquely capable of handling specific types of signal processing efficiently. With these processors becoming smaller and demanding less power, it has become possible to group multiple processors, a heterogeneous set of processors, into single systems. Different portions of the desired problem set can be assigned to different processor types as appropriate. As software development tools do not keep pace with these processors, especially when multiple processors of different types are used, a method is needed to enable software code portability among multiple processors and multiple types of processors along with their respective software environments. Sundance DSP, Inc. has developed a software toolkit called “PARS”, whose objective is to provide a framework that uses suites of tools provided by different vendors, along with modeling tools and a real time operating system, to build an application that spans different processor types. The software language used to express the behavior of the system is a very high level modeling language, “Simulink”, a MathWorks product. ORNL has used this toolkit to effectively implement several deliverables. This CRADA describes this collaboration between ORNL and Sundance DSP, Inc.

  10. Fabrication, Treatment and Testing of a 1.6 Cell Photo-injector Cavity for HZB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Kneisel, T. Kamps, J. Knobloch, O. Kugeler, A. Neumann, R. Nietubyc, J.K. Sekutowicz

    2011-03-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Forschungszentrum Dresden (FZD) and JLab we have fabricated and tested after appropriate surface treatment a 1.5 cell, 1300 MHz RRR niobium photo-injector cavity to be used in a demonstration test at BESSY*. Following a baseline test at JLab, the cavity received a lead spot coating of ~8 mm diameter deposited with a cathode arc at the Soltan Institute on the endplate made from large grain niobium. It had been demonstrated in earlier tests with a DESY built 1.5 cell cavity the original design that a lead spot of this size can be a good electron source, when irradiated with a laser light of 213 nm . In the initial test with the lead spot we could measure a peak surface electric field of ~ 29 MV/m; after a second surface treatment, carried out to improve the cavity performance, but which was not done with sufficient precaution, the lead spot was destroyed and the cavity had to be coated a second time. This contribution reports about the experiences and results obtained with this cavity.

  11. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  12. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker, Charles L. III; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  13. DPF Durability ORNL-04-0692

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Stafford, Randall [Cummins, Inc

    2016-11-01

    A substantial amount of testing and analysis was performed over the 13-year-duration of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Cummins Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL's work focused on developing fundamental understanding of the mechanical and physical properties and their relationship to the microstructure of Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) materials (i.e., cordierite, aluminum titanate, Si-SiC). These materials exhibit significant strain tolerance owing to their highly porous and mircocracked microstructures. That is, while very weak, the porous and compliant microstructure could withstand large strains without failing catastrophically. Substantial knowledge was also gained with respect to preparation of test specimens for evaluation of mechanical properties and the care required. Once the role of the microstructure of the wall material on its mechanical response was understood, the DPF honeycombs themselves were re-examined, and the influence of the honeycomb structure was considered. Cummins s work focused mainly on the apparent strength of the DPF honeycomb structure and using the material properties generated at ORNL for input to their regeneration and performance-predictive models.

  14. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na 2 B 10 H 10 ) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity

  15. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  16. Web-based document and content management with off-the-shelf software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, J.

    1999-01-01

    This, then, is the current status of the project: Since we made the switch to Intradoc, we are now treating the project as a document and image management system. In reality, it could be considered a document and content management system since we can manage almost any file input to the system such as video or audio. At present, however, we are concentrating on images. As mentioned above, my CRADA funding was only targeted at including thumbnails of images in Intradoc. We still had to modify Intradoc so that it would compress images submitted to the system. All processing of files submitted to Intradoc is handled in what is called the Document Refinery. Even though MrSID created thumbnails in the process of compressing an image, work needed to be done to somehow build this capability into the Document Refinery. Therefore we made the decision to contract the Intradoc Engineering Team to perform this custom development work. To make Intradoc even more capable of handling images, we have also contracted for customization of the Document Refinery to accept Adobe PhotoShop and Illustrator file in their native format

  17. Freeze-drying technology: A separation technique for liquid nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musgrave, J.A.; Efurd, D.W.; Banar, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Freeze-drying technology (FDT) has been around for several decades as a separation technology. Most commonly, FDT is associated with the processing of food, but the largest industrial-scale use of FDT is in the pharmaceutical industry. Through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with BOC Edwards Calumatic, we are demonstrating the feasibility of FDT as a waste minimization and pollution prevention technology. This is a novel and innovative application of FDT. In addition, we plan to demonstrate that the freeze-dried residue is an ideal feed material for ceramic stabilization of radioactive waste and excess fissile material. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of FDT for the separation of complex radioactive and nonradioactive materials, including liquids, slurries, and sludges containing a wide variety of constituents in which the separation factors are >10 8 . This is the first application of FDT in which the condensate is of primary importance. Our focus is applying this technology to the elimination of radioactive liquid discharges from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and within the U.S. Department of Energy complex; however, successful demonstration will lead to nuclear industry-wide applications

  18. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  19. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  20. Aqueous-stream uranium-removal technology cost/benefit and market analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information that was gathered by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) in order to help the Department of Energy (DOE) determine the merit of continued biosorption research funding. However, in the event that funding is continued, it is also intended to help the researchers in their efforts to develop a better uranium-removal process. This report (1) provides a comparison of DOE sites that may utilize aqueous-stream, uranium-removal biosorption technology, (2) presents a comparison of the biosorption and ion exchange processes, and (3) establishes performance criteria by which the project can be measured. It also attempts to provide focus for biosorbent ground-water-remediation research and to ask questions that need to be answered. This report is primarily a study of the US market for technologies that remove uranium from aqueous streams, but it also addresses the international market-particularly for Germany. Because KEI's access to international market information is extremely limited, the material presented in this report represents a best effort to obtain this data. Although uranium-contaminated aqueous streams are a problem in other countries as well, the scope of this report is primarily limited to the US and Germany for two reasons: (1) Germany is the country of the biosorbent-CRADA partner and (2) time constraints

  1. The Development of a Roof Integrated Solar Hot Water System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Infrastructure and DER Dept.; Moss, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solar Technologies Dept.; Palomino, G. Ernest [Salt River Project (SRP), Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The Salt River Project (SRP), in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Energy Laboratories, Inc. (ELI), collaborated to develop, test, and evaluate an advanced solar water-heating product for new homes. SRP and SNL collaborated under a Department of Energy Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), with ELI as SRP's industry partner. The project has resulted in the design and development of the Roof Integrated Thermal Siphon (RITH) system, an innovative product that features complete roof integration, a storage tank in the back of the collector and below the roofline, easy installation by homebuilders, and a low installed cost. SRP's market research guided the design, and the laboratory tests conducted at SNL provided information used to refine the design of field test units and indicated that the RITH concept is viable. ELI provided design and construction expertise and is currently configured to manufacture the units. This final report for the project provides all of the pertinent and available materials connected to the project including market research studies, the design features and development of the system, and the testing and evaluation conducted at SNL and at a model home test site in Phoenix, Arizona.

  2. Digital X-ray imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The global objective of this cooperation was to lower the cost and improve the quality of breast health care in the United States. We planned to achieve it by designing a very high performance digital radiography unit for breast surgical specimen radiography in the operating room. These technical goals needed to be achieved at reasonable manufacturing costs to enable MedOptics to achieve high market penetration at a profit. Responsibility for overall project execution rested with MedOptics. MedOptics fabricated and demonstrated hardware, and selected components and handled the overall integration. After completion of this CRADA, MedOptics worked with collaborators to demonstrate clinical performance and utility. Finally, the company marketed the device. LLNL convened a multi-directorate expert panel for an intensive review of MedOptics point design. A written brief of panel conclusions and recommendations was prepared. In addition, LLNL was responsible for: computationally simulating the effects of varying source voltage and filtering (predicting the required dynamic range for the detector); evaluating CsI:Tl, CdWO4 and scintillating glass as image converters; recommending image enhancement algorithms. The LLNL modeling results guided the design and experimental elements of the project. The Laboratory's unique array of sources and detectors was employed to resolve specific technical questions. Our image processing expertise was applied to the selection of enhancement tools for image display

  3. Portable reconfigurable line sensor (PRLS) and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.P.; Buckle, T.H.; Blattman, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Portable Reconfigurable Line Sensor (PRLS) is a bistatic, pulsed-Doppler, microwave intrusion detection system developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Air Force. The PRLS is rapidly and easily deployed, and can detect intruders ranging from a slow creeping intruder to a high speed vehicle. The system has a sharply defined detection zone and will not falsely alarm on nearby traffic. Unlike most microwave sensors, the PRLS requires no alignment or calibration. Its portability, battery operation, ease of setup, and RF alarm reporting capability make it an excellent choice for perimeter, portal, and gap-filler applications in the important new field of rapidly-deployable sensor systems. In October 1992, the US Air Force and Racon, Inc., entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to commercialize the PRLS, jointly sharing government and industry resources. The Air Force brings the user's perspective and requirements to the cooperative effort. Sandia, serving as the technical arm of the Air Force, adds the actual PRLS technology to the joint effort, and provides security systems and radar development expertise. Racon puts the Air Force requirements and Sandia technology together into a commercial product, making the system meet important commercial manufacturing constraints. The result is a true ''win-win'' situation, with reduced government investment during the commercial development of the PRLS, and industry access to technology not otherwise available

  4. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys in Microturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Matthews, W.J. (Capstone Turbine Corp.)

    2010-09-15

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Capstone Turbine Corporation (CTC) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for use of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels as a material of construction for microturbine recuperator components. ORNL delivered test coupons of three different AFA compositions to CTC. The coupons were exposed in steady-state elevated turbine exit temperature (TET) engine testing, with coupons removed for analysis after accumulating ~1,500, 3,000, 4,500, and 6,000 hours of operation. Companion test coupons were also exposed in oxidation testing at ORNL at 700-800°C in air with 10% H2O. Post test assessment of the coupons was performed at ORNL by light microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The higher Al and Nb containing AFA alloys exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation/corrosion, and thus show good promise for recuperator applications.

  5. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  6. Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-03-01

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

  7. ULTRACOATINGS - Enabling Energy and Power Solutions in High Contact Stress Environments Through Next Generation Nanocoatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Higdon, Clifton [Eaton Corporation

    2011-10-01

    This work was a portion of a larger DOE/ITP Grand Challenge project led by Eaton Corporation and which included Ames Lab, Borg Warner Morse, and Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne. The current report summarizes work done under a CRADA between ORNL and Eaton. Tests of two types were performed at ORNL during the course of this work: (1) simulations of timing chain wear and friction under reciprocating conditions, and (2) pin-on-disk screening tests for bearings undergoing unidirectional sliding. The four materials supplied for evaluation in a timing chain link simulation were hardened type 440B stainless steel, nitrided type 440B stainless steel, VC-coated type 52100 bearing steel, and (ZrTi)B-coated type 52100 bearing steel. Reciprocating wear tests revealed that the VC coating was by far the most wear resistant. In friction, the nitrided stainless steel did slightly better than the other materials. The results will also be included in the overall project report by Eaton Corp.

  8. Real-time vision systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Lu, Shin-yee [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Many industrial and defence applications require an ability to make instantaneous decisions based on sensor input of a time varying process. Such systems are referred to as `real-time systems` because they process and act on data as it occurs in time. When a vision sensor is used in a real-time system, the processing demands can be quite substantial, with typical data rates of 10-20 million samples per second. A real-time Machine Vision Laboratory (MVL) was established in FY94 to extend our years of experience in developing computer vision algorithms to include the development and implementation of real-time vision systems. The laboratory is equipped with a variety of hardware components, including Datacube image acquisition and processing boards, a Sun workstation, and several different types of CCD cameras, including monochrome and color area cameras and analog and digital line-scan cameras. The equipment is reconfigurable for prototyping different applications. This facility has been used to support several programs at LLNL, including O Division`s Peacemaker and Deadeye Projects as well as the CRADA with the U.S. Textile Industry, CAFE (Computer Aided Fabric Inspection). To date, we have successfully demonstrated several real-time applications: bullet tracking, stereo tracking and ranging, and web inspection. This work has been documented in the ongoing development of a real-time software library.

  9. Develop Solid State Laser Sources for High Resolution Video Projection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickeen, B.K.

    2000-10-24

    Magic Lantern and Honeywell FM and T worked together to develop lower-cost, visible light solid-state laser sources to use in laser projector products. Work included a new family of video displays that use lasers as light sources. The displays would project electronic images up to 15 meters across and provide better resolution and clarity than movie film, up to five times the resolution of the best available computer monitors, up to 20 times the resolution of television, and up to six times the resolution of HDTV displays. The products that could be developed as a result of this CRADA could benefit the economy in many ways, such as: (1) Direct economic impact in the local manufacture and marketing of the units. (2) Direct economic impact in exports and foreign distribution. (3) Influencing the development of other elements of display technology that take advantage of the signals that these elements allow. (4) Increased productivity for engineers, FAA controllers, medical practitioners, and military operatives.

  10. Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihl, J.; West, B.; Toops, T.; Adelman, B. (Navistar, Inc.); Derybowski, E. (Navistar, Inc.)

    2011-09-30

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT, also known as NOx adsorber catalyst) regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

  11. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  12. Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

  13. Low-cost compact MEMS scanning ladar system for robotic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Yuan, Ping; Bai, Xiaogang; Quesada, Emilio; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Stann, Barry L.; Dammann, John F.; Giza, Mark M.; Lawler, William B.

    2012-06-01

    Future robots and autonomous vehicles require compact low-cost Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) systems for autonomous navigation. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) had recently demonstrated a brass-board short-range eye-safe MEMS scanning LADAR system for robotic applications. Boeing Spectrolab is doing a tech-transfer (CRADA) of this system and has built a compact MEMS scanning LADAR system with additional improvements in receiver sensitivity, laser system, and data processing system. Improved system sensitivity, low-cost, miniaturization, and low power consumption are the main goals for the commercialization of this LADAR system. The receiver sensitivity has been improved by 2x using large-area InGaAs PIN detectors with low-noise amplifiers. The FPGA code has been updated to extend the range to 50 meters and detect up to 3 targets per pixel. Range accuracy has been improved through the implementation of an optical T-Zero input line. A compact commercially available erbium fiber laser operating at 1550 nm wavelength is used as a transmitter, thus reducing the size of the LADAR system considerably from the ARL brassboard system. The computer interface has been consolidated to allow image data and configuration data (configuration settings and system status) to pass through a single Ethernet port. In this presentation we will discuss the system architecture and future improvements to receiver sensitivity using avalanche photodiodes.

  14. Modeling, system identification, and control for slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.; Baty, R.; Dykhuizen, R.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses work performed under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) with Corning, Inc., to analyze and test various techniques for controlling the motion of a high speed robotic arm carrying an open container of viscous liquid, in this case, molten glass. A computer model was generated to estimate the modes of oscillation of the liquid based on the shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. This fluid model was experimentally verified and tuned based on experimental data from a capacitive sensor on the side of the container. A model of the robot dynamics was also developed and verified through experimental tests on a Fanuc S-800 robot arm. These two models were used to estimate the overall modes of oscillation of an open container of liquid being carried by a robot arm. Using the estimated modes, inverse dynamic control techniques were used to determine a motion profile which would eliminate waves on the liquid`s surface. Experimental tests showed that residual surface waves in an open container of water at the end of motion were reduced by over 95% and that in-motion surface waves were reduced by over 75%.

  15. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  16. The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S. R. [ORNL; Daniel, A. [Southwire Company

    2013-10-31

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy?s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

  17. The commercial development of water repellent coatings for high voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and Southwire Company was to jointly develop a low cost, commercially viable, water-repellant anti-icing coating system for high voltage transmission lines. Icing of power lines and other structures caused by freezing rain events occurs annually in the United States, and leads to severe and prolonged power outages. These outages cause untold economic and personal distress for many American families and businesses. Researchers at the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have previously developed a set of superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anti-icing properties that could potentially be sprayed or painted onto high-tension power lines and pylons. These coatings drastically reduce ice accumulation on these structures during freezing rain events. The project involved obtaining technical input, supplies and test high voltage cables from Southwire, along with the joint development of anti-icing coating techniques, which would result in a commercial license agreement between Southwire and ORNL, and potentially other companies requiring water repellent anti-icing coatings.

  18. Development and Testing of Abrasion Resistant Hard Coats For Polymer Film Reflectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Gee, R.; DiGrazia, M.

    2010-10-01

    Reflective polymer film technology can significantly reduce the cost of solar reflectors and installed Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants by both reduced material cost and lower weight. One challenge of polymer reflectors in the CSP environment pertains to contact cleaning methods typically used with glass mirrors. Such contact cleaning methods can scratch the surface of polymer reflectors and thereby reduce specular reflectance. ReflecTech, Inc. (a subsidiary of SkyFuel, Inc.) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to devise and develop an abrasion resistant coating (ARC) suitable for deposition onto polymer based mirror film. A number of candidate ARC products were identified as candidate formulations. Industrial collaborators prepared samples having their ARCs deposited onto ReflecTech Mirror Film pre-laminated to aluminum sheet substrates. Samples were provided for evaluation and subjected to baseline (unweathered) and accelerated exposure conditions and subsequently characterized for abrasion resistance and adhesion. An advanced ARC product has been identified that exhibits outstanding initial abrasion resistance and adhesion to ReflecTech Mirror Film. These properties were also retained after exposure to the various accelerated stress conditions. This material has been successfully manufactured as a 1.5 m wide roll-to-roll construction in a production environment.

  19. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems

  20. Reinforcement of Aluminum Castings with Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q

    2004-01-07

    The project ''Reinforcement of Aluminum Casting with Dissimilar Metal'' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Cummins Inc. This project, technologies have been developed to reinforce aluminum castings with steel insert. Defect-free bond between the steel insert and the aluminum casting has been consistently obtained. The push-out experiment indicated that the bond strength is higher than that of the Al-Fin method. Two patents have been granted to the project team that is comprised of Cummins Inc. and ORNL. This report contains four sections: the coating of the steel pins, the cast-in method, microstructure characterization, and the bond strength. The section of the coating of the steel pins contains coating material selection, electro-plating technique for plating Cu and Ni on steel, and diffusion bonding of the coatings to the steel. The section of cast-in method deals with factors that affecting the quality of the metallurgical bond between the coated steel and the aluminum castings. The results of microstructure characteristics of the bonding are presented in the microstructure characterization section. A push-out experiment and the results obtained using this method is described in the section of bond strength/mechanical property.

  1. Aqueous-stream uranium-removal technology cost/benefit and market analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information that was gathered by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) in order to help the Department of Energy (DOE) determine the merit of continued biosorption research funding. However, in the event that funding is continued, it is also intended to help the researchers in their efforts to develop a better uranium-removal process. This report (1) provides a comparison of DOE sites that may utilize aqueous-stream, uranium-removal biosorption technology, (2) presents a comparison of the biosorption and ion exchange processes, and (3) establishes performance criteria by which the project can be measured. It also attempts to provide focus for biosorbent ground-water-remediation research and to ask questions that need to be answered. This report is primarily a study of the US market for technologies that remove uranium from aqueous streams, but it also addresses the international market-particularly for Germany. Because KEI`s access to international market information is extremely limited, the material presented in this report represents a best effort to obtain this data. Although uranium-contaminated aqueous streams are a problem in other countries as well, the scope of this report is primarily limited to the US and Germany for two reasons: (1) Germany is the country of the biosorbent-CRADA partner and (2) time constraints.

  2. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  3. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNL’s focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  4. Miniature chemical sensor combining molecular recognition with evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages

  5. Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiarski, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  6. ADVANCED BIOMASS REBURNING FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY NOx CONTROL AND BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES JOINT FINAL REPORT; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir M Zamansky; Mark S. Sheldon; Vitali V. Lissianski; Peter M. Maly; David K. Moyeda; Antonio Marquez; W. Randall Seeker

    2000-01-01

    This report presents results of studies under a Phase II SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and a closely coordinated project sponsored by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL, formerly FETC). The overall Phase II objective of the SBIR project is to experimentally optimize the biomass reburning technologies and conduct engineering design studies needed for process demonstration at full scale. The DOE project addresses supporting issues for the process design including modeling activities, economic studies of biomass handling, and experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling. The performance of biomass has been examined in a 300 kW (1 x 10(sup 6) Btu/hr) Boiler Simulator Facility under different experimental conditions. Fuels under investigation include furniture waste, willow wood and walnut shells. Tests showed that furniture pellets and walnut shells provided similar NO(sub x) control as that of natural gas in basic reburning at low heat inputs. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with walnut shell and furniture pellets was 65% and 58% respectively. Willow wood provided a maximum NO(sub x) reduction of 50% and was no better than natural gas at any condition tested. The efficiency of biomass increases when N-agent is injected into reburning and/or burnout zones, or along with OFA (Advanced Reburning). Co-injection of Na(sub 2)CO(sub 3) with N-agent further increases efficiency of NO(sub x) reduction. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with furniture pellets and willow wood in Advanced Reburning was 83% and 78% respectively. All combustion experiments of the Phase II project have been completed. All objectives of the experimental tasks were successfully met. The kinetic model of biomass reburning has been developed. Model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus correctly represents main features of the reburning process. Modeling suggests that the most important factors that provide

  7. ADVANCED BIOMASS REBURNING FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY NOx CONTROL AND BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES JOINT FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir M. Zamansky; Mark S. Sheldon; Vitali V. Lissianski; Peter M. Maly; David K. Moyeda; Antonio Marquez; W. Randall Seeker

    2000-10-01

    This report presents results of studies under a Phase II SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and a closely coordinated project sponsored by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL, formerly FETC). The overall Phase II objective of the SBIR project is to experimentally optimize the biomass reburning technologies and conduct engineering design studies needed for process demonstration at full scale. The DOE project addresses supporting issues for the process design including modeling activities, economic studies of biomass handling, and experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling. The performance of biomass has been examined in a 300 kW (1 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr) Boiler Simulator Facility under different experimental conditions. Fuels under investigation include furniture waste, willow wood and walnut shells. Tests showed that furniture pellets and walnut shells provided similar NO{sub x} control as that of natural gas in basic reburning at low heat inputs. Maximum NO{sub x} reduction achieved with walnut shell and furniture pellets was 65% and 58% respectively. Willow wood provided a maximum NO{sub x} reduction of 50% and was no better than natural gas at any condition tested. The efficiency of biomass increases when N-agent is injected into reburning and/or burnout zones, or along with OFA (Advanced Reburning). Co-injection of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} with N-agent further increases efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction. Maximum NO{sub x} reduction achieved with furniture pellets and willow wood in Advanced Reburning was 83% and 78% respectively. All combustion experiments of the Phase II project have been completed. All objectives of the experimental tasks were successfully met. The kinetic model of biomass reburning has been developed. Model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus correctly represents main features of the reburning process. Modeling suggests that the most important factors that provide

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF DISPOSABLE SORBENTS FOR CHLORIDE REMOVAL FROM HIGH TEMPERATURE COAL-DERIVED GASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala Krishnan; Raghubir Gupta

    1999-09-01

    SRI and RTI to conduct tests at high-temperature, high-pressure conditions (HTHP). The HTHP tests confirmed the ability of nahcolite pellets and granules to reduce the HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm levels with a very high sorbent utilization for chloride capture. The effect of several operating variables such as temperature, pressure, presence of hydrogen sulfide, and sorbent preparation methods was studied on the efficacy of HCl removal by the sorbent. Pilot-scale tests were performed in the fluidized-bed mode at the gasifier facility at the GE-CRD. Sorbent exposure tests were also conducted using a hot coal gas stream from the DOE/FETC's fluidized-bed gasifier at Morgantown, WV. These tests confirmed the results obtained at SRI and RTI. A preliminary economic assessment showed that the cost of HCl removal in a commercial IGCC system will be about $0.001/kWh (1 mills/kWh).

  9. Weight Loss Associated With Different Patterns of Self-Monitoring Using the Mobile Phone App My Meal Mate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michelle C; Burley, Victoria J; Cade, Janet E

    2017-02-02

    , conscientiousness, and consideration of future consequences were not statistically associated with extent of self-monitoring. The results of this post hoc exploratory analysis indicate that duration and frequency of app use is associated with improved weight loss, but further research is required to identify whether there are participant characteristics that would reliably predict those who are most likely to regularly self-monitor their diet. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01744535; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01744535 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6FEtc3PVB). ©Michelle C Carter, Victoria J Burley, Janet E Cade. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 02.02.2017.

  10. ULTRACOATINGS: Enabling Energy and Power Solutions in High Contact Stress Environments through Next-Generation Nanocoatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.; Qu, J.; Higdon, C. III (Eaton Corp.)

    2011-09-30

    This industry-driven project was the result of a successful response by Eaton Corporation to a DOE/ITP Program, Grand Challenge, industry call. It consisted of a one-year effort in which ORNL participated in the area of friction and wear testing. In addition to Eaton Corporation and ORNL (CRADA), the project team included: Ames Laboratory, who developed the underlying concept for titanium- zirconium-boron (TZB) based nanocomposite coatings; Borg-Warner Morse TEC, an automotive engine timing chain manufacturer in Ithaca, New York, with its own proprietary hard coating; and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, Inc., a dry-solids pump manufacturer in San Fernando Valley, California. This report focuses only on the portion of work that was conducted by ORNL, in a CRADA with Eaton Corporation. A comprehensive final report for the entire effort, which ended in September 2010, has been prepared for DOE by the team. The term 'ultracoatings' derives from the ambitious technical target for the new generation of nanocoatings. As applications, Eaton was specifically considering a fuel pump and a gear application in which the product of the contact pressure and slip velocity during operation of mating surfaces, commonly called the 'PV value', was equal to or greater than 70,000 MPa-m/s. This ambitious target challenges the developers of coatings to produce material capable of strong bonding to the substrate, as well as high wear resistance and the ability to maintain sliding friction at low, energy-saving levels. The partners in this effort were responsible for the selection and preparation of such candidate ultracoatings, and ORNL used established tribology testing capabilities to help screen these candidates for performance. This final report summarizes ORNL's portion of the nanocomposite coatings development effort and presents both generated data and the analyses that were used in the course of this effort. Initial contact stress and speed calculations

  11. Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-08-01

    velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

  12. EVALUATION OF RANGE ESTIMATES FOR TOYOTA FCHV-ADV UNDER OPEN ROAD DRIVING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, D.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-07-10

    The objective of this evaluation was to independently and objectively verify driving ranges of >400 miles announced by Toyota for its new advanced Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) utilizing 70 MPa compressed hydrogen. To accomplish this, participants from both Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) witnessed and participated in a 2-vehicle evaluation with Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA) over a typical open road route for over 11 hours in one day with all relevant data recorded. SRNL and TEMA first entered into discussions of verifying the range of the advanced Toyota Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) in August 2008 resulting from reported 400+ mile range by Toyota. After extended negotiations, a CRADA agreement, SRNS CRADA No. CR-04-003, was signed on May 6, 2009. Subsequently, on June 30, 2009 SRNL and NREL participated in an all-day evaluation of the FCHV-adv with TEMA to determine the real-world driving range of this vehicle through on-road driving on an extended round-trip drive between Torrance and San Diego, California. SRNL and NREL observed the vehicles being refueled at Toyota's headquarters the day before the evaluation in Torrance, CA on June 29. At 8:00 AM on June 30, the vehicles departed Torrance north toward downtown Los Angeles, then west to the Pacific Coast Highway, and down to San Diego. After lunch the vehicles retraced their route back to Torrance. The traffic encountered was much heavier than anticipated, causing the vehicles to not return to Torrance until 9 PM. Each vehicle was driven by the same Toyota driver all day, with one SRNL/NREL observer in each vehicle the entire route. Data was logged by Toyota and analyzed by NREL. The maximum range of the FCHV-adv vehicles was calculated to be 431 miles under these driving conditions. This distance was calculated from the actual range of 331.5 miles during over 11 hours driving, plus 99.5 miles

  13. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  14. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  15. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  16. Reflection and Transmission of Plane Electromagnetic Waves by a Geologic Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Electric field and magnetic field reflection and transmission responses generated by a plane wave normally incident onto a finite - thickness geologic layer are mathematically derived and numerically evaluated. A thin layer with enhanced electric current conductivity and/or magnetic permeability is a reasonable geophysical representation of a hydraulic fracture inject ed with a high - contrast proppant pack. Both theory and numerics indicate that backward - and forward - scattered electromagnetic wavefields are potentially observable in a field experiment, despite the extreme thinness of a fracture compared to a typical low - frequency electromagnetic wavelength. The First Born Approximation (FBA) representation of layer scattering, significant for inversion studies, is shown to be accurate for a thin layer with mild medium parameter (i.e., conductivity, permeability, and per mittivity) contrasts with the surrounding homogeneous wholespace. However, FBA scattering theory breaks down for thick layers and strong parameter contrasts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. This research is conducted under the auspices of CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) SC11/01780.00 between Carbo Ceramics Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories. The author acknowledges former Carbo R&D Vic e - President Mr. Chad Cannan and former SNL Geophysics Department manage r Ms. Amy Halloran for their interest i n and support of this work. Technical discussions with Project Manager and Principal Investigator Dr. Chester J. Weiss of the SNL Geophysics Department greatly benefited this work. Dr. Lewis C. Bartel, formerly with S NL and presently a consultant to Carbo Ceramics, provided many useful and intuitive insights, and

  17. Neutron Scattering Studies of Liquid on or Confined in Nano- and Mesoporous Carbons, Including Carbide-Derived Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    This project involved the synthesis of microporous graphitic-carbon powders with subnanometer average pore size, and very narrow pore size distributions, and the use of these materials in experimental studies of pore-fluid structure and dynamics. Samples of carbide-derived carbon powder, synthesized by extraction of the metal cations from TiC by a high temperature chlorination process, followed by high temperature vacuum annealing, were prepared by Ranjan Dash and his associates at CRADA partner Y-Carbon, Inc. The resulting material had average pore sizes ranging from 5 to 8 . These powders were used in two experiments conducted by researchers involved in the Energy Frontier Research Center Directed by David J. Wesolowski at ORNL, the Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST) Center. FIRST-funded researchers at Drexel University collaborated with scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to measure the expansion and contraction of the microporous carbon particles during charging and discharging of supercapactor electrodes composed of these particles (Hantell et al., 2011, Electrochemistry Communications, v. 13, pp. 1221-1224.) in an electrolyte composed of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate dissolved in acetonitrile. In the second experiment, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Drexel University conducted quasielastic neutron scattering studies of the diffusional dynamics of water imbibed into the micropores of the same material (Chathoth et al., 2011, EuroPhysics Journal, v. 95, pp. 56001/1-6). These studies helped to establish the role of pores approaching the size of the solvent and dissolved ions in altering diffusional dynamics, ion transport and physical response of conducting substrates to ion desolvation and entry into subnamometer pores.

  18. High Efficiency Room Air Conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Pradeep [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This project was undertaken as a CRADA project between UT-Battelle and Geberal Electric Company and was funded by Department of Energy to design and develop of a high efficiency room air conditioner. A number of novel elements were investigated to improve the energy efficiency of a state-of-the-art WAC with base capacity of 10,000 BTU/h. One of the major modifications was made by downgrading its capacity from 10,000 BTU/hr to 8,000 BTU/hr by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity (8,000 BTU/hr) but high efficiency compressor having an EER of 9.7 as compared with 9.3 of the original compressor. However, all heat exchangers from the original unit were retained to provide higher EER. The other subsequent major modifications included- (i) the AC fan motor was replaced by a brushless high efficiency ECM motor along with its fan housing, (ii) the capillary tube was replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and (iii) the unit was tested with a drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (90% molar concentration)/R125 (10% molar concentration). The WAC was tested in the environmental chambers at ORNL as per the design rating conditions of AHAM/ASHRAE (Outdoor- 95F and 40%RH, Indoor- 80F, 51.5%RH). All these modifications resulted in enhancing the EER of the WAC by up to 25%.

  19. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A ampersand M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV reg-sign IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV reg-sign IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies

  20. Additively Manufactured, Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Cans for Valves Used in Energy Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, William H. [ORNL; Gandy, David [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Lannom, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2018-01-01

    This CRADA NFE-14-05241 was conducted as a Technical Collaboration project within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) sponsored by the US Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office (CPS Agreement Number 24761). Opportunities for MDF technical collaborations are listed in the announcement “Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations for US Manufacturers in Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Technologies” posted at http://web.ornl.gov/sci/manufacturing/docs/FBO-ORNL-MDF-2013-2.pdf. The goal of technical collaborations is to engage industry partners to participate in short-term, collaborative projects within the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) to assess applicability and of new energy efficient manufacturing technologies. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.ORNL would like to acknowledge the leadership of EPRI in pulling together the extensive team and managing the execution of the project. In addition, ORNL would like to acknowledge the other contributions of the team members associated with this project. Quintus provided time, access, expertise, and labor of their hydro forming capabilities to evaluate both conventional and additively manufactured tools through this process. Crane ChemPharma Energy provided guidance and information on valve geometries. Carpenter Powder Products was involved with the team providing information on powder processing as it pertains to the canning and hot isostatic pressing of powder. on providing powder and knowledge as it pertains to powder supply for hot isostatic pressing; they also provided powder for the test trials by the industrial team. Bodycote provided guidance on hot isostatic pressing and can requirements. They were also responsible for the hot isostatic pressing of the test valve

  1. High Efficiency, Low Emission Refrigeration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL

    2016-08-01

    Supermarket refrigeration systems account for approximately 50% of supermarket energy use, placing this class of equipment among the highest energy consumers in the commercial building domain. In addition, the commonly used refrigeration system in supermarket applications is the multiplex direct expansion (DX) system, which is prone to refrigerant leaks due to its long lengths of refrigerant piping. This leakage reduces the efficiency of the system and increases the impact of the system on the environment. The high Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants commonly used in these systems, coupled with the large refrigerant charge and the high refrigerant leakage rates leads to significant direct emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Methods for reducing refrigerant leakage and energy consumption are available, but underutilized. Further work needs to be done to reduce costs of advanced system designs to improve market utilization. In addition, refrigeration system retrofits that result in reduced energy consumption are needed since the majority of applications address retrofits rather than new stores. The retrofit market is also of most concern since it involves large-volume refrigerant systems with high leak rates. Finally, alternative refrigerants for new and retrofit applications are needed to reduce emissions and reduce the impact on the environment. The objective of this Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hill Phoenix is to develop a supermarket refrigeration system that reduces greenhouse gas emissions and has 25 to 30 percent lower energy consumption than existing systems. The outcomes of this project will include the design of a low emission, high efficiency commercial refrigeration system suitable for use in current U.S. supermarkets. In addition, a prototype low emission, high efficiency supermarket refrigeration system will be produced for

  2. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  3. Optimization and Domestic Sourcing of Lithium Ion Battery Anode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, III, D. L.; Yoon, S. [A123 Systems, Inc.

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between ORNL and A123Systems, Inc. was to develop a low-temperature heat treatment process for natural graphite based anode materials for high-capacity and long-cycle-life lithium ion batteries. Three major problems currently plague state-of-the-art lithium ion battery anode materials. The first is the cost of the artificial graphite, which is heat-treated well in excess of 2000°C. Because of this high-temperature heat treatment, the anode active material significantly contributes to the cost of a lithium ion battery. The second problem is the limited specific capacity of state-of-the-art anodes based on artificial graphites, which is only about 200-350 mAh/g. This value needs to be increased to achieve high energy density when used with the low cell-voltage nanoparticle LiFePO4 cathode. Thirdly, the rate capability under cycling conditions of natural graphite based materials must be improved to match that of the nanoparticle LiFePO4. Natural graphite materials contain inherent crystallinity and lithium intercalation activity. They hold particular appeal, as they offer huge potential for industrial energy savings with the energy costs essentially subsidized by geological processes. Natural graphites have been heat-treated to a substantially lower temperature (as low as 1000-1500°C) and used as anode active materials to address the problems described above. Finally, corresponding graphitization and post-treatment processes were developed that are amenable to scaling to automotive quantities.

  4. Annual Performance Evaluation of a Pair of Energy Efficient Houses (WC3 and WC4) in Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in 2008, two pairs of energy-saver houses were built at Wolf Creek in Oak Ridge, TN. These houses were designed to maximize energy efficiency using new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The first two houses contained 3713 square feet of conditioned area and were designated as WC1 and WC2; the second pair consisted of 2721 square feet conditioned area with crawlspace foundation and they re called WC3 and WC4. This report is focused on the annual energy performance of WC3 and WC4, and how they compare against a previously benchmarked maximum energy efficient house of a similar footprint. WC3 and WC4 are both about 55-60% more efficient than traditional new construction. Each house showcases a different envelope system: WC3 is built with advanced framing featured cellulose insulation partially mixed with phase change materials (PCM); and WC4 house has cladding composed of an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). The previously benchmarked house was one of three built at the Campbell Creek subdivision in Knoxville, TN. This house (CC3) was designed as a transformation of a builder house (CC1) with the most advanced energy-efficiency features, including solar electricity and hot water, which market conditions are likely to permit within the 2012 2015 period. The builder house itself was representative of a standard, IECC 2006 code-certified, all-electric house built by the builder to sell around 2005 2008.

  5. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J. [Caterpillar Corp.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for

  6. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

  7. Ionic Liquids as Multi-Functional Lubricant Additives to Enhance Engine Efficiency (final report NFE-12-03876)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Barnhill, William C [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Papke, Brian L [Shell Global Solutions (US); Gao, Hong [Shell Global Solutions (US); Kheireddin, Bassem [Shell Global Solutions (US); Chen, Cheng [Shell Global Solutions (US)

    2016-04-01

    This ORNL-Shell CRADA developed and investigated ionic liquids (ILs) as multifunctional additives for next-generation low-viscosity engine oils. Several groups of oil-miscible ILs were successfully designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Synergistic effects between the common anti-wear additive zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and a particular group of ILs were discovered with > 30% friction reduction and 70% wear reduction compared with using ZDDP or IL alone. The IL+ZDDP tribofilm distinguishes itself from the IL or ZDDP tribofilms with substantially higher contents of metal phosphates but less metal oxides and sulfur compounds. Notably, it was revealed that the actual concentrations of functional elements on the droplet surface of the oil containing IL+ZDDP are one order magnitude higher than their nominal values. Such significantly increased concentrations of anti-wear agents are presumably expected for the oilsolid interface and believed to be responsible for the superior lubricating performance. A prototype SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a synergistic IL+ZDDP pair as the anti-wear additive has been formulated based on the compatibility between the IL and other additives. Sequence VIE full-scale engine dynamometer tests demonstrated fuel economy improvement (FEI) for this prototype oil and revealed the individual contributions from the lower oil viscosity and reduced boundary friction. The impact of IL and IL+ZDDP on exhaust emission catalyst was investigated using an accelerated small engine aging test and results were benchmarked against ZDDP.

  8. Safe Use Limits for Advanced Ferritic Steels in Ultra-Supercritical Power Boilers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, RW

    2003-11-03

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Babcock & Wilcox Company to examine the databases for advanced ferritic steels and determine the safe limits for operation in supercritical steam power boilers. The materials of interest included the vanadium-modified 9-12% Cr steels with 1-2% Mo or W. The first task involved a review of pertinent information and the down-selection of a steel of special interest. The long-time database for 9Cr-1Mo-V steel was found to be most satisfactory for the examinations, and this steel was taken to be representative of the group. The second task involved the collection of aged and service exposed samples for metallurgical and mechanical testing. Here, aged samples to 75,000 hours, laboratory-tested samples to 83,000 hours, and service-exposed sample with up to 143,000 hours exposure were collected. The third task involved mechanical testing of exposed samples. Creep-rupture testing to long times was undertaken. Variable stress and temperature testing was included. Results were compared against the prediction of damage models. These models seemed to be adequate for life prediction. The fourth task involved the metallurgical examination of exposed specimens. Changes in microstructure were compared against published information on the evolution of microstructures in 9Cr-Mo-V steels and the results were found to be consistent with expectations. The fifth task involved a survey of steam and fireside corrosion. Data from the service-exposed tubing was examined, and a literature survey was undertaken as part of an activity in support of ultra-supercritical steam boiler technology. The corrosion study indicated some concerns about long-time fireside corrosion and suggested temperature limits were needed for corrosive coal ash conditions.

  9. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories

  10. Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, J. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Confer, K. [Delphi Automotive Systems (United States)

    2012-09-11

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

  11. Improved Method for Quantifying Nonvolatile Residues on Surfaces and in Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovich, M.G.

    2004-03-30

    The objective of the project was to develop an improved method to quantify nonvolatile residues on surfaces and in liquids. The project accomplishments are summarized below: (1) ERA Systems, Inc., The MESERAN Company has designed, developed, built, evaluated, tested, and delivered MicroSolventEvaporator systems to KCP, Astro Pak, and Lockheed Martin, that automatically deposit and evaporate successive small quantities (5-10 microliters) of solvents onto clean reference surfaces. (2) ERA Systems, Inc., The MESERAN Company, and KCP have designed, procured, and evaluated stainless steel disks with specific machined grooves to be used as reference surfaces with the MicroSolventEvaporator and MESERAN Analyzers. (3) KCP evaluated various cleaning processes to easily clean the reference surfaces to acceptable levels. Even though some methods (or a combination of methods) may have worked better than others, an easy method that most companies could use to acceptably clean the disks was desired. Aqueous ultrasonic cleaning with Dirl Lum 603 (30 g per liter concentration) followed by flowing DI water and ultrasonic DI water rinses, nitrogen blow drying, and baking in a HEPA filtered oven at 220 F for 30 minutes proved to be a relatively simple method that most companies could use. (4) KCP developed calibrations of several contaminants on the chosen reference substrates so the MESERAN data could be converted into quantifiable amounts of contamination. (5) KCP performed a prove-in of the MicroSolventEvaporator in conjunction with the MESERAN Analyzer and compared the results to gravimetric data. The method worked and was able to provide data at low contamination levels that can not be reliably obtained gravimetrically. (6) Astro Pak and Lockheed Martin have done limited testing at their facilities. The MESERAN Company has agreed to let them keep the units for awhile so they can continue to perform tests to prove-in the process at their facilities even after the CRADA is

  12. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 2: January through March 2011).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 2 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of the four carbons that have been added to the negative active material of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for the purposes of this study. The four carbons selected for this study were a graphitic carbon, a carbon black, an activated carbon, and acetylene black. The morphology, crystallinity, and impurity contents of each of the four carbons were analyzed; results were consistent with previous data. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown.

  13. RSP Tooling Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-11-20

    RSP Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The general concept involves converting a mold design described by a CAD file to a tooling master using a suitable rapid prototyping (RP) technology such as stereolithography. A pattern transfer is made to a castable ceramic, typically alumina or fused silica (Figure 1). This is followed by spray forming a thick deposit of a tooling alloy on the pattern to capture the desired shape, surface texture, and detail. The resultant metal block is cooled to room temperature and separated from the pattern. The deposit's exterior walls are machined square, allowing it to be used as an insert in a standard mold base. The overall turnaround time for tooling is about 3 to 5 days, starting with a master. Molds and dies produced in this way have been used in high volume production runs in plastic injection molding and die casting. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Grupo Vitro has been established to evaluate the feasibility of using RSP Tooling technology for producing molds and dies of interest to Vitro. This report summarizes results from Phase I of this agreement, and describes work scope and budget for Phase I1 activities. The main objective in Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling method to produce molds for the manufacture of glass and other components of interest to Vitro. This objective was successfully achieved.

  14. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  15. Wildlife biomaterial banking in Africa for now and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Paul; Kotze, Antoinette

    2006-08-01

    The Wildlife Biological Resource Centre (wBRC) together with its partners in BioBank SA, have created a Biological Resource Bank (BRB) that is dedicated to the acquisition, processing, banking, using and provision of biomaterials to the scientific and conservation industry that are viable, diverse and representative of southern Africa's wildlife populations. Banked biomaterials include tissue such as muscle, kidney, fat, liver, embryos, fibroblast cultures, blood, sperm, hair, egg shells and other tissue, fluids and cells. Biomaterials are made available for research, biodiversity conservation and biotechnology development. Biomaterials are used in many disciplines, including genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and disease studies. Biomaterials from selected species are also useful for the detection and monitoring of Persistent Organic Pollutants and other potentially harmful substances found in the environment. Biomaterials are made available to third parties with prior consent from the biomaterials "owner" and only after the signing of a customised Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) or Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The training of staff from National and Provincial Game Reserves, Zoological Gardens, Animal Breeders and laboratories is carried out on a regular basis with the aim of securing good quality biomaterials. Sampling kits are made available to persons tasked with the collection of wildlife biomaterials. The Biobank SA consortium acts as an integrated resource centre linking partner collections. The consortium's operational arm, namely wBRC, is active in the development of relevant policy, regulations and legislation pertaining to biomaterials, including Access and Benefit Sharing systems. The main sponsor of the project is the Department of Science and Technology, National Government of South Africa.

  16. Automated tools for cross-referencing large databases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapp, N E; Green, P L; Bell, D [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was funded with TRESP Associates, Inc., to develop a limited prototype software package operating on one platform (e.g., a personal computer, small workstation, or other selected device) to demonstrate the concepts of using an automated database application to improve the process of detecting fraud and abuse of the welfare system. An analysis was performed on Tennessee`s welfare administration system. This analysis was undertaken to determine if the incidence of welfare waste, fraud, and abuse could be reduced and if the administrative process could be improved to reduce benefits overpayment errors. The analysis revealed a general inability to obtain timely data to support the verification of a welfare recipient`s economic status and eligibility for benefits. It has been concluded that the provision of more modern computer-based tools and the establishment of electronic links to other state and federal data sources could increase staff efficiency, reduce the incidence of out-of-date information provided to welfare assistance staff, and make much of the new data required available in real time. Electronic data links have been proposed to allow near-real-time access to data residing in databases located in other states and at federal agency data repositories. The ability to provide these improvements to the local office staff would require the provision of additional computers, software, and electronic data links within each of the offices and the establishment of approved methods of accessing remote databases and transferring potentially sensitive data. In addition, investigations will be required to ascertain if existing laws would allow such data transfers, and if not, what changed or new laws would be required. The benefits, in both cost and efficiency, to the state of Tennessee of having electronically-enhanced welfare system administration and control are expected to result in a rapid return of investment.

  17. Report 1: International Cooperation to Development of Strategy and R&D Collaboration for Substitution of Rare Earth Resources and Report 2: Development of Magnetocaloric Alloys without Critical Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Ha [Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States); Ott, Ryan [Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-05-26

    A Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Ames Laboratory and Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH) in April of 2011 to establish a close cooperative relationship of research on Rare Metals. The Ames Laboratory through its operating contractor, Iowa State University, and the KITECH, as one of the goals of a joint Memorandum of Understanding, made agreement on a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for a personnel exchange in April of 2012. Ames Laboratory and KITECH would be jointly performing collaboration work in this cooperation as the Parties. The individual backgrounds and capabilities of the Parties are ideally suited to the successful execution of this work. The Ames Laboratory has a history spanning more than 60 years of pioneering work in rare-earth (RE) research. With its team of internationally recognized rare-earth experts, the Ames Laboratory is uniquely positioned to provide the knowledge, expertise and training necessary to help ensure a global leadership position for the United States in rare-earth research, development and applications. The KITECH was founded to promote technological capability of small and medium-sized enterprises in Korea and has a mission of supporting research on materials science and engineering in Korea. In 2009, Korea Institute for Rare Metals (KIRAM) at KITECH was established. KIRAM makes selection and funding decisions for technology projects for strategic rare metals, and provides oversight of R&D programs. The KIRAM is focusing on the commercialization and recycling of particular rare metals. In addition KIRAM will be coordinating government, local universities, and small to medium enterprises to facilitate R&D support for core technologies. KIRAM will be carrying them through to commercialization, and establishing new industry.

  18. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R ampersand D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993)

  19. Low–Cost Bio-Based Carbon Fiber for High-Temperature Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Akato, Kokouvi M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tran, Chau D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paul, Ryan M. [GrafTech International Holdings, Inc., Brooklyn Heights, OH (United States); Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings, Inc., Brooklyn Heights, OH (United States)

    2017-02-01

    GrafTech International Holdings Inc. (GTI), worked with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under CRADA No. NFE-15-05807 to develop lignin-based carbon fiber (LBCF) technology and to demonstrate LBCF performance in high-temperature products and applications. This work was unique and different from other reported LBCF work in that this study was application-focused and scalability-focused. Accordingly, the executed work was based on meeting criteria based on technology development, cost, and application suitability. The focus of this work was to demonstrate lab-scale LBCF from at least 4 different precursor feedstock sources that could meet the estimated production cost of $5.00/pound and have ash level of less than 500 ppm in the carbonized insulation-grade fiber. Accordingly, a preliminary cost model was developed based on publicly available information. The team demonstrated that 4 lignin samples met the cost criteria, as highlighted in Table 1. In addition, the ash level for the 4 carbonized lignin samples were below 500 ppm. Processing asreceived lignin to produce a high purity lignin fiber was a significant accomplishment in that most industrial lignin, prior to purification, had greater than 4X the ash level needed for this project, and prior to this work there was not a clear path of how to achieve the purity target. The lab scale development of LBCF was performed with a specific functional application in mind, specifically for high temperature rigid insulation. GTI is currently a consumer of foreignsourced pitch and rayon based carbon fibers for use in its high temperature insulation products, and the motivation was that LBCF had potential to decrease costs and increase product competitiveness in the marketplace through lowered raw material costs, lowered energy costs, and decreased environmental footprint. At the end of this project, the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) remained at 5 for LBCF in high temperature insulation.

  20. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  1. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31

    derivatizing the radiofullerenes for water-solubility and a method for removing exohedral radionuclides are reported. The methods and chemistry developed during this CRADA are the crucial first steps for the development of fullerenes as a method superior to existing technologies for in vivo transport of radionuclides.

  2. INVESTIGATION IN HARDSURFACING A NICKEL-COPPER ALLOY (MONEL400)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CZAJKOWSKI, C.; BUTTERS, M.

    2001-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigated the causes of weldability problems and materials failures encountered with the application of Monel (Ni-Cu) 400 as a base material and Stellite 6 (Co-Cr) as the hard-surfacing material when using the oxyacetylene welding process. This work was performed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the Target Rock Division of the Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Corporation. BNL evaluated two heats of Monel 400 material. One of the heats had performed well during manufacturing, producing an acceptable number of ''good'' parts. The second heat had produced some good parts but also exhibited a peculiar type of hardsurfacing/base metal collapse during the welding process. A review of the chemistry on the two heats of material indicated that they both met the chemical requirements for Monel400. During examination of the failed component, linear indications (cracks) were evident on the valve body, both on the circumferential area (top of valve body) and below the hard surfaced weld deposit. independent measurements also indicated that the two heats met the specification requirement for the material. The heat affected zone (HAZ) also contained linear discontinuities. The valve body was welded using the oxyacetylene welding process, a qualified and skilled welder, and had been given a pre-heat of between 1400-1600 F (760-871 C), which is the Target Rock qualified procedure requirement. Both original suppliers performed mechanical testing on their material that indicated the two heats also met the mechanical property requirements of the specification. The BNL investigation into the cause of the differences between these heats of material utilized the following techniques: (1) Heat Treatment of both heats of material; (2) Hardness testing; (3) Optical microscopy; (4) Scanning electron microscope (SEM)/Fractography; and (5) Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The report concludes that the cause of the

  3. Low-Cost Bio-Based Carbon Fibers for High Temperature Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan Michael [GrafTech International, Brooklyn Heights, OH (United States); Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-03

    GrafTech International Holdings Inc. (GTI), under Award No. DE-EE0005779, worked with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under CRADA No. NFE-15-05807 to develop lignin-based carbon fiber (LBCF) technology and to demonstrate LBCF performance in high-temperature products and applications. This work was unique and different from other reported LBCF work in that this study was application-focused and scalability-focused. Accordingly, the executed work was based on meeting criteria based on technology development, cost, and application suitability. High-temperature carbon fiber based insulation is used in energy intensive industries, such as metal heat treating and ceramic and semiconductor material production. Insulation plays a critical role in achieving high thermal and process efficiency, which is directly related to energy usage, cost, and product competitiveness. Current high temperature insulation is made with petroleum based carbon fibers, and one goal of this protect was to develop and demonstrate an alternative lignin (biomass) based carbon fiber that would achieve lower cost, CO2 emissions, and energy consumption and result in insulation that met or exceeded the thermal efficiency of current commercial insulation. In addition, other products were targeted to be evaluated with LBCF. As the project was designed to proceed in stages, the initial focus of this work was to demonstrate lab-scale LBCF from at least 4 different lignin precursor feedstock sources that could meet the estimated production cost of $5.00/pound and have ash level of less than 500 ppm in the carbonized insulation-grade fiber. Accordingly, a preliminary cost model was developed based on publicly available information. The team demonstrated that 4 lignin samples met the cost criteria. In addition, the ash level for the 4 carbonized lignin samples was below 500 ppm. Processing as-received lignin to produce a high purity lignin fiber was a significant accomplishment in that most industrial

  4. SHAPE OF FEMININITY IN THE TEXT OF GEGURITAN (PHILOSOPICAL VERSE IN BALI: ANALYSIS OF FEMINISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Karmini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is Balinese traditional literature which is the form of geguritan(philosophical verse. The reason why such texts are used as the object of the study is that theycontain very complex and interesting narrations about feminism. The objectives of this studyare to find out the formal and narrative structure of the texts and to describe the shape offemininity in the texts and its relevance to the lives of Balinese women who are Hindufollowers in the society. The objectives are all at once the answers to the problems of the study.The theory applied is that of feminism which emphasizes the concept ofRadical-Cultural Feminism. This study is a qualitative one of which the data were collected bydocumentation method, that is, by the techniques of note taking, observation and interview. Thedata were analyzed using the formal method in accordance with literature studies.There were nine geguritan (philosophical verses which were used as the object of thestudy. From the formal structural analysis, the pupuh (strophe used, its function and literarystyle could be identified. From the content, religious and amusement functions could beidentified. From the narrative structural analysis, it could be identified that the plot waschronological and sorot balik (backward directed; the characters and characterization weredescribed to express extraordinary ability, which was based on Hinduism, while the theme wasdescribed to express the application of panca crada (the five principles in Hinduism. Therewere seven findings as far as the analysis of the text is concerned: they are: (1 the educatedwomen could determine their attitudes, make decisions, show prestige and maintain theirdignity; (2 the women in the texts had extraordinary power. This means that the women werenot weak. Therefore, the stereotype that women were weak was neglected; (3 the educatedwomen who used Hinduism as the reference could become the men’s power; (4 the womenwho could

  5. Biomedical wellness standoff screening by unsupervised learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles; Hoekstra, Philip; Beeney, Jerry

    2009-04-01

    Biomedical Wellness (BMW) surveillance system may become indispensible in public health riding on four confluent trends: (i) The surge of retirement waves of WWII baby boomers; (ii) The longevity of the seniors, thanks to 3 decades steady NIH budgets 23B per year; (iii) The economic melting down is exasperating resources for entitlements; (iv) The emergent Next Gen Internet having the last mile challenges solved entirely and friendly with IT wired and wireless delivery system, thanks to DoD/DARPA pioneer and numerous entrepreneurs visionary efforts. To be effective in job recreation in current economic slag, BMW needs a jump start, WH/HHS should establish a balanced investment policy in health care, not just to illness but to wellness, and a BMW blue ribbon panel (BMWbrp), which must be, however, independent of NIHbrp, recommending additional resources, say 5B budget for BMW infrastructure building that will surely create new jobs to prepare badly needed geriatric caretakers. Being governmental investment, the BMWbrp must come back with a upward-conversion compatible infrastructure Blue-Print, version#1, an open architecture of standard interfaces, workable with distributed data bases and programming languages. The infrastructure must be simple, transparent, scalable, to leverage with a win-win-win(senior) CRADA from the private investments worldwide, e.g. from the insurance companies and home security companies, etc. that can further attract senior community center BOT. To start whenever the rubber meets the road, we shall enlist the military infrastructure, their sensors suite located in DoD & DHS labs supported with their affiliated contractors and universities. However, the down selections should be done under open bids, oversight by BMWbrp, under HHS $5B budget, to translate their sophisticated military persistent and precision surveillance know-how technology to watch out, no longer the enemy of USA but also, the enemy of mankind, the malicious microorganisms

  6. The use of Saildrones as Long Endurance, Ocean Research Platforms in Remote and Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R.; Peacock, D.; Jones, E.

    2016-02-01

    The world's oceans are experiencing significant change, which will have a profound impact on ecosystems, fish stocks and climate. Furthermore, the areas where some of the biggest changes are occurring are also some of the least measured and understood. This is largely due to their remote location and/or harsh environment, where the cost of deploying sensors is significant. New technologies are required to supplement ships and mooring data to meet the demand for longer, more economical deployments with the ability for real-time data and adaptive sampling. The Saildrone was designed to meet this need, providing the ability to reach almost any part of the world's oceans, without requiring a ship. Deployed from the dock, the unmanned Saildrone navigates autonomously to the area of interest, where it operates for extended periods before returning to shore for servicing and subsequent re-deployment. The Saildrone is propelled by wind power from a 4 m solid wing. Stability is provided by static weight in the keel and outrigger hulls. The 5.8 m hull includes several payload bays, with a payload capacity of 100 kg. Working with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), under a collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the Saildrone platform was equipped with a suite of meteorological and oceanographic sensors that would enable a wide variety of ocean research missions to be undertaken. After field tests in San Francisco Bay, a 3 month mission was conducted in the eastern Bering Sea in spring 2015. The mission included rough sea-trials, sensor comparisons in coordination with the NOAAS Oscar Dyson, and a survey of the northern Bering Sea shortly after ice retreat. The mission was completed as planned, with the two Saildrones (SD-126 & SD-128) returning to the dock from which they were deployed after 97 days and each completing 4400 nautical miles. During the second half of 2015, two subsequent missions were conducted in the Gulf of Mexico. Two

  7. DESCRIPTION OF THE SOFTWARE AND INTEGRATING PLATFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2009-12-31

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Waste Processing. The objective of the CBP project is to develop a set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. A multi-disciplinary partnership of federal, academic, private sector, and international expertise has been formed to accomplish the project objective. In addition to the US DOE, the CBP partners are the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Vanderbilt University (VU)/Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Energy Research Center of the Netherlands (ECN), and SIMCO Technologies, Inc. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing support under a Memorandum of Understanding. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is providing research under an Interagency Agreement. Neither the NRC nor NIST are signatories to the CRADA. The periods of cementitious performance being evaluated are >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The set of simulation tools and data developed under this project will be used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near surface engineered waste disposal systems, e.g., waste forms, containment structures, entombments, and environmental remediation, including decontamination and decommissioning analysis of structural concrete components of nuclear facilities (spent-fuel pools, dry spent-fuel storage units, and recycling facilities such as fuel fabrication, separations processes). Simulation parameters will be obtained from prior literature and will be experimentally measured under this project, as necessary, to demonstrate application of the simulation tools for three prototype applications (waste form in

  8. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S; D' Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of

  9. Modification and Validation of an Automotive Data Processing Unit, Compessed Video System, and Communications Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The primary purpose of the "modification and validation of an automotive data processing unit (DPU), compressed video system, and communications equipment" cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) was to modify and validate both hardware and software, developed by Scientific Atlanta, Incorporated (S-A) for defense applications (e.g., rotary-wing airplanes), for the commercial sector surface transportation domain (i.e., automobiles and trucks). S-A also furnished a state-of-the-art compressed video digital storage and retrieval system (CVDSRS), and off-the-shelf data storage and transmission equipment to support the data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) project conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In turn, S-A received access to hardware and technology related to DASCAR. DASCAR was subsequently removed completely and installation was repeated a number of times to gain an accurate idea of complete installation, operation, and removal of DASCAR. Upon satisfactory completion of the DASCAR construction and preliminary shakedown, ORNL provided NHTSA with an operational demonstration of DASCAR at their East Liberty, OH test facility. The demonstration included an on-the-road demonstration of the entire data acquisition system using NHTSA'S test track. In addition, the demonstration also consisted of a briefing, containing the following: ORNL generated a plan for validating the prototype data acquisition system with regard to: removal of DASCAR from an existing vehicle, and installation and calibration in other vehicles; reliability of the sensors and systems; data collection and transmission process (data integrity); impact on the drivability of the vehicle and obtrusiveness of the system to the driver; data analysis procedures; conspicuousness of the vehicle to other drivers; and DASCAR installation and removal training and documentation. In order to identify any operational problems not captured by the systems

  10. Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Brian A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sharma, Vishaldeep [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abdelaziz, Omar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Supermarket refrigeration systems account for approximately 50% of supermarket energy use, placing this class of equipment among the highest energy consumers in the commercial building domain. In addition, the commonly used refrigeration system in supermarket applications is the multiplex direct expansion (DX) system, which is prone to refrigerant leaks due to its long lengths of refrigerant piping. This leakage reduces the efficiency of the system and increases the impact of the system on the environment. The high Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants commonly used in these systems, coupled with the large refrigerant charge and the high refrigerant leakage rates leads to significant direct emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Environmental concerns are driving regulations for the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry towards lower GWP alternatives to HFC refrigerants. Existing lower GWP refrigerant alternatives include hydrocarbons, such as propane (R-290) and isobutane (R-600a), as well as carbon dioxide (R-744), ammonia (R-717), and R-32. In addition, new lower GWP refrigerant alternatives are currently being developed by refrigerant manufacturers, including hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) and unsaturated hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFO) refrigerants. The selection of an appropriate refrigerant for a given refrigeration application should be based on several factors, including the GWP of the refrigerant, the energy consumption of the refrigeration system over its operating lifetime, and leakage of refrigerant over the system lifetime. For example, focusing on energy efficiency alone may overlook the significant environmental impact of refrigerant leakage; while focusing on GWP alone might result in lower efficiency systems that result in higher indirect impact over the equipment lifetime. Thus, the objective of this Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between

  11. Lean Burn Natural Gas Engine R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-12

    The primary objective of this cooperative research is to develop and verify models of internal combustion engine spark ignition devices in order to improve combustion chamber fuel ignition characteristics and to improve spark plug durability. As a direct result of this joint research, a novel spark plug design was improved. A theory of spark arc motion was developed that explains experimentally observed effects not explained by other published theories. The knowledge developed by this research will be used to further improve spark plugs as well as improve the ignition process in a combustion chamber. The predictive models developed here are compared with experimental measurements, including high-speed photographs, of the spark as it translates across the gap. Two different spark plug configurations were investigated: the conventional or J-gap plug, and a novel spark ignition device (the FANG plug) invented by Cummins, Inc., the CRADA partner. A description of the physics of arc dynamic motion in a spark plug gap, including the effects of an imposed transverse magnetic field, appears here in Appendix A as a result of the analytical effort. The theory proposed here does explain experimentally observed effects not completely explained by other research publications appearing in the scientific literature. These effects are due to pressure and ion, electron, and electrode interactions. A dominant mechanism for electrode erosion is presented for both spark plug configurations. Reversing the polarity of both types of spark plugs has verified this proposed erosion mechanism, according to data collected at Cummins. An extensive series of experiments measured the arc position, voltage, and current as a function of time during the approximately 2 millisecond spark discharge. FANG plug data, obtained with the fast-framing camera experimental apparatus operating at 200,000 frames per second, are presented that show the transverse arc velocity varying directly as the inverse

  12. New Anti-Corrosive Coatings with Resin-Bonded Polyaniline and Related Electroactive Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Edward D.

    1997-01-01

    It is already known that polyaniline (an electroactive polymer) functions as a corrosion inhibitor for steel and in view of the fact that it is known to perform in the presence of hydrochloric acid, it has been considered likely that it may be useful to NASA for protecting launch structures at KSC which are exposed to not only continual ocean-side salt spray but also to hydrochloric acid at the times that solid-fuel boosters are fired. The currently used zinc-rich silicate-bonded coating is not wholly protective against the hydrochloric acid. Water pollution from zinc salts is another concern. Other earlier and concurrent NASA sponsored projects have been focussed on polyaniline specifically. Our project, administered for NASA by Dr. K. Thompson of KSC and these more-specifically polyaniline-related projects are included in a CRADA coordinated by Dr. F. Via of Akzo Nobel. A parallel project at Polytechnic under Prof K. Levon concentrated more specifically on polyaniline with various dopants. Our exploratory project reported herein was aimed at broadening the range of such corrosion inhibitors, to give protective paint compounders a wider latitude for adding corrosion inhibitors having polyaniline-like performance, and thus we diverged in several probing directions from polyaniline. Our working hypothesis was that physical variants of polyaniline, such as supported formulations on pigments or carriers, and chemical variants of polyaniline, including those having no electroconductive character, may have enhanced anticorrosion activity. We also hypothesized that small (non-polymeric) molecules having structures related to those occurring in polyaniline, may be active as corrosion inhibitors. We did preliminary testing, using an ASTM salt spray method at a nearby commercial paint testing laboratory. Our most interesting findings were that a non-electroconductive meta-isomer of polyaniline showed some corrosion activity, suggesting that the features of the polyaniline

  13. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 1: October through December 2010).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails conducting a thorough literature review to establish the current level of understanding of the mechanisms through which carbon additions to the negative active material improve valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Most studies have entailed phenomenological research observing that the carbon additions prevent/reduce sulfation of the negative electrode; however, no understanding is available to provide insight into why certain carbons are successful while others are not. Impurities were implicated in one recent review of the electrochemical behavior of carbon additions. Four carbon samples have been received from East Penn Manufacturing and impurity contents have been analyzed. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic

  14. Advanced Infusion Techniques with 3-D Printed Tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttall, David [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2016-05-10

    The manufacturing of tooling for large, contoured surfaces for fiber-layup applications requires significant effort to understand the geometry and then to subtractively manufacture the tool. Traditional methods for the auto industry use clay that is hand sculpted. In the marine pleasure craft industry, the exterior of the model is formed from a foam lay-up that is either hand cut or machined to create smooth lines. Engineers and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF) collaborated with Magnum Venus Products (MVP) in the development of a process for reproducing legacy whitewater adventure craft via digital scanning and large scale 3-D printed layup molds. The process entailed 3D scanning a legacy canoe form, converting that form to a CAD model, additively manufacturing (3-D Print) the mold tool, and subtractively finishing the mold s transfer surfaces. Future work will include applying a gelcoat to the mold transfer surface and infusing using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, or VARTM principles, to create a watertight vessel. The outlined steps were performed on a specific canoe geometry found by MVP s principal participant. The intent of utilizing this geometry is to develop an energy efficient and marketable process for replicating complex shapes, specifically focusing on this particular watercraft, and provide a finished product for demonstration to the composites industry. The culminating part produced through this agreement has been slated for public presentation and potential demonstration at the 2016 CAMX (Composites and Advanced Materials eXpo) exposition in Anaheim, CA. Phase I of this collaborative research and development agreement (MDF-15-68) was conducted under CRADA NFE-15-05575 and was initiated on May 7, 2015, with an introduction to the MVP product line, and concluded in March of 2016 with the printing of and processing of a canoe mold. The project partner Magnum Venous Products (MVP) is

  15. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Luis G.; Arvidson, Kirk B.; Chanderbhan, Ronald F.; Contrera, Joseph F.

    2007-01-01

    , comprised primarily of pharmaceutical, industrial and some natural products developed under an FDA-MDL cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA). The predictive performance for this group of dietary natural products and the control group was 97% sensitivity and 80% concordance. Specificity was marginal at 53%. This study finds that the in silico QSAR analysis employing this software's rodent carcinogenicity database is capable of identifying the rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring organic molecules found in the human diet with a high degree of sensitivity. It is the first study to demonstrate successful QSAR predictive modeling of naturally occurring carcinogens found in the human diet using an external validation test. Further test validation of this software and expansion of the training data set for dietary chemicals will help to support the future use of such QSAR methods for screening and prioritizing the risk of dietary chemicals when actual animal data are inadequate, equivocal, or absent

  16. Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump System Development – Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ally, Moonis R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uselton, R. B. [Lennox Industries, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Between October 2007 and September 2017, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Lennox Industries, Inc. (Lennox) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. The Lennox AS-IHP concept consisted of a high-efficiency air-source heat pump (ASHP) for space heating and cooling services and a separate heat pump water heater/dehumidifier (WH/DH) module for domestic water heating and dehumidification (DH) services. A key feature of this system approach with the separate WH/DH is capability to pretreat (i.e., dehumidify) ventilation air and dedicated whole-house DH independent of the ASHP. Two generations of laboratory prototype WH/DH units were designed, fabricated, and lab tested. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the US Department of Energy/ORNL heat pump design model (Rice 1992; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al. 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps served as the input to TRNSYS (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2010) to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (i.e., a combination of an ASHP with a seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) of 13 and resistance water heater with an energy factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings (based on use of a two-speed ASHP and the second-generation WH/DH prototype for the AS-IHP), while providing space conditioning, water heating, and dehumidification for a tight, well-insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at three US locations, ranged from 33 to 36%, averaging 35%, relative to the baseline system. The lowest savings were seen at the cold-climate Chicago location. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced by about 50 to 60% relative to a resistance WH.

  17. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass via Integrated Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroconversion - Wastewater Cleanup by Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, Mariefel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Todd R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-19

    DOE-EE Bioenergy Technologies Office has set forth several goals to increase the use of bioenergy and bioproducts derived from renewable resources. One of these goals is to facilitate the implementation of the biorefinery. The biorefinery will include the production of liquid fuels, power and, in some cases, products. The integrated biorefinery should stand-alone from an economic perspective with fuels and power driving the economy of scale while the economics/profitability of the facility will be dependent on existing market conditions. UOP LLC proposed to demonstrate a fast pyrolysis based integrated biorefinery. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has expertise in an important technology area of interest to UOP for use in their pyrolysis-based biorefinery. This CRADA project provides the supporting technology development and demonstration to allow incorporation of this technology into the biorefinery. PNNL developed catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) for use with aqueous streams within the pyrolysis biorefinery. These aqueous streams included the aqueous phase separated from the fast pyrolysis bio-oil and the aqueous byproduct streams formed in the hydroprocessing of the bio-oil to finished products. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a technically and economically viable technology for converting renewable biomass feedstocks to sustainable and fungible transportation fuels. To demonstrate the technology, UOP constructed and operated a pilot-scale biorefinery that processed one dry ton per day of biomass using fast pyrolysis. Specific objectives of the project were to: The anticipated outcomes of the project were a validated process technology, a range of validated feedstocks, product property and Life Cycle data, and technical and operating data upon which to base the design of a full-scale biorefinery. The anticipated long-term outcomes from successful commercialization of the technology were: (1) the replacement of a significant

  18. Development of a Versatile Laser Ultrasonic System and Application to On-Line Measurement for Process Control of Wall Thickness and Eccentrictiy of Steel Seamless Mechanical Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, R.A.; Kercel, S.W.; Damiano, B.; Bingham, P.R.; Gee, T.F.; Tucker, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Hileman, M.; Emery, M.; Lenarduzzi, R.; Hardy, J.E.; Weaver, K.; Crutcher, R.; Kolarik, R.V., II; Vandervaart, R.H.

    2002-04-24

    Researchers at the Timken Company conceived a project to develop an on-line instrument for wall thickness measurement of steel seamless mechanical tubing based on laser ultrasonic technology. The instrument, which has been installed and tested at a piercing mill, provides data on tube eccentricity and concentricity. Such measurements permit fine-tuning of manufacturing processes to eliminate excess material in the tube wall and therefore provide a more precisely dimensioned product for their customers. The resulting process energy savings are substantial, as is lowered environmental burden. The expected savings are $85.8 million per year in seamless mechanical tube piercing alone. Applied across the industry, this measurement has a potential of reducing energy consumption by 6 x 10{sup 12} BTU per year, greenhouse gas emissions by 0.3 million metric tons carbon equivalent per year, and toxic waste by 0.255 million pounds per year. The principal technical contributors to the project were the Timken Company, Industrial Materials Institute (IMI, a contractor to Timken), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Timken provided mill access as well as process and metallurgical understanding. Timken researchers had previously developed fundamental ultrasonic analysis methods on which this project is based. IMI developed and fabricated the laser ultrasonic generation and receiver systems. ORNL developed Bayesian and wavelet based real-time signal processing, spread-spectrum wireless communication, and explored feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. The resulting instrument has successfully measured production tubes at one of Timken's piercing mills. This report concentrates on ORNL's contribution through the CRADA mechanism. The three components of ORNL's contribution were met with mixed success. The real-time signal-processing task accomplished its goal of improvement in detecting time of flight information with a minimum of false data. The

  19. Future Operations of HAARP with the UAF's Geophysical Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The High frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona Alaska is the world's premier facility for active experimentation in the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. The ionosphere affects communication, navigation, radar and a variety of other systems depending on, or affected by, radio propagation through this region. The primary component of HAARP, the Ionospheric Research Instrument (IRI), is a phased array of 180 HF antennas spread across 33 acres and capable of radiating 3.6 MW into the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The array is fed by five 2500 kW generators, each driven by a 3600 hp diesel engine (4 + 1 spare). Transmit frequencies are selectable in the range 2.8 to 10 MHz and complex configurations of rapidly slewed single or multiple beams are possible. HAARP was owned by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RV) in Albuquerque, NM but recently was transferred to the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF/GI). The transfer of ownership of the facility is being implemented in stages involving a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) and an Educational Partnership Agreement (EPA) which are complete, and future agreements to transfer ownership of the facility land. The UAF/GI plans to operate the facility for continued ionospheric and upper atmospheric experimentation in a pay-per-use model. In their 2013 "Decadal Survey in Solar and Space Physics" the National Research Council (NRC) made the recommendation to "Fully realize the potential of ionospheric modification…" and in their 2013 Workshop Report: "Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research" the NRC outlined the broad range of future ionospheric, thermospheric and magnetospheric experiments that could be performed with HAARP. HAARP is contains a variety of RF and optical ionospheric diagnostic instruments to measure the effects of the heater in real time. The UAF/GI encourages the

  20. Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system